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1

Manage Stress  

MedlinePLUS

... Conditions and Diseases > Heart Health > Manage Stress Manage Stress The Basics Take Action! Ver en espańol Content ... on: August 19, 2014 The Basics Not all stress is bad. Stress can help protect you in ...

2

Cystic fibrosis: managing nutrition.  

PubMed

A crucial part of the management of patients with cystic fibrosis is ensuring that dietary requirements are met, and therefore weight gain and growth are achieved. The author outlines the nutritional problems faced by this client group and suggests how they may be overcome. She argues that optimum nutrition contributes not only to an improved standard of health, but also to the overall quality of life of patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:1467229

Duncan-Skingle, F

3

Stress Management for Elementary Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Stress management for school children has had various degrees of success. School officials need information about stress and how to deal with it. The purpose of this book is to provide information useful in inauguration of such programs where they do not exist. While stress management should begin in the home and include nutrition, physical…

Humphrey, James H.

4

Stress Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide is intended for use in conducting a three-session course that will help employees in the manufacturing and service industries acquire necessary stress management skills. The instructional materials presented are designed to help students learn to accomplish the following: recognize good and bad stress and understand the physical,…

Pollak, Ave

5

Nutritional Management of Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) is a cornerstone of treatment for the estimated 20.8 million people with diabetes in the United\\u000a States. MNT is a more intensive and focused comprehensive nutrition therapy service that relies heavily on follow-up and provides\\u000a repeated reinforcement to help change behavior. The long-term goal of medical nutrition therapy in diabetes is to prevent\\u000a and\\/or delay diabetes

Norica Tomuta; Nichola Davis; Carmen Isasi; Vlad Tomuta; Judith Wylie-Rosett

6

ISS Update: Nutrition Manager Talks About Children's Book '??Space Nutrition'  

NASA Video Gallery

NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean interviews Scott Smith, Manager of Nutritional Biochemistry at Johnson Space Center, about the children'??s book he co-authored called "Space Nutrition."?ť T...

7

Nutritional Management of Phenylketonuria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phenylketonuria (PKU) is caused by deficient activity of the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase, needed to convert the essential amino acid (AA) phenylalanine (phe) to tyrosine. In order to prevent neurological damage, lifelong adherence to a low-phe diet that is restricted in natural foods and requires ingestion of a phe-free AA formula to meet protein needs is required. The goal of nutritional

Erin L. MacLeod; Denise M. Ney

2010-01-01

8

Nutritional management of Crohn's disease  

PubMed Central

Nutritional care and therapy forms an integral part of the management of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD). Nutritional deficiencies result from reduced oral intake, malabsorption, medication side effects and systemic inflammation due to active disease. Enteral nutrition has a role in support for the malnourished patient, as well as in primary therapy to induce and maintain remission. The use of parenteral nutrition in CD is mainly limited to the preoperative setting or for patients with intestinal failure, but does not offer any additional advantage over EN in disease control. Dietary modifications, including elimination–reintroduction diets and a low fermentable, oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) diet may improve symptoms but there are currently no data to suggest that these approaches have any role in the induction or maintenance of remission. PMID:23634187

Yann, Lee H.; Lal, Simon

2013-01-01

9

Managing Stress  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... to relieve it with illicit drugs, smoking, or alcohol. Stimulants like these may seem like they reduce ... depression. It may also lead to drug and alcohol abuse. Preventing stress is easy with some changes ...

10

Assistant Professor Beef Cattle Nutrition/Management  

E-print Network

Assistant Professor Beef Cattle Nutrition/Management Department of Animal Science University Beef Cattle Nutrition/Management, 12-month, tenure track position (100% Research) in the Department and to the recently established University of Tennessee Beef and Forage Center in the area of ruminant nutrition

Tennessee, University of

11

Worksite Stress Management Interventions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a framework used for viewing stress and organizational stress interventions. Reviews the stress management intervention literature in the context of this framework. Provides examples of corporations committed to stress management programs. Identifies future needs appropriate for organizational psychologists to address. (Author/JS)

Ivancevich, John M.; And Others

1990-01-01

12

Web Based Personal Nutrition Management Tool  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Internet is being used increasingly as a resource for accessing health-related information because of its several advantages. Therefore, Internet tailoring becomes quite preferable in health education and personal health management recently. Today, there are many web based health programs de-signed for individuals. Among these studies nutrition and weight management is popular because, obesity has become a heavy burden for populations worldwide. In this study, we designed a web based personal nutrition education and management tool, The Nutrition Web Portal, in order to enhance patients’ nutrition knowledge, and provide behavioral change against obesity. The present paper reports analysis, design and development processes of The Nutrition Web Portal.

Bozkurt, Selen; Zayim, Ne?e; Gülkesen, Kemal Hakan; Samur, Mehmet Kemal

13

How Coaches Manage Stress.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents stress management strategies for coaches, focusing on what stress is, how it affects the body, and what to do to minimize the effects of stress on health. The article explains on- and off-the-job stress factors so coaches can recognize potential stress situations and handle them as they occur. (SM)

Ruder, M. Karen

1991-01-01

14

Irritable bowel syndrome: contemporary nutrition management strategies.  

PubMed

Irritable bowel syndrome is a complex disorder whose pathophysiology involves alterations in the enteric microbiota, visceral hypersensitivity, gut immune/barrier function, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation, neurotransmitters, stress response, psychological factors, and more. The importance of diet in the management of irritable bowel syndrome has taken center stage in recent times as the literature validates the relationship of certain foods with the provocation of symptoms. Likewise, a number of elimination dietary programs have been successful in alleviating irritable bowel syndrome symptoms. Knowledge of the dietary management strategies for irritable bowel syndrome will help guide nutritionists and healthcare practitioners to deliver optimal outcomes. This tutorial reviews the nutrition management strategies for irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:25085503

Mullin, Gerard E; Shepherd, Sue J; Chander Roland, Bani; Ireton-Jones, Carol; Matarese, Laura E

2014-09-01

15

Managing Leadership Stress  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Everyone experiences stress, and leaders face the additional stress brought about by the unique demands of leadership: having to make decisions with limited information, to manage conflict, to do more with less ...and faster! The consequences of stress can include health problems and deteriorating relationships. Knowing what signs of stress to…

Bal, Vidula; Campbell, Michael; McDowell-Larsen, Sharon

2008-01-01

16

Institutional Preventive Stress Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Stress is an inevitable characteristic of academic life, but colleges and universities can introduce stress management activities at the organizational level to avert excessive tension. Preventive actions are described, including flexible work schedules and social supports. (Author/MSE)

Quick, James C.

1987-01-01

17

Managing Time and Stress.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Chapter 14 of a revised volume on school leadership, this chapter offers many practical suggestions for managing time and reducing stress. The primary challenge is to unblock the route to effective time/stress management by recognizing unproductive values and attitudes (such as overreliance on the Protestant work ethic or the appearance of…

Huffstutter, Sandra; Smith, Stuart C.

18

Nutritional issues in cancer management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this article was to investigate the relationship between nutrition and cancer, as it relates to the initiation, promotion, and treatment of tumor growth. English-language studies published in the last 25 years were retrieved using MEDLINE, bibliographies, and consultation with experts. MEDLINE search terms included “cancer”, “malnutrition,” and “nutritional support.” In vitro and in vivo controlled studies addressing

Alessandro Laviano; Michael M. Meguid

1996-01-01

19

Stress Management for Sport.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Included in this volume are papers on stress management in athletics; eight of the ten papers are followed with a "Coach's Reaction": (1) "Competitive Athletic Stress Factors in Athletes and Coaches" (Walter Kroll); (2) "Mental Preparation for Peak Performance in Swimmers" (Eugene F. Gauron)--Coach's Reaction by Suzi D'Annolfo; (3) "Cognitive…

Zaichkowsky, Leonard D., Ed.; Sime, Wesley E., Ed.

20

Nutritionally Mediated Oxidative Stress and Inflammation  

PubMed Central

There are many sources of nutritionally mediated oxidative stress that trigger inflammatory cascades along short and long time frames. These events are primarily mediated via NF?B. On the short-term scale postprandial inflammation is characterized by an increase in circulating levels of IL-6 and TNF-? and is mirrored on the long-term by proinflammatory gene expression changes in the adipocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of obese individuals. Specifically the upregulation of CCL2/MCP-1, CCL3/MIP-1?, CCL4/MIP-1?, CXCL2/MIP-2?, and CXCL3/MIP-2? is noted because these changes have been observed in both adipocytes and PBMC of obese humans. In comparing numerous human intervention studies it is clear that pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory consumption choices mediate gene expression in humans adipocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Arachidonic acid and saturated fatty acids (SFAs) both demonstrate an ability to increase pro-inflammatory IL-8 along with numerous other inflammatory factors including IL-6, TNF?, IL-1?, and CXCL1 for arachidonic acid and IGB2 and CTSS for SFA. Antioxidant rich foods including olive oil, fruits, and vegetables all demonstrate an ability to lower levels of IL-6 in PBMCs. Thus, dietary choices play a complex role in the mediation of unavoidable oxidative stress and can serve to exacerbate or dampen the level of inflammation. PMID:23844276

Munoz, Alexandra; Costa, Max

2013-01-01

21

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Financial Stress, and Childhood Obesity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the largest nutritional assistance program addressing food insecurity in the United States. Due to the program’s reach, SNAP has been called upon to address other nutrition-related challenges facing low-income Americans, including childhood obesity. This study considers the effect of SNAP participation on child weight outcomes after controlling for household financial stress, an important

Rebecca Burgstahler; Craig Gundersen; Steven B. Garasky

2012-01-01

22

Exploring Nutrition Literacy and Knowledge among a National Sample of School Nutrition Managers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this national study was to describe nutrition literacy levels and nutrition knowledge among school nutrition (SN) managers, and explore if barriers to seeking SN information, perceived role in school wellness, and confidence in SN decision making varied by nutrition literacy and knowledge scores. Methods: An…

Zoellner, Jamie; Carr, Deborah

2010-01-01

23

How Can I Manage Stress?  

MedlinePLUS

How Can I Manage Stress? Updated:Feb 8,2013 It’s important to learn how to recognize how stress affects you, learn how to deal with it, and develop healthy habits to ease your stress. What is stressful to one person may not ...

24

Stress Management for College Administrators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Individual and organizational stress management strategies that have been used by many administrators and managers in academic organizations are described. The need to be a diagnostician as well as an effective decision maker and implementor is discussed. (MLW)

Schuler, Randall S.

1981-01-01

25

Neuroimmunomodulation, Stress–Nutrition Interactions and Diet  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The immune system requires a constant supply of nutrients for its optimal function and performance. Under stress conditions,\\u000a the immune response may be suppressed and is modulated by the central nervous system through a complex network of signals.\\u000a Communication between the neuroendocrine and immune systems has been well established, and there is ample evidence to indicate\\u000a that stress-associated immune dysregulation

Javier Romeo Marin; Julia Wärnberg; E. Nova; S Sonia Gómez-Martínez; Ligia Esperanza Díaz; A. Veses; Ascansión Marcos

26

Management of Hyperglycemia During Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition Therapy  

PubMed Central

Hyperglycemia is a frequent complication of enteral and parenteral nutrition in hospitalized patients. Extensive evidence from observational studies indicates that the development of hyperglycemia during parenteral and enteral nutrition is associated with an increased risk of death and infectious complications. There are no specific guidelines recommending glycemic targets and effective strategies for the management of hyperglycemia during specialized nutritional support. Managing hyperglycemia in these patients should include optimization of carbohydrate content and administration of intravenous or subcutaneous insulin therapy. The administration of continuous insulin infusion and insulin addition to nutrition bag are efficient approaches to control hyperglycemia during parenteral nutrition. Subcutaneous administration of long-acting insulin with scheduled or corrective doses of short-acting insulin is superior to the sliding scale insulin strategy in patients receiving enteral feedings. Randomized controlled studies are needed to evaluate safe and effective therapeutic strategies for the management of hyperglycemia in patients receiving nutritional support. PMID:23065369

Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

2013-01-01

27

Managing the Stress of Organizational Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emphasizes the importance of recognizing and managing the stress produced by organizational development and encourages practitioners to acknowledge stress management as an important organizational development skill. (LRA)

Warrick, D. D.

1981-01-01

28

Experimental Evidence for Nutrition Regulated Stress Resistance in Drosophila ananassae  

PubMed Central

Background The amount and quality of nutrients consumed by organisms have a strong impact on stress resistance, life-history traits and reproduction. The balance between energy acquisition and expenditure is crucial to the survival and reproductive success of animals. The ability of organisms to adjust their development, physiology or behavior in response to environmental conditions, called phenotypic plasticity, is a defining property of life. One of the most familiar and important examples of phenotypic plasticity is the response of stress tolerance and reproduction to changes in developmental nutrition. Larval nutrition may affect a range of different life-history traits as well as responses to environmental stress in adult. Principal Findings Here we investigate the effect of larval nutrition on desiccation, starvation, chill-coma recovery, heat resistance as well as egg to adult viability, egg production and ovariole number in Drosophila ananassae. We raised larvae on either protein rich diet or carbohydrate rich diet. We found that flies consuming protein rich diet have higher desiccation and heat shock resistance whereas flies developed on carbohydrate rich diet have higher starvation and cold resistance. Egg production was higher in females developed on protein rich diet and we also found trade-off between egg production and Egg to adult viability of the flies. Viability was higher in carbohydrate rich diet. However, sex specific viability was found in different nutritional regimes. Higher Egg production might be due to higher ovariole number in females of protein rich diet. Conclusion Thus, Drosophila ananassae adapts different stress tolerance and life-history strategies according to the quality of the available diet, which are correlated with phenotypic adjustment at anatomical and physiological levels. PMID:23049693

Sisodia, Seema; Singh, Bashisth N.

2012-01-01

29

Nutritional Management of Hypertension: Cost Versus Benefit  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a The incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and hypertension is increasing in both developed and developing countries with\\u000a major impacts on morbidity and mortality.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Nutritional management of high blood pressure is an important intervention that is safe, sustainable and cost-effective.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Dietary modifications that decrease BP include: reduced sodium and increased potassium intake; increased fruit and vegetable\\u000a intake; low-moderate

Angelique Mavrodaris; Saverio Stranges

30

Stress-busters Tips and techniques for managing stress and  

E-print Network

Stress-busters Tips and techniques for managing stress and introducing relaxation into your life UCSC Counseling & Psychological Services What is stress? Stress is the physiological and psychological semester or new job can bring on stress. We are all under stress every day. A certain amount of stress

California at Santa Cruz, University of

31

Helping Patients Manage Stress  

PubMed Central

Stress and worry are always a part of our patients' problems and frequently the sole cause of their symptoms. Ways of relieving anxiety in different types of patients are described, according to complexity and time required. The main principles are: adequate diagnosis; explanation of the stress symptom cycle; supportive reassurance; identification and reduction of stressors where possible, and varying degrees of personal development to bring patients' level of functioning and adjustment up to match his stresses. Objections and difficulties are discussed, together with benefits such as diminised use of anxiolytics; a healthier adjustment for the patient, and greater job satisfaction for the physician. PMID:21283346

Rainham, David C.

1983-01-01

32

Managing Teacher Stress and Burnout.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph offers a practical guide for identifying and managing those stressors that are in the specific domain of the individual--exercise, diet, sleep, interpersonal relations, time and conflict management, and relaxation. The first section covers stress theory; methods to identify and clarify stressors; restoration of a balanced…

Sparks, Dennis; Hammond, Janice

33

Managing Anxiety and Stress. Second Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This self-help book provides information about stress and stress management. The first part focuses on awareness of stress. A number of activities are included to help the individual understand and analyze stress reactions. Information is provided about stressors, performance stress, cumulative stress, and several other aspects of stress

Archer, James, Jr.

34

Nutrition, synchronization, and management of beef embryo transfer recipients.  

PubMed

A commercially viable cattle embryo transfer industry was established during the early 1970s. Initially, techniques for transferring cattle embryos were exclusively surgical. However, by the early 1980s, most embryos were transferred nonsurgically. For an embryo transfer program to be effective, numerous factors need to be in place to ensure success. Nutrition, estrous cycle control, and recipient management are all responsible for the success or failure in fertility for a given herd. Utilization of body condition scores is a practical method to determine nutritional status of the recipient herd. Prepartum nutrition is critical to ensure that cows calve in adequate body condition to reinitiate postpartum estrous cycles early enough to respond to synchronization protocols. Estrus synchronization for embryo transfer after detected estrus or for fixed-time embryo transfer without estrus detection are effective methods to increase the number of calves produced by embryo transfer. In addition, resynchronization of nonpregnant recipients effectively ensures that a high percentage of recipients will return to estrus during a 72 h interval and are eligible for subsequent embryo transfers. Numerous additional factors need to be assessed to ensure that the recipient herd achieves its reproductive potential. These factors include assessing the merits of nulliparous, primiparous, or multiparous cows, ensuring that facilities allow for minimal stress, and that the herd health program is well-defined and followed. Numerous short- and long-term factors contribute to recipients conceiving to a transferred embryo, maintaining the embryo/fetus to term, delivering the calf without assistance and raising and weaning a healthy calf. PMID:17964640

Jones, A L; Lamb, G C

2008-01-01

35

Survivorship: nutrition and weight management, version 2.2014.  

PubMed

Healthy lifestyle habits have been associated with improved health outcomes and quality of life and, for some cancers, a reduced risk of recurrence and death. The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship therefore recommend that cancer survivors be encouraged to achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle, including attention to weight management, physical activity, and dietary habits. This section of the NCCN Guidelines focuses on recommendations regarding nutrition, weight management, and supplement use in survivors. Weight management recommendations are based on the survivor's body mass index and include discussions of nutritional, weight management, and physical activity principles, with referral to community resources, dietitians, and/or weight management programs as needed. PMID:25313179

Denlinger, Crystal S; Ligibel, Jennifer A; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Dizon, Don; Friedman, Debra L; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; Moslehi, Javid J; O'Connor, Tracey; Overholser, Linda; Paskett, Electra D; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Raza, Muhammad; Rodriguez, M Alma; Syrjala, Karen L; Urba, Susan G; Wakabayashi, Mark T; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole R; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A

2014-10-01

36

How IT project managers cope with stress  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examines the level of stress experienced by IT project managers and determines the types of coping strategies used to handle their stress. Sixty-four South African IT project managers completed an online questionnaire. The findings indicate that IT project managers are highly stressed and tend to utilize maladaptive coping strategies more as their stress levels increase. These strategies included

Derek Smith; Justin de Passos; Rafieqah Isaacs

2010-01-01

37

Managing Academic Stress Are You Experience Too Much Stress?  

E-print Network

academic difficulty Resources Academic stress and challenges: Center for Student Learning (AddlestoneManaging Academic Stress Are You Experience Too Much Stress? Sources of Academic Stress Course for yourself Ways to Reduce Academic Stress Take a look at your course load. For every hour you are in class

Kasman, Alex

38

Stress Management by Biofeedback  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the 1980's, Dr. Patrick Doyle served on a project to train U.S. astronauts at Johnson Space Center in biofeedback techniques to control anxiety and hypertension. Traditional biofeedback concepts were found to be too mundane, repetitive and boring, so Doyle developed Bio-Games with more interesting and involved formats. The first product, Bio-Ball, is an interactive, multimedia baseball video game that is played by relaxing in order to hit the ball. Gradually the player is able to relax at will, and with practice is able to apply the skills to real-life situations. Doyle has since gone on to create a number of biofeedback games marketed by Creative MultiMedia Inc. including Bio-Golf, Clutch City, and Pachyderm. Stress-busting screen savers are also being marketed under the Buddies series. In addition to being used in the corporate world, Bio-Games have been recognized by the Starbright Foundation which focuses on improving the total hospital environments of critically injured and chronically-ill children.

1997-01-01

39

Nutritional management of older adults with cognitive decline and dementia.  

PubMed

Age-related cognitive decline is a main predictor of disability among elderly people, and with the continued expansion of the aging population and the increase in life expectancy, the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment and dementia represented by Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder of older adults, have increased. Recent epidemiological and observational studies suggest a relationship exists between lifestyle factors, including nutrition and diet, and cognitive function in aging adults. It is also suggested that malnutrition and nutrient deficiencies are associated with cognitive decline in patients with dementia. There are a variety of nutritional factors, including nutritional status and dietary patterns, that might be associated with cognitive function, and specific micronutrients and dietary components have been suggested to have an association with cognitive function as well. Based on these findings and evidence, evaluation of nutritional state, as well as nutritional intervention, might be able to play a role in the management and prevention of dementia. PMID:24650061

Ogawa, Sumito

2014-04-01

40

Steller sea lions Eumetopias jubatus and nutritional stress: evidence from captive studiesmam_150 284..306  

E-print Network

Steller sea lions Eumetopias jubatus and nutritional stress: evidence from captive studiesmam_150, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4, Canada ABSTRACT 1. Numbers of Steller sea lions Eumetopias jubatus in the North if the nutritional stress hypothesis can explain the decline of Steller sea lions. 2. Overall, there is strong

41

INFLUENCE OF NUTRITIONAL STRESS AND THE AGE OF ADULTS ON THE MORPHOMETRICS OF HONEY BEES  

E-print Network

INFLUENCE OF NUTRITIONAL STRESS AND THE AGE OF ADULTS ON THE MORPHOMETRICS OF HONEY BEES (APIS, U.S. Department of Agriculture, ARS, Beltsville, MD 20705 **Honey Bee Breeding, Genetics of nutritional stress, and the post-emergence age of adult worker honey bees, on the morphometric determinations

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

42

Nutrition management of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.  

PubMed

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurological disease with high risk of malnutrition. Symptoms of dysphagia, depression, cognitive impairment, difficulty with self-feeding and meal preparation, hypermetabolism, anxiety, respiratory insufficiency, and fatigue with meals increase the risk of malnutrition. Malnutrition negatively affects prognosis and quality of life, making early and frequent nutrition assessment and intervention essential. Implementation of an adequate calorie diet, dietary texture modification, use of adaptive eating utensils, and placement of a feeding tube aid in preventing malnutrition. When nutrition status is compromised by dysphagia and weight loss (5%-10% of usual body weight) or body mass index <20 kg/m(2) without weight loss and when forced vital capacity is >50%, a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement is indicated. When forced vital capacity is <50%, a radiologically inserted gastrostomy is the preferred means of enteral placement due to lessened aspiration and respiratory risk. Parenteral nutrition (PN) is indicated only when enteral nutrition (EN) is contraindicated or impossible. This article reviews the background of ALS, nutrition implications and risk of malnutrition, treatment strategies to prevent malnutrition, the role of EN and PN, and feeding tube placement methods according to disease stage. PMID:23466470

Greenwood, Daniel I

2013-06-01

43

Nutritional and Feeding Management of Broodmares  

E-print Network

Nutrition and Feeding Man age ment of Broodmares B-5025 4/05 Nutrition and Feeding Man age ment of Broodmares Pete G. Gibbs, Gary D. Potter and Martha M Vogelsang* Horse producers should be con cerned about their mares? re- pro duc tive... weight gain with milking mares during the breed ing season (Table 1), especially for those in marginal condition. While no foaling dif- fi culties or rebreeding prob lems have been found in mares that are obese, there are no re pro duc tive...

Gibbs, Pete G.; Potter, Gary D.; Vogelsang, M. M.

2005-04-13

44

Nutrition and exercise in the management of liver cirrhosis  

PubMed Central

Liver cirrhosis (LC) patients often have protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and decreased physical activity. These conditions often lead to sarcopenia, which is the loss of skeletal muscle volume and increased muscle weakness. Recent studies have demonstrated that PEM and sarcopenia are predictors for poor survival in LC patients. Nutrition and exercise management can improve PEM and sarcopenia in those patients. Nutrition management includes sufficient dietary intake and improved nutrient metabolism. With the current high prevalence of obesity, the number of obese LC patients has increased, and restriction of excessive caloric intake without the exacerbation of impaired nutrient metabolism is required for such patients. Branched chain amino acids are good candidates for supplemental nutrients for both obese and non-obese LC patients. Exercise management can increase skeletal muscle volume and strength and improve insulin resistance; however, nutritional status and LC complications should be assessed before an exercise management regimen is implemented in LC patients. The establishment of optimal exercise regimens for LC patients is currently required. In this review, we describe nutritional status and its clinical impact on the outcomes of LC patients and discuss general nutrition and exercise management in LC patients. PMID:24966599

Toshikuni, Nobuyuki; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; Tsutsumi, Mikihiro

2014-01-01

45

Teacher Wellness: Too Stressed for Stress Management?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Healthier, happier teachers promote healthier, happier, and more effective learning environments. Yet, many teachers experience considerable stress. Studies have found that between one fifth and one fourth of teachers frequently experience a great deal of stress (Kyriacou, 1998). Stress in teaching appears to be universal across nations and…

Kipps-Vaughan, Debi; Ponsart, Tyler; Gilligan, Tammy

2012-01-01

46

Nutritional management in chyle leaks and chylous effusions.  

PubMed

Chyle leaks occur when there is interruption to the lymphatic ducts that transport chyle around the body. The loss of this protein-rich, calorie-rich fluid can cause serious complications including dehydration, malnutrition and immunosuppression. Treatment of chyle leaks depends on the underlying cause, which may be surgical, secondary to malignant invasion or the result of a medical condition. Nutritional support is vital and leads to spontaneous leak closure in many cases. Nutritional management options include total bowel rest with parenteral nutrition, enteral feeding with specialized formula, or oral diet with supplementation. At present there is no consensus regarding which approach is superior. In reality, most patients with chyle leaks are managed with a combination or oral and enteral feeding, but further work is needed to clarify the optimum management strategy. PMID:25381927

Bibby, Anna C; Maskell, Nick A

2014-10-01

47

Nutritional management in chyle leaks and chylous effusions.  

PubMed

Chyle leaks occur when there is interruption to the lymphatic ducts that transport chyle around the body. The loss of this protein-rich, calorie-rich fluid can cause serious complications including dehydration, malnutrition and immunosuppression. Treatment of chyle leaks depends on the underlying cause, which may be surgical, secondary to malignant invasion or the result of a medical condition. Nutritional support is vital and leads to spontaneous leak closure in many cases. Nutritional management options include total bowel rest with parenteral nutrition, enteral feeding with specialized formula, or oral diet with supplementation. At present there is no consensus regarding which approach is superior. In reality, most patients with chyle leaks are managed with a combination or oral and enteral feeding, but further work is needed to clarify the optimum management strategy. PMID:25299666

Bibby, Anna C; Maskell, Nick A

2014-10-01

48

MANAGING JOB LOSS and FINANCIAL STRESS  

E-print Network

MANAGING JOB LOSS and FINANCIAL STRESS a Personal and Family Guide CENTER ON THE FAMILY #12;2 Managing Job Loss and Financial Stress The issues associated with losing one's job or having hours cut of income can be stressful and traumatic. If you find yourself in this situation, you should know

49

The ABCs of Managing Teacher Stress.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes stress management for teachers and presents strategies that teachers can use to lessen the impact of stress. Outlines the ABCs of stress: Acknowledge, Behavior Modification, and Communication. Notes that stress can motivate teachers to explore new instructional strategies, adopt innovative approaches to increasing student motivation, and…

Nagel, Liza; Brown, Sheri

2003-01-01

50

Nutritional management of the dialysis patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

•Objective: To review the current literature so that appropriate nutritional guidelines, interventions, and management for the dialysis patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) can be determined.•Data: Relevant English language articles were identified via MEDLINE search (1980 to 1995), Relevant texts also were reviewed. Additional references were selected from bibliographies of identified articles and texts.•Study selection: All selected articles and texts

Dodi Plourd

1995-01-01

51

Stress Management and Gifted Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Stress can affect anyone, and gifted children are no exception. Giftedness can sometimes be the cause of the stress. Perfectionism, sensitivity, and intensity are characteristics of gifted children that may exacerbate stress. Stress can be constructive. Prolonged stress, however, with no time to recover becomes detrimental. Continued stress upsets…

Patel, Vidisha A.

2009-01-01

52

Do stable isotopes reflect nutritional stress? Results from a laboratory experiment on song sparrows.  

PubMed

Stable isotope analysis is an increasingly valuable tool in ecological studies and shows promise as a measure of nutritional stress in wild animals. Thus far, however, the only studies on endotherms that have conclusively shown changes in delta(15)N and delta(13)C values in response to nutritional stress were conducted on fasting animals and animals growing under extreme levels of food restriction. We conducted a laboratory experiment to test whether delta(15)N and delta(13)C values provide a general index of nutritional stress. We compared the isotopic composition of whole blood, liver, muscle and feathers between two groups of juvenile song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) hand-reared in captivity under identical conditions except for feeding regime. To verify that our experimental treatment induced a biologically meaningful level of nutritional stress, we simultaneously measured the effects on physiology, growth and development at multiple scales. While food-restricted birds were physiologically stressed, physically smaller, and showed poorer growth and brain development compared to ad libitum-fed birds, there was no effect of feeding regime on either delta(15)N or delta(13)C values in any tissue. Instead of a continuum where the level of change in (15)N or (13)C contents corresponds to the level of nutritional stress, we suggest there may be a threshold level of nutritional stress below which such isotopic changes are likely to be negligible. PMID:17102993

Kempster, Bethany; Zanette, Liana; Longstaffe, Fred J; MacDougall-Shackleton, Scott A; Wingfield, John C; Clinchy, Michael

2007-03-01

53

Do stable isotopes reflect nutritional stress? Results from a laboratory experiment on song sparrows  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable isotope analysis is an increasingly valuable tool in ecological studies and shows promise as a measure of nutritional\\u000a stress in wild animals. Thus far, however, the only studies on endotherms that have conclusively shown changes in ?15N and ?13C values in response to nutritional stress were conducted on fasting animals and animals growing under extreme levels of food\\u000a restriction.

Bethany Kempster; Liana Zanette; Fred J. Longstaffe; Scott A. MacDougall-Shackleton; John C. Wingfield; Michael Clinchy

2007-01-01

54

Nutritional management of patients after bariatric surgery.  

PubMed

Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective method of sustainable weight loss among morbidly obese patients. The types of bariatric surgeries can be divided into three categories: restrictive procedures, malabsorptive procedures, and combination (restrictive and malabsorption) procedures. In general, patients undergoing restrictive procedures have the least risk for long-term diet-related complications, whereas patients undergoing malabsorptive procedures have the highest risk. For many patients, the benefits of weight loss, such as decreased blood glucose, lipids, and blood pressure and increased mobility, will outweigh the risks of surgical complications. Most diet-related surgical complications can be prevented by adhering to strict eating behavior guidelines and supplement prescriptions. Eating behavior guidelines include restricting portion sizes, chewing foods slowly and completely, eating and drinking separately, and avoiding foods that are poorly tolerated. Supplement prescriptions vary among practitioners and usually involve at least a multivitamin with minerals. Some practitioners may add other supplements only as needed for diagnosed deficiencies; others may prescribe additional prophylactic supplements. The most common nutrient deficiencies are of iron, folate, and vitamin B12. However, deficiencies of fat-soluble vitamins have been reported in patients with malabsorption procedures, and thiamin deficiency has been reported among patients with very poor intake and/or nausea and vomiting. Frequent monitoring of nutrition status for all patients can aid in preventing severe clinical deficiencies. PMID:16617236

Parkes, Emmy

2006-04-01

55

A nutrition support service web application to manage patients receiving parenteral nutrition.  

PubMed

Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a complex therapy that requires expertise and experience to avoid errors in prescribing and management. Because of care coordination issues, one medical center has developed and implemented a Web-based application to manage PN patients. PN orders have already been programmed into the physician order entry system, but the nutrition support service (NSS) consult and daily PN management have been performed using paper forms. The Web system is developed for ease of use by clinicians and accessibility at any computer within the medical center. The database consists of 12 tables interrelated by the patient medical record number, admission number, or location. The NSS consult is the main table used to navigate to the other tables. Update of the laboratory and PN formula table must be done through the consult table. The system is compliant with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act guidelines, and has been developed so that the forms that are required to be placed in the patient's permanent record can be printed. Demographic information and laboratory data are automatically populated via a link to the medical center's medication management system. At present, there are 1393 patients in the database and 21,000 pages are viewed each month during daily PN management by clinicians. Data can be easily retrieved for management reports. Data elements can be exported directly from the database to worksheets. This function has been used for projects designed to improve the efficiency of this PN system. PMID:19605799

Mirtallo, Jay M; Hawksworth, Kim; Payne, Brett

2009-01-01

56

Nutritional management of Eosinophilic Gastroenteropathies: Case series from the community  

PubMed Central

Eosinophilic gastroenteropathies, such as eosinophilic esophagitis and eosinophilic colitis, have classically been treated with swallowed inhaled corticosteroids or oral corticosteroids. More recent studies have found elimination and elemental diets to be effective treatment alternatives to steroids. In this case series we describe the treatment of three children using nutritional management in a community setting. Elimination diets and elemental diets based on patch testing and skin prick tests reduced the eosinophil counts to normal levels in all three children. Food items which tested positive were then reintroduced while symptoms and eosinophil counts were monitored. Nutritional management of eosinophilic esophagitis and eosinophilic colitis was found to be effective in reducing symptoms. However, obstacles facing patients who choose this type of therapy include limitations due to the cost of repeated endoscopies, palatability of elimination/elemental diets and the availability of subspecialists trained in management (e.g. Allergy, Gastroenterology, and Pathology). It may be a worthwhile endeavour to overcome these obstacles as nutritional management minimizes the potential long-term effects of chronic steroid therapy. PMID:21619708

2011-01-01

57

Nutritional effects and management of diarrhoea in infancy.  

PubMed

The interactions between diarrhoeal disease and nutritional status are complex and synergistic. These are serious issues globally because they affect hundreds of millions of young children and annually cause > 3 million deaths in children aged under 5 y. Despite intensive field-based and laboratory studies over three decades, many questions remain unanswered about the causes, pathophysiology and best approaches to management and prevention of this "diarrhoea-malnutrition" syndrome. Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) has been a major advance and has saved many lives from acute diarrhoea. However, persistent diarrhoea is now a major problem and is very significant because of its strong negative impacts on nutritional status and because persistent diarrhoea and dysentery are now major causes of infant and young child deaths. ORT provides clear and practical methods for replacement of fluid and electrolyte losses during diarrhoea. Rehydration salts can be made available as (i) a simple, easy-to-use package, complete with user instructions; (ii) cereal-based formulae based on widely available ingredients that can be prepared domestically or commercially; and (iii) home-made mixtures of sugar and salt which should be simple to prepare but are risky because of inadequate understanding about their preparation at home and the chance of mixing the ingredients inaccurately and giving them wrongly. Continuation and encouragement of breastfeeding is an important strategy to prevent and control diarrhoea and as part of its management. Early refeeding during diarrhoea is another important principle to help to reduce its duration, severity and its nutritional impacts. Supplementation with specific dietary ingredients, such as vitamin A, zinc and folate, is rather contentious and drug therapy is of little value unless specifically indicated. Some patients may require enteral nutrition or parenteral nutrition but these require specialized equipment and skills that are usually beyond the reach of developing countries and infants and children who live in remote areas. PMID:10569233

Gracey, M

1999-08-01

58

Recommendations for the nutrition management of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency.  

PubMed

The effectiveness of a phenylalanine-restricted diet to improve the outcome of individuals with phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency (OMIM no. 261600) has been recognized since the first patients were treated 60 years ago. However, the treatment regime is complex, costly, and often difficult to maintain for the long term. Improvements and refinements in the diet for phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency have been made over the years, and adjunctive therapies have proven to be successful for certain patients. Yet evidence-based guidelines for managing phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency, optimizing outcomes, and addressing all available therapies are lacking. Thus, recommendations for nutrition management were developed using evidence from peer-reviewed publications, gray literature, and consensus surveys. The areas investigated included choice of appropriate medical foods, integration of adjunctive therapies, treatment during pregnancy, monitoring of nutritional and clinical markers, prevention of nutrient deficiencies, providing of access to care, and compliance strategies. This process has not only provided assessment and refinement of current nutrition management and monitoring recommendations but also charted a direction for future studies. This document serves as a companion to the concurrently published American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics guideline for the medical treatment of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency. PMID:24385075

Singh, Rani H; Rohr, Fran; Frazier, Dianne; Cunningham, Amy; Mofidi, Shideh; Ogata, Beth; Splett, Patricia L; Moseley, Kathryn; Huntington, Kathleen; Acosta, Phyllis B; Vockley, Jerry; Van Calcar, Sandra C

2014-02-01

59

Early nutritional stress impairs development of a song-control brain region in both male and  

E-print Network

Early nutritional stress impairs development of a song-control brain region in both male and female stress hypothesis predicts that early food restriction should impair development of song-control brain phase of song learning) and rapidly developing the brain regions associated with this process. Thus

Zanette, Liana

60

Helping Young Children Manage Stress.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the common symptoms of stress exhibited by young children including: (1) social or behavioral; (2) physical; (3) emotional; (4) cognitive; and (5) language. Addresses causes of stress, which typically represent change, fear, or loss in children. Offers strategies for easing children's stress including muscle relaxation, deep breathing,…

Texas Child Care, 2002

2002-01-01

61

Life-History Consequences of Chronic Nutritional Stress in an Outbreaking Insect Defoliator  

PubMed Central

Food shortage is a common situation in nature but little is known about the strategies animals use to overcome it. This lack of knowledge is especially true for outbreaking insects, which commonly experience nutritional stress for several successive generations when they reach high population densities. The aim of this study is to evaluate the life history consequences of chronic nutritional stress in the outbreaking moth Choristoneura fumiferana. Larvae were reared on two different artificial diets that emulate nutritional conditions larvae face during their natural population density cycle (low and medium quality artificial diets). After four generations, a subset of larvae was fed on the same diet as their parents, and another on the opposite diet. We explored larval life-history strategies to cope with nutritional stress, its associated costs and the influence of nutritional conditions experienced in the parental generation. We found no evidence of nutritional stress in the parental generation increasing offspring ability to feed on low quality diet, but the contrary: compared to offspring from parents that were fed a medium quality diet, larvae from parents fed a low quality diet had increased mortality, reduced growth rate and reduced female reproductive output. Our results support a simple stress hypothesis because the negative effects of malnutrition accumulated over successive generations. Density-dependent deterioration in plant quality is thought to be an important factor governing the population dynamics of outbreaking insects and we hypothesize that chronic nutritional stress can be a driver of outbreak declines of C. fumiferana, and of forest insects in general. PMID:24505368

Frago, Enric; Bauce, Éric

2014-01-01

62

Management of oxidative stress by microalgae.  

PubMed

The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current research on oxidative stress in eukaryotic microalgae and the antioxidant compounds microalgae utilize to control oxidative stress. With the potential to exploit microalgae for the large-scale production of antioxidants, interest in how microalgae manage oxidative stress is growing. Microalgae can experience increased levels of oxidative stress and toxicity as a result of environmental conditions, metals, and chemicals. The defence mechanisms for microalgae include antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidases, and glutathione reductase, as well as non-enzymatic antioxidant molecules such as phytochelatins, pigments, polysaccharides, and polyphenols. Discussed herein are the 3 areas the literature has focused on, including how conditions stress microalgae and how microalgae respond to oxidative stress by managing reactive oxygen species. The third area is how beneficial microalgae antioxidants are when administered to cancerous mammalian cells or to rodents experiencing oxidative stress. PMID:23368282

Cirulis, Judith T; Scott, J Ashley; Ross, Gregory M

2013-01-01

63

STRESS MANAGEMENT Stress occurs in everyone's life. How stressful something is depends on how we perceive it. Stress is not  

E-print Network

STRESS MANAGEMENT Stress occurs in everyone's life. How stressful something is depends on how we perceive it. Stress is not necessarily a bad thing. It can help to motivate and drive us toward our goals levels of stress can have a negative impact. Medical school is demanding and can cause both prolonged

Wu, Shin-Tson

64

Nutrition  

MedlinePLUS

... Library Home > Understanding Breast Cancer > Beyond the Basics > Quality-of-Life Issues > Nutrition Terms Used On This Page Understanding ... Basics Beyond the Basics Symptoms and Side Effects Quality-of-Life Issues Fitness and Exercise Nutrition Financial Concerns Planning ...

65

Scale Development: Factors Affecting Diet, Exercise, and Stress Management (FADESM)  

PubMed Central

Background The objective of this study was to develop scales measuring personal and environmental factors that affect dietary fat intake behavior, physical activity, and stress management in low-income mothers. Methods FADESM (factors affecting diet, exercise, and stress management) scales were developed using the Social Cognitive Theory to measure personal (outcome expectancies, self-efficacy, emotional coping response) and environmental (physical environment, social environment, situation) factors affecting dietary fat intake behavior, physical activity, and stress management. Low-income African American and white mothers were recruited from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children in three counties in Michigan. In Phase one, 45 mothers completed individual cognitive interviews. Content analyses were performed. In Phase two, items modified from the cognitive interviews were administered to 216 mothers. Factor analysis and multiple indicators/multiple causes were performed. Results Results of cognitive interviews were used to revise items for the instrument that was tested in Phase two. The factor solution revealed 19 dimensions to measure personal and environmental factors affecting dietary fat intake behavior (three dimensions), physical activity (eight dimensions), and stress management (eight dimensions). Results of multiple indicators/multiple causes model showed scale invariance. Of 19 dimensions, 15 had Cronbach alpha between 0.76 and 0.94 and four were between 0.66 and 0.69. All dimensions had composite construct reliability scores between 0.74 to 0.97 and satisfactory construct and discriminant validities. Conclusion The theory-based FADESM scales have documented good validity and reliability for measuring factors affecting dietary fat intake behavior, physical activity, and stress management in low-income women. Results of this study support the use of these scales with low-income African American and white mothers in community settings. PMID:18302762

Chang, Mei-Wei; Brown, Roger; Nitzke, Susan

2008-01-01

66

Three Approaches to Stress Management for Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes guided fantasy, yoga and autogenic phrases and thermal feedback as approaches to helping children manage stress. Provides guidelines for the use of these methods, followed by descriptions of each approach. (BH)

Angus, Samuel F.

1989-01-01

67

Cost-Effective Stress Management Training.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Stress management training can be a cost effective way to improve productivity and job performance. Among many relaxation techniques, the most effective in terms of teachability, participant motivation, and profitability are self-hypnosis, progressive relaxation, and transcendental meditation. (SK)

Shea, Gordon F.

1980-01-01

68

Between Teachers & Parent: Helping Children Manage Stress  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author discusses how to manage stress in children. A teacher's story and a parent's story about a child who complains of frequent stomach aches, is presented. Stomach aches and other somatic complaints without any apparent physical explanation are common among young children experiencing stress. Nevertheless, it is essential…

Brodkin, Adele M.

2005-01-01

69

Stress Management Techniques for Young Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The director of a not-for-profit nursery school adapted the adult stress management techniques of exercise and relaxation for use with 3- to 5-year-old children. Specifically, children were taught visualization techniques and yoga exercises involving deep breathing. The goal of the practicum was to rechannel children's negative stress-related…

Piper, Francesca M.

70

Assessment and management of nutrition and growth in Rett syndrome  

PubMed Central

Objectives We developed recommendations for the clinical management of poor growth and weight gain in Rett syndrome through evidence review and the consensus of an expert panel of clinicians. Methods Initial draft recommendations were created based upon literature review and 34 open-ended questions where the literature was lacking. Statements and questions were made available to an international, multi-disciplinary panel of clinicians in an online format and a Microsoft Word formatted version of the draft via email. Input was sought using a 2-stage modified Delphi process to reach consensus agreement. Items included clinical assessment of growth, anthropometry, feeding difficulties and management to increase caloric intake, decrease feeding difficulties and consideration of gastrostomy. Results Agreement was achieved on 101/112 statements. A comprehensive approach to the management of poor growth in Rett syndrome is recommended that takes into account factors such as feeding difficulties and nutritional needs. A BMI of approximately the 25th centile can be considered as a reasonable target in clinical practice. Gastrostomy is indicated for very poor growth, if there is risk of aspiration and if feeding times are prolonged. Conclusions These evidence- and consensus-based recommendations have the potential to improve care of nutrition and growth in a rare condition and stimulate research to improve the current limited evidence base. PMID:24084372

Leonard, Helen; Ravikumara, Madhur; Baikie, Gordon; Naseem, Nusrat; Ellaway, Carolyn; Percy, Alan; Abraham, Suzanne; Geerts, Suzanne; Lane, Jane; Jones, Mary; Bathgate, Katherine; Downs, Jenny

2014-01-01

71

Multidisciplinary Treatment of Pediatric Obesity: Nutrition Evaluation and Management  

PubMed Central

Assessment and treatment methods for pediatric obesity are rapidly evolving. Thought to be caused by an imbalance of caloric intake and expenditure, obesity requires a comprehensive evaluation of patient, familial, environmental, genetic, and cultural characteristics so clinicians can design successful interventions. Quantitative nutrition assessment of caloric intake is difficult and time consuming and should be used only in isolated settings, such as in the research setting, or if initial approaches to management have been unsuccessful. As an alternative, providers should identify dietary patterns or behaviors that have been linked to obesity and are promising targets for change. Clinicians should tailor interventions by considering patient and family motivation and readiness to change. Current guidelines recommend stepwise increases in treatment plans, and multidisciplinary treatment teams are recommended for patients who require intense intervention. Providers involved at the multidisciplinary level must incorporate their area of expertise into that of the team to develop a comprehensive management plan. This article reviews current recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of pediatric obesity with a focus on nutrition evaluation as part of a multidisciplinary team. PMID:20702836

Ross, Michael M.; Kolbash, Stacy; Cohen, Gail M.; Skelton, Joseph A.

2014-01-01

72

Purification and Use of Glycomacropeptide for Nutritional Management of Phenylketonuria  

PubMed Central

Individuals with phenylketonuria (PKU) cannot metabolize phenylalanine (Phe) and must adhere to a low-Phe diet in which most dietary protein is provided by a Phe-free amino acid formula. Glycomacropeptide (GMP) is the only naturally occurring protein that does not contain Phe, and is of interest as a source of protein for dietary management of PKU. However, commercially available GMP contains too much Phe from residual whey proteins and does not contain adequate levels of all the indispensable amino acids to provide a nutritionally complete protein. The aim of this study was to increase purity of GMP and develop a mass balance calculation for indispensable amino acid supplementation of GMP foods. Cation exchange chromatography, ultrafiltration/diafiltration, and lyophilization were used at the pilot plant scale to decrease Phe. Enough purified GMP (5 kg) was manufactured to provide 15 PKU subjects with a 4-d diet in which the majority of protein was from GMP foods. A mass balance was used to supplement GMP foods so that all indispensable amino acids met or exceeded the daily recommended intake. GMP foods were tested in a human clinical trial as a replacement for the traditional amino acid formula. Nutritionally complete GMP foods created with high purity GMP provide individuals with PKU with more options to manage PKU, which may lead to improved compliance and quality of life. PMID:19490325

LaClair, Caitlin E.; Ney, Denise M.; MacLeod, Erin L.; Etzel, Mark R.

2013-01-01

73

Disaster stress: an emergency management perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the sources of stress likely to be encountered by emergency managers when responding to a disaster. Stressors relating to environmental (e.g. time pressure, level of risk, heat), organisational (e.g. bureaucracy, appropriateness of information, decision support and management systems) and operational (e.g. incident command, decision making, interagency liaison, team and media management) demands are considered. The mediating role

Douglas Paton; Rhona Flin

1999-01-01

74

DEAF HEALTH TALKS: Stress Management  

E-print Network

coaster ride · Strength before a sports game #12;Common Stressful Events Distress: Negative · Difficult overeating, smoking, drinking, and drug abuse. These are used as an escape or a temporary way but the problem alcohol to 1 or 2 drinks a day 5. Stop smoking ­ tobacco is really a stimulant! 6. Cut back on caffeine

Goldman, Steven A.

75

Nutritional stress due to habitat loss may explain recent honeybee colony collapses  

Microsoft Academic Search

In spite of the tremendous public interest in the recent large honeybee losses attributed to colony collapse disorder, there is still no definitive explanation for the phenomenon. With the hypothesis that nutritional stress due to habitat loss has played an important role in honeybee colony collapse, I analyze the land use data in United States to show that the colony

Dhruba Naug

2009-01-01

76

Nutritional stress and body condition in the Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) during winter irruptive  

E-print Network

Nutritional stress and body condition in the Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) during winter Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa), carbon, nitrogen, C/N, fasting, Minnesota, reversed sexual size dimorphism lapone (Strix nebulosa), carbone, azote, C/N, jeûne, Minnesota, dimorphisme sexuel inversé de la taille

Mathis, Wayne N.

77

Significance of Nutrition to Change in Human Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism under Emotional Stress.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Two experiments were performed on 16 test subjects (13 men and 3 women) to study stress effects on the blood content of sugar and cholesterol. The test subjects were given a nutritionally balanced diet of canned foodstuffs. The caloric value of the diet w...

V. P. Bychkov, L. I. Mosyakina, O. S. Khokhlova

1988-01-01

78

Nutritional strategy in the management of heart failure in adults.  

PubMed

The incidence of congestive heart failure (CHF) is increasing in Westernized countries, and patients with CHF experience poor quality of life (functional impairment, high hospitalization rate and high mortality). Malnutrition occurring during the course of CHF is referred to as cardiac cachexia and is associated with higher mortality independent of the severity of CHF. Cardiac cachexia involving a loss of more than 10% of lean body mass can clinically be defined as a bodyweight loss of 7.5% of previous dry bodyweight in a period longer than 6 months. The energy requirements of patients with CHF, whether cachectic or not, are not noticeably modified since the increase in resting energy expenditure is compensated by a decrease in physical activity energy expenditure. Malnutrition in CHF has been ascribed to neurohormonal alterations, i.e. anabolic/catabolic imbalance and increased cytokine release. Anorexia may occur, particularly during acute decompensation of CHF. Function is impaired in CHF, because of exertional dyspnea and changes in skeletal muscle. Decreased exercise endurance seems to be related to decreased mitochondrial oxidative capacities and atrophy of type 1 fibers, which are attributed to alteration in muscle perfusion and are partially reversible by training. Malnutrition could also impair muscle function, because of decreased muscle mass and strength associated with decreased glycolytic capacities and atrophy of type 2a and 2b fibres. With respect to the putative mechanisms of cardiac cachexia, anabolic therapy (hormones or nutrients) and anticytokine therapy have been proposed, but trials are scarce and often inconclusive. In surgical patients with CHF, perioperative (pre- and postoperative) nutritional support has been shown to be effective in reducing the mortality rate. Long term nutritional supplementation trials in patients with CHF and cachexia are thus required to establish recommendations for the nutritional management of patients with CHF. PMID:14728018

Bourdel-Marchasson, I; Emeriau, J P

2001-01-01

79

Nutrition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is a collection of viewgraphs on the Johnson Space Center's work on nutrition for long duration space missions. Nutritional requirements are affected by isolation, workloads, and cold as well as the psychological needs, metabolism, and fluid balance of an individual.

Lane, Helen W.

1990-01-01

80

Nutrition  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Here we will be discussing different nutritional topics my pyramid my calorie counter calorie king health finder healthy people National Institutes of Health: Health Information diabetes nutrition live strong teen health facts tone teen kidshealth beauty campaign Center For Change Eating Disorders ...

Huish, Mrs.

2009-11-02

81

Nutrition.  

PubMed

Nutrition appeared somewhat late on the scene in the I.B.P. projects in the U.K., but eventually it occupied an integral part of many of the H.A. (human adaptability) investigations. The nutritional data obtained in the studies of isolated and nearisolated communities in Tristan da Cunha and in New Guinea provided information of wide nutritional significance. There were also detailed and extensive studies in Israel which, similarly to those in New Guinea, attempted to relate nutritional factors to enviroment, working conditions, and physical fitness. Some extraordinarily low energy intakes found in Ethiopians have induced much speculation on the extent which man can adequately adapt to restricted food supplies. Interesting nutritional observations, of general importance, have also arisen from results obtained on such disparate groups as Glasgow adolescents, Tanzanian and Sudanese students, children in Malawi and vegans in the U.K. PMID:8801

Durnin, J V

1976-07-01

82

Incorporating Stress Management into Athletic Injury Rehabilitation  

PubMed Central

Objective: Our objective is to provide a paradigm that can assist certified athletic trainers in selecting and implementing techniques to help athletes cope with the stress associated with injury. Background: The psychological impact of injury and the stress associated with rehabilitation are well known in the athletic training room. Specific stress management techniques should be determined by the personality of the athlete, the specific stressors associated with the injury and rehabilitation process, and the education and expertise of the certified athletic trainer. Therefore, it is important that certified athletic trainers be proficient in stress theory regarding the psychological aspects of injury, as well as the techniques to address them. Description: We provide a framework that applies transactional theory to athletic injury and suggests that an athlete's belief about injury plays a central role in the stress reaction. It describes the role of the certified athletic trainer in addressing the 4 components of transactional theory: 1) increased awareness, 2) information processing and appraisal, 3) modified behavior, and 4) peaceful resolution with injured athletes. Clinical Advantages: The application of this conceptual framework allows certified athletic trainers to differentiate stress management techniques based on the individual athlete's reaction rather than apply a generic approach. PMID:16558538

Hedgpeth, Elizabeth G.; Sowa, Claudia J.

1998-01-01

83

Job Stress among Learning Center Managers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the concerns of learning center managers in relation to job stress factors. Reports that respondents to a survey identify "inadequate support by supervisor" as the most severe stressor; "Fellow workers not doing their job" ranked second highest. (Contains 22 references.) (NB)

Norton, Jan

2002-01-01

84

Stress Management in the Workplace. WBGH Worksite Wellness Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper on designing and implementing a stress management program in the workplace begins by defining stress. A brief overview of the relationship of stress to health and personal style follows. The subsequent discussion of the relationship between stress and work focuses on these topics: work contributes to stress; stress affects work…

Jaffe, Dennis T.; And Others

85

Tips for Managing Stress Key to managing stress is to remember that stress not inherent in any event; it lies in how we  

E-print Network

1 Tips for Managing Stress Key to managing stress is to remember that stress not inherent in any. If the problem is beyond your control now, try to let go of it until you can change it. 9. When you feel stress stress signals, the easier it is to change your behavior and stop the progress of the stress. 10. When

Westfall, Peter H.

86

Forage Quality and Quantity in Texas: Managing Nutrition in Range Beef Cattle  

E-print Network

&M University System Forage Quality and Quantity in Texas ? Managing Nutrition in Range Beef Cattle Robert K. Lyons, Richard V. Machen and Jerry W. Stuth* Regional Cattle Forage Diet Quality Trends Regional monthly average crude protein and digestibil- ity... used a nutritional analysis system to estimate forage intake, an indicator of forage availability. This system includes 1) NIRS fecal analysis to estimate forage diet quality, 2) the Nutritional Balance Analyzer (NUTBAL PRO) computer software...

Lyons, Robert K.; Machen, Richard V.; Stuth, Jerry W.

2002-09-23

87

Bovine immunoglobulin protein isolates for the nutritional management of enteropathy.  

PubMed

The gastrointestinal tract is responsible for a multitude of digestive and immune functions which depend upon the balanced interaction of the intestinal microbiota, diet, gut barrier function, and mucosal immune response. Disruptions in one or more of these factors can lead to intestinal disorders or enteropathies which are characterized by intestinal inflammation, increased gut permeability, and reduced capacity to absorb nutrients. Enteropathy is frequently associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune enteropathy, radiation enteritis, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where pathologic changes in the intestinal tract lead to abdominal discomfort, bloating, abnormal bowel function (e.g., diarrhea, urgency, constipation and malabsorption). Unfortunately, effective therapies for the management of enteropathy and restoring intestinal health are still not available. An accumulating body of preclinical studies has demonstrated that oral administration of plasma- or serum-derived protein concentrates containing high levels of immunoglobulins can improve weight, normalize gut barrier function, and reduce the severity of enteropathy in animal models. Recent studies in humans, using serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate, demonstrate that such protein preparations are safe and improve symptoms, nutritional status, and various biomarkers associated with enteropathy. Benefits have been shown in patients with HIV infection or diarrhea-predominant IBS. This review summarizes preclinical and clinical studies with plasma/serum protein concentrates and describes the effects on host nutrition, intestinal function, and markers of intestinal inflammation. It supports the concept that immunoglobulin-containing protein preparations may offer a new strategy for restoring functional homeostasis in the intestinal tract of patients with enteropathy. PMID:25206275

Petschow, Bryon W; Blikslager, Anthony T; Weaver, Eric M; Campbell, Joy M; Polo, Javier; Shaw, Audrey L; Burnett, Bruce P; Klein, Gerald L; Rhoads, J Marc

2014-09-01

88

Bovine immunoglobulin protein isolates for the nutritional management of enteropathy  

PubMed Central

The gastrointestinal tract is responsible for a multitude of digestive and immune functions which depend upon the balanced interaction of the intestinal microbiota, diet, gut barrier function, and mucosal immune response. Disruptions in one or more of these factors can lead to intestinal disorders or enteropathies which are characterized by intestinal inflammation, increased gut permeability, and reduced capacity to absorb nutrients. Enteropathy is frequently associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune enteropathy, radiation enteritis, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where pathologic changes in the intestinal tract lead to abdominal discomfort, bloating, abnormal bowel function (e.g., diarrhea, urgency, constipation and malabsorption). Unfortunately, effective therapies for the management of enteropathy and restoring intestinal health are still not available. An accumulating body of preclinical studies has demonstrated that oral administration of plasma- or serum-derived protein concentrates containing high levels of immunoglobulins can improve weight, normalize gut barrier function, and reduce the severity of enteropathy in animal models. Recent studies in humans, using serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate, demonstrate that such protein preparations are safe and improve symptoms, nutritional status, and various biomarkers associated with enteropathy. Benefits have been shown in patients with HIV infection or diarrhea-predominant IBS. This review summarizes preclinical and clinical studies with plasma/serum protein concentrates and describes the effects on host nutrition, intestinal function, and markers of intestinal inflammation. It supports the concept that immunoglobulin-containing protein preparations may offer a new strategy for restoring functional homeostasis in the intestinal tract of patients with enteropathy. PMID:25206275

Petschow, Bryon W; Blikslager, Anthony T; Weaver, Eric M; Campbell, Joy M; Polo, Javier; Shaw, Audrey L; Burnett, Bruce P; Klein, Gerald L; Rhoads, J Marc

2014-01-01

89

The art and science of effective stress management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Discusses the nature of stress before outlining the types of stress which may be experienced. Introduces some techniques for stress management. Covers stressors in the workplace, and gives some hints in combating these issues.

Victor M. Rojas; Brian H. Kleiner

2001-01-01

90

Health Tip: Manage Stress to Keep Diabetes in Check  

MedlinePLUS

... this page, please enable JavaScript. Health Tip: Manage Stress to Keep Diabetes in Check Get regular exercise (* ... Monday, August 25, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Diabetes Stress (HealthDay News) -- Physical and emotional stress can be ...

91

Dietary Management in Gastrointestinal Diseases. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 13.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

Stein, Joan Z.; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

92

Dietary Management in Hyperlipidemia. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 12.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.; Townley, Nancy A.

93

Dietary Management for Alcoholic Patients. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 14.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

Hurley, Roberta Smith; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

94

Nutritional management of enterocutaneous fistula: a retrospective study at a Malaysian university medical center  

PubMed Central

Enterocutaneous fistula is a challenging clinical condition with serious complications and considerable morbidity and mortality. Early nutritional support has been found to decrease these complications and to improve the clinical outcome. Location of the fistula and physiological status affect the nutrition management plan in terms of feeding route, calories, and protein requirements. This study investigated the nutritional management procedures at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, and attempted to determine factors that affect the clinical outcome. Nutritional management was evaluated retrospectively in 22 patients with enterocutaneous fistula seen over a 5-year period. Medical records were reviewed to obtain data on nutritional status, biochemical indices, and route and tolerance of feeding. Calories and protein requirements are reported and categorized. The results show that surgery was the predominant etiology and low output fistula was the major physiological category; anatomically, the majority were ileocutaneous. The spontaneous healing rate was 14%, the total healing rate was 45%, and the mortality rate was 22%, with 14% due to fistula-associated complications. There was a significant relationship between body mass index/serum albumin levels and fistula healing; these parameters also had a significant relationship with mortality. Glutamine was used in 50% of cases; however, there was no significant relationship with fistula healing or mortality rate. The nutritional status of the patient has an important impact on the clinical outcome. Conservative management that includes nutrition support is very important in order to improve nutritional status before surgical repair of the fistula. PMID:25187726

Badrasawi, Manal MH; Shahar, Suzana; Sagap, Ismail

2014-01-01

95

Dietary Management in Hypertension. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 11.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

Molleson, Ann L.; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

96

Dietary Management in Diabetes Mellitus. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 10.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

Bossetti, Brenda; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

97

Nutritional supplementation, performance, and oxidative stress in college soccer players.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine changes in performance and metabolic parameters in collegiate soccer players during preseason preparation and to determine the impact of a nutraceutical blend proposed to reduce oxidative stress. Male Division I college soccer players (n = 22) performed a progressive maximal treadmill test at the beginning and end of preseason to assess changes in Vo2max, velocity at lactate threshold (VLT), time-to-exhaustion, lipid hydroperoxide (LPO), 8-isoprostane, and creatine kinase (CK) response. After baseline testing, athletes were randomly assigned to receive the nutraceutical blend (EXP; n = 12) or an isocaloric equivalent (CON; n = 10) for 20 days of preseason training. DeltaVo2max (2.1 +/- 3.3 ml.kg.min, p = 0.007), DeltaVLT (0.8 +/- 1.4 km.h, p = 0.045), and Deltatime-to-exhaustion (39.4 +/- 77.4 seconds, p = 0.033) were improved across groups, but a significant effect of supplementation on performance was not seen. Changes in resting levels of CK from the beginning to end of preseason were significantly lower (p = 0.044) in EXP (64.8 +/- 188.4 U.L) than in CON (292.8 +/- 304.8 U.L). Additionally, EXP demonstrated a significant decrease in the magnitude of the 8-isoprostane response at Trial 2 compared with Trial 1 (effect size [ES] = -0.74), whereas CON had an increased response (ES = 0.20). A similar pattern was seen for LPO (p = 0.067). Preseason training in male college soccer players resulted in significant improvements in Vo2max, VLT, and time-to-exhaustion. Supplementing with a proprietary antioxidant and nutraceutical blend may enhance some of these effects as indicated by magnitude of the responses. However, it appears that the most notable effects of supplementation were seen for reduced CK and oxidative stress, at least with short-term supplementation. PMID:20300015

Arent, Shawn M; Pellegrino, Joseph K; Williams, Carey A; Difabio, David A; Greenwood, John C

2010-04-01

98

Nursing management of nutrition in cancer and palliative care.  

PubMed

Malnutrition is prevalent in patients with cancer. This can have deleterious effects including reduced response to treatment, diminished quality of life, increased length of hospital stay and decreased survival. It is, therefore, imperative that thorough nutritional screening is carried out by nurses on patients' admission and during their hospital stay to detect those who are malnourished or at risk of malnutrition in order to plan their nutritional care effectively. Cancer cachexia is the progressive weight loss and emaciation seen in cancer patients, particularly in advanced disease, which can have a devastating effect on the physical, psychological, social and spiritual aspects of the patient's life. Therefore, the aims of nutritional care are identified depending on the stage of the patient's illness and recommendations made for nursing, pharmacological and nutritional intervention. These include nursing comfort strategies, the use of recommended pharmacological agents and dietary interventions such as experimenting with different foods, textures, portion sizes and nutritional supplements. The use of fish oil-enhanced nutritional supplements and artificial nutritional support is also discussed. Consideration is also given to the legal and ethical aspects of providing nutrition and nutritional support. PMID:12829966

Holder, Helen

99

Nutrition  

MedlinePLUS

... Elementary Middle High Percentage of Schools in Which Teachers Taught * Nutrition and Dietary Behavior Topics as Part of Required Instruction, by School Level Topic Elementary Middle High Dietary Guidelines for Americans NA 67.0 73.7 Food guidance using MyPyramid 76.9 76.1 77.7 ...

100

Nutrition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An elementary level nutrition unit provides teachers with student background information, suggested activities, and student worksheets. Part 1 focuses on the relationship of food to growth, health, and energy. In part 2, students learn about the four main food groups. Part 3 deals with nutrients and provides information about carbohydrates, fats,…

Saur, Susan

101

The Nurturing Teacher: Managing the Stress of Caring  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book tackles the concerns of stressed teachers. Whether from nurturance suffering (stress related to caring for students) or from the piles of paperwork yet to be tackled, this text helps the reader sort through the causes of stress, the emotional, physical and social reactions to stress and how one can begin to plan a stress management plan.…

VanSlyke-Briggs, Kjersti

2010-01-01

102

Helping Gifted Students with Stress Management. ERIC Digest #E488.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented in a question-and-answer format, this digest offers guidelines to help gifted students manage stress effectively. The following questions are considered: What is stress? How can a youngster experience stress when nothing bad is happening? Is a gifted student more likely to feel stress than others? What are some stresses on a gifted…

Kaplan, Leslie S.

103

MyStudentBody–Stress: An Online Stress Management Intervention for College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

College students who have high stress levels tend to experience an increased risk of academic difficulties, substance abuse, and emotional problems. To enhance student stress management and health promoting behaviors, an online stress management intervention called MyStudentBody–Stress (MyStudentBody–Stress) was developed and tested. College students at six U.S. colleges were randomized to one of three conditions: MyStudentBody–Stress, a control health information

Emil Chiauzzi; Julie Brevard; Christina Thurn; Stacey Decembrele; Sarah Lord

2008-01-01

104

Stress Management with Law Enforcement Personnel: A Controlled Outcome Study of EMDR Versus a Traditional Stress Management Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) has been shown to be effective for treating posttraumatic stress disorder, but its efficacy as a stress management tool for normal individuals in highly stressful occupations has not been demonstrated. Sixty-two police officers were randomly assigned to either EMDR or a standard stress management program (SMP), each consisting of 6 hours of individualized contact.

Sandra A. Wilson; Robert H. Tinker; Lee A. Becker; Carol R. Logan

2001-01-01

105

Nutrition  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Do you know what food belongs in which food group? Which foods will give you the most energy? Which foods will drag your body? Lets learn together about which foods will make you physically fit. Which foods are good for you and which food group do they belong in? Monster nutrition This food game will teach which food belongs in which group. You will also get a bonus question when your monster eats a food. Answer the bonus question right and your ...

Moffat, Mrs.

2010-12-13

106

Nutritional Interventions to Alleviate the Negative Consequences of Heat Stress12  

PubMed Central

Energy metabolism is a highly coordinated process, and preferred fuel(s) differ among tissues. The hierarchy of substrate use can be affected by physiological status and environmental factors including high ambient temperature. Unabated heat eventually overwhelms homeothermic mechanisms resulting in heat stress, which compromises animal health, farm animal production, and human performance. Various aspects of heat stress physiology have been extensively studied, yet a clear understanding of the metabolic changes occurring at the cellular, tissue, and whole-body levels in response to an environmental heat load remains ill-defined. For reasons not yet clarified, circulating nonesterified fatty acid levels are reduced during heat stress, even in the presence of elevated stress hormones (epinephrine, glucagon, and cortisol), and heat-stressed animals often have a blunted lipolytic response to catabolic signals. Either directly because of or in coordination with this, animals experiencing environmental hyperthermia exhibit a shift toward carbohydrate use. These metabolic alterations occur coincident with increased circulating basal and stimulated plasma insulin concentrations. Limited data indicate that proper insulin action is necessary to effectively mount a response to heat stress and minimize heat-induced damage. Consistent with this idea, nutritional interventions targeting increased insulin action may improve tolerance and productivity during heat stress. Further research is warranted to uncover the effects of heat on parameters associated with energy metabolism so that more appropriate and effective treatment methodologies can be designed. PMID:23674792

Rhoads, Robert P.; Baumgard, Lance H.; Suagee, Jessica K.; Sanders, Sara R.

2013-01-01

107

Effect of a Stress Management Class: One Year Later.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Graduate and undergraduate students showed a reduction in anxiety during a 16-week course designed to include information on the causes and effects of stress as well as practical techniques for stress management. A follow-up study showed that the students were still successfully using the stress management techniques a year later. (RM)

Somerville, Addison W.; And Others

1984-01-01

108

Stress Management Model for the Elementary/Middle/High School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Matthews Stress Management formula is a stress management model for use in schools. This effective, practical, and inexpensive model entails the awareness of the physiology of stress, perception of tangible bases of motivation for children, appropriate and simplified techniques, applicability to other areas, and full recognition of the…

Matthews, Doris B.

109

Psychophysiological Responses to Stress after Stress Management Training in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis  

PubMed Central

Background Stress management interventions may prove useful in preventing the detrimental effects of stress on health. This study assessed the effects of a stress management intervention on the psychophysiological response to stress in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Seventy-four patients with RA, who were randomly assigned to either a control group or a group that received short-term stress management training, performed a standardized psychosocial stress task (Trier Social Stress Test; TSST) 1 week after the stress management training and at a 9-week follow-up. Psychological and physical functioning, and the acute psychophysiological response to the stress test were assessed. Results Patients in the intervention group showed significantly lower psychological distress levels of anxiety after the training than did the controls. While there were no between-group differences in stress-induced tension levels, and autonomic (?-amylase) or endocrine (cortisol) responses to the stress test 1 week after the intervention, levels of stress-induced tension and cortisol were significantly lower in the intervention group at the 9-week follow-up. Overall, the response to the intervention was particularly evident in a subgroup of patients with a psychological risk profile. Conclusion A relatively short stress management intervention can improve psychological functioning and influences the psychophysiological response to stress in patients with RA, particularly those psychologically at risk. These findings might help understand how stress can affect health and the role of individual differences in stress responsiveness. Trial Registration TrialRegister.nl NTR1193 PMID:22162990

de Brouwer, Sabine J. M.; Kraaimaat, Floris W.; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.; Donders, Rogier T.; Eijsbouts, Agnes; van Koulil, Saskia; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; Evers, Andrea W. M.

2011-01-01

110

The art and science of effective stress management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Looks at the nature of stress and the need to ensure employees do not suffer excessive levels. Considers the different types of stress and focuses on detrimental stress. Proffers techniques for stress management such as breathing methods, meditation, exercising and massaging. Outlines the most common stressors in the workplace and suggests some ways in which these can be alleviated.

Victor M. Rojas; Brian H. Kleiner

2000-01-01

111

A Stress-Management Guide for Young People.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents a comprehensive guide to help young people understand and cope with stress, pressure, and anxiety. Adolescent readers are introduced to the concept of stress, the ways that stress can affect them, and the skills and techniques needed to help them learn effective ways to reduce and manage stress. The guide begins by defining…

Youngs, Bettie B.

112

Individual Stress Management Coursework in Canadian Teacher Preparation Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teacher stress is a significant issue facing the teaching profession. The current paper explores individual stress management as a viable option to address stress in this profession. Specifically, Canadian teacher education programs are examined to identify the prevalence of pre-service teacher education courses focused on individual stress

Harris, Gregory E.

2011-01-01

113

Stress, Food, and Inflammation: Psychoneuroimmunology and Nutrition at the Cutting Edge  

PubMed Central

Inflammation is the common link among the leading causes of death. Mechanistic studies have shown how various dietary components can modulate key pathways to inflammation including sympathetic activity, oxidative stress, transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) activation, and proinflammatory cytokine production. Behavioral studies have demonstrated that stressful events and depression can also influence inflammation through these same processes. If the joint contributions of diet and behavior to inflammation were simply additive, they would certainly be important. However, several far more intriguing interactive possibilities are discussed: stress influences food choices; stress can enhance maladaptive metabolic responses to unhealthy meals; and diet can impact mood as well as proinflammatory responses to stressors. Furthermore, because the vagus nerve innervates tissues involved in the digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients, vagal activation can directly and profoundly influence metabolic responses to food, as well as inflammation; in turn, both depression and stress have well-documented negative effects on vagal activation, contributing to the lively interplay between the brain and the gut. As one example, omega-3 fatty acid intake can boost mood and vagal tone, dampen NF-?B activation and responses to endotoxin, and modulate the magnitude of inflammatory responses to stressors. A better understanding of how stressors, negative emotions, and unhealthy meals work together to enhance inflammation will benefit behavioral and nutritional research, as well as the broader biomedical community. PMID:20410248

Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.

2010-01-01

114

Tips for Survivors of a Traumatic Event: Managing Your Stress  

MedlinePLUS

... when to get help. Know the Signs of Stress Your Behavior: An increase or decrease in your ... Mental Health Services www.samhsa.gov Managing Your Stress Tips for Survivors of a Traumatic Event Helpful ...

115

Lipidomic analysis of lipid droplets from murine hepatocytes reveals distinct signatures for nutritional stress.  

PubMed

Liver steatosis can be induced by fasting or high-fat diet. We investigated by lipidomic analysis whether such metabolic states are reflected in the lipidome of hepatocyte lipid droplets (LDs) from mice fed normal chow diet (FED), fasted (FAS), or fed a high-fat diet (HFD). LC-MS/MS at levels of lipid species profiles and of lipid molecular species uncovered a FAS phenotype of LD enriched in triacylglycerol (TG) molecular species with very long-chain (VLC)-PUFA residues and an HFD phenotype with less unsaturated TG species in addition to characteristic lipid marker species. Nutritional stress did not result in dramatic structural alterations in diacylglycerol (DG) and phospholipid (PL) classes. Moreover, molecular species of bulk TG and of DG indicated concomitant de novo TG synthesis and lipase-catalyzed degradation to be active in LDs. DG species with VLC-PUFA residues would be preferred precursors for phosphatidylcholine (PC) species, the others for TG molecular species. In addition, molecular species of PL classes fitted the hepatocyte Kennedy and phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase pathways. We demonstrate that lipidomic analysis of LDs enables phenotyping of nutritional stress. TG species are best suited for such phenotyping, whereas structural analysis of TG, DG, and PL molecular species provides metabolic insights. PMID:22872753

Chitraju, Chandramohan; Trötzmüller, Martin; Hartler, Jürgen; Wolinski, Heimo; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Lass, Achim; Zechner, Rudolf; Zimmermann, Robert; Köfeler, Harald C; Spener, Friedrich

2012-10-01

116

Nutrition  

MedlinePLUS

... banks. Also offers information & links to help consumers determine their eligibility for federal food assistance such as SNAP and the National School Lunch ... for Thought A guide to healthy eating—includes managing symptoms, changing eating habits, and the ...

117

Multidisciplinary Management of Enteral Nutrition Support Related Diarrhea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diarrhea is one of the most common problems associated with enteral nutrition support. Occurrence of diarrhea is expensive in nursing time, linen usage, and wastage of tube feeding formula. It often leads to discontinuation of enteral support of the patient. The patient then lacks the benefits of enteral feeding which are well documented in current literature. Diarrhea may result from

M. Kaylor; P. Pullen; S. Rowell; F. Sinclair; M. Nelson; S. Dauenhauer; E. Taylor; A. Marr

1995-01-01

118

Position of the American Dietetic Association: nutrition services in managed care.  

PubMed

It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that medical nutrition therapy is an essential component of disease management and healthcare provided by managed care organizations, and that such care must be provided by qualified nutrition professionals. Compared with traditional fee-for-service reimbursement systems, managed care presents new opportunities for dietetics professionals. Until recently, the lack of billing infrastructure has handicapped nutrition providers who wish to bill for their services and has made it difficult to track the outcomes of nutrition care. With the publication of current procedure terminology codes for medical nutrition therapy (MNT) and the implementation of MNT benefits in Medicare part B for diabetes and nondialysis kidney disease, commercial payers, including managed care organizations (MCOs) are likely to implement or expand their coverage of MNT. A large body of evidence supports the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of MNT coverage within managed care plans. This evidence includes cost analyses of conditions treated by MNT, and clinical trial data confirming the efficacy of MNT in improving patient outcomes. MNT is also an important part of national standards of care for many chronic disease conditions. Based on evidence supporting the role of MNT in improving patient outcomes, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended that MNT services be reimbursed by Medicare when patients are referred by a physician. Provision of appropriate MNT can also help MCOs meet accreditation and quality standards established by entities such as the National Committee for Quality Assurance and the Joint Commission for the Accreditation of Health Care Organizations. Much of the work required to secure a place for MNT in MCOs will be done at the practitioner level, by nutrition professionals themselves. Registered dietitians must market MNT to their customers in managed care by addressing the needs of each player. By emphasizing the importance of MNT and other cost-effective forms of preventive care and disease management, MCOs will be well positioned to improve population health at modest cost. PMID:12396170

Chima, Cinda S; Pollack, Harold A

2002-10-01

119

MANAGING HOLIDAY STRESS Holiday stress and depression are usually the result of  

E-print Network

MANAGING HOLIDAY STRESS Holiday stress and depression are usually the result of Relationships: As families grow and change, realize that traditions often changes as well. Find new ways to celebrate if you

O'Toole, Alice J.

120

Stress management in dental students: a systematic review.  

PubMed

This study compared the effectiveness of stress management programs in dental education by systematic review of the literature. The number of studies concerning stress management programs for dental students is limited compared with studies discussing sources of stress. Several types of programs for stress management have been reported, and differ in their duration, content, and outcomes. Two main strategies have been used to help stressed students, ie, decreasing the number of stressors and increasing the ability to cope with stress. The first strategy includes several components, such as reducing fear of failure and workload pressure due to examinations and requirements. The second strategy includes coping techniques, such as deep breathing exercises. Although positive effects have been reported for most of the programs, these have mainly been evaluated using subjective self-report measures. There is a need for more research to identify the most effective stress management program. PMID:24904226

Alzahem, Abdullah M; Van der Molen, Henk T; Alaujan, Arwa H; De Boer, Benjamin J

2014-01-01

121

Stress management in dental students: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

This study compared the effectiveness of stress management programs in dental education by systematic review of the literature. The number of studies concerning stress management programs for dental students is limited compared with studies discussing sources of stress. Several types of programs for stress management have been reported, and differ in their duration, content, and outcomes. Two main strategies have been used to help stressed students, ie, decreasing the number of stressors and increasing the ability to cope with stress. The first strategy includes several components, such as reducing fear of failure and workload pressure due to examinations and requirements. The second strategy includes coping techniques, such as deep breathing exercises. Although positive effects have been reported for most of the programs, these have mainly been evaluated using subjective self-report measures. There is a need for more research to identify the most effective stress management program. PMID:24904226

Alzahem, Abdullah M; Van der Molen, Henk T; Alaujan, Arwa H; De Boer, Benjamin J

2014-01-01

122

Changes in glucocorticoids, IGF-I and thyroid hormones as indicators of nutritional stress and subsequent refeeding in Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus)  

E-print Network

Changes in glucocorticoids, IGF-I and thyroid hormones as indicators of nutritional stress-I Thyroid Nutritional stress Hormonal regulation Physiological responses to changes in energy balance are tightly regulated by the endocrine system through glucocorticoids, IGF-I and thyroid hormones. Changes

123

Dysphagia in the elderly: management and nutritional considerations  

PubMed Central

Dysphagia is a prevalent difficulty among aging adults. Though increasing age facilitates subtle physiologic changes in swallow function, age-related diseases are significant factors in the presence and severity of dysphagia. Among elderly diseases and health complications, stroke and dementia reflect high rates of dysphagia. In both conditions, dysphagia is associated with nutritional deficits and increased risk of pneumonia. Recent efforts have suggested that elderly community dwellers are also at risk for dysphagia and associated deficits in nutritional status and increased pneumonia risk. Swallowing rehabilitation is an effective approach to increase safe oral intake in these populations and recent research has demonstrated extended benefits related to improved nutritional status and reduced pneumonia rates. In this manuscript, we review data describing age related changes in swallowing and discuss the relationship of dysphagia in patients following stroke, those with dementia, and in community dwelling elderly. Subsequently, we review basic approaches to dysphagia intervention including both compensatory and rehabilitative approaches. We conclude with a discussion on the positive impact of swallowing rehabilitation on malnutrition and pneumonia in elderly who either present with dysphagia or are at risk for dysphagia. PMID:22956864

Sura, Livia; Madhavan, Aarthi; Carnaby, Giselle; Crary, Michael A

2012-01-01

124

Dysphagia in the elderly: management and nutritional considerations.  

PubMed

Dysphagia is a prevalent difficulty among aging adults. Though increasing age facilitates subtle physiologic changes in swallow function, age-related diseases are significant factors in the presence and severity of dysphagia. Among elderly diseases and health complications, stroke and dementia reflect high rates of dysphagia. In both conditions, dysphagia is associated with nutritional deficits and increased risk of pneumonia. Recent efforts have suggested that elderly community dwellers are also at risk for dysphagia and associated deficits in nutritional status and increased pneumonia risk. Swallowing rehabilitation is an effective approach to increase safe oral intake in these populations and recent research has demonstrated extended benefits related to improved nutritional status and reduced pneumonia rates. In this manuscript, we review data describing age related changes in swallowing and discuss the relationship of dysphagia in patients following stroke, those with dementia, and in community dwelling elderly. Subsequently, we review basic approaches to dysphagia intervention including both compensatory and rehabilitative approaches. We conclude with a discussion on the positive impact of swallowing rehabilitation on malnutrition and pneumonia in elderly who either present with dysphagia or are at risk for dysphagia. PMID:22956864

Sura, Livia; Madhavan, Aarthi; Carnaby, Giselle; Crary, Michael A

2012-01-01

125

Nutritional iron turned inside out: intestinal stress from a gut microbial perspective.  

PubMed

Iron is abundantly present on earth, essential for most microorganisms and crucial for human health. Human iron deficiency that is nevertheless highly prevalent in developing regions of the world can be effectively treated by oral iron administration. Accumulating evidence indicates that excess of unabsorbed iron that enters the colonic lumen causes unwanted side effects at the intestinal host-microbiota interface. The chemical properties of iron, the luminal environment and host iron withdrawal mechanisms, especially during inflammation, can turn the intestine in a rather stressful milieu. Certain pathogenic enteric bacteria can, however, deal with this stress at the expense of other members of the gut microbiota, while their virulence also seems to be stimulated in an iron-rich intestinal environment. This review covers the multifaceted aspects of nutritional iron stress with respect to growth, composition, metabolism and pathogenicity of the gut microbiota in relation to human health. We aim to present an unpreceded view on the dynamic effects and impact of oral iron administration on intestinal host-microbiota interactions to provide leads for future research and other applications. PMID:25205464

Kortman, Guus A M; Raffatellu, Manuela; Swinkels, Dorine W; Tjalsma, Harold

2014-11-01

126

Capitalizing on Stress Management Techniques in Developmental Classes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mastering stress management techniques can help college developmental class educators protect themselves from burnout. These techniques can also be taught to students in developmental classes to enable them to maximize the benefits from these classes. This paper outlines the causes of stress, identifies stressors, describes responses to stress,…

Price, Elsa C.

127

rkfsbopfqv=lc=proobv= STRESS POLICY -MANAGERS GUIDELINES  

E-print Network

= = = rkfsbopfqv=lc=proobv= STRESS POLICY - MANAGERS GUIDELINES JUNE 2006 #12;= = = = = eo=abm^oqjbkq= 1/2 1. Introduction 1.1 Stress is something that affects everyone on occasions. It is a natural reaction we all have to excessive pressure. Stress is not a disease, but can lead to illness if excessive

Doran, Simon J.

128

Stress and Time Management for Educators. Georgia Comprehensive Guidance Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide to stress and time management for educators defines stress as a physiological response to the pressures of daily living and differentiates between stress as a motivator and a debilitator. The guide presents stressor inventories for teachers, administrators, and counselors, and outlines a personal behavior contract for implementing…

Daly, Michael J.; Moore, Earl J.

129

Immune responses to stress after stress management training in patients with rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

Introduction Psychological stress may alter immune function by activating physiological stress pathways. Building on our previous study, in which we report that stress management training led to an altered self-reported and cortisol response to psychological stress in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we explored the effects of this stress management intervention on the immune response to a psychological stress task in patients with RA. Methods In this study, 74 patients with RA, who were randomly assigned to either a control group or a group that received short stress management training, performed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) 1 week after the intervention and at a 9-week follow-up. Stress-induced changes in levels of key cytokines involved in stress and inflammatory processes (for example, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8) were assessed. Results Basal and stress-induced cytokine levels were not significantly different in patients in the intervention and control groups one week after treatment, but stress-induced IL-8 levels were lower in patients in the intervention group than in the control group at the follow-up assessment. Conclusions In line with our previous findings of lower stress-induced cortisol levels at the follow-up of stress management intervention, this is the first study to show that relatively short stress management training might also alter stress-induced IL-8 levels in patients with RA. These results might help to determine the role of immunological mediators in stress and disease. Trial registration The Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR1193) PMID:24274618

2013-01-01

130

Identification of energy consumption and nutritional stress by isotopic and elemental analysis of urine in bonobos (Pan paniscus)  

E-print Network

a particular food chain.[1�5] However, evidence from feeding experiments involving various avian, reptile, can be used to monitor fluctuations in nitrogen balance caused by situations such as nutritional stress.[6�13] During episodes of negative nitrogen balance and in response to mobilization of endogenous

131

Effect of Silicon on Plant Growth and Mineral Nutrition of Maize Grown Under Water-Stress Conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of silicon (Si) on physiological attributes and nutritional status of maize (Zea mays cv. DK 647 F1) under water stress was studied in a pot experiment. Treatments were (1) well watered (WW): 100% of FC (soil field capacity), (2) WW + Si1: 100% of FC + 1 mM Si, (3) WW + Si2: 100% of FC + 2

Cengiz Kaya; Levent Tuna; David Higgs

2006-01-01

132

A stress management course to prevent teacher distress  

Microsoft Academic Search

The question of teacher motivation is of paramount concern for educational leaders and managers. Both the commonly observed deficiency in teacher motivation and the abundance of teacher stress are serious problems that can be mitigated through teacher education. This study describes a relational-training stress-management course that was prepared and implemented in an attempt to reduce teacher stress. The 30-hour programme

Saul Neves de Jesus; Joseph Conboy

2001-01-01

133

Occupational Stress, Mental Health Status and Stress Management Behaviors among Secondary School Teachers in Hong Kong  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study aimed to examine occupational stress and mental health among secondary school teachers in Hong Kong, and to identify the differences between those actively engaged in stress management behaviors and those who were not. Design: Survey design was adopted using validated instruments including Occupational Stress Inventory…

Leung, Sharron S. K.; Mak, Yim Wah; Chui, Ying Yu; Chiang, Vico C. L.; Lee, Angel C. K.

2009-01-01

134

Perceptions of School Nutrition Directors and Managers Regarding Their Role in School Wellness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose/Objectives: The objectives of this study were to investigate the perceptions of school nutrition (SN) directors and managers regarding their role in school wellness, the responsibility of SN professionals for serving as positive role models, and factors contributing to greater involvement in school wellness. Methods: A survey assessing the…

Stinson, Wendy Bounds; Lofton, Kristi

2009-01-01

135

An evaluation of total parenteral nutrition in the management of inflammatory bowel disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is commonly used in the management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Claims of its effectiveness are conflicting, and most reports have been limited to short-term assessments. We undertook a nonrandomized prospective study of the effects of TPN on the course of IBD in 30 patients whose disease was refractory to medical therapy, 20 with Crohn's disease

Charles O. Elson; Thomas J. Layden; Bernard A. Nemchausky; James L. Rosenberg; Irwin H. Rosenberg

1980-01-01

136

Heat stress impairs the nutritional metabolism and reduces the productivity of egg-laying ducks.  

PubMed

This research was conducted to determine the effect of heat stress on the nutritional metabolism and productivity of egg-laying shelducks. Healthy shelducks (n=120) in the early laying stage (uniform body weights and normal feed intakes) were randomly assigned to two identical climate chambers and exposed to constant high temperature (34°C) or control temperature (23°C) for 28d. The heat-exposed ducks had reduced feed intakes and laying rates (P<0.05), increased frequency of panting and spreading wings and dull featheration; egg weight, eggshell thickness and strength, and Haugh unit also decreased and malondialdehyde (MDA) content of egg yolk increased (P<0.05). Compared with the control ducks, the plasma concentrations of HCO3(-), phosphorus, glucose, thyroxine and activities of glutamic-pyruvic transaminase and glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase were decreased, while there were increased concentrations of corticosterone (P<0.05). The content of MDA and lactate in plasma and liver was greater in heat-exposed than in control ducks, but superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), total antioxidant enzymes (T-AOC) activities and glutathione (GSH) contents were less. The expression of HSP70 gene expression in the liver was increased in heat-stressed ducks. The relative weight of oviduct, number of large ovarian follicles, length of the oviduct all decreased (P<0.05) in heat-treated ducks, as did expression of carbonic anhydrase and calcium binding protein genes in the shell gland as a result of heat stress. In summary, heat stress decreased the productivity of ducks, which related to reduced feed intake, protein synthesis, endocrine dysfunction, less antioxidant capacity, and derangement of calcium and phosphorous balance. PMID:24491646

Ma, Xianyong; Lin, Yingcai; Zhang, Hanxing; Chen, Wei; Wang, Shang; Ruan, Dong; Jiang, Zongyong

2014-03-01

137

Nutrition knowledge of rural older populations: can congregate meal site participants manage their own diets?  

PubMed

Congregate meal sites were funded to assist socioeconomically disadvantaged, rural older individuals in improving their health-related practices. Although the participants in the program are largely female, the meals are designed to meet one third of the daily caloric intake of a 70-year-old male, and to satisfy his recommended dietary allowances for total fat, fiber, calcium, and sodium. The actual percentage of the required nutrient intake contributed by meals served at congregate sites is indefinite. Moreover, the ability of congregate meal participants to manage their diets and their receptiveness to helpful nutrition information in that regard is unknown. Our objective was to promote nutritional knowledge in economically disadvantaged, rural older participants by studying its impact on their ability to benefit from congregate meal programs. We used a test, intervention, retest methodology to examine the effect of short-term nutrition interventions on congregate meal site participants' nutrition knowledge. The objective was to determine the participants' potential for managing their own diets (e.g., their ability to determine what diet behaviors are appropriate for specific chronic conditions). We found that while congregate meal site participants have knowledge of nutrition recommendations, their ability to apply this information in helping themselves to prevent or control their chronic conditions remains in question. PMID:20711926

Thomas, Lionel; Almanza, Barbara; Ghiselli, Richard

2010-07-01

138

Helping Clients Manage Stress: A Practical Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The pervasiveness of stress as a problem, with its many harmful effects on people, makes it a matter of growing interest for counselors and other personnel workers. This monograph provides definitions of stress, distress, and eustress, and discusses numerous causes of distress, as well as the benefits of stress to a healthy, productive life.…

Sparks, Dennis

139

Diabetes White Paper: Defining the Delivery of Nutrition Services in Medicare Medical Nutrition Therapy vs Medicare Diabetes Self-Management Training Programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Registered dietitians (RDs) have a defined and unique role in care for patients with diabetes that differs depending on whether the service is for medical nutrition therapy (MNT) or part of a diabetes self-management training (DSMT) program (DSMT and diabetes self-management education [DSME] are used interchangeably in this article). The purpose of this article is to describe the current regulatory

Anne Daly; Pam Michael; Elvira Q. Johnson; Carolyn C. Harrington; Stephanie Patrick; Tori Bender

2009-01-01

140

Different colors reveal different information: how nutritional stress affects the expression of melanin- and structurally based ornamental plumage.  

PubMed

Avian plumage colors have emerged recently as model systems for investigating the types of information that can be signaled by showy sexual displays in animals. In many species, the brightness of carotenoid-based plumage reflects the health and condition of individuals and is used in mate selection. The information contained in melanin-based and structurally based ornamental colors in birds is less well resolved, however. We subjected male house sparrows Passer domesticus and brown-headed cowbirds Molothrus ater to stressful nutritional conditions during molt to test the hypothesis that melanin- and structurally based plumage colors are nutritionally condition-dependent. We restricted food access for treatment males during randomized 6 h periods on 4 days per week, while allowing control birds access to food ad libitum throughout the course of the molt. We found that the size and brightness of the melanin-based throat badges in male house sparrows were not affected by nutritional stress. Similarly, there were no differences between treatment and control male cowbirds in the size or brightness of the melanin-based brown hood. However, the structurally based iridescent plumage of cowbirds was indicative of the nutritional condition of males during molt. Nutritionally stressed cowbirds grew significantly less colorful plumage than did males with access to food ad libitum. These results are consistent with observations in other avian species that different types of plumage color communicate different sets of information. Melanin ornaments are less sensitive to nutritional conditions during molt and instead may reflect the hormonal status and/or competitive ability of males, whereas structural coloration appears to be an accurate signal of health and condition. PMID:12409501

McGraw, Kevin J; Mackillop, Emiko A; Dale, James; Hauber, Mark E

2002-12-01

141

Pharmacotherapy prevention and management of nutritional deficiencies post Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.  

PubMed

Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the most commonly performed bariatric procedure. It is associated with nutritional deficiencies due to gastric reduction, intestinal bypass, reduced caloric intake, avoidance of nutrient-rich foods, noncompliance with supplementation and poor food tolerability. Although there are multiple publications on this topic, there is a lack of consistent guidance for the healthcare practitioner caring for the bariatric patient. This article will encompass literature reviewing the pharmacotherapy approach to prevention and management of nutritional deficiencies since the American Society of Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery guidelines were published in 2008. PMID:23558789

Levinson, Radmila; Silverman, Jon B; Catella, Jennifer G; Rybak, Iwona; Jolin, Hina; Isom, Kellene

2013-07-01

142

Welfare-positive management and nutrition for the dairy herd: a European perspective.  

PubMed

As European dairy farms become larger and diverge between grass-based and fully housed systems, interest in the welfare of the dairy cow and related environmental issues by consumers and legislators is increasing. These pressures mean that good nutrition and management, which underpin much dairy cow welfare, is critical. Despite considerable research into the management and nutrition of the dairy cow from calf to adulthood there is much on-farm variability in its application. While the incidences of many endemic diseases are reduced most are still significant, for example lameness. In addition, trade and climate change are bringing a more diverse range of pathogens, parasites and pests into Northern Europe. Housing aspects are limited in application by economics and in most cases still do not match grazing for welfare in temperate climates. Genomic technologies offer increased opportunities to breed for 'robustness' but like 'precision animal management systems' have still to be fully exploited. PMID:24360757

Logue, David N; Mayne, C Sinclair

2014-01-01

143

Nutrition-related health management in a Bangladeshi community.  

PubMed

The British Bangladeshi community is one of the youngest and fastest growing ethnic minority groups in the UK. Many report poor socio-economic and health profiles with the existence of substantial health inequalities, particularly in relation to type 2 diabetes. Although there is compelling evidence for the effectiveness of lifestyle interventions in the prevention of type 2 diabetes, there is little understanding of how best to tailor treatments to the needs of minority ethnic groups. Little is known about nutrition related lifestyle choices in the Bangladeshi community or the factors influencing such decisions. Only by exploring these factors will it be possible to design and tailor interventions appropriately. The Bangladeshi Initiative for the Prevention of Diabetes study explored lay beliefs and attitudes, religious teachings and professional perspectives in relation to diabetes prevention in the Bangladeshi community in Tower Hamlets, London. Contrary to the views of health professionals and previous research, poor knowledge was not the main barrier to healthy lifestyle choices. Rather the desire to comply with cultural norms, particularly those relating to hospitality, conflicted with efforts to implement healthy behaviours. Considerable support from Islamic teachings for diabetes prevention messages was provided by religious leaders, and faith may have an important role in supporting health promotion in this community. Some health professionals expressed outdated views on community attitudes and were concerned about their own limited cultural understanding. The potential for collaborative working between health educators and religious leaders should be explored further, and the cultural competence of health professionals addressed. PMID:21144124

Grace, Clare

2011-02-01

144

Parenteral nutrition in the management of a dog with lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis and severe protein-losing enteropathy.  

PubMed Central

Management of lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis in a dog with whipworm infestation, hypoproteinemia, and ascites is described. Short-term parenteral nutrition hastened normalization of serum proteins, resolution of diarrhea, and weight gain. A description of the potential benefits, limitations, and possible complications of parenteral nutrition in refractory inflammatory bowel disease is given. PMID:10572669

Lane, I F; Miller, E; Twedt, D C

1999-01-01

145

Evaluation of the Role of Enteral Nutrition in Managing Patients with Diabetes: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed. The prevalence of diabetes is on the increase in the UK and globally partly due to lack of physical activities, poor dietary regimes and genetic susceptibility. The development of diabetes often leads to complications such as stroke, which may require enteral nutritional support. The provision of enteral feeds comes with its complications including hyperglycaemia which if not managed can have profound consequences for the patients in terms of clinical outcomes. Therefore, it is essential to develop strategies for managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed with respect to the type and composition of the feed. This is a systematic review of published peer reviewed articles. EBSCOhost Research, PubMed and SwetsWise databases were searched. Reference lists of identified articles were reviewed. Randomised controlled trials comparing enteral nutrition diabetes specific formulas with standard formulas were included. The studies which compared diabetes specific formulas (DSF) with standard formulas showed that DSF was more effective in controlling glucose profiles including postprandial glucose, HbA1c and insulinemic response. The use of DSF appears to be effective in managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed compared with standard feed. PMID:25412151

Ojo, Omorogieva; Brooke, Joanne

2014-01-01

146

Parent Stress Management Training for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed the effectiveness of a targeted 9-week parent stress management program (PSM) on the parenting stress, mood, family functioning, parenting style, locus of control, and perceived social support of parents of children diagnosed with DSM-IV ADHD. Sixty-three parents from 42 families were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 conditions:…

Treacy, Lee; Tripp, Gail; Baird, Amanda

2005-01-01

147

Does Personal Initiative Training Work as a Stress Management Intervention?  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental trial is reported that compares 2 stress management intervention programs and a waitlist control. Both programs involved training in problem-focused strategies of identifying and changing the sources of stress. One of the programs contained additional content on how to display more personal initiative (PI). Both programs involved 2 sessions held 1 week apart, each session lasting 3–4 hr.

Ben J. Searle

2008-01-01

148

Blood Pressure Variability and Stress Management Training for Essential Hypertension  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine whether stress management training reduces blood pressure (BP) variability in hypertensive patients. Previous literature suggests that cardiovascular risk is not only a function of BP levels, but also of BP variability, and this partially depends on changes induced by the stress of everyday life. The…

Garcia-Vera, Maria Paz; Sanz, Jesus; Labrador, Francisco J.

2004-01-01

149

Nutritional approaches in the risk reduction and management of Alzheimer's disease.  

PubMed

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a heterogeneous and devastating neurodegenerative disease with increasing socioeconomic burden for society. In the past 30 y, notwithstanding advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease and consequent development of therapeutic approaches to novel pathogenic targets, no cure has so far emerged. This contribution focuses on recent nutritional approaches in the risk reduction and management of AD with emphasis on factors providing a rationale for nutritional approaches in AD, including compromised nutritional status, altered nutrient uptake and metabolism, and nutrient requirements for synapse formation. Collectively these factors are believed to result in specific nutritional requirement in AD. The chapter also emphasizes investigated nutritional interventions in patients with AD, including studies with single nutrients and with the specific nutrient combination Fortasyn Connect and discusses the current shift of paradigm to intervene in earlier stages of AD, which offers opportunities for investigating nutritional strategies to reduce the risk for disease progression. Fortasyn Connect was designed to enhance synapse formation and function in AD by addressing the putative specific nutritional requirements and contains docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, uridine-5'-mono-phosphate, choline, phospholipids, antioxidants, and B vitamins. Two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with the medical food Souvenaid, containing Fortasyn Connect, showed that this intervention improved memory performance in mild, drug-naďve patients with AD. Electroencephalography outcome in one of these clinical studies suggests that Souvenaid has an effect on brain functional connectivity, which is a derivative of changed synaptic activity. Thus, these studies suggest that nutritional requirements in AD can be successfully addressed and result in improvements in behavioral and neuro-physiological alterations that are characteristic to AD. The recent advance of methodologies and techniques for early diagnosis of AD facilitates the investigation of strategies to reduce the risk for AD progression in the earliest stages of the disease. Nutrition-based approaches deserve further investigation as an integral part of such strategies due to their low risk for side effects and their potential to affect pathological processes of very early AD. PMID:23756280

Mi, Weiqian; van Wijk, Nick; Cansev, Mehmet; Sijben, John W C; Kamphuis, Patrick J G H

2013-09-01

150

Nutritional education for management of osteodystrophy (NEMO) trial: Design and patient characteristics, Lebanon  

PubMed Central

This study aims to determine the effect of a trained dedicated dietitian on clinical outcomes among Lebanese hemodialysis (HD) patients: and thus demonstrate a viable developing country model. This paper describes the study protocol and baseline data. The study was a multicenter randomized controlled trial with parallel-group design involving 12 HD units: assigned to cluster A (n = 6) or B (n = 6). A total of 570 patients met the inclusion criteria. Patients in cluster A were randomly assigned as per dialysis shift to the following: Dedicated Dietitian (DD) (n = 133) and Existing Practice (EP) (n = 138) protocols. Cluster B patients (n = 299) received Trained Hospital Dietitian (THD) protocol. Dietitians of the DD and THD groups were trained by the research team on Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative nutrition guidelines. DD protocol included: individualized nutrition education for 2 hours/month/HD patient for 6 months focusing on renal osteodystrophy and using the Trans-theoretical theory for behavioral change. EP protocol included nutrition education given to patients by hospital dietitians who were blinded to the study. The THD protocol included nutrition education to patients given by hospital dietitian as per the training received but within hospital responsibilities, with no set educational protocol or tools. Baseline data revealed that 40% of patients were hyperphosphatemics (> 5.5 mg/dl) with low dietary adherence and knowledge of dietary P restriction in addition to inadequate daily protein intake (58.86%± 33.87% of needs) yet adequate dietary P intake (795.52 ± 366.94 mg/day). Quality of life (QOL) ranged from 48-75% of full health. Baseline differences between the 3 groups revealed significant differences in serum P, malnutrition status, adherence to diet and P chelators and in 2 factors of the QOL: physical and social functioning. The data show room for improvement in the nutritional status of the patients. The NEMO trial may be able to demonstrate a better nutritional management of HD patients. PMID:24611112

Abboud, Saade; Elzein, Hafez; Haydar, Sarah; de Vries, Nanne

2014-01-01

151

Effects of two stress management interventions on student nurses' perceived stress and general self-efficacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine the differential effects of a health promotion Stress Management Workshop and Verbal Persuasion Interventions on the perceived stress and general self-efficacy of first year student nurses. The two dependent variables examined were perceived stress and general self-efficacy. A quasi-experimental two-group research study was conducted with first year student nurses at a large

Ann Marie Collins

2005-01-01

152

STRESS  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

During this activity, students will use the available resources to learn more about stress, the effects of stress and how to handle stress. This activity focuses on the Utah fifth grade health core Standard 1: The students will learn ways to improve mental health and manage stress. During this project, students are given two different scenarios and ...

Hancey, Ms.

2010-04-27

153

The impact of stress in site management effectiveness  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on the findings of a piece of research work aimed at investigating and analysing the impact of stress on the effectiveness of site managers as leaders. The sample of the study included semi-structured interviews with 71 site managers at the sharp end of production and their superiors. The investigation was more specifically concerned with the impact of

Ramdane Djebarni

1996-01-01

154

Mammary gland immunology around parturition. Influence of stress, nutrition and genetics.  

PubMed

Adequate immune functions are essential for the defence against udder infections. Detailed knowledge about the immune response and important defence factors is essential in order to find new ways for the prevention and treatment of udder infections leading to mastitis. Work should be concentrated on ways of minimising the negative influence on immune functions and/or ways of stimulating these functions, especially during periods of immune suppression. A depression of important immune functions has been reported around parturition and there is a higher prevalence of clinical mastitis and other diseases during this period. Immunosuppression is often associated with high levels of glucocorticoids in blood, a common finding around parturition and during stressful conditions. A number of stressors are present around calving, e.g. parturition, onset of lactation and changes in feeding and management regimes. Adequate management including feeding strategies and routines are important for the immune functions. Metabolic stress as well as deficiencies in vitamins and minerals around parturition and during the first month of lactation can have a negative influence on the immune functions and thereby increase the risks for udder infections and mastitis. There seem to be a genetic variability in certain immune functions among periparturient cows. This might indicate a possibility to find markers for genetic selection of individuals with a well-developed immune system without negative effects on milk productivity. PMID:10959432

Waller, K P

2000-01-01

155

The conservative management of genuine stress incontinence  

Microsoft Academic Search

All conservative methods of treating genuine stress incontinence (GSI) aim to increase the urethral closure pressure, either by increasing pelvic floor or urethral muscular tone (pelvic floor physiotherapy, electrostimulation, alpha-adrenergic agents), increasing tissue occlusive forces (hormone replacement) or by mechanical means. Simple pelvic floor exercises should suffice for motivated patients who are able to isolate the correct muscles. In the

K. S. Olfih; N. Bridges; D. Farrar

1991-01-01

156

Nutritional Aspects in Diagnosis and Management of Food Hypersensitivity--The Dietitians Role  

PubMed Central

Many common foods including cow's milk, hen's egg, soya, peanut, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, and wheat may cause food allergies. The prevalence of these immune-mediated adverse reactions to foods ranges from 0.5% to 9% in different populations. In simple terms, the cornerstone of managing food allergy is to avoid consumption of foods causing symptoms and to replace them with nutritionally equivalent foods. If poorly managed, food allergy impairs quality of life more than necessary, affects normal growth in children, and causes an additional economic burden to society. Delay in diagnosis may be a further incremental factor. Thus, an increased awareness of the appropriate procedures for both diagnosis and management is of importance. This paper sets out to present principles for taking an allergy-focused diet history as part of the diagnostic work-up of food allergy. A short overview of guidelines and principles for dietary management of food allergy is discussed focusing on the nutritional management of food allergies and the particular role of the dietitian in this process. PMID:23150738

Venter, Carina; Laitinen, Kirsi; Vlieg-Boerstra, Berber

2012-01-01

157

Mindfulness-based stress reduction as a stress management intervention for healthy individuals: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Stress is a global public health problem with several negative health consequences, including anxiety, depression, cardiovascular disease, and suicide. Mindfulness-based stress reduction offers an effective way of reducing stress by combining mindfulness meditation and yoga in an 8-week training program. The purpose of this study was to look at studies from January 2009 to January 2014 and examine whether mindfulness-based stress reduction is a potentially viable method for managing stress. A systematic search from Medline, CINAHL, and Alt HealthWatch databases was conducted for all types of quantitative articles involving mindfulness-based stress reduction. A total of 17 articles met the inclusion criteria. Of the 17 studies, 16 demonstrated positive changes in psychological or physiological outcomes related to anxiety and/or stress. Despite the limitations of not all studies using randomized controlled design, having smaller sample sizes, and having different outcomes, mindfulness-based stress reduction appears to be a promising modality for stress management. PMID:25053754

Sharma, Manoj; Rush, Sarah E

2014-10-01

158

Prevention and management of pain and stress in the neonate  

PubMed Central

This statement is intended for health care professionals caring for neonates (preterm to one month of age). The objectives of this statement are to: increase awareness that neonates experience pain; provide a physiological basis for neonatal pain and stress assessment and management by health care professionals; make recommendations for reduced exposure of the neonate to noxious stimuli and to minimize associated adverse outcomes; and recommend effective and safe interventions that relieve pain and stress. PMID:20107594

2000-01-01

159

The effect of health and nutrition management classes on nutrition choices: a case study on diabetics in huntsville, alabama, United States.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the effectiveness of a one-day nutrition education seminar utilizing a sample of 26 confirmed diabetics who had at least once before, participated in nutrition classes. The participants were exposed to a seminar that promoted, evaluated, and rewarded good nutrition choices in an effort to educate this group about coping with diabetes through nutrition management. A 24-hour food recall was used as a pre-test, meal plans constructed by trained graduate-level diet interns were used as the standard by which proper nutrition was judged, and participants' choices were used as the post-test evaluation. Significant differences were found between the 24-hour recall and the ideal meal plans in all of the three nutrient measured (energy, protein and fat). Participants showed a preference for personally constructed meal plans as opposed to those constructed by the interns. However, significant diet adjustments were shown in the short term. Discussion focused on the need for repeated involvement in diet interventions, and the challenges faced in changing diet habits of a group of middle-aged individuals who are even slightly obese. PMID:22691752

Cort, Malcolm A; Sovyanhadi, Marta

2007-09-01

160

Acid stress management by Cronobacter sakazakii.  

PubMed

Cronobacter sakazakii is a foodborne pathogenic microorganism associated with sporadic cases of neonatal meningitis, necrotising enterocolitis, septicaemia, bloody diarrhoea and brain abscesses acquired through the consumption of contaminated powdered infant formula (PIF). This study aimed to investigate the growth of C. sakazakii DPC6529, a particularly stress tolerant clinical isolate, in acidified laboratory media and PIF. The possibility of a stationary-phase acid tolerance response (ATR) was also investigated. C. sakazakii DPC6529 grew in LB broth acidified to pH4.2 with hydrochloric acid (HCl) and was capable of relatively fast growth in PIF acidified to pH5.0 with HCl, representing the stomach pH reported for newborns and infants. Moreover, bacterial growth in LB broth supplemented with 1% (w/v) glucose gave rise to a stationary-phase ATR which resulted in enhanced survival against a subsequent acid challenge at pH3.0. A transposon mutagenesis approach was used to shed light on some of the molecular mechanisms involved in the response C. sakazakii DPC6529 to normally lethal acid exposures. The data suggests that repairing damage in proteins and nucleic acids, posttranscriptional modification of tRNA molecules and maintenance of the integrity of the cellular envelope are key processes in the defence against acid stress. Clones carrying transposon insertions in genes encoding the envelope stress response regulators CpxR and OmpR were identified as acid-sensitive mutants. Further analyses of the ompR defective mutant and its complemented counterpart evidenced that OmpR is a key player in the response of C. sakazakii to acid stress, although it was not essential to mount an active stationary-phase ATR, at least under the tested conditions. The ability of C. sakazakii DPC6529 to grow in acid environments and to develop an adaptive stationary-phase ATR may allow for its survival or even proliferation within the infant gastrointestinal tract after consumption of contaminated milk formulae. PMID:24667315

Alvarez-Ordóńez, Avelino; Cummins, Conor; Deasy, Thérčse; Clifford, Tanya; Begley, Máire; Hill, Colin

2014-05-16

161

Managing heat and immune stress in athletes with evidence-based strategies.  

PubMed

Heat and immune stress can affect athletes in a wide range of sports and environmental conditions. The classical thermoregulatory model of heat stress has been well characterized, as has a wide range of practical strategies largely centered on cooling and heat-acclimation training. In the last decade evidence has emerged of an inflammatory pathway that can also contribute to heat stress. Studies are now addressing the complex and dynamic interplay between hyperthermia, the coagulation cascade, and a systemic inflammatory response occurring after transient damage to the gastrointestinal tract. Damage to the intestinal mucosal membrane increases permeability, resulting in leakage of endotoxins into the circulation. Practical strategies that target both thermoregulatory and inflammatory causes of heat stress include precooling; short-term heat-acclimation training; nutritional countermeasures including hydration, energy replacement, and probiotic supplementation; pacing strategies during events; and postevent cooling measures. Cooperation between international, national, and local sporting organizations is required to ensure that heat-management policies and strategies are implemented effectively to promote athletes' well-being and performance. PMID:24911928

Pyne, David B; Guy, Joshua H; Edwards, Andrew M

2014-09-01

162

Identifying and managing posttraumatic stress disorder.  

PubMed

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) occurs in an estimated 8% of men and 20% of women who are exposed to traumatic events. PTSD is a trauma- and stress-related disorder associated with significant psychosocial morbidity, substance abuse, and other negative physical health outcomes. The hallmarks of PTSD include exposure to a traumatic event; reexperiencing the event or intrusion symptoms; avoidance of people, places, or things that serve as a reminder of the trauma; negative mood and thoughts associated with the trauma; and chronic hyperarousal symptoms. Self-report questionnaires can assist clinicians in identifying anxiety problems associated with traumatic events. For patients who meet criteria for PTSD, trauma-focused psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy improve symptoms. Benzodiazepines and atypical antipsychotics are not recommended because studies have shown that adverse effects outweigh potential health benefits. Primary care physicians should monitor patients with PTSD for comorbid conditions such as substance abuse, mood disorders, and suicidality, and should refer patients to behavioral health specialists and support groups when appropriate. PMID:24364547

Warner, Christopher H; Warner, Carolynn M; Appenzeller, George N; Hoge, Charles W

2013-12-15

163

Nutritional Challenges  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this nutrition activity (page 26 of PDF), learners consider the nutritional needs of people with specific dietary requirements, such as athletes, persons with diabetes and vegetarians, and create a full-day menu for these individuals. This activity may be used as an assessment for any unit on nutrition. This guide includes background information, setup and management tips, extensions, information about eating in space and handouts.

Moreno, Nancy P.; Clayton, Sonia R.; Cutler, Paula H.; Young, Martha S.; Tharp, Barbara Z.

2009-01-01

164

Structural linear relationships between job stress, burnout, physiological stress, and performance of construction project managers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Construction is a competitive, ever-changing, and challenging industry. Therefore, it is not surprising that the majority of construction professionals suffer from stress, especially construction project managers (C-PMs), who are often driven by the time pressures, uncertainties, crisis-ridden environment, and dynamic social structures that are intrinsic to every construction project. Extensive literature has indicated that stress can be categorized

Mei-yung Leung; Yee Shan Isabelle Chan; Chen Dongyu

2011-01-01

165

Emergency and crisis management: critical incident stress management for first responders and business organisations.  

PubMed

A literature review was performed on critical incident stress after September 11th, 2001 (9/11), and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, which focused on the need to implement a holistic critical incident stress management programme for first responders and business organisations. Critical incident stress management is required to handle acute stress and other distress in the face of natural or man-made disasters, including terrorist attacks. A holistic approach to community resilience through a well-planned and implemented critical incident stress management programme has been shown in the literature to promote self-help and self-efficacy of individuals and organisations. The interventions and programme elements defined clearly show how a number of different intervention and prevention strategies will promote business and community resilience and also self-efficacy in a culturally-diverse community and organisation. Implementing a critical incident stress management programme within a responding business organisation is critical because of the fact that first responders are the most susceptible every day to exposure to critical incidents that will affect their mental health; and business employees will suffer some of the same maladies as first responders in the event of a disaster or crisis. Utilising the framework provided, a holistic critical incident stress management programme can be implemented to help reduce the effects of burnout, absenteeism, acute stress, post-traumatic stress, substance use and traumatic stress, and to work to promote community resilience and toughen individuals against the effects of stress. Taking care of the needs of the employees of a business organisation, and of those of first responders, is clearly required. PMID:22576135

Guenthner, Daniel H

2012-01-01

166

Occupational Stress and Turnover Intention: Implications for Nursing Management  

PubMed Central

Background: The main purpose of this study was to explore the status of occupational stress among hospital nurses in Isfahan, Iran. It also aimed to examine the relationship between nurses’ occupational stress and their intention to leave the hospital. Methods: The study employed a cross-sectional research design. A validated questionnaire was used to collect data from 296 nurses. Respondents were asked to rate the intensity of 30 common occupational stressors using a five-point scale. Results: A third of hospital nurses rated their occupational stress high. The major sources of stress were inadequate pay, inequality at work, too much work, staff shortage, lack of promotion, job insecurity and lack of management support. More than 35% of nurses stated that they are considering leaving the hospital, if they could find another job opportunity. Occupational stress was positively associated with nurses’ turnover intentions. Conclusion: Hospital managers should develop and apply appropriate policies and strategies to reduce occupational stress and consequently nurses’ turnover intention. PMID:24596858

Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

2013-01-01

167

Stress Management Training for Parents of Severely Handicapped Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined the efficacy of a stress management training procedure for reducing anxiety and depression in parents of severely handicapped children between the ages of 4 and 16. Thirty-six parents were randomly assigned to treatment or control groups which completed pre- and post-measures of the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the…

Singer, George H. S.

168

Managing occupational stress: A national and international perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Theoretical models of occupational stress are important because they suggest a focus for intervention, and inform practice. The gap between research and practice was exposed most recently by Burke (1993) claiming “little awareness of research findings by practitioners (managers, consultants, clinicians), little intervention activity being undertaken at the organizational level, little research being undertaken to determine the effectiveness of individual

Maureen F. Dollard; Anthony H. Winefield

1996-01-01

169

Stress Management Training for Hospice Personnel: An Exploratory Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is very little published research specifically addressing the stress management skills of hospice caregivers. In order to ascertain if breathing exercises, biofeedback training, relaxation exercises, and cognitive therapy would be beneficial, pre- and post-treatment questionnaires and six 30-minute treatment sessions were administered to…

Clark, Susan; And Others

170

Employee Assistance Programmes: The Emperor's New Clothes of Stress Management?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the employee assistance program (EAP), a benefit increasingly provided by United Kingdom employers that claims to reduce the effects of stress on individuals and organizations, provide a management tool to improve workplace performance and productivity, and respond to critical incidents. Describes EAPs, their history, development and…

Arthur, Andrew R.

2000-01-01

171

Influence of nutritional stress on digestive enzyme activities in juveniles of two marine clam species, Ruditapes decussatus and Venerupis pullastra  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The potential use of digestive activities as indicators of the nutritional status in bivalves is discussed in relation to the results obtained in two clam species exposed to starvation and refeeding. Activities of some digestive enzymes (amylase, laminarinase, cellulase, and protease) were measured in juveniles of two commercially interesting species of clams, Ruditapes decussatus and Venerupis pullastra. The specimens were fed normally, being after subjected to a 15-days starvation and a further refeeding period. Samples were obtained at different moments of such feeding schedule to evaluate enzymes as well as weight (live, dry and organic) and length, in order to calculate growth rates and feeding efficiencies. Starvation led to a major decrease in clam growth as measured by dry weight and a negative growth as measured by organic weight, this coinciding with a certain degree of growth of the shell and a consumption of soft tissue. This response occurred more rapidly in R. decussatus but was of a lower magnitude than in V. pullastra. Activity of carbohydrases decreased rapidly in both species with starvation, although protease activity was maintained in R. decussatus. Recovery after the end of starvation was not similar in both species; while R. decussatus attained similar growth rates and enzyme activities to those measured prior to nutritional stress, V. pullastra only recovered 50% of its initial values. For both species of bivalves it can be concluded that digestive enzymes, and more specifically amylase, could be used as indicative of their nutritional condition.

Albentosa, Marina; Moyano, Francisco J.

2008-08-01

172

The Involvement of Glutamate Metabolism in the Resistance to Thermal, Nutritional, and Oxidative Stress in Trypanosoma cruzi  

PubMed Central

The inhibition of some glutamate metabolic pathways could lead to diminished parasite survival. In this study, the effects of L-methionine sulfoximine (MS), DL-methionine sulfone (MSO), and DL-methionine sulfoxide (MSE), three glutamate analogs, on several biological processes were evaluated. We found that these analogs inhibited the growth of epimastigotes cells and showed a synergistic effect with stress conditions such as temperature, nutritional starvation, and oxidative stress. The specific activity for the reductive amination of ?-ketoglutaric acid, catalyzed by the NADP+-linked glutamate dehydrogenase, showed an increase in the NADP+ levels, when MS, MSE, and MSO were added. It suggests an eventual conversion of the compounds tested by the T. cruzi cells. The fact that trypomastigote bursting was not significantly inhibited when infected cells were treated with these compounds, remarks the existence of relevant metabolic differences among the different life-cycle stages. It must be considered when proposing a new therapeutic drug. PMID:21629861

Magdaleno, Anahi; Suarez Mantilla, Brian; Rocha, Sandra C.; Pral, Elizabeth M. F.; Silber, Ariel M.

2011-01-01

173

Nutrition management guideline for maple syrup urine disease: an evidence- and consensus-based approach.  

PubMed

In an effort to increase harmonization of care and enable outcome studies, the Genetic Metabolic Dietitians International (GMDI) and the Southeast Regional Newborn Screening and Genetics Collaborative (SERC) are partnering to develop nutrition management guidelines for inherited metabolic disorders (IMD) using a model combining both evidence- and consensus-based methodology. The first guideline to be completed is for maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). This report describes the methodology used in its development: formulation of five research questions; review, critical appraisal and abstraction of peer-reviewed studies and unpublished practice literature; and expert input through Delphi surveys and a nominal group process. This report includes the summary statements for each research question and the nutrition management recommendations they generated. Each recommendation is followed by a standardized rating based on the strength of the evidence and consensus used. The application of technology to build the infrastructure for this project allowed transparency during development of this guideline and will be a foundation for future guidelines. Online open access of the full, published guideline allows utilization by health care providers, researchers, and collaborators who advise, advocate and care for individuals with MSUD and their families. There will be future updates as warranted by developments in research and clinical practice. PMID:24881969

Frazier, Dianne M; Allgeier, Courtney; Homer, Caroline; Marriage, Barbara J; Ogata, Beth; Rohr, Frances; Splett, Patricia L; Stembridge, Adrya; Singh, Rani H

2014-07-01

174

Effects of a Stress Management workshop on perceived stress, state anxiety, and self-efficacy in counselors-in-training  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the effects of a Stress Management workshop on perceived stress, state anxiety, and self-efficacy in counselors-in-training. It was hypothesized the stress management workshop with verbal persuasion e-mail messages would have a positive effect on decreasing perceived stress and state anxiety, while enhancing self-efficacy in counselors-in-training. The study participants were the practicum students from Spring\\/Summer and Fall, 2008

Vida Ann-Nicholas Fiorentino

2009-01-01

175

Hyperspectral imaging of oil producing microalgae under thermal and nutritional stress.  

SciTech Connect

This short-term, late-start LDRD examined the effects of nutritional deprivation on the energy harvesting complex in microalgae. While the original experimental plan involved a much more detailed study of temperature and nutrition on the antenna system of a variety of TAG producing algae and their concomitant effects on oil production, time and fiscal constraints limited the scope of the study. This work was a joint effort between research teams at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico and California. Preliminary results indicate there is a photosystem response to silica starvation in diatoms that could impact the mechanisms for lipid accumulation.

Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Davis, Ryan W.; Ricken, James Bryce; Powell, Amy Jo; Keenan, Michael Robert

2008-09-01

176

Occupational Stress in Secondary Education in Cyprus: Causes, Symptoms, Consequences and Stress Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The survey attempted to look into the causes, symptoms and consequences that occupational stress has on teachers in Secondary Education in Cyprus and find ways to manage it. Thirty eight schools with 553 teachers participated in the survey. The sample chosen is a result of a simple random sampling and it is representative of the country's…

Hadjisymeou, Georgia

2010-01-01

177

Stress fractures in female athletes. Diagnosis, management and rehabilitation.  

PubMed

Stress fractures are a common overuse injury among athletes. The incidence of stress fractures among females is higher in the military, but this difference is not as evident in the athletic population. The history of the patient with stress fracture is typically one of insidious onset of activity-related pain. If the patient continues to exercise, the pain may well become more severe or occur at an earlier stage of exercise. As well as obtaining a history of the patient's pain and its relation to exercise, it is important to determine the presence of predisposing factors. On physical examination, the most obvious feature is localised bony tenderness. Occasionally, redness, swelling or periosteal thickening may be present at the site of the stress fracture. The diagnosis of stress fracture is primarily a clinical one; however, if the diagnosis is uncertain, various imaging techniques can be used to confirm the diagnosis. In the majority of stress fractures, there is no obvious abnormality on plain radiograph. Although the triple phase bone radiograph is extremely sensitive, the fracture itself is not visualised and it may be difficult to precisely locate the site, especially in the foot. The radionuclide scan will detect evolving stress fractures at the stage of accelerated remodelling, so the findings must be closely correlated with the clinical picture. The characteristic bone scan appearance of a stress fracture is of a sharply marginated area of increased uptake, usually involving one cortex of the bone. Computerised tomography scanning is a helpful addition if the fracture needs to be visualised, or to distinguish between a stress reaction and stress fracture. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is being used increasingly as the investigation of choice for stress fractures. The typical findings on MRI are of periosteal and marrow oedema, as well as fracture line. The basis of treatment of a stress fracture involves rest from the aggravating activity. Most stress fractures will heal in a straightforward manner, and return to sport occurs within 6 to 8 weeks. The rate of resumption of activity should be influenced by symptoms and physical findings. When free of pain, the aggravating activity can be resumed and slowly increased. It is important that the athlete with a stress fracture maintain fitness during this period of rehabilitation. The most commonly used methods are cycling, swimming, upper body weights and water running. There are a number of specific stress fractures that require additional treatment because of a tendency to develop delayed union or nonunion. These include stress fractures of the neck of the femur, anterior cortex of the tibia, navicular and second and fifth metatarsals. An essential component of the management of stress fractures, as with any overuse injury, involves identification of the factors that have contributed to the injury and, where possible, correction or modification of some of these factors to reduce the risk of the injury recurring. Stress fractures are more common in female athletes with menstrual disturbances. This may be due to the effect on bone density. The role of hormonal replacement in the management of these athletes is unclear at this stage. PMID:9421865

Brukner, P; Bennell, K

1997-12-01

178

Stress and Reproductive Hormones in Grizzly Bears Reflect Nutritional Benefits and Social Consequences of a Salmon Foraging Niche  

PubMed Central

Physiological indicators of social and nutritional stress can provide insight into the responses of species to changes in food availability. In coastal British Columbia, Canada, grizzly bears evolved with spawning salmon as an abundant but spatially and temporally constrained food source. Recent and dramatic declines in salmon might have negative consequences on bear health and ultimately fitness. To examine broadly the chronic endocrine effects of a salmon niche, we compared cortisol, progesterone, and testosterone levels in hair from salmon-eating bears from coastal BC (n?=?75) with the levels in a reference population from interior BC lacking access to salmon (n?=?42). As predicted, testosterone was higher in coastal bears of both sexes relative to interior bears, possibly reflecting higher social density on the coast mediated by salmon availability. We also investigated associations between the amount of salmon individual bears consumed (as measured by stable isotope analysis) and cortisol and testosterone in hair. Also as predicted, cortisol decreased with increasing dietary salmon and was higher after a year of low dietary salmon than after a year of high dietary salmon. These findings at two spatial scales suggest that coastal bears might experience nutritional or social stress in response to on-going salmon declines, providing novel insights into the effects of resource availability on fitness-related physiology. PMID:24312230

Bryan, Heather M.; Darimont, Chris T.; Paquet, Paul C.; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine E.; Smits, Judit E. G.

2013-01-01

179

Stress and reproductive hormones in grizzly bears reflect nutritional benefits and social consequences of a salmon foraging niche.  

PubMed

Physiological indicators of social and nutritional stress can provide insight into the responses of species to changes in food availability. In coastal British Columbia, Canada, grizzly bears evolved with spawning salmon as an abundant but spatially and temporally constrained food source. Recent and dramatic declines in salmon might have negative consequences on bear health and ultimately fitness. To examine broadly the chronic endocrine effects of a salmon niche, we compared cortisol, progesterone, and testosterone levels in hair from salmon-eating bears from coastal BC (n?=?75) with the levels in a reference population from interior BC lacking access to salmon (n?=?42). As predicted, testosterone was higher in coastal bears of both sexes relative to interior bears, possibly reflecting higher social density on the coast mediated by salmon availability. We also investigated associations between the amount of salmon individual bears consumed (as measured by stable isotope analysis) and cortisol and testosterone in hair. Also as predicted, cortisol decreased with increasing dietary salmon and was higher after a year of low dietary salmon than after a year of high dietary salmon. These findings at two spatial scales suggest that coastal bears might experience nutritional or social stress in response to on-going salmon declines, providing novel insights into the effects of resource availability on fitness-related physiology. PMID:24312230

Bryan, Heather M; Darimont, Chris T; Paquet, Paul C; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine E; Smits, Judit E G

2013-01-01

180

RISK MANAGEMENT OF SEDIMENT STRESS: A FRAMEWORK FOR SEDIMENT RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH  

EPA Science Inventory

Research related to the ecological risk management of sediment stress in watersheds is placed under a common conceptual framework in order to help promote the timely advance of decision support methods for aquatic resource managers and watershed-level planning. The proposed risk ...

181

An Examination of the Effects of Stress Management Training for Japanese College Students of Social Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of a stress-management program for college students of social work on their perception of mental stress and stress-coping strategies. Students in a stress-management group received progressive muscle training, cognitive-behavioral skills training, and assertion training for 14 weeks. Their life events, stress symptoms, and stress-coping skills (active and passive coping

Kumi Hirokawa; Akihiro Yagi; Yo Miyata

2002-01-01

182

Coaches are people too: An applied model of stress management for sports coaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the growing concern over stress among sports coaches. In particular, it provides an applied model of stress management in coaching which explores some of the significant causes of stress and outlines a five-step stress management program designed to address the special needs and concerns of coaches. The model is based on an integration of previous theoretical and

Jim Taylor

1992-01-01

183

Expanding research to provide an evidence base for nutritional interventions for the management of inborn errors of metabolism?  

PubMed Central

A trans-National Institutes of Health initiative, Nutrition and Dietary Supplement Interventions for Inborn Errors of Metabolism (NDSI-IEM), was launched in 2010 to identify gaps in knowledge regarding the safety and utility of nutritional interventions for the management of inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) that need to be filled with evidence-based research. IEM include inherited biochemical disorders in which specific enzyme defects interfere with the normal metabolism of exogenous (dietary) or endogenous protein, carbohydrate, or fat. For some of these IEM, effective management depends primarily on nutritional interventions. Further research is needed to demonstrate the impact of nutritional interventions on individual health outcomes and on the psychosocial issues identified by patients and their families. A series of meetings and discussions were convened to explore the current United States’ funding and regulatory infrastructure and the challenges to the conduct of research for nutritional interventions for the management of IEM. Although the research and regulatory infrastructure are well-established, a collaborative pathway that includes the professional and advocacy rare disease community and federal regulatory and research agencies will be needed to overcome current barriers. PMID:23806236

Camp, Kathryn M.; Lloyd-Puryear, Michele A.; Yao, Lynne; Groft, Stephen C.; Parisi, Melissa A.; Mulberg, Andrew; Gopal-Srivastava, Rashmi; Cederbaum, Stephen; Enns, Gregory M.; Ershow, Abby G.; Frazier, Dianne M.; Gohagan, John; Harding, Cary; Howell, R. Rodney; Regan, Karen; Stacpoole, Peter W.; Venditti, Charles; Vockley, Jerry; Watson, Michael; Coates, Paul M.

2014-01-01

184

A Framework for Facilitating Stress Management Educational Groups for Police Officers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social workers provide a variety of stress management interventions to police officers and their families. Educational groups can be useful for providing information regarding stress management interventions. The purpose of this article is to describe a framework for facilitating stress management educational groups for police officers. The framework was developed and implemented to inform officers about sources and types of

George T. Patterson

2008-01-01

185

Trait Anxiety Reductions in a Substance Abuse Population Trained in Stress Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated a stress management training program for 11 hospitalized drug-abusing patients, compared to a control group in different psychotherapy programs. Results indicated that the stress management treatment group produced significant decreases in trait anxiety. Subjects used the stress management techniques to overcome insomnia, anger, and…

Charlesworth, Edward A.; Dempsey, George

1982-01-01

186

Optimizing the Effects of Stress Management Interventions in HIV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scott-Sheldon, Kalichman, Carey, and Fiedler (2008) present a thoughtful, important, and timely meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of stress management interventions in HIV. They differentiate controlled effect sizes across classes of acute outcomes including psychological distress, psychosocial processes, biological processes (immune status, viral, and hormonal) and fatigue. The authors join Scott-Sheldon et al., in considering future directions for this type

Conall OCleirigh; Steven Safren

2008-01-01

187

Assessment and management of nutrition in older people and its importance to health  

PubMed Central

Nutrition is an important element of health in the older population and affects the aging process. The prevalence of malnutrition is increasing in this population and is associated with a decline in: functional status, impaired muscle function, decreased bone mass, immune dysfunction, anemia, reduced cognitive function, poor wound healing, delayed recovery from surgery, higher hospital readmission rates, and mortality. Older people often have reduced appetite and energy expenditure, which, coupled with a decline in biological and physiological functions such as reduced lean body mass, changes in cytokine and hormonal level, and changes in fluid electrolyte regulation, delay gastric emptying and diminish senses of smell and taste. In addition pathologic changes of aging such as chronic diseases and psychological illness all play a role in the complex etiology of malnutrition in older people. Nutritional assessment is important to identify and treat patients at risk, the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool being commonly used in clinical practice. Management requires a holistic approach, and underlying causes such as chronic illness, depression, medication and social isolation must be treated. Patients with physical or cognitive impairment require special care and attention. Oral supplements or enteral feeding should be considered in patients at high risk or in patients unable to meet daily requirements. PMID:20711440

Ahmed, Tanvir; Haboubi, Nadim

2010-01-01

188

Staff burn-out prevention and stress management.  

PubMed

In many ways, adolescent seasonal camp staff are asked to do what no parent would likely be capable of doing: to be best friend, role model, and risk manager for a group of young strangers. The high expectations for camp responsibility converge at a time when the developmental stages of most camp staff and their growing skill sets may be most challenged. What we ask of seasonal staff may, in fact, be at direct odds with their developmental capabilities as adolescents. This conflict may be a primary source of daily hassle-type stress, which has been shown to have tremendous impact on health and general well-being. To help prevent or, at least, mitigate this impact, the combination of administrative structure, supervisory support, and peer and self-care is critical to staff development. This article provides a brief exploration of the developmental stages and capabilities of seasonal staff and, an overview of methods to support and empower staff while on the job to help prevent burnout and encourage stress management. The focus of this article is on mechanical and procedural prevention as a stress management tool. PMID:17823059

Paisley, Karen; Powell, Gwynn M

2007-10-01

189

Psychosomatic symptoms of Japanese working women and their need for stress management.  

PubMed

This study was conducted to clarify Japanese female workers' psychosomatic symptoms including women-specific complaints and their need for stress management as part of occupational health services (OHS). In 1997, a survey was conducted in which a questionnaire was sent to 1108 full-time female workers. The response rate was 92.1%. They classified their own health status excellent (26.0%), good (60.4%), fair (9.6%), or bad (1.6%). They also reported their irritability (25.3%) and depression (15.6%). There were high rates of complaints of eye discomfort (53.6%), fatigue (44.1%), headache (43.0%), and menstrual pain (32.5%). Such symptoms were associated with irritability or depression. Amount of overtime works, marital status in the 30-44 age group, the presence of children were found to be important factors in determining health status. Regarding the needs for occupational health services, 22.2% of respondents answered they needed mental health management (MHM). Compared with other services, such as management of lifestyle diseases, gynecological diseases, cancer screenings and counseling on nutrition and exercise, the need for MHM was low. The preferred personnel were female doctors and nurses. Workers who performed frequent overtime work had a greater need for MHM. The most preferred means of receiving MHM was personal counseling by doctors (not psychologists) and nurses. PMID:10319574

Araki, Y; Muto, T; Asakura, T

1999-04-01

190

Stress and Nutrition During Alcohol Dependence And Withdrawal: A Rat Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

During attempts to achieve and maintain sobriety, humans with a history of alcohol dependence struggle with symptoms including stress hypersensitivity and eating disruption. Rat models can help to develop treatment protocols that ease symptoms and thus increase the likelihood of success. The present study examined: how protracted alcohol exposure affects chow consumption and body weight; withdrawal stress; and whether exposure

Patricia ONeill

2003-01-01

191

Using Biofeedback while Immersed in a Stressful Videogame Increases the Effectiveness of Stress Management Skills in Soldiers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assessed the efficacy of using visual and auditory biofeedback while immersed in a tridimensional videogame to practice a stress management skill (tactical breathing). All 41 participants were soldiers who had previously received basic stress management training and first aid training in combat. On the first day, they received a 15-minute refresher briefing and were randomly assigned to either:

Stéphane Bouchard; François Bernier; Éric Boivin; Brian Morin; Genevičve Robillard

2012-01-01

192

Phytoplasma-Responsive microRNAs Modulate Hormonal, Nutritional, and Stress Signalling Pathways in Mexican Lime Trees  

PubMed Central

Background Witches’ broom disease of Mexican lime (Citrus aurantifolia L.), which is associated to the phytoplasma ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia’, is a devastating disease that results in significant economic losses. Plants adapt to biotic stresses by regulating gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a recently identified family of molecules that regulate plant responses to environmental stresses through post-transcriptional gene silencing. Methods Using a high-throughput approach to sequence small RNAs, we compared the expression profiles of miRNAs in healthy Mexican lime trees and in plants infected with ‘Ca. P. aurantifolia’. Results Our results demonstrated the involvement of different miRNAs in the response of Mexican lime trees to infection by ‘Ca. P. aurantifolia’. We identified miRNA families that are expressed differentially upon infection with phytoplasmas. Most of the miRNAs had variants with small sequence variations (isomiRs), which are expressed differentially in response to pathogen infection. Conclusions It is likely that the miRNAs that are expressed differentially in healthy and phytoplasma-infected Mexican lime trees are involved in coordinating the regulation of hormonal, nutritional, and stress signalling pathways, and the complex interactions between them. Future research to elucidate the roles of these miRNAs should improve our understanding of the level of diversity of specific plant responses to phytoplasmas. PMID:23824690

Mohseni Fard, Ehsan; Karimi Farsad, Laleh; Khayam Nekouei, Mojtaba; Mardi, Mohsen; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

2013-01-01

193

Bacteria modulate the degree of amphimix of their symbiotic entomopathogenic nematodes (Heterohabditis spp) in response to nutritional stress  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Facultatively sexual entomopathogenic nematodes are a promising model for the experimental study of the adaptive values of sex. Our experiments in the laboratory showed that entomopathogenic nematodes display at least two different strategies in regulating the degree of amphimix as a response to nutritional stress. One strategy promotes the production of males, amphimix and the genetic variability of the offspring, improving the chances for a successful new adaptation. Another strategy increases the production of hermaphrodites at the expense of males, increasing the total number of reproductive individuals and thus the total number of offspring produced. Surprisingly, the strategy used depends upon the strain of symbiotic bacteria the nematodes are growing. The relevance of the results, in helping to discriminate between rival theories for the evolutionary maintenance of sex, is discussed.

Rincones, Johana; Mauléon, Hervé; Jaffe, Klaus

2001-06-01

194

Interreality in the management of psychological stress: a clinical scenario.  

PubMed

The term "psychological stress" describes a situation in which a subject perceives that environmental demands tax or exceed his or her adaptive capacity. According to the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the best validated approach covering both stress management and stress treatment is the Cognitive Behavioral (CBT) approach. We aim to design, develop and test an advanced ICT based solution for the assessment and treatment of psychological stress that is able to improve the actual CBT approach. To reach this goal we will use the "interreality" paradigm integrating assessment and treatment within a hybrid environment, that creates a bridge between the physical and virtual worlds. Our claim is that bridging virtual experiences (fully controlled by the therapist, used to learn coping skills and emotional regulation) with real experiences (allowing both the identification of any critical stressors and the assessment of what has been learned) using advanced technologies (virtual worlds, advanced sensors and PDA/mobile phones) is the best way to address the above limitations. To illustrate the proposed concept, a clinical scenario is also presented and discussed: Paola, a 45 years old nurse, with a mother affected by progressive senile dementia. PMID:20543263

Riva, Giuseppe; Raspelli, Simona; Pallavicini, Federica; Grassi, Alessandra; Algeri, Davide; Wiederhold, Brenda K; Gaggioli, Andrea

2010-01-01

195

Nutrition, management and other environmental influences on the quality and production of mohair and cashmere: A review with particular reference to mediterranean and annual temperate climatic zones  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goat fibre production is affected by genetic and environmental influences. Environmental influences which are the subject of this review include bio–geophysical factors (photoperiod, climate–herbage system and soil–plant trace nutrient composition), nutrition factors and management factors. Nutrition and management influences discussed include rate of stocking, supplementary feeding of energy and protein, liveweight change, parturition and management during shearing. While experimental data

B. A McGregor

1998-01-01

196

Effectiveness of Stress Management Skill Training on the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Levels in Drug Addicts after Drug Withdrawal  

PubMed Central

Background Stressful life events may cause initiation of drug use among people. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of stress management skill training on depression, anxiety and stress levels in drug addicts after withdrawal. Objectives The population included all drug addicts after withdrawal in 2012 in Alborz province. Materials and Methods The study was quasi-experimental with pretest-posttest design with a control group. Levels of emotional reactions (depression, anxiety and stress) in all referrals to a counseling center for drug withdrawal in 2012 using the Depression, Anxiety, Stress (DASS-21) questionnaire was assessed. The study population included drug addicts after withdrawal. The sampling method was available sampling and random assignment. Thirty people who had higher emotional reactions were randomly selected and divided into two test (n = 15) and control (n = 15) groups. For the test group, a stress management skill training course was held in twelve 90-minute sessions, but the control group received no intervention. The obtained data were analyzed using SPSS-19 software with analysis of covariance. Results The results showed that stress management skill training has a significant effect on reducing emotional reactions (P < 0.01). It was noted that after 2 months test group follow-up, stress management training has retained its effect. Conclusion Apparently, training addicts about life skills, particularly stress management seems to be a good idea. PMID:24971280

Habibi, Zahra; Tourani, Somayeh; Sadeghi, Hasan; Abolghasemi, Abbass

2013-01-01

197

Nutritional management of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity and pharmacologic therapies to facilitate weight loss.  

PubMed

Diet plays an integral role in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Unfortunately, many patients with T2DM do not have access to a registered dietitian or certified diabetes educator, and rates of physician counseling about diet remain low. This article provides an overview of the current recommendations for the nutritional management of T2DM, which are endorsed by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Medical nutrition therapy, which provides a flexible and individualized approach to diet, emphasizes the total number (rather than the type) of carbohydrate consumed. Because fat intake also affects glycemia and cardiovascular risk, a reduction in daily mono- and polyunsaturated fat intake is recommended for most patients with T2DM. Weight loss plays an important adjunct role in treating patients with T2DM, because the majority of individuals with T2DM are overweight or obese. Patient lifestyle modification, which encompasses diet, physical activity, and behavioral therapy, can be used to facilitate weight loss in conjunction with several different dietary approaches. These include low-carbohydrate, low-fat, low-glycemic index, and Mediterranean diets. Studies have demonstrated that modest weight loss (5%-10% of body weight) is associated with significant improvements in patient measures of glycemic control, lipids, blood pressure, and other cardiovascular risk factors. Furthermore, a modest weight loss of as little as 4.5 kg can result in reducing the glycated hemoglobin level by approximately 0.5%. Pharmacologic agents, when combined with these approaches, may further augment weight loss. Familiarity with these principles can help physicians provide dietary counseling to their patients with T2DM and obesity. PMID:24393761

Vetter, Marion L; Amaro, Anastassia; Volger, Sheri

2014-01-01

198

The Effects of a High School Stress Management Unit on Student's Heart Rate and Muscle Tension.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attempted to determine effectiveness of three-week stress management unit for high school students. Measures of heart rate and muscle tension were used to determine the amount of control demonstrated during a period of relaxation and a period of induced stress. Results of the study indicate that a stress management unit for high school students…

Richardson, Glenn E.; And Others

1982-01-01

199

A Systematic Review of Stress-Management Programs for Medical Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Because medical students experience a considerable amount of stress during training, academic leaders have recognized the importance of developing stress-management programs for medical students. The authors set out to identify all controlled trials of stress-management interventions and determine the efficacy of those interventions.…

Shiralkar, Malan T.; Harris, Toi B.; Eddins-Folensbee, Florence F.; Coverdale, John H.

2013-01-01

200

Stress Management for Special Educators: The Self-Administered Tool for Awareness and Relaxation (STAR)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Self-Administered Tool for Awareness and Relaxation (STAR) is a stress management strategy designed to facilitate awareness of the physical, mental, emotional, and physiological effects of stress through the interconnectedness of the brain, body, and emotions. The purpose of this article is to present a stress-management model for teachers,…

Williams, Krista; Poel, Elissa Wolfe

2006-01-01

201

Oxidative stress protection and vulnerability in aging: putative nutritional implications for intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research indicates that vulnerability to oxidative stress (OSV) may increase in aging, suggesting that age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or vascular dementia (VAD) may be superimposed upon a vulnerable neuronal environment. Determinations in cell models have suggested that the enhanced OSV may be the result of, (a) increases in membrane lipids, especially sphingomyelin and the sphingomyelin metabolite,

J. A Joseph; N. A Denisova; D Bielinski; D. R Fisher; B Shukitt-Hale

2000-01-01

202

Judgment and decision making under stress: an overview for emergency managers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses human judgment and decision making under stress. The authors review selected recent literature across various disciplines and suggest a definition of stress within the context of decision making during the management of emergencies. They also discuss fieldwork by the Pittsburgh Research Laboratory, NIOSH, which explores traumatic incident stress, the relationship between previous training and performance under stressful

Kathleen M. Kowalski-Trakofler; Charles Vaught; Ted Scharf

2003-01-01

203

Nutrition Management of School Age Children with Special Needs: A Resource Manual for School Personnel, Families, and Health Professionals. Second Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide is intended to help school personnel facilitate the management of special diets and nutrition education in the school curriculum in accordance with requirements of the National School Lunch Act, the Child Nutrition Act, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504), and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. After the introduction,…

Horsley, Janet W.; Allen, Elizabeth R.; Daniel, Patricia White

204

Management of Stress in Corrections. Participant's Handbook. Criminal Justice Research Utilization Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This handbooks for participants contains materials for a three-day workshop on stress management in corrections. The workshop is intended for correctional administrators and managers, to enable them to produce a stress-management plan for identifying and remedying such problems as employee disability, alcoholism, drug abuse, and distressed…

Dahl, James J.

205

Management of intestinal failure in inflammatory bowel disease: Small intestinal transplantation or home parenteral nutrition?  

PubMed Central

Inflammatory bowel disease and Crohn’s disease in particular, is a common cause of intestinal failure. Current therapeutic options include home parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation. For most patients, home intravenous therapy including parenteral nutrition, with a good probability of long-term survival, is the favoured choice. However, in selected patients, with specific features that may shorten survival or complicate home parenteral nutrition, intestinal transplantation presents a viable alternative. We present survival, complications, quality of life and economic considerations that currently influence individualised decision-making between home parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation. PMID:24696601

Harrison, Elizabeth; Allan, Philip; Ramu, Amrutha; Vaidya, Anil; Travis, Simon; Lal, Simon

2014-01-01

206

Lysosomal responses to nutritional and contaminant stress in mussel hepatopancreatic digestive cells: a modelling study.  

PubMed

The lysosomal system occupies a central and crucial role in cellular food degradation (intracellular digestion), toxic responses and internal turnover (autophagy) of the hepatopancreatic digestive cell of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. Understanding the dynamic response of this system requires factors affecting performance, conceived as a function of the throughput, degradative efficiency and lysosomal membrane stability, to be defined and quantified. A previous carbon/nitrogen flux model has been augmented by separately identifying lysosomal 'target' material (autophagocytosed or endocytosed proteins, carbohydrates and lipids) and 'internal' material (digestive enzymes and lipid membrane components). Additionally, the whole cell's energetic costs for maintaining lysosomal pH and production of these internal components have been incorporated, as has the potentially harmful effect of generation of lipofuscin on the transitory and semi-permanent lysosomal constituents. Inclusion of the three classes of nutrient organic compounds at the whole cell level allows for greater range in the simulated response, including deamination of amino acids to provide molecules as a source of energy, as well as controlling nitrogen and carbon concentrations in the cytosol. Coupled with a more functional framework of pollutant driven reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and antioxidant defence, the separate and combined effects of three stressors (nutritional quality, nutrient quantity and a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon [PAH-phenanthrene]) on the digestive cell are simulated and compare favourably with real data. PMID:16730788

McVeigh, Allan; Moore, Michael; Allen, J Icarus; Dyke, Phil

2006-07-01

207

Effects of organizational attributes on adoption of technology for supply chain management in large school nutrition programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

School operators are looking for ways to improve efficiency by reducing costs. One approach is to examine costs along the supply chain using technology to reduce identified costs. The purpose of this study was to identify key attributes that affect a school nutrition program's willingness to adopt technology for supply chain management (SCM).\\u000aA survey design was used to gather

Julie Ann Boettger

2009-01-01

208

NUTRITIONAL MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH HEAD AND NECK CANCER: INTEGRATING RESEARCH INTO PRACTICE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Malnutrition is known to be a problem in head and neck cancer throughout all phases of treatment and rehabilitation. Nutrition interventions have demonstrated beneficial intermediate outcomes. Despite this, nutrition services for this patient group are not consistent across Australia. Routine screening procedures should be implemented in multidisciplinary head and neck clinics and treatment areas to identify patients who are at

Wendy Davidson; Elisabeth Isenring; Teresa Brown; Bena Riddle

209

College Students and Stress Management: Utilizing Biofeedback and Relaxation Skills Training.  

E-print Network

??ABSTRACT College Students and Stress Management: Utilizing Biofeedback and Relaxation Skills Training Shannon Jones Anstead Department of Counseling Psychology and Special Education Education Specialist This… (more)

Anstead, Shannon Jones

2009-01-01

210

Use the Nutrition Facts Label  

MedlinePLUS

... For Health Professionals Tools and Resources Promotional Materials Programming Materials Weight Management Nutrition Physical Activity Reduce Screen ... Training For Health Professionals Tools & Resources Promotional ... Materials Weight Management Nutrition Physical Activity Reduce Screen ...

211

Stressful Dieting: Nutritional Conditions but Not Compensatory Growth Elevate Corticosterone Levels in Zebra Finch Nestlings and Fledglings  

PubMed Central

Unfavourable conditions throughout the period of parental care can severely affect growth, reproductive performance, and survival. Yet, individuals may be affected differently, depending on the developmental period during which constraints are experienced. Here we tested whether the nestling phase compared to the fledgling phase is more susceptible to nutritional stress by considering biometry, physiology, sexually selected male ornaments and survival using zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) as a model species. As nestlings (day 0–17) or fledglings (day 17–35), subjects were raised either on low or high quality food. A low quality diet resulted in significantly elevated baseline corticosterone titres in both nestlings and fledglings. Subjects showed substantial compensatory growth after they had experienced low quality food as nestlings but catch-up growth did neither lead to elevated baseline corticosterone titres nor did we detect long term effects on biometry, male cheek patch, or survival. The compensation for temporally unfavourable environmental conditions reflects substantial phenotypic plasticity and the results show that costs of catch-up growth were not mediated via corticosterone as a physiological correlate of allostatic load. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms and plasticity with which animals respond to periods of constraints during development as they may occur in a mistiming of breeding. PMID:20927394

Honarmand, Mariam; Goymann, Wolfgang; Naguib, Marc

2010-01-01

212

The effect of the ALAnerv nutritional supplement on some oxidative stress markers in postacute stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation.  

PubMed

Stroke is a pathologic condition associated with redox imbalance. This pilot study was designed to evaluate the effect of the consumption of the nutritional supplement ALAnerv on some oxidative stress markers in postacute stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation. To achieve this goal, we assigned 28 patients to 2 study groups: (-)ALA and (+)ALA. Patients in both groups participated in the same rehabilitation program and received comparable standard medications; however, patients in the (+)ALA group received ALAnerv for 2 weeks (2 pills per day). We assessed total and nonproteic thiols, protein carbonyls, ceruloplasmin, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles, lipid hydroperoxide concentrations, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity, and total antioxidant capacity. Regression analysis indicated that supplementation with ALAnerv was responsible for the significant decrease in glucose (p = 0.002) and oxidized LDL particles (p < 0.001) during the study period. For both parameters, the variation in the percent of concentration between the 2 groups during the study period reached statistical significance (p = 0.012 and p < 0.001, respectively). Moreover, Barthel Index values at discharge were significantly influenced by ALAnerv treatment. These preliminary results indicate that ALAnerv might be helpful because it rapidly corrects plasma fasting glucose and corrects serum oxidized LDL particle concentrations, suggesting the need for longer treatment with 2 pills or more per day. PMID:23724877

Oprea, Eliza; Berteanu, Mihai; Cinteză, Delia; Manolescu, Bogdan Nicolae

2013-06-01

213

Reproduction and nutritional stress are risk factors for Hendra virus infection in little red flying foxes (Pteropus scapulatus)  

PubMed Central

Hendra virus (HeV) is a lethal paramyxovirus which emerged in humans in 1994. Poor understanding of HeV dynamics in Pteropus spp. (flying fox or fruit bat) reservoir hosts has limited our ability to determine factors driving its emergence. We initiated a longitudinal field study of HeV in little red flying foxes (LRFF; Pteropus scapulatus) and examined individual and population risk factors for infection, to determine probable modes of intraspecific transmission. We also investigated whether seasonal changes in host behaviour, physiology and demography affect host–pathogen dynamics. Data showed that pregnant and lactating females had significantly higher risk of infection, which may explain previously observed temporal associations between HeV outbreaks and flying fox birthing periods. Age-specific seroprevalence curves generated from field data imply that HeV is transmitted horizontally via faeces, urine or saliva. Rapidly declining seroprevalence between two field seasons suggests that immunity wanes faster in LRFF than in other flying fox species, and highlights the potentially critical role of this species in interspecific viral persistence. The highest seroprevalence was observed when animals showed evidence of nutritional stress, suggesting that environmental processes that alter flying fox food sources, such as habitat loss and climate change, may increase HeV infection and transmission. These insights into the ecology of HeV in flying fox populations suggest causal links between anthropogenic environmental change and HeV emergence. PMID:18198149

Plowright, Raina K; Field, Hume E; Smith, Craig; Divljan, Anja; Palmer, Carol; Tabor, Gary; Daszak, Peter; Foley, Janet E

2008-01-01

214

Heat stress and reduced plane of nutrition decreases intestinal integrity and function in pigs.  

PubMed

Heat stress can compromise intestinal integrity and induce leaky gut in a variety of species. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine if heat stress (HS) directly or indirectly (via reduced feed intake) increases intestinal permeability in growing pigs. We hypothesized that an increased heat-load causes physiological alterations to the intestinal epithelium, resulting in compromised barrier integrity and altered intestinal function that contributes to the overall severity of HS-related illness. Crossbred gilts (n=48, 43±4 kg BW) were housed in constant climate controlled rooms in individual pens and exposed to 1) thermal neutral (TN) conditions (20°C, 35-50% humidity) with ad libitum intake, 2) HS conditions (35°C, 20-35% humidity) with ad libitum feed intake, or 3) pair-fed in TN conditions (PFTN) to eliminate confounding effects of dissimilar feed intake. Pigs were sacrificed at 1, 3, or 7 d of environmental exposure and jejunum samples were mounted into modified Ussing chambers for assessment of transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and intestinal fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled lipopolysaccharide (LPS) permeability (expressed as apparent permeability coefficient, APP). Further, gene and protein markers of intestinal integrity and stress were assessed. Irrespective of d of HS exposure, plasma endotoxin levels increased 45% (P<0.05) in HS compared with TN pigs, while jejunum TER decreased 30% (P<0.05) and LPS APP increased 2-fold (P<0.01). Furthermore, d 7 HS pigs tended (P=0.06) to have increased LPS APP (41%) compared with PFTN controls. Lysozyme and alkaline phosphatase activity decreased (46 and 59%, respectively; P<0.05) over time in HS pigs, while the immune cell marker, myeloperoxidase activity, was increased (P<0.05) in the jejunum at d 3 and 7. These results indicate that both HS and reduced feed intake decrease intestinal integrity and increase endotoxin permeability. We hypothesize that these events may lead to increased inflammation, which might contribute to reduced pig performance during warm summer months. PMID:23989867

Pearce, S C; Mani, V; Weber, T E; Rhoads, R P; Patience, J F; Baumgard, L H; Gabler, N K

2013-11-01

215

Job Stress in Disaster Case Managers Working with Hurricane Ike Recovery  

E-print Network

resources. The purpose of this study was to evaluate stress levels of the disaster case managers employed through the ten smaller faith-based organizations that make up one of the larger recipient organizations providing case management services to victims...

Forman, Megan Hajecate

2011-10-21

216

Challenges in the nutrition and management of herbivores in the temperate zone.  

PubMed

The expected higher global demand for animal proteins and the competition for starch and sugars between food, fuel and feed seem to favour herbivores that convert solar energy captured in fibrous plants into animal products. However, the required higher production level of herbivores questions the sustainability of this conversion. An increase in herbivore production can be achieved by increasing the number of animals associated with the increasing demand of plant biomass or by improving the efficiency with which plant biomass is converted into meat and milk. The potential to increase food production by cattle, the main food-producing herbivore in the temperate zones outside China, was considered in three production systems: grassland-based, mixed rain-fed and mixed irrigated systems. The potential to increase plant biomass production in grassland-based systems seems limited, unless fertiliser is imported in large quantities and crop production is increased, sacrificing valuable, high-quality grasslands, which often conflicts with sustainable production methods. Also, in mixed systems with high inputs of fertiliser or water, improvements in plant biomass production seem marginal and the main challenges for these systems are in breeding high-quality plant biomass at lower levels of fertiliser and the use of new co-products from food processing and bio-based economies. Consequently, the main challenge in herbivore nutrition management is to improve the efficiency of plant biomass utilisation. Stocking rate management along with seasonal variation in the grazing capacity of grasslands and moderate use of fertiliser may increase meat production in grassland-based systems by 400%. Improving plant biomass utilisation in the more industrialised mixed rain-fed systems seems possible by better feed storage technologies and for dairy cattle by improving animal health and lifetime production level. Managing the transition period seems crucial to achieve more sustainable mixed rain-fed and mixed irrigated dairy production systems. Whether sustainable production methods will be implemented also depends on macro-economic conditions and awareness of regional and global environmental concerns. PMID:23031652

van Vuuren, A M; Chilibroste, P

2013-03-01

217

Management of post traumatic stress disorder after childbirth: a review.  

PubMed

Prevalence and risk factors for the development of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after childbirth is well described in the literature. However, its management and treatment has only begun to be investigated. The aim of this article is to describe the studies that examine the effects of interventions on PTSD after childbirth. MedLine, PILOTS, CINAHL and ISI Web of Science databases were systematically searched for randomised controlled trials, pilot studies and case studies using key words related to PTSD, childbirth, treatment and intervention. The reference lists of the retrieved articles were also used to supplement the search. A total of nine studies were retrieved. Seven studies that examined debriefing or counselling were identified; six randomised controlled trials and one pilot study. Also found were one case report describing the effects of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) on two women, and one pilot study of eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR). Overall, there is limited evidence concerning the management of women with PTSD after childbirth. The results agree with the findings from the non-childbirth related literature: debriefing and counselling are inconclusively effective while CBT and EMDR may improve PTSD status but require investigation in controlled trials before conclusions could be drawn. PMID:20653342

Lapp, Leann K; Agbokou, Catherine; Peretti, Charles-Siegfried; Ferreri, Florian

2010-09-01

218

Improved nutritional management of phenylketonuria by using a diet containing glycomacropeptide compared with amino acids  

PubMed Central

Background: Phenylketonuria (PKU) requires a lifelong low-phenylalanine diet that provides the majority of protein from a phenylalanine-free amino acid (AA) formula. Glycomacropeptide (GMP), an intact protein formed during cheese production, contains minimal phenylalanine. Objective: The objective was to investigate the effects of substituting GMP food products for the AA formula on acceptability, safety, plasma AA concentrations, and measures of protein utilization in subjects with PKU. Design: Eleven subjects participated in an inpatient metabolic study with two 4-d treatments: a current AA diet (AA diet) followed by a diet that replaced the AA formula with GMP (GMP diet) supplemented with limiting AAs. Plasma concentrations of AAs, blood chemistries, and insulin were measured and compared in AA (day 4) and GMP diets (day 8). Results: The GMP diet was preferred to the AA diet in 10 of 11 subjects with PKU, and there were no adverse reactions to GMP. There was no significant difference in phenylalanine concentration in postprandial plasma with the GMP diet compared with the AA diet. When comparing fasting with postprandial plasma, plasma phenalyalanine concentration increased significantly with the AA but not with the GMP diet. Blood urea nitrogen was significantly lower, which suggests decreased ureagenesis, and plasma insulin was higher with the GMP diet than with the AA diet. Conclusions: GMP, when supplemented with limiting AAs, is a safe and highly acceptable alternative to synthetic AAs as the primary protein source in the nutritional management of PKU. As an intact protein source, GMP improves protein retention and phenylalanine utilization compared with AAs. PMID:19244369

van Calcar, Sandra C; MacLeod, Erin L; Gleason, Sally T; Etzel, Mark R; Clayton, Murray K; Wolff, Jon A; Ney, Denise M

2009-01-01

219

Helping Children Manage Stress: A Guide for Adults.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

From birth--and possibly before--children are likely to encounter a considerable amount of stress generated by society. This book explains what adults can do to prevent and/or minimize the harmful consequences of stress for children. Part 1, "Understanding Stress in Children," explores the general causes of stress, with particular emphasis on…

Humphrey, James H.

220

Home parenteral nutrition in management of patients with severe radiation enteritis  

SciTech Connect

Five patients who would have been unable to survive because of intestinal complications of radiation therapy were able to lead an otherwise normal life with the use of parenteral nutrition administered at home. One patient died of recurrent carcinoma of the cervix after 14 months. Another patient died as the result of a totally avoidable pharmaceutical error after 2 1/2 years. The remaining three are still disease free without morbidity relating to the parenteral nutrition.

Lavery, I.C.; Steiger, E.; Fazio, V.W.

1980-03-01

221

Theoretical Foundations of Yoga Meditation: A Contribution to Self-Actualization and Stress Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent evidence purporting that stress contributes to the development of disorders ranging from depression to cancer to general immunological dysfunction suggests that a concise understanding of stress and stress management techniques is needed in order to develop efficacious interventions. What is needed is an effective, easy-to-learn technique…

Janowiak, John J.

222

Principals Responding to Constant Pressure: Finding a Source of Stress Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This conceptual article presents a review of the research concerning the stress level of principals over the past three decades, with emphasis on the occupational stress that principals encounter because of heightened accountability and expectations for student achievement. Mindfulness meditation, as a stress management intervention, provides the…

Wells, Caryn M.

2013-01-01

223

Building Coping Skills on a Firm Foundation: Using a Metaphorical Interface To Deliver Stress Management Instruction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the benefits of a metaphorical graphical user interface (GUI) and discusses how metaphorical interfaces can be used to deliver instruction on stress management. A computer-based instructional (CBI) program for college students was developed on the fundamentals of stress and the role of time management as a coping strategy. The…

Berkley, Jeannette; Cates, Ward Mitchell

224

European adolescents' level of perceived stress is inversely related to their diet quality: the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study.  

PubMed

As stress is hypothesised to influence dietary behaviour, the relationship between perceived stress and diet quality in European adolescents was investigated. Within the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study, adolescents (n 704, aged 12-17 years) from schools in five European cities (Ghent, Stockholm, Zaragoza, Athens and Vienna) completed a 2 d 24 h dietary recall assessment and an Adolescent Stress Questionnaire. Measurements and information were taken on height, weight, pubertal stage, parental education level, the level of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sleep duration. The Diet Quality Index for Adolescents (DQI-A) was calculated from the dietary data, which comprised three components reflecting dietary diversity, quality and equilibrium. Hierarchical linear models were performed to investigate the relationship between the adolescents' level of perceived stress and the DQI-A and its components, adjusting for relevant covariates (age, BMI z-score, pubertal stage and parental education). These models were additionally adjusted for MVPA or sleep duration. In both boys and girls, perceived stress was a significant independent negative predictor for their overall DQI-A. This inverse relationship was observed for all dietary components, except for dietary diversity in boys, and it was unaltered when additionally adjusted for MVPA or sleep duration. The observed inverse relationship between stress and diet quality within these European adolescents supports the hypothesis that stress influences dietary behaviour, thus emphasising the need for preventive stress-coping strategies for adolescents. PMID:22054044

De Vriendt, Tineke; Clays, Els; Huybrechts, Inge; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Moreno, Luis A; Patterson, Emma; Molnár, Dénes; Mesana, María I; Beghin, Laurent; Widhalm, Kurt; Manios, Yannis; De Henauw, Stefaan

2012-07-01

225

The effect of stress management training on stress and depression in women with depression disorders: Using cognitive-behavioral techniques  

PubMed Central

Background: The present study aimed to investigate the effect of stress management training through cognitive-behavioral techniques on stress, social adaptability and depression in women with depression disorders. Materials and Methods: In this study, 40 patients diagnosed with depression who had referred to psychiatry and consultation clinics of Isfahan were randomly selected and assigned to intervention and control groups (20 patients in each group). The intervention group received eight 90-min sessions of stress training through cognitive–behavioral techniques. Data collection tools included Cooper's stress questionnaire, Bell's social adaptability questionnaire and Hamilton's depression scale questionnaire. The participants completed the questionnaires before the intervention and 1 month after the same. Data analysis was performed using covariance analysis. Results: Based on the results, considering variables of stress, social adaptability and depression, the equal variance hypothesis was confirmed. The relationship between pre- and post-test scores on stress, social adaptability and depression was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The modified mean difference was F = 12.45, P < 0.001 on stress; F = 6.88, P < 0.01 on social adaptability; and F = 5.36, P < 0.02 on depression, all of which were significant. Conclusion: Stress management training through cognitive behavioral techniques can play a main role in depression reduction and development of social adaptability through modifying inappropriate social information-processing patterns. PMID:25077163

Abbasian, Farahzad; Najimi, Arash; Meftagh, Sayyed Davood; Ghasemi, Gholamreza; Afshar, Hamid

2014-01-01

226

The World Trade Center Attack: Helping the helpers: the role of critical incident stress management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Healthcare and prehospital workers involved in disaster response are susceptible to a variety of stress-related psychological and physical sequelae. Critical incident stress management, of which critical incident stress debriefing is a component, can mitigate the response to these stressors. Critical incident stress debriefing is a peer-driven, therapist-guided, structured, group intervention designed to accelerate the recovery of personnel. The attack on

Jeffrey Hammond; Jill Brooks

2001-01-01

227

Stress in Adults after a Disaster: Warning Signs and Management  

E-print Network

Experiencing a disaster can lead to erratic behavior, changes in mood, and even physical symptoms. The warning signs of post-disaster stress are explained in this publication. There are suggestions for helping victims deal with stress...

Warren, Judith L.

2005-09-30

228

NutriSonic web expert system for meal management and nutrition counseling with nutrient time-series analysis, e-food exchange and easy data transition.  

PubMed

This study was conducted to develop the NutriSonic Web Expert System for Meal Management and Nutrition Counseling with Analysis of User's Nutritive Changes of selected days and food exchange information with easy data transition. This program manipulates a food, menu and meal and search database that has been developed. Also, the system provides a function to check the user's nutritive change of selected days. Users can select a recommended general and therapeutic menu using this system. NutriSonic can analyze nutrients and e-food exchange ("e" means the food exchange data base calculated by a computer program) in menus and meals. The expert can insert and store a meal database and generate the synthetic information of age, sex and therapeutic purpose of disease. With investigation and analysis of the user's needs, the meal planning program on the internet has been continuously developed. Users are able to follow up their nutritive changes with nutrient information and ratio of 3 major energy nutrients. Also, users can download another data format like Excel files (.xls) for analysis and verify their nutrient time-series analysis. The results of analysis are presented quickly and accurately. Therefore it can be used by not only usual people, but also by dietitians and nutritionists who take charge of making a menu and experts in the field of food and nutrition. It is expected that the NutriSonic Web Expert System can be useful for nutrition education, nutrition counseling and expert meal management. PMID:20126376

Hong, Soon-Myung; Cho, Jee-Ye; Lee, Jin-Hee; Kim, Gon; Kim, Min-Chan

2008-01-01

229

Prepartum and postpartum nutritional management to optimize fertility in high-yielding dairy cows in confined TMR systems.  

PubMed

The 6 to 8-week period centered on parturition, known as the transition or periparturient period, is critical to welfare and profitability of individual cows. Fertility of high-producing cows is compromised by difficult transitions. Deficiencies in either nutritional or non-nutritional management increase risk for periparturient metabolic disorders and infectious diseases, which decrease subsequent fertility. A primary factor impeding fertility is the extent of negative energy balance (NEB) early postpartum, which may inhibit timing of first ovulation, return to cyclicity, and oocyte quality. In particular, pronounced NEB during the first 10 days to 2 weeks (the time of greatest occurrence of health problems) is critical for later reproductive efficiency. Avoiding over-conditioning and preventing cows from over-consuming energy relative to their requirements in late gestation result in higher dry matter intake (DMI) and less NEB after calving. A pooled statistical analysis of previous studies in our group showed that days to pregnancy are decreased (by 10 days) by controlling energy intake to near requirements of cows before calving compared with allowing cows to over-consume energy. To control energy intake, total mixed rations (TMR) must be well balanced for metabolizable protein, minerals and vitamins yet limit total DM consumed, and cows must uniformly consume the TMR without sorting. Dietary management to maintain blood calcium and rumen health around and after calving also are important. Opportunities may exist to further improve energy status in fresh cows. Recent research to manipulate the glucogenic to lipogenic balance and the essential fatty acid content of tissues are intriguing. High-producing cows that adapt successfully to lactation can have high reproductive efficiency, and nutritional management of the transition period both pre- and post-calving must facilitate that adaptation. PMID:24844126

Drackley, J K; Cardoso, F C

2014-05-01

230

Using Biofeedback while Immersed in a Stressful Videogame Increases the Effectiveness of Stress Management Skills in Soldiers  

PubMed Central

This study assessed the efficacy of using visual and auditory biofeedback while immersed in a tridimensional videogame to practice a stress management skill (tactical breathing). All 41 participants were soldiers who had previously received basic stress management training and first aid training in combat. On the first day, they received a 15-minute refresher briefing and were randomly assigned to either: (a) no additional stress management training (SMT) for three days, or (b) 30-minute sessions (one per day for three days) of biofeedback-assisted SMT while immersed in a horror/first-person shooter game. The training was performed in a dark and enclosed environment using a 50-inch television with active stereoscopic display and loudspeakers. On the last day, all participants underwent a live simulated ambush with an improvised explosive device, where they had to provide first aid to a wounded soldier. Stress levels were measured with salivary cortisol collected when waking-up, before and after the live simulation. Stress was also measured with heart rate at baseline, during an apprehension phase, and during the live simulation. Repeated-measure ANOVAs and ANCOVAs confirmed that practicing SMT was effective in reducing stress. Results are discussed in terms of the advantages of the proposed program for military personnel and the need to practice SMT. PMID:22558370

Bouchard, Stephane; Bernier, Francois; Boivin, Eric; Morin, Brian; Robillard, Genevieve

2012-01-01

231

Stress Management in Education: Warning Signs and Coping Mechanisms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Only in recent years have researchers begun to study stress in the workplace. Psychologists and other stress analysts have discovered that the most trying professions are those that involve high pressure and serious responsibilities, often beyond the control of the individuals employed. Most interesting, the American Institute of Stress revealed…

Sorenson, Richard D.

2007-01-01

232

Body condition scoring (BCS) is a useful management tool for distinguishing differences in nutritional needs  

E-print Network

over the back, ribs, and over the horizontal processes of the backbone (edge of loin). `Thin' cows are excellent indicators of the nutritional status in beef cows. Ideal liveweight varies from cow to cow whereas ideal body condition (BCS 5-6) is the same for all cows. Also, body condition can be measured

Liskiewicz, Maciej

233

Is space management of female meadow voles ( Microtus pennsylvanicus ) related to nutritive quality of plants?  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is thought by many (see Ims 1987 for review; Desy and Batzli 1989) that high quality food regulate population processes, territoriality and mating systems among small herbivores like meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus). We thought that comparisons of nutritive components from selected plants eaten by sexually active and inactive voles, as well as between territorial and non territorial sexually active

Jean-Marie Bergeron; Richard Brunet; Louise Jodoin

1990-01-01

234

Academic Major as a Perceived Stress Indicator: Extending Stress Management Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous research that has explored stress differences between "hard" and "soft" academic majors did not provide clear criteria for categorizing "hard" and "soft" majors, used a single item to measure reported stress, and reported contradictory stress differences between academic majors (Myrtek, Hilgenberg, Brugner, & Muller, 1997). With an…

May, Ross W.; Casazza, Stephen P.

2012-01-01

235

Stress Management Strategies for Students: The Immediate Effects of Yoga, Humor, and Reading on Stress  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Health science programs can be demanding and difficult for many students, leading to high levels of stress. High levels of stress can have a negative effect on students and subsequently the practicing clinician. Research suggests that yoga, humor, and reading are simple, effective methods to help reduce stress. To date no research…

Rizzolo, Denise; Zipp, Genevieve Pinto; Stiskal, Doreen; Simpkins, Susan

2009-01-01

236

Student Well-Being Interventions: The Effects of Stress Management Techniques and Gratitude Journaling in the Management Education Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student well-being in the management classroom is of concern to both educators and managers. Well-being is conceptualized here as students' reduction in stress, enhanced experienced meaning and engagement in the classroom, and, ultimately, heightened satisfaction with life. The authors investigated whether purposeful semester-long classroom…

Flinchbaugh, Carol L.; Moore, E. Whitney G.; Chang, Young K.; May, Douglas R.

2012-01-01

237

Managing Stress for College Success through Self-Hypnosis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addresses the problem of stress and outlines the steps for self-hypnosis as an effective method of teaching inner-city college freshmen ways of coping with the pressures of higher education. The described method can be used in numerous settings with all populations. An appendix provides the Stress Identification and Evaluation Form. (Author/MKA)

Carrese, Marie A.

1998-01-01

238

Managing Stress and Burnout among Helpers in Rural Areas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Individuals who work in the helping professions (physicians, counselors, nurses, pastors, and social workers) often work with individuals in stressful crisis situations. In addition to working in high stress situations, helpers in rural areas also suffer from isolation from support networks and peers that are available to urban helpers. This…

Reed, John C.

239

Cognitive-behavioral stress management for individuals with substance use disorders: a pilot study.  

PubMed

Stress-induced craving and stress reactivity may influence risk for substance use or relapse to use. Interventions designed to attenuate stress-induced craving and stress reactivity may serve as excellent adjuncts to more comprehensive treatment programs. The purpose of this study was to (1) tailor an existing, manualized, cognitive-behavioral stress management (CBSM) intervention for use in individuals with substance use disorders and (2) preliminarily evaluate the effects of the intervention using an experimental stress-induction paradigm. Twenty individuals were interviewed and then completed a psychological stress task, the Mental Arithmetic Task (MAT). After this, participants were assigned to either the CBSM intervention group or a nontreatment comparison group. Approximately 3 weeks later, participants completed a second MAT. In contrast to the comparison group, the CBSM group demonstrated significantly less stress-induced craving (p<.04) and stress (p<.02), and reported greater ability to resist urges to use (p<.02) after the second MAT. These findings are among the first to report on the use of an intervention to attenuate craving and stress reactivity among individuals with substance use disorders. Although preliminary, the findings suggest that systematic investigation of interventions specifically targeting stress management in individuals with substance use disorders should be undertaken. PMID:17700298

Back, Sudie E; Gentilin, Stephanie; Brady, Kathleen T

2007-08-01

240

Stress: a self-management approach and nursing care plan for nurses.  

PubMed

Stress is unavoidable but can be controlled to provide the energy for health, growth, and the development of human potential. This article provides a self-management approach and a nursing care plan for nurses. PMID:12024497

Cericola, S A

2000-01-01

241

The role of nutrition therapy and dietitians in the management of the metabolic syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nutrition therapy interventions for the metabolic syndrome include weight reduction or maintenance, physical activity, whole\\u000a grains and fiber, and type and amount of food fats. Interventions related to carbohydrate—amount and type—and alcohol are\\u000a controversial. The role of the dietitian is to assist persons with the metabolic syndrome to make lifestyle changes that modify\\u000a the factors that increase risk of diabetes

Marion J. Franz

2007-01-01

242

Long-term management of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy by a nutritional support team  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims: Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG) has become a commonly-performed procedure, to provide enteral nutrition for patients who are unable to eat. The aims of this study were to evaluate the long term efficacy, morbidity and mortality of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Material and methods: We analysed 144 patients who underwent a PEG procedure. Survival curves were done with the Kaplan–Meier

H. CORTEZ-PINTO; A. PINTO CORREIA; M. E. CAMILO; L. TAVARES; M. CARNEIRO DE MOURA

2002-01-01

243

Nutrition Therapy and the Management of Obesity and Diabetes: An Update  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetes and obesity have each become a national health crisis in recent years. The number of people who have diabetes and\\u000a prediabetes continues to grow with a predicted number of 336 million people worldwide with type 2 diabetes by 2030. The prevalence\\u000a of diabetes has risen in parallel with the increased prevalence of obesity. The optimal nutrition therapy for the

Gillian G. Arathuzik; Ann E. Goebel-Fabbri

2011-01-01

244

Early nutritional stress impairs development of a song-control brain region in both male and female juvenile song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) at the onset of song learning.  

PubMed

Birdsong is a sexually selected trait and is often viewed as an indicator of male quality. The developmental stress hypothesis proposes a model by which song could be an indicator; the time during early development, when birds learn complex songs and/or local variants of song, is of rapid development and nutritional stress. Birds that cope best with this stress may better learn to produce the most effective songs. The developmental stress hypothesis predicts that early food restriction should impair development of song-control brain regions at the onset of song learning. We examined the effect of food restriction on song-control brain regions in fledgling (both sexes, 23-26 days old) song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). Food restriction selectively reduced HVC volume in both sexes. In addition, sex differences were evident in all three song-control regions. This study lends further support to a growing body of literature documenting a variety of behavioural, physiological and neural detriments in several songbird species resulting from early developmental stress. PMID:16959649

MacDonald, Ian F; Kempster, Bethany; Zanette, Liana; MacDougall-Shackleton, Scott A

2006-10-01

245

Route and Type of Nutrition and Surgical Stress Influence Secretory Phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) Secretion of the Murine Small Intestine  

PubMed Central

Background The function of sPLA2 is site dependent. In tissue, sPLA2 regulates eicosanoid production; in the blood, sPLA2 primes neutrophils; and in the intestinal lumen sPLA2 provides innate bactericidal immunity as a defensin-related protein. Since parenteral nutrition (PN) with lack of enteral stimulation primes leukocytes while suppressing intra-luminal mucosal immunity, we hypothesized that 1) PN would diminish luminal sPLA2 activity, but increase sPLA2 activity in small intestinal (SI) tissue and serum and 2) stress would accentuate these changes. Methods Mice received Chow, Complex Enteral Diet (CED), intragastric PN (IG-PN), or PN in Experiment 1, and Chow, Chow + Stress, PN, and PN + Stress in Experiment 2. Tissue, intestinal luminal fluid, and portal and systemic serum were analyzed for sPLA2 activity. IgA was measured in luminal fluid as a marker of acquired mucosal immunity. Results Expt1 Luminal fluid sPLA2 activity was greatest in Chow and decreased in CED (p=0.0001), IG-PN (p=0.0002), and PN (p=0.0001) with PN lower than CED (p<0.002) or IG-PN (p<0.0001). Compared to Chow, serum sPLA2 activity dropped after CED (p = 0.042), IG-PN (p<0.0001), and PN (p=0.0004). Serum sPLA2 was higher in portal than systemic serum (p=0.04). Expt2 PN lowered luminal fluid sPLA2 activity vs Chow (p<0.0001). Stress lowered luminal sPLA2 activity in Chow (p<0.0001), without a change with PN. Following stress, luminal IgA increased in Chow (p=0.0025) but not PN (p=0.18). Serum sPLA2 activity was unchanged after Chow but increased in PN (p<0.03). Conclusions Parenteral nutrition with lack of enteral stimulation attenuates sPLA2 activity in intestinal fluid consistent with a suppressed innate mucosal defense. Stress suppresses luminal fluid sPLA2 activity in Chow, but not the IgA response: PN impairs both. Stress significantly elevates serum sPLA2 in PN fed mice consistent with the known increased neutrophil priming with PN. PN reduces innate bactericidal immunity of the gut but up-regulates serum pro-inflammatory products after stress. PMID:22042050

Pierre, Joseph F; Heneghan, Aaron F; Tsao, Francis H.C.; Sano, Yoshifumi; Jonker, Mark A; Omata, Jiro; Lan, Jinggang; Kudsk, Kenneth A

2012-01-01

246

An Experimental Evaluation of Stress-Management Training for the Airborne Soldier. Technical Report 550.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A project was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the stress-management training given to students in the jumpmaster training course at Fort Benning, Georgia. The course, which trains airborne personnel to conduct landings of men and equipment, features relatively stressful training programs during which instructors grade the performance of…

Burke, William P.

247

Stress Traps of the Management Team--And How to Break Out.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines (1) a simple model of the origin, development, and effects of stress; (2) the 12 most important causes of stress found in a survey of Oregon school administrators; (3) coping strategies used by the administrators surveyed; and (4) management skills as a potential coping technique. (MCG)

Gould, Walter; Swent, Boyd

1985-01-01

248

The Effects of a Stress Management Course on Counselors-in-Training  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effects of a stress management course on the stress knowledge and coping techniques of 101 graduate students in counseling were examined. Participants, drawn from various racial groups, were typically female (79%) and 21 to 55 years of age. Seven of the 8 null hypotheses were rejected. There were significant differences on 6 of the 7 dependent…

Abel, Holly; Abel, Annette; Smith, Robert L.

2012-01-01

249

Virtually Stress Free: Keeping Online Graduate Management Students Healthy from Afar  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines stress experienced by graduate management students in an online learning environment. I use qualitative methodology to examine data collected from 32 students in 2 sections of a graduate online course. Findings identify 6 categories of stressors experienced by the students as well as 6 categories of stress relief agents.…

Martinak, M. Linda

2012-01-01

250

Coping with Workplace Stress: A Multiple-Group Comparison of Female Managers and Clerical Workers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A causal model of workplace stress was refined and cross-validated. Multivariate analysis and multiple-group structural equation modeling were used to investigate the effects of social roles on patterns of coping with workplace stress and job satisfaction. Differences found between managers (n=249) and clerical workers (n=214) suggest power and…

Long, Bonita C.

1998-01-01

251

Opening the Manager's Door: State Probation Officer Stress and Perceptions of Participation in Workplace Decision Making  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stress can be costly not only to individuals but also to organizations. Participatory management has been recommended as a means for reducing probation officer stress. This article via self-report surveys of probation personnel in a southern state considers the relationship of a number of demographic variables with employee perceptions of participation in workplace decision making, job satisfaction, and organizational and

Risdon N. Slate; Terry L. Wells; W. Wesley Johnson

2003-01-01

252

Stress Management Through Written Emotional Disclosure Improves Academic Performance Among College Students With Physical Symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study tested whether writing about stressful events improves grade point averages (GPAs) and whether decreases in writing-induced negative mood from the first to last day of writing predicts GPA improvements. College students (n = 74) reporting elevated physical symptoms were randomized to write for 4 days about either stressful experiences (disclosure group) or time management (control group). Students rated

Mark A. Lumley; Kimberly M. Provenzano

2003-01-01

253

Career stress and female managers' health in Taiwan's hospitals: A multilevel model approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: This study investigates how perception-induced stress (barrier) and social capital (facilitator) affect the health of female managers. Methods and Measurement: On the basis of the responses of 229 valid questionnaires of middle- and high-level female managers in large-scale hospitals, using a multilevel data analysis approach, this study investigates how perception-induced stress and social capital influence self-reported poor health of

Duan-Rung Chen; Yeh-Yun Lin; Kuo-Piao Chung

2008-01-01

254

Tips for Disaster Responders: Preventing and Managing Stress  

MedlinePLUS

... paid and volunteer staff of community and faithbased organizations active in disasters). Depending on the nature of the event, sources of stress may include exposure to scenes of human suffering ...

255

The influence of maternal prenatal and early childhood nutrition and maternal prenatal stress on offspring immune system development and neurodevelopmental disorders  

PubMed Central

The developing immune system and central nervous system in the fetus and child are extremely sensitive to both exogenous and endogenous signals. Early immune system programming, leading to changes that can persist over the life course, has been suggested, and other evidence suggests that immune dysregulation in the early developing brain may play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. The timing of immune dysregulation with respect to gestational age and neurologic development of the fetus may shape the elicited response. This creates a possible sensitive window of programming or vulnerability. This review will explore the effects of maternal prenatal and infant nutritional status (from conception until early childhood) as well as maternal prenatal stress and anxiety on early programming of immune function, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. We will describe fetal immune system development and maternal-fetal immune interactions to provide a better context for understanding the influence of nutrition and stress on the immune system. Finally, we will discuss the implications for prevention of neurodevelopmental disorders, with a focus on nutrition. Although certain micronutrient supplements have shown to both reduce the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders and enhance fetal immune development, we do not know whether their impact on immune development contributes to the preventive effect on neurodevelopmental disorders. Future studies are needed to elucidate this relationship, which may contribute to a better understanding of preventative mechanisms. Integrating studies of neurodevelopmental disorders and prenatal exposures with the simultaneous evaluation of neural and immune systems will shed light on mechanisms that underlie individual vulnerability or resilience to neurodevelopmental disorders and ultimately contribute to the development of primary preventions and early interventions. PMID:23914151

Marques, Andrea Horvath; O'Connor, Thomas G.; Roth, Christine; Susser, Ezra; Bj?rke-Monsen, Anne-Lise

2013-01-01

256

The physician's role in managing acute stress disorder.  

PubMed

Acute stress disorder is a psychiatric diagnosis that may occur in patients within four weeks of a traumatic event. Features include anxiety, intense fear or helplessness, dissociative symptoms, reexperiencing the event, and avoidance behaviors. Persons with this disorder are at increased risk of developing posttraumatic stress disorder. Other risk factors for posttraumatic stress disorder include current or family history of anxiety or mood disorders, a history of sexual or physical abuse, lower cognitive ability, engaging in excessive safety behaviors, and greater symptom severity one to two weeks after the trauma. Common reactions to trauma include physical, mental, and emotional symptoms. Persistent psychological distress that is severe enough to interfere with psychological or social functioning may warrant further evaluation and intervention. Patients experiencing acute stress disorder may benefit from psychological first aid, which includes ensuring the patient's safety; providing information about the event, stress reactions, and how to cope; offering practical assistance; and helping the patient to connect with social support and other services. Cognitive behavior therapy is effective in reducing symptoms and decreasing the future incidence of posttraumatic stress disorder. Critical Incident Stress Debriefing aims to mitigate emotional distress through sharing emotions about the traumatic event, providing education and tips on coping, and attempting to normalize reactions to trauma. However, this method may actually impede natural recovery by overwhelming victims. There is insufficient evidence to recommend the routine use of drugs in the treatment of acute stress disorder. Short-term pharmacologic intervention may be beneficial in relieving specific associated symptoms, such as pain, insomnia, and depression. PMID:23062092

Kavan, Michael G; Elsasser, Gary N; Barone, Eugene J

2012-10-01

257

The evaluation of stress management strategies in general practice: an evidence-led approach.  

PubMed Central

Recent surveys have highlighted sources of stress for UK general practitioners (GPs). Interventions to reduce stress in general practice have been introduced at both an individual and an organizational level, but there is little published evidence of their effectiveness. This paper systematically reviews the literature and reports that the research evidence from stress management programmes employed with other workforces is equivocal. Results so far suggest that relaxation and cognitive behavioural skills are helpful and that group methods are both more cost-effective and more beneficial than individual counselling. It is important for scientific, practical, and financial reasons that stress management programmes be properly evaluated. This paper suggests possible avenues for future interventions to alleviate stress. PMID:9406495

Sims, J

1997-01-01

258

Yoga as an alternative and complementary approach for stress management: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Stress has become a global public health problem. Yoga offers one possible way of reducing stress. The purpose of this study was to look at studies from 2011 to May 2013 and examine whether yoga can be an efficacious approach for managing stress. A systematic search of Medline, CINAHL, and Alt HealthWatch databases was conducted for quantitative articles involving all schools of yoga. A total of 17 articles met the inclusion criteria. Six of these were from the United States, 3 from India, 2 from the United Kingdom, and 1 each from Australia, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Sweden, and Taiwan. Of the 17 studies, 12 demonstrated positive changes in psychological or physiological outcomes related to stress. Despite the limitations, not all studies used a randomized controlled design, had smaller sample sizes, had different outcomes, had nonstandardized yoga intervention, and had varying lengths, yoga appears to be a promising modality for stress management. PMID:24647380

Sharma, Manoj

2014-01-01

259

Tolerating Uncertainty: The Exploration of a 10-Week Stress Management Course which Supports a Process of Recovery, Personal Change and Educational Development for People Experiencing Stress and Anxiety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 10-week stress management and relaxation course helped anxious students develop skills and strategies derived from self-awareness. Course included stress theory, organizational skills (time management, goal setting), personal transformation, tolerance for uncertainty, and metacognition, with an emphasis on self-efficacy and autonomy. (Contains…

Smith, Sue

2002-01-01

260

Nutrition therapy and the management of obesity and diabetes: an update.  

PubMed

Diabetes and obesity have each become a national health crisis in recent years. The number of people who have diabetes and prediabetes continues to grow with a predicted number of 336 million people worldwide with type 2 diabetes by 2030. The prevalence of diabetes has risen in parallel with the increased prevalence of obesity. The optimal nutrition therapy for the treatment of both diabetes and obesity remains controversial. Health care practitioners are no longer solely prescribing the conventional low-fat, higher-carbohydrate diet approach that was used for over a decade. Lower-carbohydrate, higher-fat, or higher-protein diets are now being viewed as equally or sometimes more effective treatment plans for diabetes and obesity. In addition, there are other aspects of diet beyond macronutrient composition that are currently being investigated. This article will summarize research conducted over the past 2 years examining medical nutrition therapy for diabetes and obesity. It will also describe the unique challenges that come with treating this patient population. PMID:21240571

Arathuzik, Gillian G; Goebel-Fabbri, Ann E

2011-04-01

261

[MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Occupational Strand: Foods and Nutrition. Module II-C-2: Operations and Activities of a Food Service Operation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on operations and activities of a food service operation is the second in a set of three modules on occupational education relating to foods and nutrition. (This set is part of a larger series of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and…

Waskey, Frank

262

Review: managing posttraumatic stress disorder in combat veterans with comorbid traumatic brain injury.  

PubMed

Military deployments to Afghanistan and Iraq have been associated with elevated prevalence of both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) among combat veterans. The diagnosis and management of PTSD when a comorbid TBI may also exist presents a challenge to interdisciplinary care teams at Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and civilian medical facilities, particularly when the patient reports a history of blast exposure. Treatment recommendations from VA and Department of Defense's (DOD) recently updated VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guideline for Management of Post-Traumatic Stress are considered from the perspective of simultaneously managing comorbid TBI. PMID:23015586

Capehart, Bruce; Bass, Dale

2012-01-01

263

The management of sacral stress fractures: current concepts  

PubMed Central

Summary Sacral stress fractures are an unusual but curable cause of low-back pain that should be considered in differential diagnosis, particularly in elderly osteoporotic patients. Rarely, they may occur in young women during the last trimester of pregnancy or a few weeks after delivery. Encompassing fatigue and insufficiency fractures, the occurrence of sacral stress fractures appears to be relatively under-reported, because of the general lack of awareness of this condition and the non-specificity of symptoms. Plain radiographs of the pelvis are the first exam performed but they are often inconclusive, whereas MRI and CT scans are the examinations of choice to establish the diagnosis. The purpose of this review is to increase awareness of this condition so that clinicians may consider sacral stress fracture in the differential diagnosis of low-back and pelvic pain, particularly in elderly patients without a history of trauma. PMID:22461824

Longhino, Valentina; Bonora, Cristina; Sansone, Valerio

2011-01-01

264

How to Master Stress 1. Understanding Stress  

E-print Network

1 How to Master Stress 1. Understanding Stress Introduction to Stress Management Understanding Stress o Survival Stress o Internally Generated Stress o Environmental Stress, Job Stress and Fatigue How to Recognize Stress Optimizing Your Levels of Stress Managing Life Crises How stress can get

Kasman, Alex

265

usask.ca/pharmacy-nutrition College of Pharmacy and Nutrition  

E-print Network

usask.ca/pharmacy-nutrition College of Pharmacy and Nutrition Annual Report 2011-12 #12;Table ................................................................................................. 5 Awards Pharmacy Management Business Plan Competition 2012 Faculty Highlights ........................................................................................................16 College of Pharmacy and Nutrition / Thorvaldson Building / 110 Science Place / Saskatoon, SK S7N 5

Saskatchewan, University of

266

Special Food and Nutrition Needs in School Nutrition Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the prevalence of special food and/or nutrition needs in school nutrition programs. In addition, researchers focused on the issues surrounding these needs and the role of the school nutrition (SN) directors and managers in meeting these needs. Methods: An expert panel was used to…

Molaison, Elaine Fontenot; Nettles, Mary Frances

2010-01-01

267

Factors Affecting Deer Diets and Nutrition  

E-print Network

Knowledge of deer diets and nutrition can benefit ranchers who are interested in deer management and who want to coordinate vegetation management practices with changes in nutritional value of the habitat. Three important considerations...

Richardson, Calvin

2000-04-25

268

Resistance and Resilience: The Final Frontier in Traumatic Stress Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper asserts that the constructs of resistance and resilience represent a domain rich in potential for a wide variety of applications in the field of traumatic stress. Resilience holds great potential for those working in applied settings such as public health planning and preparedness, Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) and business continuity, as well as transportation, law enforcement, fire suppression,

George S. Everly; Jodi M. Jacobson

269

Quantifying livestock responses for heat stress management: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hot weather challenges livestock production but technology exists to offset the challenge if producers have made appropriate strategic decisions. Key issues include understanding the hazards of heat stress, being prepared to offer relief from the heat, recognizing when an animal is in danger, and taking appropriate action. This paper describes our efforts to develop biological response functions; assesses climatic probabilities

J. A. Nienaber; G. L. Hahn; R. A. Eigenberg

1999-01-01

270

Diagnosis and management of post-traumatic stress disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a debilitating anxiety disorder that may cause significant distress and increased use of health resources, the condition often goes undiagnosed. The lifetime prevalence of PTSD in the United States is 8 to 9 percent, and approximately 25 to 30 percent of victims of significant trauma develop PTSD. The emotional and physical symptoms of PTSD

Bradley D. Grinage

2003-01-01

271

The administration of food supplemented with cocoa powder during nutritional recovery reduces damage caused by oxidative stress in rat brain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Malnutrition contributes to the development of oxidative damage in the central nervous system. The selective administration\\u000a of nutrients tends to show positive results in individuals who have suffered from malnutrition. To determine the effect of\\u000a the administration of cocoa powder on the peroxidation of lipids and glutathione level during the nutritional recovery in\\u000a brain, rats of 21 days old were subjected

Gerardo Barragán Mejía; David Calderón Guzmán; Hugo Juárez Olguín; Nancy Hernández Martínez; Edna García Cruz; Aline Morales Ramírez; Norma Labra Ruiz; Gabriela Esquivel Jiménez; Norma Osnaya Brizuela; Raquel García Álvarez; Esperanza Ontiveros Mendoza

272

Management of climatic heat stress risk in construction: a review of practices, methodologies, and future research.  

PubMed

Climatic heat stress leads to accidents on construction sites brought about by a range of human factors emanating from heat induced illness, and fatigue leading to impaired capability, physical and mental. It is an occupational characteristic of construction work in many climates and the authors take the approach of re-engineering the whole safety management system rather than focusing on incremental improvement, which is current management practice in the construction industry. From a scientific viewpoint, climatic heat stress is determined by six key factors: (1) air temperature, (2) humidity, (3) radiant heat, and (4) wind speed indicating the environment, (5) metabolic heat generated by physical activities, and (6) "clothing effect" that moderates the heat exchange between the body and the environment. By making use of existing heat stress indices and heat stress management processes, heat stress risk on construction sites can be managed in three ways: (1) control of environmental heat stress exposure through use of an action-triggering threshold system, (2) control of continuous work time (CWT, referred by maximum allowable exposure duration) with mandatory work-rest regimens, and (3) enabling self-paced working through empowerment of employees. Existing heat stress practices and methodologies are critically reviewed and the authors propose a three-level methodology for an action-triggering, localized, simplified threshold system to facilitate effective decisions by frontline supervisors. The authors point out the need for "regional based" heat stress management practices that reflect unique climatic conditions, working practices and acclimatization propensity by local workers indifferent geographic regions. The authors set out the case for regional, rather than international, standards that account for this uniqueness and which are derived from site-based rather than laboratory-based research. PMID:24079394

Rowlinson, Steve; Yunyanjia, Andrea; Li, Baizhan; Chuanjingju, Carrie

2014-05-01

273

Nutritional armor for the warfighter: can omega-3 Fatty acids enhance stress resilience, wellness, and military performance?  

PubMed

This panel discussion, moderated by Dr. Deuster, illustrates the thinking of selected military leaders on the approach that must be taken to ensure the relationship between nutrition and performance. Insights and challenges these leaders face are provided, with consideration of the complex issues relating to sufficient scientific evidence, timing for Department of Defense policy, and the unique needs of service members. The discussion resulted in several recommendations. First, more nutritionists in uniform should be placed in/on the battlefield on every base and camp in Afghanistan and Iraq. Second, nutritionists/dietitians need to be working in the preventive arena, using the health promotion model and marketing to help shift behavior. Third, contract dietitians should be hired to work primarily in tertiary care. Dietitians must forward-deploy to implement preventive medicine and human performance optimization as it relates to nutrition and dietary supplementation. Unfortunately, almost all military dietitians are constrained within the medical model and we think of them just as "hospital providers." Finally, line units need to decide that dietitians are a requisite part of their force structure. Putting many dieticians in line units will allow our active duty members to believe diet and nutrition are important for performance. PMID:25373105

Deuster, Patricia

2014-11-01

274

Ambient temperature and nutritional stress influence fatty acid composition of structural and fuel lipids in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) tissues.  

PubMed

In birds, fatty acids (FA) serve as the primary metabolic fuel during exercise and fasting, and their composition affects metabolic rate and thus energy requirements. To ascertain the relationship between FAs and metabolic rate, a distinction should be made between structural and fuel lipids. Indeed, increased unsaturation of structural lipid FAs brings about increased cell metabolism, and changes in the FA composition of fuel lipids affects metabolic rate through selective mobilization and increasing availability of specific FAs. We examined the effects of acclimation to a low ambient temperature (Ta: 12.7±3.0°C) and nutritional status (fed or unfed) on the FA composition of four tissues in Japanese quail, Coturnix japonica. Differentiating between neutral (triglycerides) and polar (phospholipids) lipids, we tested the hypothesis that both acclimation to low Ta and nutritional status modify FA composition of triglycerides and phospholipids. We found that both factors affect FA composition of triglycerides, but not the composition of phospholipids. We also found changes in liver triacylglyceride FA composition in the low-Ta acclimated quail, namely, the two FAs that differed, oleic acid (18:1) and arachidonic acid (20:4), were associated with thermoregulation. In addition, the FAs that changed with nutritional status were all reported to be involved in regulation of glucose metabolism, and thus we suggest that they also play a role in the response to fasting. PMID:23796822

Ben-Hamo, Miriam; McCue, Marshall D; Khozin-Goldberg, Inna; McWilliams, Scott R; Pinshow, Berry

2013-10-01

275

The influence of phosphorus nutrition and water stress on the osmotic adjustment and growth of loblolly pine  

E-print Network

LITERATURE REVIEW Water Stress Osmotic Adjustment Phosphorus MATERIALS AND METHODS Experimental Design Sowing Preparation Sowing and Seedling Cultivation Treatments . . . . . . . ~ Measurements . . . . . . - ~ ~ ~ Statistical Analysis RESULTS... LITERATURE REVIEW Water Stress Osmotic Adjustment Phosphorus MATERIALS AND METHODS Experimental Design Sowing Preparation Sowing and Seedling Cultivation Treatments . . . . . . . ~ Measurements . . . . . . - ~ ~ ~ Statistical Analysis RESULTS...

Wilson, Alan Byron

2012-06-07

276

Post-traumatic stress disorder: Differential diagnosis and management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that may develop after an individual experiences severe psychologic\\u000a trauma such as combat or rape. Characteristic symptoms of PTSD include re-experiencing symptoms, such as intrusive memories\\u000a or dreams of the event, avoidance of reminders of the event, and persistent symptoms of increased arousal such as insomnia\\u000a or hypervigilance. Chronic PTSD can result

Mark B. Hamner; Sophie Robert

2004-01-01

277

Quantifying livestock responses for heat stress management: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hot weather challenges livestock production but technology exists to offset the challenge if producers have made appropriate\\u000a strategic decisions. Key issues include understanding the hazards of heat stress, being prepared to offer relief from the\\u000a heat, recognizing when an animal is in danger, and taking appropriate action. This paper describes our efforts to develop\\u000a biological response functions; assesses climatic probabilities

J. A. Nienaber; G. L. Hahn; R. A. Eigenberg

1999-01-01

278

Wheel of LifeEffective steps for stress management  

Microsoft Academic Search

This continues the author’s previous article, in which the concept of work-life balance was described and defined as a way of tackling the problem of increasing amounts of stress in the workplace as people try to juggle a wide range of factors in their life\\/work environment, including: work; family; friends; health; and spirit\\/self. (Byrne, 2005). Reviews the major factors involved

Una Byrne

2005-01-01

279

Contemporary Perspectives on Stress Management: Medication, Meditation or Mitigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stressful life events can increase the risk for developing a variety of physical disorders and emotional problems. A biopsychosocial\\u000a approach can help mental health professions to better understand and more effectively treat disorders that are related to\\u000a severe negative life events. Biological approaches focus on suppressing emotional reactions, usually through a reliance on\\u000a psychopharmacological interventions. Psychological approaches usually focus on

James C. Overholser; Lauren B. Fisher

2009-01-01

280

Resistance and resilience: the final frontier in traumatic stress management.  

PubMed

This paper asserts that the constructs of resistance and resilience represent a domain rich in potential for a wide variety of applications in the field of traumatic stress. Resilience holds great potential for those working in applied settings such as public health planning and preparedness, Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) and business continuity, as well as transportation, law enforcement, fire suppression, emergency medical services, pre-deployment training for military and other high risk professional groups. Additionally, its application to "the war on terrorism" cannot be denied. Finally, the construct of resilience may have direct applicability to businesses and organizations wherein there is perceived value in preparing a workforce to effectively function under adverse or high stress conditions. The putative value of resistance and resiliency in such applied settings resides in their ability to protect against stress-related behavioral morbidity, as well as counterproductive behavioral reactions. Given its importance, the question arises as to whether resilience is an innate trait or an acquired skill. This paper will report on preliminary data suggesting resiliency may be an attribute that can be acquired through participation in a relatively brief training program. PMID:19278142

Everly, George S; Welzant, Victor; Jacobson, Jodi M

2008-01-01

281

Stress management using UMTS cellular phones: a controlled trial.  

PubMed

One of the best strategies for dealing with stress is learning how to relax. However, relaxing is difficult to achieve in typical real world situations. For this study, we developed a specific protocol based on mobile narratives - multimedia narratives experienced on UMTS/3G phones - to help workers in reducing commuting stress. In a controlled trial 33 commuters were randomly divided between three conditions: Mobile narratives (MN); New age music and videos (NA); no treatment (CT). In two consecutive days the MN and NA samples experienced during their commute trip 2 x 2 6-minute multimedia experiences on a Motorola A925 3G phone provided by the "TRE" Italian UMTS carrier: the MN sample experienced a mobile narrative based on the exploration of a desert beach; the NA sample experienced a commercial new age video with similar visual contents. The trials showed the efficacy of mobile narratives in reducing the level of stress experienced during a commute trip. No effects were found in the other groups. These results suggest that 3G mobile handsets may be used as relaxation tool if backed by a specific therapeutic protocol and meaningful narratives. PMID:16404099

Riva, Giuseppe; Preziosa, Alessandra; Grassi, Alessandra; Villani, Daniela

2006-01-01

282

School-based Stress Management Training for Adolescents: Longitudinal Results from an Experimental Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a school-based universal preventive stress management training program\\u000a for early and middle adolescents in comparison with a no-treatment control group. The study examined the intervention effects\\u000a of age (early versus middle adolescents) and gender on perceived stress, interpersonal coping, and self-efficacy prior, immediately\\u000a after as well as 3 months after the intervention. Three

Petra Hampel; Manuela Meier; Ursula Kümmel

2008-01-01

283

Management of Tarsal Navicular Stress FracturesConservative Versus Surgical Treatment: A Meta-Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: This study was conducted to provide a statistical analysis of previously reported tarsal navicular stress fracture studies regarding the outcomes and effectiveness of conservative and surgical management.Study Design: Systematic review.Methods: A systematic review of the published literature was conducted utilizing MEDLINE through Ovid, PubMed, ScienceDirect, and EBSCOhost. Reports of studies that provided the type of tarsal navicular stress fracture

Joseph S. Torg; James Moyer; John P. Gaughan; Barry P. Boden

2010-01-01

284

Energy manager stresses accounting. [Grede Foundaries, Inc. , Milwaukee, WI  

SciTech Connect

Plant managers need energy-use data that allows them to identify opportunities for energy conservation. Grede Foundaries Inc. mails detailed consumption data to each of its five plants to help them plan cost studies for conservation projects. Plant energy use is divided into four categories: baseline energy, non-productive energy, seasonal energy, and variable production energy. The last two categories offer the best opportunities to conserve. The company oversees regular maintenance, internal and utility reports, and coordinates regular meetings involving plant managers. Energy consumption has dropped 21% since 1976 at a saving of $6 million. (DCK)

Galvin, C.

1982-09-13

285

Responses of nitrogen metabolism and seed nutrition to drought stress in soybean genotypes differing in slow-wilting phenotype1  

PubMed Central

Recent advances in soybean breeding have resulted in genotypes that express the slow-wilting phenotype (trait) under drought stress conditions. The physiological mechanisms of this trait remain unknown due to the complexity of trait × environment interactions. The objective of this research was to investigate nitrogen metabolism and leaf and seed nutrients composition of the slow-wilting soybean genotypes under drought stress conditions. A repeated greenhouse experiment was conducted using check genotypes: NC-Roy (fast wilting), Boggs (intermediate in wilting); and NTCPR94-5157 and N04-9646 (slow-wilting, SLW) genotypes. Plants were either well-watered or drought stressed. Results showed that under well-watered conditions, nitrogen fixation (NF), nitrogen assimilation (NA), and leaf and seed composition differed between genotypes. Under drought stress, NF and NA were higher in NTCPR94-5157 and N04-9646 than in NC-Roy and Boggs. Under severe water stress, however, NA was low in all genotypes. Leaf water potential was significantly lower in checks (?2.00 MPa) than in the SLW genotypes (?1.68 MPa). Leaf and seed concentrations of K, P, Ca, Cu, Na, B were higher in SLW genotypes than in the checks under drought stress conditions. Seed protein, oleic acid, and sugars were higher in SLW genotypes, and oil, linoleic and linolenic acids were lower in SLW genotypes. This research demonstrated that K, P, Ca, Cu, Na, and B may be involved in SLW trait by maintaining homeostasis and osmotic regulation. Maintaining higher leaf water potential in NTCPR94-5157 and N04-9646 under drought stress could be a possible water conservation mechanism to maintain leaf turgor pressure. The increase in osmoregulators such as minerals, raffinose, and stachyose, and oleic acid could be beneficial for soybean breeders in selecting for drought stress tolerance. PMID:24339829

Bellaloui, Nacer; Gillen, Anne M.; Mengistu, Alemu; Kebede, Hirut; Fisher, Daniel K.; Smith, James R.; Reddy, Krishna N.

2013-01-01

286

The Endosymbiont Hamiltonella Increases the Growth Rate of Its Host Bemisia tabaci during Periods of Nutritional Stress  

PubMed Central

The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) harbors several bacterial symbionts. Among the secondary (facultative) symbionts, Hamiltonella has high prevalence and high infection frequencies, suggesting that it may be important for the biology and ecology of its hosts. Previous reports indicated that Hamiltonella increases whitefly fitness and, based on the complete sequencing of its genome, may have the ability to synthesize cofactors and amino acids that are required by its host but that are not sufficiently synthesized by the host or by the primary endosymbiont, Portiera. Here, we assessed the effects of Hamiltonella infection on the growth of B. tabaci reared on low-, standard-, or high-nitrogen diets. When B. tabaci was reared on a standard-nitrogen diet, no cost or benefit was associated with Hamiltonella infection. But, if we reared whiteflies on low-nitrogen diets, Hamiltonella-infected whiteflies often grew better than uninfected whiteflies. Furthermore, nitrogen levels in field-collected whiteflies indicated that the nutritional conditions in the field were comparable to the low-nitrogen diet in our laboratory experiment. These data suggest that Hamiltonella may play a previously unrecognized role as a nutritional mutualist in B. tabaci. PMID:24558462

Su, Qi; Xie, Wen; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Liu, Baiming; Fang, Yong; Xu, Baoyun; Zhang, Youjun

2014-01-01

287

Variation in Broccoli Cultivar Phytochemical Content under Organic and Conventional Management Systems: Implications in Breeding for Nutrition  

PubMed Central

Organic agriculture requires cultivars that can adapt to organic crop management systems without the use of synthetic pesticides as well as genotypes with improved nutritional value. The aim of this study encompassing 16 experiments was to compare 23 broccoli cultivars for the content of phytochemicals associated with health promotion grown under organic and conventional management in spring and fall plantings in two broccoli growing regions in the US (Oregon and Maine). The phytochemicals quantified included: glucosinolates (glucoraphanin, glucobrassicin, neoglucobrassin), tocopherols (?-, ?-, ?-tocopherol) and carotenoids (lutein, zeaxanthin, ?-carotene). For glucoraphanin (17.5%) and lutein (13%), genotype was the major source of total variation; for glucobrassicin, region (36%) and the interaction of location and season (27.5%); and for neoglucobrassicin, both genotype (36.8%) and its interactions (34.4%) with season were important. For ?- and ?- tocopherols, season played the largest role in the total variation followed by location and genotype; for total carotenoids, genotype (8.41–13.03%) was the largest source of variation and its interactions with location and season. Overall, phytochemicals were not significantly influenced by management system. We observed that the cultivars with the highest concentrations of glucoraphanin had the lowest for glucobrassicin and neoglucobrassicin. The genotypes with high concentrations of glucobrassicin and neoglucobrassicin were the same cultivars and were early maturing F1 hybrids. Cultivars highest in tocopherols and carotenoids were open pollinated or early maturing F1 hybrids. We identified distinct locations and seasons where phytochemical performance was higher for each compound. Correlations among horticulture traits and phytochemicals demonstrated that glucoraphanin was negatively correlated with the carotenoids and the carotenoids were correlated with one another. Little or no association between phytochemical concentration and date of cultivar release was observed, suggesting that modern breeding has not negatively influenced the level of tested compounds. We found no significant differences among cultivars from different seed companies. PMID:25028959

Renaud, Erica N. C.; Lammerts van Bueren, Edith T.; Myers, James R.; Paulo, Maria Joao; van Eeuwijk, Fred A.; Zhu, Ning; Juvik, John A.

2014-01-01

288

Evaluation and conservative management of women with stress urinary incontinence.  

PubMed

Urinary incontinence can be a social and practical problem. A complete evaluation correlating the history, physical examination, and screening studies confirms the syndrome and its significance, leading to the therapeutic management most appropriate for the individual patient. Although long-term cure can be effected by surgery, conservative measures are available and effective depending on the degree of dysfunction and the motivation of the individual patient. PMID:7869865

Genadry, R R

1995-01-01

289

Role of diet and nutritional management in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.  

PubMed

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a spectrum ranging from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, which causes an increased risk of cirrhosis, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular complications. With the worldwide growing incidence of obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and unhealthy dietary pattern, NAFLD has currently been recognized as a major health burden. Dietary patterns and nutrients are the important contributors to the development, progression, and treatment of NAFLD and associated metabolic comorbidities. Generally, hypercaloric diet, especially rich in trans/saturated fat and cholesterol, and fructose-sweetened beverages seem to increase visceral adiposity and stimulate hepatic lipid accumulation and progression into non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, whereas reducing caloric intake, increasing soy protein and whey consumption, and supplement of monounsaturated fatty acids, omega-3 fatty acids, and probiotics have preventive and therapeutic effects. In addition, choline, fiber, coffee, green tea, and light alcohol drinking might be protective factors for NAFLD. Based on available data, at least 3-5% of weight loss, achieved by hypocaloric diet alone or in conjunction with exercise and behavioral modification, generally reduces hepatic steatosis, and up to 10% weight loss may be needed to improve hepatic necroinflammation. A sustained adherence to diet rather than the actual diet type is a major predictor of successful weight loss. Moreover, a healthy diet has benefits beyond weight reduction on NAFLD patients whether obese or of normal weight. Therefore, nutrition serves as a major route of prevention and treatment of NAFLD, and patients with NAFLD should have an individualized diet recommendation. PMID:24251710

Fan, Jian-Gao; Cao, Hai-Xia

2013-12-01

290

Nature-based stress management course for individuals at risk of adverse health effects from work-related stress-effects on stress related symptoms, workability and sick leave.  

PubMed

Sick leave due to stress-related disorders is increasing in Sweden after a period of decrease. To avoid that individuals living under heavy stress develop more severe stress-related disorders, different stress management interventions are offered. Self-assessed health, burnout-scores and well-being are commonly used as outcome measures. Few studies have used sick-leave to compare effects of stress interventions. A new approach is to use nature and garden in a multimodal stress management context. This study aimed to explore effects on burnout, work ability, stress-related health symptoms, and sick leave for 33 women participating in a 12-weeks nature based stress management course and to investigate how the nature/garden activities were experienced. A mixed method approach was used. Measures were taken at course start and three follow-ups. Results showed decreased burnout-scores and long-term sick leaves, and increased work ability; furthermore less stress-related symptoms were reported. Tools and strategies to better handle stress were achieved and were widely at use at all follow-ups. The garden and nature content played an important role for stress relief and for tools and strategies to develop. The results from this study points to beneficial effects of using garden activities and natural environments in a stress management intervention. PMID:25003175

Sahlin, Eva; Ahlborg, Gunnar; Matuszczyk, Josefa Vega; Grahn, Patrik

2014-06-01

291

mechanisms for V. jacobsoni tolerance have not proven viable as management tools.  

E-print Network

into colony management as a potential means of V. jacobsoni infestation control. Varroa jacobsoni / honey bee, the incidence of the fungal pathogen chalk- brood (Ascosphaera apis) increases under nutritional stress

Boyer, Edmond

292

ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: surgery.  

PubMed

In modern surgical practice it is advisable to manage patients within an enhanced recovery protocol and thereby have them eating normal food within 1-3 days. Consequently, there is little room for routine perioperative artificial nutrition. Only a minority of patients may benefit from such therapy. These are predominantly patients who are at risk of developing complications after surgery. The main goals of perioperative nutritional support are to minimize negative protein balance by avoiding starvation, with the purpose of maintaining muscle, immune, and cognitive function and to enhance postoperative recovery. Several studies have demonstrated that 7-10 days of preoperative parenteral nutrition improves postoperative outcome in patients with severe undernutrition who cannot be adequately orally or enterally fed. Conversely, its use in well-nourished or mildly undernourished patients is associated with either no benefit or with increased morbidity. Postoperative parenteral nutrition is recommended in patients who cannot meet their caloric requirements within 7-10 days orally or enterally. In patients who require postoperative artificial nutrition, enteral feeding or a combination of enteral and supplementary parenteral feeding is the first choice. The main consideration when administering fat and carbohydrates in parenteral nutrition is not to overfeed the patient. The commonly used formula of 25 kcal/kg ideal body weight furnishes an approximate estimate of daily energy expenditure and requirements. Under conditions of severe stress requirements may approach 30 kcal/kg ideal body weights. In those patients who are unable to be fed via the enteral route after surgery, and in whom total or near total parenteral nutrition is required, a full range of vitamins and trace elements should be supplemented on a daily basis. PMID:19464088

Braga, M; Ljungqvist, O; Soeters, P; Fearon, K; Weimann, A; Bozzetti, F

2009-08-01

293

Plant Nutrition and Fertilizer Management for Winter Wheat Production in the Blackland Prairie.  

E-print Network

. Effects of Cropping System and Previous Residue Management on Nitrogen Fertilization Reduced and no-till crop production systems are becoming common practices in the Texas Black land (Pigg, 1994). Advantages of tillage systems that leave crop... residues are tilled leaving sufficient residue (30 to 60% remaining) on the soil surface to re duce erosion prior to planting. Only a small por tion of the previous crop residue is incorporated into the top few inches of soil using tools...

Knowles, Tim C.; Hipp, Billy W.; Marshall, David S.; Sutton, Russelll L.

1995-01-01

294

A Nutrition Center Provides Practical Application for Teaching Diabetes Self-Management Skills  

Microsoft Academic Search

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the incidence of diabetes in mis area is 1 in 14, much higher than the 1 in 20 national average. In spite of the high incidence of diabetes, there are no Endocrinologists or Diabetologists in mis community.To the fill the void, Certified Diabetes Educators have developed a Diabetes Self-Management Program in an off-campus

Linda D. Mack

1999-01-01

295

Size matters: management of stress responses and chronic stress in beaked whales and other marine mammals may require larger exclusion zones.  

PubMed

Marine mammal management traditionally focuses on lethal takes, but non-lethal (or not immediately lethal) impacts of human disturbance, such as prolonged or repeated activation of the stress response, can also have serious conservation implications. The physiological stress response is a life-saving combination of systems and events that maximises the ability of an animal to kill or avoid being killed. However, "chronic stress" is linked to numerous conditions in humans, including coronary disease and infertility. Through examples, including beaked whales and sonar exposure, we discuss increasing human disturbance, mal-adaptive stress responses and chronic stress. Deep-diving and coastal species, and those targeted by whalewatching, may be particularly vulnerable. The various conditions linked with chronic stress in humans would have troubling implications for conservation efforts in endangered species, demands management attention, and may partly explain why some species have not recovered after protective measures (e.g., smaller protected areas) have been put into place. PMID:20045527

Wright, Andrew J; Deak, Terrence; Parsons, E C M

2011-01-01

296

B.S. in Nutritional Sciences The Nutritional Sciences (NUTR) program is designed to provide students with a strong  

E-print Network

in specific areas of nutrition, including nutrition communications, wellness and weight management, and sports and professional communication skills through course work in public speaking, statistics, business and professional

Saldin, Dilano

297

Family Stress Management Following Acute Myocardial Infarction: An Educational and Skills Training Intervention Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides a conceptual background for specific behavioral-therapy approach to family stress management in dealing with the sequelae of acute myocardial infarction for all family members with the goal of reducing morbidity for all family members as they cope with ongoing survivorship issues. Describes the program and discusses its pilot…

Nelson, David V.; Cleveland, Sidney E.; Baer, Paul E.

1998-01-01

298

On the Horizon. Biofeedback and Self-Management of Stress in Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of biofeedback in the self management of stress in school children is discussed. Educational research on biofeedback suggests that biofeedback training can help children to learn relaxation skills, reduce school-related anxiety, and gain a measure of self-discipline and confidence. (PHR)

Schultz, Edward W.; Walton, Wilbur T.

1979-01-01

299

Social Validity of the Critical Incident Stress Management Model for School-Based Crisis Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) model for crisis intervention was developed for use with emergency service personnel. Research regarding the use of the CISM model has been conducted among civilians and high-risk occupation groups with mixed results. The purpose of this study is to examine the social validity of the CISM model for…

Morrison, Julie Q.

2007-01-01

300

Promoting Stress Management: The Role of Comprehensive School Health Programs. ERIC Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Digest examines how Comprehensive School Health Programs (CSHPs) may promote stress management in children and adolescents. CSHPs contain four key elements. The first element, community participation and focus, can be achieved through school health newsletters, health fairs, local newspaper, radio, and television promotions, and guest…

Massey, Marilyn S.

301

A Systematic Review of Stress-Management Interventions for Multiple Sclerosis Patients  

PubMed Central

Background: The objective of this study was to identify stress-management interventions used for people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and systematically evaluate the efficacy of these interventions. Methods: Several strategies were used to search for studies reported in articles published up to 2013. Results: Our initial search retrieved 117 publications, of which 8 met our criteria for review. Of the eight studies, one provided Class I evidence, five provided Class III evidence, and two provided Class IV evidence for the efficacy of stress-management interventions according to the evidence classification established by the American Academy of Neurology. Most studies showed positive changes in outcomes assessed; however, the range of methodological quality among the published studies made it difficult to draw conclusions. Conclusions: The promising findings for stress-management interventions highlight the need for future studies. Additional large, prospective, multicenter studies will help to define the role of stress-management interventions in the treatment and course of MS. Furthermore, including outcome measures based on biological and clinical markers of disease will prove useful in understanding potential underlying mechanisms. PMID:25337056

Reynard, Alison K.; Rae-Grant, Alexander

2014-01-01

302

Pakistan Vt. J., 22(4): 2002 STRESS MANAGEMENT FOLLOWING VACCINATION AGAINST  

E-print Network

in broilers and its management by using multivitaminsand aspirin. The parameters studied were heterophil gain and minimum stress, while thé aspirin therapy did not show any significant différence. Key words/4 lit. of drinking water. c) Aspirin (Shamsi Pharma) containing acetyl salicylic acid. Dose: 180 mg

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

303

The Frazzled Principal's Wellness Plan: Reclaiming Time, Managing Stress, and Creating a Healthy Lifestyle  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This wellness guide for today's busy principals, school leaders, supervisors, and administrators has been custom crafted by the authors to address the stresses of managing workplace environments, juggling time and competing priorities, learning to delegate, balancing personal and professional agendas, and creating win-win situations. Special…

Queen, J. Allen; Queen, Patsy S.

2004-01-01

304

Classroom Connections: A Sourcebook for Teaching Stress Management and Fostering Self-Esteem.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book contains teacher instructions and a set of reproducible activity sheets concerned with self-esteem and stress management designed for teachers to use in the classroom. Included are activities for students at all grade levels, kindergarten through grade 12. The expressed purposes of the book are to: (1) explain in simple terms the nature…

Schuster, Sandy

305

How Stress Management Improves Quality of Life after Treatment for Breast Cancer  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The range of effects of psychosocial interventions on quality of life among women with breast cancer remains uncertain. Furthermore, it is unclear which components of multimodal interventions account for such effects. To address these issues, the authors tested a 10-week group cognitive-behavioral stress management intervention among 199 women…

Antoni, Michael H.; Lechner, Suzanne C.; Kazi, Aisha; Wimberly, Sarah R.; Sifre, Tammy; Urcuyo, Kenya R.; Phillips, Kristin; Gluck, Stefan; Carver, Charles S.

2006-01-01

306

Cognitive-Adaptation Training for Improving Performance and Stress Management of Air Force Pilots  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the effects of cognitive-adaptation training on flight performance and stress management in a sample of pilot cadets who were undergoing a basic flying program (N?=?21). The aim of the training was to enhance the participants' awareness of the cognitive processes that they used in a given situation, and to strengthen reflective processes. Cadets were assigned to a

Marie-Pierre Fornette; Marie-Héloďse Bardel; Camille Lefrançois; Jacques Fradin; Farid El Massioui; René Amalberti

2012-01-01

307

Developing and Implementing a Stress Management Program for Special Educators in a Juvenile Detention Center.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a practicum designed to increase the stress management skills of 10 special educators working in a juvenile detention center. Teachers at the juvenile detention center were taking an inordinate amount of sick leave and engaging in behaviors that were counter-productive to their delivery of educational services to detained…

Francis, Joan R.

308

Relationship of Job Stress to Job Performance: A Study of Managers and Blue-Collar Workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four types of relationships were proposed between job stress and performance: curvilinear\\/U-shaped, negative linear, positive linear, and no relationship between the two. Data were collected from middle managers (N = 227) and blue-collar workers (N = 283) employed in a large Canadian organization. Bivariate multiple regression and hierarchical multiple regression analyses generally supported the prevalence of a negative linear relationship

Muhammad Jamal

1985-01-01

309

Navicular stress reactions in runners: a review of evaluation and management of a competitive athlete.  

PubMed

Navicular stress injuries in athletes can be devastating. Clinical findings are frequently nonspecific until significant progression of the abnormality has occurred. The use of diagnostic imaging techniques early in the discovery period increases the likelihood of establishing an immediate diagnosis and avoids frank fracture of the navicular bone. Delayed diagnosis of navicular stress injuries in athletes can cause dire consequences. The physician must be aware of the injury in establishing a high index of clinical suspicion. The timing and sequencing of diagnostic imaging studies is essential in establishing a diagnosis to manage the patient and minimize time away from competition. This case study examines the history and management of an elite high school track athlete who sustained a navicular stress injury. The timing and use of diagnostic imaging studies is reviewed. PMID:21957277

Yoho, Robert M; Wells, Shevonne K

2011-01-01

310

Nursing students' time management, reducing stress and gaining satisfaction: a grounded theory study.  

PubMed

In the course of their studies, nursing students must learn many skills and acquire the knowledge required for their future profession. This study investigates how Iranian nursing students manage their time according to the circumstances and obstacles of their academic field. Research was conducted using the grounded theory method. Twenty-one nursing students were purposefully chosen as participants. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using the method suggested by Corbin and Strauss. One of the three processes that the nursing students used was "unidirectional time management." This pattern consists of accepting the nursing field, overcoming uncertainty, assessing conditions, feeling stress, and trying to reduce stress and create satisfaction. It was found that students allotted most of their time to academic tasks in an attempt to overcome their stress. The findings of this study indicate the need for these students to have time for the extra-curricular activities and responsibilities that are appropriate to their age. PMID:22293018

Mirzaei, Tayebeh; Oskouie, Fatemeh; Rafii, Forough

2012-03-01

311

Four years of North American registry home parenteral nutrition outcome data and their implications for patient management  

SciTech Connect

The OASIS Registry started annual collection of longitudinal data on patients on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in 1984. This report describes outcome profiles on 1594 HPN patients in seven disease categories. Analysis showed clinical outcome was principally a reflection of the underlying diagnosis. Patients with Crohn's disease, ischemic bowel disease, motility disorders, radiation enteritis, and congenital bowel dysfunction all had a fairly long-term clinical outcome, whereas those with active cancer and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) had a short-term outcome. The long-term group had a 3-year survival rate of 65 to 80%, they averaged 2.6 complications requiring hospitalization per year, and 49% experienced complete rehabilitation. The short-term group had a mean survival of 6 months; they averaged 4.6 complications per year and about 15% experienced complete rehabilitation. The registry data also indicated HPN was used for 19,700 patients in 1987 with therapy growth averaging about 8% per year. This growth was chiefly from new cancer patients. The number of new patients with long-term disorders in whom HPN was initiated appeared rather constant. The authors conclude that these clinical outcome assessments justify HPN for long-term patients, but the utility and appropriateness of HPN for the cancer and AIDS patients remains uncertain and requires further study. Medical, social, and fiscal aspects of HPN management in long-term and short-term patients appear to involve quite separate considerations.

Howard, L.; Heaphey, L.; Fleming, C.R.; Lininger, L.; Steiger, E. (Division of Clinical Nutrition, Albany Medical Center, New York (United States))

1991-07-01

312

Yin Yang 1 and Adipogenic Gene Network Expression in Longissimus Muscle of Beef Cattle in Response to Nutritional Management  

PubMed Central

Among 36 differentially-expressed genes during growth in longissimus muscle (LM) of Angus steers, Yin Yang 1 (YY1) had the most relationships with other genes including some associated with adipocyte differentiation. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of nutritional management on mRNA expression of YY1 along with its targets genes PPARG, GTF2B, KAT2B, IGFBP5 and STAT5B. Longissimus from Angus and Angus × Simmental steers (7 total/treatment) on early weaning plus high-starch (EWS), normal weaning plus starch creep feeding (NWS), or normal weaning without starch creep feeding (NWN) was biopsied at 0, 96, and 240 days on treatments. Results suggest that YY1 does not exert control of adipogenesis in LM, and its expression is not sensitive to weaning age. Among the YY1-related genes, EWS led to greater IGFBP5 during growing and finishing phases. Pro-adipogenic transcriptional regulation was detected in EWS due to greater PPARG and VDR at 96 and 240 d vs. 0 d. GTF2B and KAT2B expression was lower in response to NWS and EWS than NWN, and was most pronounced at 240 d. The increase in PPARG and GTF2B expression between 96 and 240 d underscored the existence of a molecular programming mechanism that was sensitive to age and dietary starch. Such response partly explains the greater carcass fat deposition observed in response to NWS. PMID:23700364

Moisa, Sonia J.; Shike, Daniel W.; Meteer, William T.; Keisler, Duane; Faulkner, Dan B.; Loor, Juan J.

2013-01-01

313

Yin yang 1 and adipogenic gene network expression in longissimus muscle of beef cattle in response to nutritional management.  

PubMed

Among 36 differentially-expressed genes during growth in longissimus muscle (LM) of Angus steers, Yin Yang 1 (YY1) had the most relationships with other genes including some associated with adipocyte differentiation. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of nutritional management on mRNA expression of YY1 along with its targets genes PPARG, GTF2B, KAT2B, IGFBP5 and STAT5B. Longissimus from Angus and Angus × Simmental steers (7 total/treatment) on early weaning plus high-starch (EWS), normal weaning plus starch creep feeding (NWS), or normal weaning without starch creep feeding (NWN) was biopsied at 0, 96, and 240 days on treatments. Results suggest that YY1 does not exert control of adipogenesis in LM, and its expression is not sensitive to weaning age. Among the YY1-related genes, EWS led to greater IGFBP5 during growing and finishing phases. Pro-adipogenic transcriptional regulation was detected in EWS due to greater PPARG and VDR at 96 and 240 d vs. 0 d. GTF2B and KAT2B expression was lower in response to NWS and EWS than NWN, and was most pronounced at 240 d. The increase in PPARG and GTF2B expression between 96 and 240 d underscored the existence of a molecular programming mechanism that was sensitive to age and dietary starch. Such response partly explains the greater carcass fat deposition observed in response to NWS. PMID:23700364

Moisá, Sonia J; Shike, Daniel W; Meteer, William T; Keisler, Duane; Faulkner, Dan B; Loor, Juan J

2013-01-01

314

Redox regulation of heat shock protein expression in aging and neurodegenerative disorders associated with oxidative stress: A nutritional approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary. Oxidative stress has been implicated in mechanisms leading to neuronal cell injury in various pathological states of the brain. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive disorder with cognitive and memory decline, speech loss, personality changes and synapse loss. Many approaches have been undertaken to understand AD, but the heterogeneity of the etiologic factors makes it difficult to define the

V. Calabrese; G. Scapagnini; C. Colombrita; A. Ravagna; G. Pennisi; A. M. Giuffrida Stella; F. Galli; D. A. Butterfield

2003-01-01

315

Cognitive–Behavioral Stress Management Interventions for Persons Living with HIV: A Review and Critique of the Literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Psychological adjustment and coping are central to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) management. To improve HIV-infected\\u000a patients’ ability to cope with stress, a variety of stress management interventions have been designed and evaluated.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Purpose  This paper provides a review and critique of the stress management literature, including a: (1) synthesis of core components\\u000a of interventions for HIV-infected people, (2) summary of stress,

Jennifer L. Brown; Peter A. Vanable

2008-01-01

316

The effectiveness of current approaches to workplace stress management in the nursing profession: an evidence based literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effectiveness of current approaches to workplace stress management for nurses was assessed through a systematic review. Seven randomised controlled trials and three prospective cohort studies assessing the effectiveness of a stress management programmes were identified and reviewed. The quality of research identified was weak. There is more evidence for the effectiveness of programmes based on providing personal support than

C Mimura; P Griffiths

2003-01-01

317

Effects of short duration stress management training on self-perceived depression, anxiety and stress in male automotive assembly workers: a quasi-experimental study  

Microsoft Academic Search

To examine the effects of short duration stress management training (SMT) on self-perceived depression, anxiety and stress in male automotive assembly workers, 118 male automotive workers from Pekan, Pahang (n = 60, mean age = 40.0 years, SD = 6.67) and Kota Bharu, Kelantan (n = 58, mean age = 38.1 years, SD = 5.86) were assigned to experimental and

BA Edimansyah; BN Rusli; L Naing

2008-01-01

318

Improvement in A1C Levels and Diabetes Self-Management Activities Following a Nutrition and Diabetes Education Program in Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the effects of a nutrition and diabetes education intervention on improving hemoglobin A1C levels, diabetes self-management activities, and A1C knowledge in congregate meal recipients in senior centers in north Georgia. Participants were a convenience sample and completed a pre-test, an educational intervention, and a post-test (N = 91, mean age = 73 years, 60% Caucasian, and 40%

Elizabeth H. Redmond; Sarah M. Burnett; Mary Ann Johnson; Joan G. Fischer; Tommy Johnson

2007-01-01

319

Development and application of a web-based nutritional management program to improve dietary behaviors for the prevention of metabolic syndrome.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to develop a Web-based nutritional management program for the prevention of metabolic syndrome and to evaluate how the program affects health-related behaviors and the health status of office workers with metabolic syndrome risk factors. For the pilot test of the Web-based nutritional management program, 29 employees (19 males, 10 females) with more than one metabolic syndrome risk factor participated in the Web-based nutritional management program for 16 weeks. Participants visited the Web site more than two times per week and completed customized assessments of health status, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, dietary habits, food intake, ideal body weight, energy requirements, and exercise. Subjects had a significant decrease in body weight, waist circumference, body mass index (P < .01 in males, P < .05 in females), and body fat (P < .01 in males). The frequency of dietary habits such as eating snacks, eating out, and dining with others decreased, whereas the frequency of intake of foods such as whole grains, seaweed, fruit, and low-fat milk increased after intervention. After 16 weeks, program satisfaction was evaluated using a Web evaluation questionnaire, and most of the participants were highly satisfied with Web site components such as the loading speed, configuration, privacy, design, functionality, and contents. PMID:24651253

Choi, Yoon; Lee, Min June; Kang, Hee Cheol; Lee, Mee Sook; Yoon, Sun

2014-05-01

320

PROCEEDINGS OF THE COMPARATIVE NUTRITION SOCIETY 2004 Effects of Body Condition on Resting Metabolism in Captive and Free-ranging  

E-print Network

PROCEEDINGS OF THE COMPARATIVE NUTRITION SOCIETY 2004 Effects of Body Condition on Resting juvenile survival and nutritional stress are the leading but unconfirmed hypotheses attributed andwestern Alaskanpopulations to discernwhetherthere is any evidence of nutritional stress. Methods Oxygen

321

A Systematic Review of Biopsychosocial Training Programs for the Self-Management of Emotional Stress: Potential Applications for the Military  

PubMed Central

Combat-exposed troops and their family members are at risk for stress reactions and related disorders. Multimodal biopsychosocial training programs incorporating complementary and alternative self-management techniques have the potential to reduce stress-related symptoms and dysfunction. Such training can preempt or attenuate the posttraumatic stress response and may be effectively incorporated into the training cycle for deploying and redeploying troops and their families. A large systematic review was conducted to survey the literature on multimodal training programs for the self-management of emotional stress. This report is an overview of the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) identified in this systematic review. Select programs such as mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Cognitive Behavioral Stress Management, Autogenic Training, Relaxation Response Training, and other meditation and mind-body skills practices are highlighted, and the feasibility of their implementation within military settings is addressed. PMID:24174982

Clausen, Shawn S.; Jonas, Wayne B.; Walter, Joan A. G.

2013-01-01

322

Postoperative hypocaloric peripheral parenteral nutrition with branched-chain-enriched amino acids provides no better clinical advantage than fluid management in nonmalnourished colorectal cancer patients.  

PubMed

To assess clinical efficacy of using postoperative branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs)-enriched nutritional support in lower gastrointestinal cancer patients, we conducted a retrospective observational study comparing this regimen with traditional fluid management. Sixty-one eligible colorectal cancer patients consecutively admitted in the Colorectal Surgery Ward to receive postoperative hypocaloric peripheral parenteral nutrition (HPPN) were categorized into dextrose-only control group (n = 20), dextrose plus low-dose BCAA fat group (n = 20), and dextrose plus high-dose BCAA fat group (n = 21). Nutritional, clinical, and biochemical outcomes were collected on the day before and 7 days after surgery. Patients were nonmalnourished. Over the 7-day observation period, the control group had a significantly higher reduction in body mass index than the lower dose and the higher dose BCAA groups (P = 0.023 and P = 0.002, respectively). Compared to high-dose BCAA group, the control group also had a lower nitrogen excretion (P < 0.0001) and less reduction in nitrogen balance (P < 0.0001). There were no differences between study groups in biochemical measures, phlebitis, postoperative hospital stay, and in-hospital mortality. We found no better clinical advantage to the postoperative administration of BCAA-enriched HPPN than fluid management in nonmalnourished colorectal cancer patients. PMID:25298128

Huang, Hsiu-Hua; Wu, Pi-Chuan; Kang, Shiu-Ping; Wang, Jui-Ho; Hsu, Chien-Wei; Chwang, Leh-Chii; Chang, Sue-Joan

2014-01-01

323

Nutrition Frontiers  

Cancer.gov

The Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention at NCI issues a quarterly electronic newsletter, Nutrition Frontiers, that highlights emerging evidence linking diet to cancer prevention and showcases recent findings about who will likely benefit most from dietary change.

324

Nutrition and Stroke Prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract—Nutrition is much,more important in prevention of stroke than is appreciated by most physicians. The powerful effects of statin drugs in lowering the levels of fasting cholesterol, combined with an unbalanced focus on fasting lipids (as opposed to postprandial fat and oxidative stress), have led many physicians and patients to believe that diet is relatively unimportant. Because the statins can

Marc Fisher; Kennedy Lees; J. David Spence

2009-01-01

325

Stress  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This project collects resources for studying mental health and stress issues with middle schoolers. Teens and stress Science NetLinks: The Laughing Brain 2: A Good Laugh Dealing with anger Stress-o-meter Look at each of the above sites. Choose one and read the content. Write a one-paragraph summary. Play interactive games and take quizzes. Keep a log of what you do. Tell which site you liked best and why. Watch the following video for positive things teens do to reduce the stress ...

Deaton, Mrs.

2011-06-10

326

Helping Employees Manage the Stress of Working in Higher Education: A Challenge to Human Resource Managers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article suggests ways to develop individual employees' capabilities to minimize the negative effects of workplace stress in higher education, particularly that caused by organizational change. It is argued that early action to prepare employees for change is more beneficial to individuals and the institution than treating dysfunctional…

Munz, David C.

1995-01-01

327

Food Products Made With Glycomacropeptide, a Low Phenylalanine Whey Protein, Provide a New Alternative to Amino Acid-Based Medical Foods for Nutrition Management of Phenylketonuria  

PubMed Central

Phenylketonuria (PKU), an inborn error in phenylalanine (phe) metabolism, requires lifelong nutrition management with a low-phe diet, which includes a phe-free amino acid-based medical formula to provide the majority of an individual’s protein needs. Compliance with this diet is often difficult for older children, adolescents and adults with PKU. The whey protein glycomacropeptide (GMP) is ideally suited for the PKU diet since it is naturally low in phe. Nutritionally complete, acceptable medical foods and beverages can be made with GMP to increase the variety of protein sources for the PKU diet. As an intact protein, GMP improves protein utilization and increases satiety compared with amino acids. Thus, GMP provides a new, more physiologic source of low-phe dietary protein for those with PKU. PMID:22818728

Van Calcar, Sandra C.; Ney, Denise M.

2012-01-01

328

Codon usage bias and tRNA over-expression in Buchnera aphidicola after aromatic amino acid nutritional stress on its host Acyrthosiphon pisum  

PubMed Central

Codon usage bias and relative abundances of tRNA isoacceptors were analysed in the obligate intracellular symbiotic bacterium, Buchnera aphidicola from the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, using a dedicated 35mer oligonucleotide microarray. Buchnera is archetypal of organisms living with minimal metabolic requirements and presents a reduced genome with high-evolutionary rate. Codonusage in Buchnera has been overcome by the high mutational bias towards AT bases. However, several lines of evidence for codon usage selection are given here. A significant correlation was found between tRNA relative abundances and codon composition of Buchnera genes. A significant codon usage bias was found for the choice of rare codons in Buchnera: C-ending codons are preferred in highly expressed genes, whereas G-ending codons are avoided. This bias is not explained by GC skew in the bacteria and might correspond to a selection for perfect matching between codon–anticodon pairs for some essential amino acids in Buchnera proteins. Nutritional stress applied to the aphid host induced a significant overexpression of most of the tRNA isoacceptors in bacteria. Although, molecular regulation of the tRNA operons in Buchnera was not investigated, a correlation between relative expression levels and organization in transcription unit was found in the genome of Buchnera. PMID:16963497

Charles, Hubert; Calevro, Federica; Vinuelas, Jose; Fayard, Jean-Michel; Rahbe, Yvan

2006-01-01

329

Nutrition Expert  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Nutrition Expert is a group of Registered dietitians providing nutrition information to the web community online. Topics include weight loss, cholesterol, sports nutrition, and diabetes, and additional directories are under construction. They also offer a for-fee telephone consulting service which lets you pay by check over the phone.

330

Management of Diabetes Mellitus: Could Simultaneous Targeting of Hyperglycemia and Oxidative Stress Be a Better Panacea?  

PubMed Central

The primary aim of the current management of diabetes mellitus is to achieve and/or maintain a glycated hemoglobin level of ?6.5%. However, recent evidence indicates that intensive treatment of hyperglycemia is characterized by increased weight gain, severe hypoglycemia and higher mortality. Besides, evidence suggests that it is difficult to achieve and/or maintain optimal glycemic control in many diabetic patients; and that the benefits of intensively-treated hyperglycemia are restricted to microvascular complications only. In view of these adverse effects and limitations of intensive treatment of hyperglycemia in preventing diabetic complications, which is linked to oxidative stress, this commentary proposes a hypothesis that “simultaneous targeting of hyperglycemia and oxidative stress” could be more effective than “intensive treatment of hyperglycemia” in the management of diabetes mellitus. PMID:22489136

Erejuwa, Omotayo O.

2012-01-01

331

Cognitive behavioral stress management effects on injury and illness among competitive athletes: A Randomized Clinical trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive behavioral stress management (CBSM) has previously been found to reduce fatigue, depression, and cortisol response\\u000a to heavy exercise training among competitive collegiate athletes and to speed physical and psychological recovery from surgery\\u000a (1,2). Our study assessed the efficacy of a CBSM program to reduce the frequency of injury and illness among collegiate athletes\\u000a in a randomized, single-blind, controlled clinical

Frank M. Perna; Michael H. Antoni; Andrew Baum; Paul Gordon; Neil Schneiderman

2003-01-01

332

A randomized trial of stress management for the prevention of new brain lesions in MS  

E-print Network

stress management therapy for MS (SMT-MS) or a wait-list control condition. SMT-MS provided 16 individual of participants remained free of Gd lesions during the treatment (76.8% vs 54.7%, p 0.02), compared.5% vs 42.7%, p 0.006). These effects were no longer detectable during the 24-week post-treatment follow

Chisholm, Rex L.

333

Stress  

MedlinePLUS

... daily responsibilities Stress brought about by a sudden negative change, such as losing a job, divorce, or illness Traumatic stress, which happens when you are in danger of being seriously hurt or killed. Examples include a major accident, war, assault, or a natural disaster. This type of ...

334

Positive technology: a free mobile platform for the self-management of psychological stress.  

PubMed

We describe the main features and preliminary evaluation of Positive Technology, a free mobile platform for the self-management of psychological stress (http://positiveapp.info/). The mobile platform features three main components: (i) guided relaxation, which provides the user with the opportunity of browsing a gallery of relaxation music and video-narrative resources for reducing stress; (ii) 3D biofeedback, which helps the user learning to control his/her responses, by visualizing variations of heart rate in an engaging 3D environment; (iii) stress tracking, by the recording of heart rate and self-reports. We evaluated the Positive Technology app in an online trial involving 32 participants, out of which 7 used the application in combination with the wrist sensor. Overall, feedback from users was satisfactory and the analysis of data collected online indicated the capability of the app for reducing perceived stress levels. A future goal is to improve the usability of the application and include more advanced stress monitoring features, based on the analysis of heart rate variability indexes. PMID:24875684

Gaggioli, Andrea; Cipresso, Pietro; Serino, Silvia; Campanaro, Danilo Marco; Pallavicini, Federica; Wiederhold, Brenda K; Riva, Giuseppe

2014-01-01

335

Stress Management  

MedlinePLUS

... Healthy Heart See More » Healthier Kids Our Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

336

Team Nutrition: Educator Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How do we help young people learn about nutrition? It's not an easy task, but the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has created this page as part of their Food and Nutrition Service to help educators do just that. Their "Team Nutrition" staff members have brought together a range of fact sheets, classroom activities, and web applications for K-12 students. New visitors can click on the Empowering Youth with Nutrition and Physical Activity online modules to get high-quality online resources that help young people learn about the food pyramid and crafting a positive food environment. Moving along, the Elementary Schools area contains fun activities such as "Dig In!" and "The Great Garden Detective Adventure." Finally, visitors can also click on over to the Healthy Meals Resource System and the homepage of the National Food Service Management Institute.

2013-04-26

337

Stress  

MedlinePLUS

... blood glucose elevation in response to mental stress. Learning to Relax For some people with diabetes, controlling ... care issues can also help. Think about the aspects of life with diabetes that are the most ...

338

A randomized trial of stress management for the prevention of new brain lesions in MS  

PubMed Central

Objectives: This trial examined the efficacy of a stress management program in reducing neuroimaging markers of multiple sclerosis (MS) disease activity. Methods: A total of 121 patients with relapsing forms of MS were randomized to receive stress management therapy for MS (SMT-MS) or a wait-list control condition. SMT-MS provided 16 individual treatment sessions over 24 weeks, followed by a 24-week post-treatment follow-up. The primary outcome was the cumulative number of new gadolinium-enhancing (Gd+) brain lesions on MRI at weeks 8, 16, and 24. Secondary outcomes included new or enlarging T2 MRI lesions, brain volume change, clinical exacerbation, and stress. Results: SMT-MS resulted in a reduction in cumulative Gd+ lesions (p = 0.04) and greater numbers of participants remained free of Gd+ lesions during the treatment (76.8% vs 54.7%, p = 0.02), compared to participants receiving the control treatment. SMT-MS also resulted in significantly reduced numbers of cumulative new T2 lesions (p = 0.005) and a greater number of participants remaining free of new T2 lesions (69.5% vs 42.7%, p = 0.006). These effects were no longer detectable during the 24-week post-treatment follow-up period. Conclusions: This trial indicates that SMT-MS may be useful in reducing the development of new MRI brain lesions while patients are in treatment. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that SMT-MS, a manualized stress management therapy program, reduced the number of Gd+ lesions in patients with MS during a 24-week treatment period. This benefit was not sustained beyond 24 weeks, and there were no clinical benefits. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00147446. PMID:22786596

Lovera, Jesus; Brown, Ted; Cohen, Bruce; Neylan, Thomas; Henry, Roland; Siddique, Juned; Jin, Ling; Daikh, David; Pelletier, Daniel

2012-01-01

339

Stress management skills, cortisol awakening response, and post-exertional malaise in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.  

PubMed

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is characterized in part by debilitating fatigue typically exacerbated by cognitive and/or physical exertion, referred to as post-exertional malaise (PEM). In a variety of populations, the cortisol awakening response (CAR) has stood out as a marker of endocrine dysregulation relevant to the experience of fatigue, and may therefore be particularly relevant in CFS. This is the first study to examine PEM and the CAR in a sample of individuals with CFS. The CAR has also been established as a stress-sensitive measure of HPA axis functioning. It follows that better management of stress could modulate the CAR, and in turn PEM. In this cross-sectional study, we hypothesized that greater Perceived Stress Management Skills (PSMS) would relate to lower reports of PEM, via the impact of PSMS on the CAR. A total of 117 adults (72% female) with a CFS diagnosis completed self-report measures of PSMS and PEM symptomatology and a two-day protocol of saliva collection. Cortisol values from awakening and 30min post-awakening were used to compute the CAR. Regression analyses revealed that greater PSMS related to greater CAR and greater CAR related to less PEM severity. Bootstrapped analyses revealed an indirect effect of PSMS on PEM via the CAR, such that greater PSMS related to less PEM, via a greater CAR. Future research should examine these trends longitudinally and whether interventions directed at improving stress management skills are accompanied by improved cortisol regulation and less PEM in individuals with CFS. PMID:25049069

Hall, Daniel L; Lattie, Emily G; Antoni, Michael H; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Czaja, Sara; Perdomo, Dolores; Klimas, Nancy G

2014-11-01

340

Enhancing Standard Cardiac Rehabilitation with Stress Management Training: Background, Methods, and Design for the ENHANCED study  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE: Enhancing Standard Cardiac Rehabilitation with Stress Management Training in Patients with Heart Disease (ENHANCED) is a randomized clinical trial (RCT) funded by the NHLBI to evaluate the effects of stress management training (SMT) on changes in biomarkers of risk and quality of life for patients enrolled in traditional exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR). METHODS: One hundred fifty cardiac patients recruited from Duke University and the University of North Carolina will be evaluated and randomized to CR enhanced by SMT (including sessions devoted to relaxation training, cognitive restructuring, communication skills, and problem solving) or to standard exercise-based CR. Before and following 12 weeks of treatment, patients will undergo a battery of psychometric questionnaires and evaluation of cardiovascular biomarkers including measures of flow-mediated dilation, heart rate variability, baroreflex sensitivity, platelet function and inflammation, and ischemia during laboratory mental stress testing. The primary outcomes include a composite measure of stress (distress, depression, anxiety, and hostility and 24-hr urinary catecholamines and cortisol) and a composite measure of cardiac biomarkers of risk (vascular endothelial function, cardiac vagal control, inflammation, platelet function and mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia). Secondary outcomes include measures of quality of life as well as clinical events including death, hospitalizations, myocardial infarction, and revascularization procedures. RESULTS: This article reviews prior studies in the area and describes the design of the ENHANCED study. Several key methodological issues are discussed including the assessment of biomarkers of risk and barriers to the integration of SMT into traditional CR. CONCLUSIONS: The ENHANCED study will provide important information by determining the extent to which SMT combined with exercise-based CR may improve prognosis and quality of life in vulnerable cardiac patients. PMID:20216360

Blumenthal, James A.; Wang, Jenny T.; Babyak, Michael; Watkins, Lana; Kraus, William; Miller, Paula; Hinderliter, Alan; Sherwood, Andrew

2010-01-01

341

A Study of the Effects of a Stress Management Program on Affective and Cognitive Measures of Middle School Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Middle school children make a number of accomodations that create stress in their lives. This study examined the effects on sixth and seventh grade students (N=53) of a stress management program that emphasized self-regulation of physiological aspects of functioning along the relaxation/arousal continuum. The experimental group received intensive…

Matthews, Doris B.

342

Postgraduate Clinical Psychology Students' Perceptions of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Stress Management Intervention and Clinical Training  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Research into stress management interventions for clinical psychology trainees (CPTs) is limited, despite evidence indicating that these individuals are at risk for elevated stress, which can negatively impact personal and professional functioning. This study explored: (1) CPTs' perceptions of a previously evaluated Acceptance and…

Pakenham, Kenneth I.; Stafford-Brown, Johanna

2013-01-01

343

"Learn Young, Learn Fair", a Stress Management Program for Fifth and Sixth Graders: Longitudinal Results from an Experimental Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: This study examined the effects of a universal stress management program (Learn Young, Learn Fair) on stress, coping, anxiety and depression in fifth and sixth grade children. Methods: Fifty-two schools (1467 children) participated in a clustered randomized controlled trial. Data was collected in the fall of 2002, the spring of 2003,…

Kraag, Gerda; Van Breukelen, Gerard J. P.; Kok, Gerjo; Hosman, Clemens

2009-01-01

344

The Effectiveness of Self-Directed and Lecture/Discussion Stress Management Approaches and the Locus of Control of Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The interaction effects of two stress management strategies, the directed lecture discussion versus self-directed, and locus of control of teachers were examined. Results indicated directed and self-directive programs were effective in reducing stress. Locus of control was not an important factor. (Author/DWH)

Friedman, Gail H.; And Others

1983-01-01

345

Stress management-augmented behavioral weight loss intervention for African American women: a pilot, randomized controlled trial.  

PubMed

The relationship between chronic stress and weight management efforts may be a concern for African American (AA) women, who have a high prevalence of obesity, high stress levels, and modest response to obesity treatment. This pilot study randomly assigned 44 overweight/obese AA women with moderate to high stress levels to either a 12-week adaptation of the Diabetes Prevention Program Lifestyle Balance intervention augmented with stress management strategies (Lifestyle + Stress) or Lifestyle Alone. A trend toward greater percentage of baseline weight loss at 3-month data collection was observed in Lifestyle + Stress (-2.7 ± 3.6%) compared with Lifestyle Alone (-1.4 ± 2.3%; p = .17) and a greater reduction in salivary cortisol (Lifestyle + Stress: -0.2461 ± 0.3985 ng/mL; Lifestyle Alone: -0.0002 ± 0.6275 ng/mL; p = .20). These promising results suggest that augmenting a behavioral weight control intervention with stress management components may be beneficial for overweight/obese AA women with moderate to high stress levels and merit further investigation with an adequately powered trial. PMID:22505570

Cox, Tiffany L; Krukowski, Rebecca; Love, Sharhonda J; Eddings, Kenya; DiCarlo, Marisha; Chang, Jason Y; Prewitt, T Elaine; West, Delia Smith

2013-02-01

346

Interreality for the management and training of psychological stress: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Psychological stress occurs when an individual perceives that environmental demands tax or exceed his or her adaptive capacity. Its association with severe health and emotional diseases, points out the necessity to find new efficient strategies to treat it. Moreover, psychological stress is a very personal problem and requires training focused on the specific needs of individuals. To overcome the above limitations, the INTERSTRESS project suggests the adoption of a new paradigm for e-health - Interreality - that integrates contextualized assessment and treatment within a hybrid environment, bridging the physical and the virtual worlds. According to this premise, the aim of this study is to investigate the advantages of using advanced technologies, in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), based on a protocol for reducing psychological stress. Methods/Design The study is designed as a randomized controlled trial. It includes three groups of approximately 50 subjects each who suffer from psychological stress: (1) the experimental group, (2) the control group, (3) the waiting list group. Participants included in the experimental group will receive a treatment based on cognitive behavioral techniques combined with virtual reality, biofeedback and mobile phone, while the control group will receive traditional stress management CBT-based training, without the use of new technologies. The wait-list group will be reassessed and compared with the two other groups five weeks after the initial evaluation. After the reassessment, the wait-list patients will randomly receive one of the two other treatments. Psychometric and physiological outcomes will serve as quantitative dependent variables, while subjective reports of participants will be used as the qualitative dependent variable. Discussion What we would like to show with the present trial is that bridging virtual experiences, used to learn coping skills and emotional regulation, with real experiences using advanced technologies (virtual reality, advanced sensors and smartphones) is a feasible way to address actual limitations of existing protocols for psychological stress. Trial registration http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01683617 PMID:23806013

2013-01-01

347

Disruption of the salmon reproductive endocrine axis through prolonged nutritional stress: changes in circulating hormone levels and transcripts for ovarian genes involved in steroidogenesis and apoptosis.  

PubMed

Mechanisms regulating the normal progression of ovarian follicular growth versus onset of atresia in fishes are poorly understood. To gain a better understanding of these processes, we exposed immature female coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to prolonged fasting to induce follicular atresia and monitored body growth, development of the ovarian follicles, changes in reproductive hormones, and transcripts for ovarian genes. Prolonged fasting reduced body and ovary weight and increased the appearance of atretic follicles relative to normally fed controls. Endocrine analyses showed that fasting reduced plasma insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), estradiol-17? (E2), and pituitary, but not plasma, levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Transcripts for ovarian fsh receptor (fshr) and steroidogenesis-related genes, such as steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (star), 3?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (hsd3b), and P450 aromatase (cyp19a1a) were significantly lower in fasted fish. Ovarian expression of apoptosis-related genes, such as Fas-associated death domain (fadd), caspase 8 (casp8), caspase 3 (casp3), and caspase 9 (casp9) were significantly elevated in fasted fish compared to fed fish, indicating that apoptosis is involved in the process of atresia in this species. Interestingly, some genes such as fadd, casp8, casp3, and hsd3b, were differentially expressed prior to increases in the number of atretic follicles and reductions in hormone levels induced by fasting, and may therefore have potential as early indicators of atresia. Together these results suggest that prolonged nutritional stress may disrupt the reproductive system and induce follicular atresia in part via reductions in ovarian IGF and FSH signaling, and downstream effects on steroidogenesis-related genes and E2 production. PMID:21447335

Yamamoto, Yoji; Adam Luckenbach, J; Goetz, Frederick W; Young, Graham; Swanson, Penny

2011-07-01

348

Psychoneuroimmunology-Based Stress Management during Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Early Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Objective. In a randomized trial of women with early stage breast cancer undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy, two stress management interventions, tai chi training and spiritual growth groups, were compared to a usual care control group, to evaluate psychosocial functioning, quality of life (QOL), and biological markers thought to reflect cancer- and treatment-specific mechanisms. Method. The sample consisted of 145 women aged 27–75 years; 75% were Caucasian and 25% African American. A total of 109 participants completed the study, yielding a 75% retention rate. Grounded in a psychoneuroimmunology framework, the overarching hypothesis was that both interventions would reduce perceived stress, enhance QOL and psychosocial functioning, normalize levels of stress-related neuroendocrine mediators, and attenuate immunosuppression. Results. While interesting patterns were seen across the sample and over time, the interventions had no appreciable effects when delivered during the period of chemotherapy. Conclusions. Findings highlight the complex nature of biobehavioral interventions in relation to treatment trajectories and potential outcomes. Psychosocial interventions like these may lack sufficient power to overcome the psychosocial or physiological stress experienced during the chemotherapy treatment period. It may be that interventions requiring less activity and/or group attendance would have enhanced therapeutic effects, and more active interventions need to be tested prior to and following recovery from chemotherapy. PMID:23762127

Robins, Jo Lynne W.; McCain, Nancy L.; Elswick, R. K.; Walter, Jeanne M.; Gray, D. Patricia; Tuck, Inez

2013-01-01

349

Management Effects on Biomass and Foliar Nutritive Value of Robinia pseudoacacia and Gleditsia triacanthos f. inermis in Arkansas, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The browse potential of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) and thornless honey locust [Gleditsia triacanthos f. inermis (L.) Zabel] has not been adequately tested. Our objective was to determine effects of fertilization and pollarding on biomass and foliar nutritive value in separate studies of black locust and thornless honey locust in Arkansas, USA. Shoots were sampled monthly for two consecutive

D. M. Burner; D. H. Pote; A. Ares

2005-01-01

350

Effect of some management and nutritional factors on the fertility of milking cows under traditional husbandry system in Sudan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Six farms (A, B, C, D, E and F) of the intensive system type were selected. They were located 50 km south of Khartoum. Nutritional parameters with respect to metabolizable energy intake (MEI)and crude protein (CP) concentration of the diet were investigat...

H. S. E. Ahmed

1998-01-01

351

Managing Sales of Beverages in Schools to Preserve Profits and Improve Children's Nutrition Intake in 15 Mississippi Schools  

Microsoft Academic Search

School environments that provide consistent and reliable nutrition information promote the development of healthful eating in children. High-energy, nutrient-poor beverages offered for sale to children during the school day compete with healthful choices. The primary objective of this prospective, quasiexperimental study was to encourage children to choose more healthful beverages during the school day without adversely affecting the profits realized

Denise M. Brown; Suresh K. Tammineni

2009-01-01

352

Addressing Cultural Contexts in the Management of Stress via Narrative and Mobile Technology.  

PubMed

In developing applications for stress management and mental health, developers have largely ignored cultural context in design, opting instead to produce apps for a general audience. However, apps designed without a specific population in mind actually have limited reach. Generally stress trackers and socalled "therapists in your pocket", tend to be lost among a jungle of other generic apps that appeal only to the quantified self population and those already predisposed to help-seeking behavior. To reach a broader audience, designing for a specific population may have appeal. The AppHappy Project's Journey to the West is a mobile app being developed by a multidisciplinary group of students at the University of Pennsylvania. The objective is to promote better stress management and mental health among Asian international college students and facilitate their social integration with the general student population. With a prevalence of depression twice that of domestic college students, a reluctance to engage in help-seeking behavior due to stigma, and the challenge of cultural integration, creating interventions for this population requires a different approach to app-mediated therapy. Journey to the West packages bite-sized pieces of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques within the framework of a role-playing game. Every element of its design-from its characters to its art style, from its narrative to its mechanics to its approach to community features-is rooted in a culturally appropriate context. An avatar serves as a surrogate of self while experiencing externalized stressors. Each quest blends therapeutic elements into gameplay with the goal of building resilience towards stressful events. PMID:24875715

Lee, Matthew D; Kang, Xiao; Hanrahan, Nancy

2014-01-01

353

Managing exam stress using UMTS phones: the advantage of portable audio/video support.  

PubMed

Test-taking anxiety or stress is very common among university students. It can be very distressing and sometimes debilitating. Exam anxiety involves physical components and emotional components that may be taken into account for managing and reducing anxiety. An approach to control exam anxiety is to learn how to regulate emotions. To help students in managing exam stress we developed a specific protocol based on mobile narratives--multimedia narratives experienced on UMTS/3G phones. 30 female university students (M=23.48; sd=1.24) who were going to perform an exam within a week were included in the trial. They were randomly divided in five groups according to the type and mobility of the medium used: (1) audio only narrative (CD at home); (2) audio only narrative (portable MP3); (3) audio and video narrative (DVD at home); (4) audio and video narrative (UMTS based); (5) control group. Audio/video narratives induced a reduction in exam anxiety in more than 80% of the sample vs 50% of the MP3 sample and 0% of the CD sample. Further, all the users who experienced mobile narratives on UMTS phones were able to relax before the exam, against 50% of DVD users and 33% of audio-only users. The trial showed a better efficacy of mobile narratives experienced on UMTS phones in reducing the level of exam stress and in helping the student to relax. These results suggest that for the specific sample considered--Italian university students--the media used for providing an anti-stress protocol has a clear impact on its efficacy. PMID:17377312

Riva, Giuseppe; Grassi, Alessandra; Villani, Daniela; Gaggioli, Andrea; Preziosa, Alessandra

2007-01-01

354

A Public Health Nutrition Collateral within the  

E-print Network

credits) QNME 0611 - Design of Epidemiologic Studies and Clinical Trials QNME 0612 - Linear Models): NUTR 6160 - Weight Management and Disordered Eating NUTR 6270 - Nutrition and Exercise Physiology NUTR

Garfunkel, Eric

355

Management of protein-energy wasting in non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease: reconciling low protein intake with nutritional therapy1234  

PubMed Central

Protein-energy wasting (PEW), characterized by a decline in body protein mass and energy reserves, including muscle and fat wasting and visceral protein pool contraction, is an underappreciated condition in early to moderate stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and a strong predictor of adverse outcomes. The prevalence of PEW in early to moderate CKD is ?20–25% and increases as CKD progresses, in part because of activation of proinflammatory cytokines combined with superimposed hypercatabolic states and declines in appetite. This anorexia leads to inadequate protein and energy intake, which may be reinforced by prescribed dietary restrictions and inadequate monitoring of the patient's nutritional status. Worsening uremia also renders CKD patients vulnerable to potentially deleterious effects of uncontrolled diets, including higher phosphorus and potassium burden. Uremic metabolites, some of which are anorexigenic and many of which are products of protein metabolism, can exert harmful effects, ranging from oxidative stress to endothelial dysfunction, nitric oxide disarrays, renal interstitial fibrosis, sarcopenia, and worsening proteinuria and kidney function. Given such complex pathways, nutritional interventions in CKD, when applied in concert with nonnutritional therapeutic approaches, encompass an array of strategies (such as dietary restrictions and supplementations) aimed at optimizing both patients’ biochemical variables and their clinical outcomes. The applicability of many nutritional interventions and their effects on outcomes in patients with CKD with PEW has not been well studied. This article reviews the definitions and pathophysiology of PEW in patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD, examines the current indications for various dietary modification strategies in patients with CKD (eg, manufactured protein-based supplements, amino acids and their keto acid or hydroxyacid analogues), discusses the rationale behind their potential use in patients with PEW, and highlights areas in need of further research. PMID:23636234

Kovesdy, Csaba P; Kopple, Joel D; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

2013-01-01

356

The Contribution of Emotional Intelligence to Social Skills and Stress Management Skills Among Automated Foodservice Industry Executives  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study revalidated three dimensions of emotional intelligence (EI) and examined EI's contribution to social skills and stress management skills among members of the National Automatic Merchandising (NAMA), representing executives of the vending, coffee services, and foodservice management industries. After performing Confirmatory Factor Analysis, a sample of 191 was spilt into high EI and low EI groups, based on respondents'

Jaemin Cha; Ronald F. Cichy; Seung Hyun Kim

2008-01-01

357

Effects of short-term management stress and ACTH injections on plasma cortisol levels in cultured white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus  

Microsoft Academic Search

General management practices including capture, handling and transportation in fish hatcheries can induce a stress response indicated by a plasma cortisol increase in many species. However, this phenomenon is not well established in cultured white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). We determined resting levels of cortisol and the cortisol responses to two management stressors and to exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH1–24) injections in

J. M Belanger; J. H Son; K. D Laugero; G. P Moberg; S. I Doroshov; S. E Lankford; J. J Cech

2001-01-01

358

[Enteral nutrition in cancer patients].  

PubMed

The significance of nutritional management in patients with malignant tumors is under-recognized due to the lack of clear evidence of a direct link with survival rate. However, for cancer patients, with markedly reduced food intake continuing for?7 days or intake of under 60% of estimated energy expenditure for?10 days, as referred to in the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, rapid implementation of nutritional support constitutes a clinically appropriate intervention. With regard to route of administration, as with other conditions, enteral nutritional management is recommended if the gastrointestinal tract is available. The utility of enteral immunonutrition formulae containing eicosapentaenoic acid and other forms of nutritional management has also recently been reported and further studies are anticipated. However, the principles of nutritional management for cancer patients comprise not simply weight increase or improvement in nutritional markers but the maintenance of patient QOL in ways that include alleviation of symptoms and antitumor therapy side-effects, and decreased risk of infection. Administration routes such as percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy should therefore also be discussed from this perspective. PMID:25335700

Suzuki, Yutaka

2014-10-01

359

Test Results of a Nb3Sn Wind/React"Stress-Managed" Block Dipole  

SciTech Connect

A second phase of a high field dipole technology development has been tested. A Nb{sub 3}Sn block-coil model dipole was fabricated, using magnetic mirror geometry and wind/react coil technology. The primary objective of this phase was to make a first experimental test of the stress-management strategy pioneered at Texas A&M. In this strategy a high-strength support matrix is integrated with the windings to intercept Lorentz stress from the inner winding so that it does not accumulate in the outer winding. The magnet attained a field that was consistent with short sample limit on the first quench; there was no training. The decoupling of Lorentz stress between inner and outer windings was validated. In ramp rate studies the magnet exhibited a remarkable robustness in rapid ramping operation. It reached 85% of short sample(ss) current even while ramping 2-3 T/s. This robustness is attributed to the orientation of the Rutherford cables parallel to the field in the windings, instead of the transverse orientation that characterizes common dipole designs. Test results are presented and the next development phase plans are discussed.

McInturff, A.; Blackburn, R.; Diaczenko, N.; Elliott, T.; Henchel, W.; Jaisle, A.; McIntyre, P.; Noyes, P.; Sattarov, A.; Lietzke, A.; Hafalia Jr., R.; Lau, W.; Nyman, M.; Bish, P.

2007-06-01

360

Acceptance and mindfulness-based stress management for support staff caring for individuals with intellectual disabilities.  

PubMed

Support staff working with individuals with intellectual disability (ID) and challenging behaviour experience high levels of work-related stress. Preliminary theoretical and experimental research has highlighted the potential suitability of acceptance and mindfulness approaches for addressing support staff stress. This study examines the effectiveness of an acceptance and mindfulness-based stress management workshop on the levels of psychological distress and well-being of support staff working with individuals with ID and challenging behaviour. Support staff (n=120) were randomly assigned to a workshop intervention condition (n=66) or to a waiting list control condition (n=54). Measurements were completed at three time points (pre-, post and 6 week follow-up) for: psychological distress, well-being, perceived work stressors, thought suppression, and emotional avoidance/psychological inflexibility. Main Findings: The intervention led to significantly greater reductions in distress in the intervention group than in the control group. This was largely maintained at 6 week follow-up. This effect was more pronounced amongst a subsample that had shown higher levels of psychological distress at baseline. Thought suppression was found to reduce significantly in the intervention group between post intervention and follow-up, although no significant change was found in well-being or experiential avoidance/psychological inflexibility. Overall, results demonstrated support for the effectiveness of an acceptance and mindfulness-based intervention in reducing distress. PMID:24685937

McConachie, Douglas Alexander James; McKenzie, Karen; Morris, Paul Graham; Walley, Robert M

2014-06-01

361

Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) in complex systems: cultural adaptation and safety impacts in healthcare.  

PubMed

In complex systems, such as hospitals or air traffic control operations, critical incidents (CIs) are unavoidable. These incidents can not only become critical for victims but also for professionals working at the "sharp end" who may have to deal with critical incident stress (CIS) reactions that may be severe and impede emotional, physical, cognitive and social functioning. These CIS reactions may occur not only under exceptional conditions but also during every-day work and become an important safety issue. In contrast to air traffic management (ATM) operations in Europe, which have readily adopted critical incident stress management (CISM), most hospitals have not yet implemented comprehensive peer support programs. This survey was conducted in 2010 at the only European general hospital setting which implemented CISM program since 2004. The aim of the article is to describe possible contribution of CISM in hospital settings framed from the perspective of organizational safety and individual health for healthcare professionals. Findings affirm that daily work related incidents also can become critical for healthcare professionals. Program efficiency appears to be influenced by the professional culture, as well as organizational structure and policies. Overall, findings demonstrate that the adaptation of the CISM program in general hospitals takes time but, once established, it may serve as a mechanism for changing professional culture, thereby permitting the framing of even small incidents or near misses as an opportunity to provide valuable feedback to the system. PMID:24491831

Müller-Leonhardt, Alice; Mitchell, Shannon G; Vogt, Joachim; Schürmann, Tim

2014-07-01

362

Nutritional adaptation and variability.  

PubMed

In current nutrition literature man's requirement for energy for a given status and pattern of physical activity and body mass is fixed. Available experimental data on the other hand show that it is variable and self-regulated over a considerable range. This homoeostatic range is associated with covariance of man's genotype with local environmental effect under a sustained perturbation of common external environment. The implication is that man can have his intake anywhere in the range without being under nutritional stress. Below the lower limit of this range man is under energy stress, growth is retarded and man adapts to small body size. Unlike the homoeostatic range, this long-term adaptation is heritable, but there is no evidence that work output equals energy intake in adaptation to low intake. On the contrary, small subjects on a lower plane of nutrition are found to be metabolically more efficient. Evidence is cited to show that it is the decrease in BMR in subjects with low intake which plays a major role in facilitating a higher level of metabolic efficiency for subjects undergoing energy stress. PMID:2707218

Sukhatme, P V

1989-02-01

363

Management and prevention of bone stress injuries in long-distance runners.  

PubMed

Synopsis Bone stress injury (BSI) represents the inability of bone to withstand repetitive loading, which results in structural fatigue and localized bone pain and tenderness. A BSI occurs along a pathology continuum that begins with a stress reaction, which can progress to a stress fracture and, ultimately, a complete bone fracture. Bone stress injuries are a source of concern in long-distance runners, not only because of their frequency and the morbidity they cause but also because of their tendency to recur. While most BSIs readily heal following a period of modified loading and a progressive return to running activities, the high recurrence rate of BSIs signals a need to address their underlying causative factors. A BSI results from disruption of the homeostasis between microdamage formation and its removal. Microdamage accumulation and subsequent risk for development of a BSI are related both to the load applied to a bone and to the ability of the bone to resist load. The former is more amenable to intervention and may be modified by interventions aimed at training-program design, reducing impact-related forces (eg, instructing an athlete to run "softer" or with a higher stride rate), and increasing the strength and/or endurance of local musculature (eg, strengthening the calf for tibial BSIs and the foot intrinsics for BSIs of the metatarsals). Similarly, malalignments and abnormal movement patterns should be explored and addressed. The current commentary discusses management and prevention of BSIs in runners. In doing so, information is provided on the pathophysiology, epidemiology, risk factors, clinical diagnosis, and classification of BSIs. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 5. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2014;44(10):749-765. Epub 7 August 2014. doi:10.2519/jospt.2014.5334. PMID:25103133

Warden, Stuart J; Davis, Irene S; Fredericson, Michael

2014-10-01

364

Female Stress Urinary Incontinence Clinical Guidelines Panel Summary Report on Surgical Management of Female Stress Urinary Incontinence  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeThe American Urological Association convened the Female Stress Urinary Incontinence Clinical Guidelines Panel to analyze the literature regarding surgical procedures for treating stress urinary incontinence in the otherwise healthy female subject and to make practice recommendations based on the treatment outcomes data.

Gary E. Leach; Roger R. Dmochowski; Rodney Appell; Jerry G. Blaivas; H. Roger Hadley; Karl M. Luber; Jacek L. Mostwin; Pat D. O'Donnell; Claus G. Roehrborn

1997-01-01

365

Mortality salience and symbols of cultural worldview affect the desirability of a stressful job: the ironic consequences of terror management.  

PubMed

In a study of terror management theory, participants first responded to prompts asking them to imagine their own death or dental pain and later rated the desirability of a generic job described explicitly as extremely stressful. The job description included either an American or foreign company logo. As predicted by terror management theory, the participants shown an American logo ironically desired the stressful job more, having been prompted with reminders of death than with reminders of dental pain. This study is the first to examine terror management theory's prediction of the influence of symbols of cultural worldview on health-related decisions. The authors discuss possible implications of the findings for making unintentionally stress-inducing decisions and for public health campaigns. PMID:23402041

Wirth-Petrik, Brittney; Guenther, R Kim

2012-12-01

366

Nutrition of the elderly.  

PubMed Central

The progressively increasing number of elderly people in the Canadian population and the disproportionate expenditure on their health care has stimulated interest in prevention of common illnesses observed in this age group. It is now recognized that nutrition plays an important role in health status, and both undernutrition and overnutrition are associated with greater risk of morbidity and mortality. Nutritional problems in the elderly can be suspected if there are several high-risk factors present--for example, living alone, physical or mental disability, recent loss of spouse or friend, weight loss, use of multiple medications, poverty, and high consumption of alcohol. Physical examination, anthropometry, and measurements of serum albumin levels and hemoglobin and lymphocyte counts are simple but helpful tools in confirming the presence of nutritional disorders. The prevention and correction of nutritional problems is likely to prove beneficial in the management of common geriatric illnesses. In these efforts, it is desirable to have a team approach in which the physician, the dietitian and the nurse each have a defined interactive role. Home care support services are important adjuncts in continuing care. Nutrition should receive a greater emphasis in the training of physicians and other health professionals. PMID:1959109

Chandra, R K; Imbach, A; Moore, C; Skelton, D; Woolcott, D

1991-01-01

367

[MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Consumer Approach Strand: Foods and Nutrition. Module I-C-1: Technological, Sociological, Ecological, and Environmental Factors Related to Food.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on technological, sociological, ecological, and environmental factors related to food is the first in a set of five modules on consumer education related to foods and nutrition. (This set is part of a larger series of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching…

Newsome, Ratana

368

The nutrition advisor expert system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Nutrition Advisor Expert System (NAES) is an expert system written in the C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS). NAES provides expert knowledge and guidance into the complex world of nutrition management by capturing the knowledge of an expert and placing it at the user's fingertips. Specifically, NAES enables the user to: (1) obtain precise nutrition information for food items; (2) perform nutritional analysis of meal(s), flagging deficiencies based upon the U.S. Recommended Daily Allowances; (3) predict possible ailments based upon observed nutritional deficiency trends; (4) obtain a top ten listing of food items for a given nutrient; and (5) conveniently upgrade the data base. An explanation facility for the ailment prediction feature is also provided to document the reasoning process.

Huse, Scott M.; Shyne, Scott S.

1991-01-01

369

Management of ischiopubic stress fracture in patients with anorexia nervosa and excessive compulsive exercising.  

PubMed

This case report describes a 28-year-old non-athlete female patient with anorexia nervosa who was diagnosed with an ischiopubic ramus stress fracture and treated successfully as an inpatient with a cognitive behaviour-based therapy. The patient's clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment are described, and a brief review of the relevant literature is included. The importance of this case report stems from the rarity of descriptions of this kind of injury in such patients, despite their inherent risk, and the originality of the treatment applied. This, in addition to the usual approach to medical management, exploited specific cognitive and behavioural procedures and strategies to address the patient's excessive compulsive exercising, promoting rest and movement avoidance in order to allow the fracture to heal, while simultaneously addressing the underlying psychopathology. PMID:25301426

El Ghoch, Marwan; Bazzani, Paola; Dalle Grave, Riccardo

2014-01-01

370

Management of recurrent stress urinary incontinence and urinary retention following midurethral sling insertion in women  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Synthetic midurethral slings are the most common operations performed for women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). However, there is only very scarce evidence regarding the management of complications from these operations. The aim of this survey was to canvass expert opinion regarding the management of recurrent SUI and urinary retention following insertion of these slings. METHODS Expert urologists and urogynaecologists in the UK with an interest in SUI were identified. Three clinical scenarios on recurrent SUI and one on urinary retention following midurethral sling placements were emailed twice to the experts. RESULTS The majority of the experts chose a repeat synthetic midurethral retropubic transvaginal tape (TVT) as the procedure of choice for recurrent SUI in patients who had had a previous TVT or midurethral transobturator tape inserted. In patients who continued to suffer SUI after a failed second TVT, there were mixed results with experts choosing fascial slings, colposuspension and bulking agents as their preferred method of treatment. In women who develop urinary retention following a TVT, tape pull-down within two weeks was the preferred method among the experts. However, division of the tape within two to six weeks following the procedure was also popular. CONCLUSIONS Based on expert opinion, it is difficult to make a recommendation as to the best method of treating recurrent SUI or urinary retention following tape insertion. There is an urgent requirement for well conducted, multicentre, randomised clinical trials to look at the management of these complications and also the tools used to assess the patient before salvage surgical management. PMID:23031773

Hashim, H; Terry, TR

2012-01-01

371

Test Results of a Nb3Sn Wind/React 'Stress-Managed' BlockDipole  

SciTech Connect

A second phase of a highfield dipole technology developmenthas been tested. A Nb3Sn block-coil model dipole was fabricated, usingmagnetic mirror geometry and wind/react coil technology. The primaryobjective of this phase was to make a first experimental test of thestress-management strategy pioneered at Texas A&M. In this strategy ahigh-strength support matrix is integrated with the windings to interceptLorentz stress from the inner winding so that it does not accumulate inthe outer winding. The magnet attained a field that was consistent withshort sample limit on the first quench; there was no training. Thedecoupling of Lorentz stress between inner and outer windings wasvalidated. In ramp rate studies the magnet exhibited a remarkablerobustness in rapid ramping operation. It reached 85 percent of shortsample(ss) current even while ramping 2-3 T/s. This robustness isattributed to the orientation of the Rutherford cables parallel to thefield in the windings, instead of the transverse orientation thatcharacterizes common dipole designs. Test results are presented and thenext development phase plans are discussed.

McInturff, A.; Bish, P.; Blackburn, R.; Diaczenko, N.; Elliott,T.; Hafalia Jr., R.; Henchel, W.; Jaisle, A.; Lau, W.; Lietzke, A.; McIntyre, P.; Noyes, P.; Nyman, M.; Sattarov, A.; Sattarov, A.

2006-08-25

372

Graduate Procedures Master of Science in Food and Nutrition Services and Coordinated Program  

E-print Network

addressed in the department include child nutrition, diet/nutrient assessment, food safety, food policy1 Graduate Procedures Master of Science in Food and Nutrition Services and Coordinated Program Department of Nutrition and Hospitality Management The Department

Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

373

[Chonic diarrhea and malabsorption due to common variable immunodeficiency, gastrectomy and giardiasis infection: a difficult nutritional management].  

PubMed

Gastric cancer is a frequent cause of cancer-related mortality in the world. Surgery is the only potentially curative therapy, although the adverse effects of surgery are common and considerable. Common variable immunodeficiency is in many cases cause of gastrointestinal system problems such as chronic diarrhea caused by infestation with giardia lamblia, nodular lymphoid hiperplasia ad loss of villi leading frequently to malapsortion and malnutrition. Nutritional deficiencies due to malapsorption (postgastrectomy and secondary to loss of villi, giardiasis and common variable inmunodeficiency) are common. We present the case of a patient with gastric cancer who underwent a gastrectomy with common variable hipogammaglobulinemia and chronic infestation by giardia lamblia, with serious diarrhea resistant to treatment and malabsorption. PMID:22470044

Domínguez-López, M E; González-molero, I; Ramírez-Plaza, C P; Soriguer, F; Olveira, G

2011-01-01

374

The Effects of Case Management on Clinical Nutrition Practice for the Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery Patient  

Microsoft Academic Search

Case Management is a systemic clinical process which provides quality patient care within a predetermined time frame established by dianostic related groups. To achieve our goals, critical care paths were developed for selected diagnostic related groups. The pilot diagnostic related group for case management was the coronary artery bypass graft, which is a high volume case type. Collaboration with an

W. R. Neely

1995-01-01

375

Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

Petrov, Max

2013-01-01

376

Enteral Nutrition in Critical Care  

PubMed Central

There is a consensus that nutritional support, which must be provided to patients in intensive care, influences their clinical outcome. Malnutrition is associated in critically ill patients with impaired immune function and impaired ventilator drive, leading to prolonged ventilator dependence and increased infectious morbidity and mortality. Enteral nutrition is an active therapy that attenuates the metabolic response of the organism to stress and favorably modulates the immune system. It is less expensive than parenteral nutrition and is preferred in most cases because of less severe complications and better patient outcomes, including infections, and hospital cost and length of stay. The aim of this work was to perform a review of the use of enteral nutrition in critically ill patients. PMID:23390469

Seron-Arbeloa, Carlos; Zamora-Elson, Monica; Labarta-Monzon, Lorenzo; Mallor-Bonet, Tomas

2013-01-01

377

Taking Care of You: Body, Mind, Spirit--A Unique Stress Management Program That Improves Lifestyle Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Taking Care of You: Body, Mind, Spirit is a multi-session group program developed by University of Missouri Extension that provides a unique and practical approach to helping adults better managing their stress and bounce back from life's challenges while improving lifestyle behaviors. The program combines mindfulness and a variety of other…

Vetter-Smith, Molly; Massey, Vera; Rellergert, Linda; Wissmann, Mary

2014-01-01

378

Cognitive-Behavioral Stress Management Intervention Buffers Distress Responses and Immunologic Changes Following Notification of HIV-1 Seropositivity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Randomly assigned 47 asymptomatic, healthy gay men to cognitive-behavioral stress management condition or assessment-only control group 5 weeks before notification of human immunodeficiency virus antibody status. Individual difference analyses suggest that psychological buffering and immunomodulating effects of treatment may be attributable, in…

Antoni, Michael H.; And Others

1991-01-01

379

The Relationship between Sex, Age, and Heart Rate Reactivity to a Psychological Stressor: Implications for Student Stress Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared heart rate reactivity (HRR) in a wide age range of 128 male and female students. Used mental arithmetic under timed and competitive conditions as the stressor. Findings showed no significant differences in the HRR of men and women suggesting that college stress management programs should be evenly aimed at women and men. (Author/PVV)

Sharpley, Christopher F.; Scuderi, Carl S.

1990-01-01

380

Measurement and management of stress in health professionals working with advanced cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Staff working with advanced cancer patients may experience considerable stress but there have been few attempts to measure such stress systematically. This paper presents preliminary studies of staff stress in two cancer centers. Nurses in an active treatment cancer hospital were found to focus on problems with dying patients as a displacement for their feelings of personal inadequacy in stressful

M. L. S. Vachon; W. A. L. Lyall; S. J. J. Freeman

1977-01-01

381

Iliotibial band release as an adjunct to the surgical management of patellar stress fracture in the athlete: a case report and review of the literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stress fracture of the patella is rare. In this report, a case of patellar stress fracture occurring in an amateur athlete is presented, and an operative adjunct to the surgical management of this condition is proposed. A review of the English literature identified 21 previous cases of stress fracture of the patella, the majority in young athletes. None of these

Anthony Keeley; Paul Bloomfield; Peter Cairns; Robert Molnar

2009-01-01

382

Medical Issues: Nutrition  

MedlinePLUS

... support & care > living with sma > medical issues > nutrition Nutrition Good nutrition is essential to health and growth. ... must make decisions based on their own needs. Nutrition Considerations Since we are still waiting for clinical ...

383

Be A Nutritional Entrepreneur  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students research and define nutrition. Students choose a definition of nutrition or a nutritional theme around which they design a restaurant. This activity helps students answer the question "What is a nutritionally balanced meal? in the context of different cultures.

BEGIN:VCARD VERSION:2.1 FN:Elaine Kilmer N:Kilmer;Elaine ORG:John Burroughs School REV:2005-04-08 END:VCARD

1995-06-30

384

A case study in R and D productivity: Helping the program manager cope with job stress and improve communication effectiveness  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Certain structural changes in the Naval Material Command which resulted from a comparison of its operations to those of selected large-scale private sector companies are described. Central to the change was a reduction in the number of formal reports from systems commands to headquarters, and the provision of Program Management Assistance Teams (at the request of the program manager) to help resolve project problems. It is believed that these changes improved communication and information-processing, reduced program manager stress, and resulted in improved productivity.

Bodensteiner, W. D.; Gerloff, E. A.

1985-01-01

385

Nutritional management of the low birth weight/preterm infant in community settings: a perspective from the developing world.  

PubMed

Globally, about 20 million infants are born with low birth weight (LBW; <2500 g). Of all LBW infants, approximately 95% are born in developing countries. The greatest incidence of LBW occurs in South-Central Asia; the second greatest is in Africa. The two main reasons for LBW are preterm birth (<37 weeks) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), which are risk factors for increased morbidity and mortality in newborn infants. Maternal nutrition status is one of the most important risk factors for LBW/IUGR. Providing balanced protein energy and multiple micronutrient supplements to pregnant women will reduce incidence of IUGR. Calcium supplementation during pregnancy will reduce the incidence of pre-eclampsia and preterm birth in developing countries. Exclusive breastfeeding is protective for a mother and her infant and has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality in infancy. Kangaroo mother care for preterm infants will reduce severe morbidity and mortality as well. Community-based intervention packages are among the most effective methods of reducing morbidity and mortality in mothers and children. Future research should focus on improving triage of preterm and IUGR infants. Exclusive breastfeeding should be promoted, and appropriate alternative food supplements should be provided when breastfeeding is not possible. PMID:23445841

Imdad, Aamer; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

2013-03-01

386

Noontime Nutrition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A preliminary report by the Department of Agriculture shows that school lunches are still fattier and saltier than they should be. Cites examples of how some nutrition-conscious school dietitians are improving school lunches. Lists statistics about the National School Lunch Program. (MLF)

Bushweller, Kevin

1993-01-01

387

Growth, physiology, and nutrition of loblolly pine seedlings stressed by ozone and acidic precipitation: A summary of the ropis-south project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previously published results from a multidisciplinary research program, Response of Plants to Interacting Stress (ROPIS), initiated by the Electric Power Research Insitute are summarized here. The overall objective of the ROPIS program was to develop a general mechanistic theory of plant response to air pollutants and other stresses. Direct and indirect phytotoxic impacts of O3 combined with induced deficiencies of

J. M. Kelly; G. E. Taylor; N. T. Edwards; M. B. Adams; G. S. Edwards; A. L. Friend

1993-01-01

388

Nutritional metabolomics: Progress in addressing complexity in diet and health  

PubMed Central

Nutritional metabolomics is rapidly maturing to use small molecule chemical profiling to support integration of diet and nutrition in complex biosystems research. These developments are critical to facilitate transition of nutritional sciences from population-based to individual-based criteria for nutritional research, assessment and management. This review addresses progress in making these approaches manageable for nutrition research. Important concept developments concerning the exposome, predictive health and complex pathobiology, serve to emphasize the central role of diet and nutrition in integrated biosystems models of health and disease. Improved analytic tools and databases for targeted and non-targeted metabolic profiling, along with bioinformatics, pathway mapping and computational modeling, are now used for nutrition research on diet, metabolism, microbiome and health associations. These new developments enable metabolome-wide association studies (MWAS) and provide a foundation for nutritional metabolomics, along with genomics, epigenomics and health phenotyping, to support integrated models required for personalized diet and nutrition forecasting. PMID:22540256

Jones, Dean P.; Park, Youngja; Ziegler, Thomas R.

2013-01-01

389

Community Attitudes to the Appropriation of Mobile Phones for Monitoring and Managing Depression, Anxiety, and Stress  

PubMed Central

Background The benefits of self-monitoring on symptom severity, coping, and quality of life have been amply demonstrated. However, paper and pencil self-monitoring can be cumbersome and subject to biases associated with retrospective recall, while computer-based monitoring can be inconvenient in that it relies on users being at their computer at scheduled monitoring times. As a result, nonadherence in self-monitoring is common. Mobile phones offer an alternative. Their take-up has reached saturation point in most developed countries and is increasing in developing countries; they are carried on the person, they are usually turned on, and functionality is continually improving. Currently, however, public conceptions of mobile phones focus on their use as tools for communication and social identity. Community attitudes toward using mobile phones for mental health monitoring and self-management are not known. Objective The objective was to explore community attitudes toward the appropriation of mobile phones for mental health monitoring and management. Methods We held community consultations in Australia consisting of an online survey (n = 525), focus group discussions (n = 47), and interviews (n = 20). Results Respondents used their mobile phones daily and predominantly for communication purposes. Of those who completed the online survey, the majority (399/525 or 76%) reported that they would be interested in using their mobile phone for mental health monitoring and self-management if the service were free. Of the 455 participants who owned a mobile phone or PDA, there were no significant differences between those who expressed interest in the use of mobile phones for this purpose and those who did not by gender (?21, = 0.98, P = .32, phi = .05), age group (?24, = 1.95, P = .75, phi = .06), employment status (?22, = 2.74, P = .25, phi = .08) or marital status (?24, = 4.62, P = .33, phi = .10). However, the presence of current symptoms of depression, anxiety, or stress affected interest in such a program in that those with symptoms were more interested (?2 1, = 16.67, P < .001, phi = .19). Reasons given for interest in using a mobile phone program were that it would be convenient, counteract isolation, and help identify triggers to mood states. Reasons given for lack of interest included not liking to use a mobile phone or technology, concerns that it would be too intrusive or that privacy would be lacking, and not seeing the need. Design features considered to be key by participants were enhanced privacy and security functions including user name and password, ease of use, the provision of reminders, and the availability of clear feedback. Conclusions Community attitudes toward the appropriation of mobile phones for the monitoring and self-management of depression, anxiety, and stress appear to be positive as long as privacy and security provisions are assured, the program is intuitive and easy to use, and the feedback is clear. PMID:21169174

Parker, Gordon; Hadzi Pavlovic, Dusan; Manicavasagar, Vijaya; Adler, Einat; Whitton, Alexis

2010-01-01

390

Cardiac Rehabilitation: The Nutrition Counseling Component  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Cardiac rehabilitation following a cardiac event is a comprehensive, multidisciplinary program that includes lifestyle counseling\\u000a in nutrition, physical activity, stress management, and smoking cessation.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Special concerns that can affect implementation of cardiac rehabilitation in older patients include complicated co-morbidities;\\u000a functional limitations, alterations in taste, smell, and appetite; difficulties with medication use\\/effectiveness; and limited\\u000a financial, social, and\\/or caregiver resources.

William E. Kraus; Julie D. Pruitt

391

The Principal's Next Challenge: The Twentieth Century Art of Managing Stress  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stress is a normal condition of living in today's complex society. It is a condi tion to which the school administrator is not immune. A formula for measuring stress and some strategies for dealing with it are offered here.

Walter H. Gmelch

1978-01-01

392

North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition Consensus Statement on the Diagnosis and Management of Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) is a disorder noted for its unique intensity of vomiting, repeated emergency department visits and hospitalizations, and reduced quality of life. It is often misdiagnosed due to the unappreciated pattern of recurrence and lack of confirmatory testing. Because no accepted approach to management has been established, the task force was charged to develop a report on

B UK Li; Frank Lefevre; Gisela G Chelimsky; Richard G Boles; Susanne P Nelson; Donald W Lewis; Steven L Linder; Robert M Issenman; Colin D Rudolph

2008-01-01

393

Modulation of the Maladaptive Stress Response to Manage Diseases of Protein Folding  

PubMed Central

Diseases of protein folding arise because of the inability of an altered peptide sequence to properly engage protein homeostasis components that direct protein folding and function. To identify global principles of misfolding disease pathology we examined the impact of the local folding environment in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NPC1), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and cystic fibrosis (CF). Using distinct models, including patient-derived cell lines and primary epithelium, mouse brain tissue, and Caenorhabditis elegans, we found that chronic expression of misfolded proteins not only triggers the sustained activation of the heat shock response (HSR) pathway, but that this sustained activation is maladaptive. In diseased cells, maladaptation alters protein structure–function relationships, impacts protein folding in the cytosol, and further exacerbates the disease state. We show that down-regulation of this maladaptive stress response (MSR), through silencing of HSF1, the master regulator of the HSR, restores cellular protein folding and improves the disease phenotype. We propose that restoration of a more physiological proteostatic environment will strongly impact the management and progression of loss-of-function and gain-of-toxic-function phenotypes common in human disease. PMID:25406061

Roth, Daniela Martino; Hutt, Darren M.; Tong, Jiansong; Bouchecareilh, Marion; Wang, Ning; Seeley, Theo; Dekkers, Johanna F.; Beekman, Jeffrey M.; Garza, Dan; Drew, Lawrence; Masliah, Eliezer; Morimoto, Richard I.; Balch, William E.

2014-01-01

394

Modulation of the maladaptive stress response to manage diseases of protein folding.  

PubMed

Diseases of protein folding arise because of the inability of an altered peptide sequence to properly engage protein homeostasis components that direct protein folding and function. To identify global principles of misfolding disease pathology we examined the impact of the local folding environment in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NPC1), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and cystic fibrosis (CF). Using distinct models, including patient-derived cell lines and primary epithelium, mouse brain tissue, and Caenorhabditis elegans, we found that chronic expression of misfolded proteins not only triggers the sustained activation of the heat shock response (HSR) pathway, but that this sustained activation is maladaptive. In diseased cells, maladaptation alters protein structure-function relationships, impacts protein folding in the cytosol, and further exacerbates the disease state. We show that down-regulation of this maladaptive stress response (MSR), through silencing of HSF1, the master regulator of the HSR, restores cellular protein folding and improves the disease phenotype. We propose that restoration of a more physiological proteostatic environment will strongly impact the management and progression of loss-of-function and gain-of-toxic-function phenotypes common in human disease. PMID:25406061

Roth, Daniela Martino; Hutt, Darren M; Tong, Jiansong; Bouchecareilh, Marion; Wang, Ning; Seeley, Theo; Dekkers, Johanna F; Beekman, Jeffrey M; Garza, Dan; Drew, Lawrence; Masliah, Eliezer; Morimoto, Richard I; Balch, William E

2014-11-01

395

Anxiety buffer disruption theory: a terror management account of posttraumatic stress disorder.  

PubMed

We present anxiety buffer disruption theory (ABDT) and provide a review of current evidence regarding the theory. ABDT is an application of terror management theory to explain diverse reactions to traumatic events and the onset and maintenance of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It posits that PTSD results from a disruption in one's anxiety-buffering mechanisms, which normally provide protection against anxiety in general and death anxiety in particular. The disruption of these mechanisms leaves the individual defenseless in the face of overwhelming anxiety, which leads to the major symptom clusters of PTSD: re-experiencing, hyper-arousal, and avoidance. According to ABDT, because of the disruption in their anxiety-buffering mechanisms, individuals with PTSD symptoms do not respond to mortality reminders in the defensive ways that psychologically healthier individuals do. We review four sets of studies conducted in four different cultures and with people who have experienced different types of trauma, which reveal this atypical response pattern and lend support to ABDT. PMID:20924831

Pyszczynski, Tom; Kesebir, Pelin

2011-01-01

396

Novel endoscopic management of a late complication following TVT insertion for stress urinary incontinence  

PubMed Central

Patient: Female, 57 Final Diagnosis: Bladder erosion Symptoms: Haematuria • irritative bladder symptoms • recurrent UTI Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Endoscopic tape resection Specialty: Urology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Since 1995 over 1 million tension free vaginal slings have been utilized to treat stress incontinence. The 10 year success rates range from 84–93%. Complication rates are low by comparision. Bladder perforation occurring during the time of surgery and is managed effectively if diagnosed and treated intraoperatively. However bladder erosion occuring post-operatively predominantly occur within the first 2 years. The risk of erosion increases with body mass index and previous vaginal surgery. Case Report: We report the case of a bladder erosion occurring 5 years following the original surgery. The symptoms included recurrent urinary tract infections, frequency and haematuria. A novel technique was employed using the transurethral approach to initially disintegrate the calculus and then using an endoshears to excise the mesh below the level of the epithelium. Continence was maintained postoperatively. Conclusions: This approach provides a safe alternative to both the transvaginal and transabdominal approach to excising intravesical mesh. PMID:24222816

O'Sullivan, Orfhlaith E.; Martyn, Fiona; O'Connor, Rory; Jaffery, Syed

2013-01-01

397

Cultivating and Nurturing a Successful Organizational Stress-management Program: Mission of Unlimited Possibilities  

PubMed Central

Background: Organizations that value their employees and appreciate their contributions strive to create a supportive work environment. Leaders can demonstrate care and support for staff by offering a stress-management program. However, program implementation can be challenging. Leadership endorsement, funding, program development, and assimilation within the organizational culture are important elements. Demonstrating value is critical to success, and even the most effective programs may not provide leaders with the results they anticipated. What gets in the way? Methods: This presentation provides a retrospective review of situations within Mayo Clinic that propelled its trainers to navigate the waters of uncertainty and rise above adversity. From a leadership perspective, a successful program requires ongoing intentional focus and promotion, not an easy task when resources are at a premium and organizational priorities are constantly vying for attention. When the trainers faced the prospect of program demise due to the loss of an executive sponsor and three of the four original trainers, the remaining members were at a crossroads. Rather than surrender to the lack of a well-defined champion, trainers decided to continue the legacy of sharing the gift of the Transforming Stress program with colleagues. Through the application of HeartMath coherence-building and -sustaining techniques, the remaining trainers listened to their own heart wisdom and found that each trainer possessed a unique skill set to contribute to the group. The information received during several group Heart Lock-In's guided the training team to collaboratively explore new ways of thinking. Results: A fluid marketing plan includes methods of informing employees about the program, focusing on evidence-based benefits and motivating them to participate. At Mayo Clinic, it is crucial for training programs to create incentives and opportunities for employees to attend stress-management workshops. Trainers rearranged their training schedules, offered evening classes, developed a web and email presence, and created a variety of marketing tools that were highly effective. Individual class registration improved and entire departments (intact teams) were requesting workshops. Similarly, the weeks and months immediately after the workshop, during which the employee is introduced to new techniques and tools, are critical. Answering their questions in real time via email or in person and keeping them engaged in the application of these emotional refocusing techniques were highly valued by individuals and groups alike. These efforts contributed significantly to the ongoing success and evolution of our program. Conclusion: By the end of the presentation, attendees learned how to identify potential challenges associated with program maintenance and expansion; describe coherence-building strategies for trainers, individuals, and teams; and conceptualize internal marketing approaches and practical applications to grow and sustain a resilient program within an organization. As part of a robust employee benefits package, the perception of a caring work environment may lead to reduced staff turnover, feelings of joy and fulfillment among staff, and increased organizational loyalty, as well as serve as a competitive recruitment tool.

Eley, Christine L.; Harris, Katherine E.; Hudak, Barbara; Hulvey, Lynne E.; Launder, Susan K.

2014-01-01

398

Managing Perceived Stress among College Students: The Roles of Social Support and Dysfunctional Coping  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author examined the conditions (i.e., social support and dysfunctional coping) under which perceived stress predicted psychological well-being in 459 college students. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated a significant 2-way interaction (Perceived Stress x Social Support) and a significant 3-way interaction (Perceived Stress x Social…

Chao, Ruth Chu-Lien

2012-01-01

399

Managing Stress and Maintaining Well-Being: Social Support, Problem-Focused Coping, and Avoidant Coping  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tested a model that links stress, social support, problem-focused coping, and well-being. First, it looks at how high support significantly moderated the association between stress and well-being. Next, the students' problem-focused coping was seen as mediating this moderated association. Finally, a 3-way interaction of stress, social…

Chao, Ruth Chu-Lien

2011-01-01

400

Nutrition in Africa.  

PubMed

Village women have adopted techniques set down by UNICEF in achieving higher food production and, ultimately, self sufficiency. Women's cooperatives integrate kitchen gardening and irrigated agriculture in an effort to combat the complex nutritional problems in Africa. Projects also offered training in a variety of areas including management of plots, labor-saving technology--diesel-driven grinding mills, rice husking, machines, wells with hand pumps, motor pumps for irrigation, all geared towards women benefitting themselves by growing their own food and furthering their children's health and development. Projects such as the one in Senegal were undertaken in other regions of Africa, like the Sahel and the Wadis--low-lying areas. From these projects, aid agencies and governments have suggested a number of recommendations in seeking a solution to Africa's nutritional problems. 1st, a balance between production of cash crops and food for consumption is called for. 2nd, research is necessary to improve the quality of locally grown food as much as livestock. 3rd, governments should extend surface area cultivation, 4th, more research on the advantage of indigenous food plants, 5th, women should be in on all levels of decision making in food production, 6th, governments should increase women farmer's efficiency, and further women's access to land and credit and 7th, women should be provided with increased educational opportunities. Nutrition in developing countries cannot be viewed as an isolated phenomenon--solutions to nutritional development should include all aspects of the problem including health and nutrition education, growth monitoring, water supply, literacy, technological know-how, and agricultural and plant and soil conservation. PMID:12283697

Murray-lee, M

1989-07-01

401

Internet-based stress management for women with preterm labour-a case-based experience report.  

PubMed

Pregnant women with preterm labour (PTL) in pregnancy often experience increased distress and anxieties regarding both the pregnancy and the child's health. The pathogenesis of PTL is, among other causes, related to the stress-associated activation of the maternal-foetal stress system. In spite of these psychobiological associations, only a few research studies have investigated the potential of psychological stress-reducing interventions. The following paper will present an online anxiety and stress management self-help program for pregnant women with PTL. Structure and content of the program will be illustrated by a case-based experience report. L.B., 32 years (G3, P1), was recruited at gestational week 27 while hospitalized for PTL for 3 weeks. She worked independently through the program for 6 weeks and had regular written contact with a therapist. Processing the program had a positive impact on L.B.'s anxiety and stress levels, as well as on her experienced depressive symptoms and bonding to the foetus. As PTL and the risk of PTB are associated with distress, psychological stress-reducing interventions might be beneficial. This study examines the applicability of an online intervention for pregnant women with PTL. The case report illustrates how adequate low-threshold psychological support could be provided to these women. PMID:25123471

Scherer, Sandra; Urech, Corinne; Hösli, Irene; Tschudin, Sibil; Gaab, Jens; Berger, Thomas; Alder, Judith

2014-12-01

402

Maple syrup urine disease: Nutritional management by intravenous hyperalimentation and uneventful course after surgical repair of dislocation of the hip  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD; McKusick 248600, 248610), an autosomal recessive disorder, is caused by a de—ciency of the branched-chain a-ketoacid dehy- drogenase. We report a patient with MSUD complicated by incomplete dislocation of the hip joint caused by spastic diplegia of the legs. She was successfully managed with dietary control in the perioperative period to prevent ketoacidotic attack after

Y. Koga; T. Iwanaga; I. Yoshida; M. Yoshino; S. Kaneko; H. Kato

1998-01-01

403

Conventional and Organic Soil Fertility Management Practices Affect Corn Plant Nutrition and Ostrinia nubilalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) Larval Performance.  

PubMed

Few studies compare how different soil fertilization practices affect plant mineral content and insect performance in organic systems. This study examined: 1) The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner), larval response on corn (Zea mays L.) grown in field soils with different soil management histories; and 2) resilience of these plants to O. nubilalis herbivory. Treatments included: 1) standard organic-organically managed soil fertilized with dairy manure and 2 yr of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in the rotation; 2) basic cation saturation ratio-organically managed soil fertilized with dairy manure and alfalfa nitrogen credits, plus addition of gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) according to the soil balance hypothesis; and 3) conventional-conventionally managed soil fertilized with synthetic fertilizers. Corn plants were reared to maturity in a greenhouse, and then infested with 0-40 O. nubilalis larvae for 17 d. O. nubilalis exhibited negative competitive response to increasing larval densities. Mean development time was significantly faster for larvae consuming basic cation saturation ratio plants than those on standard organic plants, with intermediate development time on conventional plants. Neither total yield (number of kernels) nor proportion kernels damaged differed among soil fertility treatments. Soil nutrients differed significantly in S and in Ca:Mg and Ca:K ratios, but principal components analysis of plant tissue samples taken before O. nubilalis infestation showed that S, Fe, and Cu contributed most to differences in plant nutrient profiles among soil fertility treatments. Results demonstrate that different fertilization regimens can significantly affect insect performance within the context of organic systems, but the effects in this study were relatively minor compared with effects of intraspecific competition. PMID:25203485

Murrell, Ebony G; Cullen, Eileen M

2014-10-01

404

Development of a Paradigm to Assess Nutritive and Biochemical Substances in Humans: A Preliminary Report on the Effects of Tyrosine upon Altitude- and Cold-Induced Stress Responses,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Tyrosine, a large neutral amino acid found in food, is the precursor for the catecholamine neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine. Recent experiments have shown the behavior of animals given tyrosine is less impaired after stressful treatments than...

L. E. Banderet, H. R. Lieberman, R. P. Francesconi, B. L. Shukitt, R. F. Goldman

1987-01-01

405

SOME DELETERIOUS EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM SALT STRESS ON GROWTH, NUTRITION, AND PHYSIOLOGY OF GERBERA (GERBERA JAMESONII L.) AND POTENTIAL INDICATORS OF ITS SALT TOLERANCE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tolerance of gerbera (Gerbera jamesonii L.) to long-term sodium chloride (NaCl) salt stress was evaluated by subjecting plants to 0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 mM NaCl levels for ten weeks. Increased NaCl led to a significant decrease in leaf and stem biomass. Salt stress significantly affected sodium (Na), potassium (K) concentrations in leaves, stems and roots leading to sharp

Kapila Kumara Ganege Don; Yi Ping Xia; Zhujun Zhu; Chang Le; Alge Wattage Wijeratne

2010-01-01

406

Nutritional factors and Alzheimer's disease.  

PubMed

Nutritional factors are integrally linked with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although AD patients have no changes in energy metabolism, fluctuations in weight are fairly common. The potential role of vitamin B(12) and folate, with the production of hyperhomocysteinemia, in the pathophysiology of AD is explored. The role of free-radical damage in AD is discussed. It is stressed that alterations in dietary lipids may play an important role in cognitive defects in AD secondary to their effects on neuronal membrane lipids. More research is needed on the role of nutrition in the ongoing development of cognitive changes in AD. PMID:11682574

Reynish, W; Andrieu, S; Nourhashemi, F; Vellas, B

2001-11-01

407

Nutritional Biochemistry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews some of the effects that space flight has on humans nutritional biochemistry. Particular attention is devoted to the study of protein breakdown, inflammation, hypercatabolism, omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin D, calcium, urine, folate and nutrient stability of certain vitamins, the fluid shift and renal stone risk, acidosis, iron/hematology, and the effects on bone of dietary protein, potassium. inflammation, and omega-3 fatty acids

Smith, Scott M.

2010-01-01

408

Enteral nutrition.  

PubMed

Enteral nutrition (EN) is defined as the delivery of nutrients beyond the oesophagus via feeding tubes, and the oral intake of dietary foods for special medical purposes. It should be provided in patients with at least a partially functioning gut, whose energy and nutrient needs cannot be met by a regular food intake. Further indications are when the liquid diet is used as a treatment of the disease, and when a feeding time in the disabled child is excessively prolonged. Advantages of enteral intake over parenteral nutrition are well recognized, however there are clinical settings such as intensive care units where nutritional needs can often be met only by their combination despite the functioning gut. For the majority of paediatric patients on EN, age-adapted standard polymeric formula enriched with fibres is an appropriate choice. There is also a wide array of different disease-adapted enteral formulations that may be beneficial in certain clinical conditions, however for most of them, results of controlled studies are either missing or do not support the claims. For the delivery of EN, both the stomach and intermittent feeding mode are more physiological; continuous mode is reserved for patients with severely diseased gut, postpyloric feeding is indicated in patients with the high risk of tracheal aspiration, and feeding over gastrostomy is preferable if the anticipated duration of EN is exceeding 4-6 weeks. Although EN is a well-established and effective feeding method, it may be poorly tolerated and associated with numerous complications. To minimize the risks, development of procedural protocols with regular quality controls and audits, and monitoring by a dedicated nutrition support team are recommended. PMID:24029791

Kola?ek, Sanja

2013-01-01

409

Nutritional and Medicinal Potential of Lagenaria siceraria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dietary prebiotics and phytomedicine have made available novel therapeutic possibilities to manage human health and diseases. Sitotherapy, the therapeutic use of diet and nutrition, strives to adapt the chemistry of food and nutrition in order to improve human health. Gastrointestinal crypt stem cells and enteric microflora are believed to be affected by diet, which can result in improved health. Lagenaria

Irfan Ahmad; M. Moshahid A. Rizvi

2011-01-01

410

SCHOOL OF FAMILY, CONSUMER AND NUTRITION SCIENCES,  

E-print Network

SCHOOL OF FAMILY, CONSUMER AND NUTRITION SCIENCES, NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY Hospitality Administration Hospitality Administration School of Family, Consumer, and Nutrition Sciences Wirtz Hall Room 118://eventplanning.about.com/od/eventcareers/tp/corporatee vents.htm Walker, John. Introduction to Hospitality Management. New Jersey:Pearson Education, 2004

Karonis, Nicholas T.

411

The Effectiveness of an ACT Informed Intervention for Managing Stress and Improving Therapist Qualities in Clinical Psychology Trainees  

E-print Network

Objectives: Clinical psychology trainees (CPTs) are vulnerable to high stress, which can adversely affect their personal and professional functioning. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a group acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) informed stress management intervention for CPTs. Design: Outcome measures were work-related stress, distress, life satisfaction, counseling selfefficacy, self-compassion, and therapeutic alliance. A cohort-controlled design, where an experimental group (n = 28) was compared with a waitlist control group (n = 28), was utilized, with a 10-week follow-up. Results: Group comparisons showed statistically significant intervention effects for the main outcome measures, which were maintained at follow-up. Mediational analyses showed that changes on most outcomes were mediated by ACT mindfulness and acceptance processes.

Johanna Stafford-brown; Kenneth I. Pakenham

412

Construction challenges and solutions in TAMU3, a 14 T stress-managed Nb3Sn dipole  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Accelerator Research Laboratory at Texas A&M University is nearing completion of a Nb3Sn dipole that incorporates stress management directly in its windings. The windings utilize graded-cross-section cable made from 54/61 (54 out of a 61 subelement hexagonal pattern) Restacked Rod Processed® Nb3Sn/Cu conductor and fine-filament S-2 glass fabric insulation. Coil heat treatment and associated differential expansions have brought about some tin leakage, highresistance electrical shorts, and coil gaps. TAMU3b impregnation successfully increased the coil-to-ground resistance. Quench protection in TAMU3 was simulated using QUENCH. The tests of TAMU3 should provide the first examination of stress management at field intensities greater than 12 T.

Holik, E. F.; Garrison, R.; Diaczenko, N.; Elliott, T.; Jaisle, A.; McInturff, A. D.; McIntyre, P.; Sattarov, A.

2014-01-01

413

Influence of nitrogen nutrition management on biomass partitioning and nitrogen use efficiency indices in hydroponically grown potato  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been conducting controlled environment research with potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) in recirculating nutrient film technique (NFT)-hydroponic systems as a human life support component during long-duration spaceflight. Standard nutrient solution management approaches include constant pH regulation with nitric acid (HNO3) and daily adjustment of electrical conductivity (EC) equivalent to half-strength modified Hoagland's solution, where nitrate (NO3-) is the sole nitrogen (N) source. Although tuber yields have been excellent with such an approach, N use efficiency indices are expected to be low relative to tuber biomass production. Furthermore, the high amount of N used in NFT-hydroponics, typically results in high inedible biomass, which conflicts with the need to minimize system mass, volume, and expenditure of resources for long-duration missions. More effective strategies of N fertilization need to be developed to more closely match N supply with demand of the crop. Hence, the primary objective of this study was to identify the optimal N management regime and plant N requirement to achieve high yields and to avoid inefficient use of N and excess inedible biomass production. In separate 84-day cropping experiments, three N management protocols were tested. Treatments which decreased NO3(-)-N supply indirectly through lowering nutrient solution EC (Expt. I), or disabling pH control, and/or supplying NH4(+)-N (Expt. III) did not significantly benefit tuber yield, but did influence N use efficiency indices. When supplied with an external 7.5 mM NO3(-)-N for the first 42 days after planting (DAP), lowered to 1.0 mM NO3(-)-N during the final 42 days (Expt. II), plants were able to achieve yields on par with plants which received constant 7.5 mM NO3(-)-N (control). By abruptly decreasing N supply at tuber initiation in Expt. II, less N was taken up and accumulated by plants compared to those which received high constant N (control). However, proportionately more plant accumulated N was used (N use efficiency) to produce tuber biomass when N supply was abruptly lowered at tuber initiation in Expt. II. Hence, a hydroponic nutrient solution N management system may be modified to elicit greater plant N-use while maintaining overall high tuber yield as opposed to achieving high tuber yields through excess N supply and shoot growth.

Goins, Gregory D.; Yorio, Neil C.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

2004-01-01

414

Stress and dress: investigating the relationship between social anxiety and appearance management among gay and straight men.  

PubMed

This research project explores the relationship between social anxiety and appearance management behaviors (AMB), including both routine and non-routine, among gay and straight men and women. Prior research had found links between AMB and stress (Reilly & Rudd, 2002), stress and (perceived) discrimination (Lee, 1997; Savin-Williams, 1994), and sexual orientation and weight (Brand, Rothblum, & Solom, 1992). An argument is made that links stress with AMB using the foundation of Social Comparison Theory (Festinger, 1954) as a guide. Research questions investigated were: (1) Is there a correlation between stress and AMB; (2) Is there a significant difference between body mass indices of men and women of differing sexual orientations; (3) How do AMB differ between those with gay and straight orientations; and (4) How do AMB differ between men and women? Using a survey design, a questionnaire was posted on the Internet. Measures included the Rudd/Lennon Appearance Management Scale of Routine and Risky Behaviors and the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale. A total of 365 usable forms were completed. Results show that social anxiety is positively correlated with non-routine AMB, or behaviors that carry some risk. Gay and straight participants differed on the routine AMB they practiced. Men and women differed on the non-routine or risky AMB they practiced or would consider practicing. Implications are discussed and further research is suggested. PMID:17594975

Reilly, Andrew; Rudd, Nancy Ann

2007-01-01

415

The impact of a new emotional self-management program on stress, emotions, heart rate variability, DHEA and cortisol  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the effects on healthy adults of a new emotional self-management program, consisting of two key techniques,\\u000a “Cut-Thru” and the “Heart Lock-In.” These techniques are designed to eliminate negative thought loops and promote sustained\\u000a positive emotional states. The hypotheses were that training and practice in these techniques would yield lowered levels of\\u000a stress and negative emotion and cortisol,

Rollin McCraty; Bob Barrios-Choplin; Deborah Rozman; Mike Atkinson; Alan D. Watkins

1998-01-01

416

Cognitive–Behavioral Stress Management Increases Free Testosterone and Decreases Psychological Distress in HIV-Seropositive Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of a 10-week group-based itive–behavioral stress management (CBSM) intervention on psychological distress and plasma free testosterone in symptomatic, HIV-seropositive men were examined. Participants were randomized to either CBSM (n = 42) or a wait-list control group (n = 23). Men in the CBSM intervention showed significant increases in testosterone, whereas control participants showed significant decreases. Those participating in

Dean G. Cruess; Michael H. Antoni; Neil Schneiderman; Gail Ironson; Philip McCabe; Jesus B. Fernandez; Stacy E. Cruess; Nancy Klimas; Mahendra Kumar

2000-01-01

417

Pediatric Nutrition Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nutrition services are important in the prevention of disabilities as well as in the treatment and\\/or habilitation of children with chronic illness. Level 1 nutrition care requires some basic knowledge of nutrition to screen for nutritional risk factors, knowledge of and access to referral systems for children identified to be at risk, and ability to use general nutrition education materials.

MARION TAYLOR BAER; ANNE BRADFORD HARRIS

1997-01-01

418

Cognitive-behavioral stress management reverses anxiety-related leukocyte transcriptional dynamics  

PubMed Central

Background Chronic threat and anxiety are associated with pro-inflammatory transcriptional profiles in circulating leukocytes, but the causal direction of that relationship has not been established. This study tested whether a Cognitive-Behavioral Stress Management (CBSM) intervention targeting negative affect and cognition might counteract anxiety-related transcriptional alterations in people confronting a major medical threat. Methods 199 women undergoing primary treatment of Stage 0–III breast cancer were randomized to a 10-week CBSM protocol or an active control condition. 79 provided peripheral blood leukocyte samples for genome-wide transcriptional profiling and bioinformatic analyses at baseline, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups. Results Baseline negative affect was associated with > 50% differential expression of 201 leukocyte transcripts, including up-regulated expression of pro-inflammatory and metastasis-related genes. CBSM altered leukocyte expression of 91 genes by > 50% at follow-up (Group × Time interaction), including down-regulation of pro-inflammatory and metastasis-related genes and up-regulation of Type I interferon response genes. Promoter-based bioinformatic analyses implicated decreased activity of NF-?B/Rel and GATA family transcription factors and increased activity of Interferon Response Factors and the Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) as potential mediators of CBSM-induced transcriptional alterations. Conclusions In early stage breast cancer patients, a 10-week CBSM intervention can reverse anxiety-related up-regulation of pro-inflammatory gene expression in circulating leukocytes. These findings clarify the molecular signaling pathways by which behavioral interventions can influence physical health and alter peripheral inflammatory processes that may reciprocally affect brain affective and cognitive processes. PMID:22088795

Antoni, Michael H.; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Blomberg, Bonnie; Carver, Charles S.; Lechner, Suzanne; Diaz, Alain; Stagl, Jamie; Arevalo, Jesusa M.G.; Cole, Steven W.

2011-01-01

419

Roadmap: Nutrition Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-NUTR  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Nutrition ­ Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-NUTR] College of Education, Health and Human Communication 3 Fulfills Kent Core Additional NUTR 23511 Science of Human Nutrition 3 Fulfills Kent Core of Management 3 BSCI 30030 Human Physiology 4 NUTR 43016 Cultural Aspects of Food, Nutrition and Health 3

Sheridan, Scott

420

A note on the reproductive performance of Damara, Dorper and Merino sheep under optimum management and nutrition for Merino ewes in the eastern wheatbelt of Western Australia.  

PubMed

The reproductive performance of 48 Damara, 42 Dorper and 46 Merino ewes was evaluated under an optimum nutritional regime for Merino ewes that included one annual joining in a mixed (cropping and sheep) farming system in the eastern wheatbelt of Western Australia (W.A.) over a 3-year period. In 2005, when the Damara, Dorper and Merino ewes were aged between 8 and 9 months at joining and weighed 41.2, 42.4 and 33.3 kg with average body condition scores of 2.3, 2.4 and 1.8, respectively, their weaning rates were 71% (Damara), 81% (Dorper) and 13% (Merino). The Merino ewes had significantly lighter body weights and were lower conditioned (p??0.05), the Damara weaning rates were significantly lower compared with the Dorper and Merino groups (p??0.05). In 2007, the Damara, Dorper and Merino ewes weighed 71.6, 77.1 and 70.2 kg at joining with body condition scores of 2.8, 2.8 and 2.5, respectively. Again, the Dorper ewes were heavier (p??0.05). The Damara and Dorper had the same body condition while the Merino ewes were less and different (p?nutritional management system optimal for Merino sheep and with one annual joining, with increasing age the Merino ewes weaned more lambs. However, while the Damara and Dorper ewes conceived and weaned relatively high lamb numbers when they were joined as lambs, their reproductive performance decreased over time. This nutritional regime resulted in increased levels of fatness of the Damara and Dorper ewes with no increase in reproduction rates under an annual joining system. A significant factor for the lower conception and weaning rates in the Damara ewes was the enlarged fat tail due to the increased fat levels, which made it difficult for the rams to impregnate the ewes. PMID:21725705

Kilminster, Tanya F; Greeff, Johan C

2011-10-01

421

Guideline clinical nutrition in patients with stroke  

PubMed Central

Stroke is regularly accompanied by dysphagia and other factors associated with decreased nutritional intake. Dysphagia with aspiration pneumonia and insufficient nutritional intake lead to worse outcome after stroke. This guideline is the first chapter of the guideline “Clinical Nutrition in Neurology” of the German Society for Clinical Nutrition (DGEM) which itself is one part of a comprehensive guideline about all areas of Clinical Nutrition. The thirty-one recommendations of the guideline are based on a systematic literature search and review, last updated December 31, 2011. All recommendations were discussed and consented at several consensus conferences with the entire DGEM guideline group. The recommendations underline the importance of an early screening and assessment of dysphagia and give advice for an evidence based and comprehensive nutritional management to avoid aspiration, malnutrition and dehydration. PMID:24289189

2013-01-01

422

Nutrition Frontiers - Winter 2010  

Cancer.gov

Nutrition Frontiers - Winter 2010 Winter 2010 Volume 1, Issue 1 Dear Colleague, Welcome to the first issue of Nutrition Frontiers, a quarterly newsletter from the Nutritional Science Research Group (NSRG), Division of Cancer Prevention, NCI. In this

423

Assessing and Managing Caregiver Stress: Development of a Teaching Tool for Medical Residents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Forty medical residents from major teaching hospitals in Boston, Massachusetts, participated in small group teaching sessions about caregiver stress. A teaching tool was developed that included a teaching handout, interactive cases, standard instruments for assessing caregiver stress, peer-reviewed articles about caregiving, and a list of…

Famakinwa, Abisola; Fabiny, Anne

2008-01-01

424

Self-Efficacy and Stress of Staff Managing Challenging Behaviours of People with Learning Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Self-efficacy has been reported to play a significant role in stress levels of parents facing challenging behaviours of their children with learning disabilities. The role of self-efficacy has also been found to affect the stress levels of professional caregivers in such situations. To understand the implications of staff self-efficacy in…

Cudre-Mauroux, Annick

2011-01-01

425

An Academic Approach to Stress Management for College Students in a Conventional Classroom Setting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the identification of stress and the relationship of individual stress responses to physical and mental health, medical and behavioral professionals have been training individuals in coping strategies. To investigate the possibility of teaching cognitive coping skills to a nonclinical population in an academic setting, 41 college students…

Carnahan, Robert E.; And Others

426

Relax for Success: An Educator's Guide to Stress Management. [With CD-ROM].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is designed as a practical, concise, easy-to-read guide for relieving stress. It is written specifically for educators, with examples and anecdotes that relate to professional educators' experiences. It assumes a holistic approach to stress relief that incorporates thought, verbal and action strategies and techniques. The harm that…

Glanz, Jeffrey

427

STRESS MANAGEMENT Contact us for more information lds@qub.ac.uk 028 9097 2727  

E-print Network

of a recent example where you felt stressed and it was useful to help you perform e.g. your driving test Difficulty processing information Negative self-statements Emotional Signs of Stress Increased irritability PATTERNS Your thinking affects how you approach situations. Do you notice that you sometimes have

Paxton, Anthony T.

428

School-based nutrition education: lessons learned and new perspectives.  

PubMed

Nutrition is a major environmental influence on physical and mental growth and development in early life. Food habits during infancy can influence preferences and practices in later life and some evidence suggests fair to moderate tracking of food habits from childhood to adolescence. Studies support that good nutrition contributes to improving the wellbeing of children and their potential learning ability, thus contributing to better school performance. Children and young people who learn healthy eating habits, are encouraged to be physically active, to avoid smoking and to learn to manage stress, have the potential for reduced impact of chronic diseases in adulthood. Nutrition education is a key element to promoting lifelong healthy eating and exercise behaviours and should start from the early stages of life; it should also address the specific nutritional needs associated with pregnancy, including reinforcing breastfeeding. Food habits are complex in nature and multiple conditioning factors interact in their development. Young children do not choose what they eat, but their parents decide and prepare the food for them. During infancy and early childhood the family is a key environment for children to learn and develop food preferences and eating habits. As they grow and start school, teachers, peers and other people at school, together with the media and social leaders, become more important. Progressively children become more independent and start making their own food choices. The peer group is very important for adolescents and has a major influence in developing both food habits and lifestyles. Community trials suggest that nutrition education is an accessible effective tool in health promotion programmes with a focus on the development of healthy eating practices. PMID:11255503

Pérez-Rodrigo, C; Aranceta, J

2001-02-01

429

Building the Foundation for a Relevant and Acceptable Stress-Management Program to Millenial College Students: Use of Focus Groups to Determine How to Communicate with Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The college experience can involve many challenges that can contribute to stress and life adversity, and that can detract from the potential benefits of a successful college experience. In this study the qualitative research method of focus groups was used at three different universities to address college stress and how it could be managed. Seven focus groups were conducted to

Brent G. Ryder

2010-01-01

430

Setting Up the Next Generation Biofeedback Program for Stress and Anxiety Management for College Students: A Simple and Cost-Effective Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The increasing prevalence of stress and anxiety on college campuses along with limited resources and budget reductions for many campuses has prompted the need for innovative approaches to help students effectively manage their stress and anxiety. With college students becoming more and more technology-savvy, the authors present an innovative…

Ratanasiripong, Paul; Sverduk, Kevin; Hayashino, Diane; Prince, Judy

2010-01-01

431

The effects of Stress Management Training on collegiate football athletes' anxiety, self-esteem, self-efficacy, motivation, academic performance and coping skills  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study sought to examine the differential effects of a Stress Management Training on the anxiety, self-esteem, self-efficacy, motivation, academic performance, and coping skills for collegiate football athletes. It was hypothesized the Stress Management Training would have a positive effect on outcomes. The study was conducted using collegiate football athletes at a large urban university. Eighty-five collegiate football athletes participated,

Maria Lucille Sepulvelda

2008-01-01

432

Impact of ambient and supplemental ultraviolet-B stress on kidney bean plants: an insight into oxidative stress management.  

PubMed

In the present study, the response of kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Pusa Komal) plants was evaluated under three different levels of ultraviolet-B (UV-B), i.e., excluded UV-B (eUV-B), ambient UV-B (aUV-B; 5.8 kJ m(-2) day(-1)), and supplemental UV-B (sUV-B; 280-315 nm; ambient?+?7.2 kJ m(-2) day(-1)), under near-natural conditions. eUV-B treatment clearly demonstrated that both aUV-B and sUV-B are capable of causing significant changes in the plant's growth, metabolism, economic yield, genome template stability, total protein, and antioxidative enzyme profiles. The experimental findings showed maximum plant height at eUV-B, but biomass accumulation was minimum. Significant reductions in quantum yield (Fv/Fm) were observed under both aUV-B and sUV-B, as compared to eUV-B. UV-B-absorbing flavonoids increased under higher UV-B exposures with consequent increments in phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activities. The final yield was significantly higher in plants grown under eUV-B, compared to those under aUV-B and sUV-B. Total protein profile through sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and analysis of isoenzymes, like superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POX), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), and glutathione reductase (GR), through native PAGE revealed major changes in the leaf proteome under aUV-B and sUV-B, depicting induction of some major stress-related proteins. The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profile of genomic DNA also indicated a significant reduction of genome template stability under UV-B exposure. Thus, it can be inferred that more energy is diverted for inducing protection mechanisms rather than utilizing it for growth under high UV-B level. PMID:24728984

Singh, Suruchi; Sarkar, Abhijit; Agrawal, S B; Agrawal, Madhoolika

2014-11-01

433

Mobile Mental Wellness Training for Stress Management: Feasibility and Design Implications Based on a One-Month Field Study  

PubMed Central

Background Prevention and management of work-related stress and related mental problems is a great challenge. Mobile applications are a promising way to integrate prevention strategies into the everyday lives of citizens. Objective The objectives of this study was to study the usage, acceptance, and usefulness of a mobile mental wellness training application among working-age individuals, and to derive preliminary design implications for mobile apps for stress management. Methods Oiva, a mobile app based on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), was designed to support active learning of skills related to mental wellness through brief ACT-based exercises in the daily life. A one-month field study with 15 working-age participants was organized to study the usage, acceptance, and usefulness of Oiva. The usage of Oiva was studied based on the usage log files of the application. Changes in wellness were measured by three validated questionnaires on stress, satisfaction with life (SWLS), and psychological flexibility (AAQ-II) at the beginning and at end of the study and by user experience questionnaires after one week’s and one month’s use. In-depth user experience interviews were conducted after one month’s use to study the acceptance and user experiences of Oiva. Results Oiva was used actively throughout the study. The average number of usage sessions was 16.8 (SD 2.4) and the total usage time per participant was 3 hours 12 minutes (SD 99 minutes). Significant pre-post improvements were obtained in stress ratings (mean 3.1 SD 0.2 vs mean 2.5 SD 0.1, P=.003) and satisfaction with life scores (mean 23.1 SD 1.3 vs mean 25.9 SD 0.8, P=.02), but not in psychological flexibility. Oiva was perceived easy to use, acceptable, and useful by the participants. A randomized controlled trial is ongoing to evaluate the effectiveness of Oiva on working-age individuals with stress problems. Conclusions A feasibility study of Oiva mobile mental wellness training app showed good acceptability, usefulness, and engagement among the working-age participants, and provided increased understanding on the essential features of mobile apps for stress management. Five design implications were derived based on the qualitative findings: (1) provide exercises for everyday life, (2) find proper place and time for challenging content, (3) focus on self-improvement and learning instead of external rewards, (4) guide gently but do not restrict choice, and (5) provide an easy and flexible tool for self-reflection. PMID:25100683

Ahtinen, Aino; Valkkynen, Pasi; Kaipainen, Kirsikka; Vanhala, Toni; Ermes, Miikka; Sairanen, Essi; Myllymaki, Tero; Lappalainen, Raimo

2013-01-01

434

Energy sources for intravenous nutrition  

PubMed Central

Controversy exists concerning the appropriate use of carbohydrate solutions and fat emulsions as energy sources in intravenous nutritional regimens. Current evidence suggests that glucose is the carbohydrate energy source of choice and that when infused with appropriate quantities of protein it provides cheap and effective nutritional support in the majority of patients and clinical circumstances. During glucose infusion, blood glucose and acid-base balance should be closely monitored and, when indicated, exogenous insulin should be added to the regimen to combat hyperglycaemia and improve protein anabolism. Fat emulsions, although expensive, may justifiably be used in patients with moderate or severe stress to provide up to 50% of non-protein energy, especially in circumstances where attempts to satisfy energy requirements exclusively with glucose would impose an additional metabolic stress. PMID:3109093

Rowlands, B J

1987-01-01

435

Eating for 1, Healthy and Active for 2; feasibility of delivering novel, compact training for midwives to build knowledge and confidence in giving nutrition, physical activity and weight management advice during pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Background Women in Wales are more likely to be obese in pregnancy than in any other United Kingdom (UK) country. Midwives are ideally placed to explore nutrition, physical activity and weight management concerns however qualitative studies indicate they lack confidence in raising the sensitive issue of weight. Acknowledging this and the reality of finite time and resources, this study aimed to deliver compact training on nutrition, physical activity and weight management during pregnancy to increase the knowledge and confidence of midwives in this subject. Methods A compact training package for midwives was developed comprising of evidence based nutrition, physical activity and weight management guidance for pregnancy. Training was promoted via midwifery leads and delivered within the Health Board. Questionnaires based on statements from national public health guidance were used to assess changes in self-reported knowledge and confidence pre and post training. Descriptive statistics were applied and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results 43 midwives registered for training, 32 (74%) attended and completed the questionnaires. Although, pre training knowledge and confidence varied between participants, statistically significant improvements in self-reported knowledge and confidence were observed post training. 97% indicated knowledge of pregnancy specific food and nutrition messages as ‘better’ (95% CI 85 to 100), as opposed to 3% stating ‘stayed the same’ – 60% stated ‘much better’. 83% indicated confidence to explain the risks of raised BMI in pregnancy was either ‘much’ or ‘somewhat better’ (95% CI 66 to 93), as opposed to 17% stating ‘stayed the same’. 89% indicated confidence to discuss eating habits and physical activity was ‘much’ or ‘somewhat better’ (95% CI 73 to 97) as opposed to 11% stating ‘stayed the same’. Emergent themes highlighted that training was positively received and relevant to midwifery practice. Conclusions This study provides early indications that a compact nutrition, physical activity and weight management training package improves midwives self-reported knowledge and confidence. Cascading training across the midwifery service in the Health Board and conducting further studies to elicit longer term impact on midwifery practice and patient outcomes are recommended. PMID:24996422

2014-01-01

436

Assessment of Parenting Stress as Measured by the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form Related to Treatment and Management of a Child with Phenylketonuria.  

E-print Network

??Levels of parenting stress in parents/caregivers of children with phenylketonuria (PKU) and factors associated with stress levels were evaluated, using the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form,… (more)

Stevenson, Angela

2013-01-01

437

Knockout of multiple Arabidopsis cation/H(+) exchangers suggests isoform-specific roles in metal stress response, germination and seed mineral nutrition.  

PubMed

Cation/H(+) exchangers encoded by CAX genes play an important role in the vacuolar accumulation of metals including Ca(2+) and Mn(2+). Arabidopsis thaliana CAX1 and CAX3 have been previously shown to differ phylogenetically from CAX2 but the physiological roles of these different transporters are still unclear. To examine the functions and the potential of redundancy between these three cation transporters, cax1/cax2 and cax2/cax3 double knockout mutants were generated and compared with wild type and cax single knockouts. These double mutants had equivalent metal stress responses to single cax mutants. Both cax1 and cax1/cax2 had increased tolerance to Mg stress, while cax2 and cax2/cax3 both had increased sensitivity to Mn stress. The cax1/cax2 and cax2/cax3 mutants did not exhibit the deleterious developmental phenotypes previously seen with the cax1/cax3 mutant. However, these new double mutants did show alterations in seed germination, specifically a delay in germination time. These alterations correlated with changes in nutrient content within the seeds of the mutants, particularly the cax1/cax2 mutant which had significantly higher seed content of Ca and Mn. This study indicates that the presence of these Arabidopsis CAX transporters is important for normal germination and infers a role for CAX proteins in metal homeostasis within the seed. PMID:23071810

Connorton, James M; Webster, Rachel E; Cheng, Ninghui; Pittman, Jon K

2012-01-01

438

Managing Traumatic Stress: Tips for Recovering from Disasters and Other Traumatic Events  

MedlinePLUS

... and life stress. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology , 75 (5), 671. doi: 10.1037/0022-006X. ... 2001). Loss and human resilience. Applied and Preventive Psychology , 10 (3), 193-206. doi: 10.1016/S0962- ...

439

Nutrient Content of Foods, Nutritional Supplements, and Food Fallacies. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.; Stein, Joan Z.

440

Fostering assumption-based stress-test thinking in managing groundwater systems: learning to avoid failures due to basic dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sustainable groundwater resource management can only be achieved if planning processes address the basic dynamics of the groundwater system. Conceptual and distributed groundwater models do not necessarily translate into an understanding of how a plan might operate in reality. Prompted by Australian experiences, `iterative closed-question modelling' has been used to develop a process of iterative dialogue about management options, objectives and knowledge. Simple hypothetical models of basic system dynamics that satisfy agreed assumptions are used to stress-test the ability of a proposed management plan to achieve desired future conditions. Participants learn from models in which a plan succeeds and fails, updating their assumptions, expectations or plan. Their new understanding is tested against further hypothetical models. The models act as intellectual devices that confront users with new scenarios to discuss. This theoretical approach is illustrated using simple one and two-cell groundwater models that convey basic notions of capture and spatial impacts of pumping. Simple extensions can address uncertain climate, managed-aquifer recharge and alternate water sources. Having learnt to address the dynamics captured by these models, participants may be better placed to address local conditions and develop more effective arrangements to achieve management outcomes.

Guillaume, Joseph H. A.; El Sawah, Sondoss

2014-06-01

441

Nutrition of the Fetus and Newborn  

PubMed Central

Both the successful development of healthy, long-term animal models to study fetal nutrition and metabolism and the improved survival of low-birth-weight, preterm infants have focused interest and research on fetal and neonatal nutrition and metabolism. Such a focus is important, given the recent emphasis on promoting neonatal growth in preterm infants at “normal” in utero growth rates. Estimates of nutrient requirements for growth in a human fetus remain ill defined, however. Body composition data appear biased toward thin infants. Animal data suggest that fetal nutrition proceeds according to species-specific growth rates, with variations in fat content largely dependent on placental fat permeability and on maternal nutrient supply as regulated by the placenta. After birth, neonatal nutrition is affected primarily by food intake and the functional integrity and capacity of the gastrointestinal tract. Additionally, muscle activity, thermoregulation and stresses of various kinds and degrees modify a neonate's nutritional requirements. Functional deficits of the gastrointestinal tract have been circumvented by a more aggressive use of intravenous nutrition. Both intravenous and enteral nutrient mixtures have been substantially improved in the quantity of all nutrients and have been modified qualitatively toward compositions that are closer to those of human milk. These nutrient mixtures now produce plasma nutrient concentrations that approximate those of a healthy, breast-fed infant. Although such efforts to improve the nutritional balance and growth of preterm infants have been successful, much remains to be learned about the nutritional requirements of sick infants. PMID:3318138

Kennaugh, Jan M.; Hay, William W.

1987-01-01

442

Implementation and effects of an individual stress management intervention for family caregivers of an elderly relative living at home: A mixed research design  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this project was to evaluate the implementation and effects of a stress management intervention for family caregivers of elderly persons. The intervention was implemented through an action research design with the collaboration of case managers working in community health centers. A total of 81 caregivers participated in the study. The quasi- experimental design used to test the

Francine Ducharme; Paule Lebel; Lise Lachance; Denise Trudeau

2006-01-01

443

Co-occurring Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Substance Use Disorder: Recommendations for Management and Implementation in the Department of Veterans Affairs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recently revised Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and Department of Defense Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) offers guidance to treat co-occurring PTSD and substance use disorder. The release of the guideline occurred at a time of cultural shifts in recognizing and managing substance use disorders and when major changes were made in the

Nancy C. Bernardy; Jessica L. Hamblen; Matthew J. Friedman; Daniel R. Kivlahan

2011-01-01

444

A Model of Oxidative Stress Management: Moderation of Carbohydrate Metabolizing Enzymes in SOD1-Null Drosophila melanogaster  

PubMed Central

The response to oxidative stress involves numerous genes and mutations in these genes often manifest in pleiotropic ways that presumably reflect perturbations in ROS-mediated physiology. The Drosophila melanogaster SOD1-null allele (cSODn108) is proposed to result in oxidative stress by preventing superoxide breakdown. In SOD1-null flies, oxidative stress management is thought to be reliant on the glutathione-dependent antioxidants that utilize NADPH to cycle between reduced and oxidized form. Previous studies suggest that SOD1-null Drosophila rely on lipid catabolism for energy rather than carbohydrate metabolism. We tested these connections by comparing the activity of carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes, lipid and triglyceride concentration, and steady state NADPH:NADP+ in SOD1-null and control transgenic rescue flies. We find a negative shift in the activity of carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes in SOD1-nulls and the NADP+-reducing enzymes were found to have significantly lower activity than the other enzymes assayed. Little evidence for the catabolism of lipids as preferential energy source was found, as the concentration of lipids and triglycerides were not significantly lower in SOD1-nulls compared with controls. Using a starvation assay to impact lipids and triglycerides, we found that lipids were indeed depleted in both genotypes when under starvation stress, suggesting that oxidative damage was not preventing the catabolism of lipids in SOD1-null flies. Remarkably, SOD1-nulls were also found to be relatively resistant to starvation. Age profiles of enzyme activity, triglyceride and lipid concentration indicates that the trends observed are consistent over the average lifespan of the SOD1-nulls. Based on our results, we propose a model of physiological response in which organisms under oxidative stress limit the production of ROS through the down-regulation of carbohydrate metabolism in order to moderate the products exiting the electron transport chain. PMID:21909438

Bernard, Kristine E.; Parkes, Tony L.; Merritt, Thomas J. S.

2011-01-01

445

Nutrition and ageing.  

PubMed

The reviewed literature indicates that, even in industrialised countries, the nutrition of mature and aged subjects is often inadequate (because of deficiency or excess), which may lead to premature or pathological senescence. Recent nutritional research on ageing laboratory animals shows that dietary restriction may be the most effective procedure to achieve a long and disease-free life span, probably owing to a better protection against mitochondria-linked oxygen stress. Likewise, the experimental and clinical work from many laboratories, including our own, indicates that age-dependent changes in the cardiovascular and immune systems are linked to oxygen stress and that an adequate intake of dietary antioxidants may protect those systems against chronic degenerative syndromes in the physiopathology of which reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a key role. The extant data indicate that the antioxidant vitamins C and E are centrally involved in defending the above two systems against ROS attack. Moreover, recent research suggests that the glutathione-related thiolic antioxidants, thiazolidine carboxylic acid (thioproline) and N-acetylcysteine, as well as the phenolic liposoluble 'co-antioxidants' of Curcuma longa, may have a significant protective effect against age-related atherogenesis and immune dysfunction. Key messages from this paper are the following. (1) It is generally accepted that oxygen free radicals released in metabolic reactions play a key role in the physiopathology of 'normal ageing' and of many age-related degenerative diseases. (2) Consumption of adequate levels of antioxidants in the diet is essential in order to preserve health in old age. (3) A certain degree of protection against atherogenesis and immune dysfunction may be achieved by preventing vitamin E deficiency and an excessive oxidation of the glutathione-supported thiol pool. PMID:11918486

Miquel, J

2001-12-01

446

Nutrition in Gastrointestinal Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gastrointestinal cancers can significantly impact nutrition status. Data indicate that the presence of malnutrition in cancer\\u000a patients negatively impacts response to treatment, quality of life and survival. The nutritional support of patients with\\u000a gastrointestinal cancer should be individualized and may be dependent upon anticancer treatment modality. Interventions with\\u000a parenteral nutrition, enteral nutrition and immunonutrition are indicated in certain situations. Nutritional

Maureen B. Huhmann; David A. August

447

Lead impact on nutrition, energy reserves, respiration and stress protein (hsp 70) level in Porcellio scaber (Isopoda) populations differently preconditioned in their habitats.  

PubMed

The impact of lead on food consumption, energy metabolism and the stress protein (hsp 70) level was investigated in the woodlouse Porcellio scaber (Isopoda), a common representative of the saprophagous soil macrofauna. To examine possible acclimation or tolerance to lead in woodlice from a contaminated habitat, animals of two populations, one deriving from a lead-contaminated artillery range and one from an uncontaminated control stand, were exposed to a series of lead concentrations under otherwise constant laboratory conditions for a maximum of 80 days. The applied lead concentrations (at a maximum 7945 mg/kg food dry wt) did not have any significant quantitative effect on the food consumption of the isopods, although the population pre-exposed in the artillery range showed a tendency toward a higher food uptake than the control population. After 80 days of exposure, both populations showed an equal trend toward increasing their respiration as lead concentrations, that they had been fed on, were increased. Accordingly, the glycogen content of the body, in both populations, was elevated with increasing lead concentrations in the food. This effect was more pronounced in the pre-exposed isopod population than in the one from the control stand. The non-pre-exposed isopods showed a general tendency toward a lower protein content of their bodies than the pre-exposed ones, although no effect of the lead on this parameter could be statistically proven. The ability of the artillery range isopods to synthesise stress proteins (hsp 70) in response to lead contamination decreased at much lower lead concentrations in their food than in the non-pre-exposed control population, even though the artillery range isopods seemed to be equally or even slightly better equipped with energy storage products. Even though the better nutrient status of these animals might refer to some lead tolerance of the pre-exposed population, the stress protein data suggest that a metal-resistant Porcellio population did not evolve in this lead-contaminated site. PMID:15092951

Knigge, T; Köhler, H R

2000-05-01

448

Stress Literacy in Australian Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Stress literacy is a term that refers to knowledge about stress and stress management techniques. Levels of stress literacy were examined in more than nine hundred Australian adolescents by providing a short stress-management education session and assessing stress literacy using a pre-post survey design. It was found that while adolescents had a…

Varlow, Megan; Wuthrich, Viviana; Murrihy, Rachael; Remond, Louise; Tuqiri, Rebekka; van Kessel, Jacobine; Wheatley, Anna; Dedousis-Wallace, Anna; Kidman, Antony

2009-01-01

449

Nutritional management of gastrointestinal disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is primarily responsible for acquiring and digesting food, absorbing nutrients and water, and expelling wastes from the body as feces. A proper diet and normally functioning GI tract are integral for the delivery of nutrients, prevention of nutrient deficiencies and malnutrition, repair of damaged intestinal epithelium, restoration of normal luminal bacterial populations, promotion of normal GI

Deb Zoran

2003-01-01

450

Stress testing in the prognosis and management of ischemic heart disease.  

PubMed

Stress testing is by no means perfect as far diagnosing coronary artery disease, but at this time it is the single best noninvasive method for establishing the presence of ischemic heart disease. From the data shown here, one can see that it adds some important prognostic features as well. The American Heart Association has published a "Coronary Risk Handbook" which can be used to predict the likelihood of a future coronary event by means of accepted risk factors such as hypertension, cholesterol level, and smoking. If we include a positive stress test as a risk factor and compare it to the others, it is clear that a posi