Sample records for nutrition stress management

  1. Stress Management

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Friendly Worksites Program Requirements Fit-Friendly Resources Stress Management Banner 1 - To Stress or Not to Stress - ... Decide But We Can Help What Is Stress Management? Banner 2 - Stress Continuum Graphic Banner Live life ...

  2. Stress management

    MedlinePLUS

    ... stress, such as stomach cramps, for example. Stress management means trying to control and reduce the tension ... a person cope with stress. AN INDIVIDUAL STRESS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Find the positive in situations, and do ...

  3. Manage Stress

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Conditions and Diseases > Heart Health > Manage Stress Manage Stress The Basics Take Action! Ver en espańol Content ... on: March 31, 2015 The Basics Not all stress is bad. Stress can help protect you in ...

  4. Nutrition and fluid management.

    PubMed

    Pegram, Anne; Bloomfield, Jacqueline

    2015-04-01

    Management of fluid intake and nutrition is an essential component of nursing care and should be practised skilfully by all nurses and nursing students. This requirement forms the basis of the fourth essential skills cluster, nutrition and fluid management. The essential skills clusters stipulate key skills and behaviours to be demonstrated to meet the standards for registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council. This article, the fourth in a series on the essential skills clusters, discusses the core aspects of nutrition and fluid management and emphasises their importance in recovery from illness and in maintaining optimal health. PMID:25828020

  5. Horse Nutrition and Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Horses are used in a variety of activities with over 5.32 million animals reported in the US. Many of these horses are owned and managed for profit and a significant number are for recreation and sport. Regardless of the use, proper nutrition is essential for maximizing animal growth and productivit...

  6. Nutritional management of stroke patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. CAIRELLA; L. SCALFI; R. BERNI CANANI; F. GARBAGNATI; M. G. GENTILE; C. GIANNI; M. MARCELLI; A. MOLFINO; M. MUSCARITOLI; S. PAOLUCCI; L. PRATESI; F. ROSSI FANELLI; U. SCOGNAMIGLIO; Y. TARI; E. TROIANO; F. BRANCA

    Stroke has a significant impact on public health in Italy as well as in most industri- alized countries due to its high incidence, prevalence and subsequent disability rate. While ap- propriate diagnostic tools and pharmacological agents have proven effective in the manage- ment of this disease, the unequivocal demonstration of the usefulness of nutrition therapy in stroke patients is lacking.

  7. Influences of nutrition and stress on people at risk for neutropenia: nursing implications.

    PubMed

    Carter, L W

    1993-09-01

    Neutropenia may be influenced by malignancy type, treatment, age extremes, inadequate nutrition, or psychological stress. Of these five factors, only nutrition and stress are amenable to nursing intervention and management. The increasing trend of providing treatment in the outpatient setting and managing the patient with neutropenia in the home challenges nurses to develop innovative methods of care. This article offers suggestions to assist nurses in the creative management of individuals at risk for neutropenia by maximizing nutrition and minimizing psychological stress. This discussion addresses the physiology of the inflammatory immune response; pathophysiology of neutropenia; factors that may influence the risk of infection, such as sustained stress, dietary fiber, antioxidant vitamins, and food-borne bacteria; and interventions that reduce the potential for neutropenic sepsis. Nursing implications that reduce the risk of neutropenic infection include patient education related to nutrition, stress management, and self-care. PMID:8415151

  8. Nutrient Management Module No. 2 Plant Nutrition

    E-print Network

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Nutrient Management Module No. 2 Plant Nutrition and Soil Fertility by Clain Jones, Soil Chemist of Extension materials designed to provide pertinent information on a variety of nutrient management, water" as well as offer the potential for credits for CCAs in Nutrient Management (within the "Plant Nutrition

  9. Managing Stress. Project Seed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muto, Donna; Wilk, Jan

    One of eight papers from Project Seed, this paper describes a stress management project undertaken with high school sophomores. Managing Stress is described as an interactive workshop that offers young people an opportunity to examine specific areas of stress in their lives and to learn effective ways to deal with them. The program described…

  10. Managing Leadership Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bal, Vidula; Campbell, Michael; McDowell-Larsen, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    Everyone experiences stress, and leaders face the additional stress brought about by the unique demands of leadership: having to make decisions with limited information, to manage conflict, to do more with less ...and faster! The consequences of stress can include health problems and deteriorating relationships. Knowing what signs of stress to…

  11. Oxidative Stress and Nutritional Status in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Niraj; Baral, Nirmal; Shrestha, Shrijana; Dhakal, Subodh Sagar; Bhatta, Narendra; Dubey, Raju Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress and malnutrition are shown to have pathogenic effect in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Aim: This study was done to assess the burden of oxidative stress in COPD and to determine its relation to their nutritional status. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 100 COPD cases from emergency and medical ward and meeting inclusion criteria, along with age, sex and occupation (mainly farmers, housewives and drivers) matched 100 controls without COPD and meeting inclusion criteria were enrolled. Oxidative stress was assessed by measuring lipid peroxidation product, Malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidants, like Vitamin C, E and Red Blood Cell Catalase (RBCC). Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) tool and Body Mass Index (BMI) were used to assess nutritional status. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square test was applied for categorical variable. Student t-test was applied for comparison of means. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was applied for comparison between groups followed by Bonferroni post hoc analysis. Pearson correlation method was used for quantitative variables. Statistical significance was defined as p< 0.05 (two tailed). Results: COPD cases had significantly high MDA level with low level of Vitamin E and catalase as compared to controls (p < 0.001). Most of the COPD cases were underweight (BMI ? 18.5 Kg/m2) and malnourished (MNA score less than 7). Bonferroni post-hoc analysis, showed significantly high burden of oxidative stress in underweight and malnourished cases as compared to normal weight (p < 0.05) among COPD cases. Highly significant correlation was seen between BMI and plasma MDA level (r = ?0.27, p = 0.008) in COPD cases. Conclusion: This study shows impaired oxidant/antioxidant balance along with malnutrition and underweight in COPD, which signals for considering antioxidant therapy along with nutritional management.

  12. Managing Time and Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffstutter, Sandra; Smith, Stuart C.

    Chapter 14 of a revised volume on school leadership, this chapter offers many practical suggestions for managing time and reducing stress. The primary challenge is to unblock the route to effective time/stress management by recognizing unproductive values and attitudes (such as overreliance on the Protestant work ethic or the appearance of…

  13. Nutritional issues in cancer management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alessandro Laviano; Michael M. Meguid

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this article was to investigate the relationship between nutrition and cancer, as it relates to the initiation, promotion, and treatment of tumor growth. English-language studies published in the last 25 years were retrieved using MEDLINE, bibliographies, and consultation with experts. MEDLINE search terms included “cancer”, “malnutrition,” and “nutritional support.” In vitro and in vivo controlled studies addressing

  14. Stress Management for Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaichkowsky, Leonard D., Ed.; Sime, Wesley E., Ed.

    Included in this volume are papers on stress management in athletics; eight of the ten papers are followed with a "Coach's Reaction": (1) "Competitive Athletic Stress Factors in Athletes and Coaches" (Walter Kroll); (2) "Mental Preparation for Peak Performance in Swimmers" (Eugene F. Gauron)--Coach's Reaction by Suzi D'Annolfo; (3) "Cognitive…

  15. Correlations among Stress, Physical Activity and Nutrition: School Employee Health Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillan, Wynn; Naquin, Millie; Zannis, Marie; Bowers, Ashley; Brewer, Julie; Russell, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Employee health promotion programs increase work productivity and effectively reduce employer costs related to health care and absenteeism, and enhance worker productivity. Components of an effective worksite health program include stress management, exercise and nutrition and/or weight management classes or counseling. Few studies have documented…

  16. Nutritionally Mediated Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Muńoz, Alexandra; Costa, Max

    2013-01-01

    There are many sources of nutritionally mediated oxidative stress that trigger inflammatory cascades along short and long time frames. These events are primarily mediated via NF?B. On the short-term scale postprandial inflammation is characterized by an increase in circulating levels of IL-6 and TNF-? and is mirrored on the long-term by proinflammatory gene expression changes in the adipocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of obese individuals. Specifically the upregulation of CCL2/MCP-1, CCL3/MIP-1?, CCL4/MIP-1?, CXCL2/MIP-2?, and CXCL3/MIP-2? is noted because these changes have been observed in both adipocytes and PBMC of obese humans. In comparing numerous human intervention studies it is clear that pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory consumption choices mediate gene expression in humans adipocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Arachidonic acid and saturated fatty acids (SFAs) both demonstrate an ability to increase pro-inflammatory IL-8 along with numerous other inflammatory factors including IL-6, TNF?, IL-1?, and CXCL1 for arachidonic acid and IGB2 and CTSS for SFA. Antioxidant rich foods including olive oil, fruits, and vegetables all demonstrate an ability to lower levels of IL-6 in PBMCs. Thus, dietary choices play a complex role in the mediation of unavoidable oxidative stress and can serve to exacerbate or dampen the level of inflammation. PMID:23844276

  17. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Financial Stress, and Childhood Obesity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca Burgstahler; Craig Gundersen; Steven B. Garasky

    2012-01-01

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the largest nutritional assistance program addressing food insecurity in the United States. Due to the program’s reach, SNAP has been called upon to address other nutrition-related challenges facing low-income Americans, including childhood obesity. This study considers the effect of SNAP participation on child weight outcomes after controlling for household financial stress, an important

  18. Exploring Nutrition Literacy and Knowledge among a National Sample of School Nutrition Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoellner, Jamie; Carr, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this national study was to describe nutrition literacy levels and nutrition knowledge among school nutrition (SN) managers, and explore if barriers to seeking SN information, perceived role in school wellness, and confidence in SN decision making varied by nutrition literacy and knowledge scores. Methods: An…

  19. Evolution of nutritional management of acute malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Golden, Michael H

    2010-08-01

    Wasting, kwashiorkor and stunting are not usually due to either protein or energy deficiency. Treatment based upon this concept results in high mortality rates, and failure of treated children to return physiologically to normal. They become relatively obese with insufficient lean tissue. Preventive strategies have also failed. Wasting and stunting are primarily due to deficiency of type II nutrients and kwashiorkor probably due to deficiency of several type I nutrients that confer resistance to oxidative stress. Modern dietary treatments are based upon the F75 formula whilst the child is sick without an appetite, followed by F100 for rapid gain of weight. Derivative, ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF) allow treatment of large numbers of children at home, are preferred by mothers and dramatically improve coverage. Children are indentified by screening in the community and treated before complications arise, using simple protocols. Successful treatment of the sick children with severe malnutrition not only depends upon these products, but appropriate management of complications. The physiology of the malnourished child is completely different from the normal child and many drugs and treatments that are safe in children with normal physiology are fatal for the malnourished child. In particular, the diagnosis and management of diarrhea and dehydration is different in the malnourished child. Giving standard treatment frequently leads to circulatory overload and death from heart failure. The challenge now is to find successful local ways to prevent malnutrition and achieve nutritional security. Until prevention works, we have to rely on fortified foods for treatment and convalescence from illness. PMID:20972284

  20. Personal and Family Stress Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Patricia Tanner; Nelson, Carl William

    1981-01-01

    Reviews selected research on personal and family stress and outlines some of the most effective strategies for stress management. Topics include effective management strategies for individuals, families under stress, stress pile-ups, conflicting role expectations, and effective coping strategies for families. (CT)

  1. ISS Update: Nutrition Manager Talks About Children's Book '??Space Nutrition' - Duration: 12:10.

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean interviews Scott Smith, Manager of Nutritional Biochemistry at Johnson Space Center, about the children'??s book he co-authored called "Space Nutrition."?ť T...

  2. Nutrition Training Improves Health Workers’ Nutrition Knowledge and Competence to Manage Child Undernutrition: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sunguya, Bruno F.; Poudel, Krishna C.; Mlunde, Linda B.; Urassa, David P.; Yasuoka, Junko; Jimba, Masamine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medical and nursing education lack adequate practical nutrition training to fit the clinical reality that health workers face in their practices. Such a deficit creates health workers with poor nutrition knowledge and child undernutrition management practices. In-service nutrition training can help to fill this gap. However, no systematic review has examined its collective effectiveness. We thus conducted this study to examine the effectiveness of in-service nutrition training on health workers’ nutrition knowledge, counseling skills, and child undernutrition management practices. Methods: We conducted a literature search on nutrition interventions from PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, and World Health Organization regional databases. The outcome variables were nutrition knowledge, nutrition-counseling skills, and undernutrition management practices of health workers. Due to heterogeneity, we conducted only descriptive analyses. Results: Out of 3910 retrieved articles, 25 were selected as eligible for the final analysis. A total of 18 studies evaluated health workers’ nutrition knowledge and showed improvement after training. A total of 12 studies with nutrition counseling as the outcome variable also showed improvement among the trained health workers. Sixteen studies evaluated health workers’ child undernutrition management practices. In all such studies, child undernutrition management practices and competence of health workers improved after the nutrition training intervention. Conclusion: In-service nutrition training improves quality of health workers by rendering them more knowledge and competence to manage nutrition-related conditions, especially child undernutrition. In-service nutrition training interventions can help to fill the gap created by the lack of adequate nutrition training in the existing medical and nursing education system. In this way, steps can be taken toward improving the overall nutritional status of the child population. PMID:24350206

  3. Metabolomic differentiation of nutritional stress in an aquatic invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Nicole D; Lankadurai, Brian P; Simpson, Myrna J; Simpson, Andre J; Frost, Paul C

    2015-01-01

    Poor diet quality frequently constrains the growth and reproduction of primary consumers, altering their population dynamics, interactions in food webs, and contributions to ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling. The identification and measurement of an animal's nutritional state are thus central to studying the connections between diet and animal ecology. Here we show how the nutritional state of a freshwater invertebrate, Daphnia magna, can be determined by analyzing its endogenous metabolites using hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics. With a multivariate analysis, we observed the differentiation of the metabolite composition of animals grown under control conditions (good food and no environmental stress), raised on different diets (low quantity, nitrogen limited, and phosphorus limited), and exposed to two common environmental stressors (bacterial infection and salt stress). We identified 18 metabolites that were significantly different between control animals and at least one limiting food type or environmental stressor. The unique metabolite responses of animals caused by inadequate nutrition and environmental stress are reflective of dramatic and distinctive effects that each stressor has on animal metabolism. Our results suggest that dietary-specific induced changes in metabolite composition of animal consumers hold considerable promise as indicators of nutritional stress and will be invaluable to future studies of animal nutrition. PMID:25590592

  4. Stress Management: A Rational Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Cecil

    This workbook was designed for use as the primary resource tool during a l-day participatory stress management seminar in which participants identify stressful situations, conduct analyses, and develop approaches to manage the stressful situations more effectively. Small group warm-up activities designed to introduce participants, encourage…

  5. DEAF HEALTH TALKS: Stress Management

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    #12;Stress Hormones · Cortisol ­ primary stress hormone · Increases: sugars in blood & brain's useDEAF HEALTH TALKS: Stress Management Student Development Center October 12, 2011 This presentation Research (NCDHR) · Matthew Starr and Michael McKee · Student Life Team #12;So What is Stress? · Normal

  6. Ms Sylvia Stephen, MSc. Human Nutrition Unit Manager

    E-print Network

    Levi, Ran

    Ms Sylvia Stephen, MSc. Human Nutrition Unit Manager 01224 438607 sylvia.stephen@abdn.ac.uk Contact us: The Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health offers a bespoke service to the food industry We also offer guidance and advice on when a nutritional claim can be made on your product Back of pack

  7. Neuroimmunomodulation, Stress–Nutrition Interactions and Diet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Javier Romeo Marin; Julia Wärnberg; E. Nova; S Sonia Gómez-Martínez; Ligia Esperanza Díaz; A. Veses; Ascansión Marcos

    \\u000a The immune system requires a constant supply of nutrients for its optimal function and performance. Under stress conditions,\\u000a the immune response may be suppressed and is modulated by the central nervous system through a complex network of signals.\\u000a Communication between the neuroendocrine and immune systems has been well established, and there is ample evidence to indicate\\u000a that stress-associated immune dysregulation

  8. Nutrition assessment and management of left ventricular assist device patients.

    PubMed

    Holdy, Kalman; Dembitsky, Walter; Eaton, Laura L; Chillcott, Suzanne; Stahovich, Marcia; Rasmusson, Brad; Pagani, Francis

    2005-10-01

    Nutrition evaluation and support is an integral component of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) therapy. Malnutrition in the LVAD patient contributes to a host of post-operative problems, such as infection and limited functional capacity, which compromise long-term outcomes. Comprehensive pre-operative evaluation of the LVAD patient should include a nutrition assessment and formalized plan to initiate and advance nutrition support while addressing the metabolic imbalances associated with heart failure. An interdisciplinary approach, including a nutrition support team, is desirable to manage these patients effectively. This article reviews essential aspects regarding nutrition management of these patients. PMID:16210148

  9. Stress: Neurobiology, consequences and management

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil; Rinwa, Puneet; Kaur, Gurleen; Machawal, Lalit

    2013-01-01

    Stress, both physical and psychological, is attracting increasing attention among neuroresearchers. In the last 20 decades, there has been a surge of interest in the research of stress-induced manifestations and this approach has resulted in the development of more appropriate animal models for stress-associated pathologies and its therapeutic management. These stress models are an easy and convenient method for inducing both psychological and physical stress. To understand the behavioral changes underlying major depression, molecular and cellular studies are required. Dysregulation of the stress system may lead to disturbances in growth and development, and may this may further lead to the development of various other psychiatric disorders. This article reviews the different types of stress and their neurobiology, including the different neurotransmitters affected. There are various complications associated with stress and their management through various pharmacological and non-pharmacological techniques. The use of herbs in the treatment of stress-related problems is practiced in both Indian and Western societies, and it has a vast market in terms of anti-stress medications and treatments. Non-pharmacological techniques such as meditation and yoga are nowadays becoming very popular as a stress-relieving therapy because of their greater effectiveness and no associated side effects. Therefore, this review highlights the changes under stress and stressor and their impact on different animal models in understanding the mechanisms of stress along with their effective and safe management. PMID:23833514

  10. Stress: Neurobiology, consequences and management.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Rinwa, Puneet; Kaur, Gurleen; Machawal, Lalit

    2013-04-01

    Stress, both physical and psychological, is attracting increasing attention among neuroresearchers. In the last 20 decades, there has been a surge of interest in the research of stress-induced manifestations and this approach has resulted in the development of more appropriate animal models for stress-associated pathologies and its therapeutic management. These stress models are an easy and convenient method for inducing both psychological and physical stress. To understand the behavioral changes underlying major depression, molecular and cellular studies are required. Dysregulation of the stress system may lead to disturbances in growth and development, and may this may further lead to the development of various other psychiatric disorders. This article reviews the different types of stress and their neurobiology, including the different neurotransmitters affected. There are various complications associated with stress and their management through various pharmacological and non-pharmacological techniques. The use of herbs in the treatment of stress-related problems is practiced in both Indian and Western societies, and it has a vast market in terms of anti-stress medications and treatments. Non-pharmacological techniques such as meditation and yoga are nowadays becoming very popular as a stress-relieving therapy because of their greater effectiveness and no associated side effects. Therefore, this review highlights the changes under stress and stressor and their impact on different animal models in understanding the mechanisms of stress along with their effective and safe management. PMID:23833514

  11. Experimental Evidence for Nutrition Regulated Stress Resistance in Drosophila ananassae

    PubMed Central

    Sisodia, Seema; Singh, Bashisth N.

    2012-01-01

    Background The amount and quality of nutrients consumed by organisms have a strong impact on stress resistance, life-history traits and reproduction. The balance between energy acquisition and expenditure is crucial to the survival and reproductive success of animals. The ability of organisms to adjust their development, physiology or behavior in response to environmental conditions, called phenotypic plasticity, is a defining property of life. One of the most familiar and important examples of phenotypic plasticity is the response of stress tolerance and reproduction to changes in developmental nutrition. Larval nutrition may affect a range of different life-history traits as well as responses to environmental stress in adult. Principal Findings Here we investigate the effect of larval nutrition on desiccation, starvation, chill-coma recovery, heat resistance as well as egg to adult viability, egg production and ovariole number in Drosophila ananassae. We raised larvae on either protein rich diet or carbohydrate rich diet. We found that flies consuming protein rich diet have higher desiccation and heat shock resistance whereas flies developed on carbohydrate rich diet have higher starvation and cold resistance. Egg production was higher in females developed on protein rich diet and we also found trade-off between egg production and Egg to adult viability of the flies. Viability was higher in carbohydrate rich diet. However, sex specific viability was found in different nutritional regimes. Higher Egg production might be due to higher ovariole number in females of protein rich diet. Conclusion Thus, Drosophila ananassae adapts different stress tolerance and life-history strategies according to the quality of the available diet, which are correlated with phenotypic adjustment at anatomical and physiological levels. PMID:23049693

  12. Adaptation of an outbreaking insect defoliator to chronic nutritional stress.

    PubMed

    Quezada García, R; Seehausen, M L; Bauce, É

    2015-02-01

    During insect outbreaks, the high number of individuals feeding on its host plant causes a depletion of the food source. Reduced availability and decreased quality of nutrients negatively influence life-history traits of insects driving them to develop adaptive strategies to persist in the environment. In a laboratory experiment with three repetitions, we tested the effect of chronic nutritional stress on spruce budworm performance during three generations to determine the adaptive strategies employed by the insect to deal with a selection pressure produced by low-quality diet. Our results show that all tested life-history traits (mortality, developmental time, pupal mass, growth rate and female fecundity) but female fertility were negatively influenced by the low-quality diet simulating food depletion during outbreak conditions. However, especially females in the third generation under chronic nutritional stress show an adaptive response in life-history traits when compared to those reared only one generation on low-quality diet. Larval developmental time significantly decreased and pupal mass, growth rate and fecundity significantly increased. The study demonstrates the capacity of spruce budworm to react to chronic nutritional stress with adaptations that may be caused by epigenetic parental effects. This information can help to understand the course of an outbreak especially at peak densities and during the collapse. PMID:25510541

  13. Nutritional Management of Hypertension: Cost Versus Benefit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angelique Mavrodaris; Saverio Stranges

    \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a The incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and hypertension is increasing in both developed and developing countries with\\u000a major impacts on morbidity and mortality.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Nutritional management of high blood pressure is an important intervention that is safe, sustainable and cost-effective.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Dietary modifications that decrease BP include: reduced sodium and increased potassium intake; increased fruit and vegetable\\u000a intake; low-moderate

  14. Managing the Stress of Organizational Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warrick, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    Emphasizes the importance of recognizing and managing the stress produced by organizational development and encourages practitioners to acknowledge stress management as an important organizational development skill. (LRA)

  15. Stress-busters Tips and techniques for managing stress and

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Stress-busters Tips and techniques for managing stress and introducing relaxation into your life UCSC Counseling & Psychological Services What is stress? Stress is the physiological and psychological semester or new job can bring on stress. We are all under stress every day. A certain amount of stress

  16. Rehabilitation nutrition for sarcopenia with disability: a combination of both rehabilitation and nutrition care management.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Sakuma, Kunihiro

    2014-12-01

    Malnutrition and sarcopenia often occur in rehabilitation settings. The prevalence of malnutrition and sarcopenia in older patients undergoing rehabilitation is 49-67 % and 40-46.5 %, respectively. Malnutrition and sarcopenia are associated with poorer rehabilitation outcome and physical function. Therefore, a combination of both rehabilitation and nutrition care management may improve outcome in disabled elderly with malnutrition and sarcopenia. The concept of rehabilitation nutrition as a combination of both rehabilitation and nutrition care management and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health guidelines are used to evaluate nutrition status and to maximize functionality in the elderly and other people with disability. Assessment of the multifactorial causes of primary and secondary sarcopenia is important because rehabilitation nutrition for sarcopenia differs depending on its etiology. Treatment of age-related sarcopenia should include resistance training and dietary supplements of amino acids. Therapy for activity-related sarcopenia includes reduced bed rest time and early mobilization and physical activity. Treatment for disease-related sarcopenia requires therapies for advanced organ failure, inflammatory disease, malignancy, or endocrine disease, while therapy for nutrition-related sarcopenia involves appropriate nutrition management to increase muscle mass. Because primary and secondary sarcopenia often coexist in people with disability, the concept of rehabilitation nutrition is useful for their treatment. Stroke, hip fracture, and hospital-associated deconditioning are major causes of disability, and inpatients of rehabilitation facilities often have malnutrition and sarcopenia. We review the concept of rehabilitation nutrition, the rehabilitation nutrition options for stroke, hip fracture, hospital-associated deconditioning, sarcopenic dysphagia, and then evaluate the amount of research interest in rehabilitation nutrition. PMID:25223471

  17. Managing Teacher Stress and Burnout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Dennis; Hammond, Janice

    This monograph offers a practical guide for identifying and managing those stressors that are in the specific domain of the individual--exercise, diet, sleep, interpersonal relations, time and conflict management, and relaxation. The first section covers stress theory; methods to identify and clarify stressors; restoration of a balanced…

  18. Stress fractures: classification and management.

    PubMed

    Kaeding, Christopher C; Najarian, Robert G

    2010-10-01

    Stress fractures occur as a result of microdamage secondary to repetitive strains. A mechanism for the development of stress fractures involves the accumulation of microdamage, which occurs with multiple subultimate failure loads applied to the bone. Stress fractures may be classified as high or low risk, depending on the grade of the injury. The most common site of injury is the lower extremity. In this article, we review the pathophysiology, etiology, diagnosis, and management of stress fractures, and present treatment guidelines for return to play. PMID:20959695

  19. Managing Academic Stress Are You Experience Too Much Stress?

    E-print Network

    Kasman, Alex

    for yourself Ways to Reduce Academic Stress Take a look at your course load. For every hour you are in class stress is high and learn how to say "No". Use your resources! The best way to reduce academic stressManaging Academic Stress Are You Experience Too Much Stress? Sources of Academic Stress Course

  20. Nutritional and Feeding Management of Broodmares

    E-print Network

    Gibbs, Pete G.; Potter, Gary D.; Vogelsang, M. M.

    2005-04-13

    Nutrition and Feeding Man age ment of Broodmares B-5025 4/05 Nutrition and Feeding Man age ment of Broodmares Pete G. Gibbs, Gary D. Potter and Martha M Vogelsang* Horse producers should be con cerned about their mares? re- pro duc tive...

  1. Nutritional stress affects the tsetse fly's immune gene expression.

    PubMed

    Akoda, K; Van den Bossche, P; Marcotty, T; Kubi, C; Coosemans, M; De Deken, R; Van den Abbeele, J

    2009-09-01

    Tsetse-transmitted trypanosomiasis poses a serious threat to human and animal health in sub-Saharan Africa. The majority of tsetse flies (Glossina spp.) in a natural population will not develop a mature infection of either Trypanosoma congolense or Trypanosoma brucei sp. because of refractoriness, a phenomenon that is affected by different factors, including the tsetse fly's immune defence. Starvation of tsetse flies significantly increases their susceptibility to the establishment of a trypanosome infection. This paper reports the effects of nutritional stress (starvation) on (a) uninduced baseline levels of gene expression of the antimicrobial peptides attacin, defensin and cecropin in the tsetse fly, and (b) levels of expression induced in response to bacterial (Escherichia coli) or trypanosomal challenge. In newly emerged, unfed tsetse flies, starvation significantly lowers baseline levels of antimicrobial peptide gene expression, especially for attacin and cecropin. In response to trypanosome challenge, only non-starved older flies showed a significant increase in antimicrobial peptide gene expression within 5 days of ingestion of a trypanosome-containing bloodmeal, especially with T. brucei bloodstream forms. These data suggest that a decreased expression of immune genes in newly hatched flies or a lack of immune responsiveness to trypanosomes in older flies, both occurring as a result of fly starvation, may be among the factors contributing to the increased susceptibility of nutritionally stressed tsetse flies to trypanosome infection. PMID:19712150

  2. Nutritional and medical management of phenylketonuria and its implications on childhood nutritional status, growth and development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebekah Lord

    A literature review on the management of phenylketonuria (PKU) suggests that nutritional therapy may be associated with many challenges. Children who are diagnosed with phenylketonuria (PKU) must follow a strict protein-restricted diet from birth, and supplementation of these children with specialised phenylalanine (Phe)-free protein formula is essential. However, current dietary management may result in risk of deficiency of several essential

  3. Effect of Multiple Stresses (Thermal, Nutritional, and Walking Stress) on the Reproductive Performance of Malpura Ewes

    PubMed Central

    Sejian, V.; Maurya, V. P.; Kumar, K.; Naqvi, S. M. K.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the effect of multiple stresses (thermal, nutritional, and walking stress) on the reproductive performance of Malpura ewes. The study was conducted for a period of 35 days covering two estrous cycles during summer season (April-May). The ewes were randomly allocated into two groups of twelve animals each namely, GI (n=12; Control), and GII (n=1 2; Multiple stresses). GI ewes were maintained in the shed, while GII ewes were subjected to multiple stresses (thermal, nutritional, and walking stress). The estrus % differed significantly (P< 0.05) between the groups. Estrus duration also showed similar trend to that of estrus %. Both conception and lambing rate also differed significantly (P< 0.05) between the control and multiple-stress group. In addition plasma estradiol and progesterone also showed significant difference between the groups. The study proved the detrimental effects of multiple-stresses on various reproductive parameters studied. Hence it is very pertinent to conclude that when two or more than two stressors occur simultaneously, the total impact may be severe on reproductive functions of the animals. PMID:22448337

  4. Stress-management program: intervention in nursing student performance anxiety.

    PubMed

    Godbey, K L; Courage, M M

    1994-06-01

    This study measured the effect of an individualized stress-management program on nursing students who identified anxiety as interfering with academic performance in the nursing program. The quasi-experimental longitudinal study used a pretest, posttest, and follow-up test, control group design. Data were analyzed using t tests and analysis of variance (ANOVAS). In a 6-week counseling program students identified personal stress reactions and adapted coping strategies related to nutrition, exercise, progressive relaxation, cognitive control, time management, and testing skills to personal use. The program was effective in significantly increasing self-esteem and decreasing depression and anxiety. Grades improved sufficiently for student retention. PMID:8080308

  5. PROCEEDINGS OFTHE COMPARATIVE NUTRITION SOCIETY 2M)O Assessing the Role of Nutritional Stress in the Decline of Wild Populations: A

    E-print Network

    PROCEEDINGS OFTHE COMPARATIVE NUTRITION SOCIETY 2M)O Assessing the Role of Nutritional Stress Marine Mammal Research Unit University of British Columbia, 6248 Biological Sciences Rd., Vancouver, B statusofwild animals. Unfortunately, it is difficult to assess whether nutritional stress is a contributing

  6. INFLUENCE OF NUTRITIONAL STRESS AND THE AGE OF ADULTS ON THE MORPHOMETRICS OF HONEY BEES

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    INFLUENCE OF NUTRITIONAL STRESS AND THE AGE OF ADULTS ON THE MORPHOMETRICS OF HONEY BEES (APIS, U.S. Department of Agriculture, ARS, Beltsville, MD 20705 **Honey Bee Breeding, Genetics of nutritional stress, and the post-emergence age of adult worker honey bees, on the morphometric determinations

  7. Steller sea lions Eumetopias jubatus and nutritional stress: evidence from captive studiesmam_150 284..306

    E-print Network

    Steller sea lions Eumetopias jubatus and nutritional stress: evidence from captive studiesmam_150, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4, Canada ABSTRACT 1. Numbers of Steller sea lions Eumetopias jubatus in the North if the nutritional stress hypothesis can explain the decline of Steller sea lions. 2. Overall, there is strong

  8. Steller sea lions Eumetopias jubatus and nutritional stress: evidence from captive studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DAVID A. S. ROSEN

    Numbers of Steller sea lions Eumetopias jubatus in the North Pacific have declined. According to the nutritional stress hypothesis, this decline is due to reduced food availability. Data from studies conducted on pinnipeds in the laboratory are used here to test if the nutritional stress hypothesis can explain the decline of Steller sea lions. 2. Overall, there is strong evidence

  9. Critical incident stress management (Cism)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George S Everly; Raymond B Flannery; Jeffrey T Mitchell

    2000-01-01

    Critical incident stress management (CISM) comprises a range of crisis intervention services that usually include precrisis training, individual crisis counseling, group debriefing, and postincident referral for primary and secondary victims. CISM is utilized to address the aftermath of violent acts, and has evolved from earlier crisis intervention and group psychological debriefing procedures. These approaches have been used throughout the world,

  10. A Stress Management Primer for College Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloud, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    A discussion of stress and college administrators looks at two types of stress (eustress and distress), stress and the autonomic nervous system, the need for regular exercise as well as stress reduction activities, the influence of personality on stress, the sources and stages of burnout, and stress management for administrators. (MSE)

  11. Nutritional Management of Acute Diarrhea in Infants and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, Washington, DC. Food and Nutrition Board.

    Written primarily for health professionals advising on programs and policy related to nutrition and diarrhea therapy, this report is aimed at management of diarrhea in less-developed countries, but its information and technical insights are relevant to an understanding of diarrhea and its management throughout the world. Technical in orientation…

  12. Stress Management by Biofeedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In the 1980's, Dr. Patrick Doyle served on a project to train U.S. astronauts at Johnson Space Center in biofeedback techniques to control anxiety and hypertension. Traditional biofeedback concepts were found to be too mundane, repetitive and boring, so Doyle developed Bio-Games with more interesting and involved formats. The first product, Bio-Ball, is an interactive, multimedia baseball video game that is played by relaxing in order to hit the ball. Gradually the player is able to relax at will, and with practice is able to apply the skills to real-life situations. Doyle has since gone on to create a number of biofeedback games marketed by Creative MultiMedia Inc. including Bio-Golf, Clutch City, and Pachyderm. Stress-busting screen savers are also being marketed under the Buddies series. In addition to being used in the corporate world, Bio-Games have been recognized by the Starbright Foundation which focuses on improving the total hospital environments of critically injured and chronically-ill children.

  13. Nutrition in the Management of the Cancer Patient

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cheryl L. Rock

    \\u000a Attention to nutritional status is important in the management of the cancer patient, across the spectrum from the initial\\u000a phases of treatment and recovery through the long-term continuum of care. Maintaining good nutritional status during the initial\\u000a post-diagnosis treatment phase may enable the successful completion of prescribed treatments and improve the quality of life\\u000a of the patient. Following initial treatment,

  14. Nutrition and exercise in the management of liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Toshikuni, Nobuyuki; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; Tsutsumi, Mikihiro

    2014-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis (LC) patients often have protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and decreased physical activity. These conditions often lead to sarcopenia, which is the loss of skeletal muscle volume and increased muscle weakness. Recent studies have demonstrated that PEM and sarcopenia are predictors for poor survival in LC patients. Nutrition and exercise management can improve PEM and sarcopenia in those patients. Nutrition management includes sufficient dietary intake and improved nutrient metabolism. With the current high prevalence of obesity, the number of obese LC patients has increased, and restriction of excessive caloric intake without the exacerbation of impaired nutrient metabolism is required for such patients. Branched chain amino acids are good candidates for supplemental nutrients for both obese and non-obese LC patients. Exercise management can increase skeletal muscle volume and strength and improve insulin resistance; however, nutritional status and LC complications should be assessed before an exercise management regimen is implemented in LC patients. The establishment of optimal exercise regimens for LC patients is currently required. In this review, we describe nutritional status and its clinical impact on the outcomes of LC patients and discuss general nutrition and exercise management in LC patients. PMID:24966599

  15. The management of conditioned nutritional requirements in heart failure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc L. Allard; Khursheed N. Jeejeebhoy; Michael J. Sole

    2006-01-01

    Patients suffering from congestive heart failure exhibit impaired myocardial energy production, myocyte calcium overload and\\u000a increased oxidative stress. Nutritional factors known to be important for myocardial energy production, calcium homeostasis\\u000a and the reduction of oxidative stress, such as thiamine, riboflavin, pyridoxine, L-carnitine, coenzyme Q10, creatine and taurine\\u000a are reduced in this patient population. Furthermore, deficiencies of taurine, carnitine, and thiamine

  16. UNIVERSITY OF SUSSEX STRESS MANAGEMENT POLICY

    E-print Network

    Sussex, University of

    set out here will have a substantial effect on reducing those potential causes of stress within its staff are exposed. 2.1(iv) Harmful stress reduces performance, creativity and productivity and reduce stress at work · to assist staff in managing stress in others and themselves · to manage problems

  17. Effect of a nutritive-tonic drink on stress-induced serum glucocorticoid in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Yasuko; Ayada, Kentaro; Ito, Yoshihisa; Tadano, Takeshi; Endo, Yasuo

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated stress during "restraint with gnawing (R+G+)" and "restraint without gnawing (R+G-)" in a mouse system. R+G- induced a higher serum glucocorticoid level than R+G+. Zena F-III (a nutritive-tonic drink prescribed as "Kampo", a traditional Japanese medicine with its origin in Chinese medicine) reduced the glucocorticoid elevation in R+G+, but not in R+G-. These results support the hypotheses that (i) activity, such as gnawing, which potentially leading to escape from distress, reduces the severity of emotional distress and (ii) Zena F-III reduces the severity of mental or emotional fatigue, or increases motivation, in a stressful situation that the animal can manage itself. PMID:15673191

  18. Nutrition and Supplements for Pain Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Sulindro-Ma; Charise L. Ivy; Amber C. Isenhart

    This chapter discusses dietary guidelines and nutritional supplements that have been proven to be beneficial in the treatment\\u000a of pain. First, a strong foundational diet is presented, including anti-inflammatory ingredients. Next, several key supplements\\u000a that are helpful for pain conditions are discussed. The chapter is completed with a discussion of some of the most common\\u000a chronic pain conditions, with specific

  19. Teacher Wellness: Too Stressed for Stress Management?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kipps-Vaughan, Debi; Ponsart, Tyler; Gilligan, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    Healthier, happier teachers promote healthier, happier, and more effective learning environments. Yet, many teachers experience considerable stress. Studies have found that between one fifth and one fourth of teachers frequently experience a great deal of stress (Kyriacou, 1998). Stress in teaching appears to be universal across nations and…

  20. Endocrine and Nutritional Management After Bariatric Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... chances of regaining weight and to ensure good management of other obesity-related health problems. Care after ... immediately after surgery, as well as long-term management to prevent complications and weight regain. How does ...

  1. Do stable isotopes reflect nutritional stress? Results from a laboratory experiment on song sparrows.

    PubMed

    Kempster, Bethany; Zanette, Liana; Longstaffe, Fred J; MacDougall-Shackleton, Scott A; Wingfield, John C; Clinchy, Michael

    2007-03-01

    Stable isotope analysis is an increasingly valuable tool in ecological studies and shows promise as a measure of nutritional stress in wild animals. Thus far, however, the only studies on endotherms that have conclusively shown changes in delta(15)N and delta(13)C values in response to nutritional stress were conducted on fasting animals and animals growing under extreme levels of food restriction. We conducted a laboratory experiment to test whether delta(15)N and delta(13)C values provide a general index of nutritional stress. We compared the isotopic composition of whole blood, liver, muscle and feathers between two groups of juvenile song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) hand-reared in captivity under identical conditions except for feeding regime. To verify that our experimental treatment induced a biologically meaningful level of nutritional stress, we simultaneously measured the effects on physiology, growth and development at multiple scales. While food-restricted birds were physiologically stressed, physically smaller, and showed poorer growth and brain development compared to ad libitum-fed birds, there was no effect of feeding regime on either delta(15)N or delta(13)C values in any tissue. Instead of a continuum where the level of change in (15)N or (13)C contents corresponds to the level of nutritional stress, we suggest there may be a threshold level of nutritional stress below which such isotopic changes are likely to be negligible. PMID:17102993

  2. MANAGING JOB LOSS and FINANCIAL STRESS

    E-print Network

    MANAGING JOB LOSS and FINANCIAL STRESS a Personal and Family Guide CENTER ON THE FAMILY #12;2 Managing Job Loss and Financial Stress The issues associated with losing one's job or having hours cut of income can be stressful and traumatic. If you find yourself in this situation, you should know

  3. Management of Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Cornella, Jeffrey L

    2004-01-01

    Although there is renewed interest in conservative therapies for stress urinary incontinence, such as pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and duloxetine therapy, surgery remains the primary choice in managing this condition. Surgical options include paravaginal defect repair, the Marshall-Marchetti-Krantz procedure, open and laparoscopic Burch urethropexy, and pubovaginal sling procedures. There is a growing trend in the United States toward use of the pubovaginal sling procedure as the primary operation for urinary incontinence due to less invasive techniques. Studies comparing the pubovaginal sling with open urethropexy have shown similar short-term cure rates. More large prospective, randomized studies are needed to assess long-term rates. PMID:16985904

  4. The ABCs of Managing Teacher Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Liza; Brown, Sheri

    2003-01-01

    Describes stress management for teachers and presents strategies that teachers can use to lessen the impact of stress. Outlines the ABCs of stress: Acknowledge, Behavior Modification, and Communication. Notes that stress can motivate teachers to explore new instructional strategies, adopt innovative approaches to increasing student motivation, and…

  5. Phenotypic flexibility as a measure of health: the optimal nutritional stress response test.

    PubMed

    Stroeve, Johanna H M; van Wietmarschen, Herman; Kremer, Bas H A; van Ommen, Ben; Wopereis, Suzan

    2015-05-01

    Nutrition research is struggling to demonstrate beneficial health effects, since nutritional effects are often subtle and long term. Health has been redefined as the ability of our body to cope with daily-life challenges. Physiology acts as a well-orchestrated machinery to adapt to the continuously changing environment. We term this adaptive capacity "phenotypic flexibility." The phenotypic flexibility concept implies that health can be measured by the ability to adapt to conditions of temporary stress, such as physical exercise, infections or mental stress, in a healthy manner. This may offer a more sensitive way to assess changes in health status of healthy subjects. Here, we performed a systematic review of 61 studies applying different nutritional stress tests to quantify health and nutritional health effects, with the objective to define an optimal nutritional stress test that has the potential to be adopted as the golden standard in nutrition research. To acknowledge the multi-target role of nutrition, a relevant subset of 50 processes that govern optimal health, with high relevance to diet, was used to define phenotypic flexibility. Subsequently, we assessed the response of biomarkers related to this subset of processes to the different challenge tests. Based on the obtained insights, we propose a nutritional stress test composed of a high-fat, high-caloric drink, containing 60 g palm olein, 75 g glucose and 20 g dairy protein in a total volume of 400 ml. The use of such a standardized nutritional challenge test in intervention studies is expected to demonstrate subtle improvements of phenotypic flexibility, thereby enabling substantiation of nutritional health effects. PMID:25896408

  6. Stress Management and Gifted Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Vidisha A.

    2009-01-01

    Stress can affect anyone, and gifted children are no exception. Giftedness can sometimes be the cause of the stress. Perfectionism, sensitivity, and intensity are characteristics of gifted children that may exacerbate stress. Stress can be constructive. Prolonged stress, however, with no time to recover becomes detrimental. Continued stress upsets…

  7. Managing Nutrition Services in Nursing Homes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura W. Robidoux; Gopal Sankaran

    1998-01-01

    Continuous quality improvement (CQI) is a relatively new health services paradigm with respect to quality. Derived from the industrial model for total quality management (TQM), CQI originated from teachings of the quality experts-Deming, Juran, and Crosby. Monitoring of quality in healthcare is evolving. The objectives of this paper are to: (1) summarize the history of monitoring quality in healthcare, (2)

  8. Nutritional management of pediatric food hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Mofidi, Shideh

    2003-06-01

    The diagnosis and management of food allergy requires attention to several important dietary issues. Successful exclusion of identified dietary allergens requires extensive education regarding the interpretation of ingredient labels of commercial products and an appreciation for issues of cross-contact in settings such as restaurants and commercial manufacturing. Once a food or food group is eliminated, attention must be focused on potential dietary insufficiencies resulting from these exclusions. These dietary issues are also central to the successful use of diagnostic elimination diets and physician-supervised oral food challenges. This review provides a framework for the dietary management of food hypersensitivity in infants and children both for short-term diagnostic and long-term therapeutic purposes. In addition, approaches for maternal dietary restriction for breastfed infants with food allergy and the introduction of solid foods to atopic infants are reviewed. PMID:12777605

  9. Identification of Nutritional Stress-Responsive miRNAs in Phaseolus vulgaris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators for Arabidopsis development and stress responses. A hybridization approach using miRNAs-macroarrays was used to identify miRNAs that respond to nutritional stress in Phaseolus vulgaris. miRNAs-macroarrays were prepared by printing nylon filters with DNA syntheti...

  10. Recommendations for the nutrition management of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rani H.; Rohr, Fran; Frazier, Dianne; Cunningham, Amy; Mofidi, Shideh; Ogata, Beth; Splett, Patricia L.; Moseley, Kathryn; Huntington, Kathleen; Acosta, Phyllis B.; Vockley, Jerry; Van Calcar, Sandra C.

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of a phenylalanine-restricted diet to improve the outcome of individuals with phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency (OMIM no. 261600) has been recognized since the first patients were treated 60 years ago. However, the treatment regime is complex, costly, and often difficult to maintain for the long term. Improvements and refinements in the diet for phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency have been made over the years, and adjunctive therapies have proven to be successful for certain patients. Yet evidence-based guidelines for managing phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency, optimizing outcomes, and addressing all available therapies are lacking. Thus, recommendations for nutrition management were developed using evidence from peer-reviewed publications, gray literature, and consensus surveys. The areas investigated included choice of appropriate medical foods, integration of adjunctive therapies, treatment during pregnancy, monitoring of nutritional and clinical markers, prevention of nutrient deficiencies, providing of access to care, and compliance strategies. This process has not only provided assessment and refinement of current nutrition management and monitoring recommendations but also charted a direction for future studies. This document serves as a companion to the concurrently published American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics guideline for the medical treatment of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency. Genet Med 16 2, 121–131. PMID:24385075

  11. Advances in the nutritional and pharmacological management of phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Ney, Denise M.; Blank, Robert D.; Hansen, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    Structural Abstract Purpose of review The purpose is to discuss advances in the nutritional and pharmacological management of phenylketonuria (PKU). Recent findings Glycomacropeptide (GMP), a whey protein produced during cheese production, is a low-phe intact protein that represents a new dietary alternative to synthetic amino acids (AAs) for people with PKU. Skeletal fragility is a long-term complication of PKU that based on murine research, appears to result from both genetic and nutritional factors. Skeletal fragility in murine PKU is attenuated with the GMP diet, compared with an AA diet, allowing greater radial bone growth. Pharmacologic therapy with tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), acting as a molecular chaperone for phenylalanine hydroxylase, increases tolerance to dietary phe in some individuals. Large neutral AAs (LNAA) inhibit phe transport across the intestinal mucosa and blood brain barrier; LNAA are most effective for individuals unable to comply with the low-phe diet. Summary Although a low-phe synthetic AA diet remains the mainstay of PKU management, new nutritional and pharmacological treatment options offer alternative approaches to maintain lifelong low phe concentrations. GMP medical foods provide an alternative to AA formula that may improve bone health, and BH4 permits some individuals with PKU to increase tolerance to dietary phe. Further research is needed to characterize the long-term efficacy of these new approaches for PKU management. PMID:24136088

  12. Life-History Consequences of Chronic Nutritional Stress in an Outbreaking Insect Defoliator

    PubMed Central

    Frago, Enric; Bauce, Éric

    2014-01-01

    Food shortage is a common situation in nature but little is known about the strategies animals use to overcome it. This lack of knowledge is especially true for outbreaking insects, which commonly experience nutritional stress for several successive generations when they reach high population densities. The aim of this study is to evaluate the life history consequences of chronic nutritional stress in the outbreaking moth Choristoneura fumiferana. Larvae were reared on two different artificial diets that emulate nutritional conditions larvae face during their natural population density cycle (low and medium quality artificial diets). After four generations, a subset of larvae was fed on the same diet as their parents, and another on the opposite diet. We explored larval life-history strategies to cope with nutritional stress, its associated costs and the influence of nutritional conditions experienced in the parental generation. We found no evidence of nutritional stress in the parental generation increasing offspring ability to feed on low quality diet, but the contrary: compared to offspring from parents that were fed a medium quality diet, larvae from parents fed a low quality diet had increased mortality, reduced growth rate and reduced female reproductive output. Our results support a simple stress hypothesis because the negative effects of malnutrition accumulated over successive generations. Density-dependent deterioration in plant quality is thought to be an important factor governing the population dynamics of outbreaking insects and we hypothesize that chronic nutritional stress can be a driver of outbreak declines of C. fumiferana, and of forest insects in general. PMID:24505368

  13. Life-history consequences of chronic nutritional stress in an outbreaking insect defoliator.

    PubMed

    Frago, Enric; Bauce, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Food shortage is a common situation in nature but little is known about the strategies animals use to overcome it. This lack of knowledge is especially true for outbreaking insects, which commonly experience nutritional stress for several successive generations when they reach high population densities. The aim of this study is to evaluate the life history consequences of chronic nutritional stress in the outbreaking moth Choristoneura fumiferana. Larvae were reared on two different artificial diets that emulate nutritional conditions larvae face during their natural population density cycle (low and medium quality artificial diets). After four generations, a subset of larvae was fed on the same diet as their parents, and another on the opposite diet. We explored larval life-history strategies to cope with nutritional stress, its associated costs and the influence of nutritional conditions experienced in the parental generation. We found no evidence of nutritional stress in the parental generation increasing offspring ability to feed on low quality diet, but the contrary: compared to offspring from parents that were fed a medium quality diet, larvae from parents fed a low quality diet had increased mortality, reduced growth rate and reduced female reproductive output. Our results support a simple stress hypothesis because the negative effects of malnutrition accumulated over successive generations. Density-dependent deterioration in plant quality is thought to be an important factor governing the population dynamics of outbreaking insects and we hypothesize that chronic nutritional stress can be a driver of outbreak declines of C. fumiferana, and of forest insects in general. PMID:24505368

  14. Nutrition

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Pearson

    2007-10-12

    3rd grade Health Education Look at these cool sites and try some of the games! Nutrition Games Food Pyramid Game For this website first click on \\"Take me to the flash version\\" and then you can explore! Nutrition Caf ...

  15. Nutrition

    MedlinePLUS

    Updated September 27, 2010 Nutrition is a tool that you can use to improve your overall health and quality of life. You’ve probably heard conflicting information about nutrition and breast cancer. You may wonder whether the ...

  16. Stress management training in medical school.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J A; Bradlyn, A S; Dubbert, P M; St Lawrence, J S

    1982-02-01

    It has been widely noted that medical school can be stressful experience for many students and that on completion of their medical education students will enter a profession high in potential stressors. However, very few systematic efforts to teach medical students practical stress management skills have been undertaken. In the study reported here, a group of students volunteered to participate in a six-session program that taught them personal stress management techniques, including self-relaxation training, schedule-planning, priority-setting, leisure time-planning, and cognitive modification techniques. From pretraining to posttraining, the students showed improvement on a variety of measures that included knowledge about stress, self-report inventory scores assessing stress symptoms and life-style, personal ratings of stressful situations, and their daily activity schedules. A control group largely failed to show improvement relative to the stress management training group largely failed to show improvement relative to the stress management training group subjects. The importance of making available to students such specific, behavioral and preventive stress management training is discussed. PMID:7035671

  17. Consultation Stressors and Stress Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portman, Sandy Kosub

    A high incidence of occupational stress has been demonstrated in the mental health and social service professions and appears to be a major factor contributing to low worker morale, absenteeism, high job turnover, and other indices of job stress. A study was conducted to examine the issue of occupational stress among psychological consultants.…

  18. STRESS MANAGEMENT Stress occurs in everyone's life. How stressful something is depends on how we perceive it. Stress is not

    E-print Network

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    STRESS MANAGEMENT Stress occurs in everyone's life. How stressful something is depends on how we perceive it. Stress is not necessarily a bad thing. It can help to motivate and drive us toward our goals levels of stress can have a negative impact. Medical school is demanding and can cause both prolonged

  19. Cost-Effective Stress Management Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Gordon F.

    1980-01-01

    Stress management training can be a cost effective way to improve productivity and job performance. Among many relaxation techniques, the most effective in terms of teachability, participant motivation, and profitability are self-hypnosis, progressive relaxation, and transcendental meditation. (SK)

  20. Evaluation of a portable stress management device.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeon; Finkelstein, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Portable consumer health management devices are increasingly gaining attention from health consumers. StressEraser is a portable biofeedback device widely advertised as a stress reliever and cognition enhancer. However number of evaluation studies assessing effect of StressEraser on cognitive performance improvement and stress relief is very limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of StressEraser on cognitive performance and stress relief using a crossover design. A computerized psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) was selected as a mental stressor. The cognitive performance and stress level were measured in fourteen subjects having two 10-minute PVTs and 10-minute StressEraser intervention in between the PVTs. All main PVT metrics of cognitive performance (MeanRT, MedianRT, and Fastest 10%) became significantly worse after StressEraser application (P<0.05). On the other hand, six heart rate variability (HRV) parameters (MeanRR, SDNN, RMSSD, aLF, aHF, and LF/HF) used to assess stress level showed no significant differences between the first and the second PVTs. Furthermore, the subjective stress levels reported by the study subjects after the first and the second PVTs were not significantly different. We concluded that the StressEraser had a negative effect on cognitive performance and no effect on stress level. PMID:25676982

  1. Between Teachers & Parent: Helping Children Manage Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodkin, Adele M.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to manage stress in children. A teacher's story and a parent's story about a child who complains of frequent stomach aches, is presented. Stomach aches and other somatic complaints without any apparent physical explanation are common among young children experiencing stress. Nevertheless, it is essential…

  2. How Can I Manage Stress?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... time. Chronic stress may cause an increase in heart rate and blood pressure. Not all stress is bad. Speaking to a ... Symptoms of High Blood Pressure? 5 All About Heart Rate (Pulse) 6 Low Blood Pressure 7 What Your Cholesterol Levels Mean 8 Warning ...

  3. Stress Symptoms and Nutritional Status Among Survivors of the Marmara Region Earthquakes in Turkey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Binnur Yesilyaprak; Ibrahim Kisac; Nevin Sanlier

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine posttraumatic stress symptoms of people still living in the Marmara region 15–18 months after the earthquakes, that occurred there and examine differences in the nutritional status of these people. A daily nutrient consumption form and symptom checklist were used to collect data. Results indicated that there was no significant difference among the

  4. Nutritional stress and body condition in the Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) during winter irruptive

    E-print Network

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    Nutritional stress and body condition in the Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) during winter Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa), carbon, nitrogen, C/N, fasting, Minnesota, reversed sexual size dimorphism lapone (Strix nebulosa), carbone, azote, C/N, jeûne, Minnesota, dimorphisme sexuel inversé de la taille

  5. Nutrition

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Huish

    2009-11-02

    Here we will be discussing different nutritional topics my pyramid my calorie counter calorie king health finder healthy people National Institutes of Health: Health Information diabetes nutrition live strong teen health facts tone teen kidshealth beauty campaign Center For Change Eating Disorders ...

  6. Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.

    1990-01-01

    This is a collection of viewgraphs on the Johnson Space Center's work on nutrition for long duration space missions. Nutritional requirements are affected by isolation, workloads, and cold as well as the psychological needs, metabolism, and fluid balance of an individual.

  7. Changes in glucocorticoids, IGF-I and thyroid hormones as indicators of nutritional stress and subsequent refeeding in Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus)

    E-print Network

    Changes in glucocorticoids, IGF-I and thyroid hormones as indicators of nutritional stress-I Thyroid Nutritional stress Hormonal regulation Physiological responses to changes in energy balance, with younger animals showing more intense hormonal changes to nutritional stress. Thyroid hormones, however

  8. MORPHOMETRIC EVIDENCE FOR NUTRITIONAL STRESS IN ENGLISH SOLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present an application of the powerful thin plate spline method of morphometric analysis to demonstrate its utility for detecting environmental stress in an estuarine flatfish. Juvenile English sole (Pleuronectes vetulus) were captured from Yaquina Bay, Oregon, photographed w...

  9. Disaster stress: an emergency management perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas Paton; Rhona Flin

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the sources of stress likely to be encountered by emergency managers when responding to a disaster. Stressors relating to environmental (e.g. time pressure, level of risk, heat), organisational (e.g. bureaucracy, appropriateness of information, decision support and management systems) and operational (e.g. incident command, decision making, interagency liaison, team and media management) demands are considered. The mediating role

  10. Oral habits--part 1: the dental effects and management of nutritive and non-nutritive sucking.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mihiri; Manton, David

    2015-01-01

    Nutritive sucking and non-nutritive sucking are among the most commonly reported oral habits in children. These habits generally cease around four years of age as interaction with other children increases. However, prolonged habits may alter dento-skeletal development, leading to orthodontic problems, which may persist into the permanent dentition. Rewards, reminder therapy, and appliance therapy have been described for the management of nutritive and non-nutritive sucking habits. Reminder therapy includes the use of gloves, thumb-guards, mittens, and tastants applied to fingers. When other modes of treatment have failed, appliance therapy, such as palatal cribs or Bluegrass appliances, may be necessary to prevent the placement of the digit in its sucking position. These tools are very effective and are associated with few adverse effects; however, they must be used with the cooperation of the child and never as punishment. The purpose of this paper is to update clinicians about nutritive and non-nutritive sucking habits in children and their impact on dental/skeletal development, and management options. PMID:25514257

  11. [A stress management program for university students].

    PubMed

    Hori, Masashi; Shimazu, Akihito

    2007-08-01

    This study examined the effects of a stress management program for university students related to their stressors, problem-solving abilities (problem-solving confidence, approach-avoidance style, and personal control), knowledge of stress, and stress responses. Participants (n = 27) were randomly assigned to either an intervention or a waiting list control group. The program, including small group discussions, completion of a workbook, and follow-up interviews, was conducted for the intervention group for three weeks. Participants (n = 8 and n = 12 for the intervention and waiting list control groups, respectively) responded to three waves of questionnaires (pre, post, and follow-up). The results showed significant favorable intervention effects for knowledge of stress, problem-solving confidence, and stress responses on the post-tests, while no intervention effects were found at the follow-up. PMID:17892026

  12. Women's strategies to alleviate nutritional stress in a rural African society.

    PubMed

    Bentley, G R; Aunger, R; Harrigan, A M; Jenike, M; Bailey, R C; Ellison, P T

    1999-01-01

    Many agricultural populations are subject to chronic or seasonal undernutrition, reproductive women and children often being most vulnerable. This paper presents quantitative and qualitative data on food consumption, food distribution practices, food taboos, garden sizes and work effort to show how Lese horticulturalist women living in the Ituri Forest of northeast Democratic Republic of Congo attempt to alleviate nutritional stress. The Lese experience an annual hunger season when approximately one quarter of the population suffer from energy deficiency. Nutritional intake is also compromised by a complex system of food taboos against meat from wild forest animals. Anthropometric data collected over several years suggest that Lese women suffer from nutritional stress more than men during the hunger season. They also have more food taboos particularly during pregnancy and lactation. Their low fertility is compounded by nutritional stress. Despite these inequities, Lese women use several strategies to improve their food intake. Since they are responsible for all household cooking, they manipulate food portions. During the hunger season, they snack frequently, and increase their consumption of palliative foods. Women with more food taboos plant larger gardens to supplement their diet with vegetable foods. Although this results in their consumption of more daily protein, they work harder compared to women with smaller gardens. Women cheat in their adherence to specific food taboos by actively discounting them, or by eating prophylactic plants that supposedly prevent the consequences (usually illness) of eating tabooed foods. In addition, women resort to subterfuge to access desirable resources. Lese women do not reduce work effort during the hunger season, but adapt physiologically by reducing resting metabolic rates during periods of weight loss. These results point to the ability of Lese women to minimize the ecological and cultural constraints on their nutrition. More data, however, are required to assess the long-term effectiveness of these strategies. PMID:10048774

  13. Clinical Nutrition and Foodservice Personnel in Teaching Hospitals have Different Perceptions of Total Quality Management Performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    YUKYEONG CHONG; NAN UNKLESBAY; RICHARD DOWDY

    2000-01-01

    Objective To investigate the perceived total quality management (TQM) performance of their department by clinical nutrition managers and dietitians, and foodservice managers and supervisors, in hospital food and nutrition service departments.Design Using a 2-part questionnaire containing items about 3 constructs of TQM performance and demographic characteristics, participants rated their perceptions of TQM performance.Subjects Employees in 7 Council of Teaching Hospitals.

  14. A comparative study on dietary behavior, nutritional knowledge and life stress between Korean and Chinese female high school students

    PubMed Central

    Son, Sohwan; Ro, Yoona; Hyun, Hwajin; Lee, Hongmie

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Dietary behavior and life stress in adolescence is related to growth rate and learning ability. This study was conducted to identify the relations between dietary habits, dietary attitude nutritional knowledge and life stress among high school girls in Korea and China. SUBJECTS/METHODS The subjects of this study were 221 high school girls in Korea and 227 high school girls in China. The questionnaire were about dietary habits, dietary attitude, nutritional knowledge and life stress. RESULTS The dietary habits of chinese girls were healthier than those of Korean girls with a significant difference (P < .001). There was no significant difference in dietary attitude between Korean girls and Chinese girls. Korean girls had more nutritional knowledge than Chinese girls with a significant difference (P < .001). Korean girls did less physical exercise but spent more time watching TV and using PCs, compared to Chinese girls. Korean girls' degree of confidence in nutrition information that they had learned and their performance in their real lives were low. Also, they had a low level of awareness of the need for nutritional education. There was no significant difference in life stress between the two groups. Dietary habits had a significantly negative correlation with life stress in both Korean and Chinese girls (P < .01, P < .001). As for Chinese students, dietary attitude had a negative correlation with life stress with a significant difference (P < .05). As for Korean girls, nutritional knowledge had a negative correlation with life stress with a significant difference (P < .05), which means as life stress was less, dietary habits were better. CONCLUSIONS This study shows that effective nutrition education programs should include components that encourage application of learned nutrition information to real life, increase physical exercise and reduce life stress. PMID:24741406

  15. Early Fasting Is Long Lasting: Differences in Early Nutritional Conditions Reappear under Stressful Conditions in Adult Female Zebra Finches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Tobias Krause; Mariam Honarmand; Jennifer Wetzel; Marc Naguib; Sue Healy

    2009-01-01

    Conditions experienced during early life can have profound effects on individual development and condition in adulthood. Differences in nutritional provisioning in birds during the first month of life can lead to differences in growth, reproductive success and survival. Yet, under natural conditions shorter periods of nutritional stress will be more prevalent. Individuals may respond differently, depending on the period of

  16. Stress resistance and aging: Influence of genes and nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Harper, James M.; Salmon, Adam B.; Chang, Yayi; Bonkowski, Michael; Bartke, Andrzej; Miller, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that dermal fibroblast cell lines derived from young adult mice of the long-lived Snell dwarf (dw/dw), Ames dwarf (df/df) and growth hormone receptor knockout (GHR-KO) mouse stocks are resistant, in vitro, to the cytotoxic effects of hydrogen peroxide, cadmium, ultraviolet light, paraquat, and heat. Here we show that, in contrast, fibroblasts from mice on low-calorie (CR) or low methionine (Meth-R) diets are not stress resistant in culture, despite the longevity induced by both dietary regimes. A second approach, involving induction of liver cell death in live animals using acetaminophen (APAP), documented hepatotoxin resistance in the CR and Meth-R mice, but dw/dw and GHR-KO mutant mice were not resistant to this agent, and were in fact more susceptible than littermate controls to the toxic effects of APAP. These data thus suggest that while resistance to stress is a common characteristic of experimental life span extension in mice, the cell types showing resistance may differ among the various models of delayed or decelerated aging. PMID:16713617

  17. Bovine immunoglobulin protein isolates for the nutritional management of enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Petschow, Bryon W; Blikslager, Anthony T; Weaver, Eric M; Campbell, Joy M; Polo, Javier; Shaw, Audrey L; Burnett, Bruce P; Klein, Gerald L; Rhoads, J Marc

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is responsible for a multitude of digestive and immune functions which depend upon the balanced interaction of the intestinal microbiota, diet, gut barrier function, and mucosal immune response. Disruptions in one or more of these factors can lead to intestinal disorders or enteropathies which are characterized by intestinal inflammation, increased gut permeability, and reduced capacity to absorb nutrients. Enteropathy is frequently associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune enteropathy, radiation enteritis, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where pathologic changes in the intestinal tract lead to abdominal discomfort, bloating, abnormal bowel function (e.g., diarrhea, urgency, constipation and malabsorption). Unfortunately, effective therapies for the management of enteropathy and restoring intestinal health are still not available. An accumulating body of preclinical studies has demonstrated that oral administration of plasma- or serum-derived protein concentrates containing high levels of immunoglobulins can improve weight, normalize gut barrier function, and reduce the severity of enteropathy in animal models. Recent studies in humans, using serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate, demonstrate that such protein preparations are safe and improve symptoms, nutritional status, and various biomarkers associated with enteropathy. Benefits have been shown in patients with HIV infection or diarrhea-predominant IBS. This review summarizes preclinical and clinical studies with plasma/serum protein concentrates and describes the effects on host nutrition, intestinal function, and markers of intestinal inflammation. It supports the concept that immunoglobulin-containing protein preparations may offer a new strategy for restoring functional homeostasis in the intestinal tract of patients with enteropathy. PMID:25206275

  18. Nutritional management of PKU with glycomacropeptide from cheese whey

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, S. T.; van Calcar, S. C.; MacLeod, E. L.; Nelson, K. L.; Etzel, M. R.; Rice, G. M.; Wolff, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Individuals with phenylketonuria (PKU) must follow a lifelong low-phenylalanine (Phe) diet to prevent neurological impairment. Compliance with the low-Phe diet is often poor owing to restriction in natural foods and the requirement for consumption of a Phe-free amino acid formula or medical food. Glycomacropeptide (GMP), a natural protein produced during cheese-making, is uniquely suited to a low-Phe diet because when isolated from cheese whey it contains minimal Phe (2.5–5 mg Phe/g protein). This paper reviews progress in evaluating the safety, acceptability and efficacy of GMP in the nutritional management of PKU. A variety of foods and beverages can be made with GMP to improve the taste, variety and convenience of the PKU diet. Sensory studies in individuals with PKU demonstrate that GMP foods are acceptable alternatives to amino acid medical foods. Studies in the PKU mouse model demonstrate that GMP supplemented with limiting indispensable amino acids provides a nutritionally adequate source of protein and improves the metabolic phenotype by reducing concentrations of Phe in plasma and brain. A case report in an adult with classical PKU who followed the GMP diet for 10 weeks at home indicates safety, acceptability of GMP food products, a 13–14% reduction in blood Phe levels (p<0.05) and improved distribution of dietary protein throughout the day compared with the amino acid diet. In summary, food products made with GMP that is supplemented with limiting indispensable amino acids provide a palatable alternative source of protein that may improve dietary compliance and metabolic control of PKU. PMID:18956251

  19. Bovine immunoglobulin protein isolates for the nutritional management of enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Petschow, Bryon W; Blikslager, Anthony T; Weaver, Eric M; Campbell, Joy M; Polo, Javier; Shaw, Audrey L; Burnett, Bruce P; Klein, Gerald L; Rhoads, J Marc

    2014-09-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is responsible for a multitude of digestive and immune functions which depend upon the balanced interaction of the intestinal microbiota, diet, gut barrier function, and mucosal immune response. Disruptions in one or more of these factors can lead to intestinal disorders or enteropathies which are characterized by intestinal inflammation, increased gut permeability, and reduced capacity to absorb nutrients. Enteropathy is frequently associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune enteropathy, radiation enteritis, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where pathologic changes in the intestinal tract lead to abdominal discomfort, bloating, abnormal bowel function (e.g., diarrhea, urgency, constipation and malabsorption). Unfortunately, effective therapies for the management of enteropathy and restoring intestinal health are still not available. An accumulating body of preclinical studies has demonstrated that oral administration of plasma- or serum-derived protein concentrates containing high levels of immunoglobulins can improve weight, normalize gut barrier function, and reduce the severity of enteropathy in animal models. Recent studies in humans, using serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate, demonstrate that such protein preparations are safe and improve symptoms, nutritional status, and various biomarkers associated with enteropathy. Benefits have been shown in patients with HIV infection or diarrhea-predominant IBS. This review summarizes preclinical and clinical studies with plasma/serum protein concentrates and describes the effects on host nutrition, intestinal function, and markers of intestinal inflammation. It supports the concept that immunoglobulin-containing protein preparations may offer a new strategy for restoring functional homeostasis in the intestinal tract of patients with enteropathy. PMID:25206275

  20. Stress: Its Management and Life in a Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Tim

    1996-01-01

    Changes in the library profession have increased the level of job-related stress. Describes a public librarian's efforts to deal with employee stress; discusses symptoms of stress and assessing levels of stress; ranks stress factors in order of severity; describes the action plan; and lists management techniques to minimize stress. (PEN)

  1. Stress Management in the Workplace. WBGH Worksite Wellness Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, Dennis T.; And Others

    This paper on designing and implementing a stress management program in the workplace begins by defining stress. A brief overview of the relationship of stress to health and personal style follows. The subsequent discussion of the relationship between stress and work focuses on these topics: work contributes to stress; stress affects work…

  2. Dietary Management for Alcoholic Patients. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Roberta Smith; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  3. A Review of Managing Huanglongbing (Citrus Greening) in China Using a Nutritional Approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Supplemental nutrition as a part of huanglongbing (HLB) management is being adopted by an increasing number of citrus growers in Florida. The hope is that additional nutrition, especially micronutrients, will extend the productive life of HLB affected trees. Although the approach is recent in the U...

  4. Dietary Management in Hypertension. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molleson, Ann L.; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  5. Dietary Management in Gastrointestinal Diseases. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Joan Z.; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  6. Nutritional stress enhances cell viability of odontoblast-like cells subjected to low level laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliani, M. M.; Oliveira, C. F.; Lins, E. M. M.; Kurachi, C.; Hebling, J.; Bagnato, V. S.; de Souza Costa, C. A.

    2010-03-01

    In spite of knowing that cells under stress are biostimulated by low level laser (LLL) irradiation, the ideal condition of stress to different cell lines has not yet been established. Consequently, the aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of a defined parameter of LLL irradiation applied on stressed odontoblast-like pulp cells (MDPC-23). The cells were seeded (12500 cells/cm2) in wells of 24-well plates using complete culture medium (DMEM) and incubated for 24 hours. Then, the DMEM was replaced by a new medium with low concentrations (nutritional stress condition) of fetal bovine serum (FBS) giving rise to the following experimental groups: G1: 2% FBS; G2: 5% FBS; and G3: 10% FBS. The cells were irradiated three times with LLL in specific parameters (808±3 nm, 100 mW, 1.5 J/cm2) every 24 hours. No irradiation was carried out in groups G4 (2% FBS-Control), G5 (5% FBS-Control), and G6 (10% FBS-Control). For all groups, the cell metabolism (MTT assay) and morphology (SEM) was evaluated. The experimental groups showed enhanced cell metabolism and normal cell morphology regardless of FBS concentration. A slight increase in the cell metabolism was observed only in group G2. It was concluded that cell nutritional stress caused by reducing the concentration of FBS to 5% is the most suitable method to assess the biostimulation of LLL irradiated MDPC-23 cells.

  7. Isotopic segregation between sympatric seabird species increases with nutritional stress

    PubMed Central

    Barger, Christopher P.; Kitaysky, Alexander S.

    2012-01-01

    Dietary segregation is essential for the coexistence of closely related species of animals. However, little is known about how changes in availability of food resources might affect trophic interactions of wild animals breeding in sympatry. Here, we examined how interannual variations in relative food availability (as reflected in blood levels of stress hormone corticosterone, CORT) affect food partitioning (assessed via a comparison of stable isotope ?15N and ?13C ratios of blood) between the common murre (Uria aalge) and thick-billed murre (Uria lomvia), breeding on a single colony in the Bering Sea. During a 6-year study, CORT varied among years but not between species, whereas stable isotope ratios varied among years and between species. Isotopic distance between species increased with increasing CORT. These results indicate that, when food was not limiting, both species relied on similar food resources. As foraging conditions deteriorated, murres diverged in their diets. We conclude that the degree of dietary segregation between Uria spp. varies with changes in the availability of food and is greatest during food shortages. PMID:22171022

  8. [Dietetic and nutritional management in a university children's hospital].

    PubMed

    Robert, M; Thiébaut, I; Debande, M; Eekhout, S; Harpigny, I; Podlubnai, S; Queverue, S; Renson, S; De Laet, C; Goyens, Ph

    2006-01-01

    Dietetics and nutrition are new, expanding disciplines. Feeding man's cub to ensure the best physical, brain and psychic growth to reach the adult age in a "sane" state is the daily challenge of pediatric dieteticians. The role of dieteticians in a pediatric hospital is essential: optimizing sick children's nutrition. A child is highly vulnerable, above all when he is sick. Unappropriate feeding can put his growth and development, as well as his healing at stake. Numerous studies believe that denutrition in pediatric hospitals prevail by 7 to 45%. A survey has been carried out in two care units in the University Children's Hospital Queen Fabiola in Brussels. For one month, the nutritional hazard has been evaluated in every children admitted in these units. One observes that one third of these children shows a high nutritional hazard, and another third a moderate nutritional hazard. The tracking of the nutritional hazard and the appropriate nutritional care must be an integral part of the care given to any child admitted in hospital. A nutrition unit, with all the attending people involved (doctor, dietician, chemist, nurse), is necessary to improve the nutritional care of the patients. PMID:21818902

  9. [Prevention of burnout by stress management].

    PubMed

    Günthner, A; Batra, A

    2012-02-01

    Burnout is a possible consequence of excessive demands, high levels of stress, or a consequence of lack of resources for coping with difficult tasks. Systematic stress management might be effective in reducing the risk for development of a burnout syndrome. Based on a literature search on available research papers and meta-analyses in Medline and Pubmed, current findings on the content and effectiveness of stress management programs are reported for different target groups. Stress management programs can be divided into programs focusing on primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention. In contrast to primary prevention programs, secondary and tertiary preventive programs focus on the specific needs of different target groups. Cognitive-behavioral programs have been shown to be the most effective interventions. A combination of psycho-educational treatment with follow-up or booster sessions increases the long-term outcome in the prevention of burn-out syndromes. Beside the duration of the program, focus on problems and sustainability of supply is important for the long-term effectiveness in secondary and tertiary prevention. PMID:22290161

  10. Stress-management intervention to prevent family violence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Paul Schinke; Robert F. Schilling; Richard P. Barth; Lewayne D. Gilchrist; Josie Solseng Maxwell

    1986-01-01

    Stress and its management influence the nature of family interactions. Harmful family interactions, including violent interactions, are likely affected by mismanaged stress. This paper reviews scientific evidence on stress concepts, sources, and treatment strategies. Particular emphasis is given to the potential of stress-management preventive intervention for reducing the risk of family violence. Based on a study with teenage parents, the

  11. Nutrition

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Moffat

    2010-12-13

    Do you know what food belongs in which food group? Which foods will give you the most energy? Which foods will drag your body? Lets learn together about which foods will make you physically fit. Which foods are good for you and which food group do they belong in? Monster nutrition This food game will teach which food belongs in which group. You will also get a bonus question when your monster eats a food. Answer the bonus question right and your ...

  12. Nutritional Interventions to Alleviate the Negative Consequences of Heat Stress12

    PubMed Central

    Rhoads, Robert P.; Baumgard, Lance H.; Suagee, Jessica K.; Sanders, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    Energy metabolism is a highly coordinated process, and preferred fuel(s) differ among tissues. The hierarchy of substrate use can be affected by physiological status and environmental factors including high ambient temperature. Unabated heat eventually overwhelms homeothermic mechanisms resulting in heat stress, which compromises animal health, farm animal production, and human performance. Various aspects of heat stress physiology have been extensively studied, yet a clear understanding of the metabolic changes occurring at the cellular, tissue, and whole-body levels in response to an environmental heat load remains ill-defined. For reasons not yet clarified, circulating nonesterified fatty acid levels are reduced during heat stress, even in the presence of elevated stress hormones (epinephrine, glucagon, and cortisol), and heat-stressed animals often have a blunted lipolytic response to catabolic signals. Either directly because of or in coordination with this, animals experiencing environmental hyperthermia exhibit a shift toward carbohydrate use. These metabolic alterations occur coincident with increased circulating basal and stimulated plasma insulin concentrations. Limited data indicate that proper insulin action is necessary to effectively mount a response to heat stress and minimize heat-induced damage. Consistent with this idea, nutritional interventions targeting increased insulin action may improve tolerance and productivity during heat stress. Further research is warranted to uncover the effects of heat on parameters associated with energy metabolism so that more appropriate and effective treatment methodologies can be designed. PMID:23674792

  13. Oxidative stress and innate immunity in feline patients with diabetes mellitus: the role of nutrition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig B. Webb; Lauren Falkowski

    2009-01-01

    This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that oxidative stress is increased and neutrophil function is decreased in cats with diabetes mellitus (DM). Measures of oxidative stress and neutrophil function were evaluated in 20 control and 15 diabetic cats. Cats were then fed a diet designed specifically for feline diabetics (Purina DM Dietetic Management Feline Formula) for 8 weeks,

  14. Management of rowers with rib stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Wajswelner, Henry

    1996-01-01

    Stress fractures of the ribs in rowers occur mostly along the anterior axillary line, but also anteriorly and posteriorly. Management has previously consisted of rest, but symptoms can recur on return to training. Earlier return to rowing can be achieved with management that includes ice and TENS for pain relief, pulsed magnetic field therapy and passive mobilisation of the thoracic spine and costovertebral joints. Aerobic fitness is maintained with stationary cycling. Rowing is progressively introduced according to symptoms and strapping is used to support the ribs during training. Posture and technique is reviewed with the coach to eliminate unusual movements of the shoulder girdle. PMID:11676647

  15. MyStudentBody–Stress: An Online Stress Management Intervention for College Students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emil Chiauzzi; Julie Brevard; Christina Thurn; Stacey Decembrele; Sarah Lord

    2008-01-01

    College students who have high stress levels tend to experience an increased risk of academic difficulties, substance abuse, and emotional problems. To enhance student stress management and health promoting behaviors, an online stress management intervention called MyStudentBody–Stress (MyStudentBody–Stress) was developed and tested. College students at six U.S. colleges were randomized to one of three conditions: MyStudentBody–Stress, a control health information

  16. Possible Role of Nutritional Priming for Early Salt and Drought Stress Responses in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Staudinger, Christiana; Mehmeti, Vlora; Turetschek, Reinhard; Lyon, David; Egelhofer, Volker; Wienkoop, Stefanie

    2012-01-01

    Most legume species establish a symbiotic association with soil bacteria. The plant accommodates the differentiated rhizobia in specialized organs, the root nodules. In this environment, the microsymbiont reduces atmospheric nitrogen (N) making it available for plant metabolism. Symbiotic N-fixation is driven by the respiration of the host photosynthates and thus constitutes an additional carbon sink for the plant. Molecular phenotypes of symbiotic and non-symbiotic Medicago truncatula are identified. The implication of nodule symbiosis on plant abiotic stress response mechanisms is not well understood. In this study, we exposed nodulated and non-symbiotic N-fertilized plants to salt and drought conditions. We assessed the stress effects with proteomic and metabolomic methods and found a nutritionally regulated phenotypic plasticity pivotal for a differential stress adjustment strategy. PMID:23267362

  17. The Nurturing Teacher: Managing the Stress of Caring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanSlyke-Briggs, Kjersti

    2010-01-01

    This book tackles the concerns of stressed teachers. Whether from nurturance suffering (stress related to caring for students) or from the piles of paperwork yet to be tackled, this text helps the reader sort through the causes of stress, the emotional, physical and social reactions to stress and how one can begin to plan a stress management plan.…

  18. Helping Gifted Students with Stress Management. ERIC Digest #E488.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Leslie S.

    Presented in a question-and-answer format, this digest offers guidelines to help gifted students manage stress effectively. The following questions are considered: What is stress? How can a youngster experience stress when nothing bad is happening? Is a gifted student more likely to feel stress than others? What are some stresses on a gifted…

  19. Nutrition

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 84.2% participated in the USDA reimbursable Service Manager to Have a Minimum Level of National School ... 18.8% in 2006. • Among school food service managers who served as study respondents, 4.1% had ...

  20. BASELINE OCCUPATIONAL STRESS LEVELS AND PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO A TWO DAY STRESS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. P. Vempati; Shirley Telles

    The benefits of work site stress management programs for a symptomatic employee populations remain to be established. The present study evaluated the physiological changes of a yoga based stress management program for 26 a symptomatic, male, middle managers. The Occupational Stress index (OSI) and autonomic parameters were measured. Data of subjects with OSI greater or less than the median ware

  1. Canalization and developmental instability of the fetal skull in a mouse model of maternal nutritional stress.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Paula N; Lotto, Federico P; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt

    2014-08-01

    Nutritional imbalance is one of the main sources of stress in both extant and extinct human populations. Restricted availability of nutrients is thought to disrupt the buffering mechanisms that contribute to developmental stability and canalization, resulting in increased levels of fluctuating asymmetry (FA) and phenotypic variance among individuals. However, the literature is contradictory in this regard. This study assesses the effect of prenatal nutritional stress on FA and among-individual variance in cranial shape and size using a mouse model of maternal protein restriction. Two sets of landmark coordinates were digitized in three dimensions from skulls of control and protein restricted specimens at E17.5 and E18.5. We found that, by the end of gestation, maternal protein restriction resulted in a significant reduction of skull size. Fluctuating asymmetry in size and shape exceeded the amount of measurement error in all groups, but no significant differences in the magnitude of FA were found between treatments. Conversely, the pattern of shape asymmetry was affected by the environmental perturbation since the angles between the first eigenvectors extracted from the covariance matrix of shape asymmetric component of protein restricted and control groups were not significantly different from the expected for random vectors. In addition, among-individual variance in cranial shape was significantly higher in the protein restricted than the control group at E18.5. Overall, the results obtained from a controlled experiment do not support the view of fluctuating asymmetry of cranial structures as a reliable index for inferring nutritional stress in human populations. PMID:24888714

  2. Nutrition in the Management of Cirrhosis and its Neurological Complications

    PubMed Central

    Bémeur, Chantal; Butterworth, Roger F.

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common feature of chronic liver diseases that is often associated with a poor prognosis including worsening of clinical outcome, neuropsychiatric complications as well as outcome following liver transplantation. Nutritional assessment in patients with cirrhosis is challenging owing to confounding factors related to liver failure. The objectives of nutritional intervention in cirrhotic patients are the support of liver regeneration, the prevention or correction of specific nutritional deficiencies and the prevention and/or treatment of the complications of liver disease per se and of liver transplantation. Nutritional recommendations target the optimal supply of adequate substrates related to requirements linked to energy, protein, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins and minerals. Some issues relating to malnutrition in chronic liver disease remain to be addressed including the development of an appropriate well-validated nutritional assessment tool, the identification of mechanistic targets or therapy for sarcopenia, the development of nutritional recommendations for obese cirrhotic patients and liver-transplant recipients and the elucidation of the roles of vitamin A hepatotoxicity, as well as the impact of deficiencies in riboflavin and zinc on clinical outcomes. Early identification and treatment of malnutrition in chronic liver disease has the potential to lead to better disease outcome as well as prevention of the complications of chronic liver disease and improved transplant outcomes. PMID:25755550

  3. Nutrition in the management of cirrhosis and its neurological complications.

    PubMed

    Bémeur, Chantal; Butterworth, Roger F

    2014-06-01

    Malnutrition is a common feature of chronic liver diseases that is often associated with a poor prognosis including worsening of clinical outcome, neuropsychiatric complications as well as outcome following liver transplantation. Nutritional assessment in patients with cirrhosis is challenging owing to confounding factors related to liver failure. The objectives of nutritional intervention in cirrhotic patients are the support of liver regeneration, the prevention or correction of specific nutritional deficiencies and the prevention and/or treatment of the complications of liver disease per se and of liver transplantation. Nutritional recommendations target the optimal supply of adequate substrates related to requirements linked to energy, protein, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins and minerals. Some issues relating to malnutrition in chronic liver disease remain to be addressed including the development of an appropriate well-validated nutritional assessment tool, the identification of mechanistic targets or therapy for sarcopenia, the development of nutritional recommendations for obese cirrhotic patients and liver-transplant recipients and the elucidation of the roles of vitamin A hepatotoxicity, as well as the impact of deficiencies in riboflavin and zinc on clinical outcomes. Early identification and treatment of malnutrition in chronic liver disease has the potential to lead to better disease outcome as well as prevention of the complications of chronic liver disease and improved transplant outcomes. PMID:25755550

  4. Paneth cell granule depletion in the human small intestine under infective and nutritional stress.

    PubMed

    Kelly, P; Feakins, R; Domizio, P; Murphy, J; Bevins, C; Wilson, J; McPhail, G; Poulsom, R; Dhaliwal, W

    2004-02-01

    Paneth cells are important contributors to the intestinal antimicrobial barrier through synthesis and release of antimicrobial peptides and proteins. Animal studies indicate that Paneth cell numbers, location and granule morphology are altered by infection and zinc status. We examined human tissue to determine whether Paneth cell numbers, distribution or granule morphology are altered in infective, inflammatory and nutritional disorders. Archival sections from infective disorders (giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, HIV, helminth infection) were compared with active inflammatory conditions (coeliac, Crohn's and graft-versus-host diseases) and histologically normal tissues. A subset of tissues was studied by electron microscopy and TUNEL staining for apoptosis. Human defensin-5 (HD5) peptide and mRNA was analysed by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Sections from a tropical population cohort study were then analysed to determine the relationship of granule depletion to infection, nutritional status and plasma zinc concentration. In HIV-related cryptosporidiosis, but not other disorders, Paneth cells were reduced in number and markedly depleted of granules. Paneth cell granule depletion was associated with reduced HD5 immunoreactivity, but this was not due to apoptosis and there was no reduction in mRNA transcripts. In the tropical population studied, depletion of granules was associated with reduced body mass index, reduced plasma zinc levels and HIV infection. Paneth cell granules in human small intestine may be depleted in response to infective and nutritional stress. We postulate that this is one mechanism through which zinc status influences host susceptibility to intestinal infection. PMID:14738460

  5. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-198. 2005. 123 Management of Ponderosa Pine Nutrition

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    of the Intermountain Forest Tree Nutrition Cooperative, Forest Resources Department, College of Natural ResourcesUSDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-198. 2005. 123 Management of Ponderosa Pine Nutrition. Lawson) nutrition. Ponderosa pine nitrogen (N) status was often better than the N-status of other Inland

  6. Stress in disaster response: a risk management approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas Paton

    2003-01-01

    Using a risk management framework, this paper discusses an approach to conceptualising disaster stress risk that can be used to develop readiness strategies that facilitate an adaptive response to disaster stress in emergency managers. It illustrates this process by describing how incident, operational and organisational demands interact with resilience and vulnerability factors to affect stress risk during the mobilisation, response

  7. Competency-Based Performance Appraisals: Improving Performance Evaluations of School Nutrition Managers and Assistants/Technicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Evelina W.; Asperin, Amelia Estepa; Nettles, Mary Frances

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the research was to develop a competency-based performance appraisal resource for evaluating school nutrition (SN) managers and assistants/technicians. Methods: A two-phased process was used to develop the competency-based performance appraisal resource for SN managers and assistants/technicians. In Phase I, draft…

  8. Management of stress and stress-related diseases: Emerging computer-based technologies and the rationale for clinical laboratory assessment

    PubMed Central

    Nwose, Ezekiel Uba; Richards, Ross Stuart

    2009-01-01

    Background: Over the years, the issue of stress management in mental health has been discussed without reference to the clinical laboratory perspectives. Translational research and the vast array of emerging diagnostic technologies in alternative medical practice are now bridging the gap. While it would be scientific arrogance for the clinical practitioner and scientist to ignore the trend, the new technologies seeking clinical acceptability necessarily require expatiation of the scientific aspects of their products. Aims: This commentary builds on a comparative critical review to further our hypothesis that oxidative stress is the biochemical basis of the emerging computer-based diagnostic technologies. Materials & Method: The available information on Computer Meridian Diagnostics, Neuropattern and Virtual Scanning technologies were critically reviewed. The differences and similarities were articulated. Results: The technologies seem different, but have similarities that have not been articulated before. The seemingly different theories are traceable to Russian scientists and are based upon stress-induced adrenal secretions and the associated effect on glucose metabolism. The therapeutic effects of antioxidant nutrition, exercise or relaxation that are inherent in the technologies are highlighted. Conclusion: This commentary furthers explanation of the alterations in antioxidant activities as a result of biofeedback, oxidative stress and/or physiological effects as the biochemical basis of the technologies. The place for antioxidant indices and whole blood viscosity are also highlighted. This provides a rationale for the evaluation of available clinical diagnostic tests both to validate the technologies and as clinical laboratory correlates in stress management. PMID:22666709

  9. Lipidomic analysis of lipid droplets from murine hepatocytes reveals distinct signatures for nutritional stress.

    PubMed

    Chitraju, Chandramohan; Trötzmüller, Martin; Hartler, Jürgen; Wolinski, Heimo; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Lass, Achim; Zechner, Rudolf; Zimmermann, Robert; Köfeler, Harald C; Spener, Friedrich

    2012-10-01

    Liver steatosis can be induced by fasting or high-fat diet. We investigated by lipidomic analysis whether such metabolic states are reflected in the lipidome of hepatocyte lipid droplets (LDs) from mice fed normal chow diet (FED), fasted (FAS), or fed a high-fat diet (HFD). LC-MS/MS at levels of lipid species profiles and of lipid molecular species uncovered a FAS phenotype of LD enriched in triacylglycerol (TG) molecular species with very long-chain (VLC)-PUFA residues and an HFD phenotype with less unsaturated TG species in addition to characteristic lipid marker species. Nutritional stress did not result in dramatic structural alterations in diacylglycerol (DG) and phospholipid (PL) classes. Moreover, molecular species of bulk TG and of DG indicated concomitant de novo TG synthesis and lipase-catalyzed degradation to be active in LDs. DG species with VLC-PUFA residues would be preferred precursors for phosphatidylcholine (PC) species, the others for TG molecular species. In addition, molecular species of PL classes fitted the hepatocyte Kennedy and phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase pathways. We demonstrate that lipidomic analysis of LDs enables phenotyping of nutritional stress. TG species are best suited for such phenotyping, whereas structural analysis of TG, DG, and PL molecular species provides metabolic insights. PMID:22872753

  10. Oxidative stress and nutritional intakes in lung patients with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome.

    PubMed

    Madill, J; Aghdassi, E; Arendt, B M; Gutierrez, C; Singer, L; Chow, C-W; Keshavjee, S; Allard, J P

    2009-11-01

    Survival after lung transplantation is limited by bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). Oxidative stress (OxS) can be associated with BOS due to chronic inflammation. The type of fat and antioxidant intakes may also contribute to OxS. Our aim was to compare OxS and nutritional intakes in non-BOS versus various stages of BOS. Fifty-eight lung recipients with versus without BOS were prospectively classified as: non-BOS; BOS Op-1 (mild), and BOS 2-3 (severe). We measured nutritional intake and plasma vitamins A, C, and E. Among a subgroup of 37 patients, OxS was assessed by measuring lipid peroxidation (LPO micromol/L MDA) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) in bronchoalveolar lavage BAL fluid (BALF). One-way analysis of variance was used to compare groups. Results are reported as mean values +/- standard errors of the mean. There was no significant difference in demographic features on time posttransplant among groups. Although there were comparable cell counts in BALF, severe BOS patients showed significantly higher BALF LPO concentrations when compared with milder stage of BOS or with non-BOS (P = .001, for both). Severe BOS recipients also displayed higher BALF GSSG concentrations compared to milder stage of BOS (P = .001) or non-BOS (P = .007). In conclusion, patients with severe BOS were more oxidatively stressed compared with mild and non-BOS recipients. PMID:19917398

  11. Lipidomic analysis of lipid droplets from murine hepatocytes reveals distinct signatures for nutritional stress[S

    PubMed Central

    Chitraju, Chandramohan; Trötzmüller, Martin; Hartler, Jürgen; Wolinski, Heimo; Thallinger, Gerhard G.; Lass, Achim; Zechner, Rudolf; Zimmermann, Robert; Köfeler, Harald C.; Spener, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Liver steatosis can be induced by fasting or high-fat diet. We investigated by lipidomic analysis whether such metabolic states are reflected in the lipidome of hepatocyte lipid droplets (LDs) from mice fed normal chow diet (FED), fasted (FAS), or fed a high-fat diet (HFD). LC-MS/MS at levels of lipid species profiles and of lipid molecular species uncovered a FAS phenotype of LD enriched in triacylglycerol (TG) molecular species with very long-chain (VLC)-PUFA residues and an HFD phenotype with less unsaturated TG species in addition to characteristic lipid marker species. Nutritional stress did not result in dramatic structural alterations in diacylglycerol (DG) and phospholipid (PL) classes. Moreover, molecular species of bulk TG and of DG indicated concomitant de novo TG synthesis and lipase-catalyzed degradation to be active in LDs. DG species with VLC-PUFA residues would be preferred precursors for phosphatidylcholine (PC) species, the others for TG molecular species. In addition, molecular species of PL classes fitted the hepatocyte Kennedy and phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase pathways. We demonstrate that lipidomic analysis of LDs enables phenotyping of nutritional stress. TG species are best suited for such phenotyping, whereas structural analysis of TG, DG, and PL molecular species provides metabolic insights. PMID:22872753

  12. [Change of blood antioxidant capacity of experimental animals during nutritional correction under oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Basov, A A; Bykov, I M

    2013-01-01

    The effect of nutritional correction (a diet high in foods with antioxidant content) on blood parameters in laboratory animals with metabolic disorders associated with oxidative stress has been studied. In experimental models of laboratory animals (male rabbits weighing 3.5-4.0 kg, n = 40) with purulent septic diseases it has been demonstrated that the use of nutritive correction (replacement of 100 g of the cereal mixture through day on a mixture of cabbage 50 g, carrots 50 g, beet 25 g, apple 25 g, kiwi 10 g and garnet 10 g per 1 rabbit) is not inferior to its efficiency of glutathione use (2 g per day). The use of these antioxidants in laboratory animals significantly reduced the phenomenon of oxidative stress on the 5th day: blood antioxidant capacity significantly increased by 14.9 and 26.6%, and the area of the flash of luminol-dependent H2O2-induced chemiluminescence of blood plasma reduced by 44.2 and 48.6% in the experimental groups receiving respectively nutritive correction and glutathione. The low-molecula level of blood antioxidant capacity was restored and the balance of the activity of superoxide dismutase (decrease) and catalase (increase) was achieved on the 10th day of the experiment. These figures significantly (p < 0.05) differed from than in the group of animals receiving no antioxidant correction. The latter studied parameters of prooxidant-antioxidant system reached values comparable with those in intact animals (n = 10) only on the 30th day, confirming the advisability of appointing a complex antioxidant therapy. PMID:24741961

  13. A Stress-Management Guide for Young People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youngs, Bettie B.

    This document presents a comprehensive guide to help young people understand and cope with stress, pressure, and anxiety. Adolescent readers are introduced to the concept of stress, the ways that stress can affect them, and the skills and techniques needed to help them learn effective ways to reduce and manage stress. The guide begins by defining…

  14. Individual Stress Management Coursework in Canadian Teacher Preparation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Gregory E.

    2011-01-01

    Teacher stress is a significant issue facing the teaching profession. The current paper explores individual stress management as a viable option to address stress in this profession. Specifically, Canadian teacher education programs are examined to identify the prevalence of pre-service teacher education courses focused on individual stress

  15. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: revised 2014 standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists in management of food and nutrition systems.

    PubMed

    Berthelsen, Rita M; Barkley, William C; Oliver, Patricia M; McLymont, Veronica; Puckett, Ruby

    2014-07-01

    Management in food and nutrition systems is presented with an ever-challenging tension between effective utilization of manpower resources, mechanical equipment, financial management, material production, and time constraints to produce optimal products. Management drives opportunities for personal development for multiple levels of its employee workforce. Given an increasing need to deliver high-quality food and services to satisfied customers, the Management in Food and Nutrition Systems Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed the Revised 2014 Standards of Professional Performance, which replace the 2009 Standards, as a tool for registered dietitian nutritionists working in food and nutrition systems management within health care and non-health care organizations. These Standards of Professional Performance consist of six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate how strong communication skills, attention to customer satisfaction, use of various resources, and application of personnel management principles can be applied to practice. The indicators describe three skill levels (ie, competent, proficient, and expert) for registered dietitian nutritionists managing food and nutrition systems. PMID:24956994

  16. Tips for Survivors of a Traumatic Event: Managing Your Stress

    MedlinePLUS

    ... when to get help. Know the Signs of Stress Your Behavior: An increase or decrease in your ... Mental Health Services www.samhsa.gov Managing Your Stress Tips for Survivors of a Traumatic Event Helpful ...

  17. Nutritional assessment and management of the malnourished patient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter reviews, for the practicing gastroenterologist: 1) basic knowledge in human nutrition, 2) the diagnosis of malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies in patients, 3) the circumstances in which protein-calorie malnutrition needs to be aggressively addressed in patients, 4) some of ...

  18. MANAGING HOLIDAY STRESS Holiday stress and depression are usually the result of

    E-print Network

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    MANAGING HOLIDAY STRESS Holiday stress and depression are usually the result of Relationships, Finances and/or Physical Demands. Here are a few suggestions of things to do to minimize stress and to help appropriate time for discussion. Be understanding if others get upset or stressed. Suggestions to Limit

  19. Running Therapy: Change Agent in Anxiety and Stress Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachs, Michael L.

    1982-01-01

    Running can be used effectively to produce positive physiological and psychological changes, including cardiovascular and physical fitness, reduction of anxiety, and more effective management of stress. (CJ)

  20. Protective roles of osmotic stress-resistant Hos3 against oxidative, nitrosative and nutritional stresses in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chang-Jin; Jo, Hannah; Kim, Kyunghoon

    2015-01-01

    Hos3 is involved in cellular growth under osmotic stress in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The recombinant plasmid pYFHos3 harboring the structural gene encoding Hos3 was constructed. The S. pombe cells harboring pYFHos3 contained the increased hos3 (+) mRNA content and exhibited an enhanced growth in high osmotic conditions, such as 1.5 M KCl and 2.5 M D-glucose, compared with the vector control cells. In the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion-generating menadione (MD) and nitric oxide (NO)-generating sodium nitroprusside (SNP), they could grow better than the vector control cells. In the presence of H2O2, MD and SNP and in the absence of a nitrogen source, the S. pombe cells harboring pYFHos3 contained less elevated NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels than the vector control cells. Collectively, the S. pombe Hos3 also participate in the cellular defense against oxidative, nitrosative and nutritional stresses through down-regulating ROS and NO levels. PMID:25342311

  1. Stress management in dental students: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Alzahem, Abdullah M; Van der Molen, Henk T; Alaujan, Arwa H; De Boer, Benjamin J

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of stress management programs in dental education by systematic review of the literature. The number of studies concerning stress management programs for dental students is limited compared with studies discussing sources of stress. Several types of programs for stress management have been reported, and differ in their duration, content, and outcomes. Two main strategies have been used to help stressed students, ie, decreasing the number of stressors and increasing the ability to cope with stress. The first strategy includes several components, such as reducing fear of failure and workload pressure due to examinations and requirements. The second strategy includes coping techniques, such as deep breathing exercises. Although positive effects have been reported for most of the programs, these have mainly been evaluated using subjective self-report measures. There is a need for more research to identify the most effective stress management program. PMID:24904226

  2. Pancreatic cancer surgery and nutrition management: a review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Afaneh, Cheguevara; Gerszberg, Deborah; Slattery, Eoin; Seres, David S; Chabot, John A; Kluger, Michael D

    2015-02-01

    Surgery remains the only curative treatment for pancreaticobiliary tumors. These patients typically present in a malnourished state. Various screening tools have been employed to help with preoperative risk stratification. Examples include the subjective global assessment (SGA), malnutrition universal screening tool (MUST), and nutritional risk index (NRI). Adequate studies have not been performed to determine if perioperative interventions, based on nutrition risk assessment, result in less morbidity and mortality. The routine use of gastric decompression with nasogastric sump tubes may be unnecessary following elective pancreatic resections. Instead, placement should be selective and employed on a case-by-case basis. A wide variety of feeding modalities are available, oral nutrition being the most effective. Artificial nutrition may be provided by temporary nasal tube (nasogastric, nasojejunal, or combined nasogastrojejunal tube) or surgically placed tube [gastrostomy (GT), jejunostomy (JT), gastrojejunostomy tubes (GJT)], and intravenously (parenteral nutrition, PN). The optimal tube for enteral feeding cannot be determined based on current data. Each is associated with a specific set of complications. Dual lumen tubes may be useful in the presence of delayed gastric emptying (DGE) as the stomach may be decompressed while feeds are delivered to the jejunum. However, all feeding tubes placed in the small intestine, except direct jejunostomies, commonly dislodge and retroflex into the stomach. Jejunostomies are associated with less frequent, but more serious complications. These include intestinal torsion and bowel necrosis. PN is associated with septic, metabolic, and access-related complications and should be the feeding strategy of last-resort. Enteral feeds are clearly preferred over parental nutrition. A sound understanding of perioperative nutrition may improve patient outcomes. Patients undergoing pancreatic cancer surgery should undergo multidisciplinary nutrition screening and intervention, and the surgical/oncological team should include nutrition professionals in managing these patients in the perioperative period. PMID:25713805

  3. Pancreatic cancer surgery and nutrition management: a review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    Afaneh, Cheguevara; Gerszberg, Deborah; Slattery, Eoin; Seres, David S.; Chabot, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery remains the only curative treatment for pancreaticobiliary tumors. These patients typically present in a malnourished state. Various screening tools have been employed to help with preoperative risk stratification. Examples include the subjective global assessment (SGA), malnutrition universal screening tool (MUST), and nutritional risk index (NRI). Adequate studies have not been performed to determine if perioperative interventions, based on nutrition risk assessment, result in less morbidity and mortality. The routine use of gastric decompression with nasogastric sump tubes may be unnecessary following elective pancreatic resections. Instead, placement should be selective and employed on a case-by-case basis. A wide variety of feeding modalities are available, oral nutrition being the most effective. Artificial nutrition may be provided by temporary nasal tube (nasogastric, nasojejunal, or combined nasogastrojejunal tube) or surgically placed tube [gastrostomy (GT), jejunostomy (JT), gastrojejunostomy tubes (GJT)], and intravenously (parenteral nutrition, PN). The optimal tube for enteral feeding cannot be determined based on current data. Each is associated with a specific set of complications. Dual lumen tubes may be useful in the presence of delayed gastric emptying (DGE) as the stomach may be decompressed while feeds are delivered to the jejunum. However, all feeding tubes placed in the small intestine, except direct jejunostomies, commonly dislodge and retroflex into the stomach. Jejunostomies are associated with less frequent, but more serious complications. These include intestinal torsion and bowel necrosis. PN is associated with septic, metabolic, and access-related complications and should be the feeding strategy of last-resort. Enteral feeds are clearly preferred over parental nutrition. A sound understanding of perioperative nutrition may improve patient outcomes. Patients undergoing pancreatic cancer surgery should undergo multidisciplinary nutrition screening and intervention, and the surgical/oncological team should include nutrition professionals in managing these patients in the perioperative period. PMID:25713805

  4. Nutritional iron turned inside out: intestinal stress from a gut microbial perspective.

    PubMed

    Kortman, Guus A M; Raffatellu, Manuela; Swinkels, Dorine W; Tjalsma, Harold

    2014-11-01

    Iron is abundantly present on earth, essential for most microorganisms and crucial for human health. Human iron deficiency that is nevertheless highly prevalent in developing regions of the world can be effectively treated by oral iron administration. Accumulating evidence indicates that excess of unabsorbed iron that enters the colonic lumen causes unwanted side effects at the intestinal host-microbiota interface. The chemical properties of iron, the luminal environment and host iron withdrawal mechanisms, especially during inflammation, can turn the intestine in a rather stressful milieu. Certain pathogenic enteric bacteria can, however, deal with this stress at the expense of other members of the gut microbiota, while their virulence also seems to be stimulated in an iron-rich intestinal environment. This review covers the multifaceted aspects of nutritional iron stress with respect to growth, composition, metabolism and pathogenicity of the gut microbiota in relation to human health. We aim to present an unpreceded view on the dynamic effects and impact of oral iron administration on intestinal host-microbiota interactions to provide leads for future research and other applications. PMID:25205464

  5. Beneficial Effects of a Q-ter® Based Nutritional Mixture on Functional Performance, Mitochondrial Function, and Oxidative Stress in Rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jinze Xu; Arnold Y. Seo; Darya A. Vorobyeva; Christy S. Carter; Stephen D. Anton; Angela M. S. Lezza; Christiaan Leeuwenburgh; Alejandro Lucia

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundMitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are central mechanisms underlying the aging process and the pathogenesis of many age-related diseases. Selected antioxidants and specific combinations of nutritional compounds could target many biochemical pathways that affect both oxidative stress and mitochondrial function and, thereby, preserve or enhance physical performance.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsIn this study, we evaluated the potential anti-aging benefits of a Q-ter® based

  6. rkfsbopfqv=lc=proobv= STRESS POLICY -MANAGERS GUIDELINES

    E-print Network

    Doran, Simon J.

    = = = rkfsbopfqv=lc=proobv= STRESS POLICY - MANAGERS GUIDELINES JUNE 2006 #12;= = = = = eo=abm^oqjbkq= 1/2 1. Introduction 1.1 Stress is something that affects everyone on occasions. It is a natural reaction we all have to excessive pressure. Stress is not a disease, but can lead to illness if excessive

  7. Stress and Time Management for Educators. Georgia Comprehensive Guidance Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Michael J.; Moore, Earl J.

    This guide to stress and time management for educators defines stress as a physiological response to the pressures of daily living and differentiates between stress as a motivator and a debilitator. The guide presents stressor inventories for teachers, administrators, and counselors, and outlines a personal behavior contract for implementing…

  8. How Much Do Librarians Know about Stress Management?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollendorff, Monica

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the topic of burnout and librarianship, and concludes that little effort has been made to address this issue. The findings of a survey of librarians that examined how much they know about stress management are used to confirm the need for stress management training in librarianship. The questionnaire used is appended. (46…

  9. Effects of nutritional management intervention on gestational weight gain and perinatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiao-Dong; Dong, Xiaojing; Zhou, Jin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate whether nutritional management intervention can prevent excessive weight gain during pregnancy and improve perinatal outcomes. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 276 pregnant women undergoing prenatal care between June 2010 and December 2011 at the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of the Second Affiliate Hospital of the ChongQing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing, China. Of them, 131 women received individualized nutritional management in addition to routine prenatal care (intervention group), and 145 women received only routine prenatal care (control group). The primary study outcome was gestational weight gain (GWG). Secondary outcomes included birth weight, Apgar score, and incidence of pregnancy complications. Results: Baseline demographic characteristics of the 2 groups were the same. The average GWG was higher in the control group (12.57±4.62 kg) compared with the intervention group (7.58±1.59 kg; p=0.000). The incidence rate of preeclampsia was 3.1% and gestational diabetes was 3.8% for the intervention group, compared with 11% for preeclampsia and 14.5% gestational diabetes for the control group (p<0.05). The incidence rates of premature rupture of membranes, preterm labor, birth weight, birth of a newborn, and major congenital anomalies did not significantly differ between the 2 groups. Conclusion: Nutritional management intervention prevented excessive GWG and improved perinatal outcomes. These results support the hypothesis that nutritional management intervention can decrease the rate of complications experienced by expecting mothers. PMID:25316475

  10. IMPACT OF ANIMAL NUTRITION AND FEED MANAGEMENT ON THE ENVIRONMENT: SUCCESS, CHALLENGES AND FUTURE DIRECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To predict the future direction of animal nutrition and feed management on the environment, one must understand where we are today in terms of making animal production more environmentally friendly. With current regulations on phosphorus (P) (soil runoff and ground water infiltration), nitrogen (N)...

  11. Perceptions of School Nutrition Directors and Managers Regarding Their Role in School Wellness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinson, Wendy Bounds; Lofton, Kristi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The objectives of this study were to investigate the perceptions of school nutrition (SN) directors and managers regarding their role in school wellness, the responsibility of SN professionals for serving as positive role models, and factors contributing to greater involvement in school wellness. Methods: A survey assessing the…

  12. Nutrition knowledge of rural older populations: can congregate meal site participants manage their own diets?

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lionel; Almanza, Barbara; Ghiselli, Richard

    2010-07-01

    Congregate meal sites were funded to assist socioeconomically disadvantaged, rural older individuals in improving their health-related practices. Although the participants in the program are largely female, the meals are designed to meet one third of the daily caloric intake of a 70-year-old male, and to satisfy his recommended dietary allowances for total fat, fiber, calcium, and sodium. The actual percentage of the required nutrient intake contributed by meals served at congregate sites is indefinite. Moreover, the ability of congregate meal participants to manage their diets and their receptiveness to helpful nutrition information in that regard is unknown. Our objective was to promote nutritional knowledge in economically disadvantaged, rural older participants by studying its impact on their ability to benefit from congregate meal programs. We used a test, intervention, retest methodology to examine the effect of short-term nutrition interventions on congregate meal site participants' nutrition knowledge. The objective was to determine the participants' potential for managing their own diets (e.g., their ability to determine what diet behaviors are appropriate for specific chronic conditions). We found that while congregate meal site participants have knowledge of nutrition recommendations, their ability to apply this information in helping themselves to prevent or control their chronic conditions remains in question. PMID:20711926

  13. Stress and Stress Management in Contemporary Adult Education: A Commentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosbab, F. Paul

    The stress felt by older students in higher education should be addressed by educators and members of the helping professions. The word stress is related to "distress" and perhaps best describes what substantial numbers of adult learners experience when returning to school. For instance, researchers have found graduate students to be particularly…

  14. Different colors reveal different information: how nutritional stress affects the expression of melanin- and structurally based ornamental plumage.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Kevin J; Mackillop, Emiko A; Dale, James; Hauber, Mark E

    2002-12-01

    Avian plumage colors have emerged recently as model systems for investigating the types of information that can be signaled by showy sexual displays in animals. In many species, the brightness of carotenoid-based plumage reflects the health and condition of individuals and is used in mate selection. The information contained in melanin-based and structurally based ornamental colors in birds is less well resolved, however. We subjected male house sparrows Passer domesticus and brown-headed cowbirds Molothrus ater to stressful nutritional conditions during molt to test the hypothesis that melanin- and structurally based plumage colors are nutritionally condition-dependent. We restricted food access for treatment males during randomized 6 h periods on 4 days per week, while allowing control birds access to food ad libitum throughout the course of the molt. We found that the size and brightness of the melanin-based throat badges in male house sparrows were not affected by nutritional stress. Similarly, there were no differences between treatment and control male cowbirds in the size or brightness of the melanin-based brown hood. However, the structurally based iridescent plumage of cowbirds was indicative of the nutritional condition of males during molt. Nutritionally stressed cowbirds grew significantly less colorful plumage than did males with access to food ad libitum. These results are consistent with observations in other avian species that different types of plumage color communicate different sets of information. Melanin ornaments are less sensitive to nutritional conditions during molt and instead may reflect the hormonal status and/or competitive ability of males, whereas structural coloration appears to be an accurate signal of health and condition. PMID:12409501

  15. Occupational Stress, Mental Health Status and Stress Management Behaviors among Secondary School Teachers in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Sharron S. K.; Mak, Yim Wah; Chui, Ying Yu; Chiang, Vico C. L.; Lee, Angel C. K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine occupational stress and mental health among secondary school teachers in Hong Kong, and to identify the differences between those actively engaged in stress management behaviors and those who were not. Design: Survey design was adopted using validated instruments including Occupational Stress Inventory…

  16. RelE, a global inhibitor of translation, is activated during nutritional stress

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Susanne K.; Mikkelsen, Marie; Pedersen, Kim; Gerdes, Kenn

    2001-01-01

    The stringent response is defined as the physiological changes elicited by amino acid starvation. Many of these changes depend on the regulatory nucleotide ppGpp (guanosine tetraphosphate) synthesized by RelA (ppGpp synthetase I), the relA-encoded protein. The second rel locus of Escherichia coli is called relBE and encodes RelE cytotoxin and RelB antitoxin. RelB counteracts the toxic effect of RelE. In addition, RelB is an autorepressor of relBE transcription. Here we reveal a ppGpp-independent mechanism that reduces the level of translation during amino acid starvation. Artificial overexpression of RelE severely inhibited translation. During amino acid starvation, the presence of relBE caused a significant reduction in the poststarvation level of translation. Concomitantly, relBE transcription was rapidly and strongly induced. Induction of transcription occurred independently of relA and spoT (encoding ppGpp synthetase II), but instead depended on Lon protease. Consistently, Lon was required for degradation of RelB. Replacement of the relBE promoter with a LacI-regulated promoter indicated that strong and ongoing transcription of relBE is required to maintain a proper RelB:RelE ratio during starvation. Thus relBE may be regarded as a previously uncharacterized type of stress-response element that reduces the global level of translation during nutritional stress. PMID:11717402

  17. Major intestinal complications of radiotherapy. Management and nutrition

    SciTech Connect

    Deitel, M.; To, T.B.

    1987-12-01

    Hospitalization was required in 57 patients for intestinal injuries following radiotherapy for carcinoma of the cervix, endometrium, ovary, bladder, rectum, and other primary sites. Intestinal complications included stenosis, perforation, rectal ulcer, and rectovaginal, ileovaginal, and ileovesical fistula; 27 patients had multiple intestinal complications. Operation was necessary in 33 patients, as follows: bowel resections, 18; colostomy alone, five; adhesiolysis, five; ileocolic bypass, three; and Hartmann's procedure for sigmoid perforation, two. Five anastomotic leaks and six postoperative deaths occurred. Causes of death among the remaining patients included residual cancer (ten), de novo bowel cancer (two), radiation injury (four), and unrelated causes (six). Resection to uninvolved bowel, omental wrap of anterior resection anastomosis, avoidance of unnecessary adhesiolysis, and long-tube orientation seemed to contribute to successful operations. Nutritional support was used for repletion, post-operative fistulas, and short-gut syndrome.

  18. Effects of Boron Nutrition and Water Stress on Nitrogen Fixation, Seed ?15N and ?13C Dynamics, and Seed Composition in Soybean Cultivars Differing in Maturities

    PubMed Central

    Bellaloui, Nacer; Mengistu, Alemu

    2015-01-01

    Therefore, the objective of the current research was to investigate the effects of foliar B nutrition on seed protein, oil, fatty acids, and sugars under water stress conditions. A repeated greenhouse experiment was conducted using different maturity group (MG) cultivars. Plants were well-watered with no foliar B (W ? B), well-watered with foliar B (W + B), water-stressed with no foliar B (WS ? B), and water-stressed with foliar B (WS + B). Foliar B was applied at rate of 0.45?kg·ha?1 and was applied twice at flowering and at seed-fill stages. The results showed that seed protein, sucrose, fructose, and glucose were higher in W + B treatment than in W ? B, WS + B, and WS ? B. The increase in protein in W + B resulted in lower seed oil, and the increase of oleic in WS ? B or WS + B resulted in lower linolenic acid. Foliar B resulted in higher nitrogen fixation and water stress resulted in seed ?15N and ?13C alteration. Increased stachyose indicated possible physiological and metabolic changes in carbon and nitrogen pathways and their sources under water stress. This research is beneficial to growers for fertilizer management and seed quality and to breeders to use 15N/14N and 13C/12C ratios and stachyose to select for drought tolerance soybean. PMID:25667936

  19. Effects of boron nutrition and water stress on nitrogen fixation, seed ?15N and ?13C dynamics, and seed composition in soybean cultivars differing in maturities.

    PubMed

    Bellaloui, Nacer; Mengistu, Alemu

    2015-01-01

    Therefore, the objective of the current research was to investigate the effects of foliar B nutrition on seed protein, oil, fatty acids, and sugars under water stress conditions. A repeated greenhouse experiment was conducted using different maturity group (MG) cultivars. Plants were well-watered with no foliar B (W - B), well-watered with foliar B (W + B), water-stressed with no foliar B (WS - B), and water-stressed with foliar B (WS + B). Foliar B was applied at rate of 0.45 kg · ha(-1) and was applied twice at flowering and at seed-fill stages. The results showed that seed protein, sucrose, fructose, and glucose were higher in W + B treatment than in W - B, WS + B, and WS - B. The increase in protein in W + B resulted in lower seed oil, and the increase of oleic in WS - B or WS + B resulted in lower linolenic acid. Foliar B resulted in higher nitrogen fixation and water stress resulted in seed ? (15)N and ? (13)C alteration. Increased stachyose indicated possible physiological and metabolic changes in carbon and nitrogen pathways and their sources under water stress. This research is beneficial to growers for fertilizer management and seed quality and to breeders to use (15)N/(14)N and (13)C/(12)C ratios and stachyose to select for drought tolerance soybean. PMID:25667936

  20. Smart stress management system for media and arts employees.

    PubMed

    Kaklauskas, Arturas; Kovachec, Ludmil; Safonov, Andrej; Paliskiene, Rasa; Bartkiene, Lina; Jackute, Ieva

    2014-01-01

    As the tempo of contemporary life quickens along with the increasing rates of competition on the art and media market, uncertainty about the future and continual demands for greater competency, the risk of experiencing stress unavoidably rises. Stress is the physiological and psychological state of tension in a person caused by external and internal irritants called stressors. Stress is a natural reaction of an organism to internal as well as external, positive as well as negative stimuli. Stress frequently manifests in our lives and it stimulates action, inventiveness and creativity. However, long-lasting, uncontrolled stress exhausts the psyche and the immune system of an organism and it can cause various illnesses. To manage stress, a Smart Stress Management System for Media and Arts Employees was developed by the authors of this paper. PMID:25488234

  1. A cost management model for hospital food and nutrition in a public hospital.

    PubMed

    Neriz, Liliana; Núńez, Alicia; Ramis, Francisco

    2014-11-13

    BackgroundIn Chile, the use of costing systems in the public sector is limited. The Ministry of Health requires hospitals to manage themselves with the aim of decentralizing health care services and increasing their quality. However, self-management with a lack of accounting information is almost impossible. On the other hand, nutrition department costs have barely been studied before, and there are no studies specifically for activity based costing (ABC) systems. ABC focuses on the process and traces health care activities to gain a more accurate measurement of the object costs and the financial performance of an organization.MethodThis paper uses ABC in a nutrition unit of a public hospital of high complexity to determine costs associated with the different meals for inpatients. The paper also provides an activity based management (ABM) analysis for this unit.ResultsThe results show positive effects on the reduction of costs for the nutrition department after implementing ABC/ABM. Therefore, there are opportunities to improve the profitability of the area and the results could also be replicated to other areas in the hospital. ABC shed light on the amount of nutritionist time devoted to completing paperwork, and as a result, system changes were introduced to reduce this burden and allow them to focus on more relevant activities. Additional efficiencies were achieved through the elimination of non-value adding activities and automation of reports. ABC reduced the cost of the nutrition department and could produce similar results in other areas of the hospital.ConclusionsThis is a practical application of a financial management tool, ABC, which would be useful for hospital managers to reduce costs and improve the management of the unit. This paper takes ABC and examines its use in an area, which has had little exposure to the benefits of this tool. PMID:25391844

  2. Helping Clients Manage Stress: A Practical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Dennis

    The pervasiveness of stress as a problem, with its many harmful effects on people, makes it a matter of growing interest for counselors and other personnel workers. This monograph provides definitions of stress, distress, and eustress, and discusses numerous causes of distress, as well as the benefits of stress to a healthy, productive life.…

  3. Evaluation of the Role of Enteral Nutrition in Managing Patients with Diabetes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Omorogieva; Brooke, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed. The prevalence of diabetes is on the increase in the UK and globally partly due to lack of physical activities, poor dietary regimes and genetic susceptibility. The development of diabetes often leads to complications such as stroke, which may require enteral nutritional support. The provision of enteral feeds comes with its complications including hyperglycaemia which if not managed can have profound consequences for the patients in terms of clinical outcomes. Therefore, it is essential to develop strategies for managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed with respect to the type and composition of the feed. This is a systematic review of published peer reviewed articles. EBSCOhost Research, PubMed and SwetsWise databases were searched. Reference lists of identified articles were reviewed. Randomised controlled trials comparing enteral nutrition diabetes specific formulas with standard formulas were included. The studies which compared diabetes specific formulas (DSF) with standard formulas showed that DSF was more effective in controlling glucose profiles including postprandial glucose, HbA1c and insulinemic response. The use of DSF appears to be effective in managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed compared with standard feed. PMID:25412151

  4. Evaluation of the role of enteral nutrition in managing patients with diabetes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Omorogieva; Brooke, Joanne

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed. The prevalence of diabetes is on the increase in the UK and globally partly due to lack of physical activities, poor dietary regimes and genetic susceptibility. The development of diabetes often leads to complications such as stroke, which may require enteral nutritional support. The provision of enteral feeds comes with its complications including hyperglycaemia which if not managed can have profound consequences for the patients in terms of clinical outcomes. Therefore, it is essential to develop strategies for managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed with respect to the type and composition of the feed. This is a systematic review of published peer reviewed articles. EBSCOhost Research, PubMed and SwetsWise databases were searched. Reference lists of identified articles were reviewed. Randomised controlled trials comparing enteral nutrition diabetes specific formulas with standard formulas were included. The studies which compared diabetes specific formulas (DSF) with standard formulas showed that DSF was more effective in controlling glucose profiles including postprandial glucose, HbA1c and insulinemic response. The use of DSF appears to be effective in managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed compared with standard feed. PMID:25412151

  5. Strategies in the Nutritional Management of Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Teri L.; Anderson, Molly A.; Chartier-Logan, Catherine; Friedman, Jacob E.; Barbour, Linda A.

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating the optimal macronutrient composition for dietary management of gestational diabetes mellitus(GDM) has enormous potential to improve perinatal outcomes. Diet therapy may result in significant cost savings if effective in deterring the need for expensive medical management within this growing population. In only 6 randomized controlled trials(RCTs) in 250 women, data suggest that a diet higher in complex carbohydrate and fiber, low in simple sugar, and lower in saturated fat may be effective in blunting postprandial hyperglycemia, preventing worsened insulin resistance and excess fetal growth. The use of diet in GDM remains an area in grave need for high-quality RCTs. PMID:24047934

  6. Nutritional approaches in the risk reduction and management of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mi, Weiqian; van Wijk, Nick; Cansev, Mehmet; Sijben, John W C; Kamphuis, Patrick J G H

    2013-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a heterogeneous and devastating neurodegenerative disease with increasing socioeconomic burden for society. In the past 30 y, notwithstanding advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease and consequent development of therapeutic approaches to novel pathogenic targets, no cure has so far emerged. This contribution focuses on recent nutritional approaches in the risk reduction and management of AD with emphasis on factors providing a rationale for nutritional approaches in AD, including compromised nutritional status, altered nutrient uptake and metabolism, and nutrient requirements for synapse formation. Collectively these factors are believed to result in specific nutritional requirement in AD. The chapter also emphasizes investigated nutritional interventions in patients with AD, including studies with single nutrients and with the specific nutrient combination Fortasyn Connect and discusses the current shift of paradigm to intervene in earlier stages of AD, which offers opportunities for investigating nutritional strategies to reduce the risk for disease progression. Fortasyn Connect was designed to enhance synapse formation and function in AD by addressing the putative specific nutritional requirements and contains docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, uridine-5'-mono-phosphate, choline, phospholipids, antioxidants, and B vitamins. Two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with the medical food Souvenaid, containing Fortasyn Connect, showed that this intervention improved memory performance in mild, drug-naďve patients with AD. Electroencephalography outcome in one of these clinical studies suggests that Souvenaid has an effect on brain functional connectivity, which is a derivative of changed synaptic activity. Thus, these studies suggest that nutritional requirements in AD can be successfully addressed and result in improvements in behavioral and neuro-physiological alterations that are characteristic to AD. The recent advance of methodologies and techniques for early diagnosis of AD facilitates the investigation of strategies to reduce the risk for AD progression in the earliest stages of the disease. Nutrition-based approaches deserve further investigation as an integral part of such strategies due to their low risk for side effects and their potential to affect pathological processes of very early AD. PMID:23756280

  7. What is the relationship between mineral nutrition and disease management?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pecan disease management potentially influences efficient use of fertilizer and other expensive orchard inputs. Optimization of tree nutrient element physiology is key to the expression of a cultivar’s full potential to express resistance to disease. This is especially important in cultivars posse...

  8. Proteomic analysis of the function of sigma factor ?54 in Helicobacter pylori survival with nutrition deficiency stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yundong; Liu, Shuang; Li, Wen; Shan, Yuqun; Li, Xinpeng; Lu, Xingxiao; Li, Yan; Guo, Qing; Zhou, Yabin; Jia, Jihui

    2013-01-01

    H. pylori can survive under a nutrition-deficient environment. During infection and transmission, H. pylori is confronted with nutrient limitation and the bacterium requires rapid alteration in gene expression for survival under stress conditions. However, the mechanism underlining this regulation remains unknown. A previous study showed that ?(54) is an important regulation factor for H. pylori survival in the nutrition-deficient environment. Our results show that the expression of ?(54) (rpoN) is significantly induced in the stationary phase (nutrition deficiency) and the rpoN mutant showed a significantly lower viability than wild-type H. pylori in the late stationary phase. Thus, ?(54) is involved in H. pylori survival during nutrient limitation. We used comparative proteomics to analyze the protein differentiation between wild-type and rpoN mutant during the stationary phase. With depleted nutrients, ?(54) can slow the process of proliferation by negatively regulating genes involved in energy metabolism and biosynthesis and enhance stress-resistant ability by positively regulating genes involved in protein fate and redox reaction. Especially, NapA positively regulated by ?(54) plays an important function in H. pylori survival both in the stationary phase and in water, and the latter situation would be beneficial for bacterial in vitro transmission. Our investigations give new light on the adaptive regulation of H. pylori under stress conditions. PMID:24015282

  9. Managing stress in health social work roles today.

    PubMed

    Dillon, C

    1990-01-01

    Stress on social workers in health settings is of increasing professional interest and concern. This article suggests individual and system sources of such stress and outlines pathways for nurture of the authentic and creative self in health careers. Replenishing measures include empowerment through teamwork, stress management techniques, consciousness raising to alter self defeating cognitions, and activities within and outside the setting to enrich definition and use of self. PMID:2237717

  10. Nutritional education for management of osteodystrophy (NEMO) trial: Design and patient characteristics, Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Saade; Elzein, Hafez; Haydar, Sarah; de Vries, Nanne

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of a trained dedicated dietitian on clinical outcomes among Lebanese hemodialysis (HD) patients: and thus demonstrate a viable developing country model. This paper describes the study protocol and baseline data. The study was a multicenter randomized controlled trial with parallel-group design involving 12 HD units: assigned to cluster A (n = 6) or B (n = 6). A total of 570 patients met the inclusion criteria. Patients in cluster A were randomly assigned as per dialysis shift to the following: Dedicated Dietitian (DD) (n = 133) and Existing Practice (EP) (n = 138) protocols. Cluster B patients (n = 299) received Trained Hospital Dietitian (THD) protocol. Dietitians of the DD and THD groups were trained by the research team on Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative nutrition guidelines. DD protocol included: individualized nutrition education for 2 hours/month/HD patient for 6 months focusing on renal osteodystrophy and using the Trans-theoretical theory for behavioral change. EP protocol included nutrition education given to patients by hospital dietitians who were blinded to the study. The THD protocol included nutrition education to patients given by hospital dietitian as per the training received but within hospital responsibilities, with no set educational protocol or tools. Baseline data revealed that 40% of patients were hyperphosphatemics (> 5.5 mg/dl) with low dietary adherence and knowledge of dietary P restriction in addition to inadequate daily protein intake (58.86%± 33.87% of needs) yet adequate dietary P intake (795.52 ± 366.94 mg/day). Quality of life (QOL) ranged from 48-75% of full health. Baseline differences between the 3 groups revealed significant differences in serum P, malnutrition status, adherence to diet and P chelators and in 2 factors of the QOL: physical and social functioning. The data show room for improvement in the nutritional status of the patients. The NEMO trial may be able to demonstrate a better nutritional management of HD patients. PMID:24611112

  11. Sources of Faculty Stress and Strategies for Its Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Paul; Clagett, Craig

    Views on sources of stress on college faculty and strategies for its management were obtained at small-group sessions in the 1980 faculty orientation at Prince George's Community College, Maryland. Sixteen faculty groups generated 218 responses expressing sources of job stress, a complete listing of which is appended. The responses were aggregated…

  12. Blood Pressure Variability and Stress Management Training for Essential Hypertension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Vera, Maria Paz; Sanz, Jesus; Labrador, Francisco J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether stress management training reduces blood pressure (BP) variability in hypertensive patients. Previous literature suggests that cardiovascular risk is not only a function of BP levels, but also of BP variability, and this partially depends on changes induced by the stress of everyday life. The…

  13. Preventing and managing stress fractures in athletes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kim Bennell; Peter Brukner

    2005-01-01

    Stress fractures are common overuse injuries of bone resulting from the repeated application of submaximal load. Factors that reduce bone strength or increase the load applied to bone can place an athlete at risk of developing a stress fracture. These factors include low bone density, menstrual disturbances, inadequate dietary intake and eating disorders, training errors, inadequate muscle function and biomechanical

  14. Work-related Stress Management by Finnish Enterprises

    PubMed Central

    KINNUNEN-AMOROSO, Maritta; LIIRA, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Work-related stress has become one of the major problems in working societies and it increases employees’ risk of disease. Its importance has been emphasized also due to its’ great socio-economic consequences. Different stress management and worksite interventions have been implemented, however, the actual practices in companies have been assessed little. The purpose of this study was to examine how enterprises in Finland manage work-related stress. An assessment of work-related stress methods was conducted in 40 enterprises acting in the metropolitan area of Finland in May 2010 by a questionnaire. The concept of work-related stress was well known by participants. Enterprises rarely had their own work-related stress management protocol even though all of the workplaces had experienced work-related stress at some point. The collaboration between the workplace and occupational health services varied. Companies easily placed the responsibility for work-related stress assessment and handling on occupational health services. Workplaces have to pay more attention to work-related stress and related issues. The easiest way to do this is to collaborate with occupational health services. Protocols for collaboration should be developed jointly using the available models which have been established as cost-effective. PMID:24583512

  15. Work-related stress management by Finnish enterprises.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen-Amoroso, Maritta; Liira, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Work-related stress has become one of the major problems in working societies and it increases employees' risk of disease. Its importance has been emphasized also due to its' great socio-economic consequences. Different stress management and worksite interventions have been implemented, however, the actual practices in companies have been assessed little. The purpose of this study was to examine how enterprises in Finland manage work-related stress. An assessment of work-related stress methods was conducted in 40 enterprises acting in the metropolitan area of Finland in May 2010 by a questionnaire. The concept of work-related stress was well known by participants. Enterprises rarely had their own work-related stress management protocol even though all of the workplaces had experienced work-related stress at some point. The collaboration between the workplace and occupational health services varied. Companies easily placed the responsibility for work-related stress assessment and handling on occupational health services. Workplaces have to pay more attention to work-related stress and related issues. The easiest way to do this is to collaborate with occupational health services. Protocols for collaboration should be developed jointly using the available models which have been established as cost-effective. PMID:24583512

  16. Delivery and Evaluation of Training for School Nutrition Administrators and Managers on Meeting Special Food and Nutrition Needs of Students in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakley, Charlotte B.; Knight, Kathy; Hobbs, Margie; Dodd, Lacy M.; Cole, Janie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this investigation was to complete a formal evaluation of a project that provided specialized training for school nutrition (SN) administrators and managers on meeting children's special dietary needs in the school setting. Methods: The training was provided as part of the "Eating Good and Moving Like We Should"…

  17. STRESS

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Hancey

    2010-04-27

    During this activity, students will use the available resources to learn more about stress, the effects of stress and how to handle stress. This activity focuses on the Utah fifth grade health core Standard 1: The students will learn ways to improve mental health and manage stress. During this project, students are given two different scenarios and ...

  18. Adaptive capability as indicated by endocrine and biochemical responses of Malpura ewes subjected to combined stresses (thermal and nutritional) in a semi-arid tropical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sejian, Veerasamy; Maurya, Vijai P.; Naqvi, Sayeed M. K.

    2010-11-01

    A study was conducted to assess the effect of combined stresses (thermal and nutritional) on endocrine and biochemical responses in Malpura ewes. Twenty eight adult Malpura ewes (average body weight 33.56 kg) were used in the present study. The ewes were divided into four groups viz., GI ( n = 7; control), GII ( n = 7; thermal stress), GIII ( n = 7; nutritional stress) and GIV ( n = 7; combined stress). The animals were stall fed with a diet consisting of 60% roughage and 40% concentrate. GI and GII ewes were provided with ad libitum feeding while GIII and GIV ewes were provided with restricted feed (30% intake of GI ewes) to induce nutritional stress. GII and GIV ewes were kept in climatic chamber at 40°C and 55% RH for 6 h a day between 1000 hours and 1600 hours to induce thermal stress. The study was conducted for a period of two estrus cycles. The parameters studied were Hb, PCV, glucose, total protein, total cholesterol, ACP, ALP, cortisol, T4, T3, and insulin. Combined stress significantly ( P < 0.05) affected all parameters studied. Furthermore, the results revealed that, compared to thermal stress, nutritional stress had a less significant effect on the parameters studied. However, when both these stresses were coupled, they had a severe impact on all the parameters studied in these ewes. It can be concluded from this study that two stressors occurring simultaneously may impact severely on the biological functions necessary to maintain homeostasis in sheep.

  19. No Trade-Offs between Lipid Stores and Structural Growth in Juvenile Zebra Finches Undergoing Nutritional Stress during Development *.

    PubMed

    Kriengwatana, Buddhamas; MacDougall-Shackleton, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Nutritional conditions during development can affect both structural growth and body fat deposition. Body size and body fat each have significant consequences for fitness, yet few studies have investigated how young birds balance resource allocation between structural growth and fat reserves. We raised zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) in consistently high- or low-food conditions until posthatch day 35 (PHD 35). From this age until PHD 62, half of the birds in each condition were switched to the other treatment, while the rest were maintained on the same conditions. Body mass, lean mass, body fat, and tarsus length were measured before (PHD 25) and after (PHD 55) nutritional independence. Precise measures of body composition were obtained noninvasively at both ages using quantitative magnetic resonance analysis. At PHD 25, birds in the high treatment had more body mass and lean mass than birds in the low treatment, but nutritional treatments did not affect body fat at this age. Unexpectedly, the strategic response of birds that experienced deteriorating food availability was to maintain body mass by increasing body fat and decreasing lean mass. Birds that experienced an improvement in food availability significantly increased body mass by increasing lean mass and not body fat. Birds maintained on a low diet throughout did not significantly increase body mass, lean mass, or body fat. Tarsus length was not affected by nutritional manipulations. These findings indicate that nutritional stress did not affect the relationship between skeletal growth and body fat deposition because lean mass, body fat, and tarsus length can be independently regulated at different developmental periods depending on nutritional conditions. PMID:25730275

  20. Synergy between immunosuppressive therapy and enteral nutrition in the management of childhood Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Heuschkel, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Induction of a remission in children with Crohn's disease is increasingly successful. However this success is dependent on what measure we use to define "remission." Achieving a clinical remission is possible in >70% of children with Crohn's disease at diagnosis, while a mucosal or even immunological remission may occur in <50%. The importance of what ;degree of remission' should be achieved during maintenance therapy is discussed. Does early aggressive management with immunomodulators or biological agents indeed alter the natural history of the disease, and is it possible to give a prognosis based on either a snap-shot of endoscopic appearance, or a mucosal cytokine profile? The potential benefits of using a 6-8 week course of exclusive enteral nutrition as an induction therapy in combination with azathioprine/6-mercaptopurine are discussed. Whole protein formulae are safe and effective at achieving a clinical remission, however they are not a long-term maintenance strategy. Given the relative safety of these immunosuppressants and their efficacy in children treated at diagnosis, it is now more important than ever to predict which individuals will benefit from use of immunomodulators very early in the disease process. There is brief mention of enteral nutrition as maintenance therapy. Given the very limited data available, it is still not possible to recommend long-term nutrition supplementation as a maintenance therapy in all children. However, some children may respond to repeated shorter cycles of exclusive enteral nutrition in the absence of other therapeutic options. PMID:15980278

  1. Assessing the nutritional stress hypothesis: Relative influence of diet quantity and quality on seabird productivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jodice, P.G.R.; Roby, D.D.; Turco, K.R.; Suryan, R.M.; Irons, D.B.; Piatt, J.F.; Shultz, M.T.; Roseneau, D.G.; Kettle, A.B.; Anthony, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Food availability comprises a complex interaction of factors that integrates abundance, taxonomic composition, accessibility, and quality of the prey base. The relationship between food availability and reproductive performance can be assessed via the nutritional stress (NSH) and junkfood (JFH) hypotheses. With respect to reproductive success, NSH posits that a deficiency in any of the aforementioned metrics can have a deleterious effect on a population via poor reproductive success. JFH, a component of NSH, posits specifically that it is a decline in the quality of food (i.e. energy density and lipid content) that leads to poor reproductive success. We assessed each in relation to reproductive success in a piscivorous seabird, the black-legged kittiwake Rissa tridactyla. We measured productivity, taxonomic composition, frequency, size, and quality of meals delivered to nestlings from 1996 to 1999 at 6 colonies in Alaska, USA, 3 each in Prince William Sound and Lower Cook Inlet. Productivity varied widely among colony-years. Pacific herring Clupea pallasi, sand lance Ammodytes hexapterus, and capelin Mallotus villosus comprised ca. 80% of the diet among colony-years, and each was characterized by relatively high energy density. Diet quality for kittiwakes in this region therefore remained uniformly high during this study. Meal delivery rate and meal size were quite variable among colony-years, however, and best explained the variability in productivity. Parent kittiwakes appeared to select prey that were energy dense and that maximized the biomass provisioned to broods. While these results fail to support JFH, they do provide substantial support for NSH. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  2. Viability of fibroblasts cultured under nutritional stress irradiated with red laser, infrared laser, and red light-emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso; Espinosa, Mariano Martinez; Bagnato, Vanderley Salvador; Machado, Maria A. A. M.

    2011-07-01

    Phototherapy is noninvasive, painless and has no known side effect. However, for its incorporation into clinical practice, more well-designed studies are necessary to define optimal parameters for its application. The viability of fibroblasts cultured under nutritional stress irradiated with either a red laser, an infrared laser, or a red light-emitting diode (LED) was analyzed. Irradiation parameters were: red laser (660 nm, 40 mW, 1 W/cm2), infrared laser (780 nm, 40 mW, 1 W/cm2), and red LED (637 +/- 15 nm, 40 mW, 1 W/cm2). All applications were punctual and performed with a spot with 0.4 mm2 of diameter for 4 or 8 s. The Kruskal-Wallis test and analysis of variance of the general linear model (p <= 0.05) were used for statistical analysis. After 72 h, phototherapy with low-intensity laser and LED showed no toxicity at the cellular level. It even stimulated methylthiazol tetrazolium assay (MTT) conversion and neutral red uptake of fibroblasts cultured under nutritional stress, especially in the group irradiated with infrared laser (p = 0.004 for MTT conversion and p < 0.001 for neutral red uptake). Considering the parameters and protocol of phototherapy used, it can be concluded that phototherapy stimulated the viability of fibroblasts cultured under nutritional deficit resembling those found in traumatized tissue in which cell viability is reduced.

  3. Immune system function, stress, exercise and nutrition profile can affect pregnancy outcome: Lessons from a Mediterranean cohort.

    PubMed

    Mparmpakas, D; Goumenou, A; Zachariades, E; Pados, G; Gidron, Y; Karteris, E

    2013-02-01

    Pregnancy is associated with major physiological and future psychosocial changes, and maternal adaptation to these changes is crucial for normal foetal development. Psychological stress in pregnancy predicts an earlier birth and lower birth weight. Pregnancy-specific stress contributes directly to preterm delivery. The importance of nutrition and exercise during pregnancy with regard to pregnancy outcome has long been acknowledged. This importance has only been further emphasized by the recent changes in food quality and availability, lifestyle changes and a new understanding of foetal programming's effects on adult outcomes. We hypothesised that for a successful pregnancy certain events at a nutritional, immune, psycho-emotional and genetic level should be tightly linked. Therefore, in this study we followed an 'integrative' approach to investigate how maternal stress, nutrition, pregnancy planning and exercise influence pregnancy outcome. A key finding of our study is that there was a significant reduction in the intake of alcohol, caffeine-containing and sugary drinks during pregnancy. However, passive smoking in the household remained unchanged. In terms of immune profile, a significant inverse correlation was noted between difficulty to 'fight' an infection and number of colds (r=-0.289, P=0.003) as well as the number of infections (r=-0.446, P<0.0001) during pregnancy. The vast majority of the pregnant women acquired a more sedentary lifestyle in the third trimester. In planned, but not in unplanned, pregnancies stress predicted infant weight, independent of age and body mass index (BMI). Notably, in mothers with negative attitudes towards the pregnancy, those with an unplanned pregnancy gave birth to infants with significantly higher weights than those with planned pregnancies. Collectively these data suggest that there is a higher order of complexity, possibly involving gene-environment interactions that work together to ensure a positive outcome for the mother as well as the foetus. PMID:23404257

  4. Micro(RNA)managing Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Andrew E.; Brewer, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Cellular disturbances that cause accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lead to a condition referred to as “ER stress” and trigger the unfolded protein response (UPR), a signaling pathway that attempts to restore ER homeostasis. The complexity of UPR signaling can generate adaptive and apoptotic outputs, depending on the nature and duration of the ER stress. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNAs that typically repress gene expression, have recently emerged as key gene regulators of the pro-adaptive/pro-apoptotic molecular switch emanating from the ER. Importantly, select miRNAs have been shown to directly regulate key UPR components. PMID:23554021

  5. Nutritional Challenges

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Nancy P. Moreno

    2009-01-01

    In this nutrition activity (page 26 of PDF), learners consider the nutritional needs of people with specific dietary requirements, such as athletes, persons with diabetes and vegetarians, and create a full-day menu for these individuals. This activity may be used as an assessment for any unit on nutrition. This guide includes background information, setup and management tips, extensions, information about eating in space and handouts.

  6. Mindfulness-based stress reduction as a stress management intervention for healthy individuals: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manoj; Rush, Sarah E

    2014-10-01

    Stress is a global public health problem with several negative health consequences, including anxiety, depression, cardiovascular disease, and suicide. Mindfulness-based stress reduction offers an effective way of reducing stress by combining mindfulness meditation and yoga in an 8-week training program. The purpose of this study was to look at studies from January 2009 to January 2014 and examine whether mindfulness-based stress reduction is a potentially viable method for managing stress. A systematic search from Medline, CINAHL, and Alt HealthWatch databases was conducted for all types of quantitative articles involving mindfulness-based stress reduction. A total of 17 articles met the inclusion criteria. Of the 17 studies, 16 demonstrated positive changes in psychological or physiological outcomes related to anxiety and/or stress. Despite the limitations of not all studies using randomized controlled design, having smaller sample sizes, and having different outcomes, mindfulness-based stress reduction appears to be a promising modality for stress management. PMID:25053754

  7. New developments in managing job related stress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandy Ornelas; Brian H. Kleiner

    2003-01-01

    We spend over ten hours a day at work or on work related issues. We not only have to deal with work pressures but also juggle, personal relationships, personal finances, information technology, personal fears and changes. All these aspects of modern-day-living can be incredibly stressful, which imposes high physical demands on our bodies and emotional costs on our lives (Cohen,

  8. COPD - managing stress and your mood

    MedlinePLUS

    Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). Global strategy for the diagnosis, management, and prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Vancouver (WA): Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD); ...

  9. Consensus statement: National Consensus Workshop on management of SAM children through medical nutrition therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. P. S. Sachdev; Umesh Kapil; Sheila Vir

    2010-01-01

    Justification  Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is an important preventable and treatable cause of morbidity and mortality in children below\\u000a five years of age in India. The concerned stakeholders are not in agreement about the role of product based medical nutrition\\u000a therapy in the management of this condition.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Process  In November 2009, a National Consensus Workshop was organized by the Department of Human

  10. Student's Stress: It's Real and Manageable

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary F. McGurn

    2011-01-01

    I have been a dental hygiene professor at a Community College from the last seven years as well as a 2001 alumna from the same dental hygiene program. The dental hygiene curriculum is demanding, and it can be overwhelming to manage the heavy work load. My goal as a teacher is to help the dental hygiene students find their own

  11. Acid stress management by Cronobacter sakazakii.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ordóńez, Avelino; Cummins, Conor; Deasy, Thérčse; Clifford, Tanya; Begley, Máire; Hill, Colin

    2014-05-16

    Cronobacter sakazakii is a foodborne pathogenic microorganism associated with sporadic cases of neonatal meningitis, necrotising enterocolitis, septicaemia, bloody diarrhoea and brain abscesses acquired through the consumption of contaminated powdered infant formula (PIF). This study aimed to investigate the growth of C. sakazakii DPC6529, a particularly stress tolerant clinical isolate, in acidified laboratory media and PIF. The possibility of a stationary-phase acid tolerance response (ATR) was also investigated. C. sakazakii DPC6529 grew in LB broth acidified to pH4.2 with hydrochloric acid (HCl) and was capable of relatively fast growth in PIF acidified to pH5.0 with HCl, representing the stomach pH reported for newborns and infants. Moreover, bacterial growth in LB broth supplemented with 1% (w/v) glucose gave rise to a stationary-phase ATR which resulted in enhanced survival against a subsequent acid challenge at pH3.0. A transposon mutagenesis approach was used to shed light on some of the molecular mechanisms involved in the response C. sakazakii DPC6529 to normally lethal acid exposures. The data suggests that repairing damage in proteins and nucleic acids, posttranscriptional modification of tRNA molecules and maintenance of the integrity of the cellular envelope are key processes in the defence against acid stress. Clones carrying transposon insertions in genes encoding the envelope stress response regulators CpxR and OmpR were identified as acid-sensitive mutants. Further analyses of the ompR defective mutant and its complemented counterpart evidenced that OmpR is a key player in the response of C. sakazakii to acid stress, although it was not essential to mount an active stationary-phase ATR, at least under the tested conditions. The ability of C. sakazakii DPC6529 to grow in acid environments and to develop an adaptive stationary-phase ATR may allow for its survival or even proliferation within the infant gastrointestinal tract after consumption of contaminated milk formulae. PMID:24667315

  12. Comparison of the Effects of Salt Stress and Salt–Alkaline Mixed Stress on the Mineral Nutrition of Sunflower

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jie Liu; Bing Bai; Shengliang Zhao; Decheng Shi

    2012-01-01

    Sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.) were treated with salt stress and salt–alkaline mixed stress, which were established by mixing proportions of sodium chloride (NaCl), sodium sulfate (Na2SO4), sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), and sodium carbonate (Na2CO3). The physiological indices of seedlings, including photosynthesis, growth, and mineral element contents, were determined to compare differences in the physiological responses of sunflower to salt stress and

  13. The ABCs of Stress Management: A Little Stress Is Good For You, If You Know How To Handle It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelehear, Zach

    2005-01-01

    Educational psychologist Jean Piaget (1972) used a term called "equilibration" to describe our attempts to manage stress. He suggested that some stress was a good thing because it was during moments of stress and angst that we were likely to learn and grow. Put another way, if we are never stressed then there is nothing challenging us to grow. So…

  14. Management of multicellular senescence and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Haines, David D; Juhasz, Bela; Tosaki, Arpad

    2013-01-01

    Progressively sophisticated understanding of cellular and molecular processes that contribute to age-related physical deterioration is being gained from ongoing research into cancer, chronic inflammatory syndromes and other serious disorders that increase with age. Particularly valuable insight has resulted from characterization of how senescent cells affect the tissues in which they form in ways that decrease an organism's overall viability. Increasingly, the underlying pathophysiology of ageing is recognized as a consequence of oxidative damage. This leads to hyperactivity of cell growth pathways, prominently including mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin), that contribute to a build-up in cells of toxic aggregates such as progerin (a mutant nuclear cytoskeletal protein), lipofuscin and other cellular debris, triggering formation of senescent cellular phenotypes, which interact destructively with surrounding tissue. Indeed, senescent cell ablation dramatically inhibits physical deterioration in progeroid (age-accelerated) mice. This review explores ways in which oxidative stress creates ageing-associated cellular damage and triggers induction of the cell death/survival programs’ apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy and ‘necroapoptophagy’. The concept of ‘necroapoptophagy’ is presented here as a strategy for varying tissue oxidative stress intensity in ways that induce differential activation of death versus survival programs, resulting in enhanced and sustained representation of healthy functional cells. These strategies are discussed in the context of specialized mesenchymal stromal cells with the potential to synergize with telocytes in stabilizing engrafted progenitor cells, thereby extending periods of healthy life. Information and concepts are summarized in a hypothetical approach to suppressing whole-organism senescence, with methods drawn from emerging understandings of ageing, gained from Cnidarians (jellyfish, corals and anemones) that undergo a unique form of cellular regeneration, potentially conferring open-ended lifespans. PMID:23789967

  15. Occupational Stress and Turnover Intention: Implications for Nursing Management

    PubMed Central

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background: The main purpose of this study was to explore the status of occupational stress among hospital nurses in Isfahan, Iran. It also aimed to examine the relationship between nurses’ occupational stress and their intention to leave the hospital. Methods: The study employed a cross-sectional research design. A validated questionnaire was used to collect data from 296 nurses. Respondents were asked to rate the intensity of 30 common occupational stressors using a five-point scale. Results: A third of hospital nurses rated their occupational stress high. The major sources of stress were inadequate pay, inequality at work, too much work, staff shortage, lack of promotion, job insecurity and lack of management support. More than 35% of nurses stated that they are considering leaving the hospital, if they could find another job opportunity. Occupational stress was positively associated with nurses’ turnover intentions. Conclusion: Hospital managers should develop and apply appropriate policies and strategies to reduce occupational stress and consequently nurses’ turnover intention. PMID:24596858

  16. Managing occupational stress: A national and international perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maureen F. Dollard; Anthony H. Winefield

    1996-01-01

    Theoretical models of occupational stress are important because they suggest a focus for intervention, and inform practice. The gap between research and practice was exposed most recently by Burke (1993) claiming “little awareness of research findings by practitioners (managers, consultants, clinicians), little intervention activity being undertaken at the organizational level, little research being undertaken to determine the effectiveness of individual

  17. Employee Assistance Programmes: The Emperor's New Clothes of Stress Management?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Andrew R.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the employee assistance program (EAP), a benefit increasingly provided by United Kingdom employers that claims to reduce the effects of stress on individuals and organizations, provide a management tool to improve workplace performance and productivity, and respond to critical incidents. Describes EAPs, their history, development and…

  18. Tips for Disaster Responders: Preventing and Managing Stress

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the impact phase of a disaster or emergency event, the focus of stress management shifts to handling the real-time stressors of the rescue and recovery mission. Set Your Personal Disaster Plan in Motion ... who may be directly affected by the event. Review your communication plan. Know where each family ...

  19. Retail managers: stress and the work-family relationship

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adelina Broadbridge

    1999-01-01

    Causes and effects of occupational stress have received research attention for several decades although increasing focus has been paid to it during the 1990s as organisations and individual workers attempt to adapt to accelerating rates of change. Previous research has proposed three hypotheses to explain the work-family relationship: spillover, compensation and independence. Drawing on qualitative research with retail managers from

  20. Nutrition management guideline for maple syrup urine disease: an evidence- and consensus-based approach.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Dianne M; Allgeier, Courtney; Homer, Caroline; Marriage, Barbara J; Ogata, Beth; Rohr, Frances; Splett, Patricia L; Stembridge, Adrya; Singh, Rani H

    2014-07-01

    In an effort to increase harmonization of care and enable outcome studies, the Genetic Metabolic Dietitians International (GMDI) and the Southeast Regional Newborn Screening and Genetics Collaborative (SERC) are partnering to develop nutrition management guidelines for inherited metabolic disorders (IMD) using a model combining both evidence- and consensus-based methodology. The first guideline to be completed is for maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). This report describes the methodology used in its development: formulation of five research questions; review, critical appraisal and abstraction of peer-reviewed studies and unpublished practice literature; and expert input through Delphi surveys and a nominal group process. This report includes the summary statements for each research question and the nutrition management recommendations they generated. Each recommendation is followed by a standardized rating based on the strength of the evidence and consensus used. The application of technology to build the infrastructure for this project allowed transparency during development of this guideline and will be a foundation for future guidelines. Online open access of the full, published guideline allows utilization by health care providers, researchers, and collaborators who advise, advocate and care for individuals with MSUD and their families. There will be future updates as warranted by developments in research and clinical practice. PMID:24881969

  1. Hyperspectral imaging of oil producing microalgae under thermal and nutritional stress.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Davis, Ryan W.; Ricken, James Bryce; Powell, Amy Jo; Keenan, Michael Robert

    2008-09-01

    This short-term, late-start LDRD examined the effects of nutritional deprivation on the energy harvesting complex in microalgae. While the original experimental plan involved a much more detailed study of temperature and nutrition on the antenna system of a variety of TAG producing algae and their concomitant effects on oil production, time and fiscal constraints limited the scope of the study. This work was a joint effort between research teams at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico and California. Preliminary results indicate there is a photosystem response to silica starvation in diatoms that could impact the mechanisms for lipid accumulation.

  2. Stress and Reproductive Hormones in Grizzly Bears Reflect Nutritional Benefits and Social Consequences of a Salmon Foraging Niche

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Heather M.; Darimont, Chris T.; Paquet, Paul C.; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine E.; Smits, Judit E. G.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological indicators of social and nutritional stress can provide insight into the responses of species to changes in food availability. In coastal British Columbia, Canada, grizzly bears evolved with spawning salmon as an abundant but spatially and temporally constrained food source. Recent and dramatic declines in salmon might have negative consequences on bear health and ultimately fitness. To examine broadly the chronic endocrine effects of a salmon niche, we compared cortisol, progesterone, and testosterone levels in hair from salmon-eating bears from coastal BC (n?=?75) with the levels in a reference population from interior BC lacking access to salmon (n?=?42). As predicted, testosterone was higher in coastal bears of both sexes relative to interior bears, possibly reflecting higher social density on the coast mediated by salmon availability. We also investigated associations between the amount of salmon individual bears consumed (as measured by stable isotope analysis) and cortisol and testosterone in hair. Also as predicted, cortisol decreased with increasing dietary salmon and was higher after a year of low dietary salmon than after a year of high dietary salmon. These findings at two spatial scales suggest that coastal bears might experience nutritional or social stress in response to on-going salmon declines, providing novel insights into the effects of resource availability on fitness-related physiology. PMID:24312230

  3. [Management of stressing events and prevention of post-traumatic stress in the railroad setting].

    PubMed

    del Nord, P

    2012-01-01

    The paper addresses the proper management of events that can lead to post traumatic stress, that are the situations where: the person experienced or witnessed, or was confronted with an event or events that involved actual or threatened death or serious injury, or a threat to the physical integrity of self or others. This document results from a collation of the knowledge acquired by railway undertakings and infrastructure managers on the management and prevention of post-traumatic stress. Having surveyed the various strategies for the management of post-traumatic stress as these are applied in the participating countries, a number of recommendations and best practices were identified and these are presented in this guide. This guide comprises two parts: * A theoretical document comprising several parts: Part one deals with the fundamental notions involved in post-traumatic stress and potentially traumatic events; Part two deals with a strategy for managing potentially traumatic events and sets out a reference framework to this end. This strategy is broken down into five key phases: risk assessment, preparation and prevention, intervention, post-intervention and follow-up, appraisal, including reports from experience. Practical "check sheets" stating the key messages to be understood and/or the specific actions to be taken before, during or after a potentially traumatic event. These sheets are intended for operational staff, managers, directors and support workers. This guide was prepared by a working group under the supervision of the UIC Safety Platform's Occupational Health and Safety Group (OHSG). The working group brought together psychologists, occupational physicians, ergonomists, safety experts, managers and safety directors. It is the fruit of interdisciplinary collaboration, marrying the concerns, needs and knowledge of railway undertakings and infrastructure managers from a variety of European countries. PMID:23405657

  4. Early nutritional stress impairs development of a song-control brain region in both male and

    E-print Network

    Zanette, Liana

    juvenile song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) at the onset of song learning Ian F. MacDonald1 , Bethany regions in fledgling (both sexes, 23­26 days old) song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). Food restriction songs. Lab-reared swamp sparrows (Melospiza georgiana), subjected to nutritional stressors early

  5. Occupational Stress in Secondary Education in Cyprus: Causes, Symptoms, Consequences and Stress Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadjisymeou, Georgia

    2010-01-01

    The survey attempted to look into the causes, symptoms and consequences that occupational stress has on teachers in Secondary Education in Cyprus and find ways to manage it. Thirty eight schools with 553 teachers participated in the survey. The sample chosen is a result of a simple random sampling and it is representative of the country's…

  6. An online stress management workbook for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Kelly M; Stoner, Susan A; Schmitz, KrisAnn; McGregor, Bonnie A; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2014-06-01

    Cognitive behavioral stress management groups have been shown to be decrease psychological symptoms and increase adaptive coping in breast cancer patients, but dissemination of this effective intervention has been challenging. The goal of the present project was to develop an online cognitive behavioral stress management intervention for early stage breast cancer survivors and evaluate its effectiveness using a 2 group × 3 time randomized, waitlist-controlled design. Intervention and waitlist control group participants were assessed at three time points: at baseline; at 10 weeks, after which only intervention participants had used the workbook; and at 20 weeks, after which both groups had used the workbook. Results indicate that at 10 weeks intervention participants showed improved self-efficacy for coping with their cancer and for regulating negative mood and lower levels of cancer-related post-traumatic symptoms as compared to the control group, suggesting that an internet stress management intervention could be effective for helping breast cancer patients increase their confidence in their ability to cope with stress. PMID:23212928

  7. RISK MANAGEMENT OF SEDIMENT STRESS: A FRAMEWORK FOR SEDIMENT RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research related to the ecological risk management of sediment stress in watersheds is placed under a common conceptual framework in order to help promote the timely advance of decision support methods for aquatic resource managers and watershed-level planning. The proposed risk ...

  8. The Influence of Time Management Practices on Job Stress Level among Beginning Secondary Agriculture Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Misty D.; Torres, Robert M.; Tummons, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring the stress of teachers continues to be important--particularly stress levels of beginning agriculture teachers. The study sought to describe the relationship between beginning teachers' perceived ability to manage their time and their level of stress. The Time Management Practices Inventory and the Job Stress Survey were used to measure…

  9. Evaluating physical and nutritional stress during mycelial growth as inducers of tolerance to heat and UV-B radiation in Metarhizium anisopliae conidia.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Drauzio E N; Anderson, Anne J; Roberts, Donald W

    2008-11-01

    Elevated tolerance to UV-B radiation and heat may be induced in conidia produced on fungi exposed during mycelial growth to sublethal stresses other than heat or UV-B. This is due to a phenomenon referred to as 'cross-protection'. Several mechanisms are associated with this increased conidial tolerance, one of which is the accumulation of trehalose and mannitol within conidia. In the present study, conidia of the insect-pathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae were produced on mycelium subjected to nutritive, heat-shock, osmotic, or oxidative stress. The tolerance levels to UV-B radiation and heat of the conidia from stressed mycelium were evaluated, and the amounts of trehalose and mannitol accumulated in conidia were quantified. Conidia produced under nutritive stress (carbon and nitrogen starvation) were two-times more heat and UV-B tolerant than conidia produced under rich (non-stress) nutrient conditions [potato-dextrose agar with yeast extract (PDAY)], and they also accumulated the highest concentrations of trehalose and mannitol. Conidia produced on heat-shock stressed PDAY cultures had higher tolerance to UV-B radiation and heat than conidia produced without heat shock; however, both the UV-B tolerance and trehalose/mannitol concentrations in conidia produced on heat-shocked mycelium were less than those of conidia produced under nutritive stress. Conidia produced under osmotic stress (sodium or potassium chloride added to PDAY) had elevated heat and UV-B tolerances similar to those of conidia produced under nutritive stress; however, they had the lowest levels of mannitol and trehalose, which indicates that accumulation of these compounds is not the only mechanism used by M. anisopliae for protection from heat and UV-B radiation. Oxidative stress from UV-A irradiation or hydrogen peroxide did not produce conidia with elevated UV-B or heat tolerances. Conidia produced under oxidative stress generated by menadione had increased or unchanged tolerances to heat or UV-B, respectively. The levels of mannitol or trehalose in conidia were similar to those in the unstressed controls. Conidial yield was reduced, in some cases severely, by nutritive and osmotic stress; whereas oxidative and heat-shock stress did not alter levels of spore production. PMID:18938068

  10. Assessment and management of nutrition in older people and its importance to health.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Haboubi, Nadim

    2010-01-01

    Nutrition is an important element of health in the older population and affects the aging process. The prevalence of malnutrition is increasing in this population and is associated with a decline in: functional status, impaired muscle function, decreased bone mass, immune dysfunction, anemia, reduced cognitive function, poor wound healing, delayed recovery from surgery, higher hospital readmission rates, and mortality. Older people often have reduced appetite and energy expenditure, which, coupled with a decline in biological and physiological functions such as reduced lean body mass, changes in cytokine and hormonal level, and changes in fluid electrolyte regulation, delay gastric emptying and diminish senses of smell and taste. In addition pathologic changes of aging such as chronic diseases and psychological illness all play a role in the complex etiology of malnutrition in older people. Nutritional assessment is important to identify and treat patients at risk, the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool being commonly used in clinical practice. Management requires a holistic approach, and underlying causes such as chronic illness, depression, medication and social isolation must be treated. Patients with physical or cognitive impairment require special care and attention. Oral supplements or enteral feeding should be considered in patients at high risk or in patients unable to meet daily requirements. PMID:20711440

  11. Trait Anxiety Reductions in a Substance Abuse Population Trained in Stress Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlesworth, Edward A.; Dempsey, George

    1982-01-01

    Investigated a stress management training program for 11 hospitalized drug-abusing patients, compared to a control group in different psychotherapy programs. Results indicated that the stress management treatment group produced significant decreases in trait anxiety. Subjects used the stress management techniques to overcome insomnia, anger, and…

  12. Diagnosis and Management of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia and Its Nutritional and Respiratory Complications in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Rofes, Laia; Arreola, Viridiana; Almirall, Jordi; Cabré, Mateu; Campins, Lluís; García-Peris, Pilar; Speyer, Renée; Clavé, Pere

    2011-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a major complaint among older people. Dysphagia may cause two types of complications in these patients: (a) a decrease in the efficacy of deglutition leading to malnutrition and dehydration, (b) a decrease in deglutition safety, leading to tracheobronchial aspiration which results in aspiration pneumonia and can lead to death. Clinical screening methods should be used to identify older people with oropharyngeal dysphagia and to identify those patients who are at risk of aspiration. Videofluoroscopy (VFS) is the gold standard to study the oral and pharyngeal mechanisms of dysphagia in older patients. Up to 30% of older patients with dysphagia present aspiration—half of them without cough, and 45%, oropharyngeal residue; and 55% older patients with dysphagia are at risk of malnutrition. Treatment with dietetic changes in bolus volume and viscosity, as well as rehabilitation procedures can improve deglutition and prevent nutritional and respiratory complications in older patients. Diagnosis and management of oropharyngeal dysphagia need a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:20811545

  13. Diagnosis and management of oropharyngeal Dysphagia and its nutritional and respiratory complications in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Rofes, Laia; Arreola, Viridiana; Almirall, Jordi; Cabré, Mateu; Campins, Lluís; García-Peris, Pilar; Speyer, Renée; Clavé, Pere

    2011-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a major complaint among older people. Dysphagia may cause two types of complications in these patients: (a) a decrease in the efficacy of deglutition leading to malnutrition and dehydration, (b) a decrease in deglutition safety, leading to tracheobronchial aspiration which results in aspiration pneumonia and can lead to death. Clinical screening methods should be used to identify older people with oropharyngeal dysphagia and to identify those patients who are at risk of aspiration. Videofluoroscopy (VFS) is the gold standard to study the oral and pharyngeal mechanisms of dysphagia in older patients. Up to 30% of older patients with dysphagia present aspiration-half of them without cough, and 45%, oropharyngeal residue; and 55% older patients with dysphagia are at risk of malnutrition. Treatment with dietetic changes in bolus volume and viscosity, as well as rehabilitation procedures can improve deglutition and prevent nutritional and respiratory complications in older patients. Diagnosis and management of oropharyngeal dysphagia need a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:20811545

  14. Using Biofeedback while Immersed in a Stressful Videogame Increases the Effectiveness of Stress Management Skills in Soldiers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stéphane Bouchard; François Bernier; Éric Boivin; Brian Morin; Genevičve Robillard

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of using visual and auditory biofeedback while immersed in a tridimensional videogame to practice a stress management skill (tactical breathing). All 41 participants were soldiers who had previously received basic stress management training and first aid training in combat. On the first day, they received a 15-minute refresher briefing and were randomly assigned to either:

  15. [The food and nutrition program (1961-1982) and the training of housewives as family welfare managers].

    PubMed

    Trescastro López, E Ma; Galiana Sánchez, Ma E; Bernabeu-Mestre, J

    2012-01-01

    This study provides a gender-based analysis of the Food and Nutrition Education Program, developed in Spain over the last decades of the 20th century, to explore nutrition education messages and strategies aimed at improving the skills of housewives as guardians of family welfare and experts in all areas of household management. The Program's specific approach to housewives, and the assumptions on which it was based, further entrenched a social model of gender in which men were solely responsible for household income and women were family carers. PMID:23165530

  16. Prevention and management of type 2 diabetes: dietary components and nutritional strategies.

    PubMed

    Ley, Sylvia H; Hamdy, Osama; Mohan, Viswanathan; Hu, Frank B

    2014-06-01

    In the past couple of decades, evidence from prospective observational studies and clinical trials has converged to support the importance of individual nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. The quality of dietary fats and carbohydrates consumed is more crucial than is the quantity of these macronutrients. Diets rich in wholegrains, fruits, vegetables, legumes, and nuts; moderate in alcohol consumption; and lower in refined grains, red or processed meats, and sugar-sweetened beverages have been shown to reduce the risk of diabetes and improve glycaemic control and blood lipids in patients with diabetes. With an emphasis on overall diet quality, several dietary patterns such as Mediterranean, low glycaemic index, moderately low carbohydrate, and vegetarian diets can be tailored to personal and cultural food preferences and appropriate calorie needs for weight control and diabetes prevention and management. Although much progress has been made in development and implementation of evidence-based nutrition recommendations in developed countries, concerted worldwide efforts and policies are warranted to alleviate regional disparities. PMID:24910231

  17. Effects of abiotic stress and crop management on cereal grain composition: implications for food quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Halford, Nigel G; Curtis, Tanya Y; Chen, Zhiwei; Huang, Jianhua

    2014-11-26

    The effects of abiotic stresses and crop management on cereal grain composition are reviewed, focusing on phytochemicals, vitamins, fibre, protein, free amino acids, sugars, and oils. These effects are discussed in the context of nutritional and processing quality and the potential for formation of processing contaminants, such as acrylamide, furan, hydroxymethylfurfuryl, and trans fatty acids. The implications of climate change for cereal grain quality and food safety are considered. It is concluded that the identification of specific environmental stresses that affect grain composition in ways that have implications for food quality and safety and how these stresses interact with genetic factors and will be affected by climate change needs more investigation. Plant researchers and breeders are encouraged to address the issue of processing contaminants or risk appearing out of touch with major end-users in the food industry, and not to overlook the effects of environmental stresses and crop management on crop composition, quality, and safety as they strive to increase yield. PMID:25428997

  18. Nutritional management of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity and pharmacologic therapies to facilitate weight loss.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Marion L; Amaro, Anastassia; Volger, Sheri

    2014-01-01

    Diet plays an integral role in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Unfortunately, many patients with T2DM do not have access to a registered dietitian or certified diabetes educator, and rates of physician counseling about diet remain low. This article provides an overview of the current recommendations for the nutritional management of T2DM, which are endorsed by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Medical nutrition therapy, which provides a flexible and individualized approach to diet, emphasizes the total number (rather than the type) of carbohydrate consumed. Because fat intake also affects glycemia and cardiovascular risk, a reduction in daily mono- and polyunsaturated fat intake is recommended for most patients with T2DM. Weight loss plays an important adjunct role in treating patients with T2DM, because the majority of individuals with T2DM are overweight or obese. Patient lifestyle modification, which encompasses diet, physical activity, and behavioral therapy, can be used to facilitate weight loss in conjunction with several different dietary approaches. These include low-carbohydrate, low-fat, low-glycemic index, and Mediterranean diets. Studies have demonstrated that modest weight loss (5%-10% of body weight) is associated with significant improvements in patient measures of glycemic control, lipids, blood pressure, and other cardiovascular risk factors. Furthermore, a modest weight loss of as little as 4.5 kg can result in reducing the glycated hemoglobin level by approximately 0.5%. Pharmacologic agents, when combined with these approaches, may further augment weight loss. Familiarity with these principles can help physicians provide dietary counseling to their patients with T2DM and obesity. PMID:24393761

  19. Sperm DNA damage caused by oxidative stress: modifiable clinical, lifestyle and nutritional factors in male infertility.

    PubMed

    Wright, C; Milne, S; Leeson, H

    2014-06-01

    DNA fragmentation is an important factor in the aetiology of male infertility. However, it is still underevaluated and its inclusion in routine semen analysis is debated. DNA fragmentation has been shown to be a robust indicator of fertility potential, more so than conventional semen parameters. Men with high DNA fragmentation levels have significantly lower odds of conceiving, naturally or through procedures such as intrauterine insemination and IVF. Couples may be counselled to proceed directly to intracytoplasmic sperm injection as it is more successful in this group, avoiding costly procedures, recurrent failures or pregnancy losses; however, this treatment is not without limitations or risks. Ideally DNA fragmentation should be minimized where possible. Oxidative stress is the major cause of DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa. Endogenous and exogenous factors that contribute to oxidative stress are discussed, and in many cases are shown to be easily modifiable. Antioxidants play a protective role, although a delicate balance of reduction and oxidation is required for essential functions, including fertilization. Reducing oxidative stress may improve a couple's chances of conception either naturally or via assisted reproduction. Sources of oxidative stress therefore should be thoroughly examined in men with high levels of DNA fragmentation and modified where possible. DNA fragmentation is an important factor in the aetiology of male infertility. However it is still underevaluated and its inclusion in routine semen analysis is still debated. DNA fragmentation has been shown to be a robust indicator of fertility potential, more so than conventional semen parameters. Men with high levels of DNA fragmentation will have significantly lower odds of conceiving naturally or through procedures such as intrauterine insemination and IVF. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) may be much more successful in this group, and couples may be counselled to proceed directly to ICSI, avoiding costly procedures, recurrent failures or pregnancy losses. However, ICSI is not without its limitations or risks. Ideally, DNA fragmentation should be investigated and minimized where possible in men trying to conceive naturally or through assisted reproduction technology. Oxidative stress is the major cause of DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa. Endogenous and exogenous factors that contribute to oxidative stress are discussed and in many cases are easily modifiable. Antioxidants play a protective role, although a delicate balance of reduction and oxidation is required for essential sperm function, including fertilization. Reducing oxidative stress may improve a couple's chances of conception either naturally or via assisted reproduction treatment. Sources of oxidative stress therefore should be thoroughly examined in men with high levels of DNA fragmentation and modified where possible. PMID:24745838

  20. Nutrition Management of School Age Children with Special Needs: A Resource Manual for School Personnel, Families, and Health Professionals. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horsley, Janet W.; Allen, Elizabeth R.; Daniel, Patricia White

    This guide is intended to help school personnel facilitate the management of special diets and nutrition education in the school curriculum in accordance with requirements of the National School Lunch Act, the Child Nutrition Act, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504), and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. After the introduction,…

  1. Stress Management for Special Educators: The Self-Administered Tool for Awareness and Relaxation (STAR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Krista; Poel, Elissa Wolfe

    2006-01-01

    The Self-Administered Tool for Awareness and Relaxation (STAR) is a stress management strategy designed to facilitate awareness of the physical, mental, emotional, and physiological effects of stress through the interconnectedness of the brain, body, and emotions. The purpose of this article is to present a stress-management model for teachers,…

  2. A Stress Management Classroom Tool for Teachers of Children with BD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, James T.; Owens, James L.

    1999-01-01

    This article discusses how stress may affect the lives of children with behavior disorders, provides educators with a model for introducing stress management techniques, and closes with strategies for managing stress in the classroom, including listening to relaxing music, manipulating the environment, and providing a morning physical education…

  3. A Systematic Review of Stress-Management Programs for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiralkar, Malan T.; Harris, Toi B.; Eddins-Folensbee, Florence F.; Coverdale, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Because medical students experience a considerable amount of stress during training, academic leaders have recognized the importance of developing stress-management programs for medical students. The authors set out to identify all controlled trials of stress-management interventions and determine the efficacy of those interventions.…

  4. Effects of previous grazing nutrition and management on feedlot performance of cattle.

    PubMed

    Drouillard, J S; Kuhl, G L

    1999-01-01

    Management strategies designed to improve grazing animal performance can influence feedlot performance and carcass traits both positively and negatively. In spite of the economic relevance of potential interactions between grazing and finishing performance, controlled experiments evaluating integrated production systems are limited in number. Effects of grazing treatments can result from, or be overshadowed by, changes in gut fill, thus making it difficult to assign precise costs to different phases of production. Published reports have considered the effects of stocking rate, duration of grazing, forage characteristics, supplementation, and growth-promoting implants on subsequent finishing performance. Improvements in cattle performance attributed to changes in stocking rate generally have been neutral to positive with respect to effects on finishing performance. Comparisons among forages have led to the suggestion that forage species may contribute to differences in gastrointestinal fill of grazing cattle, thereby influencing gain and efficiency during the subsequent finishing phase. Creep-feeding suckling calves generally has increased preweaning performance but has had relatively little influence on performance during the subsequent finishing phase. Grain supplementation of stocker cattle during the grazing period has improved grazing performance, but effects on subsequent feedlot performance have been inconsistent. Potential carryover effects from protein and mineral supplementation also have been inconclusive. Lack of congruence among studies is puzzling but may be the consequence of highly varied production systems, differences in experimental procedures, and changes in gut fill or mass of internal organs. Based on the studies reviewed, the expression or absence of compensatory growth during the finishing phase appears to be related to the nutritional quality of forages utilized in the grazing period, with higher quality forages tending to yield greater compensatory effects. The bulk of evidence with suckling cattle and stocker implants suggests that effects on subsequent finishing performance are minimal. Attention is drawn to the noticeable lack of research pertaining to integrated production systems. A more thorough understanding of the interactions among grazing nutrition and management, finishing performance, and carcass traits is needed to facilitate greater economic exploitation of these relationships. PMID:15526788

  5. Cellular stress response: a novel target for chemoprevention and nutritional neuroprotection in aging, neurodegenerative disorders and longevity.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Vittorio; Cornelius, Carolin; Mancuso, Cesare; Pennisi, Giovanni; Calafato, Stella; Bellia, Francesco; Bates, Timothy E; Giuffrida Stella, Anna Maria; Schapira, Tony; Dinkova Kostova, Albena T; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2008-12-01

    The predominant molecular symptom of aging is the accumulation of altered gene products. Moreover, several conditions including protein, lipid or glucose oxidation disrupt redox homeostasis and lead to accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the aging brain. Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases or Friedreich ataxia are neurological diseases sharing, as a common denominator, production of abnormal proteins, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, which contribute to the pathogenesis of these so called "protein conformational diseases". The central nervous system has evolved the conserved mechanism of unfolded protein response to cope with the accumulation of misfolded proteins. As one of the main intracellular redox systems involved in neuroprotection, the vitagene system is emerging as a neurohormetic potential target for novel cytoprotective interventions. Vitagenes encode for cytoprotective heat shock proteins (Hsp) Hsp70 and heme oxygenase-1, as well as thioredoxin reductase and sirtuins. Nutritional studies show that ageing in animals can be significantly influenced by dietary restriction. Thus, the impact of dietary factors on health and longevity is an increasingly appreciated area of research. Reducing energy intake by controlled caloric restriction or intermittent fasting increases lifespan and protects various tissues against disease. Genetics has revealed that ageing may be controlled by changes in intracellular NAD/NADH ratio regulating sirtuin, a group of proteins linked to aging, metabolism and stress tolerance in several organisms. Recent findings suggest that several phytochemicals exhibit biphasic dose responses on cells with low doses activating signaling pathways that result in increased expression of vitagenes encoding survival proteins, as in the case of the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway activated by curcumin and NAD/NADH-sirtuin-1 activated by resveratrol. Consistently, the neuroprotective roles of dietary antioxidants including curcumin, acetyl-L-carnitine and carnosine have been demonstrated through the activation of these redox-sensitive intracellular pathways. Although the notion that stress proteins are neuroprotective is broadly accepted, still much work needs to be done in order to associate neuroprotection with specific pattern of stress responses. In this review the importance of vitagenes in the cellular stress response and the potential use of dietary antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders is discussed. PMID:18629638

  6. Judgment and decision making under stress: an overview for emergency managers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathleen M. Kowalski-Trakofler; Charles Vaught; Ted Scharf

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses human judgment and decision making under stress. The authors review selected recent literature across various disciplines and suggest a definition of stress within the context of decision making during the management of emergencies. They also discuss fieldwork by the Pittsburgh Research Laboratory, NIOSH, which explores traumatic incident stress, the relationship between previous training and performance under stressful

  7. Management of intestinal failure in inflammatory bowel disease: Small intestinal transplantation or home parenteral nutrition?

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Elizabeth; Allan, Philip; Ramu, Amrutha; Vaidya, Anil; Travis, Simon; Lal, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease and Crohn’s disease in particular, is a common cause of intestinal failure. Current therapeutic options include home parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation. For most patients, home intravenous therapy including parenteral nutrition, with a good probability of long-term survival, is the favoured choice. However, in selected patients, with specific features that may shorten survival or complicate home parenteral nutrition, intestinal transplantation presents a viable alternative. We present survival, complications, quality of life and economic considerations that currently influence individualised decision-making between home parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation. PMID:24696601

  8. Parenteral nutritional therapy and risk of infection: review with proposed management guidelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. DELLA LOGGIA; V. KIREN; D. GIACOMAZZI; R. LUZZATI

    2009-01-01

    Parenteral nutritional therapy increases the risk of infection when compared with enteral feeding or delayed nutrition. On the other hand, some clinical circumstances require the delivery of nu- trition by central vascular catheter for both critically ill and chronically ill patients. Catheter-related bloodstream infection remains one of the most frequent infective complications in these patients, with an incidence ranging from

  9. Nutritional management of very low birthweight infants: effects of different feeding regimens on calcium absorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adequate nutrition is a key aspect of care for very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. However, it is difficult to provide adequate nutrition to VLBW infants who have health problems that require fluid restriction and increased caloric density feedings. The effects of these changes on growth, calcium ...

  10. Study to evaluate the effectiveness of stress management workshops on response to general and occupational measures of stress.

    PubMed

    Heron, R J; McKeown, S; Tomenson, J A; Teasdale, E L

    1999-09-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of stress management training workshops within Zeneca Pharmaceuticals. The study was of cross-sectional design, comparing groups of workshop attendees and non-attendees. In addition, self-rated well-being scores of attendees were compared with results obtained pre-workshop and 2-3 months after the workshop. Employees participating in the study were drawn from the Manufacturing, Research and Development, Sales and Marketing sites of Zeneca Pharmaceuticals located in Cheshire, United Kingdom. Three hundred and ninety persons who had participated in stress management workshops since 1988 were matched for age, gender and department with an equal number of employees who had not attended stress management workshops. Outcome measures included self-rated well-being (as measured by the 30-question General Health Questionnaire), knowledge of company guidance on the management of stress in staff, and an assessment of coping strategies. Subjects who had not attended a stress management workshop were much more likely to have a poor understanding of the principles of management of stress in staff [odds ratio (OR) = 8.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 3.3-21.3] and more likely to have poor coping skills (OR = 2.8; CI = 1.3-6.1). However, mean scores for the two measures were similar in attendees and non-attendees. Self-rating of current well-being was strongly associated with the life-events score, but not related to workshop attendance. The study indicates that stress management training workshops reduce the prevalence of employees with a poor understanding of the principles of the management of stress in staff and with poor coping strategies. An improvement in the self-rated well-being observed shortly after the workshop was not sustained. PMID:10665148

  11. Chill Out! Helping Gifted Youth Deal with Stress: What Are Some Specific, Practical Ways to Teach Stress Management?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Terry

    2006-01-01

    What causes stress in gifted youth and what specific skills do they need to manage it? Although stress is a real presence in all people's lives, it can be more intense for the gifted because they are usually more sensitive, introspective, and emotional. Growing up gifted is a qualitatively different experience, which can manifest itself in the…

  12. Stressful Dieting: Nutritional Conditions but Not Compensatory Growth Elevate Corticosterone Levels in Zebra Finch Nestlings and Fledglings

    PubMed Central

    Honarmand, Mariam; Goymann, Wolfgang; Naguib, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Unfavourable conditions throughout the period of parental care can severely affect growth, reproductive performance, and survival. Yet, individuals may be affected differently, depending on the developmental period during which constraints are experienced. Here we tested whether the nestling phase compared to the fledgling phase is more susceptible to nutritional stress by considering biometry, physiology, sexually selected male ornaments and survival using zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) as a model species. As nestlings (day 0–17) or fledglings (day 17–35), subjects were raised either on low or high quality food. A low quality diet resulted in significantly elevated baseline corticosterone titres in both nestlings and fledglings. Subjects showed substantial compensatory growth after they had experienced low quality food as nestlings but catch-up growth did neither lead to elevated baseline corticosterone titres nor did we detect long term effects on biometry, male cheek patch, or survival. The compensation for temporally unfavourable environmental conditions reflects substantial phenotypic plasticity and the results show that costs of catch-up growth were not mediated via corticosterone as a physiological correlate of allostatic load. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms and plasticity with which animals respond to periods of constraints during development as they may occur in a mistiming of breeding. PMID:20927394

  13. Carotenoid and lipid production by the autotrophic microalga Chlorella protothecoides under nutritional, salinity, and luminosity stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Campenni', L; Nobre, B P; Santos, C A; Oliveira, A C; Aires-Barros, M R; Palavra, A M F; Gouveia, L

    2013-02-01

    Today microalgae represent a viable alternative source for high-value products. The specie Chlorella protothecoides (Cp), heterotrophically grown, has been widely studied and provides a high amount of lutein and fatty acids (FA) and has a good profile for biodiesel production. This work studies carotenoid and FA production by autotrophic grown Cp. Cp was grown until the medium's nitrogen was depleted, then diluted in NaCl solution, resulting in nutritional, luminosity, and salinity stresses. Different NaCl concentrations were tested (10, 20, 30 g/L) at two different dilutions. After dilution, a color shifting from green to orange-red was noticed, showing carotenoid production. The best production of both carotenoids and FA was attained with a 20 g/L NaCl solution. The total carotenoid content was 0.8 % w/w (canthaxanthin (23.3 %), echinenone (14.7 %), free astaxanthin (7.1 %), and lutein/zeaxanthin (4.1 %)). Furthermore, the total lipid content reached 43.4 % w/w, with a FA composition of C18:1 (33.64 %), C16:0 (23.30 %), C18:2 (11.53 %), and less than 12 % of C18:3, which is needed to fulfill the biodiesel quality specifications (EN 14214). PMID:23160982

  14. Reproduction and nutritional stress are risk factors for Hendra virus infection in little red flying foxes (Pteropus scapulatus)

    PubMed Central

    Plowright, Raina K; Field, Hume E; Smith, Craig; Divljan, Anja; Palmer, Carol; Tabor, Gary; Daszak, Peter; Foley, Janet E

    2008-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a lethal paramyxovirus which emerged in humans in 1994. Poor understanding of HeV dynamics in Pteropus spp. (flying fox or fruit bat) reservoir hosts has limited our ability to determine factors driving its emergence. We initiated a longitudinal field study of HeV in little red flying foxes (LRFF; Pteropus scapulatus) and examined individual and population risk factors for infection, to determine probable modes of intraspecific transmission. We also investigated whether seasonal changes in host behaviour, physiology and demography affect host–pathogen dynamics. Data showed that pregnant and lactating females had significantly higher risk of infection, which may explain previously observed temporal associations between HeV outbreaks and flying fox birthing periods. Age-specific seroprevalence curves generated from field data imply that HeV is transmitted horizontally via faeces, urine or saliva. Rapidly declining seroprevalence between two field seasons suggests that immunity wanes faster in LRFF than in other flying fox species, and highlights the potentially critical role of this species in interspecific viral persistence. The highest seroprevalence was observed when animals showed evidence of nutritional stress, suggesting that environmental processes that alter flying fox food sources, such as habitat loss and climate change, may increase HeV infection and transmission. These insights into the ecology of HeV in flying fox populations suggest causal links between anthropogenic environmental change and HeV emergence. PMID:18198149

  15. The effects of heat stress and plane of nutrition on metabolism in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Pearce, S C; Gabler, N K; Ross, J W; Escobar, J; Patience, J F; Rhoads, R P; Baumgard, L H

    2013-05-01

    Heat stress (HS) jeopardizes pig health, reduces performance variables, and results in a fatter carcass. Whether HS directly or indirectly (via reduced feed intake) is responsible for the suboptimal production is not known. Crossbred gilts (n = 48; 35 ± 4 kg BW) were housed in constantly climate-controlled rooms in individual pens and exposed to 1) thermal-neutral (TN) conditions (20°C; 35% to 50% humidity) with ad libitum intake (n = 18), 2) HS conditions (35°C; 20% to 35% humidity) with ad libitum intake (n = 24), or 3) pair-fed [PF in TN conditions (PFTN), n = 6, to eliminate confounding effects of dissimilar feed intake (FI)]. Pigs in the TN and HS conditions were sacrificed at 1, 3, or 7 d of environmental exposure, whereas the PFTN pigs were sacrificed after 7 d of experimental conditions. Individual rectal temperature (Tr), skin temperature (Ts), respiration rates (RR), and FI were determined daily. Pigs exposed to HS had an increase (P < 0.01) in Tr (39.3°C vs. 40.8°C) and a doubling in RR (54 vs. 107 breaths per minute). Heat-stressed pigs had an immediate (d 1) decrease (47%; P < 0.05) in FI, and this magnitude of reduction continued through d 7; by design the nutrient intake pattern for the PFTN controls mirrored the HS group. By d 7, the TN and HS pigs gained 7.76 and 1.65 kg BW, respectively, whereas the PFTN pigs lost 2.47 kg BW. Plasma insulin was increased (49%; P < 0.05) in d 7 HS pigs compared with PFTN controls. Compared with TN and HS pigs, on d 7 PFTN pigs had increased plasma NEFA concentrations (110%; P < 0.05). Compared with TN and PFTN controls, on d 7 circulating N(?)-methylhistidine concentrations were increased (31%; P < 0.05) in HS pigs. In summary, despite similar nutrient intake, HS pigs gained more BW and had distinctly different postabsorptive bioenergetic variables compared with PFTN controls. Consequently, these heat-induced metabolic changes may in part explain the altered carcass phenotype observed in heat-stressed pigs. PMID:23463563

  16. Challenges in the nutrition and management of herbivores in the temperate zone.

    PubMed

    van Vuuren, A M; Chilibroste, P

    2013-03-01

    The expected higher global demand for animal proteins and the competition for starch and sugars between food, fuel and feed seem to favour herbivores that convert solar energy captured in fibrous plants into animal products. However, the required higher production level of herbivores questions the sustainability of this conversion. An increase in herbivore production can be achieved by increasing the number of animals associated with the increasing demand of plant biomass or by improving the efficiency with which plant biomass is converted into meat and milk. The potential to increase food production by cattle, the main food-producing herbivore in the temperate zones outside China, was considered in three production systems: grassland-based, mixed rain-fed and mixed irrigated systems. The potential to increase plant biomass production in grassland-based systems seems limited, unless fertiliser is imported in large quantities and crop production is increased, sacrificing valuable, high-quality grasslands, which often conflicts with sustainable production methods. Also, in mixed systems with high inputs of fertiliser or water, improvements in plant biomass production seem marginal and the main challenges for these systems are in breeding high-quality plant biomass at lower levels of fertiliser and the use of new co-products from food processing and bio-based economies. Consequently, the main challenge in herbivore nutrition management is to improve the efficiency of plant biomass utilisation. Stocking rate management along with seasonal variation in the grazing capacity of grasslands and moderate use of fertiliser may increase meat production in grassland-based systems by 400%. Improving plant biomass utilisation in the more industrialised mixed rain-fed systems seems possible by better feed storage technologies and for dairy cattle by improving animal health and lifetime production level. Managing the transition period seems crucial to achieve more sustainable mixed rain-fed and mixed irrigated dairy production systems. Whether sustainable production methods will be implemented also depends on macro-economic conditions and awareness of regional and global environmental concerns. PMID:23031652

  17. [The trajectory of the Brazilian School Nutrition Program between 2003 and 2010: report of the national manager].

    PubMed

    Peixinho, Albaneide Maria Lima

    2013-04-01

    The scope of this paper is to study the report of the manager of the Brazilian School Nutrition Program (PNAE), with special emphasis on the period from 2003 to 2010. It is a critical essay based on a review of the literature and the official data. It was revealed that the program spent 954.2 million Brazilian reals in 2003 to assist 37.3 million students, and in 2010 the total resources increased to 3 billion Brazilian reals with 45.6 million students attended. Other important advances were the broadening and strengthening of the role of the School Nutrition Councils and the regulatory strategies of nutritionists as Accountable Technicians. Law No. 11.947/2009 gave a new impetus to the PNAE, extending the program to the entire basic public education grid and youths and adults, and recommending that 30% of the funds transferred from the FNDE should be used to acquire products from small farmers. The progress in technical and operational criteria seeking greater flexibility, efficiency and effectiveness in the management of the Program is clear for all to see. It is hoped that these advances will translate into effective improvement in food and nutrition conditions for schoolchildren. PMID:23670366

  18. Pediatric nutrition.

    PubMed

    Greco, Deborah S

    2014-03-01

    This article discusses pediatric nutrition in puppies and kittens. Supplementation of basic nutrients such as fat, protein, minerals, vitamins, and essential fatty acids of the bitch is essential for the proper growth and development of puppies during the lactation period. Milk replacers are compared for use in puppies and kittens. Supplements such as colostrum and probiotics for promotion of a healthy immune system and prevention or treatment of stress-induced and weaning diarrhea are also discussed. PMID:24580990

  19. Improved nutritional management of phenylketonuria by using a diet containing glycomacropeptide compared with amino acids

    PubMed Central

    van Calcar, Sandra C; MacLeod, Erin L; Gleason, Sally T; Etzel, Mark R; Clayton, Murray K; Wolff, Jon A; Ney, Denise M

    2009-01-01

    Background: Phenylketonuria (PKU) requires a lifelong low-phenylalanine diet that provides the majority of protein from a phenylalanine-free amino acid (AA) formula. Glycomacropeptide (GMP), an intact protein formed during cheese production, contains minimal phenylalanine. Objective: The objective was to investigate the effects of substituting GMP food products for the AA formula on acceptability, safety, plasma AA concentrations, and measures of protein utilization in subjects with PKU. Design: Eleven subjects participated in an inpatient metabolic study with two 4-d treatments: a current AA diet (AA diet) followed by a diet that replaced the AA formula with GMP (GMP diet) supplemented with limiting AAs. Plasma concentrations of AAs, blood chemistries, and insulin were measured and compared in AA (day 4) and GMP diets (day 8). Results: The GMP diet was preferred to the AA diet in 10 of 11 subjects with PKU, and there were no adverse reactions to GMP. There was no significant difference in phenylalanine concentration in postprandial plasma with the GMP diet compared with the AA diet. When comparing fasting with postprandial plasma, plasma phenalyalanine concentration increased significantly with the AA but not with the GMP diet. Blood urea nitrogen was significantly lower, which suggests decreased ureagenesis, and plasma insulin was higher with the GMP diet than with the AA diet. Conclusions: GMP, when supplemented with limiting AAs, is a safe and highly acceptable alternative to synthetic AAs as the primary protein source in the nutritional management of PKU. As an intact protein source, GMP improves protein retention and phenylalanine utilization compared with AAs. PMID:19244369

  20. European adolescents' level of perceived stress is inversely related to their diet quality: the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study.

    PubMed

    De Vriendt, Tineke; Clays, Els; Huybrechts, Inge; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Moreno, Luis A; Patterson, Emma; Molnár, Dénes; Mesana, María I; Beghin, Laurent; Widhalm, Kurt; Manios, Yannis; De Henauw, Stefaan

    2012-07-01

    As stress is hypothesised to influence dietary behaviour, the relationship between perceived stress and diet quality in European adolescents was investigated. Within the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study, adolescents (n 704, aged 12-17 years) from schools in five European cities (Ghent, Stockholm, Zaragoza, Athens and Vienna) completed a 2 d 24 h dietary recall assessment and an Adolescent Stress Questionnaire. Measurements and information were taken on height, weight, pubertal stage, parental education level, the level of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sleep duration. The Diet Quality Index for Adolescents (DQI-A) was calculated from the dietary data, which comprised three components reflecting dietary diversity, quality and equilibrium. Hierarchical linear models were performed to investigate the relationship between the adolescents' level of perceived stress and the DQI-A and its components, adjusting for relevant covariates (age, BMI z-score, pubertal stage and parental education). These models were additionally adjusted for MVPA or sleep duration. In both boys and girls, perceived stress was a significant independent negative predictor for their overall DQI-A. This inverse relationship was observed for all dietary components, except for dietary diversity in boys, and it was unaltered when additionally adjusted for MVPA or sleep duration. The observed inverse relationship between stress and diet quality within these European adolescents supports the hypothesis that stress influences dietary behaviour, thus emphasising the need for preventive stress-coping strategies for adolescents. PMID:22054044

  1. Nutritional management of infants and children with specific diseases or other conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cystic fibrosis is characterized by progressive deterioration of pulmonary and pancreatic function. The former may increase nutrient requirements somewhat, but probably affects nutrition more by adversely affecting intake, particularly during acute exacerbations and in older children with severe pul...

  2. The effect of a biofeedback-based stress management tool on physician stress: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Jane B; Wallace, Jean E; Lewin, Adriane M; de Grood, Jill; Schaefer, Jeffrey P

    2011-01-01

    Background Physicians often experience work-related stress that may lead to personal harm and impaired professional performance. Biofeedback has been used to manage stress in various populations. Objective To determine whether a biofeedback-based stress management tool, consisting of rhythmic breathing, actively self-generated positive emotions and a portable biofeedback device, reduces physician stress. Design Randomized controlled trial measuring efficacy of a stress-reduction intervention over 28 days, with a 28-day open-label trial extension to assess effectiveness. Setting Urban tertiary care hospital. Participants Forty staff physicians (23 men and 17 women) from various medical practices (1 from primary care, 30 from a medical specialty and 9 from a surgical specialty) were recruited by means of electronic mail, regular mail and posters placed in the physicians’ lounge and throughout the hospital. Intervention Physicians in the intervention group were instructed to use a biofeedback-based stress management tool three times daily. Participants in both the control and intervention groups received twice-weekly support visits from the research team over 28 days, with the intervention group also receiving re-inforcement in the use of the stress management tool during these support visits. During the 28-day extension period, both the control and the intervention groups received the intervention, but without intensive support from the research team. Main outcome measure Stress was measured with a scale developed to capture short-term changes in global perceptions of stress for physicians (maximum score 200). Results During the randomized controlled trial (days 0 to 28), the mean stress score declined significantly for the intervention group (change –14.7, standard deviation [SD] 23.8; p = 0.013) but not for the control group (change –2.2, SD 8.4; p = 0.30). The difference in mean score change between the groups was 12.5 (p = 0.048). The lower mean stress scores in the intervention group were maintained during the trial extension to day 56. The mean stress score for the control group changed significantly during the 28-day extension period (change –8.5, SD 7.6; p < 0.001). Conclusion A biofeedback-based stress management tool may be a simple and effective stress-reduction strategy for physicians. PMID:22567069

  3. Experts stress both wellness and amenity aspects of food and nutrition services in assisted living facilities for older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been no consensus on best practices in food and nutrition services in assisted living facilities (ALFs) for older adults. We documented experts’ views on optimal food and nutrition services emphases in ALFs, and factors affecting their views. One hundred thirty-five national experts speci...

  4. Principals Responding to Constant Pressure: Finding a Source of Stress Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Caryn M.

    2013-01-01

    This conceptual article presents a review of the research concerning the stress level of principals over the past three decades, with emphasis on the occupational stress that principals encounter because of heightened accountability and expectations for student achievement. Mindfulness meditation, as a stress management intervention, provides the…

  5. Managing Stress and Feelings of Mastery among Swedish Comprehensive School Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsson, Christian; Pousette, Anders; Thylefors, Ingela

    2001-01-01

    Created guidelines for stress management intervention by investigating the relationship of 12 factors with stress reactions and feelings of mastery among 826 Swedish teachers in 27 comprehensive schools. Teacher stress reactions were best predicted by perceived work demands, student misbehavior, and negative feedback, while mastery feelings were…

  6. Academy of nutrition and dietetics: standards of practice and standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in adult weight management.

    PubMed

    Jortberg, Bonnie; Myers, Eileen; Gigliotti, Linda; Ivens, Barbara J; Lebre, Monica; Burke March, Susan; Nogueira, Isadora; Nwankwo, Robin; Parkinson, Meredith R; Paulsen, Barbara; Turner, Tonya

    2015-04-01

    Weight management encompasses the inter-relationship of nutrition, physical activity, and health behavior change. Nutrition is key for the prevention and treatment of obesity and chronic disease and maintenance of overall health. Thus, the Weight Management Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs) in Adult Weight Management as a resource for RDNs working in weight management. This document allows RDNs to assess their current skill levels and to identify areas for further professional development in this expanding practice area. This document describes the current standards for weight management practice for RDNs. The Standards of Practice represent the four steps in the Nutrition Care Process as applied to the care of patients/clients. The Standards of Professional Performance consist of six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate how the standard can be applied to practice. The indicators describe three skill levels (competent, proficient, and expert) for RDNs working in weight management. The Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance are complementary resources for the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist in weight management. PMID:25819519

  7. Management of post traumatic stress disorder after childbirth: a review.

    PubMed

    Lapp, Leann K; Agbokou, Catherine; Peretti, Charles-Siegfried; Ferreri, Florian

    2010-09-01

    Prevalence and risk factors for the development of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after childbirth is well described in the literature. However, its management and treatment has only begun to be investigated. The aim of this article is to describe the studies that examine the effects of interventions on PTSD after childbirth. MedLine, PILOTS, CINAHL and ISI Web of Science databases were systematically searched for randomised controlled trials, pilot studies and case studies using key words related to PTSD, childbirth, treatment and intervention. The reference lists of the retrieved articles were also used to supplement the search. A total of nine studies were retrieved. Seven studies that examined debriefing or counselling were identified; six randomised controlled trials and one pilot study. Also found were one case report describing the effects of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) on two women, and one pilot study of eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR). Overall, there is limited evidence concerning the management of women with PTSD after childbirth. The results agree with the findings from the non-childbirth related literature: debriefing and counselling are inconclusively effective while CBT and EMDR may improve PTSD status but require investigation in controlled trials before conclusions could be drawn. PMID:20653342

  8. The Response of the Mediterranean Gorgonian Eunicella singularis to Thermal Stress Is Independent of Its Nutritional Regime

    PubMed Central

    Ezzat, Leďla; Merle, Pierre-Laurent; Furla, Paola; Buttler, Alexandre; Ferrier-Pagčs, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, sessile benthic organisms from the Mediterranean Sea have suffered from the global warming of the world's oceans, and several mass mortality events were observed during warm summers. It has been hypothesized that mortality could have been due to a nutrient (food) shortage following the stratification of the water column. However, the symbiotic gorgonian Eunicella singularis has also presented a locally exceptional mortality, despite its autotrophic capacities through the photosynthesis of its dinoflagellate symbionts. Thus, this study has experimentally investigated the response of E. singularis to a thermal stress (temperature increase from 18 to 26°C), with colonies maintained more than 2 months under four nutritional diets: autotrophy only (AO), autotrophy and inorganic nitrogen addition (AN), autotrophy and heterotrophy (AH), heterotrophy only (HO). At 18°C, and contrary to many other anthozoans, supplementation of autotrophy with either inorganic nitrogen or food (heterotrophy) had no effect on the rates of respiration, photosynthesis, as well as in the chlorophyll, lipid and protein content. In the dark, heterotrophy maintained the gorgonian's metabolism, except a bleaching (loss of pigments), which did not affect the rates of photosynthesis. At 24°C, rates of respiration, and photosynthesis significantly decreased in all treatments. At 26°C, in addition to a decrease in the lipid content of all treatments, a bleaching was observed after 1 week in the AO treatment, while the AH and AN treatments resisted three weeks before bleaching. These last results suggest that, temperatures above 24°C impair the energetic reserves of this species and might explain the mortality events in the Mediterranean. PMID:23667711

  9. Helping Children Manage Stress: A Guide for Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, James H.

    From birth--and possibly before--children are likely to encounter a considerable amount of stress generated by society. This book explains what adults can do to prevent and/or minimize the harmful consequences of stress for children. Part 1, "Understanding Stress in Children," explores the general causes of stress, with particular emphasis on…

  10. NutriSonic web expert system for meal management and nutrition counseling with nutrient time-series analysis, e-food exchange and easy data transition

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jee-Ye; Lee, Jin-Hee; Kim, Gon; Kim, Min-Chan

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to develop the NutriSonic Web Expert System for Meal Management and Nutrition Counseling with Analysis of User's Nutritive Changes of selected days and food exchange information with easy data transition. This program manipulates a food, menu and meal and search database that has been developed. Also, the system provides a function to check the user's nutritive change of selected days. Users can select a recommended general and therapeutic menu using this system. NutriSonic can analyze nutrients and e-food exchange ("e" means the food exchange data base calculated by a computer program) in menus and meals. The expert can insert and store a meal database and generate the synthetic information of age, sex and therapeutic purpose of disease. With investigation and analysis of the user's needs, the meal planning program on the internet has been continuously developed. Users are able to follow up their nutritive changes with nutrient information and ratio of 3 major energy nutrients. Also, users can download another data format like Excel files (.xls) for analysis and verify their nutrient time-series analysis. The results of analysis are presented quickly and accurately. Therefore it can be used by not only usual people, but also by dietitians and nutritionists who take charge of making a menu and experts in the field of food and nutrition. It is expected that the NutriSonic Web Expert System can be useful for nutrition education, nutrition counseling and expert meal management. PMID:20126376

  11. The effect of stress management training on stress and depression in women with depression disorders: Using cognitive-behavioral techniques

    PubMed Central

    Abbasian, Farahzad; Najimi, Arash; Meftagh, Sayyed Davood; Ghasemi, Gholamreza; Afshar, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study aimed to investigate the effect of stress management training through cognitive-behavioral techniques on stress, social adaptability and depression in women with depression disorders. Materials and Methods: In this study, 40 patients diagnosed with depression who had referred to psychiatry and consultation clinics of Isfahan were randomly selected and assigned to intervention and control groups (20 patients in each group). The intervention group received eight 90-min sessions of stress training through cognitive–behavioral techniques. Data collection tools included Cooper's stress questionnaire, Bell's social adaptability questionnaire and Hamilton's depression scale questionnaire. The participants completed the questionnaires before the intervention and 1 month after the same. Data analysis was performed using covariance analysis. Results: Based on the results, considering variables of stress, social adaptability and depression, the equal variance hypothesis was confirmed. The relationship between pre- and post-test scores on stress, social adaptability and depression was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The modified mean difference was F = 12.45, P < 0.001 on stress; F = 6.88, P < 0.01 on social adaptability; and F = 5.36, P < 0.02 on depression, all of which were significant. Conclusion: Stress management training through cognitive behavioral techniques can play a main role in depression reduction and development of social adaptability through modifying inappropriate social information-processing patterns. PMID:25077163

  12. Prepartum and postpartum nutritional management to optimize fertility in high-yielding dairy cows in confined TMR systems.

    PubMed

    Drackley, J K; Cardoso, F C

    2014-05-01

    The 6 to 8-week period centered on parturition, known as the transition or periparturient period, is critical to welfare and profitability of individual cows. Fertility of high-producing cows is compromised by difficult transitions. Deficiencies in either nutritional or non-nutritional management increase risk for periparturient metabolic disorders and infectious diseases, which decrease subsequent fertility. A primary factor impeding fertility is the extent of negative energy balance (NEB) early postpartum, which may inhibit timing of first ovulation, return to cyclicity, and oocyte quality. In particular, pronounced NEB during the first 10 days to 2 weeks (the time of greatest occurrence of health problems) is critical for later reproductive efficiency. Avoiding over-conditioning and preventing cows from over-consuming energy relative to their requirements in late gestation result in higher dry matter intake (DMI) and less NEB after calving. A pooled statistical analysis of previous studies in our group showed that days to pregnancy are decreased (by 10 days) by controlling energy intake to near requirements of cows before calving compared with allowing cows to over-consume energy. To control energy intake, total mixed rations (TMR) must be well balanced for metabolizable protein, minerals and vitamins yet limit total DM consumed, and cows must uniformly consume the TMR without sorting. Dietary management to maintain blood calcium and rumen health around and after calving also are important. Opportunities may exist to further improve energy status in fresh cows. Recent research to manipulate the glucogenic to lipogenic balance and the essential fatty acid content of tissues are intriguing. High-producing cows that adapt successfully to lactation can have high reproductive efficiency, and nutritional management of the transition period both pre- and post-calving must facilitate that adaptation. PMID:24844126

  13. Group Training of Stress Management vs. Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Reducing Depression, Anxiety and Perceived Stress Among HIV-Positive Men

    PubMed Central

    Hemmati Sabet, Akbar; Khalatbari, Javad; Abbas Ghorbani, Maryam; Haghighi, Mohammad; Ahmadpanah, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of group training of stress management with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing depression, anxiety and stress perceived among HIV-positive men. Methods:Inthis semi-experimental study, three groups of HIV-positive men (CBT group, stress management group, and control group) including 15 patients in each group were compared regarding depression, anxiety, and stress using pre-test and post-test tools. Results: Both interventions (CBT and stress management) were effective in reducing depression, anxiety and perceived stress. Evaluating adjustedmean showed the more effectivenessofthe group stressmanagementtraining than CBT. Conclusion: Group stress management training is more effective than group CBT in HIV-positive mentodecreasedepression, anxiety and stress management. Declaration of interest: None. Clinical Trial Registration: URL: http://.irct.ir. Unique identifier: 2012121711782N1 PMID:24644493

  14. Using biofeedback while immersed in a stressful videogame increases the effectiveness of stress management skills in soldiers.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Stéphane; Bernier, François; Boivin, Eric; Morin, Brian; Robillard, Genevičve

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of using visual and auditory biofeedback while immersed in a tridimensional videogame to practice a stress management skill (tactical breathing). All 41 participants were soldiers who had previously received basic stress management training and first aid training in combat. On the first day, they received a 15-minute refresher briefing and were randomly assigned to either: (a) no additional stress management training (SMT) for three days, or (b) 30-minute sessions (one per day for three days) of biofeedback-assisted SMT while immersed in a horror/first-person shooter game. The training was performed in a dark and enclosed environment using a 50-inch television with active stereoscopic display and loudspeakers. On the last day, all participants underwent a live simulated ambush with an improvised explosive device, where they had to provide first aid to a wounded soldier. Stress levels were measured with salivary cortisol collected when waking-up, before and after the live simulation. Stress was also measured with heart rate at baseline, during an apprehension phase, and during the live simulation. Repeated-measure ANOVAs and ANCOVAs confirmed that practicing SMT was effective in reducing stress. Results are discussed in terms of the advantages of the proposed program for military personnel and the need to practice SMT. PMID:22558370

  15. Using Biofeedback while Immersed in a Stressful Videogame Increases the Effectiveness of Stress Management Skills in Soldiers

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Stéphane; Bernier, François; Boivin, Éric; Morin, Brian; Robillard, Genevičve

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of using visual and auditory biofeedback while immersed in a tridimensional videogame to practice a stress management skill (tactical breathing). All 41 participants were soldiers who had previously received basic stress management training and first aid training in combat. On the first day, they received a 15-minute refresher briefing and were randomly assigned to either: (a) no additional stress management training (SMT) for three days, or (b) 30-minute sessions (one per day for three days) of biofeedback-assisted SMT while immersed in a horror/first-person shooter game. The training was performed in a dark and enclosed environment using a 50-inch television with active stereoscopic display and loudspeakers. On the last day, all participants underwent a live simulated ambush with an improvised explosive device, where they had to provide first aid to a wounded soldier. Stress levels were measured with salivary cortisol collected when waking-up, before and after the live simulation. Stress was also measured with heart rate at baseline, during an apprehension phase, and during the live simulation. Repeated-measure ANOVAs and ANCOVAs confirmed that practicing SMT was effective in reducing stress. Results are discussed in terms of the advantages of the proposed program for military personnel and the need to practice SMT. PMID:22558370

  16. Identification of energy consumption and nutritional stress by isotopic and elemental analysis of urine in bonobos (Pan paniscus)

    E-print Network

    with eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia,[16­18] and in athletes during physical activity, can be used to monitor fluctuations in nitrogen balance caused by situations such as nutritional

  17. Association of stress management skills and perceived stress with physical and emotional well-being among advanced prostrate cancer survivors following androgen deprivation treatment.

    PubMed

    Penedo, Frank J; Benedict, Catherine; Zhou, Eric S; Rasheed, Mikal; Traeger, Lara; Kava, Bruce R; Soloway, Mark; Czaja, Sara; Antoni, Michael H

    2013-03-01

    Advanced prostate cancer (APC) is associated with disruptions that compromise health related quality of life (HRQOL). Treatment often includes androgendeprivation therapy (ADT), which results in a range of side effects (e.g., fatigue, urinary dysfunction) that further impact HRQOL. Despite these challenges, there are limited evaluations of the impact of stress and stress management skills on HRQOL among APC survivors on ADT. This study evaluated relationships among stress, stress management skills, and HRQOL, and it was hypothesized that better stress management skills would relate to greater physical and emotional well-being by mitigating perceived stress levels. Participants (N = 77) were 69.7 years old (SD = 9.8), 18.6 months post-treatment (SD = 17.5), and ethnically diverse (65 % Non-Hispanic White, 13 % Hispanic, 21 % African-American). Measures included the Measure of Current Status for stress management skills, the Perceived Stress Scale for perceived stress, and the Medical Outcomes Study-Short Form (MOS SF-36; physical functioning and emotional well-being subscales) for HRQOL. Direct effects and mediation models were evaluated to determine the relationships between perceived stress, stress management skills, and HRQOL domains, controlling for relevant covariates. Stress management skills and perceived stress were significantly associated with physical functioning (? = .24, p < .05 and ? = -.43, p < .01, respectively) and emotional well-being (? = .35, p < .01 and ? = -.64, p < .01, respectively). Regression analyses supported the hypothesis that reduced perceived stress mediated the relationship between stress management skills and both physical functioning and emotional well-being. These results demonstrate that one way stress management skills may impact HRQOL is by lessening ongoing perceptions of stress. PMID:22739661

  18. Nutritional and Weight Management Behaviors: Public and Private High School Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearman, Silas N., III; Thatcher, William G.; Valois, Robert F.; Drane, J. Wanzer

    2000-01-01

    Examined private and public high school adolescents' weight control and nutrition behaviors, using Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System data. Private school females were more likely to diet and exercise than public school females. Public school males were more likely to attempt weight gain than private high school males. Private school students…

  19. Effects of Forage Management on the Nutritive Value of Stockpiled Bermudagrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Common' and 'Tifton 44' bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] located near Fayetteville and Batesville, AR, respectively, were chosen to evaluate the effects of stockpiling initiation date (August or September), and N fertilization rate (0, 37, 74, or 111 kg N ha-1) on the nutritive value of f...

  20. Stress Management in Education: Warning Signs and Coping Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorenson, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Only in recent years have researchers begun to study stress in the workplace. Psychologists and other stress analysts have discovered that the most trying professions are those that involve high pressure and serious responsibilities, often beyond the control of the individuals employed. Most interesting, the American Institute of Stress revealed…

  1. Nutritional evaluation of patients receiving dialysis for the management of protein-energy wasting: what is old and what is new?

    PubMed

    Riella, Miguel C

    2013-05-01

    Advances in the nutritional support of hospitalized patients in the early 1970s led to the recognition that tools were needed to evaluate the nutritional status of patients. The observation that malnutrition in patients receiving dialysis was associated with increased morbidity and mortality prompted many expert groups to develop nutritional scoring systems to be applied in these patients. Given the diverse and confusing terminologies that emerged from these publications, the International Society of Renal Nutritional and Metabolism convened an expert panel to recommend a new nomenclature and preferred methods to evaluate the nutritional status of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The new and inclusive term protein-energy wasting (PEW) refers to a systematically defined condition based on certain criteria and reflects malnutrition and wasting caused not only by inadequate nutrient intake but also by depletion resulting from the inflammatory and noninflammatory conditions that prevail in this population. Serial assessment of nutritional status for detection and management of PEW is recommended using old and new scoring tools, including the Subjective Global Assessment (SGA), malnutrition inflammation score (MIS), Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI), and PEW definition criteria. These tools, which are reliable methods and predictors of outcomes, are reviewed in this article. PMID:23611546

  2. Student Well-Being Interventions: The Effects of Stress Management Techniques and Gratitude Journaling in the Management Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flinchbaugh, Carol L.; Moore, E. Whitney G.; Chang, Young K.; May, Douglas R.

    2012-01-01

    Student well-being in the management classroom is of concern to both educators and managers. Well-being is conceptualized here as students' reduction in stress, enhanced experienced meaning and engagement in the classroom, and, ultimately, heightened satisfaction with life. The authors investigated whether purposeful semester-long classroom…

  3. Early nutritional stress impairs development of a song-control brain region in both male and female juvenile song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) at the onset of song learning.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Ian F; Kempster, Bethany; Zanette, Liana; MacDougall-Shackleton, Scott A

    2006-10-01

    Birdsong is a sexually selected trait and is often viewed as an indicator of male quality. The developmental stress hypothesis proposes a model by which song could be an indicator; the time during early development, when birds learn complex songs and/or local variants of song, is of rapid development and nutritional stress. Birds that cope best with this stress may better learn to produce the most effective songs. The developmental stress hypothesis predicts that early food restriction should impair development of song-control brain regions at the onset of song learning. We examined the effect of food restriction on song-control brain regions in fledgling (both sexes, 23-26 days old) song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). Food restriction selectively reduced HVC volume in both sexes. In addition, sex differences were evident in all three song-control regions. This study lends further support to a growing body of literature documenting a variety of behavioural, physiological and neural detriments in several songbird species resulting from early developmental stress. PMID:16959649

  4. Stress Management Strategies for Students: The Immediate Effects of Yoga, Humor, and Reading on Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizzolo, Denise; Zipp, Genevieve Pinto; Stiskal, Doreen; Simpkins, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Health science programs can be demanding and difficult for many students, leading to high levels of stress. High levels of stress can have a negative effect on students and subsequently the practicing clinician. Research suggests that yoga, humor, and reading are simple, effective methods to help reduce stress. To date no research…

  5. Nutrition: a promising route for prevention and management of obesity-related nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, Giovanni

    2014-11-01

    When dealing with the treatment of obesity-linked illnesses - in particular nonalcoholic fatty liver disease - beyond diet, various nutritional ingredients are reported to be useful as silymarin, spirulina, choline, folic acid, methionine and vitamin E, all of them showing promising but not definite results. An emerging field of study is represented by prebiotics/probiotics and restoration of normal gut flora, which could play a fundamental role diet and various its components. It is noteworthy to point out that both improving or reducing the severity of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease bear a positive consequence on evolution of atherosclerosis and its cardiovascular-associated disease, such as coronary artery disease, even though the involved immunologic mechanisms are gaining greater credit in the most recent literature, without excluding the role of nutrition in modulating the acquired immunity in this condition. PMID:25460293

  6. [Nutrition and fluid management in palliative medicine: do food and drink keep body and soul together?].

    PubMed

    Gaser, E; Meissner, W

    2012-01-01

    Induction, implementation and continuation of an invasive nutrition or fluid administration in patients with advanced, life-limiting illnesses is an often controversial but also very emotionally discussed topic. This article summarizes the current state of knowledge based mainly on the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) guidelines and is intended as a simple guide for clinical practice. In the early phase of disease the induction of an invasive food and fluid administration may be indicated in order to prevent undernutrition and cachexia, to enhance compliance with anti-tumor treatment, to control some adverse effects of anti-tumor therapy and to improve the quality of life. If oral or enteral feeding is possible this should be preferred. Patients in the final stage of a disease rarely suffer from hunger or thirst. In this phase of the disease other things, such as monitoring of patients and relatives play a much more important role. PMID:22273825

  7. Long-term management of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy by a nutritional support team

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. CORTEZ-PINTO; A. PINTO CORREIA; M. E. CAMILO; L. TAVARES; M. CARNEIRO DE MOURA

    2002-01-01

    Background\\/Aims: Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG) has become a commonly-performed procedure, to provide enteral nutrition for patients who are unable to eat. The aims of this study were to evaluate the long term efficacy, morbidity and mortality of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Material and methods: We analysed 144 patients who underwent a PEG procedure. Survival curves were done with the Kaplan–Meier

  8. Nutritional management to optimize fertility of dairy cows in pasture-based systems.

    PubMed

    Butler, S T

    2014-05-01

    The efficiency of milk production in pasture-based systems is heavily influenced by calving pattern, necessitating excellent reproductive performance in a short-breeding season. Where grazed pasture is the major component of the diet, cows are underfed relative to their intake potential. The cow responds by reducing milk output, but fertility is generally better than high intake confinement systems that achieve greater milk production per cow. A number of studies have identified body condition score (BCS) measurements that are related to likelihood of both submission and conception. Blood metabolites and metabolic hormones linked to fertility outcomes are now well characterized. In general, fertility variables have favourable associations with circulating concentrations of glucose, insulin and IGF-1 and unfavourable associations with non-esterified fatty acids, ?-hydroxybutyrate and endogenous growth hormone. Nutritional strategies to impact these metabolic indicators have been utilized, but effects on herd fertility are inconsistent. Simply supplementing cows with additional energy in the form of standard concentrates does not appear to have a pronounced effect on fertility. Energy from additional concentrates fed during lactation is preferentially partitioned towards extra milk production rather than BCS repletion. The higher the genetic merit for milk production, the greater the partitioning of additional nutrients to the mammary gland. This review outlines the unique nutritional challenges of pasture-based systems, the role of specific metabolic hormones and metabolites in regulating reproductive function, and nutritional strategies to improve herd fertility. PMID:24844127

  9. Stress Management as an Enabling Technology for High-Field Superconducting Dipole Magnets

    E-print Network

    Holik, Eddie Frank

    2014-06-03

    This dissertation examines stress management and other construction techniques as means to meet future accelerator requirement demands by planning, fabricating, and analyzing a high-field, Nb_(3)Sn dipole. In order to enable future fundamental...

  10. The influence of maternal prenatal and early childhood nutrition and maternal prenatal stress on offspring immune system development and neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; O'Connor, Thomas G.; Roth, Christine; Susser, Ezra; Bjřrke-Monsen, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    The developing immune system and central nervous system in the fetus and child are extremely sensitive to both exogenous and endogenous signals. Early immune system programming, leading to changes that can persist over the life course, has been suggested, and other evidence suggests that immune dysregulation in the early developing brain may play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. The timing of immune dysregulation with respect to gestational age and neurologic development of the fetus may shape the elicited response. This creates a possible sensitive window of programming or vulnerability. This review will explore the effects of maternal prenatal and infant nutritional status (from conception until early childhood) as well as maternal prenatal stress and anxiety on early programming of immune function, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. We will describe fetal immune system development and maternal-fetal immune interactions to provide a better context for understanding the influence of nutrition and stress on the immune system. Finally, we will discuss the implications for prevention of neurodevelopmental disorders, with a focus on nutrition. Although certain micronutrient supplements have shown to both reduce the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders and enhance fetal immune development, we do not know whether their impact on immune development contributes to the preventive effect on neurodevelopmental disorders. Future studies are needed to elucidate this relationship, which may contribute to a better understanding of preventative mechanisms. Integrating studies of neurodevelopmental disorders and prenatal exposures with the simultaneous evaluation of neural and immune systems will shed light on mechanisms that underlie individual vulnerability or resilience to neurodevelopmental disorders and ultimately contribute to the development of primary preventions and early interventions. PMID:23914151

  11. Primary Prevention for Mental Health: Design and Delivery of a Generic Stress Management Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Carmen; McRobert, Jim; Piller, Meeta

    2002-01-01

    Evaluates a stress management program, "Balancing Out," that seeks to target the needs of the local community. Quantitative results indicate that the sample had significantly higher stress levels then the norm at the beginning of the program and below population norms at program completion. Qualitative responses indicated that respondents had…

  12. Virtually Stress Free: Keeping Online Graduate Management Students Healthy from Afar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinak, M. Linda

    2012-01-01

    This article examines stress experienced by graduate management students in an online learning environment. I use qualitative methodology to examine data collected from 32 students in 2 sections of a graduate online course. Findings identify 6 categories of stressors experienced by the students as well as 6 categories of stress relief agents.…

  13. The Effects of a Stress Management Course on Counselors-in-Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abel, Holly; Abel, Annette; Smith, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of a stress management course on the stress knowledge and coping techniques of 101 graduate students in counseling were examined. Participants, drawn from various racial groups, were typically female (79%) and 21 to 55 years of age. Seven of the 8 null hypotheses were rejected. There were significant differences on 6 of the 7 dependent…

  14. A Case Study: An ACT Stress Management Group in a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daltry, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) stress management group in a college counseling center setting. This study explored (a) the effectiveness of ACT in increasing participants' ability to tolerate distress, which directly affects their ability to function in a stressful college…

  15. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Alternative Stress Management Interventions in Persons with HIV Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCain, Nancy L.; Gray, D. Patricia; Elswick, R. K., Jr.; Robins, Jolynne W.; Tuck, Inez; Walter, Jeanne M.; Rausch, Sarah M.; Ketchum, Jessica McKinney

    2008-01-01

    Research in psychoneuroimmunology suggests that immunosuppression associated with perceived stress may contribute to disease progression in persons with HIV infection. While stress management interventions may enhance immune function, few alternative approaches have yet been tested. This randomized clinical trial was conducted to test effects of…

  16. Coping with Mathematics Anxiety: Stress Management and Academic Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sime, Wesley E.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Administered the Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale to Introductory Statistics college students. A high mathematics anxiety was associated with lower performance on a statistics examination. Classroom stress-coping intervention reduced anxiety and physiological stress responses, but did not improve academic performance. (Author/KS)

  17. Evaluation of Stress Management Education: The University of Maryland Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Roger J.

    This study evaluated the efficacy of the undergraduate service program "Controlling Stress & Tension" at the University of Maryland in terms of improving the health status of participants across biomedical stress reactivity and psychometric variables. Six hundred fifty-three participants were compared to 264 control subjects for pre- to…

  18. Stress management using UMTS cellular phones: a controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giuseppe RIVA; Alessandra PREZIOSA; Alessandra GRASSI; Daniela VILLANI

    2006-01-01

    One of the best strategies for dealing with stress is learning how to relax. However, relaxing is difficult to achieve in typical real world situations. For this study, we developed a specific protocol based on mobile narratives - multimedia narratives experienced on UMTS\\/3G phones - to help workers in reducing commuting stress. In a controlled trial 33 commuters were randomly

  19. Managing Stress for College Success through Self-Hypnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrese, Marie A.

    1998-01-01

    Addresses the problem of stress and outlines the steps for self-hypnosis as an effective method of teaching inner-city college freshmen ways of coping with the pressures of higher education. The described method can be used in numerous settings with all populations. An appendix provides the Stress Identification and Evaluation Form. (Author/MKA)

  20. Managing Stress and Burnout among Helpers in Rural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, John C.

    Individuals who work in the helping professions (physicians, counselors, nurses, pastors, and social workers) often work with individuals in stressful crisis situations. In addition to working in high stress situations, helpers in rural areas also suffer from isolation from support networks and peers that are available to urban helpers. This…

  1. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND LONG-TERM RESPONSES TO ULTRAVIOLET-B RADIATION STRESS IN A MARINE DIATOM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influences of nutrition status on the photoinhibitory effects of ultraviolet-B radiation (UVBR:290 to 320nm)on the specific growth rates (Uobs )and biomass of Phaeodactylum tricornutum were determined using nutrient-replete batch cultures and nutrient-limited continuous cultures....

  2. Factors Affecting Deer Diets and Nutrition

    E-print Network

    Richardson, Calvin

    2000-04-25

    Knowledge of deer diets and nutrition can benefit ranchers who are interested in deer management and who want to coordinate vegetation management practices with changes in nutritional value of the habitat. Three important considerations...

  3. Special Food and Nutrition Needs in School Nutrition Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molaison, Elaine Fontenot; Nettles, Mary Frances

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the prevalence of special food and/or nutrition needs in school nutrition programs. In addition, researchers focused on the issues surrounding these needs and the role of the school nutrition (SN) directors and managers in meeting these needs. Methods: An expert panel was used to…

  4. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Consumer Approach Strand: Foods and Nutrition. Module I-C-5: Influences on Food Prices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Jill

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on influences on food prices is the fifth in a set of five modules on consumer education related to foods and nutrition. (This set is part of a larger series of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education [MATCHE]--see CE 019…

  5. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Occupational Strand: Foods and Nutrition. Module II-C-2: Operations and Activities of a Food Service Operation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waskey, Frank

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on operations and activities of a food service operation is the second in a set of three modules on occupational education relating to foods and nutrition. (This set is part of a larger series of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and…

  6. How to Master Stress 1. Understanding Stress

    E-print Network

    Kasman, Alex

    1 How to Master Stress 1. Understanding Stress Introduction to Stress Management Understanding Stress o Survival Stress o Internally Generated Stress o Environmental Stress, Job Stress and Fatigue How to Recognize Stress Optimizing Your Levels of Stress Managing Life Crises How stress can get

  7. Stress Management in TAMU3, a 14 Tesla Nb3Sn Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holik, Eddie, III; Benson, Christopher; Diaczenko, Nick; Elliott, Tim; Garrison, Ray; Jaisle, Andrew; McInturff, Alfred; McIntyre, Peter; Sattarov, Dior

    2011-10-01

    The Accelerator Research Laboratory at Texas A&M University is constructing TAMU3, a model dipole which implements Stress Management within its windings to prevent strain degradation of advanced superconductors under large Lorentz forces. A pier-and-beam support structure is integrated within the windings to intercept Lorentz stress from the inner windings and bypass it around the outer windings. TAMU3 will be the first rendering into practice of Stress Management and may open the way to fields of 16 Tesla and beyond for future hadron colliders, muon colliders, and other applications.

  8. Global Gradients of Coral Exposure to Environmental Stresses and Implications for Local Management

    PubMed Central

    Maina, Joseph; McClanahan, Tim R.; Venus, Valentijn; Ateweberhan, Mebrahtu; Madin, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Background The decline of coral reefs globally underscores the need for a spatial assessment of their exposure to multiple environmental stressors to estimate vulnerability and evaluate potential counter-measures. Methodology/Principal Findings This study combined global spatial gradients of coral exposure to radiation stress factors (temperature, UV light and doldrums), stress-reinforcing factors (sedimentation and eutrophication), and stress-reducing factors (temperature variability and tidal amplitude) to produce a global map of coral exposure and identify areas where exposure depends on factors that can be locally managed. A systems analytical approach was used to define interactions between radiation stress variables, stress reinforcing variables and stress reducing variables. Fuzzy logic and spatial ordinations were employed to quantify coral exposure to these stressors. Globally, corals are exposed to radiation and reinforcing stress, albeit with high spatial variability within regions. Based on ordination of exposure grades, regions group into two clusters. The first cluster was composed of severely exposed regions with high radiation and low reducing stress scores (South East Asia, Micronesia, Eastern Pacific and the central Indian Ocean) or alternatively high reinforcing stress scores (the Middle East and the Western Australia). The second cluster was composed of moderately to highly exposed regions with moderate to high scores in both radiation and reducing factors (Caribbean, Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Central Pacific, Polynesia and the western Indian Ocean) where the GBR was strongly associated with reinforcing stress. Conclusions/Significance Despite radiation stress being the most dominant stressor, the exposure of coral reefs could be reduced by locally managing chronic human impacts that act to reinforce radiation stress. Future research and management efforts should focus on incorporating the factors that mitigate the effect of coral stressors until long-term carbon reductions are achieved through global negotiations. PMID:21860667

  9. Stress Prevention through a Time Management Training Intervention: An Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Häfner, Alexander; Stock, Armin; Pinneker, Lydia; Ströhle, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a short-term time management training programme on perceived control of time and perceived stress. The sample of 177 freshmen was randomly assigned to a time management training (n?=?89) and an active control group (CG) (n?=?88). We expected that an increase in external demands during the…

  10. An 8-week stress management program in pathological gamblers: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Linardatou, C; Parios, A; Varvogli, L; Chrousos, G; Darviri, C

    2014-09-01

    Stress plays a major role at the onset and relapse of pathological gambling (PG), but at the same time it can also be the aftermath of gambling behavior, thus revealing a reciprocal relationship. Although the role of stress has been well-documented, there is a paucity of studies investigating the effect of an adjunctive stress management program on PG. In this 8-week parallel randomized waitlist controlled trial pathological gamblers, already in the gamblers anonymous (GA) group, were assigned randomly in two groups, with the intervention group (n = 22) receiving an additional stress management program (consisting of education on diet and exercise, stress coping methods, relaxation breathing -RB- and progressive muscle relaxation -PMR). Self-reported measures were used in order to evaluate stress, depression, anxiety, sleep quality/disturbances, life-satisfaction and daily routine. The statistical analyses for the between group differences concerning the main psychosocial study outcomes revealed a statistically significant amelioration of stress, depression, anxiety symptoms and an increase of life-satisfaction and a better daily routine in participants of the intervention group. We hope that these will encourage researchers and clinicians to adopt stress management in their future work. PMID:24912736

  11. Yoga as an alternative and complementary approach for stress management: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    Stress has become a global public health problem. Yoga offers one possible way of reducing stress. The purpose of this study was to look at studies from 2011 to May 2013 and examine whether yoga can be an efficacious approach for managing stress. A systematic search of Medline, CINAHL, and Alt HealthWatch databases was conducted for quantitative articles involving all schools of yoga. A total of 17 articles met the inclusion criteria. Six of these were from the United States, 3 from India, 2 from the United Kingdom, and 1 each from Australia, Brazil, Germany, Iraq, Sweden, and Taiwan. Of the 17 studies, 12 demonstrated positive changes in psychological or physiological outcomes related to stress. Despite the limitations, not all studies used a randomized controlled design, had smaller sample sizes, had different outcomes, had nonstandardized yoga intervention, and had varying lengths, yoga appears to be a promising modality for stress management. PMID:24647380

  12. Stress and risk avoidance by exploring rats: implications for stress management in fear-related behaviours.

    PubMed

    Nemati, Farshad; Kolb, Bryan; Metz, Gerlinde A

    2013-03-01

    Animals display protective patterns of behaviour. Adoption of such protective patterns requires the assessment of risks posed by the environment and subsequent avoidance of high-risk locations. We hypothesized that adverse experiences lead to formation of a context-specific memory, thus changing the pattern of exploratory behaviours in response to specific cues associated with this experience. Here we examined exploratory movement patterns and compared approach/avoidance behaviours in rats following a stressful experience in the same versus a different environment. Using an open table exploration task, we compared exploratory movements in rats that were either stressed by restraint in a different environment or stressed in the test environment. The following day rats were allowed to explore the open table environment. Different test situations were provided in which rats were given access to a refuge or a large visual object as placed in the vicinity to the open table. The results indicate that stressed rats avoid the specific location associated with a stressful experience. However, when provided with a refuge in this location the salience of the stressful memory is reduced and the refuge will become a preferred location. Exploratory patterns and avoidance behaviours were correlated with corticosterone levels. Behavioural changes were not related to dendritic morphology in the medial prefrontal cortex (layer III). The results provide insights into risk avoidance strategies in rats and suggest that environmental intervention can reverse stress-related changes in behaviour. PMID:23305801

  13. The administration of food supplemented with cocoa powder during nutritional recovery reduces damage caused by oxidative stress in rat brain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerardo Barragán Mejía; David Calderón Guzmán; Hugo Juárez Olguín; Nancy Hernández Martínez; Edna García Cruz; Aline Morales Ramírez; Norma Labra Ruiz; Gabriela Esquivel Jiménez; Norma Osnaya Brizuela; Raquel García Álvarez; Esperanza Ontiveros Mendoza

    Malnutrition contributes to the development of oxidative damage in the central nervous system. The selective administration\\u000a of nutrients tends to show positive results in individuals who have suffered from malnutrition. To determine the effect of\\u000a the administration of cocoa powder on the peroxidation of lipids and glutathione level during the nutritional recovery in\\u000a brain, rats of 21 days old were subjected

  14. Nutritional management of very low birth weight infants: effects of different feeding regimens on calcium absorption and growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adequate nutrition is a key aspect of care for very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. However, it is difficult to provide adequate nutrition to VLBW infants who require fluid restriction and increased caloric density feedings due to bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The effects of these nutritional c...

  15. Bibliotherapy Revisited: Issues in Classroom Management. Developing Teachers' Awareness and Techniques to Help Children Cope Effectively with Stressful Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Marilyn N. Malloy

    2006-01-01

    Are teachers aware of the stress in their classrooms? Do teachers plan for stress control? Educators need to understand why stress is a part of classroom life and how it affects the teacher-student relationship. Bibliotherapy can be an intervention in stress management through books. The use of appropriate reading material to help solve emotional…

  16. Nutritional armor for the warfighter: can omega-3 fatty acids enhance stress resilience, wellness, and military performance?

    PubMed

    Deuster, Patricia

    2014-11-01

    This panel discussion, moderated by Dr. Deuster, illustrates the thinking of selected military leaders on the approach that must be taken to ensure the relationship between nutrition and performance. Insights and challenges these leaders face are provided, with consideration of the complex issues relating to sufficient scientific evidence, timing for Department of Defense policy, and the unique needs of service members. The discussion resulted in several recommendations. First, more nutritionists in uniform should be placed in/on the battlefield on every base and camp in Afghanistan and Iraq. Second, nutritionists/dietitians need to be working in the preventive arena, using the health promotion model and marketing to help shift behavior. Third, contract dietitians should be hired to work primarily in tertiary care. Dietitians must forward-deploy to implement preventive medicine and human performance optimization as it relates to nutrition and dietary supplementation. Unfortunately, almost all military dietitians are constrained within the medical model and we think of them just as "hospital providers." Finally, line units need to decide that dietitians are a requisite part of their force structure. Putting many dieticians in line units will allow our active duty members to believe diet and nutrition are important for performance. PMID:25373105

  17. Job Stress in Disaster Case Managers Working with Hurricane Ike Recovery

    E-print Network

    Forman, Megan Hajecate

    2011-10-21

    , the need for studies focused on stress in disaster case managers was made evident through the process. The following study of disaster case managers working with Hurricane Katrina provided what may serve as a somewhat reflective population for the case... managers in this study due to the many similarities present in experiences, especially work related, of participants After Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast of the United States in Summer 2005, FEMA rendered aid through a program referred to as KAT...

  18. Nutritional Methods

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search for Clinical Trials NCI Publications Espańol Nutritional Methods Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) supplements or diets ... for treating prostate cancer. Clinical Trials for Nutritional Methods Find Clinical Trials for Nutritional Methods Check for ...

  19. Aerobic conditioning and stress inoculation: A comparison of stress-management interventions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bonita C. Long

    1984-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of a jogging program [aerobic conditioning (AC)] with stress-inoculation training (SI) and a waiting list control (WL) in the treatment of chronic intermittent stress. The participants were community residents; 48 were females and 25 were males. Therapy sessions were conducted over a 10-week period with subjects meeting in small groups for 1 1\\/2 hours per

  20. Atmospheric application of trace amounts of nitric oxide enhances tolerance to salt stress and improves nutritional quality in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.).

    PubMed

    Du, Shao-Ting; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Hui-Jun; Zhang, Xue-Qing; Zhang, Ran-Ran

    2015-04-15

    The increased salinity in greenhouses has become a problem of great concern. In this study, it was observed that the salt-induced oxidative damages (indicated by MDA, H2O2 and antioxidant enzymes, including POD, SOD and CAT) could be alleviated by application of NO gas. Consequently, although both photosynthesis and growth in plants were inhibited by NaCl stress, they were restored by NO gas application, and the fresh and dry biomasses of edible parts increased by 60% and 27% over NaCl stress treatment, respectively. Furthermore, gaseous NO application also significantly elevated the levels of several antioxidation-associated compounds such as proline, ascorbate, glutathione, total phenolics and flavonoids, as well as the total antioxidant capacity (indicated by DPPH scavenging activity) in NaCl-treated plants. Keeping in mind all of the above, we concluded that atmospheric application of trace amounts of nitric oxide gas could be an effective strategy for improving both biomass production and nutrition quality in spinach under salt stress. PMID:25466105

  1. The management of sacral stress fractures: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Longhino, Valentina; Bonora, Cristina; Sansone, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    Summary Sacral stress fractures are an unusual but curable cause of low-back pain that should be considered in differential diagnosis, particularly in elderly osteoporotic patients. Rarely, they may occur in young women during the last trimester of pregnancy or a few weeks after delivery. Encompassing fatigue and insufficiency fractures, the occurrence of sacral stress fractures appears to be relatively under-reported, because of the general lack of awareness of this condition and the non-specificity of symptoms. Plain radiographs of the pelvis are the first exam performed but they are often inconclusive, whereas MRI and CT scans are the examinations of choice to establish the diagnosis. The purpose of this review is to increase awareness of this condition so that clinicians may consider sacral stress fracture in the differential diagnosis of low-back and pelvic pain, particularly in elderly patients without a history of trauma. PMID:22461824

  2. 'People-Work': Emotion Management, Stress and Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Sandi

    2004-01-01

    Workers involved in 'people-work' are expected to engage in a great deal of emotion management as they attempt to convey the appropriate emotions (which they may not genuinely feel) to their clients or customers whilst perhaps suppressing inappropriate ones. Should this emotion management be unsuccessful within some industries, a customer may be…

  3. Management of climatic heat stress risk in construction: a review of practices, methodologies, and future research.

    PubMed

    Rowlinson, Steve; Yunyanjia, Andrea; Li, Baizhan; Chuanjingju, Carrie

    2014-05-01

    Climatic heat stress leads to accidents on construction sites brought about by a range of human factors emanating from heat induced illness, and fatigue leading to impaired capability, physical and mental. It is an occupational characteristic of construction work in many climates and the authors take the approach of re-engineering the whole safety management system rather than focusing on incremental improvement, which is current management practice in the construction industry. From a scientific viewpoint, climatic heat stress is determined by six key factors: (1) air temperature, (2) humidity, (3) radiant heat, and (4) wind speed indicating the environment, (5) metabolic heat generated by physical activities, and (6) "clothing effect" that moderates the heat exchange between the body and the environment. By making use of existing heat stress indices and heat stress management processes, heat stress risk on construction sites can be managed in three ways: (1) control of environmental heat stress exposure through use of an action-triggering threshold system, (2) control of continuous work time (CWT, referred by maximum allowable exposure duration) with mandatory work-rest regimens, and (3) enabling self-paced working through empowerment of employees. Existing heat stress practices and methodologies are critically reviewed and the authors propose a three-level methodology for an action-triggering, localized, simplified threshold system to facilitate effective decisions by frontline supervisors. The authors point out the need for "regional based" heat stress management practices that reflect unique climatic conditions, working practices and acclimatization propensity by local workers indifferent geographic regions. The authors set out the case for regional, rather than international, standards that account for this uniqueness and which are derived from site-based rather than laboratory-based research. PMID:24079394

  4. Diagnosis and management of post-traumatic stress disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bradley D. Grinage

    2003-01-01

    Although post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a debilitating anxiety disorder that may cause significant distress and increased use of health resources, the condition often goes undiagnosed. The lifetime prevalence of PTSD in the United States is 8 to 9 percent, and approximately 25 to 30 percent of victims of significant trauma develop PTSD. The emotional and physical symptoms of PTSD

  5. Personality Priorities, Stress Management, and the Research Administrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankinship, David A.

    1995-01-01

    To understand causes of stress in the workplace, research administrators can use the theory of "personality priorities" to understand researcher behavior. The theory suggests each individual adopts rules to help make decisions and maintain a sense of belonging. Each of these personality priorities (control, comfort, pleasing, superiority) is…

  6. Managing Stress among Adult Women Students in Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lorraine G.; Schwartz, Robert A.; Bower, Beverly L.

    2000-01-01

    An extensive review of the literature and a campus-based study found high levels of stress resulting from parenting, financial, age and health concerns for adult women students enrolled at community colleges. Presents recommendations and suggestions to help: day care, orientation, academic and financial aid advising, peer advisers, healthy…

  7. Resistance and Resilience: The Final Frontier in Traumatic Stress Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George S. Everly; Jodi M. Jacobson

    This paper asserts that the constructs of resistance and resilience represent a domain rich in potential for a wide variety of applications in the field of traumatic stress. Resilience holds great potential for those working in applied settings such as public health planning and preparedness, Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) and business continuity, as well as transportation, law enforcement, fire suppression,

  8. Finnish occupational physicians' and nurses' experience of work related stress management: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen-Amoroso, Maritta

    2011-01-01

    Work-related stress has a strong influence on the health of workers. Occupational health care has an important role in assessing and managing this stress in collaboration with enterprises. The methods to reduce stress can be directed at the individual and at the organization as a whole. There is little information about stress handling methods in occupational health practices. This study aims to investigate these practices in Finnish occupational health physicians' and nurses' work. The data were generated through semi structured interviews of ten voluntary occupational physicians and eight occupational nurses in the metropolitan area of Finland in June 2009. The work-related stress was experienced as difficult to handle. There was no specific protocol for handling work-related stress in practice. Stress reduction activities were mostly randomly directed at the individual or the organizational level. Activities remained mainly on the individual level and were rarely allocated to the organization. There is a need for structured guidelines on how to manage work-related stress to assure standardized action on both the individual and organizational level. The roles of the physician, nurse and psychologist should be clarified in teamwork. Their collaborative activities should be directed also to the organisational level. PMID:22020021

  9. Stress management: a randomized study of cognitive behavioural therapy and yoga.

    PubMed

    Granath, Jens; Ingvarsson, Sara; von Thiele, Ulrica; Lundberg, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    In this study, a stress management program based on cognitive behavioural therapy principles was compared with a Kundaliniyoga program. A study sample of 26 women and 7 men from a large Swedish company were divided randomly into 2 groups for each of the different forms of intervention; a total of 4 groups. The groups were instructed by trained group leaders and 10 sessions were held with each of groups, over a period of 4 months. Psychological (self-rated stress and stress behaviour, anger, exhaustion, quality of life) and physiological (blood pressure, heart rate, urinary catecholamines, salivary cortisol) measurements obtained before and after treatment showed significant improvements on most of the variables in both groups as well as medium-to-high effect sizes. However, no significant difference was found between the 2 programs. The results indicate that both cognitive behaviour therapy and yoga are promising stress management techniques. PMID:16500773

  10. Responses of nitrogen metabolism and seed nutrition to drought stress in soybean genotypes differing in slow-wilting phenotype1

    PubMed Central

    Bellaloui, Nacer; Gillen, Anne M.; Mengistu, Alemu; Kebede, Hirut; Fisher, Daniel K.; Smith, James R.; Reddy, Krishna N.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in soybean breeding have resulted in genotypes that express the slow-wilting phenotype (trait) under drought stress conditions. The physiological mechanisms of this trait remain unknown due to the complexity of trait × environment interactions. The objective of this research was to investigate nitrogen metabolism and leaf and seed nutrients composition of the slow-wilting soybean genotypes under drought stress conditions. A repeated greenhouse experiment was conducted using check genotypes: NC-Roy (fast wilting), Boggs (intermediate in wilting); and NTCPR94-5157 and N04-9646 (slow-wilting, SLW) genotypes. Plants were either well-watered or drought stressed. Results showed that under well-watered conditions, nitrogen fixation (NF), nitrogen assimilation (NA), and leaf and seed composition differed between genotypes. Under drought stress, NF and NA were higher in NTCPR94-5157 and N04-9646 than in NC-Roy and Boggs. Under severe water stress, however, NA was low in all genotypes. Leaf water potential was significantly lower in checks (?2.00 MPa) than in the SLW genotypes (?1.68 MPa). Leaf and seed concentrations of K, P, Ca, Cu, Na, B were higher in SLW genotypes than in the checks under drought stress conditions. Seed protein, oleic acid, and sugars were higher in SLW genotypes, and oil, linoleic and linolenic acids were lower in SLW genotypes. This research demonstrated that K, P, Ca, Cu, Na, and B may be involved in SLW trait by maintaining homeostasis and osmotic regulation. Maintaining higher leaf water potential in NTCPR94-5157 and N04-9646 under drought stress could be a possible water conservation mechanism to maintain leaf turgor pressure. The increase in osmoregulators such as minerals, raffinose, and stachyose, and oleic acid could be beneficial for soybean breeders in selecting for drought stress tolerance. PMID:24339829

  11. Management of Tarsal Navicular Stress FracturesConservative Versus Surgical Treatment: A Meta-Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph S. Torg; James Moyer; John P. Gaughan; Barry P. Boden

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study was conducted to provide a statistical analysis of previously reported tarsal navicular stress fracture studies regarding the outcomes and effectiveness of conservative and surgical management.Study Design: Systematic review.Methods: A systematic review of the published literature was conducted utilizing MEDLINE through Ovid, PubMed, ScienceDirect, and EBSCOhost. Reports of studies that provided the type of tarsal navicular stress fracture

  12. Transobturator tapes are preferable over transvaginal tapes for the management of female stress urinary incontinence: For

    PubMed Central

    Rajamaheshwari, N.; Varghese, Lilly

    2009-01-01

    Tension-free midurethral slings have proven to have low morbidity and high success rates in the management of female stress urinary incontinence. Among midurethal slings, the transobtuator tapes has comparable success and satisfaction rates as the transvaginal tapes but with reduced risk of intra-operative bladder injury, shorter operating time and quicker return to activities. Thus, the transobturator tapes may be recommended as the primary choice for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence. PMID:19955692

  13. ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: surgery.

    PubMed

    Braga, M; Ljungqvist, O; Soeters, P; Fearon, K; Weimann, A; Bozzetti, F

    2009-08-01

    In modern surgical practice it is advisable to manage patients within an enhanced recovery protocol and thereby have them eating normal food within 1-3 days. Consequently, there is little room for routine perioperative artificial nutrition. Only a minority of patients may benefit from such therapy. These are predominantly patients who are at risk of developing complications after surgery. The main goals of perioperative nutritional support are to minimize negative protein balance by avoiding starvation, with the purpose of maintaining muscle, immune, and cognitive function and to enhance postoperative recovery. Several studies have demonstrated that 7-10 days of preoperative parenteral nutrition improves postoperative outcome in patients with severe undernutrition who cannot be adequately orally or enterally fed. Conversely, its use in well-nourished or mildly undernourished patients is associated with either no benefit or with increased morbidity. Postoperative parenteral nutrition is recommended in patients who cannot meet their caloric requirements within 7-10 days orally or enterally. In patients who require postoperative artificial nutrition, enteral feeding or a combination of enteral and supplementary parenteral feeding is the first choice. The main consideration when administering fat and carbohydrates in parenteral nutrition is not to overfeed the patient. The commonly used formula of 25 kcal/kg ideal body weight furnishes an approximate estimate of daily energy expenditure and requirements. Under conditions of severe stress requirements may approach 30 kcal/kg ideal body weights. In those patients who are unable to be fed via the enteral route after surgery, and in whom total or near total parenteral nutrition is required, a full range of vitamins and trace elements should be supplemented on a daily basis. PMID:19464088

  14. Comparison of two percutaneous radiological gastrostomy tubes in the nutritional management of ALS patients.

    PubMed

    Rio, Alan; Ampong, Mary Ann; Turner, Martin R; Shaw, Ashley S; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shaw, Chris E; Leigh, P Nigel; Sidhu, Paul S

    2005-09-01

    Patient care and minimizing complications post gastrostomy have to date received little attention in ALS patients. We compare the complications associated with pigtail and mushroom type percutaneous radiological gastrostomy tubes in this patient group. Patients requiring PRG received either Wills-Oglesby or the skin level Entristar. Retrospective review of the clinical notes was performed capturing demographic data, peristomal infection, tube displacement, tube failure, nutritional status, site of disease onset, and survival. Thirty-five patients (Group 1) had the Wills-Oglesby tube of which 14 (40%) tubes required replacement. The Entristar tube was inserted in 29 patients (Group 2) where 8 (28%) required replacement (NS). The incidence of infection was significantly lower with the Entristar tube, (p<0.001). The mean time to tube removal in Group 2 was 223 days (SD 147; range 71-494 days) due to 'buried bumper syndrome'. We conclude that the Entristar skin level gastrostomy tube is associated with a reduction in peristomal infection, tube failure and blockage compared with the Wills-Oglesby tube. PMID:16183559

  15. Nutritional factors in the prevention and management of coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Das, Undurti N

    2015-02-01

    Nutritional factors such as magnesium, folic acid, vitamins B12 and B6, L-arginine, and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) appear to be significantly beneficial for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and in the prevention and arresting the progression of HF and cardiac arrhythmias. Additionally, ingestion of adequate amounts of protein and maintaining normal concentrations of plasma albumin seem to be essential for these patients. These nutrients closely interact with the metabolism of L-arginine-nitric oxide (NO) system, essential fatty acids, and eicosanoids such that beneficial products such as NO, prostaglandin E1, prostacyclin, prostaglandin I3, lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins are generated and synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines is suppressed that results in platelet anti-aggregation, vasodilation, angiogenesis, and prevention of CAD, cardiac arrhythmias, and stabilization of HF. This implies that individuals at high risk for CAD, cardiac arrhythmias, and HF and those who have these diseases need to be screened for plasma levels of magnesium, folic acid, vitamins B12 and B6, L-arginine, NO, various PUFAs, lipoxin A4, resolvins, protectins, asymmetrical dimethylarginine (an endogenous inhibitor of NO), albumin, and various eicosanoids and cytokines and correct their abnormalities to restore normal physiology. PMID:25592005

  16. The Endosymbiont Hamiltonella Increases the Growth Rate of Its Host Bemisia tabaci during Periods of Nutritional Stress

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qi; Xie, Wen; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Liu, Baiming; Fang, Yong; Xu, Baoyun; Zhang, Youjun

    2014-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) harbors several bacterial symbionts. Among the secondary (facultative) symbionts, Hamiltonella has high prevalence and high infection frequencies, suggesting that it may be important for the biology and ecology of its hosts. Previous reports indicated that Hamiltonella increases whitefly fitness and, based on the complete sequencing of its genome, may have the ability to synthesize cofactors and amino acids that are required by its host but that are not sufficiently synthesized by the host or by the primary endosymbiont, Portiera. Here, we assessed the effects of Hamiltonella infection on the growth of B. tabaci reared on low-, standard-, or high-nitrogen diets. When B. tabaci was reared on a standard-nitrogen diet, no cost or benefit was associated with Hamiltonella infection. But, if we reared whiteflies on low-nitrogen diets, Hamiltonella-infected whiteflies often grew better than uninfected whiteflies. Furthermore, nitrogen levels in field-collected whiteflies indicated that the nutritional conditions in the field were comparable to the low-nitrogen diet in our laboratory experiment. These data suggest that Hamiltonella may play a previously unrecognized role as a nutritional mutualist in B. tabaci. PMID:24558462

  17. Post-traumatic stress disorder: Differential diagnosis and management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark B. Hamner; Sophie Robert

    2004-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that may develop after an individual experiences severe psychologic\\u000a trauma such as combat or rape. Characteristic symptoms of PTSD include re-experiencing symptoms, such as intrusive memories\\u000a or dreams of the event, avoidance of reminders of the event, and persistent symptoms of increased arousal such as insomnia\\u000a or hypervigilance. Chronic PTSD can result

  18. Variation in Broccoli Cultivar Phytochemical Content under Organic and Conventional Management Systems: Implications in Breeding for Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Erica N. C.; Lammerts van Bueren, Edith T.; Myers, James R.; Paulo, Maria Joăo; van Eeuwijk, Fred A.; Zhu, Ning; Juvik, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Organic agriculture requires cultivars that can adapt to organic crop management systems without the use of synthetic pesticides as well as genotypes with improved nutritional value. The aim of this study encompassing 16 experiments was to compare 23 broccoli cultivars for the content of phytochemicals associated with health promotion grown under organic and conventional management in spring and fall plantings in two broccoli growing regions in the US (Oregon and Maine). The phytochemicals quantified included: glucosinolates (glucoraphanin, glucobrassicin, neoglucobrassin), tocopherols (?-, ?-, ?-tocopherol) and carotenoids (lutein, zeaxanthin, ?-carotene). For glucoraphanin (17.5%) and lutein (13%), genotype was the major source of total variation; for glucobrassicin, region (36%) and the interaction of location and season (27.5%); and for neoglucobrassicin, both genotype (36.8%) and its interactions (34.4%) with season were important. For ?- and ?- tocopherols, season played the largest role in the total variation followed by location and genotype; for total carotenoids, genotype (8.41–13.03%) was the largest source of variation and its interactions with location and season. Overall, phytochemicals were not significantly influenced by management system. We observed that the cultivars with the highest concentrations of glucoraphanin had the lowest for glucobrassicin and neoglucobrassicin. The genotypes with high concentrations of glucobrassicin and neoglucobrassicin were the same cultivars and were early maturing F1 hybrids. Cultivars highest in tocopherols and carotenoids were open pollinated or early maturing F1 hybrids. We identified distinct locations and seasons where phytochemical performance was higher for each compound. Correlations among horticulture traits and phytochemicals demonstrated that glucoraphanin was negatively correlated with the carotenoids and the carotenoids were correlated with one another. Little or no association between phytochemical concentration and date of cultivar release was observed, suggesting that modern breeding has not negatively influenced the level of tested compounds. We found no significant differences among cultivars from different seed companies. PMID:25028959

  19. Tackling stress management, addiction, and suicide prevention in a predoctoral dental curriculum.

    PubMed

    Brondani, Mario A; Ramanula, Dhorea; Pattanaporn, Komkhamn

    2014-09-01

    Health care professionals, particularly dentists, are subject to high levels of stress. Without proper stress management, problems related to mental health and addiction and, to a lesser extent, deliberate self-harm such as suicide may arise. There is a lack of information on teaching methodologies employed to discuss stress management and suicide prevention in dental education. The purpose of this article is to describe a University of British Columbia Faculty of Dentistry module designed to address stress management and suicide prevention, using students' personal reflections to illustrate the impact of the pedagogies used. The module enrolls more than 200 students per year and has sessions tailored to the discussion of stress management and suicide prevention. The pedagogies include standardized patients, invited guest lectures, in-class activities, video presentation, and self-reflections. More than 500 students' self-reflections collected over the past five years illustrate the seriousness of the issues discussed and the level of discomfort students experience when pondering such issues. The instructors hope to have increased students' awareness of the stressors in their profession. Further studies are needed to unravel the extent to which such pedagogy influences a balanced practice of dentistry. PMID:25179925

  20. Canadian Diabetes Association National Nutrition Committee Technical Review: Nonnutritive Intense Sweeteners in Diabetes Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Réjeanne Gougeon; Mark Spidel; Kristy Lee; Catherine J. Field

    2004-01-01

    The current Canadian Diabetes Association Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada state that up to 10% of daily calories can be derived from sugars. However, individuals with diabetes may also be relying on alternative, low-calorie sweetening agents (providing little or no calories along with sweet taste) to con- trol carbohydrate intake, blood glucose, weight

  1. Organic Highbush Blueberry Production Systems Research – Management of Plant Nutrition, Irrigation Requirements, and Weeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 0.4 ha planting of blueberry was established in October 2006 to evaluate the effects of cultivar (Duke and Liberty), bed type (flat versus raised beds), weed management (sawdust mulch and hand-weed control; sawdust+compost mulch with acetic acid, flaming, and hand control used as needed; and weed ...

  2. Organic blueberry production systems: management of plant nutrition, irrigation requirements, and weeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A long-term systems trial was established to evaluate management practices for organic production of northern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.). The factorial experiment included two planting bed treatments (flat and raised beds), source and rate of fertilizer (feather meal and fish emuls...

  3. VINEYARD FLOOR MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES AFFECT SOIL PROPERTIES & MICROBIOLOGY, WATER RELATIONS, AND CROP NUTRITION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A long-term comparison of various vineyard floor management practices (weed control and cover crops) indicates that weed control treatments had no impact on soil microbial biomass, but had a significant interactive effect with the rye cover crop on mycorrhizal colonization of grapevine roots, presum...

  4. Organic highbush blueberry production systems research – management of plant nutrition, irrigation requirements, weeds, and economic sustainability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 0.4 ha planting was established in October 2006 to evaluate the effects of cultivar (Duke and Liberty), bed type ("flat ground" and raised beds), weed management [sawdust mulch and hand weed control; compost plus sawdust mulch with acetic acid, flaming, and hand control used as needed; and landsca...

  5. Role of diet and nutritional management in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jian-Gao; Cao, Hai-Xia

    2013-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a spectrum ranging from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, which causes an increased risk of cirrhosis, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular complications. With the worldwide growing incidence of obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and unhealthy dietary pattern, NAFLD has currently been recognized as a major health burden. Dietary patterns and nutrients are the important contributors to the development, progression, and treatment of NAFLD and associated metabolic comorbidities. Generally, hypercaloric diet, especially rich in trans/saturated fat and cholesterol, and fructose-sweetened beverages seem to increase visceral adiposity and stimulate hepatic lipid accumulation and progression into non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, whereas reducing caloric intake, increasing soy protein and whey consumption, and supplement of monounsaturated fatty acids, omega-3 fatty acids, and probiotics have preventive and therapeutic effects. In addition, choline, fiber, coffee, green tea, and light alcohol drinking might be protective factors for NAFLD. Based on available data, at least 3-5% of weight loss, achieved by hypocaloric diet alone or in conjunction with exercise and behavioral modification, generally reduces hepatic steatosis, and up to 10% weight loss may be needed to improve hepatic necroinflammation. A sustained adherence to diet rather than the actual diet type is a major predictor of successful weight loss. Moreover, a healthy diet has benefits beyond weight reduction on NAFLD patients whether obese or of normal weight. Therefore, nutrition serves as a major route of prevention and treatment of NAFLD, and patients with NAFLD should have an individualized diet recommendation. PMID:24251710

  6. Associations between immunologic, inflammatory, and oxidative stress markers with severity of depressive symptoms: an analysis of the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Kobrosly, Roni; van Wijngaarden, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated increased levels of serum markers of systemic inflammation and immune system function among individuals with depressive symptoms. Despite these observations, the biological mechanisms behind this association remain elusive. The objective of the present analysis was to examine the individual and joint associations of white blood cell counts, platelet counts, and C-reactive protein with depression severity and to determine whether oxidative stress might mediate these associations. We conducted an analysis of 3867 subjects from the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey. Ordinal logistic regression was used to assess associations between three levels of depression symptom severity (as measured by the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire) and serum C-reactive protein, white blood cell counts, platelet counts, and four surrogate markers of oxidative stress. Covariates included sex, age, smoking status, physical activity, education, poverty to income ratio, as well as medication use and medical conditions influencing inflammation levels. In separate models, the risk of moderate to severe depression was significantly greater in the highest quartiles of CRP (OR=1.84. 95 percent confidence interval (CI)=1.35-2.52), WBC (OR=1.70, CI=1.31-2.19), and platelet counts (OR=1.41, CI=1.13-1.76) after adjusting for basic sociodemographic and behavioral factors. After additional adjustment for medication use and oxidative stress surrogate measures, the highest quartile of WBC counts remained associated with depression (OR=1.60, CI=1.23-2.09). Adjustment for oxidative stress measures did not substantially affect estimated associations of inflammation/immunologic markers. In summary, we observed significantly elevated white blood cell counts among subjects with moderate and severe depression, and oxidative stress and a medical history of inflammatory diseases do not appear to mediate this association. Although limited through its use of cross-sectional data, this is the first analysis to simultaneously consider immunologic and oxidative stress markers. Further research is needed to identify the biological basis for this persistent association. PMID:19853625

  7. Nature-Based Stress Management Course for Individuals at Risk of Adverse Health Effects from Work-Related Stress—Effects on Stress Related Symptoms, Workability and Sick Leave

    PubMed Central

    Sahlin, Eva; Ahlborg, Gunnar; Vega Matuszczyk, Josefa; Grahn, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    Sick leave due to stress-related disorders is increasing in Sweden after a period of decrease. To avoid that individuals living under heavy stress develop more severe stress-related disorders, different stress management interventions are offered. Self-assessed health, burnout-scores and well-being are commonly used as outcome measures. Few studies have used sick-leave to compare effects of stress interventions. A new approach is to use nature and garden in a multimodal stress management context. This study aimed to explore effects on burnout, work ability, stress-related health symptoms, and sick leave for 33 women participating in a 12-weeks nature based stress management course and to investigate how the nature/garden activities were experienced. A mixed method approach was used. Measures were taken at course start and three follow-ups. Results showed decreased burnout-scores and long-term sick leaves, and increased work ability; furthermore less stress-related symptoms were reported. Tools and strategies to better handle stress were achieved and were widely at use at all follow-ups. The garden and nature content played an important role for stress relief and for tools and strategies to develop. The results from this study points to beneficial effects of using garden activities and natural environments in a stress management intervention. PMID:25003175

  8. Nature-based stress management course for individuals at risk of adverse health effects from work-related stress-effects on stress related symptoms, workability and sick leave.

    PubMed

    Sahlin, Eva; Ahlborg, Gunnar; Matuszczyk, Josefa Vega; Grahn, Patrik

    2014-06-01

    Sick leave due to stress-related disorders is increasing in Sweden after a period of decrease. To avoid that individuals living under heavy stress develop more severe stress-related disorders, different stress management interventions are offered. Self-assessed health, burnout-scores and well-being are commonly used as outcome measures. Few studies have used sick-leave to compare effects of stress interventions. A new approach is to use nature and garden in a multimodal stress management context. This study aimed to explore effects on burnout, work ability, stress-related health symptoms, and sick leave for 33 women participating in a 12-weeks nature based stress management course and to investigate how the nature/garden activities were experienced. A mixed method approach was used. Measures were taken at course start and three follow-ups. Results showed decreased burnout-scores and long-term sick leaves, and increased work ability; furthermore less stress-related symptoms were reported. Tools and strategies to better handle stress were achieved and were widely at use at all follow-ups. The garden and nature content played an important role for stress relief and for tools and strategies to develop. The results from this study points to beneficial effects of using garden activities and natural environments in a stress management intervention. PMID:25003175

  9. Stress in Adults after a Disaster: Warning Signs and Management

    E-print Network

    Warren, Judith L.

    2005-09-30

    after a disaster. This is particularly im- portant if stress seems to interfere with your daily activities, such as work, school or family responsi- bilities. Help is available from many sources: your pastor or a clergy member, a mental health profes...- sional, a community mental health center or your doctor. All of these people can refer you to an ap- propriate source of help. In addition to family and friends, other sources of help might include sup- port groups at work or in the community. Because...

  10. The group of soil of protection and the group of plant nutrition of the ETH and the FiBL propose two MSc theses on on-farm management of organic matter in the project "Zinc biofortification of Wheat

    E-print Network

    Fischlin, Andreas

    for sustainable production of nutritionally safe, bio-fortified wheat. The two first parts Management in Sustainable Agriculture (ZOMM)" Supervision: Prof Emmanuel Frossard production. Bio-fortification of crops with Zn addresses both problems simultaneously

  11. Stress and anxiety (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Physical activity and relaxation techniques can help reduce stress and anxiety. Proper nutrition can also help the body to handle stress better by keeping it running optimally. If stress becomes unmanageable, there ...

  12. A controlled pilot study of stress management training of elderly patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Luskin, Frederic; Reitz, Megan; Newell, Kathryn; Quinn, Thomas Gregory; Haskell, William

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of stress management training on quality of life, functional capacity, and heart rate variability in elderly patients with New York Heart Association class I-III congestive heart failure (CHF). While substantial research exists on stress management training for patients with coronary heart disease, there are few data on the value of psychosocial training on patients with CHF. Thirty-three multiethnic patients (mean age, 66+/-9 years) were assigned through incomplete randomization to one of two treatment groups or a wait-listed control group. The 14 participants who completed the treatment attended eight training sessions during a 10-week period. The training consisted of 75-minute sessions adapted from the Freeze-Frame stress management program developed by the Institute of HeartMath. Subjects were assessed at baseline and again at the completion of the training. Depression, stress management, optimism, anxiety, emotional distress, and functional capacity were evaluated, as well as heart rate variability. Significant improvements (p<0.05) were noted in perceived stress, emotional distress, 6-minute walk, and depression, and positive trends were noted in each of the other psychosocial measures. The 24-hour heart rate variability showed no significant changes in autonomic tone. The authors noted that CHF patients were willing study participants and their emotional coping and functional capacity were enhanced. This program offers a simple and cost-effective way to augment medical management of CHF. Given the incompleteness of CHF medical management and the exploding interest in complementary medical intervention, it seems imperative that further work in psychosocial treatment be undertaken. PMID:12417824

  13. Development and application of a web-based nutritional management program to improve dietary behaviors for the prevention of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon; Lee, Min June; Kang, Hee Cheol; Lee, Mee Sook; Yoon, Sun

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a Web-based nutritional management program for the prevention of metabolic syndrome and to evaluate how the program affects health-related behaviors and the health status of office workers with metabolic syndrome risk factors. For the pilot test of the Web-based nutritional management program, 29 employees (19 males, 10 females) with more than one metabolic syndrome risk factor participated in the Web-based nutritional management program for 16 weeks. Participants visited the Web site more than two times per week and completed customized assessments of health status, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, dietary habits, food intake, ideal body weight, energy requirements, and exercise. Subjects had a significant decrease in body weight, waist circumference, body mass index (P < .01 in males, P < .05 in females), and body fat (P < .01 in males). The frequency of dietary habits such as eating snacks, eating out, and dining with others decreased, whereas the frequency of intake of foods such as whole grains, seaweed, fruit, and low-fat milk increased after intervention. After 16 weeks, program satisfaction was evaluated using a Web evaluation questionnaire, and most of the participants were highly satisfied with Web site components such as the loading speed, configuration, privacy, design, functionality, and contents. PMID:24651253

  14. Stress Management-Augmented Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention for African American Women: A Pilot, Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Tiffany L.; Krukowski, Rebecca; Love, ShaRhonda J.; Eddings, Kenya; DiCarlo, Marisha; Chang, Jason Y.; Prewitt, T. Elaine; West, Delia Smith

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between chronic stress and weight management efforts may be a concern for African American (AA) women, who have a high prevalence of obesity, high stress levels, and modest response to obesity treatment. This pilot study randomly assigned 44 overweight/obese AA women with moderate to high stress levels to either a 12-week…

  15. Stress management and sexual health of young adults: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dimou, P A; Bacopoulou, F; Darviri, C; Chrousos, G P

    2014-11-01

    Young people often experience excessive stress that definitely undermines their sexual life and leads them to adopt risky sexual behaviours. As such, the design and application of a stress management programme in this particular age group is, undoubtedly, a crucial matter. In this parallel randomised controlled trial, 60 psychology students of the Panteion University of Athens, aged 18–20, were randomly assigned to undergo either an 8-week stress management programme (n = 30; diaphragmatic breathing–progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery, twice a day) or not (n = 30). Self-reported validated measures were used to evaluate stress, stressful life events, health locus of control, general health status, sexual behaviours, sexual desire, satisfaction from sexual life and interpersonal relationships. Between-group analyses revealed statistically significant differences in internal health locus of control and general health evaluation. Within the intervention group analyses showed reductions in BMI, stress, the ‘chance’ subscale of multidimensional health locus of control (MHLC) and greater satisfaction from sexual life. No other significant change was reported. We deem that our results should encourage relevant future studies. PMID:25436273

  16. Family Ranching and Farming: A Consensus Management Model to Improve Family Functioning and Decrease Work Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Toni Schindler; Fetsch, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    Notes that internal and external threats could squeeze ranch and farm families out of business. Offers six-step Consensus Management Model that combines strategic planning with psychoeducation/family therapy. Describes pilot test with intergenerational ranch family that indicated improvements in family functioning, including reduced stress and…

  17. A Systematic Review of Stress-Management Interventions for Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Reynard, Alison K.; Rae-Grant, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to identify stress-management interventions used for people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and systematically evaluate the efficacy of these interventions. Methods: Several strategies were used to search for studies reported in articles published up to 2013. Results: Our initial search retrieved 117 publications, of which 8 met our criteria for review. Of the eight studies, one provided Class I evidence, five provided Class III evidence, and two provided Class IV evidence for the efficacy of stress-management interventions according to the evidence classification established by the American Academy of Neurology. Most studies showed positive changes in outcomes assessed; however, the range of methodological quality among the published studies made it difficult to draw conclusions. Conclusions: The promising findings for stress-management interventions highlight the need for future studies. Additional large, prospective, multicenter studies will help to define the role of stress-management interventions in the treatment and course of MS. Furthermore, including outcome measures based on biological and clinical markers of disease will prove useful in understanding potential underlying mechanisms. PMID:25337056

  18. On the Horizon. Biofeedback and Self-Management of Stress in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Edward W.; Walton, Wilbur T.

    1979-01-01

    The use of biofeedback in the self management of stress in school children is discussed. Educational research on biofeedback suggests that biofeedback training can help children to learn relaxation skills, reduce school-related anxiety, and gain a measure of self-discipline and confidence. (PHR)

  19. Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM): updated review of findings, 1998–2002

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raymond B Flannery; George S Everly

    2004-01-01

    Critical incident stress management (CISM) represents a departure from earlier univariate crisis intervention strategies. CISM is a comprehensive, multicomponent, crisis intervention approach that includes preincident training, acute care interventions, and postincident response follow-up. The first review of this literature included published reports through 1997. This report covers the period from 1998–2002. A databased search revealed 20 papers of specific CISM

  20. Stress Management and Anxiety Reduction Through EMG Biofeedback/Relaxation Training upon Junior High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Darrel

    The effectiveness of electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback/relaxation training on the stress management and anxiety levels of 18 eighth-grade students was tested. Chapter I serves as an introduction and presents information on the need for the study, hypotheses, limitations, and definition of terms. Chapter II contains a review of related…

  1. Social Validity of the Critical Incident Stress Management Model for School-Based Crisis Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Julie Q.

    2007-01-01

    The Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) model for crisis intervention was developed for use with emergency service personnel. Research regarding the use of the CISM model has been conducted among civilians and high-risk occupation groups with mixed results. The purpose of this study is to examine the social validity of the CISM model for…

  2. Prevention and Management of Pain and Stress in the Neonate (RE9945)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    This statement is intended for health care professionals caring for neonates (preterm to 1 month of age). The objectives of this statement are to: 1. Increase awareness that neonates experience pain; 2. Provide a physiological basis for neonatal pain and stress assessment and management by health care professionals; 3. Make recommendations for reduced exposure of the neonate to noxious stimuli

  3. Promoting Stress Management: The Role of Comprehensive School Health Programs. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Marilyn S.

    This Digest examines how Comprehensive School Health Programs (CSHPs) may promote stress management in children and adolescents. CSHPs contain four key elements. The first element, community participation and focus, can be achieved through school health newsletters, health fairs, local newspaper, radio, and television promotions, and guest…

  4. Pakistan Vt. J., 22(4): 2002 STRESS MANAGEMENT FOLLOWING VACCINATION AGAINST

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in broilers and its management by using multivitaminsand aspirin. The parameters studied were heterophil gain and minimum stress, while thé aspirin therapy did not show any significant différence. Key words/4 lit. of drinking water. c) Aspirin (Shamsi Pharma) containing acetyl salicylic acid. Dose: 180 mg

  5. Stress Management Strategies of Secondary School Teachers in Nigeria. Short Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arikewuyo, M. Olalekan

    2004-01-01

    The study provides empirical evidence for the management of stress by teachers of secondary schools in Nigeria. A total of 3466 teachers, drawn from secondary schools in Ogun State of Nigeria, returned their questionnaire for the study. Data were analysed using simple percentage and chi-square. The findings indicate that teachers frequently use…

  6. The Development of a Framework for a Comprehensive Approach to Stress Management Interventions at Work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sabir I. Giga; Cary L. Cooper; Brian Faragher

    2003-01-01

    This overview shows that organizations adopt a variety of programs to prevent and manage stress at various levels of the organization. Programs vary widely in their objectives, structure, and target groups, and there is some skepticism regarding the practicality of using off-the-peg programs that have been developed without considering specific organizational requirements. Organizational policies to sustain and develop employee health

  7. Management Characteristics and Employee Stress and Burnout as Reported in the Periodical Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Darlene Ann; Blazek, Ron

    1997-01-01

    Describes a content analysis of 106 articles in business journals that attempted to determine the role and responsibility of management as it relates to employee stress or burnout. Results are compared to those of an earlier study of the literature of reference librarianship, and suggestions for future research are included. (Author/LRW)

  8. How Stress Management Improves Quality of Life after Treatment for Breast Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antoni, Michael H.; Lechner, Suzanne C.; Kazi, Aisha; Wimberly, Sarah R.; Sifre, Tammy; Urcuyo, Kenya R.; Phillips, Kristin; Gluck, Stefan; Carver, Charles S.

    2006-01-01

    The range of effects of psychosocial interventions on quality of life among women with breast cancer remains uncertain. Furthermore, it is unclear which components of multimodal interventions account for such effects. To address these issues, the authors tested a 10-week group cognitive-behavioral stress management intervention among 199 women…

  9. Stress Management in the Health Care Setting: Matching Interventions with Patient Coping Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martelli, Michael F.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Prospective preprosthetic oral surgery patients were presented with a problem-focused, emotion-focused, or mixed-focus stress management intervention. The mixed-focus intervention produced the best overall response to surgery; the emotion-focused intervention produced the lowest adjustment levels. Better adjustment and satisfaction and lower…

  10. Stress and Activity Management: Group Treatment for Cancer Patients and Spouses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinrich, Richard L.; Schag, Cyndie Coscarelli

    1985-01-01

    Studied 51 ambulatory patients with commonly occurring cancers and 25 of their spouses to evaluate a group stress and activity management treatment program. Found support for unique effects of the treatment intervention, but also support for improvement in psychosocial adjustment for patients and spouses with the passage of time. (Author/MCF)

  11. Yoga for Stress Management Program as a Complementary Alternative Counseling Resource in a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milligan, Colleen K.

    2006-01-01

    A Yoga for Stress Management Program (YSMP) that served as a complementary alternative therapy resource was successfully implemented at a midsize, predominantly undergraduate university. It was offered in addition to traditional treatments for student mental health. Counselors, Residence Life staff, and faculty found that the program was useful…

  12. The Frazzled Principal's Wellness Plan: Reclaiming Time, Managing Stress, and Creating a Healthy Lifestyle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queen, J. Allen; Queen, Patsy S.

    2004-01-01

    This wellness guide for today's busy principals, school leaders, supervisors, and administrators has been custom crafted by the authors to address the stresses of managing workplace environments, juggling time and competing priorities, learning to delegate, balancing personal and professional agendas, and creating win-win situations. Special…

  13. Developing and Implementing a Stress Management Program for Special Educators in a Juvenile Detention Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Joan R.

    This paper describes a practicum designed to increase the stress management skills of 10 special educators working in a juvenile detention center. Teachers at the juvenile detention center were taking an inordinate amount of sick leave and engaging in behaviors that were counter-productive to their delivery of educational services to detained…

  14. Design and fabrication of a stress-managed Nb3Sn wind and react dipole

    E-print Network

    Noyes, Patrick Daniel

    2007-09-17

    A new approach to high-field dipole design is being developed at Texas A&M University. The goal of the development is to facilitate the use of high-field conductors (Nb3 and Bi-2212) and to manage Lorentz stress and magnetization so that field...

  15. Nutritional adequacy of plant-based diets for weight management: observations from the NHANES.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Bonnie

    2014-07-01

    Observational studies have shown that body mass indexes of vegetarians are lower than those of nonvegetarians and that caloric intake of vegetarians is typically lower than that of nonvegetarians, suggesting that a vegetarian diet could be an approach for weight management. However, vegetarians may be at risk of inadequate intakes of certain vitamins and minerals. Population-based studies indicate that vegetarians have lower mean intakes of vitamin B-12 and zinc and higher intakes of fiber, magnesium, and vitamins A, C, and E than do nonvegetarians. Usual intake data suggest a similar prevalence of inadequacy between vegetarians and nonvegetarians for magnesium and vitamins A, C, and E, with both groups at high risk of inadequate intakes of these nutrients. These same data report that vegetarians have a higher prevalence of inadequacy for iron, vitamin B-12, protein, and zinc than do nonvegetarians. Although mean intake data suggest that a vegetarian diet may be a useful approach for weight management, combined with energy restriction it may have a detrimental effect on diet quality. Mean intakes of fiber, vitamins A and C, magnesium, and iron were significantly lower for vegetarians with energy intakes ?500 kcal below Estimated Energy Requirements than for vegetarians who did not restrict energy. Vegetarian diets should be recommended for weight management; however, care should be taken to optimize food intake to provide adequate intakes of nutrients of concern when energy restriction is used in conjunction with a vegetarian dietary pattern. At any caloric amount, vegetarians should optimize intakes of vitamin B-12, zinc, and protein; and both vegetarians and nonvegetarians need to increase intakes of calcium, magnesium, fiber, and vitamins A, C, and E. PMID:24871478

  16. Evaluation of two diets in the nutritional management of cats with naturally occurring chronic diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Laflamme, Dorothy S; Long, Grace M

    2004-01-01

    Feeding either a highly digestible, moderate-carbohydrate diet or a highly digestible, high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet resulted in significant (P < .05) improvements in fecal scores in 71% of cats with chronic, nonspecific diarrhea. Approximately 58% of the cats improved on either diet, with no significant differences between the two diets regarding the percentage of cats responding or the degree of response. These results suggest that dietary management may be helpful in cats with chronic diarrhea. If cats do not respond within 1 month, an alternative diet should be considered. PMID:15150729

  17. Navicular stress reactions in runners: a review of evaluation and management of a competitive athlete.

    PubMed

    Yoho, Robert M; Wells, Shevonne K

    2011-01-01

    Navicular stress injuries in athletes can be devastating. Clinical findings are frequently nonspecific until significant progression of the abnormality has occurred. The use of diagnostic imaging techniques early in the discovery period increases the likelihood of establishing an immediate diagnosis and avoids frank fracture of the navicular bone. Delayed diagnosis of navicular stress injuries in athletes can cause dire consequences. The physician must be aware of the injury in establishing a high index of clinical suspicion. The timing and sequencing of diagnostic imaging studies is essential in establishing a diagnosis to manage the patient and minimize time away from competition. This case study examines the history and management of an elite high school track athlete who sustained a navicular stress injury. The timing and use of diagnostic imaging studies is reviewed. PMID:21957277

  18. Current nutrition practices in adult lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tynan, Cameo; Hasse, Jeanette M

    2004-12-01

    Nutrition therapy is vital to the overall management of lung transplant recipients. The objective of this review is to outline the current applications of pre- and posttransplant nutrition management of the adult lung transplant recipient. Pretransplant nutrition therapy decisions are based on cause of end-stage lung disease, transplant indications, and pretransplant nutritional status. Maintaining adequate nutrient stores is the major goal of nutrition therapy for patients awaiting transplantation. In the posttransplant course, several gastrointestinal (GI) complications such as gastroesophageal reflux, gastroparesis, and distal intestinal obstruction syndrome complicate nutritional recovery. Long-term nutrition therapy for lung transplant recipients is aimed at management of common comorbid conditions such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, osteoporosis, and hyperlipidemia. Lung transplantation outcomes are steadily improving; however, much has yet to be explored to improve the nutrition management of these patients in both the pre- and posttransplantation course. PMID:16215158

  19. Nutrition Counter

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Counter: A Reference For The Kidney Patient AAKP Nutrition Counter: A Reference For The Kidney Patient Buy ... Harum RD, CSR, LD Certified Specialist in Renal Nutrition, Miami, Florida Reviewed by: 2005 – Maria Karalis, MBA, ...

  20. Nutrition Frontiers

    Cancer.gov

    The Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention at NCI issues a quarterly electronic newsletter, Nutrition Frontiers, that highlights emerging evidence linking diet to cancer prevention and showcases recent findings about who will likely benefit most from dietary change.

  1. Mission Nutrition

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    swinward

    2010-04-12

    Here are the links for you healthy resources! First: Watch the Nutrition Video by clicking on the Link Nutrition Video Second: Click on 10 Reasons... to read about eating healthy 10 Reasons... Third: Click on the other links to play fun games and do nutrition activities. Fabo s Train Adventure Focus on Food Fridge Game Pyramid Game Focus on Food ...

  2. Nutrition Expert

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Nutrition Expert is a group of Registered dietitians providing nutrition information to the web community online. Topics include weight loss, cholesterol, sports nutrition, and diabetes, and additional directories are under construction. They also offer a for-fee telephone consulting service which lets you pay by check over the phone.

  3. Northern Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Territories Dept. of Education, Yellowknife.

    This guide contains nutrition information and nutrition education strategies aimed at residents of the Canadian Arctic. Section I: (1) defines nutrition terms; (2) describes the sources and functions of essential nutrients; (3) explains Canada's food guide and special considerations for the traditional northern Native diet and for lactose…

  4. Weight loss resistance: a further consideration for the nutritional management of obese Equidae.

    PubMed

    Argo, Caroline McG; Curtis, Gemma C; Grove-White, Dai; Dugdale, Alexandra H A; Barfoot, Clare F; Harris, Patricia A

    2012-11-01

    Evidence-based, weight loss management advice is required to address equine obesity. Changes in body mass (BM), body condition score (BCS), heart (HG) and belly circumference (BG), direct (ultrasonographic) and indirect (D(2)O dilution, bioelectrical impedance analysis [BIA]) measures of body fat as well as indices of insulin resistance (IR) were monitored in 12 overweight (BCS ? 7/9) horses and ponies of mixed breed and gender for 16 weeks. Animals were randomly assigned to two groups (Group 1, n=6, BCS 7.6/9 ± 0.6, 489 ± 184.6 kg; Group 2, n=6, BCS 8.1/9 ± 0.6, 479 ± 191.5 kg). Daily dry matter intake (DMI) was restricted to 1.25% BM as one of two, near-isocaloric (DE ?0.115 MJ/kg BM/day), forage-based diets (Group 1, 0.8% BM chaff-based feed: 0.45% BM hay; Group 2, 1.15% BM hay: 0.1% BM nutrient-balancer). Statistical modelling revealed considerable between-animal heterogeneity in proportional weight losses (0.16-0.55% of Week 1 BM weekly). The magnitude of weight loss resistance (WLR) or sensitivity to dietary restriction was independent of diet or any measured outset variable and was largely (65%) attributed to animal identity. Predicted rates of weight loss decreased over time. BCS and BIA were poor estimates of D(2)O-derived body fat%. Reciprocal changes in depths of retroperitoneal and subcutaneous adipose tissues were evident. Changes in BG were associated with losses in retroperitoneal fat and BM (r(2), 0.67 and 0.79). Indices of IR improved for 9/12 animals by Week 16. For obese animals, weight loss should be initiated by restricting forage DMI to 1.25% BM. Subsequent restriction to 1% BM may be warranted for WLR animals. PMID:23117030

  5. Codon usage bias and tRNA over-expression in Buchnera aphidicola after aromatic amino acid nutritional stress on its host Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    PubMed

    Charles, Hubert; Calevro, Federica; Vinuelas, José; Fayard, Jean-Michel; Rahbe, Yvan

    2006-01-01

    Codon usage bias and relative abundances of tRNA isoacceptors were analysed in the obligate intracellular symbiotic bacterium, Buchnera aphidicola from the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, using a dedicated 35mer oligonucleotide microarray. Buchnera is archetypal of organisms living with minimal metabolic requirements and presents a reduced genome with high-evolutionary rate. Codonusage in Buchnera has been overcome by the high mutational bias towards AT bases. However, several lines of evidence for codon usage selection are given here. A significant correlation was found between tRNA relative abundances and codon composition of Buchnera genes. A significant codon usage bias was found for the choice of rare codons in Buchnera: C-ending codons are preferred in highly expressed genes, whereas G-ending codons are avoided. This bias is not explained by GC skew in the bacteria and might correspond to a selection for perfect matching between codon-anticodon pairs for some essential amino acids in Buchnera proteins. Nutritional stress applied to the aphid host induced a significant overexpression of most of the tRNA isoacceptors in bacteria. Although, molecular regulation of the tRNA operons in Buchnera was not investigated, a correlation between relative expression levels and organization in transcription unit was found in the genome of Buchnera. PMID:16963497

  6. Food Products Made With Glycomacropeptide, a Low Phenylalanine Whey Protein, Provide a New Alternative to Amino Acid-Based Medical Foods for Nutrition Management of Phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Van Calcar, Sandra C.; Ney, Denise M.

    2012-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU), an inborn error in phenylalanine (phe) metabolism, requires lifelong nutrition management with a low-phe diet, which includes a phe-free amino acid-based medical formula to provide the majority of an individual’s protein needs. Compliance with this diet is often difficult for older children, adolescents and adults with PKU. The whey protein glycomacropeptide (GMP) is ideally suited for the PKU diet since it is naturally low in phe. Nutritionally complete, acceptable medical foods and beverages can be made with GMP to increase the variety of protein sources for the PKU diet. As an intact protein, GMP improves protein utilization and increases satiety compared with amino acids. Thus, GMP provides a new, more physiologic source of low-phe dietary protein for those with PKU. PMID:22818728

  7. A Systematic Review of Biopsychosocial Training Programs for the Self-Management of Emotional Stress: Potential Applications for the Military

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Shawn S.; Jonas, Wayne B.; Walter, Joan A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Combat-exposed troops and their family members are at risk for stress reactions and related disorders. Multimodal biopsychosocial training programs incorporating complementary and alternative self-management techniques have the potential to reduce stress-related symptoms and dysfunction. Such training can preempt or attenuate the posttraumatic stress response and may be effectively incorporated into the training cycle for deploying and redeploying troops and their families. A large systematic review was conducted to survey the literature on multimodal training programs for the self-management of emotional stress. This report is an overview of the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) identified in this systematic review. Select programs such as mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Cognitive Behavioral Stress Management, Autogenic Training, Relaxation Response Training, and other meditation and mind-body skills practices are highlighted, and the feasibility of their implementation within military settings is addressed. PMID:24174982

  8. Graduate Procedures Master of Science in Food and Nutrition Services and Coordinated Program

    E-print Network

    Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

    1 Graduate Procedures Master of Science in Food and Nutrition Services and Coordinated Program Department of Nutrition and Hospitality Management The Department of Nutrition and Hospitality Management combines resources of the following to meet its mission

  9. Innovative work behavior of managers: Implications regarding stressful challenges of modernized public- and private-sector organizations

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sudeshna Basu; Ray, Anjali

    2009-01-01

    Background: The present study was firstly aimed to find out the nature of stressful life events arising out of the innovative challenges in modernized organizations; and secondly, it tried to identify the relationship between innovative work behavior of managers and the levels of stress arising out of stressful events in modernized organizations (public and private) in West Bengal. Materials and Methods: Data was collected from a sample of 200 managers, by using 3 tools (General Information Schedule, Life Event Inventory and Innovative Work Behavior Scale) through a face-to-face interview. Responses were subjected to both quantitative and qualitative analyses. The data was statistically treated for ‘t’ and ANOVA. Results: Data highlighted the fact that the qualitative profile of stressful events in the lives of managers expressed specificity in terms of their organizational type (public- and private-sector modernized organizations), and levels of stress from stressful life events were significantly higher among the modernized private-sector managers than those among public-sector managers. The prevalence of innovative work behavior was moderately higher among managers of private-sector modernized organizations than their counterparts in public-sector organizations. The trends of innovative work behavior of the managers indicated much variability due to interaction of their level of perceived stressful challenges for innovation and the global forces of change that have unleashed dynamic, systematic and higher expectation level from them. PMID:21180486

  10. Stress

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Deaton

    2011-06-10

    This project collects resources for studying mental health and stress issues with middle schoolers. Teens and stress Science NetLinks: The Laughing Brain 2: A Good Laugh Dealing with anger Stress-o-meter Look at each of the above sites. Choose one and read the content. Write a one-paragraph summary. Play interactive games and take quizzes. Keep a log of what you do. Tell which site you liked best and why. Watch the following video for positive things teens do to reduce the stress ...

  11. Team Nutrition: Educator Resources

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-04-26

    How do we help young people learn about nutrition? It's not an easy task, but the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has created this page as part of their Food and Nutrition Service to help educators do just that. Their "Team Nutrition" staff members have brought together a range of fact sheets, classroom activities, and web applications for K-12 students. New visitors can click on the Empowering Youth with Nutrition and Physical Activity online modules to get high-quality online resources that help young people learn about the food pyramid and crafting a positive food environment. Moving along, the Elementary Schools area contains fun activities such as "Dig In!" and "The Great Garden Detective Adventure." Finally, visitors can also click on over to the Healthy Meals Resource System and the homepage of the National Food Service Management Institute.

  12. Approaches to preventing burnout: the effects of personal stress management and organizational socialization.

    PubMed

    Taormina, R J; Law, C M

    2000-03-01

    Several approaches to preventing burnout are compared. One hundred and fifty-four nurses in five Hong Kong hospitals completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), the Organizational Socialization Inventory (OSI), and three measures of personal stress management. Results indicated that favourable evaluations on the four OSI domains (job training, organizational understanding, coworker support and future prospects) yielded strong negative correlations with the burnout components. Also, the personal stress management measures had strong negative correlations with depersonalization and decreased personal accomplishment, but none were related to emotional exhaustion. Stepwise regression analyses indicated that training was the only (inverse) predictor of emotional exhaustion, whereas interpersonal skills and understanding were strong (inverse) predictors of depersonalization. Additionally, interpersonal skills and coworker support were excellent (inverse) predictors of decreased personal accomplishment. The findings are discussed in terms of their relevance to nursing administration. PMID:11051965

  13. Stressed triangular lattices on microsized spherical surfaces and their defect management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. R. Li; W. J. Dong; L. Gao; Z. X. Cao

    2008-01-01

    Triangular lattices were assembled on spherical surfaces and caps via thermal stress engineering on core\\/shell microstructures. The lattices on a complete spherical surface, when the total number is small, contain uniquely fivefold disclinations, whereas scars consisting of pentamer-heptamer chains emerged when more vertices are available (>360). Disclination-free pattern were obtained on caps, revealing the defect management strategy in nature. All

  14. Blood pressure reactivity can be reduced by a cognitive behavioral stress management program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Silja Vocks; Margit Ockenfels; Ralph Jürgensen; Lutz Mussgay; Heinz Rüddel

    2004-01-01

    Although enhanced cardiovascular reactivity is extensively discussed as a relevant negative factor in the alteration of vascular\\u000a structure, only a few controlled studies have been published presenting approaches to alter reactivity. Therefore, we examined\\u000a whether enhanced reactivity could be reduced by stress management training (SMT). To control for expectation effects, progressive\\u000a muscular relaxation (PMR) was the control condition. Forty-four patients

  15. Stress Management in the Health Care Setting: Matching Interventions With Patient Coping Styles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael F. Martelli; Stephen M. Auerbach; John Alexander; Louis G. Mercuri

    1987-01-01

    Forty-six patients about to undergo preprosthetic oral surgery were presented with either a problem-focused, emotion-focused, or mixed-focus stress management intervention. The mixed-focus intervention produced the best overall response to surgery; the emotion-focused intervention produced the lowest adjustment levels. The Krantz Health Opinion Survey Information scale was the best overall predictor of response to surgery in conjunction with treatments. Better adjustment

  16. The effects of postpartum nutrition and suckling management on reproductive function and preweaning calf performance in fall-calving Brahman (B?o?s? i?n?d?i?c?u?s?) females

    E-print Network

    Browning, Richard

    1992-01-01

    concentrations before estrus Correlation coefficients (r) between hormones and metabolites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 97 100 103 106 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1 Effect of parity on BCS change in cows, . . . . 2 Effect... of nutrition on BCS change in cows. , 3 Effect of suckling on BCS change in cows. . . 4 Effect of management group on BCS change in cows. 5 Effect of parity on ADG in dams. 6 Effect of nutrition on ADG in dams. . . 7 Effem of suckling on ADG in dams. . 8...

  17. Benefit Finding, Affective Reactions to Diabetes Stress, and Diabetes Management among Early Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Vincent; Wiebe, Deborah J.; Fortenberry, Katherine T.; Butler, Jorie M.; Berg, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine whether benefit finding was associated with better adjustment among adolescents with diabetes by buffering negative affective reactions to diabetes stress and by promoting positive affective reactions. Design Early adolescents aged 10-14 with type 1 diabetes (n=252) described recent diabetes stressors, affective reactions, and perceived coping effectiveness. They also completed measures of benefit finding, depressive symptoms, and adherence. Metabolic control (i.e., HbA1c) was obtained from medical records. Main Outcome Measures The main outcome measures were perceived coping effectiveness, depressive symptoms, adherence, and HbA1c. Results Benefit finding was associated with lower depressive symptoms, higher perceived coping effectiveness and better adherence, and with higher positive as well as negative affective reactions to diabetes stress. Benefit finding interacted with negative affective reactions to predict depressive symptoms and HbA1c. Negative affective reactions to stress were associated with poorer adjustment among those with low benefit finding, but were unrelated or more weakly related to poor adjustment among those with high benefit finding. Positive affective reactions did not mediate associations between benefit finding and any outcome. Conclusions Consistent with a stress-buffering process, benefit finding may be a resource that buffers the disruptive aspects of negative affective reactions to stress for adolescents’ diabetes management. PMID:21401255

  18. Positive technology: a free mobile platform for the self-management of psychological stress.

    PubMed

    Gaggioli, Andrea; Cipresso, Pietro; Serino, Silvia; Campanaro, Danilo Marco; Pallavicini, Federica; Wiederhold, Brenda K; Riva, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    We describe the main features and preliminary evaluation of Positive Technology, a free mobile platform for the self-management of psychological stress (http://positiveapp.info/). The mobile platform features three main components: (i) guided relaxation, which provides the user with the opportunity of browsing a gallery of relaxation music and video-narrative resources for reducing stress; (ii) 3D biofeedback, which helps the user learning to control his/her responses, by visualizing variations of heart rate in an engaging 3D environment; (iii) stress tracking, by the recording of heart rate and self-reports. We evaluated the Positive Technology app in an online trial involving 32 participants, out of which 7 used the application in combination with the wrist sensor. Overall, feedback from users was satisfactory and the analysis of data collected online indicated the capability of the app for reducing perceived stress levels. A future goal is to improve the usability of the application and include more advanced stress monitoring features, based on the analysis of heart rate variability indexes. PMID:24875684

  19. Stress

    MedlinePLUS

    ... higher blood glucose levels in people with either type of diabetes. It's easy to find out whether mental stress affects your glucose control. Before checking your glucose levels, write down a number rating ...

  20. Hypo-osmotic stress-induced physiological and ion-osmoregulatory responses in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) are modulated differentially by nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Amit Kumar; Dasan, Antony Franklin; Rasoloniriana, Rindra; Pipralia, Nitin; Blust, Ronny; De Boeck, Gudrun

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the impact of nutritional status on the physiological, metabolic and ion-osmoregulatory performance of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) when acclimated to seawater (32ppt), brackish water (20 and 10ppt) and hyposaline water (2.5ppt) for 2weeks. Following acclimation to different salinities, fish were either fed or fasted (unfed for 14days). Plasma osmolality, [Na(+)], [Cl(-)] and muscle water content were severely altered in fasted fish acclimated to 10 and 2.5ppt in comparison to normal seawater-acclimated fish, suggesting ion regulation and acid-base balance disturbances. In contrast to feed-deprived fish, fed fish were able to avoid osmotic perturbation more effectively. This was accompanied by an increase in Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase expression and activity, transitory activation of H(+)-ATPase (only at 2.5ppt) and down-regulation of Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) gene expression. Ammonia excretion rate was inhibited to a larger extent in fasted fish acclimated to low salinities while fed fish were able to excrete efficiently. Consequently, the build-up of ammonia in the plasma of fed fish was relatively lower. Energy stores, especially glycogen and lipid, dropped in the fasted fish at low salinities and progression towards the anaerobic metabolic pathway became evident by an increase in plasma lactate level. Overall, the results indicate no osmotic stress in both feeding treatments within the salinity range of 32 to 20ppt. However, at lower salinities (10-2.5ppt) feed deprivation tends to reduce physiological, metabolic, ion-osmo-regulatory and molecular compensatory mechanisms and thus limits the fish's abilities to adapt to a hypo-osmotic environment. PMID:25483239

  1. Nutrition Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Lloyd E.

    Nutrition labeling regulations differ in countries around the world. The focus of this chapter is on nutrition labeling regulations in the USA, as specified by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). A major reason for analyzing the chemical components of foods in the USA is nutrition labeling regulations. Nutrition label information is not only legally required in many countries, but also is of increasing importance to consumers as they focus more on health and wellness.

  2. French clinical guidelines on perioperative nutrition. Update of the 1994 consensus conference on perioperative artificial nutrition for elective surgery in adults.

    PubMed

    Chambrier, C; Sztark, F

    2012-10-01

    Surgical patient is a stressed patient. Aggression is more intense and prolonged as surgery is important. Surgery induces secretion of stress hormones, inflammatory mediators and metabolic changes resulting in significant catabolic phenomena. The presence of malnutrition is an independent risk factor for postoperative complications. Malnutrition increases morbidity (infections, delayed healing), mortality, length of stay and costs and impacts human quality of life for patients. It has been shown that the management of perioperative malnutrition reduces the additional risk generated by it. Perioperative nutritional support should not be systematically provided. Since 1994, recommendations on perioperative nutrition, the care of patients and the available resources have changed dramatically. An update of these recommendations was needed. In 2010, an expert panel of the French society of Anesthesiology (SFAR) and the French-speaking society of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (SFNEP) has made recommendations for good clinical practice of perioperative nutrition. They are presented. Thus, the perioperative nutritional management must be integrated in a process to reduce the operative risk: risk reduction due to preoperative malnutrition, reduced risk of postoperative malnutrition which may compromise the following treatments, reduction of postoperative metabolic complications, reducing the postoperative morbidity, especially infectious, through the use of pharmaconutrients either preoperatively or postoperatively in some patients. PMID:23107793

  3. Managing Stress

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... loss Dealing with grief Research Research grants Infant health research Prematurity research Birth defects research Professionals Info for your patients Medical resources Professional education Perinatal Statistics Scholarships and grants Advocacy Federal Advocacy ...

  4. Stress management skills, cortisol awakening response, and post-exertional malaise in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hall, Daniel L; Lattie, Emily G; Antoni, Michael H; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Czaja, Sara; Perdomo, Dolores; Klimas, Nancy G

    2014-11-01

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is characterized in part by debilitating fatigue typically exacerbated by cognitive and/or physical exertion, referred to as post-exertional malaise (PEM). In a variety of populations, the cortisol awakening response (CAR) has stood out as a marker of endocrine dysregulation relevant to the experience of fatigue, and may therefore be particularly relevant in CFS. This is the first study to examine PEM and the CAR in a sample of individuals with CFS. The CAR has also been established as a stress-sensitive measure of HPA axis functioning. It follows that better management of stress could modulate the CAR, and in turn PEM. In this cross-sectional study, we hypothesized that greater Perceived Stress Management Skills (PSMS) would relate to lower reports of PEM, via the impact of PSMS on the CAR. A total of 117 adults (72% female) with a CFS diagnosis completed self-report measures of PSMS and PEM symptomatology and a two-day protocol of saliva collection. Cortisol values from awakening and 30 min post-awakening were used to compute the CAR. Regression analyses revealed that greater PSMS related to greater CAR and greater CAR related to less PEM severity. Bootstrapped analyses revealed an indirect effect of PSMS on PEM via the CAR, such that greater PSMS related to less PEM, via a greater CAR. Future research should examine these trends longitudinally and whether interventions directed at improving stress management skills are accompanied by improved cortisol regulation and less PEM in individuals with CFS. PMID:25049069

  5. Enhancing Standard Cardiac Rehabilitation with Stress Management Training: Background, Methods, and Design for the ENHANCED study

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, James A.; Wang, Jenny T.; Babyak, Michael; Watkins, Lana; Kraus, William; Miller, Paula; Hinderliter, Alan; Sherwood, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Enhancing Standard Cardiac Rehabilitation with Stress Management Training in Patients with Heart Disease (ENHANCED) is a randomized clinical trial (RCT) funded by the NHLBI to evaluate the effects of stress management training (SMT) on changes in biomarkers of risk and quality of life for patients enrolled in traditional exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR). METHODS: One hundred fifty cardiac patients recruited from Duke University and the University of North Carolina will be evaluated and randomized to CR enhanced by SMT (including sessions devoted to relaxation training, cognitive restructuring, communication skills, and problem solving) or to standard exercise-based CR. Before and following 12 weeks of treatment, patients will undergo a battery of psychometric questionnaires and evaluation of cardiovascular biomarkers including measures of flow-mediated dilation, heart rate variability, baroreflex sensitivity, platelet function and inflammation, and ischemia during laboratory mental stress testing. The primary outcomes include a composite measure of stress (distress, depression, anxiety, and hostility and 24-hr urinary catecholamines and cortisol) and a composite measure of cardiac biomarkers of risk (vascular endothelial function, cardiac vagal control, inflammation, platelet function and mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia). Secondary outcomes include measures of quality of life as well as clinical events including death, hospitalizations, myocardial infarction, and revascularization procedures. RESULTS: This article reviews prior studies in the area and describes the design of the ENHANCED study. Several key methodological issues are discussed including the assessment of biomarkers of risk and barriers to the integration of SMT into traditional CR. CONCLUSIONS: The ENHANCED study will provide important information by determining the extent to which SMT combined with exercise-based CR may improve prognosis and quality of life in vulnerable cardiac patients. PMID:20216360

  6. Transobturator Tape in the Management of Female Stress Incontinence: Clinical Outcomes at Medium Term Follow-Up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Kocjancic; S. Crivellaro; I. A. Oyama; A. Singla; S. Ranzoni; R. Carone; A. Manassero; P. Gontero; B. Frea

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of transobturator tape (TOT) in the management of stress urinary incontinence at a medium term follow-up. Methods: TOT is a polypropylene tape positioned through the obturator foramen. 70 patients with type II urinary stress incontinence were treated with TOT between June 2003 and May 2006. Patients were prospectively studied by physical examination, quality of life

  7. "Learn Young, Learn Fair", a Stress Management Program for Fifth and Sixth Graders: Longitudinal Results from an Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraag, Gerda; Van Breukelen, Gerard J. P.; Kok, Gerjo; Hosman, Clemens

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study examined the effects of a universal stress management program (Learn Young, Learn Fair) on stress, coping, anxiety and depression in fifth and sixth grade children. Methods: Fifty-two schools (1467 children) participated in a clustered randomized controlled trial. Data was collected in the fall of 2002, the spring of 2003,…

  8. A Study of the Effects of a Stress Management Program on Affective and Cognitive Measures of Middle School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Doris B.

    Middle school children make a number of accomodations that create stress in their lives. This study examined the effects on sixth and seventh grade students (N=53) of a stress management program that emphasized self-regulation of physiological aspects of functioning along the relaxation/arousal continuum. The experimental group received intensive…

  9. Postgraduate Clinical Psychology Students' Perceptions of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Stress Management Intervention and Clinical Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pakenham, Kenneth I.; Stafford-Brown, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Background: Research into stress management interventions for clinical psychology trainees (CPTs) is limited, despite evidence indicating that these individuals are at risk for elevated stress, which can negatively impact personal and professional functioning. This study explored: (1) CPTs' perceptions of a previously evaluated Acceptance and…

  10. Stress management-augmented behavioral weight loss intervention for African American women: a pilot, randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cox, Tiffany L; Krukowski, Rebecca; Love, Sharhonda J; Eddings, Kenya; DiCarlo, Marisha; Chang, Jason Y; Prewitt, T Elaine; West, Delia Smith

    2013-02-01

    The relationship between chronic stress and weight management efforts may be a concern for African American (AA) women, who have a high prevalence of obesity, high stress levels, and modest response to obesity treatment. This pilot study randomly assigned 44 overweight/obese AA women with moderate to high stress levels to either a 12-week adaptation of the Diabetes Prevention Program Lifestyle Balance intervention augmented with stress management strategies (Lifestyle + Stress) or Lifestyle Alone. A trend toward greater percentage of baseline weight loss at 3-month data collection was observed in Lifestyle + Stress (-2.7 ± 3.6%) compared with Lifestyle Alone (-1.4 ± 2.3%; p = .17) and a greater reduction in salivary cortisol (Lifestyle + Stress: -0.2461 ± 0.3985 ng/mL; Lifestyle Alone: -0.0002 ± 0.6275 ng/mL; p = .20). These promising results suggest that augmenting a behavioral weight control intervention with stress management components may be beneficial for overweight/obese AA women with moderate to high stress levels and merit further investigation with an adequately powered trial. PMID:22505570

  11. Growth factor modulation of hepatic inflammation: a novel approach to the management of total parenteral nutrition–associated liver disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keith A. Thatch; Michael S. Katz; Marian M. Haber; Marshall Z. Schwartz

    2010-01-01

    PurposeDependence on total parenteral nutrition in intestinal failure or short bowel syndrome patients can lead to many complications. The most significant complication is progressive liver injury leading to liver failure. This study assesses the potential of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in modulating the hepatic response in a rat cholestatic liver injury model.

  12. Managing Sales of Beverages in Schools to Preserve Profits and Improve Children's Nutrition Intake in 15 Mississippi Schools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denise M. Brown; Suresh K. Tammineni

    2009-01-01

    School environments that provide consistent and reliable nutrition information promote the development of healthful eating in children. High-energy, nutrient-poor beverages offered for sale to children during the school day compete with healthful choices. The primary objective of this prospective, quasiexperimental study was to encourage children to choose more healthful beverages during the school day without adversely affecting the profits realized

  13. Interreality for the management and training of psychological stress: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychological stress occurs when an individual perceives that environmental demands tax or exceed his or her adaptive capacity. Its association with severe health and emotional diseases, points out the necessity to find new efficient strategies to treat it. Moreover, psychological stress is a very personal problem and requires training focused on the specific needs of individuals. To overcome the above limitations, the INTERSTRESS project suggests the adoption of a new paradigm for e-health - Interreality - that integrates contextualized assessment and treatment within a hybrid environment, bridging the physical and the virtual worlds. According to this premise, the aim of this study is to investigate the advantages of using advanced technologies, in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), based on a protocol for reducing psychological stress. Methods/Design The study is designed as a randomized controlled trial. It includes three groups of approximately 50 subjects each who suffer from psychological stress: (1) the experimental group, (2) the control group, (3) the waiting list group. Participants included in the experimental group will receive a treatment based on cognitive behavioral techniques combined with virtual reality, biofeedback and mobile phone, while the control group will receive traditional stress management CBT-based training, without the use of new technologies. The wait-list group will be reassessed and compared with the two other groups five weeks after the initial evaluation. After the reassessment, the wait-list patients will randomly receive one of the two other treatments. Psychometric and physiological outcomes will serve as quantitative dependent variables, while subjective reports of participants will be used as the qualitative dependent variable. Discussion What we would like to show with the present trial is that bridging virtual experiences, used to learn coping skills and emotional regulation, with real experiences using advanced technologies (virtual reality, advanced sensors and smartphones) is a feasible way to address actual limitations of existing protocols for psychological stress. Trial registration http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01683617 PMID:23806013

  14. Sports Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Health, Jefferson City.

    This guide deals with various aspects of sports and nutrition. Twelve chapters are included: (1) "Sports and Nutrition"; (2) "Eat to Compete"; (3) "Fit Folks Need Fit Food"; (4) "The Food Guide Pyramid"; (5) "Fat Finder's Guide"; (6) "Pre- and Post-Event Meals"; (7) "Tips for the Diabetic Athlete"; (8) "Pinning Down Your Optimal Weight"; (9)…

  15. Nutritional Epidemiology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although observations on relationships between diet and health have always been recognized—the systematic science of nutritional epidemiology in populations is relatively recent. Important observations propelling the field of nutrition forward were numerous in the 18th and 19th centuries, as it was...

  16. Management of protein-energy wasting in non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease: reconciling low protein intake with nutritional therapy1234

    PubMed Central

    Kovesdy, Csaba P; Kopple, Joel D; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW), characterized by a decline in body protein mass and energy reserves, including muscle and fat wasting and visceral protein pool contraction, is an underappreciated condition in early to moderate stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and a strong predictor of adverse outcomes. The prevalence of PEW in early to moderate CKD is ?20–25% and increases as CKD progresses, in part because of activation of proinflammatory cytokines combined with superimposed hypercatabolic states and declines in appetite. This anorexia leads to inadequate protein and energy intake, which may be reinforced by prescribed dietary restrictions and inadequate monitoring of the patient's nutritional status. Worsening uremia also renders CKD patients vulnerable to potentially deleterious effects of uncontrolled diets, including higher phosphorus and potassium burden. Uremic metabolites, some of which are anorexigenic and many of which are products of protein metabolism, can exert harmful effects, ranging from oxidative stress to endothelial dysfunction, nitric oxide disarrays, renal interstitial fibrosis, sarcopenia, and worsening proteinuria and kidney function. Given such complex pathways, nutritional interventions in CKD, when applied in concert with nonnutritional therapeutic approaches, encompass an array of strategies (such as dietary restrictions and supplementations) aimed at optimizing both patients’ biochemical variables and their clinical outcomes. The applicability of many nutritional interventions and their effects on outcomes in patients with CKD with PEW has not been well studied. This article reviews the definitions and pathophysiology of PEW in patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD, examines the current indications for various dietary modification strategies in patients with CKD (eg, manufactured protein-based supplements, amino acids and their keto acid or hydroxyacid analogues), discusses the rationale behind their potential use in patients with PEW, and highlights areas in need of further research. PMID:23636234

  17. Management of protein-energy wasting in non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease: reconciling low protein intake with nutritional therapy.

    PubMed

    Kovesdy, Csaba P; Kopple, Joel D; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-06-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW), characterized by a decline in body protein mass and energy reserves, including muscle and fat wasting and visceral protein pool contraction, is an underappreciated condition in early to moderate stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and a strong predictor of adverse outcomes. The prevalence of PEW in early to moderate CKD is ?20-25% and increases as CKD progresses, in part because of activation of proinflammatory cytokines combined with superimposed hypercatabolic states and declines in appetite. This anorexia leads to inadequate protein and energy intake, which may be reinforced by prescribed dietary restrictions and inadequate monitoring of the patient's nutritional status. Worsening uremia also renders CKD patients vulnerable to potentially deleterious effects of uncontrolled diets, including higher phosphorus and potassium burden. Uremic metabolites, some of which are anorexigenic and many of which are products of protein metabolism, can exert harmful effects, ranging from oxidative stress to endothelial dysfunction, nitric oxide disarrays, renal interstitial fibrosis, sarcopenia, and worsening proteinuria and kidney function. Given such complex pathways, nutritional interventions in CKD, when applied in concert with nonnutritional therapeutic approaches, encompass an array of strategies (such as dietary restrictions and supplementations) aimed at optimizing both patients' biochemical variables and their clinical outcomes. The applicability of many nutritional interventions and their effects on outcomes in patients with CKD with PEW has not been well studied. This article reviews the definitions and pathophysiology of PEW in patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD, examines the current indications for various dietary modification strategies in patients with CKD (eg, manufactured protein-based supplements, amino acids and their keto acid or hydroxyacid analogues), discusses the rationale behind their potential use in patients with PEW, and highlights areas in need of further research. PMID:23636234

  18. Nutrition Cafe

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Developed jointly by the Pacific Science Center and the Washington State Dairy Council, Nutrition Cafe offers students three interactive games to explore the world of nutrition. The first game, Nutrient Sleuth, is an entertaining hangman-style game where students try to discover what nutrients different characters are missing based on clues and letter guesses. Another enjoyable offering is Grab A Grape, a Jeopardy-style game where site visitors try to match nutrition-related questions with answers, e.g. Question: What Are Contained in All Foods? Answer: Calories. In addition, the site links to a few other nutrition-related resources such as Dietary Guidelines for Americans from the USDA and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Site visitors are given a choice between Flash and non-Flash versions of the Nutrition Cafe.

  19. Oxidative stress management in the filamentous, heterocystous, diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Anabaena PCC7120.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Manisha; Raghavan, Prashanth S; Ballal, Anand; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, S K

    2013-10-10

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are inevitably generated as by-products of respiratory/photosynthetic electron transport in oxygenic photoautotrophs. Unless effectively scavenged, these ROS can damage all cellular components. The filamentous, heterocystous, nitrogen-fixing strains of the cyanobacterium, Anabaena, serve as naturally abundant contributors of nitrogen biofertilizers in tropical rice paddy fields. Anabaena strains are known to tolerate several abiotic stresses, such as heat, UV, gamma radiation, desiccation, etc., that are known to generate ROS. ROS are detoxified by specific antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutases (SOD), catalases and peroxiredoxins. The genome of Anabaena PCC7120 encodes two SODs, two catalases and seven peroxiredoxins, indicating the presence of an elaborate antioxidant enzymatic machinery to defend its cellular components from ROS. This article summarizes recent findings and depicts important perspectives in oxidative stress management in Anabaena PCC7120. PMID:24122336

  20. Dairy Cattle Nutrition Home

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Pennsylvania State University Department of Dairy and Animal Science provides this site, which contains over 20 full text extension publications (circulars, charts, and tables) in the areas of dairy cattle nutrition, feed management and forage quality. Pertinent slide shows, fourteen nutritional value of forage and concentrate tables, and a growth chart and weight table populate this site. On the lighter side, visitors can download cow images (with explanations of how to turn them into computer wallpaper), and interactive "cow cards" to send to their friends. This is an excellent resource for agricultural extension faculty or agents.

  1. Psychopharmacological Strategies in the Management of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): What Have We Learned?

    PubMed

    Bernardy, Nancy C; Friedman, Matthew J

    2015-04-01

    There have been significant advancements in the pharmacologic management of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the past two decades. Multisite randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have noted the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNR Is) for PTSD treatment. Unfortunately, there have been no new medications approved to treat PTSD in the past 10 years. Although there have been exciting new findings in our knowledge of the neurobiology of PTSD, clinical trials testing new medications have lagged. This review summarizes recent research that builds on the unique pathophysiology of PTSD and suggests ways to move the field forward. PMID:25749751

  2. Nutritional supplementation in adult patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Cano, Noël

    2007-01-01

    At the beginning of the 1980s, nutritional status appeared as a key element of quality of life, health care requirements, and survival during chronic renal failure. In patients on dialysis, malnutrition is a major determinant of survival, and its management appears to be a key element in terms of outcome. Recommendations for the nutritional management of patients on hemodialysis have been elaborated by the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) and the European Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ESPEN). PMID:17198944

  3. Test Results of a Nb3Sn Wind/React"Stress-Managed" Block Dipole

    SciTech Connect

    McInturff, A.; Blackburn, R.; Diaczenko, N.; Elliott, T.; Henchel, W.; Jaisle, A.; McIntyre, P.; Noyes, P.; Sattarov, A.; Lietzke, A.; Hafalia Jr., R.; Lau, W.; Nyman, M.; Bish, P.

    2007-06-01

    A second phase of a high field dipole technology development has been tested. A Nb{sub 3}Sn block-coil model dipole was fabricated, using magnetic mirror geometry and wind/react coil technology. The primary objective of this phase was to make a first experimental test of the stress-management strategy pioneered at Texas A&M. In this strategy a high-strength support matrix is integrated with the windings to intercept Lorentz stress from the inner winding so that it does not accumulate in the outer winding. The magnet attained a field that was consistent with short sample limit on the first quench; there was no training. The decoupling of Lorentz stress between inner and outer windings was validated. In ramp rate studies the magnet exhibited a remarkable robustness in rapid ramping operation. It reached 85% of short sample(ss) current even while ramping 2-3 T/s. This robustness is attributed to the orientation of the Rutherford cables parallel to the field in the windings, instead of the transverse orientation that characterizes common dipole designs. Test results are presented and the next development phase plans are discussed.

  4. Nutritional Science

    Cancer.gov

    This group plans, develops, directs, and coordinates external research programs in diet and nutrition, including micronutrients as modifiers of cancer risk and tumor behavior, to help establish a comprehensive understanding of the precise role of bioactive food components.

  5. The importance of perceived stress management skills for patients with prostate cancer in active surveillance.

    PubMed

    Yanez, Betina; Bustillo, Natalie E; Antoni, Michael H; Lechner, Suzanne C; Dahn, Jason; Kava, Bruce; Penedo, Frank J

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about whether and how stress management skills may improve adjustment for men diagnosed with prostate cancer who opt for active surveillance. This study examined whether two types of perceived stress management skills, specifically the ability to relax and confidence in coping, moderated the relationship between prostate cancer (PC) concerns and psychological distress. Participants were 71 ethnically diverse men in active surveillance. Coping confidence moderated the relationship between PC concerns and intrusive thoughts (p < .01). At low levels of coping confidence, PC concerns was positively related to intrusive thoughts, ? = .95, p < .001, but not when coping confidence was high, ? = .19, p > .05. Coping confidence also moderated the relationship between PC treatment concerns (a subscale of PC concerns) and intrusive thoughts. At low levels of coping confidence, PC treatment concerns was positively associated with intrusive thoughts, ? = .73, p < .001, but not when coping confidence was high, ? = .20, p > .05. Findings underscore the importance of interventions aimed at improving coping in men undergoing active surveillance. PMID:25234859

  6. The nutrition advisor expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huse, Scott M.; Shyne, Scott S.

    1991-01-01

    The Nutrition Advisor Expert System (NAES) is an expert system written in the C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS). NAES provides expert knowledge and guidance into the complex world of nutrition management by capturing the knowledge of an expert and placing it at the user's fingertips. Specifically, NAES enables the user to: (1) obtain precise nutrition information for food items; (2) perform nutritional analysis of meal(s), flagging deficiencies based upon the U.S. Recommended Daily Allowances; (3) predict possible ailments based upon observed nutritional deficiency trends; (4) obtain a top ten listing of food items for a given nutrient; and (5) conveniently upgrade the data base. An explanation facility for the ailment prediction feature is also provided to document the reasoning process.

  7. Parenteral Nutrition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian S. Jackson; Alan L. Buchman

    Parenteral nutrition becomes necessary when the gastrointestinal tract has insufficient function as to afford sufficient fluid,\\u000a electrolyte and nutrient absorption. Indications for this therapy include prolonged postoperative ileus, prolonged intestinal\\u000a obstruction, short bowel syndrome, various malabsorptive disorders, proximal enteric fistulas for which an enteral feeding\\u000a tube cannot be placed distal to, severe acute pancreatitis and severe mucositis\\/esophagitis. Parenteral nutrition, although

  8. Crop rotations with annual and perennial forages under no-till soil management: soil attributes, soybean mineral nutrition, and yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extensive use of sustainable crop and soil management systems would result in profitable farms producing greater yields while maintaining or enhancing natural resources. Development of sustainable agricultural systems depends on understanding complex relationships between soil management, crop mana...

  9. Space Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2009-01-01

    Optimal nutrition will be critical for crew members who embark on space exploration missions. Nutritional assessment provides an opportunity to ensure that crewmembers begin their missions in optimal nutritional status, to document changes during a mission and, if necessary, to provide intervention to maintain that status throughout the mission, and to assesses changes after landing in order to facilitate the return to their normal status as soon as possible after landing. We report here the findings from our nutritional assessment of astronauts who participated in the International Space Station (ISS) missions, along with flight and ground-based research findings. We also present ongoing and planned nutrition research activities. These studies provide evidence that bone loss, compromised vitamin status, and oxidative damage are the critical nutritional concerns for space travelers. Other nutrient issues exist, including concerns about the stability of nutrients in the food system, which are exposed to longterm storage and radiation during flight. Defining nutrient requirements, and being able to provide and maintain those nutrients on exploration missions, will be critical for maintaining crew member health.

  10. The Food and Nutrition Information Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1996-01-01

    The Food and Nutrition Information Center (FNIC) of the National Agricultural Library (USDA) maintains a variety of electronic access points for the full texts of its bibliographies, resource lists, and fact sheets. Topics include Food Labeling Educational Materials, Food and Nutrition Software and Multimedia, and educational materials covering Foodborne Illness and the Food Guide Pyramid. Additional information is available on human nutrition, nutrition education, food service management, and other topics. Gopher to: gopher.nalusda.gov select: NAL Information Centers/Food and Nutrition Information Center

  11. Effects of short duration stress management training on self-perceived depression, anxiety and stress in male automotive assembly workers: a quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Edimansyah, BA; Rusli, BN; Naing, L

    2008-01-01

    To examine the effects of short duration stress management training (SMT) on self-perceived depression, anxiety and stress in male automotive assembly workers, 118 male automotive workers from Pekan, Pahang (n = 60, mean age = 40.0 years, SD = 6.67) and Kota Bharu, Kelantan (n = 58, mean age = 38.1 years, SD = 5.86) were assigned to experimental and control group, respectively. A SMT program consisting of aerobic exercise, stress management manual, video session, lecture, question and answer session, and pamphlet and poster session were conducted in the experimental group. A validated short-form Malay version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21) were self-administered before and after the intervention program in the experimental and control group and their time and group interaction effects were examined using the repeated measure ANOVA test. Results indicated that the mean (SD) scores for DASS-Depression (p = 0.036) and DASS-Anxiety (p = 0.011) were significantly decreased, respectively, after the intervention program in the experimental group as compared to the control group (significant time-group interaction effects). No similar effect was observed for the mean (SD) scores for DASS-Stress (p = 0.104). However, the mean (SD) scores for subscales of DASS-Depression (Dysphoria, p = 0.01), DASS-Anxiety (Subjective Anxiety, p = 0.007, Situational Anxiety, p = 0.048), and DASS-Stress (Nervous Arousal, p = 0.018, Easily Upset, p = 0.047) showed significant time and group interaction effects. These findings suggest that short duration SMT is effective in reducing some aspects of self-perceived depression, anxiety and stress in male automotive workers. PMID:19021918

  12. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Consumer Approach Strand: Foods and Nutrition. Module I-C-1: Technological, Sociological, Ecological, and Environmental Factors Related to Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newsome, Ratana

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on technological, sociological, ecological, and environmental factors related to food is the first in a set of five modules on consumer education related to foods and nutrition. (This set is part of a larger series of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching…

  13. Career Education: Learning with a Purpose. Secondary Guide-Vol. 4. Home Economics, Family/Community Relations, Home Management, Foods and Nutrition, Clothing and Textiles, Field Trip Sites and Guest Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Marilyn; And Others

    The guide offers a compilation of teacher-developed career education materials which may be integrated with secondary level curriculum in home economics. Suggested activities and ideas are presented as unit plans in the following areas of home economics: family relations/family living, home management, child development, foods and nutrition,…

  14. Female Stress Urinary Incontinence Clinical Guidelines Panel Summary Report on Surgical Management of Female Stress Urinary Incontinence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary E. Leach; Roger R. Dmochowski; Rodney Appell; Jerry G. Blaivas; H. Roger Hadley; Karl M. Luber; Jacek L. Mostwin; Pat D. O'Donnell; Claus G. Roehrborn

    1997-01-01

    PurposeThe American Urological Association convened the Female Stress Urinary Incontinence Clinical Guidelines Panel to analyze the literature regarding surgical procedures for treating stress urinary incontinence in the otherwise healthy female subject and to make practice recommendations based on the treatment outcomes data.

  15. Family caregivers of older adults on home enteral nutrition have multiple unmet task-related training needs and low overall preparedness for caregiving

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heidi J. Silver; Nancy S. Wellman; Daisy Galindo-Ciocon; Paulette Johnson

    2004-01-01

    ObjectivesWe used stress process theory to identify family caregiving variables that are salient to the experience of managing older adults’ home enteral nutrition. In this article, we describe the specific tasks family caregivers performed and their unique training needs in the context of caregiver preparedness, competence, effectiveness, and health care use.

  16. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  17. Nutritional requirements after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Bosnic, Gordana

    2014-06-01

    This article presents an overview of postoperative nutritional requirements and goals following bariatric surgery. It summarizes current diet progression and nutrient intake guidelines geared toward optimizing weight loss and maintaining adequate nutritional status, nutrient absorption, as well as hydration. The article further emphasizes the importance of postoperative follow-up with a bariatric multidisciplinary team for appropriate postoperative care, diet management, and nutrient deficiency screenings. PMID:24878210

  18. Enteral Nutrition in Critical Care

    PubMed Central

    Seron-Arbeloa, Carlos; Zamora-Elson, Monica; Labarta-Monzon, Lorenzo; Mallor-Bonet, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    There is a consensus that nutritional support, which must be provided to patients in intensive care, influences their clinical outcome. Malnutrition is associated in critically ill patients with impaired immune function and impaired ventilator drive, leading to prolonged ventilator dependence and increased infectious morbidity and mortality. Enteral nutrition is an active therapy that attenuates the metabolic response of the organism to stress and favorably modulates the immune system. It is less expensive than parenteral nutrition and is preferred in most cases because of less severe complications and better patient outcomes, including infections, and hospital cost and length of stay. The aim of this work was to perform a review of the use of enteral nutrition in critically ill patients. PMID:23390469

  19. Expanding 4-H Nutrition Education Through a Team Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Edwin L.

    The various ways of expanding the 4-H nutrition education program through team work are discussed. The need is stressed to consider "balance" in the 4-H nutrition efforts, regardless of income levels, race, color, sex, or national origin. The primary objectives of the Expanded Food Nutrition Education Program is to help hard-to-reach families…

  20. Be A Nutritional Entrepreneur

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    BEGIN:VCARD VERSION:2.1 FN:Elaine Kilmer N:Kilmer; Elaine ORG:John Burroughs School REV:2005-04-08 END:VCARD

    1995-06-30

    Students research and define nutrition. Students choose a definition of nutrition or a nutritional theme around which they design a restaurant. This activity helps students answer the question "What is a nutritionally balanced meal? in the context of different cultures.

  1. Stress testing on silicon carbide electronic devices for prognostics and health management.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplar, Robert James; Brock, Reinhard C.; Marinella, Matthew; King, Michael Patrick; Smith, Mark A.; Atcitty, Stanley

    2011-01-01

    Power conversion systems for energy storage and other distributed energy resource applications are among the drivers of the important role that power electronics plays in providing reliable electricity. Wide band gap semiconductors such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN) will help increase the performance and efficiency of power electronic equipment while condition monitoring (CM) and prognostics and health management (PHM) will increase the operational availability of the equipment and thereby make it more cost effective. Voltage and/or temperature stress testing were performed on a number of SiC devices in order to accelerate failure modes and to identify measureable shifts in electrical characteristics which may provide early indication of those failures. Those shifts can be interpreted and modeled to provide prognostic signatures for use in CM and/or PHM. Such experiments will also lead to a deeper understanding of basic device physics and the degradation mechanisms behind failure.

  2. An automated data management/analysis system for space shuttle orbiter tiles. [stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, G. L.; Ballas, M.

    1982-01-01

    An engineering data management system was combined with a nonlinear stress analysis program to provide a capability for analyzing a large number of tiles on the space shuttle orbiter. Tile geometry data and all data necessary of define the tile loads environment accessed automatically as needed for the analysis of a particular tile or a set of tiles. User documentation provided includes: (1) description of computer programs and data files contained in the system; (2) definitions of all engineering data stored in the data base; (3) characteristics of the tile anaytical model; (4) instructions for preparation of user input; and (5) a sample problem to illustrate use of the system. Description of data, computer programs, and analytical models of the tile are sufficiently detailed to guide extension of the system to include additional zones of tiles and/or additional types of analyses

  3. Test Results of a Nb3Sn Wind/React 'Stress-Managed' BlockDipole

    SciTech Connect

    McInturff, A.; Bish, P.; Blackburn, R.; Diaczenko, N.; Elliott,T.; Hafalia Jr., R.; Henchel, W.; Jaisle, A.; Lau, W.; Lietzke, A.; McIntyre, P.; Noyes, P.; Nyman, M.; Sattarov, A.; Sattarov, A.

    2006-08-25

    A second phase of a highfield dipole technology developmenthas been tested. A Nb3Sn block-coil model dipole was fabricated, usingmagnetic mirror geometry and wind/react coil technology. The primaryobjective of this phase was to make a first experimental test of thestress-management strategy pioneered at Texas A&M. In this strategy ahigh-strength support matrix is integrated with the windings to interceptLorentz stress from the inner winding so that it does not accumulate inthe outer winding. The magnet attained a field that was consistent withshort sample limit on the first quench; there was no training. Thedecoupling of Lorentz stress between inner and outer windings wasvalidated. In ramp rate studies the magnet exhibited a remarkablerobustness in rapid ramping operation. It reached 85 percent of shortsample(ss) current even while ramping 2-3 T/s. This robustness isattributed to the orientation of the Rutherford cables parallel to thefield in the windings, instead of the transverse orientation thatcharacterizes common dipole designs. Test results are presented and thenext development phase plans are discussed.

  4. Displaced femoral neck stress fractures in Royal Marine recruits--management and results of operative treatment.

    PubMed

    Evans, J T; Guyver, P M; Kassam, A M; Hubble, M J W

    2012-01-01

    Femoral neck stress fractures (FNSF) represent 3.5%-8% of stress fractures in military recruits; potentially resulting in medical discharge and/or complications. The incidence of displaced FNSF in the British Army has been reported as 1.8 in 10,000 recruits. We aimed to review the incidence and outcome of displaced FNSF in Royal Marine recruits. Retrospective review identified 6 recruits who sustained a displaced FNSF from 2001 to 2011 representing an incidence of 9.3 in 10,000 recruits. All were treated urgently by internal fixation. There were no cases of avascular necrosis, no surgical complications and no further procedures required. All united with a mean time to union of 11 months. 50% had a union time greater than 1 year. These fractures are slow to unite but with urgent surgical intervention and stable fixation 100% union was achieved. Awareness of this guides the management and rehabilitation whilst avoiding the risks of unnecessary secondary surgical interventions. PMID:22970637

  5. Nutritional metabolomics: Progress in addressing complexity in diet and health

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dean P.; Park, Youngja; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional metabolomics is rapidly maturing to use small molecule chemical profiling to support integration of diet and nutrition in complex biosystems research. These developments are critical to facilitate transition of nutritional sciences from population-based to individual-based criteria for nutritional research, assessment and management. This review addresses progress in making these approaches manageable for nutrition research. Important concept developments concerning the exposome, predictive health and complex pathobiology, serve to emphasize the central role of diet and nutrition in integrated biosystems models of health and disease. Improved analytic tools and databases for targeted and non-targeted metabolic profiling, along with bioinformatics, pathway mapping and computational modeling, are now used for nutrition research on diet, metabolism, microbiome and health associations. These new developments enable metabolome-wide association studies (MWAS) and provide a foundation for nutritional metabolomics, along with genomics, epigenomics and health phenotyping, to support integrated models required for personalized diet and nutrition forecasting. PMID:22540256

  6. The University of Pi sburgh is studying ways to learn how to manage stress, improve quality of life, and maintain independence.

    E-print Network

    Sibille, Etienne

    and your loved one may be eligible to par cipate in this study of stress reduc on. The research team) is a research study looking at ways to reduce stress. If you receive assistance with meals, transporta onThe University of Pi sburgh is studying ways to learn how to manage stress, improve quality of life

  7. Managing posttraumatic stress disorder and major depression in women veterans during the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Shivakumar, Geetha; Anderson, Elizabeth H; Surís, Alina M

    2015-01-01

    The recent surge in Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation New Dawn (OEF/OIF/OND) era women Veterans, most of whom are younger compared to other women Veterans, presenting with mental health issues is expected to pose new clinical challenges. Treatment of mental health conditions in women Veterans is not considered comprehensive without adequate examination of the impact of reproductive events across the life span, such as their menstrual cycle, pregnancy and postpartum period, and menopausal transition. The overarching aim of this article is to discuss emerging clinical issues in managing common psychiatric conditions such as posttraumatic stress disorder and major depression during pregnancy and postpartum period in the VA healthcare system and secondly, to identify steps to advance the knowledge and understanding of these complex issues. Information to be gained in this area has immediate clinical application in the overall management of major psychiatric conditions in women Veterans during pregnancy and postpartum, and implications for policy-making decisions. PMID:25560190

  8. Canadian clinical practice guidelines for the management of anxiety, posttraumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anxiety and related disorders are among the most common mental disorders, with lifetime prevalence reportedly as high as 31%. Unfortunately, anxiety disorders are under-diagnosed and under-treated. Methods These guidelines were developed by Canadian experts in anxiety and related disorders through a consensus process. Data on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment (psychological and pharmacological) were obtained through MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and manual searches (1980–2012). Treatment strategies were rated on strength of evidence, and a clinical recommendation for each intervention was made, based on global impression of efficacy, effectiveness, and side effects, using a modified version of the periodic health examination guidelines. Results These guidelines are presented in 10 sections, including an introduction, principles of diagnosis and management, six sections (Sections 3 through 8) on the specific anxiety-related disorders (panic disorder, agoraphobia, specific phobia, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder), and two additional sections on special populations (children/adolescents, pregnant/lactating women, and the elderly) and clinical issues in patients with comorbid conditions. Conclusions Anxiety and related disorders are very common in clinical practice, and frequently comorbid with other psychiatric and medical conditions. Optimal management requires a good understanding of the efficacy and side effect profiles of pharmacological and psychological treatments. PMID:25081580

  9. Cognitive-Behavioral Stress Management Intervention Buffers Distress Responses and Immunologic Changes Following Notification of HIV-1 Seropositivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antoni, Michael H.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Randomly assigned 47 asymptomatic, healthy gay men to cognitive-behavioral stress management condition or assessment-only control group 5 weeks before notification of human immunodeficiency virus antibody status. Individual difference analyses suggest that psychological buffering and immunomodulating effects of treatment may be attributable, in…

  10. The Effectiveness of Stress Management and Test-Taking Workshops in Reducing Test Anxiety of Community College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Elsa C.

    A study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a Stress Management Seminar and a Test-Taking Skills Workshop in improving the scores of pre-nursing and guidance examinees at Wallace Community College in Dothan, Alabama. The 73 subjects took the Pre-Nursing and Guidance Examination (PNGE) in June 1984, September 1984, or January 1985.…

  11. Exercise, Diet, and Stress Management as Mediators between Functional Disability and Health-Related Quality of Life in Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Connie; Chiu, Chung-Yi; Lee, Eun-Jeong; Bezyak, Jill; Chan, Fong; Muller, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the mediational and moderational effect of exercise, diet, and stress management on the relationship between functional disability and health-related quality of life. Quantitative descriptive research design using multiple regression and correlation techniques was used. Participants were 215…

  12. Trauma intensity and posttraumatic stress: Implications of the tsunami experience in Sri Lanka for the management of future disasters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ratnin Dewaraja; Noriyuki Kawamura

    2006-01-01

    Recurrent disasters such as the tsunami in South East Asia and floods in New Orleans have focused attention on the need for disaster management based on objective data. The goals of this study were to estimate the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder following a major disaster and to determine the relationship between exposure to traumatic events and the resulting psychological

  13. Taking Care of You: Body, Mind, Spirit--A Unique Stress Management Program That Improves Lifestyle Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vetter-Smith, Molly; Massey, Vera; Rellergert, Linda; Wissmann, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Taking Care of You: Body, Mind, Spirit is a multi-session group program developed by University of Missouri Extension that provides a unique and practical approach to helping adults better managing their stress and bounce back from life's challenges while improving lifestyle behaviors. The program combines mindfulness and a variety of other…

  14. Stress-wave energy management through material anisotropy Alireza V. Amirkhizi, Aref Tehranian, Sia Nemat-Nasser

    E-print Network

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    to electromagnetic waves at a certain wavelength. These cloaks are generally based on using heterogeneous compositesStress-wave energy management through material anisotropy Alireza V. Amirkhizi, Aref Tehranian, Sia i n f o a b s t r a c t Article history: Received 6 October 2009 Received in revised form 24

  15. Lessons Learned From a Study of a Complementary Therapy for Self-Managing Hypertension and Stress in Women

    PubMed Central

    Kretzer, Kikikipa; Evelo, Andrew J.; Durham, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    This report evaluates a Hawaiian-based, self-management intervention for reducing blood pressure (BP) and stress in women. It highlights lessons learned when using nonpharmacologic, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies. Specific participant characteristics and preferences should be considered for optimizing health outcomes in CAM research in nursing practice. PMID:24121698

  16. Process Evaluation of "Learn Young, Learn Fair": A Stress Management Programme for 5th and 6th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraag, Gerda; Van Breukelen, Gerard; Lamberts, Petra; Vugts, Odette; Kok, Gerjo; Fekkes, Minne; Abu-Saad, Huda Huijer

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the process evaluation of a stress management program called "Learn Young, Learn Fair" for 5th and 6th graders. Studies, reviews and meta-analyses of prevention programs report that a common limitation in studies is the restricted documentation of process factors that contribute to the success of interventions. Program…

  17. New York state case manager survey: Urban and rural differences in Job activities, job stress, and job satisfaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zvi D. Gellis; Jongchun Kim; Sung Chul Hwang

    2004-01-01

    The impact of stress in the workplace on employees' well-being and effectiveness has been increasingly recognized in recent years. The purpose of this research was to study the quality of working life of case managers in urban and rural community mental health programs in New York State. The objectives were to describe specific job activities and examine differences in the

  18. The Relationship between Sex, Age, and Heart Rate Reactivity to a Psychological Stressor: Implications for Student Stress Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharpley, Christopher F.; Scuderi, Carl S.

    1990-01-01

    Compared heart rate reactivity (HRR) in a wide age range of 128 male and female students. Used mental arithmetic under timed and competitive conditions as the stressor. Findings showed no significant differences in the HRR of men and women suggesting that college stress management programs should be evenly aimed at women and men. (Author/PVV)

  19. Managing Stress in Humanitarian Aid Workers: A Survey of Humanitarian Aid Agencies’ Psychosocial Training and Support of Staff

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John H. Ehrenreich; Teri L. Elliott

    2004-01-01

    A survey of humanitarian aid organizations was conducted, addressing their practices with respect to mitigating and managing stress in their field staff. Only 17 of over 100 nongovernmental organizations contacted responded to the survey. Even among those that did respond, the limits on their investment in this area were evident. Few reported even the most perfunctory screening of potential staff

  20. Nutritional Needs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dramatic growth of infants during the 1st yr of life (a 3-fold increase in weight; a 50% increase in length) and continued growth, albeit at lower rates, from 1 yr of age through adolescence impose unique nutritional needs. The needs for growth are superimposed on relatively high maintenance nee...

  1. Nutrition for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2005-01-01

    Nutrition has proven to be critical throughout the history of human exploration, on both land and water. The importance of nutrition during long-duration space exploration is no different. Maintaining optimal nutritional status is critical for all bodily systems, especially in light of the fact that that many are also affected by space flight itself. Major systems of concern are bone, muscle, the cardiovascular system, the immune system, protection against radiation damage, and others. The task ahead includes defining the nutritional requirements for space travelers, ensuring adequacy of the food system, and assessing crew nutritional status before, during, and after flight. Accomplishing these tasks will provide significant contributions to ensuring crew health on long-duration missions. In addition, development and testing of nutritional countermeasures to effects of space flight is required, and assessment of the impact of other countermeasures (such as exercise and pharmaceuticals) on nutrition is also critical for maintaining overall crew health. Vitamin D stores of crew members are routinely low after long-duration space flight. This occurs even when crew members take vitamin D supplements, suggesting that vitamin D metabolism may be altered during space flight. Vitamin D is essential for efficient absorption of calcium, and has numerous other benefits for other tissues with vitamin D receptors. Protein is a macronutrient that requires additional study to define the optimal intake for space travelers. Administration of protein to bed rest subjects can effectively mitigate muscle loss associated with disuse, but too much or too little protein can also have negative effects on bone. In another bed rest study, we found that the ratio of protein to potassium was correlated with the level of bone resorption: the higher the ratio, the more bone resorption. These relationships warrant further study to optimize the beneficial effect of protein on both bone and muscle during space flight. Omega3 fatty acids are currently being studied as a means of protecting against radiation-induced cancer. They have also recently been implicated as having a role in mitigating the physical wasting, or cachexia, caused by cancer. The mechanism of muscle loss associated with this type of cachexia is similar to the mechanism of muscle loss during disuse or space flight. Omega3 fatty acids have already been shown to have protective effects on bone and cardiovascular function. Omega3 fatty acids could be an ideal countermeasure for space flight because they have protective effects on multiple systems. A definition of optimal nutrient intake requirements for long-duration space travel should also include antioxidants. Astronauts are exposed to numerous sources of oxidative stress, including radiation, elevated oxygen exposure during extravehicular activity, and physical and psychological stress. Elevated levels of oxidative damage are related to increased risk for cataracts, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Many groundbased studies show the protective effects of antioxidants against oxidative damage induced by radiation or oxygen. Balancing the diet with foods that have high levels of antioxidants would be another ideal countermeasure because it should have minimal side effects on crew health. Antioxidant supplements, however, are often used without having data on their effectiveness or side effects. High doses of supplements have been associated with bone and cardiovascular problems, but research on antioxidant effects during space flight has not been conducted. Much work must be done before we can send crews on exploration missions. Nutrition is often assumed to be the simple provision of food items that will be stable throughout the mission. As outlined briefly above, the situation is much more complex than food provision. As explorers throughout history have found, failure to truly understand the role of nutrition can be catastrophic. When huns are in environments unlike any they have seen before, this is more true than ever.

  2. Firefighter feedback during active cooling: A useful tool for heat stress management?

    PubMed

    Savage, Robbie J; Lord, Cara; Larsen, Brianna L; Knight, Teagan L; Langridge, Peter D; Aisbett, Brad

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring an individual's thermic state in the workplace requires reliable feedback of their core temperature. However, core temperature measurement technology is expensive, invasive and often impractical in operational environments, warranting investigation of surrogate measures which could be used to predict core temperature. This study examines an alternative measure of an individual's thermic state, thermal sensation, which presents a more manageable and practical solution for Australian firefighters operating on the fireground. Across three environmental conditions (cold, warm, hot & humid), 49 Australian volunteer firefighters performed a 20-min fire suppression activity, immediately followed by 20 min of active cooling using hand and forearm immersion techniques. Core temperature (Tc) and thermal sensation (TS) were measured across the rehabilitation period at five minute intervals. Despite the decline in Tc and TS throughout the rehabilitation period, there was little similarity in the magnitude or rate of decline between each measure in any of the ambient conditions. Moderate to strong correlations existed between Tc and TS in the cool (0.41, p<0.05) and hot & humid (0.57, p<0.05) conditions, however this was resultant in strong correlation during the earlier stages of rehabilitation (first five minutes), which were not evident in the latter stages. Linear regression revealed TS to be a poor predictor of Tc in all conditions (SEE=0.45-0.54°C) with a strong trend for TS to over-predict Tc (77-80% of the time). There is minimal evidence to suggest that ratings of thermal sensation, which represent a psychophysical assessment of an individual's thermal comfort, are an accurate reflection of the response of an individual's core temperature. Ratings of thermal sensation can be highly variable amongst individuals, likely moderated by local skin temperature. In account of these findings, fire managers require a more reliable source of information to guide decisions of heat stress management. PMID:25455942

  3. A case study in R and D productivity: Helping the program manager cope with job stress and improve communication effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodensteiner, W. D.; Gerloff, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    Certain structural changes in the Naval Material Command which resulted from a comparison of its operations to those of selected large-scale private sector companies are described. Central to the change was a reduction in the number of formal reports from systems commands to headquarters, and the provision of Program Management Assistance Teams (at the request of the program manager) to help resolve project problems. It is believed that these changes improved communication and information-processing, reduced program manager stress, and resulted in improved productivity.

  4. AutoEmotive: Bringing Empathy to the Driving Experience to Manage Stress

    E-print Network

    during challenging daily life situations. This work describes how the stress of drivers can be measured of cardiovascular disease. In this work, we discuss how stress can be comfortably measured and describe how@media.mit.edu #12;Stress Measurement Stress can be sensed from many different modalities. One of the most common

  5. Seminar in Nutrition "Nutrition and Politics"

    E-print Network

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    and politics: Part 2 Unit 3 Food aid: World Food Program, North Korea 2/13 Intersection of nutrition and politics: Part 3 Unit 4 Food assistance: SNAP, World Bank, Haiti 2/20 Intersection of nutritionSeminar in Nutrition "Nutrition and Politics" Thursday 2:00 ­ 3:30pm Davison 216 Instructor: Daniel

  6. The Russell Nutrition Nutrition & Cognitive Function

    E-print Network

    Jornsten, Rebecka

    The Russell Nutrition Symposium Nutrition & Cognitive Function Throughout the Life-Span October 24.D., Professor, Department of Neurobiology, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, Northwestern University Title and Biological Sciences, The Department of Nutritional Sciences, and The New Jersey Institute for Food, Nutrition

  7. Nutrition in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Recasens, M A Asunción; Puig, Celia; Ortiz-Santamaria, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a connective tissue disease characterized by inflammation and fibrosis of multiple organs (skin, gastrointestinal tract, lung, kidney and heart). After the skin, the organ most affected with a frequency of 75 to 90%, the gastrointestinal tract is more often involved. Gastrointestinal tract involvement is manifested by the appearance of oropharyngeal dysphagia, esophageal dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, gastroparesis, pseudo-obstruction, bacterial overgrowth and intestinal malabsorption, constipation, diarrhea and/or fecal incontinence. These effects influence food intake and intestinal absorption leading to the gradual emergence of nutritional deficiencies. About 30% of patients with systemic sclerosis are at risk of malnutrition. In 5-10%, gastrointestinal disorders are the leading cause of death. Therapeutic strategies currently available are limited and aimed at reducing clinical symptoms. The multidisciplinary management of these patients, including nutritional intervention, helps improve gastrointestinal symptoms, and avoid malnutrition, morbidity and improve quality of life. PMID:22197834

  8. Multi-Scale Environment For Simulation And Materials Characterization In Stress Management For 3D IC TSV-Based Technologies—Effect Of Stress On The Device Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukharev, Valeriy; Zschech, Ehrenfried

    2011-09-01

    The paper addresses the growing need in a simulation-based design verification flow capable to analyze any design of 3D IC stacks and to determine across-die out-of-spec variations in device electrical characteristics caused by layout and through-silicon-via (TSV)/package-induced mechanical stress. The limited test and characterization capabilities of 3D IC stacks and a strict "good die" requirement make this type of analysis really critical for the achievement of an acceptable level of functional and parametric yield and reliability. The paper focuses on the development of a design-for-manufacturability (DFM) type of methodology for managing mechanical stresses during a sequence of designs of 3D TSV-based dies, stacks and packages. A set of physics-based compact models for a multi-scale simulation, to assess the mechanical stress across the device layers in silicon dies stacked and packaged with the 3D TSV technology, is proposed. A strategy for a materials data generation to feed simulation and a respective materials characterization approach are proposed, with the goal to establish a database for multi-scale materials parameters of wafer-level and package-level structures. A proposal for model validation based and a calibration approach based on fitting the simulation results to measured local stress components and to electrical characteristics of the test-chip devices are discussed.

  9. Nutritional assessment in children with cystic fibrosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimal nutrition, including consuming 35–40% of calories (kcal) as fat, is a vital part of the management of cystic fibrosis (CF), and involves accurate assessment of dietary intake. We compared 3 methods of nutritional assessment in 8– to 14-year-old children (n=20) with CF: 1) a 24-h Dietary Reca...

  10. Development of relative thermal stress index (RTSI) for Monitoring and Management of Dry Deciduous Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Vijayan, D.

    Gir wildlife sanctuary located between 20 r 57 to 21 r 20 N and 70 r 28 to 71 r 13 E is the last home of Asiatic lions Its biodiversity comprises of 450 recorded flowering plant species 32 species of mammals 26 species of reptiles about 300 species of birds and more than 2000 species of insects As per 1995 census it has 304 lions and 268 leopards The movement of wildlife to thermally comfortable zones to reduce stress conditions forces the changes in management plan with reference to change in localized water demand This necessitates the use of space based thermal data available from AVHRR MODIS etc to monitor temperature of Gir-ecosystem for meso-scale level operational utility As the time scale of the variability of NDVI parameter is much higher than that for lower boundary temperature LBT the dense patch in riverine forest having highest NDVI value would not experience change in its vigour with the change in the season NDVI value of such patch would be near invariant over the year and temperature of this pixel could serve as reference temperature for developing the concept of relative thermal stress index RTSI which is defined as RTSI T p -T r T max -T r wherein T r T max and T p refer to LBT over the maximum NDVI reference point maximum LBT observed in the Gir ecosystem and the temperature of the pixel in the image respectively RTSI images were computed from AVHRR images for post-monsoon leaf-shedded and summer seasons Scatter plot between RTSI and NDVI for summer seasons

  11. North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition Consensus Statement on the Diagnosis and Management of Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B UK Li; Frank Lefevre; Gisela G Chelimsky; Richard G Boles; Susanne P Nelson; Donald W Lewis; Steven L Linder; Robert M Issenman; Colin D Rudolph

    2008-01-01

    Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) is a disorder noted for its unique intensity of vomiting, repeated emergency department visits and hospitalizations, and reduced quality of life. It is often misdiagnosed due to the unappreciated pattern of recurrence and lack of confirmatory testing. Because no accepted approach to management has been established, the task force was charged to develop a report on

  12. Efficacy of the virtual reality-based stress management program on stress-related variables in people with mood disorders: the feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Shah, Lubna Bte Iskhandar; Torres, Samantha; Kannusamy, Premarani; Chng, Cecilia Mui Lee; He, Hong-Gu; Klainin-Yobas, Piyanee

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of a VR-based stress management program on people with mood disorders. A quasi-experimental study was conducted in a tertiary hospital in Singapore, and a convenience sample of 22 was recruited. The program comprised three daily 1-hour sessions incorporating psychoeducation and VR-based relaxation practice. Participants who completed the program had significantly lowered subjective stress (t=6.91, p<0.001), depression (t=5.62, p<0.001), and anxiety (t=5.54, p<0.001); and increased skin temperature (F=17.71, p<0.001), perceived relaxation (F=26.20, p<0.001) and knowledge (F=13.77, p<0.001). Participants' feedback on the program was positive. Findings from this study contribute to improving clinical practice and serve as preliminary data to conduct more rigorous research in the future. PMID:25634868

  13. Nutrition Explorations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This new site is compliments of the National Dairy Council and provides resources to help educators teach children about nutritious foods and a healthy diet. The site is made up of four principle sections. The first, Teacher Central, contains monthly updated ideas and activities for teaching nutrition, as well as annotated links and suggested books. The second section, the School Cafe, is designed for school foodservice professionals and includes promotion ideas, nutrition facts, and links to related resources. The third portion of the site, The Family Table, offers advice, activities, and tips for parents who want to help their children develop healthy eating habits. The final part of the site is aimed at kids themselves and offers games, quizzes, recipes, and more sites to explore. While a bit thin on content and probably dairy-centric, the site as a whole does offer some useful tools for educators and parents who want to instill healthy eating habits in children.

  14. Nutritional Biochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the effects that space flight has on humans nutritional biochemistry. Particular attention is devoted to the study of protein breakdown, inflammation, hypercatabolism, omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin D, calcium, urine, folate and nutrient stability of certain vitamins, the fluid shift and renal stone risk, acidosis, iron/hematology, and the effects on bone of dietary protein, potassium. inflammation, and omega-3 fatty acids

  15. Community Attitudes to the Appropriation of Mobile Phones for Monitoring and Managing Depression, Anxiety, and Stress

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Gordon; Hadzi Pavlovic, Dusan; Manicavasagar, Vijaya; Adler, Einat; Whitton, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    Background The benefits of self-monitoring on symptom severity, coping, and quality of life have been amply demonstrated. However, paper and pencil self-monitoring can be cumbersome and subject to biases associated with retrospective recall, while computer-based monitoring can be inconvenient in that it relies on users being at their computer at scheduled monitoring times. As a result, nonadherence in self-monitoring is common. Mobile phones offer an alternative. Their take-up has reached saturation point in most developed countries and is increasing in developing countries; they are carried on the person, they are usually turned on, and functionality is continually improving. Currently, however, public conceptions of mobile phones focus on their use as tools for communication and social identity. Community attitudes toward using mobile phones for mental health monitoring and self-management are not known. Objective The objective was to explore community attitudes toward the appropriation of mobile phones for mental health monitoring and management. Methods We held community consultations in Australia consisting of an online survey (n = 525), focus group discussions (n = 47), and interviews (n = 20). Results Respondents used their mobile phones daily and predominantly for communication purposes. Of those who completed the online survey, the majority (399/525 or 76%) reported that they would be interested in using their mobile phone for mental health monitoring and self-management if the service were free. Of the 455 participants who owned a mobile phone or PDA, there were no significant differences between those who expressed interest in the use of mobile phones for this purpose and those who did not by gender (?21, = 0.98, P = .32, phi = .05), age group (?24, = 1.95, P = .75, phi = .06), employment status (?22, = 2.74, P = .25, phi = .08) or marital status (?24, = 4.62, P = .33, phi = .10). However, the presence of current symptoms of depression, anxiety, or stress affected interest in such a program in that those with symptoms were more interested (?2 1, = 16.67, P < .001, phi = .19). Reasons given for interest in using a mobile phone program were that it would be convenient, counteract isolation, and help identify triggers to mood states. Reasons given for lack of interest included not liking to use a mobile phone or technology, concerns that it would be too intrusive or that privacy would be lacking, and not seeing the need. Design features considered to be key by participants were enhanced privacy and security functions including user name and password, ease of use, the provision of reminders, and the availability of clear feedback. Conclusions Community attitudes toward the appropriation of mobile phones for the monitoring and self-management of depression, anxiety, and stress appear to be positive as long as privacy and security provisions are assured, the program is intuitive and easy to use, and the feedback is clear. PMID:21169174

  16. Nutrition and health in amphibian husbandry.

    PubMed

    Ferrie, Gina M; Alford, Vance C; Atkinson, Jim; Baitchman, Eric; Barber, Diane; Blaner, William S; Crawshaw, Graham; Daneault, Andy; Dierenfeld, Ellen; Finke, Mark; Fleming, Greg; Gagliardo, Ron; Hoffman, Eric A; Karasov, William; Klasing, Kirk; Koutsos, Elizabeth; Lankton, Julia; Lavin, Shana R; Lentini, Andrew; Livingston, Shannon; Lock, Brad; Mason, Tom; McComb, Alejandra; Morris, Cheryl; Pessier, Allan P; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Probst, Tom; Rodriguez, Carlos; Schad, Kristine; Semmen, Kent; Sincage, Jamie; Stamper, M Andrew; Steinmetz, Jason; Sullivan, Kathleen; Terrell, Scott; Wertan, Nina; Wheaton, Catharine J; Wilson, Brad; Valdes, Eduardo V

    2014-01-01

    Amphibian biology is intricate, and there are many inter-related factors that need to be understood before establishing successful Conservation Breeding Programs (CBPs). Nutritional needs of amphibians are highly integrated with disease and their husbandry needs, and the diversity of developmental stages, natural habitats, and feeding strategies result in many different recommendations for proper care and feeding. This review identifies several areas where there is substantial room for improvement in maintaining healthy ex situ amphibian populations specifically in the areas of obtaining and utilizing natural history data for both amphibians and their dietary items, achieving more appropriate environmental parameters, understanding stress and hormone production, and promoting better physical and population health. Using a scientific or research framework to answer questions about disease, nutrition, husbandry, genetics, and endocrinology of ex situ amphibians will improve specialists' understanding of the needs of these species. In general, there is a lack of baseline data and comparative information for most basic aspects of amphibian biology as well as standardized laboratory approaches. Instituting a formalized research approach in multiple scientific disciplines will be beneficial not only to the management of current ex situ populations, but also in moving forward with future conservation and reintroduction projects. This overview of gaps in knowledge concerning ex situ amphibian care should serve as a foundation for much needed future research in these areas. PMID:25296396

  17. Nutritional deficiencies in children on restricted diets.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Midge; Danner, Elaine

    2009-10-01

    Pediatric nutritional deficiencies are associated not only with poverty and developing countries, but also in children in the developed world who adhere to restricted diets. At times, these diets are medically necessary, such as the gluten-free diet for management of celiac disease or exclusion diets in children with food allergies. At other times, the diets are self-selected by children with behavioral disorders, or parent-selected because of nutrition misinformation, cultural preferences, alternative nutrition therapies, or misconceptions regarding food tolerance. Health care providers must be vigilant in monitoring both growth and feeding patterns to identify inappropriate dietary changes that may result in nutritional deficiencies. PMID:19931065

  18. Experiential Virtual Scenarios With Real-Time Monitoring (Interreality) for the Management of Psychological Stress: A Block Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pallavicini, Federica; Morganti, Luca; Serino, Silvia; Scaratti, Chiara; Briguglio, Marilena; Crifaci, Giulia; Vetrano, Noemi; Giulintano, Annunziata; Bernava, Giuseppe; Tartarisco, Gennaro; Pioggia, Giovanni; Raspelli, Simona; Cipresso, Pietro; Vigna, Cinzia; Grassi, Alessandra; Baruffi, Margherita; Wiederhold, Brenda; Riva, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent convergence between technology and medicine is offering innovative methods and tools for behavioral health care. Among these, an emerging approach is the use of virtual reality (VR) within exposure-based protocols for anxiety disorders, and in particular posttraumatic stress disorder. However, no systematically tested VR protocols are available for the management of psychological stress. Objective Our goal was to evaluate the efficacy of a new technological paradigm, Interreality, for the management and prevention of psychological stress. The main feature of Interreality is a twofold link between the virtual and the real world achieved through experiential virtual scenarios (fully controlled by the therapist, used to learn coping skills and improve self-efficacy) with real-time monitoring and support (identifying critical situations and assessing clinical change) using advanced technologies (virtual worlds, wearable biosensors, and smartphones). Methods The study was designed as a block randomized controlled trial involving 121 participants recruited from two different worker populations—teachers and nurses—that are highly exposed to psychological stress. Participants were a sample of teachers recruited in Milan (Block 1: n=61) and a sample of nurses recruited in Messina, Italy (Block 2: n=60). Participants within each block were randomly assigned to the (1) Experimental Group (EG): n=40; B1=20, B2=20, which received a 5-week treatment based on the Interreality paradigm; (2) Control Group (CG): n=42; B1=22, B2=20, which received a 5-week traditional stress management training based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT); and (3) the Wait-List group (WL): n=39, B1=19, B2=20, which was reassessed and compared with the two other groups 5 weeks after the initial evaluation. Results Although both treatments were able to significantly reduce perceived stress better than WL, only EG participants reported a significant reduction (EG=12% vs CG=0.5%) in chronic “trait” anxiety. A similar pattern was found for coping skills: both treatments were able to significantly increase most coping skills, but only EG participants reported a significant increase (EG=14% vs CG=0.3%) in the Emotional Support skill. Conclusions Our findings provide initial evidence that the Interreality protocol yields better outcomes than the traditionally accepted gold standard for psychological stress treatment: CBT. Consequently, these findings constitute a sound foundation and rationale for the importance of continuing future research in technology-enhanced protocols for psychological stress management. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01683617; http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01683617 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6QnziHv3h). PMID:25004803

  19. Nutrition in pediatrics: basic science and clinical applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The first edition of Nutrition in Pediatrics: Basic Science and Clinical Applications was published in 1985 to "...offer a comprehensive review of general concepts of nutrition as they pertain to pediatrics as well as relevant information on the nutritional management of specific disease states." A ...

  20. Roadmap: Nutrition Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-NUTR

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Nutrition ­ Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-NUTR] College of Education, Health and Human Communication 3 Fulfills Kent Core Additional NUTR 23511 Science of Human Nutrition 3 Fulfills Kent Core of Management 3 BSCI 30030 Human Physiology 4 NUTR 43016 Cultural Aspects of Food, Nutrition and Health 3

  1. Maternal and Child nutrition

    E-print Network

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    Maternal and Child nutrition Earn an advanced degree in a highly specialized field Taught #12;Courses: Nutrition During Pregnancy Lactation and Infant Nutrition Child and Adolescent Nutrition Applied Research Methods in Maternal and Child Nutrition Topics in Epidemiology of Maternal and Child

  2. Nutrition in the pediatric population in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Verger, Judy

    2014-06-01

    Nutrition is an essential component of patient management in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Poor nutrition status accompanies many childhood chronic illnesses. A thorough assessment of the critically ill child is required to inform the plan for nutrition support. Accurate and clinically relevant nutritional assessment, including growth measurements, provides important guidance. Indirect calorimetry provides the most accurate measurement of resting energy expenditure, but is too often unavailable in the PICU. To prevent inappropriate caloric intake, reassessment of the child's nutrition status is imperative. Enteral nutrition is the recommended route of intake. Human milk is preferred for infants. PMID:24878206

  3. Modulation of the maladaptive stress response to manage diseases of protein folding.

    PubMed

    Roth, Daniela Martino; Hutt, Darren M; Tong, Jiansong; Bouchecareilh, Marion; Wang, Ning; Seeley, Theo; Dekkers, Johanna F; Beekman, Jeffrey M; Garza, Dan; Drew, Lawrence; Masliah, Eliezer; Morimoto, Richard I; Balch, William E

    2014-11-01

    Diseases of protein folding arise because of the inability of an altered peptide sequence to properly engage protein homeostasis components that direct protein folding and function. To identify global principles of misfolding disease pathology we examined the impact of the local folding environment in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NPC1), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and cystic fibrosis (CF). Using distinct models, including patient-derived cell lines and primary epithelium, mouse brain tissue, and Caenorhabditis elegans, we found that chronic expression of misfolded proteins not only triggers the sustained activation of the heat shock response (HSR) pathway, but that this sustained activation is maladaptive. In diseased cells, maladaptation alters protein structure-function relationships, impacts protein folding in the cytosol, and further exacerbates the disease state. We show that down-regulation of this maladaptive stress response (MSR), through silencing of HSF1, the master regulator of the HSR, restores cellular protein folding and improves the disease phenotype. We propose that restoration of a more physiological proteostatic environment will strongly impact the management and progression of loss-of-function and gain-of-toxic-function phenotypes common in human disease. PMID:25406061

  4. Novel endoscopic management of a late complication following TVT insertion for stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Orfhlaith E.; Martyn, Fiona; O’Connor, Rory; Jaffery, Syed

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 57 Final Diagnosis: Bladder erosion Symptoms: Haematuria • irritative bladder symptoms • recurrent UTI Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Endoscopic tape resection Specialty: Urology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Since 1995 over 1 million tension free vaginal slings have been utilized to treat stress incontinence. The 10 year success rates range from 84–93%. Complication rates are low by comparision. Bladder perforation occurring during the time of surgery and is managed effectively if diagnosed and treated intraoperatively. However bladder erosion occuring post-operatively predominantly occur within the first 2 years. The risk of erosion increases with body mass index and previous vaginal surgery. Case Report: We report the case of a bladder erosion occurring 5 years following the original surgery. The symptoms included recurrent urinary tract infections, frequency and haematuria. A novel technique was employed using the transurethral approach to initially disintegrate the calculus and then using an endoshears to excise the mesh below the level of the epithelium. Continence was maintained postoperatively. Conclusions: This approach provides a safe alternative to both the transvaginal and transabdominal approach to excising intravesical mesh. PMID:24222816

  5. Modulation of the Maladaptive Stress Response to Manage Diseases of Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Daniela Martino; Hutt, Darren M.; Tong, Jiansong; Bouchecareilh, Marion; Wang, Ning; Seeley, Theo; Dekkers, Johanna F.; Beekman, Jeffrey M.; Garza, Dan; Drew, Lawrence; Masliah, Eliezer; Morimoto, Richard I.; Balch, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Diseases of protein folding arise because of the inability of an altered peptide sequence to properly engage protein homeostasis components that direct protein folding and function. To identify global principles of misfolding disease pathology we examined the impact of the local folding environment in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NPC1), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and cystic fibrosis (CF). Using distinct models, including patient-derived cell lines and primary epithelium, mouse brain tissue, and Caenorhabditis elegans, we found that chronic expression of misfolded proteins not only triggers the sustained activation of the heat shock response (HSR) pathway, but that this sustained activation is maladaptive. In diseased cells, maladaptation alters protein structure–function relationships, impacts protein folding in the cytosol, and further exacerbates the disease state. We show that down-regulation of this maladaptive stress response (MSR), through silencing of HSF1, the master regulator of the HSR, restores cellular protein folding and improves the disease phenotype. We propose that restoration of a more physiological proteostatic environment will strongly impact the management and progression of loss-of-function and gain-of-toxic-function phenotypes common in human disease. PMID:25406061

  6. Nutritional stress in Northern gannets during an unprecedented low reproductive success year: Can extreme sea surface temperature event and dietary change be the cause?

    PubMed

    Franci, Cynthia D; Vézina, François; Grégoire, François; Rail, Jean-François; Verreault, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Reproductive success of seabirds is tightly associated with availability of their prey for which the spatiotemporal distribution may be influenced by sea surface temperature (SST) fluctuations. The objective of this study was to investigate whether Northern gannets (Morus bassanus) from the largest colony in North America (Bonaventure Island, Quebec, Canada) were in negative nutritional state during the unprecedented low reproductive success year of 2012, and whether this was associated with changes in SST anomalies and diet. The incubation period of gannets in 2012 was characterized by a significant decline, from early to late incubation, in plasma triglyceride levels that was associated with an increase in plasma corticosterone levels. However, no changes in plasma glycerol and ?-hydroxybutyrate levels were noted. SST anomalies recorded in this area (south of the Gulf of St. Lawrence) during the breeding period were consistently higher in 2012 compared to the previous year (a better reproductive success year). Based on signatures of stable carbon (?(13)C) and nitrogen (?(15)N) isotopes in gannet red blood cells and in whole fish homogenates of three major preys (mackerel, herring, and capelin), a minor dietary shift was noted between those years and incubation periods. In light of these findings, it is suggested that the extreme warm-water perturbation event that prevailed in the Gulf of St. Lawrence during summer 2012 was associated with a rapid deterioration of nutritional condition of Bonaventure Island gannets during the incubation. These suboptimal physiological changes likely contributed to the dramatic decline in reproductive success reported in this colony. PMID:25449633

  7. STRESS MANAGEMENT Contact us for more information lds@qub.ac.uk 028 9097 2727

    E-print Network

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    ? Look at the list below and think of how many of these symptoms you experience? #12;3 What happens when you feel stressed? Physical Signs of Stress Racing heart Cold, sweating hands Headaches Shallow consumption Cognitive Signs of Stress Forgetting things Difficulty concentrating Worrying about things

  8. Managing Stress and Maintaining Well-Being: Social Support, Problem-Focused Coping, and Avoidant Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Ruth Chu-Lien

    2011-01-01

    This study tested a model that links stress, social support, problem-focused coping, and well-being. First, it looks at how high support significantly moderated the association between stress and well-being. Next, the students' problem-focused coping was seen as mediating this moderated association. Finally, a 3-way interaction of stress, social…

  9. Managing Perceived Stress among College Students: The Roles of Social Support and Dysfunctional Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Ruth Chu-Lien

    2012-01-01

    The author examined the conditions (i.e., social support and dysfunctional coping) under which perceived stress predicted psychological well-being in 459 college students. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated a significant 2-way interaction (Perceived Stress x Social Support) and a significant 3-way interaction (Perceived Stress x Social…

  10. Guideline clinical nutrition in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is regularly accompanied by dysphagia and other factors associated with decreased nutritional intake. Dysphagia with aspiration pneumonia and insufficient nutritional intake lead to worse outcome after stroke. This guideline is the first chapter of the guideline “Clinical Nutrition in Neurology” of the German Society for Clinical Nutrition (DGEM) which itself is one part of a comprehensive guideline about all areas of Clinical Nutrition. The thirty-one recommendations of the guideline are based on a systematic literature search and review, last updated December 31, 2011. All recommendations were discussed and consented at several consensus conferences with the entire DGEM guideline group. The recommendations underline the importance of an early screening and assessment of dysphagia and give advice for an evidence based and comprehensive nutritional management to avoid aspiration, malnutrition and dehydration. PMID:24289189

  11. Construction challenges and solutions in TAMU3, a 14 T stress-managed Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Holik, E. F.; Garrison, R.; Diaczenko, N.; Elliott, T.; Jaisle, A.; McInturff, A. D.; McIntyre, P.; Sattarov, A. [Texas A and M University 3380 University Drive East College Station, Texas, 77843 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    The Accelerator Research Laboratory at Texas A and M University is nearing completion of a Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole that incorporates stress management directly in its windings. The windings utilize graded-cross-section cable made from 54/61 (54 out of a 61 subelement hexagonal pattern) Restacked Rod Processed® Nb{sub 3}Sn/Cu conductor and fine-filament S-2 glass fabric insulation. Coil heat treatment and associated differential expansions have brought about some tin leakage, highresistance electrical shorts, and coil gaps. TAMU3b impregnation successfully increased the coil-to-ground resistance. Quench protection in TAMU3 was simulated using QUENCH. The tests of TAMU3 should provide the first examination of stress management at field intensities greater than 12 T.

  12. Nutrition of aging cats.

    PubMed

    Laflamme, Dottie; Gunn-Moore, Daničlle

    2014-07-01

    At least one-third of cats seen by veterinarians are mature, defined as 7 years of age or older, and approximately 13% of cats are geriatric, defined as 12 years of age or older. The article reviews physiologic differences between these life stages and relates the changes to nutritional needs. Geriatric cats have increased requirements for dietary energy and protein. Feeding management addresses what, when, how, and where food is provided. This article provides an update on diet-sensitive conditions, including cognitive dysfunction, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, osteoarthritis, and hyperthyroidism. Although guidelines are provided, patients must be evaluated and fed according to their individual needs. PMID:24951345

  13. Nutrition Frontiers - Winter 2010

    Cancer.gov

    Nutrition Frontiers - Winter 2010 Winter 2010 Volume 1, Issue 1 Dear Colleague, Welcome to the first issue of Nutrition Frontiers, a quarterly newsletter from the Nutritional Science Research Group (NSRG), Division of Cancer Prevention, NCI. In this

  14. Nutrition.gov

    MedlinePLUS

    ... online access to government information on food and human nutrition for consumers. A service of the National Agricultural ... scientists at USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center (BHNRC) in Beltsville, Maryland. Nutrition.gov ...

  15. Nutrition and Diet

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A-Wish Perspectives Newsletter Translated brochures Relevant Links Nutrition and Diet Nutritional deficiencies are common in thalassemia, ... gamma tocopherol, plasma ascorbate, and serum folate. (See nutrition table below.) Recommendations for dietary supplementation should be ...

  16. Internet-Delivered Exposure-Based Treatment vs. Stress Management for Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Randomized Trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brjánn Ljótsson; Erik Hedman; Erik Andersson; Hugo Hesser; Perjohan Lindfors; Timo Hursti; Sara Rydh; Christian Rück; Nils Lindefors; Gerhard Andersson

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:Our research group has developed an internet-delivered cognitive behavioral treatment (ICBT) for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We compared ICBT with internet-delivered stress management (ISM) for IBS to assess whether the effects of ICBT are specific.METHODS:This was a randomized controlled trial, including 195 self-referred participants diagnosed with IBS. The treatment interventions lasted for 10 weeks and included an online therapist contact.

  17. The impact of a new emotional self-management program on stress, emotions, heart rate variability, DHEA and cortisol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rollin McCraty; Bob Barrios-Choplin; Deborah Rozman; Mike Atkinson; Alan D. Watkins

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the effects on healthy adults of a new emotional self-management program, consisting of two key techniques,\\u000a “Cut-Thru” and the “Heart Lock-In.” These techniques are designed to eliminate negative thought loops and promote sustained\\u000a positive emotional states. The hypotheses were that training and practice in these techniques would yield lowered levels of\\u000a stress and negative emotion and cortisol,

  18. Metabolic and nutritional support of critically ill patients: consensus and controversies.

    PubMed

    Preiser, Jean-Charles; van Zanten, Arthur Rh; Berger, Mette M; Biolo, Gianni; Casaer, Michael P; Doig, Gordon S; Griffiths, Richard D; Heyland, Daren K; Hiesmayr, Michael; Iapichino, Gaetano; Laviano, Alessandro; Pichard, Claude; Singer, Pierre; Van den Berghe, Greet; Wernerman, Jan; Wischmeyer, Paul; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2015-12-01

    The results of recent large-scale clinical trials have led us to review our understanding of the metabolic response to stress and the most appropriate means of managing nutrition in critically ill patients. This review presents an update in this field, identifying and discussing a number of areas for which consensus has been reached and others where controversy remains and presenting areas for future research. We discuss optimal calorie and protein intake, the incidence and management of re-feeding syndrome, the role of gastric residual volume monitoring, the place of supplemental parenteral nutrition when enteral feeding is deemed insufficient, the role of indirect calorimetry, and potential indications for several pharmaconutrients. PMID:25777846

  19. Basic nutritional investigation Efficiency of apples, strawberries, and tomatoes for reduction of oxidative stress in pigs as a model for humans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tanja Pajk; Vida Rezar; Alenka Levart; Janez Salobir

    Objective: The present study investigated the potency of apples, strawberries, and tomatoes in decreasing oxidative stress in pigs as a model for humans. Methods: Forty-eight growing pigs were individually penned in metabolic cages and divided into six groups. All groups received isocaloric daily rations composed of a basal diet supplemented with starch, linseed oil, linseed oil and apples, linseed oil

  20. 45 CFR 1304.52 - Human resources management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Management § 1304.52 Human resources management...mental health; child nutrition; and, services for...is followed. (3) Nutrition services must be supported...related to social, human, or family services...health, safety, and nutrition; adult learning...

  1. 45 CFR 1304.52 - Human resources management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Management § 1304.52 Human resources management...mental health; child nutrition; and, services for...is followed. (3) Nutrition services must be supported...related to social, human, or family services...health, safety, and nutrition; adult learning...

  2. 45 CFR 1304.52 - Human resources management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Management § 1304.52 Human resources management...mental health; child nutrition; and, services for...is followed. (3) Nutrition services must be supported...related to social, human, or family services...health, safety, and nutrition; adult learning...

  3. 45 CFR 1304.52 - Human resources management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Management § 1304.52 Human resources management...mental health; child nutrition; and, services for...is followed. (3) Nutrition services must be supported...related to social, human, or family services...health, safety, and nutrition; adult learning...

  4. Diagnosis and Management of Sleep Disorders in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder:A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mohsenin, Shahla

    2014-01-01

    Objective: International and societal conflicts and natural disasters can leave physical and mental scars in people who are directly affected by these traumatic experiences. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is the clinical manifestation of these experiences in the form of re-experiencing the trauma, avoidance of trauma-related stimuli, and persistent symptoms of hyperarousal. There is growing evidence that sleep disruption that occurs following trauma exposure may in fact contribute to the pathophysiology of PTSD and poor clinical outcomes. The purpose of this review is to highlight the importance of recognition and management of sleep disorders in patients with PTSD. Data Sources: English-language, adult research studies published between 1985 and April 2014 were identified via the PubMed database. The search terms used were PTSD AND sleep disorders. Study Selection: The search identified 792 original and review articles. Of these, 53 articles that discussed or researched sleep disorders in PTSD were selected. Fourteen randomized controlled trials of therapy for PTSD are included in this review. Results: Impaired sleep is a common complaint mainly in the form of nightmares and insomnia among people with PTSD. Sleep apnea and periodic limb movement disorder are particularly prevalent in patients with PTSD and, yet, remain unrecognized. Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are effective in improving PTSD global symptoms, they have a variable and modest effect on sleep disorder symptoms. Cognitive-behavioral treatment targeted to sleep and/or the use of the centrally acting selective ?1 antagonist prazosin have been more successful in treating insomnia and nightmares in PTSD than other classes of medications. In view of the high occurrence of sleep apnea and periodic leg movement disorder, a thorough sleep evaluation and treatment are warranted. Conclusions: Patients with PTSD have a high prevalence of sleep disorders and should be queried for insomnia, nightmares, periodic limb movement disorder, and sleep-disordered breathing.

  5. Global Gradients of Coral Exposure to Environmental Stresses and Implications for Local Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph Maina; Tim R. McClanahan; Valentijn Venus; Mebrahtu Ateweberhan; Joshua Madin

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundThe decline of coral reefs globally underscores the need for a spatial assessment of their exposure to multiple environmental stressors to estimate vulnerability and evaluate potential counter-measures.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsThis study combined global spatial gradients of coral exposure to radiation stress factors (temperature, UV light and doldrums), stress-reinforcing factors (sedimentation and eutrophication), and stress-reducing factors (temperature variability and tidal amplitude) to produce

  6. Nutrient Content of Foods, Nutritional Supplements, and Food Fallacies. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.; Stein, Joan Z.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  7. Appraisal of Nutritional Status. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latanick, Maureen Rogan; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  8. Eating for 1, Healthy and Active for 2; feasibility of delivering novel, compact training for midwives to build knowledge and confidence in giving nutrition, physical activity and weight management advice during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Women in Wales are more likely to be obese in pregnancy than in any other United Kingdom (UK) country. Midwives are ideally placed to explore nutrition, physical activity and weight management concerns however qualitative studies indicate they lack confidence in raising the sensitive issue of weight. Acknowledging this and the reality of finite time and resources, this study aimed to deliver compact training on nutrition, physical activity and weight management during pregnancy to increase the knowledge and confidence of midwives in this subject. Methods A compact training package for midwives was developed comprising of evidence based nutrition, physical activity and weight management guidance for pregnancy. Training was promoted via midwifery leads and delivered within the Health Board. Questionnaires based on statements from national public health guidance were used to assess changes in self-reported knowledge and confidence pre and post training. Descriptive statistics were applied and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results 43 midwives registered for training, 32 (74%) attended and completed the questionnaires. Although, pre training knowledge and confidence varied between participants, statistically significant improvements in self-reported knowledge and confidence were observed post training. 97% indicated knowledge of pregnancy specific food and nutrition messages as ‘better’ (95% CI 85 to 100), as opposed to 3% stating ‘stayed the same’ – 60% stated ‘much better’. 83% indicated confidence to explain the risks of raised BMI in pregnancy was either ‘much’ or ‘somewhat better’ (95% CI 66 to 93), as opposed to 17% stating ‘stayed the same’. 89% indicated confidence to discuss eating habits and physical activity was ‘much’ or ‘somewhat better’ (95% CI 73 to 97) as opposed to 11% stating ‘stayed the same’. Emergent themes highlighted that training was positively received and relevant to midwifery practice. Conclusions This study provides early indications that a compact nutrition, physical activity and weight management training package improves midwives self-reported knowledge and confidence. Cascading training across the midwifery service in the Health Board and conducting further studies to elicit longer term impact on midwifery practice and patient outcomes are recommended. PMID:24996422

  9. Development of brief stress management support groups for couples undergoing in vitro fertilization treatment 1 1 This project was not supported by any external funding sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Ellen McNaughton-Cassill; Michael Bostwick; Sara E Vanscoy; Nancy J Arthur; Timothy N Hickman; Randal D Robinson; Greg S Neal

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To develop and assess the efficacy of couples stress management groups offered concurrently with IVF treatment.Design: Couples in IVF treatment were given the option of participating in a biweekly stress management group.Setting: The IVF treatment clinic at Wilford Hall Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas.Patient(s): One or both members of 17 couples participated in the program in one of four

  10. Setting Up the Next Generation Biofeedback Program for Stress and Anxiety Management for College Students: A Simple and Cost-Effective Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratanasiripong, Paul; Sverduk, Kevin; Hayashino, Diane; Prince, Judy

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of stress and anxiety on college campuses along with limited resources and budget reductions for many campuses has prompted the need for innovative approaches to help students effectively manage their stress and anxiety. With college students becoming more and more technology-savvy, the authors present an innovative…

  11. The Development of a Stress Management Program for the Adult Degree Completion Program Admissions Team at a Four-Year Private Liberal Arts College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlee, Brian

    A stress management program was developed for the adult degree completion program admissions team at Warner Southern College, a four-year private liberal arts college. A relatively recent stress-inducing change was caused by an administrative decision to expand the program offerings from five sites to seven, using current staff. Derived from the…

  12. Knockout of multiple Arabidopsis cation/H(+) exchangers suggests isoform-specific roles in metal stress response, germination and seed mineral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Connorton, James M; Webster, Rachel E; Cheng, Ninghui; Pittman, Jon K

    2012-01-01

    Cation/H(+) exchangers encoded by CAX genes play an important role in the vacuolar accumulation of metals including Ca(2+) and Mn(2+). Arabidopsis thaliana CAX1 and CAX3 have been previously shown to differ phylogenetically from CAX2 but the physiological roles of these different transporters are still unclear. To examine the functions and the potential of redundancy between these three cation transporters, cax1/cax2 and cax2/cax3 double knockout mutants were generated and compared with wild type and cax single knockouts. These double mutants had equivalent metal stress responses to single cax mutants. Both cax1 and cax1/cax2 had increased tolerance to Mg stress, while cax2 and cax2/cax3 both had increased sensitivity to Mn stress. The cax1/cax2 and cax2/cax3 mutants did not exhibit the deleterious developmental phenotypes previously seen with the cax1/cax3 mutant. However, these new double mutants did show alterations in seed germination, specifically a delay in germination time. These alterations correlated with changes in nutrient content within the seeds of the mutants, particularly the cax1/cax2 mutant which had significantly higher seed content of Ca and Mn. This study indicates that the presence of these Arabidopsis CAX transporters is important for normal germination and infers a role for CAX proteins in metal homeostasis within the seed. PMID:23071810

  13. An Exploration of the Central Factors Influencing Teachers' Stress Management in Urban Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Kristen Lee

    2011-01-01

    In 1999, it was estimated that 50% of new teachers leave urban districts in less than five years. New urban teachers face a host of demands that can contribute towards stress and burnout. While some of the literature has focused upon teacher stress, to date none has focused upon new teachers who are enrolled in alternative licensure programs with…

  14. Providing psychological intervention following traumatic events: understanding and managing psychologists’ own stress reactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ben Hayes; Norah Frederickson

    2008-01-01

    The role of the educational psychology service in crisis support is well established. This paper examines a key aspect of this role, the impact on psychologists themselves, and reviews literature on secondary stress, considering the term “stress” itself as part of the discussion. It examines recommendations for professional practice and self care in disasters and considers a model that could

  15. Assessing and Managing Caregiver Stress: Development of a Teaching Tool for Medical Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Famakinwa, Abisola; Fabiny, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Forty medical residents from major teaching hospitals in Boston, Massachusetts, participated in small group teaching sessions about caregiver stress. A teaching tool was developed that included a teaching handout, interactive cases, standard instruments for assessing caregiver stress, peer-reviewed articles about caregiving, and a list of…

  16. Relax for Success: An Educator's Guide to Stress Management. [With CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanz, Jeffrey

    This book is designed as a practical, concise, easy-to-read guide for relieving stress. It is written specifically for educators, with examples and anecdotes that relate to professional educators' experiences. It assumes a holistic approach to stress relief that incorporates thought, verbal and action strategies and techniques. The harm that…

  17. Self-Efficacy and Stress of Staff Managing Challenging Behaviours of People with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cudre-Mauroux, Annick

    2011-01-01

    Self-efficacy has been reported to play a significant role in stress levels of parents facing challenging behaviours of their children with learning disabilities. The role of self-efficacy has also been found to affect the stress levels of professional caregivers in such situations. To understand the implications of staff self-efficacy in…

  18. Providing Psychological Intervention Following Traumatic Events: Understanding and Managing Psychologists' Own Stress Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Ben; Frederickson, Norah

    2008-01-01

    The role of the educational psychology service in crisis support is well established. This paper examines a key aspect of this role, the impact on psychologists themselves, and reviews literature on secondary stress, considering the term "stress" itself as part of the discussion. It examines recommendations for professional practice and self care…

  19. Effects of Computer-based Stress Management Training on Psychological Well-being and Work Performance in Japanese Employees: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    UMANODAN, Rino; SHIMAZU, Akihito; MINAMI, Masahide; KAWAKAMI, Norito

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a computer-based stress management training (SMT) program in improving employees’ psychological well-being and work performance. A total of 12 work units (N=263) were randomly assigned to either an intervention group (8 work units, n=142) or to a wait-list control group (4 work units, n=121). All participants were requested to answer online questionnaires assessing psychological well-being as a primary outcome, and coping style, social support, and knowledge about stress management as secondary outcomes at baseline (T0), immediately after the intervention (T1), and 2 months after the intervention (T2). The group?×?time interaction was tested using a mixed-model repeated measures ANOVA. Results showed a group?×?time interaction for “knowledge about stress management” in the entire sample. Among participants who had more than 3 d of training, a significant group?×?time interaction was observed for “problem-solving” and “avoidance and suppression” as well as “knowledge about stress management.” Our computer-based stress management program was effective for improving knowledge about stress management. It was also effective for improving coping skills in instances where participants had enough time (at least 3 d) to complete all sessions. PMID:25055847

  20. Cognitive self-care skills: a model for managing stressful lifestyles.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Brenda L

    2002-06-01

    Feeling overwhelmed or overloaded and frequently experiencing anxiety, anger, guilt, and/or frustration is preventable and amenable to personal control. It takes self-awareness and lots of practice to modify long established ways of thinking about one's self and others. It is often helpful to have someone who will support identified goals to improve stress-reducing resources; to help with developing a sensitivity to self-generated stress-inducing demands; and/or to rehearse cognitive stress-reducing, self-care skills. The cognitive self-care skills outlined herein are powerful stress-reducing resources that can prevent psychological stress and that can promote a sense of wellness. PMID:12389269