Science.gov

Sample records for nutrition stress management

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigotes Are Able to Manage Internal Cholesterol Levels under Nutritional Lipid Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Miria Gomes; Visbal, Gonzalo; Salgado, Leonardo T.; Vidal, Juliana Cunha; Godinho, Joseane L. P.; De Cicco, Nuccia N. T.; Atella, Geórgia C.; de Souza, Wanderley; Cunha-e-Silva, Narcisa

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes store high amounts of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters in reservosomes. These unique organelles are responsible for cellular digestion by providing substrates for homeostasis and parasite differentiation. Here we demonstrate that under nutritional lipid stress, epimastigotes preferentially mobilized reservosome lipid stocks, instead of lipid bodies, leading to the consumption of parasite cholesterol reservoirs and production of ergosterol. Starved epimastigotes acquired more LDL-NBD-cholesterol by endocytosis and distributed the exogenous cholesterol to their membranes faster than control parasites. Moreover, the parasites were able to manage internal cholesterol levels, alternating between consumption and accumulation. With normal lipid availability, parasites esterified cholesterol exhibiting an ACAT-like activity that was sensitive to Avasimibe in a dose-dependent manner. This result also implies that exogenous cholesterol has a role in lipid reservoirs in epimastigotes. PMID:26068009

  2. Stress Management

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Friendly Worksites Program Requirements Fit-Friendly Resources Stress Management Banner 1 - To Stress or Not to Stress - ... Decide But We Can Help What Is Stress Management? Banner 2 - Stress Continuum Graphic Banner Live life ...

  3. Manage Stress

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Manage Stress Print This Topic En espańol Manage Stress Browse Sections The Basics Overview Signs and Health ... of 9 sections The Basics: Benefits of Lower Stress What are the benefits of managing stress? Over ...

  4. Horse Nutrition and Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Horses are used in a variety of activities with over 5.32 million animals reported in the US. Many of these horses are owned and managed for profit and a significant number are for recreation and sport. Regardless of the use, proper nutrition is essential for maximizing animal growth and productivit...

  5. Ruminant Nutrition Symposium: Modulation of metabolism through nutrition and management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary role of the dairy cow is to help provide high-quality protein and other nutrients through lactation to the human diet. It is clear that these high-producing and long lactations are stressful on the cows, and minor changes in nutrition and management can have significant impacts on profi...

  6. Sport and Nutrition Education Interaction on Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozturk, Mehmet Ertugrul

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine sport and nutrition education interaction on stress. Three groups were selected for the study: control, single treatment and social treatment under nutrition treatment, too. The groups that were under nutrition treatments should have information about the nutrition resources. This experiment was done for two…

  7. Pet obesity management: beyond nutrition.

    PubMed

    Linder, Deborah; Mueller, Megan

    2014-07-01

    Excess weight has been associated with many clinical and subclinical conditions that put a pet's health at risk. Successful weight management programs extend beyond standard nutritional management and incorporate an understanding of human-animal interaction. Understanding the processes and dynamics of human-animal relationships can be a useful tool for practitioners in developing successful treatment plans for their clients. Obesity is a nutritional disorder requiring lifelong management; however, when veterinarians go beyond standard treatment to include an understanding of human-animal interaction, it is also one of the few conditions in veterinary medicine that is completely preventable and curable. PMID:24951347

  8. Web Based Personal Nutrition Management Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkurt, Selen; Zayim, Ne?e; Gülkesen, Kemal Hakan; Samur, Mehmet Kemal

    Internet is being used increasingly as a resource for accessing health-related information because of its several advantages. Therefore, Internet tailoring becomes quite preferable in health education and personal health management recently. Today, there are many web based health programs de-signed for individuals. Among these studies nutrition and weight management is popular because, obesity has become a heavy burden for populations worldwide. In this study, we designed a web based personal nutrition education and management tool, The Nutrition Web Portal, in order to enhance patients’ nutrition knowledge, and provide behavioral change against obesity. The present paper reports analysis, design and development processes of The Nutrition Web Portal.

  9. Nutritional management of regurgitation in infants.

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, Y; Lifshitz, J Z; Orenstein, S; Lifschitz, C H; Shepherd, R W; Casaubón, P R; Muinos, W I; Fagundes-Neto, U; Garcia Aranda, J A; Gentles, M; Santiago, J D; Vanderhoof, J; Yeung, C Y; Moran, J R; Lifshitz, F

    1998-08-01

    Infantile regurgitation is a frequently occurring problem. Throughout the world, anxious parents are imploring physicians to eliminate their infant's regurgitation. General practitioners, pediatricians and pediatric gastroenterologists strive to alleviate infantile regurgitation and its related parental stress. In this paper we define the scope of the problem and analyze the optimal, cost-efficient management approach to simple regurgitation in infants. The intent of this paper is to disseminate this information to practicing physicians and other health care professionals in an attempt to minimize the impact of this annoying problem of infancy and to eliminate confusion and expensive diagnostic tests and use of sub-optimal treatment modalities. Parental reassurance and dietary management by feeding thickened formula are important components in managing regurgitation in infants while maintaining optimal nutritional intake for adequate growth and development. PMID:9710837

  10. Managing Stress. Project Seed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muto, Donna; Wilk, Jan

    One of eight papers from Project Seed, this paper describes a stress management project undertaken with high school sophomores. Managing Stress is described as an interactive workshop that offers young people an opportunity to examine specific areas of stress in their lives and to learn effective ways to deal with them. The program described…

  11. Managing Leadership Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bal, Vidula; Campbell, Michael; McDowell-Larsen, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    Everyone experiences stress, and leaders face the additional stress brought about by the unique demands of leadership: having to make decisions with limited information, to manage conflict, to do more with less ...and faster! The consequences of stress can include health problems and deteriorating relationships. Knowing what signs of stress to…

  12. Nutrient Management Module No. 2 Plant Nutrition

    E-print Network

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    . A component of cell walls; plays a role in the structure and permeability of membranes Enzyme activatorNutrient Management Module No. 2 Plant Nutrition and Soil Fertility by Clain Jones, Soil Chemist" as well as offer the potential for credits for CCAs in Nutrient Management (within the "Plant Nutrition

  13. Stress Management for Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaichkowsky, Leonard D., Ed.; Sime, Wesley E., Ed.

    Included in this volume are papers on stress management in athletics; eight of the ten papers are followed with a "Coach's Reaction": (1) "Competitive Athletic Stress Factors in Athletes and Coaches" (Walter Kroll); (2) "Mental Preparation for Peak Performance in Swimmers" (Eugene F. Gauron)--Coach's Reaction by Suzi D'Annolfo; (3) "Cognitive…

  14. Nutritional status and nutritional management in children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, Edward P T; Sullivan, Peter B

    2015-12-01

    Malnutrition is often seen at the point of diagnosis in childhood malignancy or may develop during the course of treatment. Strategies for optimal diagnosis and management of nutritional problems in children with cancer are limited in the published literature. Identification of children who may be malnourished or at nutritional risk can be achieved through improved approaches for risk stratification and classification. Once recognised, various strategies have been demonstrated to reduce malnutrition, minimise side effects of treatment and improve survival. Novel approaches in vivo and adult oncology populations provide future avenues for investigation. PMID:26130383

  15. Correlations among Stress, Physical Activity and Nutrition: School Employee Health Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillan, Wynn; Naquin, Millie; Zannis, Marie; Bowers, Ashley; Brewer, Julie; Russell, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Employee health promotion programs increase work productivity and effectively reduce employer costs related to health care and absenteeism, and enhance worker productivity. Components of an effective worksite health program include stress management, exercise and nutrition and/or weight management classes or counseling. Few studies have documented…

  16. Nutrition Management Program ROCHESTER INSITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Rochester, New York

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Nutrition Management Program ROCHESTER INSITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Rochester, New York http://www.rit.edu/healthsciences/undergraduate-programs/nutrition-management 2015-2016 STUDENT HANDBOOK POLICIES & PROCEDURES #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS: I. ACADEMY OF NUTRITION Contacts for Nutrition Management Program/ACEND G Student Responsibilities H Agreement of Understanding #12

  17. STRESS RELIEF Learn to Manage Stress

    E-print Network

    Branoff, Theodore J.

    STRESS RELIEF Learn to Manage Stress It can seem as though we're always at work. First, there of life today can cause anxiety and stress. This can lead to illness, depression and strain some control over the many stressful elements of life. In this issue of Your Source, we look at ways

  18. Nutrition Management Program Supplement The Mission of the Nutrition Management Program is based on the philosophy that a college

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Nutrition Management Program Supplement The Mission of the Nutrition Management Program is based practice as well as careers in the changing food and nutrition environment to better serve society with this process, applicants should complete the following: 1. Review the Nutrition Management Student Handbook

  19. Kolss et al. Adaptation to chronic nutritional stress 1 Life history consequences of adaptation to larval nutritional stress in

    E-print Network

    Kawecki, Tadeusz J.

    .kawecki@unil.ch Running title: Adaptation to chronic nutritional stress Keywords: experimental evolution, malnutrition malnutrition. Thus, fruit flies have the genetic potential to adapt to poor larval food, with no detectable

  20. Exploring Nutrition Literacy and Knowledge among a National Sample of School Nutrition Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoellner, Jamie; Carr, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this national study was to describe nutrition literacy levels and nutrition knowledge among school nutrition (SN) managers, and explore if barriers to seeking SN information, perceived role in school wellness, and confidence in SN decision making varied by nutrition literacy and knowledge scores. Methods: An…

  1. ISS Update: Nutrition Manager Talks About Children's Book '??Space Nutrition' - Duration: 12 minutes.

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean interviews Scott Smith, Manager of Nutritional Biochemistry at Johnson Space Center, about the children'??s book he co-authored called "Space Nutrition."?ť T...

  2. ROOT PLASTICITY TO NUTRITIONAL STRESS IN MEDITERRANEAN SEA BEET

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of root adaptive responses to nutritional stress is required to improve yield stability of sugarbeet. The aim of this research was a comparative study of the root morpho-physiological plasticity among two sea beet populations collected on poor- and nutrient-rich habitats of the Adriatic co...

  3. Nutritional Management in Enterocutaneous Fistula. What is the evidence?

    PubMed Central

    BADRASAWI, Manal; SHAHAR, Suzana; SAGAP, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    The management of Enterocutaneous fistula (ECF) is challenging. It remains associated with morbidity and mortality, despite advancements in medical and surgical therapies. Early nutritional support using parenteral, enteral or fystuloclysis routs is essential to reverse catabolism and replace nutrients, fluid and electrolyte losses. This study aims to review the current literature on the management of ECF. Fistulae classifications have an impact on the calories and protein requirements. Early nutritional support with parenteral, enteral nutrition or fistuloclysis played a significant role in the management outcome. Published literature on the nutritional management of ECF is mostly retrospective and lacks experimental design. Prospective studies do not investigate nutritional assessment or management experimentally. Individualising the nutritional management protocol was recommended due to the absence of management guidelines for ECF patients. PMID:26715903

  4. Stress: Neurobiology, consequences and management.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Rinwa, Puneet; Kaur, Gurleen; Machawal, Lalit

    2013-04-01

    Stress, both physical and psychological, is attracting increasing attention among neuroresearchers. In the last 20 decades, there has been a surge of interest in the research of stress-induced manifestations and this approach has resulted in the development of more appropriate animal models for stress-associated pathologies and its therapeutic management. These stress models are an easy and convenient method for inducing both psychological and physical stress. To understand the behavioral changes underlying major depression, molecular and cellular studies are required. Dysregulation of the stress system may lead to disturbances in growth and development, and may this may further lead to the development of various other psychiatric disorders. This article reviews the different types of stress and their neurobiology, including the different neurotransmitters affected. There are various complications associated with stress and their management through various pharmacological and non-pharmacological techniques. The use of herbs in the treatment of stress-related problems is practiced in both Indian and Western societies, and it has a vast market in terms of anti-stress medications and treatments. Non-pharmacological techniques such as meditation and yoga are nowadays becoming very popular as a stress-relieving therapy because of their greater effectiveness and no associated side effects. Therefore, this review highlights the changes under stress and stressor and their impact on different animal models in understanding the mechanisms of stress along with their effective and safe management. PMID:23833514

  5. Ms Sylvia Stephen, MSc. Human Nutrition Unit Manager

    E-print Network

    Neri, Peter

    Ms Sylvia Stephen, MSc. Human Nutrition Unit Manager 01224 438607 sylvia.stephen@abdn.ac.uk Contact us: The Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health offers a bespoke service to the food industry We also offer guidance and advice on when a nutritional claim can be made on your product Back of pack

  6. Child Nutrition Management System: An Interview with Rich Connell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Gregory M., Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This article, the second in a continuing series highlighting exemplary information technology (IT) practices, recounts an interview with the project manager of New York State's Child Nutrition Management System (CNMS). CNMS is a Web-based system for claim processing and program management for the Child Nutrition Program administered by the New…

  7. Experimental Evidence for Nutrition Regulated Stress Resistance in Drosophila ananassae

    PubMed Central

    Sisodia, Seema; Singh, Bashisth N.

    2012-01-01

    Background The amount and quality of nutrients consumed by organisms have a strong impact on stress resistance, life-history traits and reproduction. The balance between energy acquisition and expenditure is crucial to the survival and reproductive success of animals. The ability of organisms to adjust their development, physiology or behavior in response to environmental conditions, called phenotypic plasticity, is a defining property of life. One of the most familiar and important examples of phenotypic plasticity is the response of stress tolerance and reproduction to changes in developmental nutrition. Larval nutrition may affect a range of different life-history traits as well as responses to environmental stress in adult. Principal Findings Here we investigate the effect of larval nutrition on desiccation, starvation, chill-coma recovery, heat resistance as well as egg to adult viability, egg production and ovariole number in Drosophila ananassae. We raised larvae on either protein rich diet or carbohydrate rich diet. We found that flies consuming protein rich diet have higher desiccation and heat shock resistance whereas flies developed on carbohydrate rich diet have higher starvation and cold resistance. Egg production was higher in females developed on protein rich diet and we also found trade-off between egg production and Egg to adult viability of the flies. Viability was higher in carbohydrate rich diet. However, sex specific viability was found in different nutritional regimes. Higher Egg production might be due to higher ovariole number in females of protein rich diet. Conclusion Thus, Drosophila ananassae adapts different stress tolerance and life-history strategies according to the quality of the available diet, which are correlated with phenotypic adjustment at anatomical and physiological levels. PMID:23049693

  8. Learn to manage stress

    MedlinePLUS

    ... commute, such as listening to a podcast or book. Avoid stressful situations. When you can, remove yourself ... could be as simple as reading a good book, listening to music, watching a favorite movie, or ...

  9. Managing Teacher Stress and Burnout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Dennis; Hammond, Janice

    This monograph offers a practical guide for identifying and managing those stressors that are in the specific domain of the individual--exercise, diet, sleep, interpersonal relations, time and conflict management, and relaxation. The first section covers stress theory; methods to identify and clarify stressors; restoration of a balanced…

  10. Tips to Manage Anxiety and Stress

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Military & Military Families Tips to Manage Anxiety and Stress When you're feeling anxious or stressed, these ... a habit. (Sponsored) Fitness Tips: Stay Healthy, Manage Stress For the biggest benefits of exercise, try to ...

  11. The management of perioperative nutrition in patients with end stage liver disease undergoing liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is found in almost 100% of patients with end stage liver disease (ESLD) awaiting transplantation and malnutrition before transplantation leads to higher rates of post-transplant complications and worse graft survival outcomes. Reasons for protein energy malnutrition include several metabolic alterations such as inadequate intake, malabsorption, and overloaded expenditure. And also, stress from surgery, gastrointestinal reperfusion injury, immunosuppressive therapy and corticosteriods use lead to delayed bowl function recovery and disorder of nutrients absorption. In the pretransplant phase, nutritional goals include optimization of nutritional status and treatment of nutrition-related symptoms induced by hepatic decompensation. During the acute post-transplant phase, adequate nutrition is required to help support metabolic demands, replenish lost stores, prevent infection, arrive at a new immunologic balance, and promote overall recovery. In a word, it is extremely important to identify and correct nutritional deficiencies in this population and provide an adequate nutritional support during all phases of liver transplantation (LT). This study review focuses on prevalence, nutrition support, evaluation, and management of perioperative nutrition disorder in patients with ESLD undergoing LT. PMID:26605281

  12. The management of perioperative nutrition in patients with end stage liver disease undergoing liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi-Kun; Wang, Meng-Long

    2015-10-01

    Malnutrition is found in almost 100% of patients with end stage liver disease (ESLD) awaiting transplantation and malnutrition before transplantation leads to higher rates of post-transplant complications and worse graft survival outcomes. Reasons for protein energy malnutrition include several metabolic alterations such as inadequate intake, malabsorption, and overloaded expenditure. And also, stress from surgery, gastrointestinal reperfusion injury, immunosuppressive therapy and corticosteriods use lead to delayed bowl function recovery and disorder of nutrients absorption. In the pretransplant phase, nutritional goals include optimization of nutritional status and treatment of nutrition-related symptoms induced by hepatic decompensation. During the acute post-transplant phase, adequate nutrition is required to help support metabolic demands, replenish lost stores, prevent infection, arrive at a new immunologic balance, and promote overall recovery. In a word, it is extremely important to identify and correct nutritional deficiencies in this population and provide an adequate nutritional support during all phases of liver transplantation (LT). This study review focuses on prevalence, nutrition support, evaluation, and management of perioperative nutrition disorder in patients with ESLD undergoing LT. PMID:26605281

  13. Managing Academic Stress Are You Experience Too Much Stress?

    E-print Network

    Kunkle, Tom

    Managing Academic Stress Are You Experience Too Much Stress? Sources of Academic Stress Course for yourself Ways to Reduce Academic Stress Take a look at your course load. For every hour you are in class are not doing it effectively then you may be causing yourself more stress. Find out what your learning

  14. Survivorship: Nutrition and Weight Management, Version 2.2014

    PubMed Central

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Dizon, Don; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G.; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; Moslehi, Javid J.; O’Connor, Tracey; Overholser, Linda; Paskett, Electra D.; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Raza, Muhammad; Rodriguez, M. Alma; Syrjala, Karen L.; Urba, Susan G.; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole R.; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Healthy lifestyle habits have been associated with improved health outcomes and quality of life and, for some cancers, a reduced risk of recurrence and death. The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship therefore recommend that cancer survivors be encouraged to achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle, including attention to weight management, physical activity, and dietary habits. This section of the NCCN Guidelines focuses on recommendations regarding nutrition, weight management, and supplement use in survivors. Weight management recommendations are based on the survivor’s body mass index and include discussions of nutritional, weight management, and physical activity principles, with referral to community resources, dietitians, and/or weight management programs as needed. PMID:25313179

  15. Managing Stress through Challenge Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunting, Camille J.

    1982-01-01

    Many positive benefits can be obtained through participation in risk, challenge, or adventure activities: (1) emotional release; (2) social interaction; (3) expanded perspective; (4) expanded personal limits; and (5) singleness of mind or attention. Participating in these activities also often helps to develop stress management skills. (CJ)

  16. Stress Management by Biofeedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In the 1980's, Dr. Patrick Doyle served on a project to train U.S. astronauts at Johnson Space Center in biofeedback techniques to control anxiety and hypertension. Traditional biofeedback concepts were found to be too mundane, repetitive and boring, so Doyle developed Bio-Games with more interesting and involved formats. The first product, Bio-Ball, is an interactive, multimedia baseball video game that is played by relaxing in order to hit the ball. Gradually the player is able to relax at will, and with practice is able to apply the skills to real-life situations. Doyle has since gone on to create a number of biofeedback games marketed by Creative MultiMedia Inc. including Bio-Golf, Clutch City, and Pachyderm. Stress-busting screen savers are also being marketed under the Buddies series. In addition to being used in the corporate world, Bio-Games have been recognized by the Starbright Foundation which focuses on improving the total hospital environments of critically injured and chronically-ill children.

  17. Endocrine and Nutritional Management After Bariatric Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... protein, fats, carbohydrates) and micronutrients (vitamins, minerals, trace elements). • Every three months for the first year, you ... take additional supplements, such as vitamin B12 or iron, to prevent nutritional deficiencies. Both weight loss itself ...

  18. STRESS MANAGEMENT Stress occurs in everyone's life. How stressful something is depends on how we perceive it. Stress is not

    E-print Network

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    STRESS MANAGEMENT Stress occurs in everyone's life. How stressful something is depends on how we, whether it is studying for a big test or training for an athletic event. However, prolonged and/or high to manage your stress effectively. Here are some stress management tips: 1) MANAGE YOUR TIME EFFECTIVELY

  19. Nutritional management of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Venter, Carina; Groetch, Marion

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize the latest information on the nutritional management of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES), focusing on the foods implicated and how to avoid these whilst maintaining a nutritionally sound diet. Recent findings A number of foods are implicated in FPIES such as milk, soy and grains, particularly rice. The number of foods implicated in FPIES per individual differs, but the majority of reported cases have two or fewer food triggers involved. Summary FPIES is a complex presentation of non-IgE-mediated food allergy. Dietary management is complicated as both common food allergens as well as atypical food allergens can trigger FPIES. Sound nutritional advice is required to ensure appropriate food avoidance, adequate consumption of other foods and sufficient nutritional intake to maintain and ensure growth and development. PMID:24699338

  20. Nutritional Management of Acute Diarrhea in Infants and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, Washington, DC. Food and Nutrition Board.

    Written primarily for health professionals advising on programs and policy related to nutrition and diarrhea therapy, this report is aimed at management of diarrhea in less-developed countries, but its information and technical insights are relevant to an understanding of diarrhea and its management throughout the world. Technical in orientation…

  1. Teacher Wellness: Too Stressed for Stress Management?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kipps-Vaughan, Debi; Ponsart, Tyler; Gilligan, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    Healthier, happier teachers promote healthier, happier, and more effective learning environments. Yet, many teachers experience considerable stress. Studies have found that between one fifth and one fourth of teachers frequently experience a great deal of stress (Kyriacou, 1998). Stress in teaching appears to be universal across nations and…

  2. The Interaction between Nutrition and Insect Stress Response in a Cotton Model System 

    E-print Network

    Deans, Carrie Ann

    2015-08-12

    The ability of organisms to deal with adversity is essential for survival, reproductive success. Nutrition has strong impacts on all physiological processes, including stress responses. Several studies have shown diet ...

  3. Management of Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Cornella, Jeffrey L

    2004-01-01

    Although there is renewed interest in conservative therapies for stress urinary incontinence, such as pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and duloxetine therapy, surgery remains the primary choice in managing this condition. Surgical options include paravaginal defect repair, the Marshall-Marchetti-Krantz procedure, open and laparoscopic Burch urethropexy, and pubovaginal sling procedures. There is a growing trend in the United States toward use of the pubovaginal sling procedure as the primary operation for urinary incontinence due to less invasive techniques. Studies comparing the pubovaginal sling with open urethropexy have shown similar short-term cure rates. More large prospective, randomized studies are needed to assess long-term rates. PMID:16985904

  4. Stress Management and Gifted Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Vidisha A.

    2009-01-01

    Stress can affect anyone, and gifted children are no exception. Giftedness can sometimes be the cause of the stress. Perfectionism, sensitivity, and intensity are characteristics of gifted children that may exacerbate stress. Stress can be constructive. Prolonged stress, however, with no time to recover becomes detrimental. Continued stress upsets…

  5. [Nutritional management of highly trained child athletes].

    PubMed

    Duhamel, J F

    2001-01-01

    The nutritional care of children and adolescents who practice sports more than 10 h/weeks is an important task. Advices must be adapted to the child according to his sport, his age, his gender, his weight and to the intensity of his physical activity; they intend to provide him, in addition to his basal requirements, those due to the extra expenses of water, energy, minerals and vitamins. The aim of the physician is to allow these children an adequate growth and the normal development of puberty, to prevent deficiencies and to concur with other specialists to the prevention of muscle, joint and bone wounds who can affect a growing organism. This ambitious program relies on a thorough knowledge in pediatrics, nutrition and sport in order to adapt the advice to the specific way of life of the child, taking into account the schedules of school time, training and competition. Such an approach needs that every child undergoes a medical examination 3-4 times/year, a biological check up at least once a year, a careful follow up of growth and pubertal maturation. Every time it is possible parents and coaches are encouraged to attend the visit when everything is OK and even more when difficulties occur, whether they are due to somatic or psychological trouble or in case of poor performance induced discouragement. A balanced nutrition, an adequate counseling and an adapted follow up are essential for the success of athletes; they do not make champions from them but decrease the hazard of wounds, underperformances and make easier blossoming for children. PMID:11974969

  6. Nutritional and Feeding Management of Broodmares 

    E-print Network

    Gibbs, Pete G.; Potter, Gary D.; Vogelsang, M. M.

    2005-04-13

    be less likely to contain blister bee tles, but there are no guar an tees. Horse men should take time to visit with hay pro duc ers, consider the harvest date and meth od of cut ting, and check al fal fa hay regularly for the pres ence of blister... of Broodmares B-5025 4/05 Nutrition and Feeding Man age ment of Broodmares Pete G. Gibbs, Gary D. Potter and Martha M Vogelsang* Horse producers should be con cerned about their mares? re- pro duc tive performance and abil i ty to moth er strong, healthy...

  7. Switchgrass: Establishment, Management, Yield, Nutritive Value, and Utilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This document reports results from 26 studies addressing the establishment, cell wall content, cultivar improvement, defoliation management, nutritive value and utilization of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) as pasture, or its conservation as hay or silage or harvested as biomass. Both lowland and...

  8. Nutrition

    MedlinePLUS

    Diet & Nutrition - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society Sign ... with MS Health and Wellness Diet & Nutrition Diet & Nutrition Eating healthy to take charge of your health. ...

  9. Identification of Nutritional Stress-Responsive miRNAs in Phaseolus vulgaris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators for Arabidopsis development and stress responses. A hybridization approach using miRNAs-macroarrays was used to identify miRNAs that respond to nutritional stress in Phaseolus vulgaris. miRNAs-macroarrays were prepared by printing nylon filters with DNA syntheti...

  10. Nutritional Management of Kidney Stones (Nephrolithiasis)

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Adam M.; Seifter, Julian L.; Dwyer, Johanna T.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of kidney stones is common in the United States and treatments for them are very costly. This review article provides information about epidemiology, mechanism, diagnosis, and pathophysiology of kidney stone formation, and methods for the evaluation of stone risks for new and follow-up patients. Adequate evaluation and management can prevent recurrence of stones. Kidney stone prevention should be individualized in both its medical and dietary management, keeping in mind the specific risks involved for each type of stones. Recognition of these risk factors and development of long-term management strategies for dealing with them are the most effective ways to prevent recurrence of kidney stones. PMID:26251832

  11. UNIVERSITY OF SUSSEX STRESS MANAGEMENT POLICY

    E-print Network

    Sussex, University of

    have substantial benefits in improving an individual's general health. 1.1(ii) Stress in the workplace absence, loss of productivity and general absenteeism. The Health and Safety Executive* views stress the University's aims and objectives for the management of health and safety in relation to harmful stress

  12. Managing workplace stress in a dynamic environment.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P; Pulich, M

    2001-03-01

    Workplace stress can be either positive or negative. While positive stress is desirable for a variety of reasons, negative stress is not. In fact, the latter can result in dysfunctional consequences for health care organizations due to altered behavior such as increased absenteeism, changes in work habits, and job burnout. Management can intervene to reverse the effects of negative stress. Some actions include proper job design, ongoing communication with employees, team building, and use of a group coordinator. PMID:15973865

  13. From diagnosis to home management: nutritional considerations for women with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, C L; Brown, L P; York, R; Robbins, D; Swank, A

    1991-01-01

    Each year 90,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with gestational diabetes. The transition from diagnosis to home management is a time of high stress for these women. Anxiety may lead to difficulty with self-care in general and the diabetic diet in particular. Follow-up education by a diabetes educator can help clients plan meals that comply with the nutritional meal plan without disrupting the family's eating habits. The client should be taught to measure portions, to recognize sugar as an ingredient in foods and medicines, and to deal with special occasions such as holiday meals, travel, and illness. If extended home care is not feasible, the creative diabetes educator will devise other educational opportunities, such as home videos, telephone support networks, special childbirth classes for women with gestational diabetes, and luncheon meetings at which nutritionally correct meals are served. PMID:1935552

  14. Helping Young Children Manage Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the common symptoms of stress exhibited by young children including: (1) social or behavioral; (2) physical; (3) emotional; (4) cognitive; and (5) language. Addresses causes of stress, which typically represent change, fear, or loss in children. Offers strategies for easing children's stress including muscle relaxation, deep breathing,…

  15. Current nutritional recommendations and novel dietary strategies to manage sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    Calvani, Riccardo; Miccheli, Alfredo; Landi, Francesco; Bossola, Maurizio; Cesari, Matteo; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Sieber, Cornel C.; Bernabei, Roberto; Marzetti, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia, the loss of skeletal muscle mass and function that occurs with aging, is associated with increased risk for several adverse health outcomes, including frailty, disability, falls, loss of independent living, and mortality. At present, no pharmacological treatment exists that is able to definitely halt the progression of sarcopenia. Likewise, no pharmacological remedies are yet available to prevent the onset of age-related muscle wasting. In this scenario, the combination of nutritional interventions and physical exercise appears to be the most effective strategy presently available for the management of sarcopenia. The purposes of this review are to summarize the current knowledge on the role of nutrition as a countermeasure for sarcopenia, illustrate the mechanisms of action of relevant dietary agents on the aging muscle, and introduce novel nutritional strategies that may help preserve muscle mass and function into old age. Issues related to the identification of the optimal timing of nutritional interventions in the context of primary and secondary prevention are also discussed. Finally, the prospect of elaborating personalized dietary and physical exercise recommendations through the implementation of integrated, high-throughput analytic approaches is illustrated. PMID:26082911

  16. Nutrition

    MedlinePLUS

    ... into your diet. These include brightly colored and dark fruits and vegetables. Balance the food you eat ... can also order your free copy of Nutrition Matters and visit our Ask about Nutrition forum. << Back ...

  17. Nutrition

    MedlinePLUS

    Nutrition Health Education During the 2 years preceding the study: • The percentage of states that provided funding for staff development or offered staff development on nutrition and dietary behavior to those who teach health ...

  18. Nutrition

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Disease Lookup > Lung Cancer > Living With Lung Cancer Nutrition Key Points There is no prescribed diet plan ... doctor! Download the PDF Get help meeting your nutrition goals and learn what to eat during lung ...

  19. Nutritional Correlates of Perceived Stress among University Students in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    El Ansari, Walid; Berg-Beckhoff, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Food intake choice and amount might change with stress. However, this has not been examined among Egyptian students. We examined students’ stress levels, its correlation with their consumption of a range of food groups, and adherence to dietary guidelines. A cross sectional survey (N = 2810 undergraduates at 11 faculties at Assiut University, Egypt) assessed two composite food intake pattern scores (one unhealthy: sweets, cakes, snacks; and a healthy one: fruits and vegetables), and two indicators of healthy eating (subjective importance of healthy eating; and dietary guideline adherence index). Multiple linear regression tested the associations of stress with two food intake pattern scores and two indicators of healthy eating, controlling for six potential confounders for the sample and separately for males and females. Higher perceived stress score was significantly associated with less frequent food intake of fruit and vegetables in males and females. The association was more pronounced among males than in females. No significant association was observed between the sweets cakes and snacks score and stress. Of the two indicators of healthy eating, the dietary guideline adherence index was not associated with stress, while the subjective judgment of healthy eating was consistently negatively associated with stress. Stress related decreased-eating was present. Recent studies suggest that stress could be associated with either decreased or increased eating depending on the study population, food group, and type of stressor. Further research is necessary to understand stress related over- and undereating. PMID:26561825

  20. Nutritional Correlates of Perceived Stress among University Students in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El Ansari, Walid; Berg-Beckhoff, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Food intake choice and amount might change with stress. However, this has not been examined among Egyptian students. We examined students' stress levels, its correlation with their consumption of a range of food groups, and adherence to dietary guidelines. A cross sectional survey (N = 2810 undergraduates at 11 faculties at Assiut University, Egypt) assessed two composite food intake pattern scores (one unhealthy: sweets, cakes, snacks; and a healthy one: fruits and vegetables), and two indicators of healthy eating (subjective importance of healthy eating; and dietary guideline adherence index). Multiple linear regression tested the associations of stress with two food intake pattern scores and two indicators of healthy eating, controlling for six potential confounders for the sample and separately for males and females. Higher perceived stress score was significantly associated with less frequent food intake of fruit and vegetables in males and females. The association was more pronounced among males than in females. No significant association was observed between the sweets cakes and snacks score and stress. Of the two indicators of healthy eating, the dietary guideline adherence index was not associated with stress, while the subjective judgment of healthy eating was consistently negatively associated with stress. Stress related decreased-eating was present. Recent studies suggest that stress could be associated with either decreased or increased eating depending on the study population, food group, and type of stressor. Further research is necessary to understand stress related over- and undereating. PMID:26561825

  1. A Review of Nutritional Factors in Hypertension Management

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha; Odelola, Olaide A.; Rangaswami, Janani; Amanullah, Aman

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is a major health problem worldwide. Its attendant morbidity and mortality complications have a great impact on patient's quality of life and survival. Optimizing blood pressure control has been shown to improve overall health outcomes. In addition to pharmacological therapies, nonpharmacological approach such as dietary modification plays an important role in controlling blood pressure. Many dietary components such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium have been studied substantially in the past decades. While some of these nutrients have clear evidence for their recommendation, some remain controversial and are still of ongoing study. Dietary modification is often discussed with patients and can provide a great benefit in blood pressure regulation. As such, reviewing the current evidence will be very useful in guiding patients and their physician and/or dietician in decision making. In this review article of nutritional factors in hypertension management, we aim to examine the role of nutritional factors individually and as components of whole dietary patterns. PMID:23691281

  2. Stress Management Techniques for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, Francesca M.

    The director of a not-for-profit nursery school adapted the adult stress management techniques of exercise and relaxation for use with 3- to 5-year-old children. Specifically, children were taught visualization techniques and yoga exercises involving deep breathing. The goal of the practicum was to rechannel children's negative stress-related…

  3. Between Teachers & Parent: Helping Children Manage Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodkin, Adele M.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to manage stress in children. A teacher's story and a parent's story about a child who complains of frequent stomach aches, is presented. Stomach aches and other somatic complaints without any apparent physical explanation are common among young children experiencing stress. Nevertheless, it is essential…

  4. Effects of Heat Stress on Metabolite Accumulation and Composition, and Nutritional Properties of Durum Wheat Grain

    PubMed Central

    de Leonardis, Anna Maria; Fragasso, Mariagiovanna; Beleggia, Romina; Ficco, Donatella Bianca Maria; de Vita, Pasquale; Mastrangelo, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum (L.) subsp. turgidum (L.) convar. durum (Desf.)) is momentous for human nutrition, and environmental stresses can strongly limit the expression of yield potential and affect the qualitative characteristics of the grain. The aim of this study was to determine how heat stress (five days at 37 °C) applied five days after flowering affects the nutritional composition, antioxidant capacity and metabolic profile of the grain of two durum wheat genotypes: “Primadur”, an elite cultivar with high yellow index, and “T1303”, an anthocyanin-rich purple cultivar. Qualitative traits and metabolite evaluation (by gas chromatography linked to mass spectrometry) were carried out on immature (14 days after flowering) and mature seeds. The effects of heat stress were genotype-dependent. Although some metabolites (e.g., sucrose, glycerol) increased in response to heat stress in both genotypes, clear differences were observed. Following the heat stress, there was a general increase in most of the analyzed metabolites in “Primadur”, with a general decrease in “T1303”. Heat shock applied early during seed development produced changes that were observed in immature seeds and also long-term effects that changed the qualitative and quantitative parameters of the mature grain. Therefore, short heat-stress treatments can affect the nutritional value of grain of different genotypes of durum wheat in different ways. PMID:26703576

  5. Effects of Heat Stress on Metabolite Accumulation and Composition, and Nutritional Properties of Durum Wheat Grain.

    PubMed

    de Leonardis, Anna Maria; Fragasso, Mariagiovanna; Beleggia, Romina; Ficco, Donatella Bianca Maria; de Vita, Pasquale; Mastrangelo, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum (L.) subsp. turgidum (L.) convar. durum (Desf.)) is momentous for human nutrition, and environmental stresses can strongly limit the expression of yield potential and affect the qualitative characteristics of the grain. The aim of this study was to determine how heat stress (five days at 37 °C) applied five days after flowering affects the nutritional composition, antioxidant capacity and metabolic profile of the grain of two durum wheat genotypes: "Primadur", an elite cultivar with high yellow index, and "T1303", an anthocyanin-rich purple cultivar. Qualitative traits and metabolite evaluation (by gas chromatography linked to mass spectrometry) were carried out on immature (14 days after flowering) and mature seeds. The effects of heat stress were genotype-dependent. Although some metabolites (e.g., sucrose, glycerol) increased in response to heat stress in both genotypes, clear differences were observed. Following the heat stress, there was a general increase in most of the analyzed metabolites in "Primadur", with a general decrease in "T1303". Heat shock applied early during seed development produced changes that were observed in immature seeds and also long-term effects that changed the qualitative and quantitative parameters of the mature grain. Therefore, short heat-stress treatments can affect the nutritional value of grain of different genotypes of durum wheat in different ways. PMID:26703576

  6. Nutritional stress and body condition in the Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) during winter irruptive

    E-print Network

    Miller, Scott

    Nutritional stress and body condition in the Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) during winter nebulosa Forster, 1772) recorded since 1831 oc- curred in Minnesota, USA, during the winter of 2004 Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa), carbon, nitrogen, C/N, fasting, Minnesota, reversed sexual size dimorphism

  7. MORPHOMETRIC EVIDENCE FOR NUTRITIONAL STRESS IN ENGLISH SOLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present an application of the powerful thin plate spline method of morphometric analysis to demonstrate its utility for detecting environmental stress in an estuarine flatfish. Juvenile English sole (Pleuronectes vetulus) were captured from Yaquina Bay, Oregon, photographed w...

  8. Multidisciplinary treatment of pediatric obesity: nutrition evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Ross, Michael M; Kolbash, Stacy; Cohen, Gail M; Skelton, Joseph A

    2010-08-01

    Assessment and treatment methods for pediatric obesity are rapidly evolving. Thought to be caused by an imbalance of caloric intake and expenditure, obesity requires a comprehensive evaluation of patient, familial, environmental, genetic, and cultural characteristics so clinicians can design successful interventions. Quantitative nutrition assessment of caloric intake is difficult and time consuming and should be used only in isolated settings, such as in the research setting, or if initial approaches to management have been unsuccessful. As an alternative, providers should identify dietary patterns or behaviors that have been linked to obesity and are promising targets for change. Clinicians should tailor interventions by considering patient and family motivation and readiness to change. Current guidelines recommend stepwise increases in treatment plans, and multidisciplinary treatment teams are recommended for patients who require intense intervention. Providers involved at the multidisciplinary level must incorporate their area of expertise into that of the team to develop a comprehensive management plan. This article reviews current recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of pediatric obesity with a focus on nutrition evaluation as part of a multidisciplinary team. PMID:20702836

  9. Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.

    1990-01-01

    This is a collection of viewgraphs on the Johnson Space Center's work on nutrition for long duration space missions. Nutritional requirements are affected by isolation, workloads, and cold as well as the psychological needs, metabolism, and fluid balance of an individual.

  10. Effects of nutritional stress during different developmental periods on song and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Kriengwatana, B; Wada, H; Schmidt, K L; Taves, M D; Soma, K K; MacDougall-Shackleton, S A

    2014-03-01

    In songbirds, developmental stress affects song learning and production. Altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function resulting in elevated corticosterone (CORT) may contribute to this effect. We examined whether developmental conditions affected the association between adult song and HPA axis function, and whether nutritional stress before and after nutritional independence has distinct effects on song learning and/or vocal performance. Zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) were raised in consistently high (HH) or low (LL) food conditions until post-hatch day (PHD) 62, or were switched from high to low conditions (HL) or vice versa (LH) at PHD 34. Song was recorded in adulthood. We assessed the response of CORT to handling during development and to dexamethasone (DEX) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenges during adulthood. Song learning and vocal performance were not affected by nutritional stress at either developmental stage. Nutritional stress elevated baseline CORT during development. Nutritional stress also increased rate of CORT secretion in birds that experienced stress only in the juvenile phase (HL group). Birds in the LL group had lower CORT levels after injection of ACTH compared to the other groups, however there was no effect of nutritional stress on the response to DEX. Thus, our findings indicate that developmental stress can affect HPA function without concurrently affecting song. PMID:24417905

  11. A nutrigenomic approach to detect nutritional stress from gene expression in blood samples drawn from Steller sea lions.

    PubMed

    Spitz, Jérôme; Becquet, Vanessa; Rosen, David A S; Trites, Andrew W

    2015-09-01

    Gene expression profiles are increasingly being used as biomarkers to detect the physiological responses of a number of species to disease, nutrition, and other stressors. However, little attention has been given to using gene expression to assess the stressors and physiological status of marine mammals. We sought to develop and validate a nutrigenomic approach to quantify nutritional stress in Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus). We subjected 4 female Steller sea lions to 3 feeding regimes over 70-day trials (unrestricted food intake, acute nutritional stress, and chronic nutritional stress), and drew blood samples from each animal at the end of each feeding regime. We then extracted the RNA of white blood cells and measured the response of 8 genes known to react to diet restriction in terrestrial mammals. Overall, we found that the genomic response of Steller sea lions experiencing nutritional stress was consistent with how terrestrial mammals respond to dietary restrictions. Our nutritionally stressed sea lions down-regulated some cellular processes involved in immune response and oxidative stress, and up-regulated pro-inflammatory responses and metabolic processes. Nutrigenomics appears to be a promising means to monitor nutritional status and contribute to mitigation measures needed to assist in the recovery of Steller sea lions and other at-risk species of marine mammals. PMID:25700740

  12. Usability of a web-based personal nutrition management tool.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Selen; Zayim, Ne?e; Gulkesen, Kemal Hakan; Samur, Mehmet Kemal; Karaa?aoglu, Nilgun; Saka, Osman

    2011-12-01

    'Personal Nutrition Management Tool' (PENUMAT) is an interactive web-based application which aims to help individuals seeking nutrition information on the Internet. However, little is known about the usability of such applications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usability of PENUMAT using multi-method approach. For an in-depth usability analysis, using a multi-method approach involving protocol analysis, interviews and a system usability scale (SUS) was adopted. The sample consisted of 10 healthy (five males and five females) volunteers between the ages of 22 and 60. The overall usability score was calculated; usability problems and users' opinions were obtained. All usability problems were classified according to the heuristics and listed with their frequencies. Overall, the usability score ranged from 77.5 to 100, with a median of 88.7. In-depth usability analysis exposed several usability problems mostly related to content, navigation and interactivity. Interview results showed that 'being personal and private' (70%) and 'providing personal feedbacks' (60%) were the most appreciated characteristics of the tool. Although the tool has an acceptable overall usability score, several unnoticed usability problems of the interface design were realised with the in-depth analysis. Therefore, the importance of using a multi-method analysis of usability was pointed out. PMID:21345010

  13. Identification of energy consumption and nutritional stress by isotopic and elemental analysis of urine in bonobos (Pan paniscus)

    E-print Network

    with eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia,[16­18] and in athletes during physical activityIdentification of energy consumption and nutritional stress by isotopic and elemental analysis, can be used to monitor fluctuations in nitrogen balance caused by situations such as nutritional

  14. Stress Management Stress is part of everyday life. Examples of stressful situations for university students

    E-print Network

    Wapstra, Erik

    and anxiety. Positive management of stress results in positive emotions such as enjoyment, satisfaction or fears about perceived threats or danger in the future. Anxiety is often triggered when stress levels underestimate our ability to cope with it. #12;Page 2 Fears and worries are not normal when they become

  15. Sugar maple growth in relation to nutrition and stress in the northeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Long, Robert P; Horsley, Stephen B; Hallett, Richard A; Bailey, Scott W

    2009-09-01

    Sugar maple, Acer saccharum, decline disease is incited by multiple disturbance factors when imbalanced calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), and manganese (Mn) act as predisposing stressors. Our objective in this study was to determine whether factors affecting sugar maple health also affect growth as estimated by basal area increment (BAI). We used 76 northern hardwood stands in northern Pennsylvania, New York, Vermont, and New Hampshire, USA, and found that sugar maple growth was positively related to foliar concentrations of Ca and Mg and stand level estimates of sugar maple crown health during a high stress period from 1987 to 1996. Foliar nutrient threshold values for Ca, Mg, and Mn were used to analyze long-term BAI trends from 1937 to 1996. Significant (P < or = 0.05) nutrient threshold-by-time interactions indicate changing growth in relation to nutrition during this period. Healthy sugar maples sampled in the 1990s had decreased growth in the 1970s, 10-20 years in advance of the 1980s and 1990s decline episode in Pennsylvania. Even apparently healthy stands that had no defoliation, but had below-threshold amounts of Ca or Mg and above-threshold Mn (from foliage samples taken in the mid 1990s), had decreasing growth by the 1970s. Co-occurring black cherry, Prunus serotina, in a subset of the Pennsylvania and New York stands, showed opposite growth responses with greater growth in stands with below-threshold Ca and Mg compared with above-threshold stands. Sugar maple growing on sites with the highest concentrations of foliar Ca and Mg show a general increase in growth from 1937 to 1996 while other stands with lower Ca and Mg concentrations show a stable or decreasing growth trend. We conclude that acid deposition induced changes in soil nutrient status that crossed a threshold necessary to sustain sugar maple growth during the 1970s on some sites. While nutrition of these elements has not been considered in forest management decisions, our research shows species specific responses to Ca and Mg that may reduce health and growth of sugar maple or change species composition, if not addressed. PMID:19769094

  16. [BALANCED SCORECARD AS A MANAGEMENT TOOL IN CLINICAL NUTRITION].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez López, Cristina; Mauriz, Jose L; Culebras, Jesús M

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, balanced scorecards have updated traditional management systems in the business sector. In this way, Kaplan and Norton propose performance measurement through several perspectives with a logical sequence: internal processes and learning impact client services, so that financial performance is affected. The aim of the present paper is to analyze the main characteristics of balanced scorecard when it is applied to non-for-profit companies and, specifically to the health sector in the clinical nutrition field. This model improves the economic vision of management with clinical indicators that represent healthcare professional's perspective. The balanced scorecard would allow a proper monitoring and tracking system for the main healthcare indicators. This contributes to a better control in comparison with standards that are associated with adequate quality assistance. Owing to the role of management accounting and cost calculations, the definition of healthcare professionals as clients or users, and clinical results relevance, it is necessary to adapt the balanced scorecard to the specific characteristics of the clinical field, redefining both perspectives and indicators. PMID:26262746

  17. Inherited Metabolic Disorders: Aspects of Chronic Nutrition Management.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Suzanne W; Barclay, Lisa J; Burrage, Lindsay C

    2015-08-01

    The introduction of newborn screening and the development of new therapies have led to an expanding population of patients with inherited metabolic disorders, and these patients are now entering adulthood. Dietary therapy is the mainstay of treatment for many of these disorders, and thus, trained metabolic dietitians are critical members of the multidisciplinary team required for management of such patients. The main goals of dietary therapy in inborn errors of metabolism are the maintenance of normal growth and development while limiting offending metabolites and providing deficient products. Typically, the offending metabolite is either significantly reduced or removed completely from the diet and then reintroduced in small quantities until blood levels are within the normal range. Such treatment is required in infancy, childhood, and adulthood and requires careful monitoring of micronutrient and macronutrient intake throughout the life span. The goal of this review is to highlight the basic principles of chronic nutrition management of the inborn errors of protein, carbohydrate, and fat metabolism. PMID:26079521

  18. Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saur, Susan

    An elementary level nutrition unit provides teachers with student background information, suggested activities, and student worksheets. Part 1 focuses on the relationship of food to growth, health, and energy. In part 2, students learn about the four main food groups. Part 3 deals with nutrients and provides information about carbohydrates, fats,…

  19. Dietary Management for Alcoholic Patients. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Roberta Smith; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  20. Dietary Management in Hypertension. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molleson, Ann L.; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  1. Dietary Management in Gastrointestinal Diseases. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Joan Z.; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  2. From Classroom to Cafeteria: A Nutrition Guide for Teachers and Managers. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan, Sara

    This guide is designed to encourage and stimulate school nutrition managers to cooperate with classroom teachers in an active nutrition education program. The suggestions in the guide have been experienced and tested in the Fulton County Schools of Atlanta, Georgia. Contents of the chapters cover the following: (1) an outline of the roles of…

  3. A Review of Managing Huanglongbing (Citrus Greening) in China Using a Nutritional Approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Supplemental nutrition as a part of huanglongbing (HLB) management is being adopted by an increasing number of citrus growers in Florida. The hope is that additional nutrition, especially micronutrients, will extend the productive life of HLB affected trees. Although the approach is recent in the U...

  4. Stress Audits as a Precursor to Stress Management Workshops: An Evaluation of the Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormond, Wayne E.; Keown-Gerrard, Janine L.; Kline, Theresa

    2003-01-01

    A stress audit assessing potential stressors; stress perceptions, responses, and outcomes; and personal, group, and situational characteristics was conducted in stress management workshops for 20 employees. New skills and attitudes for dealing with stress were taught: time management, communication, alternatives to negative attitudes, and…

  5. [Stress urinary incontinence. Its surgical management].

    PubMed

    Neri Ruz, E S; Azcona Arteaga, F J

    1991-10-01

    Ninety eight patients with stress urinary incontinence treated surgically at Central Military Hospital, were studied. We analyzed the risk factors as age, weight, height, parity, menopause age, and previous medical and surgical procedures. They were divided in two groups. The Group I, vaginal approach, with 35 patients and Group II, retropubic surgery, with 63 patients. There were no differences both groups regarding age, weight, height, parity and menopausal age. The most frequent illness associated with stress urinary incontinence, was pelvic floor relaxation. The complications were 17.1% and 33.3%, respectively. The efficacy of Burch is procedure for the management of stress urinary incontinence, with a success rate of 84.1% versus 62.1% in the vaginal approach, was confirmed. PMID:1752448

  6. The Nurturing Teacher: Managing the Stress of Caring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanSlyke-Briggs, Kjersti

    2010-01-01

    This book tackles the concerns of stressed teachers. Whether from nurturance suffering (stress related to caring for students) or from the piles of paperwork yet to be tackled, this text helps the reader sort through the causes of stress, the emotional, physical and social reactions to stress and how one can begin to plan a stress management plan.…

  7. Helping Gifted Students with Stress Management. ERIC Digest #E488.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Leslie S.

    Presented in a question-and-answer format, this digest offers guidelines to help gifted students manage stress effectively. The following questions are considered: What is stress? How can a youngster experience stress when nothing bad is happening? Is a gifted student more likely to feel stress than others? What are some stresses on a gifted…

  8. Stress management strategies for women doctoral students.

    PubMed

    Kenty, J R

    2000-01-01

    When women return to school part-time for the doctorate while continuing to work full-time, they face many changes in their lives. Adding the role of doctoral student to existing roles at work and home can be challenging for women. By using stress-reducing strategies aimed at managing role changes, time pressures, and education issues, women can successfully integrate the student role into their daily lives. PMID:16646205

  9. Pregnancy Weight Gain Limitation by a Supervised Nutritional Program Influences Placental NF-?B/IKK Complex Expression and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zerón, Hugo Mendieta; Flores, Alejandro Parada; Chávez, Araceli Amaya; Alanís, Adriana Garduńo; Ferreyra, María del Carmen Colín; Benítez, Jonnathan Guadalupe Santillán; Castańeda, Violeta Saraí Morales; García, Ma. Victoria Domínguez

    2013-01-01

    Objective Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) pathway and oxidative stress participate in endothelial dysfunction, which is one of the causes of pre-eclampsia. Among the human antioxidant mechanisms, there are the enzymes catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Our aim was to measure NF-?B, its inhibitor (IKK) and oxidative stress in placenta and umbilical cord of pregnant women submitted to a supervised nutritional program. Methods Two groups were conformed: A) 14 pregnant women with individualized nutritional counseling, and B) 12 pregnant women without nutritional guidance. NF-?B and IKK were assessed by real time PCR (RT-PCR). Enzymatic activity of CAT, GPx, lipoperoxidation (LPO) and SOD were also evaluated. Results Pregnant women that followed a supervised nutritional program had lower levels of systolic (p=0.03) and diastolic pressure (p=0.043) although they were heavier than the control group (p=0.048). Among all the women, the Spearman correlation was positive between weight gain and placental NF-?B expression (1, p?0.01). In the placenta, women with nutritional advice had lower enzymatic activity of GPx (p?0.038) and showed a tendency of IKK to be higher than in women without a nutritional supervised program. Conclusion A supervised nutritional program in pregnancy offers a proven option to control weight gain, hypertension, NF-?B/IKK complex expression and oxidative stress reactions in the placenta. PMID:23772281

  10. Survivorship: nutrition and weight management, Version 2.2014. Clinical practice guidelines in oncology.

    PubMed

    Denlinger, Crystal S; Ligibel, Jennifer A; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Dizon, Don; Friedman, Debra L; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; Moslehi, Javid J; O'Connor, Tracey; Overholser, Linda; Paskett, Electra D; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Raza, Muhammad; Rodriguez, M Alma; Syrjala, Karen L; Urba, Susan G; Wakabayashi, Mark T; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole R; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A

    2014-10-01

    Healthy lifestyle habits have been associated with improved health outcomes and quality of life and, for some cancers, a reduced risk of recurrence and death. The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship therefore recommend that cancer survivors be encouraged to achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle, including attention to weight management, physical activity, and dietary habits. This section of the NCCN Guidelines focuses on recommendations regarding nutrition, weight management, and supplement use in survivors. Weight management recommendations are based on the survivor's body mass index and include discussions of nutritional, weight management, and physical activity principles, with referral to community resources, dietitians, and/or weight management programs as needed. PMID:25313179

  11. Canalization and developmental instability of the fetal skull in a mouse model of maternal nutritional stress

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Paula N.; Lotto, Federico P.; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional imbalance is one of the main sources of stress in both extant and extinct human populations. Restricted availability of nutrients is thought to disrupt the buffering mechanisms that contribute to developmental stability and canalization, resulting in increased levels of fluctuating asymmetry (FA) and phenotypic variance among individuals. However, the literature is contradictory in this regard. This study assesses the effect of prenatal nutritional stress on FA and among-individual variance in cranial shape and size using a mouse model of maternal protein restriction. Two sets of landmark coordinates were digitized in three dimensions from skulls of control and protein restricted specimens at E17.5 and E18.5. We found that, by the end of gestation, maternal protein restriction resulted in a significant reduction of skull size. Fluctuating asymmetry in size and shape exceeded the amount of measurement error in all groups, but no significant differences in the magnitude of FA were found between treatments. Convsersely, the pattern of shape asymmetry was affected by the environmental perturbation since the angles between the first eigenvectors extracted from the covariance matrix of shape asymmetric component of protein restricted and control groups were not significantly different from the expected for random vectors. In addition, among-individual variance in cranial shape was significanlty higher in the protein restricted than the control group at E18.5. Overall, the results obtained from a controlled experiment do not support the view of fluctuating asymmetry of cranial structures as a reliable index for inferring nutritional stress in human populations. PMID:24888714

  12. The lipid management nutrition outcomes project: perspectives from a national experience in protocol implementation and nutrition outcomes tracking.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Katherine S; Weintraub, Martha S; Biesemeier, Christina K; Rubenfire, Melvyn

    2008-02-01

    The Lipid Management Nutrition Outcomes Project was a multicenter prospective noncontrolled observational study in which a network of 51 registered dietitians (RDs) from practice settings across the United States implemented the 1998 Medical Nutrition Therapy Hyperlipidemia Protocol and collected outcomes. Difficulty recruiting RDs and enrolling patients revealed a gap between practice guidelines and clinical practice. Many RDs did not have laboratory values or follow-up visits required by the protocol. RDs able to follow protocol recommendations had the expected positive results. Within a 6-month period, 377 new patients presenting for lipid management met inclusion/exclusion criteria. Some follow-up data were available on 280 (74.3%) patients. There were follow-up lipid data prior to lipid-lowering medication changes for 219 patients. Reported mean dietary fat intake was reduced to <30% (P<0.0001). The population lost weight and increased exercise frequency (P<0.001, P<0.001). In the 175 patients with initial triglycerides <400 mg/dL (4.52 mmol/L), 44.6% had either a 15% drop in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol or reached low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal. Lipid response occurred in 34.7+/-16.5 weeks with 3.0+/-1.4 RD visits. The Lipid Management Nutrition Outcomes Project highlights frustrations and values of outcomes monitoring in actual practice and identifies areas for practice advancement. PMID:18237579

  13. The Pro-Survival Role of Autophagy Depends on Bcl-2 Under Nutrition Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hai-Dong; Wu, Dan; Gu, Jin-Hua; Ge, Jian-Bin; Wu, Jun-Chao; Han, Rong; Liang, Zhong-Qin; Qin, Zheng-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy can be induced under nutrition stress conditions. Bcl-2 is a pro-survival protein which inhibits apoptosis and autophagy. However, the role of Bcl-2 in autophagy regulation and cell survival under nutrition deprivation has not been fully understood. This study sought to investigate if Bcl-2 upregulation is essential in limiting autophagic activity and prevent cell death under nutrition deprivation conditions. Autophagic activity was monitored by the changes in GFP-LC3 localization and protein levels of Beclin1, LC3-II, cathepsin D and p62 in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells underwent serum deprivation. Manipulation of Bcl-2 function was achieved with siRNAs and small molecular inhibitors. The cell viability and apoptosis were assessed with MTT assay and Annexin V/PI staining. The results showed that serum starvation increased protein levels of LC3-II and Beclin1 but decreased autophagy substrate p62. Autophagy activation induced by serum deprivation and rapamycin was accompanied by an upregulation of Bcl-2 protein levels. When Bcl-2 was knocked down with siRNA or inhibited with HA 14-1 or ABT-737, serum starvation induced profound cell death and enhanced autophagic flux under nutrition deprivation conditions, while knockdown of autophagic gene Beclin1 or autophagy inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 and E64D), rescued cell death. In contrast, overexpression of Bcl-2 inhibited autophagy and blocked cell death in response to serum deprivation. These data suggest that Bcl-2 plays an essential role in limiting autophagy activation and preventing initiation of programmed cell death. Thus Bcl-2 may be an important mechanism for balancing beneficial and detrimental impacts of autophagy on cell survival. PMID:23658815

  14. A Stress-Management Guide for Young People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youngs, Bettie B.

    This document presents a comprehensive guide to help young people understand and cope with stress, pressure, and anxiety. Adolescent readers are introduced to the concept of stress, the ways that stress can affect them, and the skills and techniques needed to help them learn effective ways to reduce and manage stress. The guide begins by defining…

  15. Individual Stress Management Coursework in Canadian Teacher Preparation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Gregory E.

    2011-01-01

    Teacher stress is a significant issue facing the teaching profession. The current paper explores individual stress management as a viable option to address stress in this profession. Specifically, Canadian teacher education programs are examined to identify the prevalence of pre-service teacher education courses focused on individual stress

  16. Nutrition in the management of cirrhosis and its neurological complications.

    PubMed

    Bémeur, Chantal; Butterworth, Roger F

    2014-06-01

    Malnutrition is a common feature of chronic liver diseases that is often associated with a poor prognosis including worsening of clinical outcome, neuropsychiatric complications as well as outcome following liver transplantation. Nutritional assessment in patients with cirrhosis is challenging owing to confounding factors related to liver failure. The objectives of nutritional intervention in cirrhotic patients are the support of liver regeneration, the prevention or correction of specific nutritional deficiencies and the prevention and/or treatment of the complications of liver disease per se and of liver transplantation. Nutritional recommendations target the optimal supply of adequate substrates related to requirements linked to energy, protein, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins and minerals. Some issues relating to malnutrition in chronic liver disease remain to be addressed including the development of an appropriate well-validated nutritional assessment tool, the identification of mechanistic targets or therapy for sarcopenia, the development of nutritional recommendations for obese cirrhotic patients and liver-transplant recipients and the elucidation of the roles of vitamin A hepatotoxicity, as well as the impact of deficiencies in riboflavin and zinc on clinical outcomes. Early identification and treatment of malnutrition in chronic liver disease has the potential to lead to better disease outcome as well as prevention of the complications of chronic liver disease and improved transplant outcomes. PMID:25755550

  17. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Occupational Strand: Foods and Nutrition. Module II-C-1: Occupational Opportunities Related to Foods and Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Mary

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on occupational opportunities related to foods and nutrition is the first in a set of three modules on occupational education related to foods and nutrition. (This set is part of a larger series of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and…

  18. Tips for Survivors of a Traumatic Event: Managing Your Stress

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Survivors of a Traumatic Event Managing Your Stress Know When to Get Help Sometimes things become ... anger, or desires revenge; or shows signs of stress (listed on this page) for several days or ...

  19. College Students' Time Management: Correlations with Academic Performance and Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macan, Therese Hoff; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The relationships between time management of college students and self-reported academic performance and various affective measures of stress were explored for 123 undergraduates. The study indicates that self-reported time management is multidimensional and that there are important relationships among time management, performance, and stress.…

  20. A systematic review of the benefit of total parenteral nutrition in the management of enterocutaneous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Sepehripour, S; Papagrigoriadis, S

    2010-10-01

    Enterocutaneous fistulas (ECFs) most commonly occur as a complication of abdominal surgery but can also occur spontaneously in inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulitis, radiation, trauma and sepsis. Although mortality and morbidity have reduced in recent years they are still a major cause of concern in patients with ECF. Nutritional support is a challenging issue in these patients and a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is widely used in the management of ECF. In this review the authors examined the evidence of the use of TPN in ECF with the aim of determining the indications, benefits and outcome of this type of nutritional support in these. PMID:21081869

  1. Competency-Based Performance Appraisals: Improving Performance Evaluations of School Nutrition Managers and Assistants/Technicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Evelina W.; Asperin, Amelia Estepa; Nettles, Mary Frances

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the research was to develop a competency-based performance appraisal resource for evaluating school nutrition (SN) managers and assistants/technicians. Methods: A two-phased process was used to develop the competency-based performance appraisal resource for SN managers and assistants/technicians. In Phase I, draft…

  2. Total Parenteral Nutrition-Induced Cholestasis: Prevention and Management.

    PubMed

    Beath, Sue V; Kelly, Deirdre A

    2016-02-01

    When cholestasis occurs in patients receiving total parenteral nutrition, it is the result of many pathogenic pathways converging on the hepatic acinus. The result may be a temporary rise in liver function tests. The resulting fibrosis, portal hypertension, and jaundice are hallmarks of type 3 intestinal-associated liver disease to which children are more susceptible than adults. The key to prevention is in identifying high-risk scenarios, meticulous monitoring, and personalized prescription of parenteral nutrition solutions combined with an active approach in reducing the impact of inflammatory events when they occur by prompt use of antibiotics and line locks. PMID:26593297

  3. Stress management in dental students: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Alzahem, Abdullah M; Van der Molen, Henk T; Alaujan, Arwa H; De Boer, Benjamin J

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of stress management programs in dental education by systematic review of the literature. The number of studies concerning stress management programs for dental students is limited compared with studies discussing sources of stress. Several types of programs for stress management have been reported, and differ in their duration, content, and outcomes. Two main strategies have been used to help stressed students, ie, decreasing the number of stressors and increasing the ability to cope with stress. The first strategy includes several components, such as reducing fear of failure and workload pressure due to examinations and requirements. The second strategy includes coping techniques, such as deep breathing exercises. Although positive effects have been reported for most of the programs, these have mainly been evaluated using subjective self-report measures. There is a need for more research to identify the most effective stress management program. PMID:24904226

  4. Maternal stress, nutrition and physical activity: Impact on immune function, CNS development and psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; Bjřrke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Teixeira, Antônio L; Silverman, Marni N

    2015-08-18

    Evidence suggests that maternal and fetal immune dysfunction may impact fetal brain development and could play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders, although the definitive pathophysiological mechanisms are still not completely understood. Stress, malnutrition and physical inactivity are three maternal behavioral lifestyle factors that can influence immune and central nervous system (CNS) functions in both the mother and fetus, and may therefore, increase risk for neurodevelopmental/psychiatric disorders. First, we will briefly review some aspects of maternal-fetal immune system interactions and development of immune tolerance. Second, we will discuss the bidirectional communication between the immune system and CNS and the pathways by which immune dysfunction could contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders. Third, we will discuss the effects of prenatal stress and malnutrition (over and undernutrition) on perinatal programming of the CNS and immune system, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. Finally, we will discuss the beneficial impact of physical fitness during pregnancy on the maternal-fetal unit and infant and how regular physical activity and exercise can be an effective buffer against stress- and inflammatory-related disorders. Although regular physical activity has been shown to promote neuroplasticity and an anti-inflammatory state in the adult, there is a paucity of studies evaluating its impact on CNS and immune function during pregnancy. Implementing stress reduction, proper nutrition and ample physical activity during pregnancy and the childbearing period may be an efficient strategy to counteract the impact of maternal stress and malnutrition/obesity on the developing fetus. Such behavioral interventions could have an impact on early development of the CNS and immune system and contribute to the prevention of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Further research is needed to elucidate this relationship and the underlying mechanisms of protection. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroimmunology in Health And Disease. PMID:25451133

  5. Perioperative nutrition.

    PubMed

    Torgersen, Zachary; Balters, Marcus

    2015-04-01

    Perioperative nutrition is a vitally important yet often overlooked aspect of surgical care. Significant disparity exists between evidenced-based recommendations and practices encouraged by traditional surgical teaching. The metabolic response to surgical stress is complex. Poor nutrition has been demonstrated to correlate with adverse surgical outcomes. Perioperative nutrition encompasses preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care. Preoperative nutritional assessment identifies at-risk patients who benefit from supplementation before surgery. Prehabilitation seeks to prepare patients for the impending surgical stress. Immunonutrition seems to provide a benefit, although its precise mechanisms are unknown. This article provides a review of the current state of perioperative nutrition. PMID:25814105

  6. COPD - managing stress and your mood

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disease (COPD) have a greater risk for depression, stress, and anxiety. Being stressed or depressed can make ... your physical health. Learning how to deal with stress and anxiety and seeking care for depression can ...

  7. Financial Management: A Growing Concern for Child Nutrition Program Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cater, Jerry B.; Mann, Nadine; Conklin, Martha

    1999-01-01

    A study of revenue-generation and cost-control measures currently employed at four school districts operating financially successful child-nutrition programs disclosed the importance of student participation to each program's financial integrity. Financial reports, productivity monitoring, and procurement plans to curb food costs were also…

  8. Nutritional assessment and management of the malnourished patient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter reviews, for the practicing gastroenterologist: 1) basic knowledge in human nutrition, 2) the diagnosis of malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies in patients, 3) the circumstances in which protein-calorie malnutrition needs to be aggressively addressed in patients, 4) some of ...

  9. Immune responses to stress after stress management training in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Psychological stress may alter immune function by activating physiological stress pathways. Building on our previous study, in which we report that stress management training led to an altered self-reported and cortisol response to psychological stress in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we explored the effects of this stress management intervention on the immune response to a psychological stress task in patients with RA. Methods In this study, 74 patients with RA, who were randomly assigned to either a control group or a group that received short stress management training, performed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) 1 week after the intervention and at a 9-week follow-up. Stress-induced changes in levels of key cytokines involved in stress and inflammatory processes (for example, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8) were assessed. Results Basal and stress-induced cytokine levels were not significantly different in patients in the intervention and control groups one week after treatment, but stress-induced IL-8 levels were lower in patients in the intervention group than in the control group at the follow-up assessment. Conclusions In line with our previous findings of lower stress-induced cortisol levels at the follow-up of stress management intervention, this is the first study to show that relatively short stress management training might also alter stress-induced IL-8 levels in patients with RA. These results might help to determine the role of immunological mediators in stress and disease. Trial registration The Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR1193) PMID:24274618

  10. Capitalizing on Stress Management Techniques in Developmental Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Elsa C.

    Mastering stress management techniques can help college developmental class educators protect themselves from burnout. These techniques can also be taught to students in developmental classes to enable them to maximize the benefits from these classes. This paper outlines the causes of stress, identifies stressors, describes responses to stress,…

  11. Rational-Emotive Therapy: Contributions to Teacher Stress Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Susan G.

    1990-01-01

    Notes that irrational beliefs are significantly related to teacher stress levels and that teacher stress management interventions having most evidence of effectiveness employ cognitive restructuring components based on rational-emotive therapy procedures. Notes that programs use stress inoculation training framework and provide behavioral and…

  12. Nutritional management of a patient with brain damage and spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Bildsten, C; Lamid, S

    1983-08-01

    Few reports on nutritional management of patients with both brain damage and spinal-cord-injury appear in the literature. We present a case of a 20-year-old male quadriplegic, C4 complete, who also sustained brain damage secondary to cerebral anoxia. When the patient was transferred to our rehabilitation unit, deterioration in nutritional status was noted, as evidenced by weight loss and depressed serum albumin and hemoglobin. Nutritional rehabilitation consisted of weaning from nasogastric tube feedings to an oral diet providing snacks and commercial supplements. This resulted in a positive nitrogen balance. Other factors, such as mobilization, exercises, and closure of a pressure sore, contributed favorably to improvement of nutritional status. PMID:6411046

  13. Decreasing Students' Stress through Time Management Training: An Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Häfner, Alexander; Stock, Armin; Oberst, Verena

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a time management training program on perceived control of time and perceived stress in the context of higher education. Twenty-three undergraduate students attended a time management training intervention and reported demands, perceived stress and perceived control of time directly before 2 and…

  14. A Stress Management Curriculum for At-Risk Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollin, S. A.; Arnold, A. R.; Solomon, S.; Rubin, R. I.; Holland, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Project KICK (Kids in Cooperation with Kids) is a delinquency prevention program for at-risk youth that uses nontraditional approaches to stress management. Twelve African American children who were taught physical, cognitive, and experiential models of stress reduction and management reported that they enjoyed the program, and they demonstrated…

  15. Pancreatic cancer surgery and nutrition management: a review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    Afaneh, Cheguevara; Gerszberg, Deborah; Slattery, Eoin; Seres, David S.; Chabot, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery remains the only curative treatment for pancreaticobiliary tumors. These patients typically present in a malnourished state. Various screening tools have been employed to help with preoperative risk stratification. Examples include the subjective global assessment (SGA), malnutrition universal screening tool (MUST), and nutritional risk index (NRI). Adequate studies have not been performed to determine if perioperative interventions, based on nutrition risk assessment, result in less morbidity and mortality. The routine use of gastric decompression with nasogastric sump tubes may be unnecessary following elective pancreatic resections. Instead, placement should be selective and employed on a case-by-case basis. A wide variety of feeding modalities are available, oral nutrition being the most effective. Artificial nutrition may be provided by temporary nasal tube (nasogastric, nasojejunal, or combined nasogastrojejunal tube) or surgically placed tube [gastrostomy (GT), jejunostomy (JT), gastrojejunostomy tubes (GJT)], and intravenously (parenteral nutrition, PN). The optimal tube for enteral feeding cannot be determined based on current data. Each is associated with a specific set of complications. Dual lumen tubes may be useful in the presence of delayed gastric emptying (DGE) as the stomach may be decompressed while feeds are delivered to the jejunum. However, all feeding tubes placed in the small intestine, except direct jejunostomies, commonly dislodge and retroflex into the stomach. Jejunostomies are associated with less frequent, but more serious complications. These include intestinal torsion and bowel necrosis. PN is associated with septic, metabolic, and access-related complications and should be the feeding strategy of last-resort. Enteral feeds are clearly preferred over parental nutrition. A sound understanding of perioperative nutrition may improve patient outcomes. Patients undergoing pancreatic cancer surgery should undergo multidisciplinary nutrition screening and intervention, and the surgical/oncological team should include nutrition professionals in managing these patients in the perioperative period. PMID:25713805

  16. Occupational Stress, Mental Health Status and Stress Management Behaviors among Secondary School Teachers in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Sharron S. K.; Mak, Yim Wah; Chui, Ying Yu; Chiang, Vico C. L.; Lee, Angel C. K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine occupational stress and mental health among secondary school teachers in Hong Kong, and to identify the differences between those actively engaged in stress management behaviors and those who were not. Design: Survey design was adopted using validated instruments including Occupational Stress Inventory…

  17. Hepatic Mitochondrial Alterations and Increased Oxidative Stress in Nutritional Diabetes-Prone Psammomys obesus Model

    PubMed Central

    Bouderba, Saida; Sanz, M. Nieves; Sánchez-Martín, Carlos; El-Mir, M. Yehia; Villanueva, Gloria R.; Detaille, Dominique; Koceďr, E. Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered to be a pivotal component of insulin resistance and associated metabolic diseases. Psammomys obesus is a relevant model of nutritional diabetes since these adult animals exhibit a state of insulin resistance when fed a standard laboratory chow, hypercaloric for them as compared to their natural food. In this context, alterations in bioenergetics were studied. Using liver mitochondria isolated from these rats fed such a diet for 18 weeks, oxygen consumption rates, activities of respiratory complexes, and content in cytochromes were examined. Levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and gluthatione (GSH) were measured in tissue homogenates. Diabetic Psammomys showed a serious liver deterioration (hepatic mass accretion, lipids accumulation), accompanied by an enhanced oxidative stress (MDA increased, GSH depleted). On the other hand, both ADP-dependent and uncoupled respirations greatly diminished below control values, and the respiratory flux to cytochrome oxydase was mildly lowered. Furthermore, an inhibition of complexes I and III together with an activation of complex II were found. With emergence of oxidative stress, possibly related to a defect in oxidative phosphorylation, some molecular adjustments could contribute to alleviate, at least in part, the deleterious outcomes of insulin resistance in this gerbil species. PMID:22675340

  18. [Relationships between biomarkers of oxidative stress and nutritional status in adults, Ecuador].

    PubMed

    Salazar-Lugo, Raquel; Barahona, Amparito; Santamaria, Manuel; Salas, Hilda; Oleas, Mariana; Bermeo, Bélgica

    2014-12-01

    In this work it was evaluated the relationship between oxidative stress biomarkers (uric acid, bilirubin and C-reactive protein) with nutritional status in 321 adults of Ecuador, belonging to administrative staff of of the Universidad Tčcnica del Norte, aged 43 ± 10 years old (46 30% female and 53.61% male). Socio demographic and epidemiological information and lifestyle were obtained through a survey; The Body Mass Index (BMI) and body fat and body water percentages were calculated; waist circumference (WC) and blood pressure was measured. Determinations of uric acid, bilirubin, and serum C-reactive protein (PCR) were performed. 17.9% of the populations were obese and 51.72% overweight. The highest values of uric acid were found in obese, hypertensive and physical activity groups. The total direct and indirect bilirubin were found in upper limits in abdominal obesity and physical activity groups. The CRP level was influenced by % fat and % water in the low body fat group and in females. In male, BMI and WC were associated with CRP. Uric acid showed relationship with % fat and WC in overweight, high body fat and PHT groups, uric acid was associated with the % water and BMI in obese. Finally, uric acid was associated with % water and the WC in the abdominal obesity, and HT groups'. The body water percentage is an important indicator to development of oxidative stress in this population. PMID:26336722

  19. Effects of Boron Nutrition and Water Stress on Nitrogen Fixation, Seed ?15N and ?13C Dynamics, and Seed Composition in Soybean Cultivars Differing in Maturities

    PubMed Central

    Bellaloui, Nacer; Mengistu, Alemu

    2015-01-01

    Therefore, the objective of the current research was to investigate the effects of foliar B nutrition on seed protein, oil, fatty acids, and sugars under water stress conditions. A repeated greenhouse experiment was conducted using different maturity group (MG) cultivars. Plants were well-watered with no foliar B (W ? B), well-watered with foliar B (W + B), water-stressed with no foliar B (WS ? B), and water-stressed with foliar B (WS + B). Foliar B was applied at rate of 0.45?kg·ha?1 and was applied twice at flowering and at seed-fill stages. The results showed that seed protein, sucrose, fructose, and glucose were higher in W + B treatment than in W ? B, WS + B, and WS ? B. The increase in protein in W + B resulted in lower seed oil, and the increase of oleic in WS ? B or WS + B resulted in lower linolenic acid. Foliar B resulted in higher nitrogen fixation and water stress resulted in seed ?15N and ?13C alteration. Increased stachyose indicated possible physiological and metabolic changes in carbon and nitrogen pathways and their sources under water stress. This research is beneficial to growers for fertilizer management and seed quality and to breeders to use 15N/14N and 13C/12C ratios and stachyose to select for drought tolerance soybean. PMID:25667936

  20. IMPACT OF ANIMAL NUTRITION AND FEED MANAGEMENT ON THE ENVIRONMENT: SUCCESS, CHALLENGES AND FUTURE DIRECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To predict the future direction of animal nutrition and feed management on the environment, one must understand where we are today in terms of making animal production more environmentally friendly. With current regulations on phosphorus (P) (soil runoff and ground water infiltration), nitrogen (N)...

  1. Forage Quality and Quantity in Texas: Managing Nutrition in Range Beef Cattle 

    E-print Network

    Lyons, Robert K.; Machen, Richard V.; Stuth, Jerry W.

    2002-09-23

    in Texas ? Managing Nutrition in Range Beef Cattle Robert K. Lyons, Richard V. Machen and Jerry W. Stuth* Regional Cattle Forage Diet Quality Trends Regional monthly average crude protein and digestibil- ity estimates are shown in Figures 1-10. Highest...

  2. Production of Correa 'Mannii' as a potted plant - propagation, nutrition management, and controlled flowering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Australian natives, Correa ‘Mannii’ and C. reflexa (Rutaceae), are considered suitable as a flowering pot plant. However, comprehensive information on the most effective propagation method and nutrition management and their impact on propagation and flowering is unavailable. The influence of temper...

  3. Helping Clients Manage Stress: A Practical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Dennis

    The pervasiveness of stress as a problem, with its many harmful effects on people, makes it a matter of growing interest for counselors and other personnel workers. This monograph provides definitions of stress, distress, and eustress, and discusses numerous causes of distress, as well as the benefits of stress to a healthy, productive life.…

  4. Counseling Students and Faculty for Stress Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Libby; Walz, Garry R.

    This monograph was written to enhance the college or university faculty member's understanding of stress as it impacts upon both students and faculty, and to help faculty members cope with the stressors in their own lives and intervene with students to reduce stress. Stress is defined and sources of distress are identified. Research is cited which…

  5. Nutrition knowledge of rural older populations: can congregate meal site participants manage their own diets?

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lionel; Almanza, Barbara; Ghiselli, Richard

    2010-07-01

    Congregate meal sites were funded to assist socioeconomically disadvantaged, rural older individuals in improving their health-related practices. Although the participants in the program are largely female, the meals are designed to meet one third of the daily caloric intake of a 70-year-old male, and to satisfy his recommended dietary allowances for total fat, fiber, calcium, and sodium. The actual percentage of the required nutrient intake contributed by meals served at congregate sites is indefinite. Moreover, the ability of congregate meal participants to manage their diets and their receptiveness to helpful nutrition information in that regard is unknown. Our objective was to promote nutritional knowledge in economically disadvantaged, rural older participants by studying its impact on their ability to benefit from congregate meal programs. We used a test, intervention, retest methodology to examine the effect of short-term nutrition interventions on congregate meal site participants' nutrition knowledge. The objective was to determine the participants' potential for managing their own diets (e.g., their ability to determine what diet behaviors are appropriate for specific chronic conditions). We found that while congregate meal site participants have knowledge of nutrition recommendations, their ability to apply this information in helping themselves to prevent or control their chronic conditions remains in question. PMID:20711926

  6. MyStudentBody-Stress: an online stress management intervention for college students.

    PubMed

    Chiauzzi, Emil; Brevard, Julie; Thum, Christina; Thurn, Christina; Decembrele, Stacey; Lord, Sarah

    2008-09-01

    College students who have high stress levels tend to experience an increased risk of academic difficulties, substance abuse, and emotional problems. To enhance student stress management and health promoting behaviors, an online stress management intervention called MyStudentBody-Stress (MyStudentBody-Stress) was developed and tested. College students at six U.S. colleges were randomized to one of three conditions: MyStudentBody-Stress, a control health information website, or no intervention. The differences between groups on stress control and health behavior measures were compared at baseline, and at 1, 3, and 6 months after baseline. Although there were no between-group differences on primary outcome variables, secondary analyses indicated that MyStudentBody-Stress participants were more likely to increase weekly physical activity, use specific stress management methods, and exhibit decreased anxiety and family problems. These findings indicate some potentially beneficial effects of online stress management programming for college students. Implications for college health practitioners are discussed. PMID:18726812

  7. Perioperative Nutritional Management in Congenital Perineal and Vestibular Fistulas: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hofmeester, Marrigje Josien; Draaisma, Jos M T H; Versteegh, Hendt P; Huibregtse, Elizabeth C P; van Rooij, Iris A L M; Blaauw, Ivo de

    2015-10-01

    Background?Surgical advancements have led to improved outcomes for children with congenital anorectal malformations with vestibular and perineal fistulas. However, the effect of perioperative nutritional management is debated and guidelines have not yet been established. Objective?The study aims to give an overview of available published evidence, regarding the impact of different perioperative nutritional management protocols on surgical outcome. Methods?A systematic literature review was conducted using PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and CINAHL databases. All original articles concerning perioperative nutrition in children with vestibular and perineal fistulas were included. Methodological quality was assessed with the Rangel score. Included studies were subdivided into two groups: early enteral nutrition and prolonged fasting with or without parenteral nutrition. Results?The database search resulted in 768 publications. Nine studies were eligible for inclusion. Wound complications were present in 56 of the 1,557 patients (4%) in whom this was assessed, and were more frequently seen in the prolonged fasting group (2 vs. 10%, p?nutritional management in children with perineal and vestibular fistulas. Although study quality is low and study heterogeneity may also influence our results, early enteral feeding seems to be the preferable postoperative feeding strategy. Both early wound complications as well as long-term complications, in terms of clinically relevant constipation, seem to be lower in the early enteral feeding group. However, a prospective randomized, multicentered trial should be initiated to draw definitive conclusions regarding this matter. PMID:25654619

  8. [What nutritional management in patients with head and neck cancers undergoing radiotherapy? An overview].

    PubMed

    Kouhen, Fadila; Afif, Mohammed; Benhmidou, Naoual; El Majjaoui, Sanaa; Elkacemi, Hanan; Kebdani, Tayeb; Benjaafar, Noureddine

    2015-10-01

    Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for head and neck cancers but patients often experience side effects, which lead to malnutrition. Morbidity related to weight loss during treatment may include dehydration, hospitalization, compromised treatment efficacy, and reduced quality of life and may impact survival hence the importance of early nutritional management prior to radiotherapy. Multiple interventions have been implemented to help ameliorate the impact of treatment on weight loss and nutritional status, including the use of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes. The goal of this overview is to search the predictive factors of malnutrition and an overview of the different types of nutritional interventions and their impact on the local control of the disease, mortality and quality of life of patients treated with radiotherapy or concomitant chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26384695

  9. Welfare-positive management and nutrition for the dairy herd: a European perspective.

    PubMed

    Logue, David N; Mayne, C Sinclair

    2014-01-01

    As European dairy farms become larger and diverge between grass-based and fully housed systems, interest in the welfare of the dairy cow and related environmental issues by consumers and legislators is increasing. These pressures mean that good nutrition and management, which underpin much dairy cow welfare, is critical. Despite considerable research into the management and nutrition of the dairy cow from calf to adulthood there is much on-farm variability in its application. While the incidences of many endemic diseases are reduced most are still significant, for example lameness. In addition, trade and climate change are bringing a more diverse range of pathogens, parasites and pests into Northern Europe. Housing aspects are limited in application by economics and in most cases still do not match grazing for welfare in temperate climates. Genomic technologies offer increased opportunities to breed for 'robustness' but like 'precision animal management systems' have still to be fully exploited. PMID:24360757

  10. Tips for Disaster Responders: Preventing and Managing Stress

    MedlinePLUS

    · Tips for Disaster Responders: PREVENTING AND MANAGING STRESS Responding to disasters and other emergencies is critically important, and while personally rewarding, it also carries the potential for affecting responders in harmful ...

  11. Stress management interventions for veterinary students.

    PubMed

    Gelberg, Susan; Gelberg, Howard

    2005-01-01

    Two-hundred-and-eighty-nine veterinary students from all four years of the University of Tennessee, College of Veterinary Medicine (UTCVM) were invited to complete the Derogatis Stress Profile (DSP)1 and an original Demographic Data Profile (DDP). The DSP assessed the students' current experiences of perceived stress, and the DDP was designed to gather information about students' academic year, their living situations, their financial situations, their interest area within the veterinary medical profession, and their current methods of coping with stress. These data were gathered as a baseline measure of veterinary medical students' perceived level of stress and quality of life. In an earlier study, data were also collected from faculty and staff about the perceived quality of the climate and culture of the veterinary college. The results of the DSP and DDP suggest that, although veterinary students at UTCVM do not experience significant levels of stress overall, they do report higher levels of subjective stress, time pressure, and depression than the general population. The more companion animals that veterinary students cared for in their personal lives, the more likely they were to report higher levels of perceived stress. Lastly, there were significant differences between genders, with female veterinary students reporting higher levels of perceived stress than their male counterparts. The preliminary results of the climate and culture data suggest that faculty and staff of the veterinary college individually feel that they are cared for in the work environment and collectively believe that the college strives for excellence. PMID:16078169

  12. Creative Stress Management: "Put Your Own Oxygen Mask On First."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruenberg, Ann

    1998-01-01

    Describes creative stress management techniques for early childhood practitioners. Presents a model whereby the caregiver identifies the problem; conducts a personal scan to identify symptoms and reactions that form behavior patterns; chooses from options to alleviate stress reactions related to the body, emotions, actions/behavior, or the mind;…

  13. Psychosocial factors related to job stress and women in management.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Emily

    2002-01-01

    This literature review explores women in management and how the psychosocial factors they face in the workplace affect their job-related stress level. The psychosocial factors identified include tokenism, sexual harassment and discrimination, work-family conflict, and workload. Various studies are cited and solutions to decrease job-related stress level are included. PMID:12441594

  14. The Prevention of Teacher Burnout Through Stress Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Doris B.

    The physical and emotional manifestations of burnout are described. A five-phase model is outlined for preventing extensive stress leading to teacher burnout. Phase One is predicated upon the notion that a professional cannot manage stress without the ability to identify it. Descriptions are given of the signs of physiological, psychological, and…

  15. Parent Stress Management Training for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treacy, Lee; Tripp, Gail; Baird, Amanda

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of a targeted 9-week parent stress management program (PSM) on the parenting stress, mood, family functioning, parenting style, locus of control, and perceived social support of parents of children diagnosed with DSM-IV ADHD. Sixty-three parents from 42 families were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 conditions:…

  16. Blood Pressure Variability and Stress Management Training for Essential Hypertension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Vera, Maria Paz; Sanz, Jesus; Labrador, Francisco J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether stress management training reduces blood pressure (BP) variability in hypertensive patients. Previous literature suggests that cardiovascular risk is not only a function of BP levels, but also of BP variability, and this partially depends on changes induced by the stress of everyday life. The…

  17. Stress Management in Medical Education: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Shauna L.; Shapiro, Daniel E.; Schwartz, Gary E. R.

    2000-01-01

    Review of clinical studies providing empirical data on stress management programs in medical education found that student participants in such programs demonstrated improved immunologic functioning, decreased depression and anxiety, increased spirituality and empathy, enhanced knowledge of alternative therapies, improved knowledge of stress

  18. Parenteral nutrition in the management of a dog with lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis and severe protein-losing enteropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, I F; Miller, E; Twedt, D C

    1999-01-01

    Management of lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis in a dog with whipworm infestation, hypoproteinemia, and ascites is described. Short-term parenteral nutrition hastened normalization of serum proteins, resolution of diarrhea, and weight gain. A description of the potential benefits, limitations, and possible complications of parenteral nutrition in refractory inflammatory bowel disease is given. PMID:10572669

  19. Adaptive capability as indicated by endocrine and biochemical responses of Malpura ewes subjected to combined stresses (thermal and nutritional) in a semi-arid tropical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sejian, Veerasamy; Maurya, Vijai P.; Naqvi, Sayeed M. K.

    2010-11-01

    A study was conducted to assess the effect of combined stresses (thermal and nutritional) on endocrine and biochemical responses in Malpura ewes. Twenty eight adult Malpura ewes (average body weight 33.56 kg) were used in the present study. The ewes were divided into four groups viz., GI ( n = 7; control), GII ( n = 7; thermal stress), GIII ( n = 7; nutritional stress) and GIV ( n = 7; combined stress). The animals were stall fed with a diet consisting of 60% roughage and 40% concentrate. GI and GII ewes were provided with ad libitum feeding while GIII and GIV ewes were provided with restricted feed (30% intake of GI ewes) to induce nutritional stress. GII and GIV ewes were kept in climatic chamber at 40°C and 55% RH for 6 h a day between 1000 hours and 1600 hours to induce thermal stress. The study was conducted for a period of two estrus cycles. The parameters studied were Hb, PCV, glucose, total protein, total cholesterol, ACP, ALP, cortisol, T4, T3, and insulin. Combined stress significantly ( P < 0.05) affected all parameters studied. Furthermore, the results revealed that, compared to thermal stress, nutritional stress had a less significant effect on the parameters studied. However, when both these stresses were coupled, they had a severe impact on all the parameters studied in these ewes. It can be concluded from this study that two stressors occurring simultaneously may impact severely on the biological functions necessary to maintain homeostasis in sheep.

  20. Nutritional ecology of ursids: A review of newer methods and management implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, Charles T.; Schwartz, Charles C.; Felicetti, L.A.

    2004-01-01

    The capability to understand the nutritional ecology of free-ranging bears has increased dramatically in the last 20 years. Advancements have occurred because (1) managers and biologists recognized the need to link habitat quality, productivity, and variability with bear movements, home ranges, and demographic parameters like reproductive output, survival, and population growth, and (2) several research teams are using new methods to build on the results of earlier field studies. Our ability to couple new field methods and empirical field research with controlled experiments using captive bears has been central to our increased understanding of bear nutrition. Newer methods include the use of stable isotopes to quantify assimilated diet and nutrient flows within ecosystems, bioelectrical impedance to measure body composition, and naturally occurring mercury to estimate fish intake. Controlled experiments using captive bears have been integral to developing methods, isolating specific variables by controlling the environment, and providing additional nutritional understanding necessary to interpret field observations. We review new methods and apply our increased understanding of bear nutritional ecology to 3 management issues: (1) the importance of salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) to brown bears (Ursus arctos) in the Pacific Northwest, (2) the consequences of the closure of the Yellowstone garbage dumps to grizzly bears, and (3) the relocation of problem bears.

  1. Effective Stress Management: A Model of Emotional Intelligence, Self-Leadership, and Student Stress Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houghton, Jeffery D.; Wu, Jinpei; Godwin, Jeffrey L.; Neck, Christopher P.; Manz, Charles C.

    2012-01-01

    This article develops and presents a model of the relationships among emotional intelligence, self-leadership, and stress coping among management students. In short, the authors' model suggests that effective emotion regulation and self-leadership, as mediated through positive affect and self-efficacy, has the potential to facilitate stress coping…

  2. Evaluation of the Role of Enteral Nutrition in Managing Patients with Diabetes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Omorogieva; Brooke, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed. The prevalence of diabetes is on the increase in the UK and globally partly due to lack of physical activities, poor dietary regimes and genetic susceptibility. The development of diabetes often leads to complications such as stroke, which may require enteral nutritional support. The provision of enteral feeds comes with its complications including hyperglycaemia which if not managed can have profound consequences for the patients in terms of clinical outcomes. Therefore, it is essential to develop strategies for managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed with respect to the type and composition of the feed. This is a systematic review of published peer reviewed articles. EBSCOhost Research, PubMed and SwetsWise databases were searched. Reference lists of identified articles were reviewed. Randomised controlled trials comparing enteral nutrition diabetes specific formulas with standard formulas were included. The studies which compared diabetes specific formulas (DSF) with standard formulas showed that DSF was more effective in controlling glucose profiles including postprandial glucose, HbA1c and insulinemic response. The use of DSF appears to be effective in managing patients with diabetes on enteral feed compared with standard feed. PMID:25412151

  3. Strategies in the nutritional management of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Teri L; Anderson, Molly A; Chartier-Logan, Catherine; Friedman, Jacob E; Barbour, Linda A

    2013-12-01

    Elucidating the optimal macronutrient composition for dietary management of gestational diabetes mellitus has enormous potential to improve perinatal outcomes. Diet therapy may result in significant cost savings if effective in deterring the need for expensive medical management within this growing population. In only 6 randomized controlled trials in 250 women, data suggest that a diet higher in complex carbohydrate and fiber, low in simple sugar, and lower in saturated fat may be effective in blunting postprandial hyperglycemia, preventing worsened insulin resistance and excess fetal growth. The use of diet in gestational diabetes mellitus remains an area in grave need for high-quality randomized controlled trials. PMID:24047934

  4. What is the relationship between mineral nutrition and disease management?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pecan disease management potentially influences efficient use of fertilizer and other expensive orchard inputs. Optimization of tree nutrient element physiology is key to the expression of a cultivar’s full potential to express resistance to disease. This is especially important in cultivars posse...

  5. The interplay of early-life stress, nutrition, and immune activation programs adult hippocampal structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Hoeijmakers, Lianne; Lucassen, Paul J.; Korosi, Aniko

    2015-01-01

    Early-life adversity increases the vulnerability to develop psychopathologies and cognitive decline later in life. This association is supported by clinical and preclinical studies. Remarkably, experiences of stress during this sensitive period, in the form of abuse or neglect but also early malnutrition or an early immune challenge elicit very similar long-term effects on brain structure and function. During early-life, both exogenous factors like nutrition and maternal care, as well as endogenous modulators, including stress hormones and mediator of immunological activity affect brain development. The interplay of these key elements and their underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. We discuss here the hypothesis that exposure to early-life adversity (specifically stress, under/malnutrition and infection) leads to life-long alterations in hippocampal-related cognitive functions, at least partly via changes in hippocampal neurogenesis. We further discuss how these different key elements of the early-life environment interact and affect one another and suggest that it is a synergistic action of these elements that shapes cognition throughout life. Finally, we consider different intervention studies aiming to prevent these early-life adversity induced consequences. The emerging evidence for the intriguing interplay of stress, nutrition, and immune activity in the early-life programming calls for a more in depth understanding of the interaction of these elements and the underlying mechanisms. This knowledge will help to develop intervention strategies that will converge on a more complete set of changes induced by early-life adversity. PMID:25620909

  6. Assessing the nutritional stress hypothesis: Relative influence of diet quantity and quality on seabird productivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jodice, P.G.R.; Roby, D.D.; Turco, K.R.; Suryan, R.M.; Irons, D.B.; Piatt, J.F.; Shultz, M.T.; Roseneau, D.G.; Kettle, A.B.; Anthony, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Food availability comprises a complex interaction of factors that integrates abundance, taxonomic composition, accessibility, and quality of the prey base. The relationship between food availability and reproductive performance can be assessed via the nutritional stress (NSH) and junkfood (JFH) hypotheses. With respect to reproductive success, NSH posits that a deficiency in any of the aforementioned metrics can have a deleterious effect on a population via poor reproductive success. JFH, a component of NSH, posits specifically that it is a decline in the quality of food (i.e. energy density and lipid content) that leads to poor reproductive success. We assessed each in relation to reproductive success in a piscivorous seabird, the black-legged kittiwake Rissa tridactyla. We measured productivity, taxonomic composition, frequency, size, and quality of meals delivered to nestlings from 1996 to 1999 at 6 colonies in Alaska, USA, 3 each in Prince William Sound and Lower Cook Inlet. Productivity varied widely among colony-years. Pacific herring Clupea pallasi, sand lance Ammodytes hexapterus, and capelin Mallotus villosus comprised ca. 80% of the diet among colony-years, and each was characterized by relatively high energy density. Diet quality for kittiwakes in this region therefore remained uniformly high during this study. Meal delivery rate and meal size were quite variable among colony-years, however, and best explained the variability in productivity. Parent kittiwakes appeared to select prey that were energy dense and that maximized the biomass provisioned to broods. While these results fail to support JFH, they do provide substantial support for NSH. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  7. Viability of fibroblasts cultured under nutritional stress irradiated with red laser, infrared laser, and red light-emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso; Espinosa, Mariano Martinez; Bagnato, Vanderley Salvador; Machado, Maria A. A. M.

    2011-07-01

    Phototherapy is noninvasive, painless and has no known side effect. However, for its incorporation into clinical practice, more well-designed studies are necessary to define optimal parameters for its application. The viability of fibroblasts cultured under nutritional stress irradiated with either a red laser, an infrared laser, or a red light-emitting diode (LED) was analyzed. Irradiation parameters were: red laser (660 nm, 40 mW, 1 W/cm2), infrared laser (780 nm, 40 mW, 1 W/cm2), and red LED (637 +/- 15 nm, 40 mW, 1 W/cm2). All applications were punctual and performed with a spot with 0.4 mm2 of diameter for 4 or 8 s. The Kruskal-Wallis test and analysis of variance of the general linear model (p <= 0.05) were used for statistical analysis. After 72 h, phototherapy with low-intensity laser and LED showed no toxicity at the cellular level. It even stimulated methylthiazol tetrazolium assay (MTT) conversion and neutral red uptake of fibroblasts cultured under nutritional stress, especially in the group irradiated with infrared laser (p = 0.004 for MTT conversion and p < 0.001 for neutral red uptake). Considering the parameters and protocol of phototherapy used, it can be concluded that phototherapy stimulated the viability of fibroblasts cultured under nutritional deficit resembling those found in traumatized tissue in which cell viability is reduced.

  8. Mindfulness-based stress reduction as a stress management intervention for healthy individuals: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manoj; Rush, Sarah E

    2014-10-01

    Stress is a global public health problem with several negative health consequences, including anxiety, depression, cardiovascular disease, and suicide. Mindfulness-based stress reduction offers an effective way of reducing stress by combining mindfulness meditation and yoga in an 8-week training program. The purpose of this study was to look at studies from January 2009 to January 2014 and examine whether mindfulness-based stress reduction is a potentially viable method for managing stress. A systematic search from Medline, CINAHL, and Alt HealthWatch databases was conducted for all types of quantitative articles involving mindfulness-based stress reduction. A total of 17 articles met the inclusion criteria. Of the 17 studies, 16 demonstrated positive changes in psychological or physiological outcomes related to anxiety and/or stress. Despite the limitations of not all studies using randomized controlled design, having smaller sample sizes, and having different outcomes, mindfulness-based stress reduction appears to be a promising modality for stress management. PMID:25053754

  9. Nutritional strategies to modulate inflammation and oxidative stress pathways via activation of the master antioxidant switch Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Ludmila F M F; Pedruzzi, Liliana M; Stenvinkel, Peter; Stockler-Pinto, Milena B; Daleprane, Julio B; Leite, Maurilo; Mafra, Denise

    2013-08-01

    The nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) plays an important role in cellular protection against cancer, renal, pulmonary, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases where oxidative stress and inflammation are common conditions. The Nrf2 regulates the expression of detoxifying enzymes by recognizing the human Antioxidant Response Element (ARE) binding site and it can regulate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory cellular responses, playing an important protective role on the development of the diseases. Studies designed to investigate how effective Nrf2 activators or modulators are need to be initiated. Several recent studies have shown that nutritional compounds can modulate the activation of Nrf2-Keap1 system. This review aims to discuss some of the key nutritional compounds that promote the activation of Nrf2, which may have impact on the human health. PMID:23643732

  10. Stress Management for Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sensor, M. Carol

    This handbook was designed to provide a basic introduction to and understanding of stress and its impact upon children. Several coping techniques for children are presented along with the methods with which to teach them. These techniques are intended to provide a resource for school psychologists working with children and adolescents who are…

  11. Climate change and cattle nutritional stress J O S E P H M . C R A I N E *, A N D R E W J . E L M O R E w , K . C . O L S O N z, D O U G T O L L E S O N }

    E-print Network

    Elmore, Andrew J.

    Climate change and cattle nutritional stress J O S E P H M . C R A I N E *, A N D R E W J . E L M O Abstract Owing to the complex interactions among climate, plants, cattle grazing, and land manage- ment practices, the impacts of climate change on cattle have been hard to predict. Predicting future grassland

  12. Prevention and management of pain and stress in the neonate

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    This statement is intended for health care professionals caring for neonates (preterm to one month of age). The objectives of this statement are to: increase awareness that neonates experience pain; provide a physiological basis for neonatal pain and stress assessment and management by health care professionals; make recommendations for reduced exposure of the neonate to noxious stimuli and to minimize associated adverse outcomes; and recommend effective and safe interventions that relieve pain and stress. PMID:20107594

  13. Physical activity, genetic, and nutritional considerations in childhood weight management.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, O; Foreyt, J; Bouchard, C; Brownell, K D; Dietz, W H; Ravussin, E; Salbe, A D; Schwenger, S; St Jeor, S; Torun, B

    1998-01-01

    Almost one-quarter of U.S. children are now obese, a dramatic increase of over 20% in the past decade. It is intriguing that the increase in prevalence has been occurring while overall fat consumption has been declining. Body mass and composition are influenced by genetic factors, but the actual heritability of juvenile obesity is not known. A low physical activity (PA) is characteristic of obese children and adolescents, and it may be one cause of juvenile obesity. There is little evidence, however, that overall energy expenditure is low among the obese. There is a strong association between the prevalence of obesity and the extent of TV viewing. Enhanced PA can reduce body fat and blood pressure and improve lipoprotein profile in obese individuals. Its effect on body composition, however, is slower than with low-calorie diets. The three main dietary approaches are: protein sparing modified fast, balanced hypocaloric diets, and comprehensive behavioral lifestyle programs. To achieve long-standing control of overweight, one should combine changes in eating and activity patterns, using behavior modification techniques. However, the onus is also on society to reduce incentives for a sedentary lifestyle and over-consumption of food. To address the key issues related to childhood weight management, the American College of Sports Medicine convened a Scientific Roundtable in Indianapolis. PMID:9475638

  14. Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM): Group Crisis Intervention, 4th June 2006, International Critical Incident Stress Foundation, Inc.

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM): Group Crisis Intervention, 4th Edition, June 2006 Management (CISM): Group Crisis Intervention, 4th Edition, June 2006, International Critical Incident Stress. · Realize those around you are under stress. · Don't make any big life changes. · Do make as many daily

  15. Water Stress and Foliar Boron Application Altered Cell Wall Boron and Seed Nutrition in Near-Isogenic Cotton Lines Expressing Fuzzy and Fuzzless Seed Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Our previous research, conducted under well-watered conditions without fertilizer application, showed that fuzziness cottonseed trait resulted in cottonseed nutrition differences between fuzzy (F) and fuzzless (N) cottonseed. Under water stress conditions, B mobility is further limited, inhibiting B movement within the plant, affecting seed nutrition (quality). Therefore, we hypothesized that both foliar B and water stress can affect B mobility, altering cottonseed protein, oil, and mineral nutrition. The objective of the current research was to evaluate the effects of the fuzziness seed trait on boron (B) and seed nutrition under water stress and foliar B application using near-isogenic cotton lines (NILs) grown in a repeated greenhouse experiment. Plants were grown under-well watered conditions (The soil water potential was kept between -15 to -20 kPa, considered field capacity) and water stress conditions (soil water potential between -100 and -150 kPa, stressed conditions). Foliar B was applied at a rate of 1.8 kg B ha-1 as H3BO3. Under well-watered conditions without B the concentrations of seed oil in N lines were higher than in F lines, and seed K and N levels were lower in N lines than in F lines. Concentrations of K, N, and B in leaves were higher in N lines than in F lines, opposing the trend in seeds. Water-stress resulted in higher seed protein concentrations, and the contribution of cell wall (structural) B to the total B exceeded 90%, supporting the structural role of B in plants. Foliar B application under well-watered conditions resulted in higher seed protein, oil, C, N, and B in only some lines. This research showed that cottonseed nutrition differences can occur due to seed fuzziness trait, and water stress and foliar B application can alter cottonseed nutrition. PMID:26098564

  16. The ABCs of Stress Management: A Little Stress Is Good For You, If You Know How To Handle It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelehear, Zach

    2005-01-01

    Educational psychologist Jean Piaget (1972) used a term called "equilibration" to describe our attempts to manage stress. He suggested that some stress was a good thing because it was during moments of stress and angst that we were likely to learn and grow. Put another way, if we are never stressed then there is nothing challenging us to grow. So…

  17. Management of multicellular senescence and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Haines, David D; Juhasz, Bela; Tosaki, Arpad

    2013-01-01

    Progressively sophisticated understanding of cellular and molecular processes that contribute to age-related physical deterioration is being gained from ongoing research into cancer, chronic inflammatory syndromes and other serious disorders that increase with age. Particularly valuable insight has resulted from characterization of how senescent cells affect the tissues in which they form in ways that decrease an organism's overall viability. Increasingly, the underlying pathophysiology of ageing is recognized as a consequence of oxidative damage. This leads to hyperactivity of cell growth pathways, prominently including mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin), that contribute to a build-up in cells of toxic aggregates such as progerin (a mutant nuclear cytoskeletal protein), lipofuscin and other cellular debris, triggering formation of senescent cellular phenotypes, which interact destructively with surrounding tissue. Indeed, senescent cell ablation dramatically inhibits physical deterioration in progeroid (age-accelerated) mice. This review explores ways in which oxidative stress creates ageing-associated cellular damage and triggers induction of the cell death/survival programs’ apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy and ‘necroapoptophagy’. The concept of ‘necroapoptophagy’ is presented here as a strategy for varying tissue oxidative stress intensity in ways that induce differential activation of death versus survival programs, resulting in enhanced and sustained representation of healthy functional cells. These strategies are discussed in the context of specialized mesenchymal stromal cells with the potential to synergize with telocytes in stabilizing engrafted progenitor cells, thereby extending periods of healthy life. Information and concepts are summarized in a hypothetical approach to suppressing whole-organism senescence, with methods drawn from emerging understandings of ageing, gained from Cnidarians (jellyfish, corals and anemones) that undergo a unique form of cellular regeneration, potentially conferring open-ended lifespans. PMID:23789967

  18. Occupational Stress and Turnover Intention: Implications for Nursing Management

    PubMed Central

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background: The main purpose of this study was to explore the status of occupational stress among hospital nurses in Isfahan, Iran. It also aimed to examine the relationship between nurses’ occupational stress and their intention to leave the hospital. Methods: The study employed a cross-sectional research design. A validated questionnaire was used to collect data from 296 nurses. Respondents were asked to rate the intensity of 30 common occupational stressors using a five-point scale. Results: A third of hospital nurses rated their occupational stress high. The major sources of stress were inadequate pay, inequality at work, too much work, staff shortage, lack of promotion, job insecurity and lack of management support. More than 35% of nurses stated that they are considering leaving the hospital, if they could find another job opportunity. Occupational stress was positively associated with nurses’ turnover intentions. Conclusion: Hospital managers should develop and apply appropriate policies and strategies to reduce occupational stress and consequently nurses’ turnover intention. PMID:24596858

  19. Stress and Reproductive Hormones in Grizzly Bears Reflect Nutritional Benefits and Social Consequences of a Salmon Foraging Niche

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Heather M.; Darimont, Chris T.; Paquet, Paul C.; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine E.; Smits, Judit E. G.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological indicators of social and nutritional stress can provide insight into the responses of species to changes in food availability. In coastal British Columbia, Canada, grizzly bears evolved with spawning salmon as an abundant but spatially and temporally constrained food source. Recent and dramatic declines in salmon might have negative consequences on bear health and ultimately fitness. To examine broadly the chronic endocrine effects of a salmon niche, we compared cortisol, progesterone, and testosterone levels in hair from salmon-eating bears from coastal BC (n?=?75) with the levels in a reference population from interior BC lacking access to salmon (n?=?42). As predicted, testosterone was higher in coastal bears of both sexes relative to interior bears, possibly reflecting higher social density on the coast mediated by salmon availability. We also investigated associations between the amount of salmon individual bears consumed (as measured by stable isotope analysis) and cortisol and testosterone in hair. Also as predicted, cortisol decreased with increasing dietary salmon and was higher after a year of low dietary salmon than after a year of high dietary salmon. These findings at two spatial scales suggest that coastal bears might experience nutritional or social stress in response to on-going salmon declines, providing novel insights into the effects of resource availability on fitness-related physiology. PMID:24312230

  20. Hyperspectral imaging of oil producing microalgae under thermal and nutritional stress.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Davis, Ryan W.; Ricken, James Bryce; Powell, Amy Jo; Keenan, Michael Robert

    2008-09-01

    This short-term, late-start LDRD examined the effects of nutritional deprivation on the energy harvesting complex in microalgae. While the original experimental plan involved a much more detailed study of temperature and nutrition on the antenna system of a variety of TAG producing algae and their concomitant effects on oil production, time and fiscal constraints limited the scope of the study. This work was a joint effort between research teams at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico and California. Preliminary results indicate there is a photosystem response to silica starvation in diatoms that could impact the mechanisms for lipid accumulation.

  1. Employee Assistance Programmes: The Emperor's New Clothes of Stress Management?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Andrew R.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the employee assistance program (EAP), a benefit increasingly provided by United Kingdom employers that claims to reduce the effects of stress on individuals and organizations, provide a management tool to improve workplace performance and productivity, and respond to critical incidents. Describes EAPs, their history, development and…

  2. Stress Management Training for Hospice Personnel: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Susan; And Others

    There is very little published research specifically addressing the stress management skills of hospice caregivers. In order to ascertain if breathing exercises, biofeedback training, relaxation exercises, and cognitive therapy would be beneficial, pre- and post-treatment questionnaires and six 30-minute treatment sessions were administered to…

  3. Coping Strategies for Managing Acculturative Stress among Asian International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ra, Young-An; Trusty, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the effects of specific coping strategies on managing acculturative stress and acculturation of Asian international students, based on a sample of 220 Asian international students in the U.S. The data were analyzed with hierarchical multiple regression using Baron and Kenny's (1986) mediation procedure. The results supported…

  4. Stress Management Training for Parents of Severely Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, George H. S.

    The study examined the efficacy of a stress management training procedure for reducing anxiety and depression in parents of severely handicapped children between the ages of 4 and 16. Thirty-six parents were randomly assigned to treatment or control groups which completed pre- and post-measures of the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the…

  5. Elicitation with abiotic stresses improves pro-health constituents, antioxidant potential and nutritional quality of lentil sprouts

    PubMed Central

    ?wieca, Micha?

    2014-01-01

    Phenolic content and antioxidant potential of lentil sprouts may be enhanced by treatment of seedlings in abiotic stress conditions without any negative influence on nutritional quality. The health-relevant and nutritional quality of sprouts was improved by elicitation of 2-day-old sprouts with oxidative, osmotic, ion-osmotic and temperature stresses. Among the sprouts studied, those obtained by elicitation with osmotic (600 mM mannitol) and ion-osmotic (300 mM NaCl) shocks had the highest total phenolic content levels: 6.52 and 6.56 mg/g flour, respectively. Oxidative stress significantly enhanced the levels of (+)-catechin and p-coumaric acid. A marked elevation of the chlorogenic and gallic acid contents was also determined for sprouts induced at 4 °C and 40 °C. The elevated phenolic content was translated into the antioxidant potential of sprouts, especially the ability to reduce lipid oxidation. A marked elevation of this ability was determined for seedlings treated with 20 mM, 200 mM H2O2 (oxidative stress) and 600 mM mannitol (osmotic stress); about a 12-fold, 8-fold and 9.5-fold increase in respect to control sprouts. The highest ability to quench free radicals was observed in sprouts induced by osmotic stress (IC50- 4.91 and 5.12 mg/ml for 200 mM and 600 mM mannitol, respectively). The highest total antioxidant activity indexes were determined for sprouts elicited with 20 mM H2O2 and 600 mM mannitol: 4.0 and 3.4, respectively. All studied growth conditions, except induction at 40 °C, caused a significant elevation of resistant starch levels which was also affected in a subsequent reduction of starch digestibility. Improvement of sprout quality by elicitation with abiotic stresses is a cheap and easy biotechnology and it seems to be an alternative to conventional techniques applied to improve the health promoting phytochemical levels and bioactivity of low-processed food. PMID:26150746

  6. Emergency and crisis management: critical incident stress management for first responders and business organisations.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, Daniel H

    2012-01-01

    A literature review was performed on critical incident stress after September 11th, 2001 (9/11), and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, which focused on the need to implement a holistic critical incident stress management programme for first responders and business organisations. Critical incident stress management is required to handle acute stress and other distress in the face of natural or man-made disasters, including terrorist attacks. A holistic approach to community resilience through a well-planned and implemented critical incident stress management programme has been shown in the literature to promote self-help and self-efficacy of individuals and organisations. The interventions and programme elements defined clearly show how a number of different intervention and prevention strategies will promote business and community resilience and also self-efficacy in a culturally-diverse community and organisation. Implementing a critical incident stress management programme within a responding business organisation is critical because of the fact that first responders are the most susceptible every day to exposure to critical incidents that will affect their mental health; and business employees will suffer some of the same maladies as first responders in the event of a disaster or crisis. Utilising the framework provided, a holistic critical incident stress management programme can be implemented to help reduce the effects of burnout, absenteeism, acute stress, post-traumatic stress, substance use and traumatic stress, and to work to promote community resilience and toughen individuals against the effects of stress. Taking care of the needs of the employees of a business organisation, and of those of first responders, is clearly required. PMID:22576135

  7. The role of nutrition for pressure ulcer management: national pressure ulcer advisory panel, European pressure ulcer advisory panel, and pan pacific pressure injury alliance white paper.

    PubMed

    Posthauer, Mary Ellen; Banks, Merrilyn; Dorner, Becky; Schols, Jos M G A

    2015-04-01

    Nutrition and hydration play an important role in preserving skin and tissue viability and in supporting tissue repair for pressure ulcer (PrU) healing. The majority of research investigating the relationship between nutrition and wounds focuses on PrUs. This white paper reviews the 2014 National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, and Pan Pacific Pressure Injury Alliance Nutrition Guidelines and discusses nutrition strategies for PrU management. PMID:25775201

  8. Occupational Stress in Secondary Education in Cyprus: Causes, Symptoms, Consequences and Stress Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadjisymeou, Georgia

    2010-01-01

    The survey attempted to look into the causes, symptoms and consequences that occupational stress has on teachers in Secondary Education in Cyprus and find ways to manage it. Thirty eight schools with 553 teachers participated in the survey. The sample chosen is a result of a simple random sampling and it is representative of the country's…

  9. Glycyrrhizin represses total parenteral nutrition-associated acute liver injury in rats by suppressing endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jai-Jen; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Lee, Kam-Fai; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2013-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is an artificial way to support daily nutritional requirements by bypassing the digestive system, but long-term TPN administration may cause severe liver dysfunction. Glycyrrhizin is an active component of licorice root that has been widely used to treat chronic hepatitis. The aim of this study is to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of glycyrrhizin on TPN-associated acute liver injury in vivo. Liver dysfunction was induced by intravenous infusion of TPN at a flow rate of 20 mL/kg/h for three h in Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were pretreated with Glycyrrhizin (1, 3 and 10 mg/kg intravenously). After receiving TPN or saline (control group) for three h, the rats were sacrificed, blood samples were collected for biochemical analyses and liver tissue was removed for histopathological and immunohistochemical examination. We found that aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total bilirubin (TB) and triglyceride (TG) levels were significantly increased in the TPN group without glycyrrhizin pretreatment and decreased in the glycyrrhizin-pretreated TPN group in a dose-dependent manner. The stained liver sections showed that glycyrrhizin relieved acute liver injury. The upregulation of serum protein biomarkers of reactive nitrogen species, including nitrotyrosine and inducible NO synthase (iNOS), were attenuated by glycyrrhizin pretreatment. Levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress factors, such as phosphorylation of JNK1/2, p38 MAPK and CHOP, were decreased by glycyrrhizin pretreatment. In summary, our results suggest that glycyrrhizin decreases TPN-associated acute liver injury factors by suppressing endoplasmic reticulum stress and reactive nitrogen stress. PMID:23771023

  10. Nutritional management and follow up of infants and children with food allergy: Italian Society of Pediatric Nutrition/Italian Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology Task Force Position Statement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although the guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of food allergy recognize the role of nutrition, there is few literature on the practical issues concerning the nutritional management of children with food allergies. This Consensus Position Statement focuses on the nutritional management and follow-up of infants and children with food allergy. It provides practical advices for the management of children on exclusion diet and it represents an evidence-based consensus on nutritional intervention and follow-up of infants and children with food allergy. Children with food allergies have poor growth compared to non-affected subjects directly proportional to the quantity of foods excluded and the duration of the diet. Nutritional intervention, if properly planned and properly monitored, has proven to be an effective mean to substantiate a recovery in growth. Nutritional intervention depends on the subject’s nutritional status at the time of the diagnosis. The assessment of the nutritional status of children with food allergies should follow a diagnostic pathway that involves a series of successive steps, beginning from the collection of a detailed diet-history. It is essential that children following an exclusion diet are followed up regularly. The periodic re-evaluation of the child is needed to assess the nutritional needs, changing with the age, and the compliance to the diet. The follow- up plan should be established on the basis of the age of the child and following the growth pattern. PMID:24386882

  11. The Impact of Stress Management Training on the Academic Performance of Low-Achieving College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, John M.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Assessed the impact of stress management training as part of an academic skills training program upon students' (N=22) self-reported symptoms of stress and academic performance. Results indicated that success-stress management treatment was more effective in reducing stress and increasing academic performance than success treatment alone. (LLL)

  12. The Influence of Time Management Practices on Job Stress Level among Beginning Secondary Agriculture Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Misty D.; Torres, Robert M.; Tummons, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring the stress of teachers continues to be important--particularly stress levels of beginning agriculture teachers. The study sought to describe the relationship between beginning teachers' perceived ability to manage their time and their level of stress. The Time Management Practices Inventory and the Job Stress Survey were used to measure…

  13. RISK MANAGEMENT OF SEDIMENT STRESS: A FRAMEWORK FOR SEDIMENT RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research related to the ecological risk management of sediment stress in watersheds is placed under a common conceptual framework in order to help promote the timely advance of decision support methods for aquatic resource managers and watershed-level planning. The proposed risk ...

  14. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Occupational Strand: Foods and Nutrition. Module II-C-3: Managing a Food Service Operation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caid, Joanne

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on managing a food service operation is the third in a set of three modules on occupational education relating to foods and nutrition. (This set is part of a larger series of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education…

  15. Co-occurrence and coaction of stress management with other health risk behaviors.

    PubMed

    Lipschitz, Jessica M; Paiva, Andrea L; Redding, Colleen A; Butterworth, Susan; Prochaska, James O

    2015-07-01

    This study provides a preliminary investigation of the role of stress management in multiple behavior change. Risk status on stress management and five health behaviors (healthy eating, exercise, alcohol, smoking, and depression management) was assessed before and after a multiple behavior change intervention. Findings suggested a link between stress management and a worse health risk behavior profile at baseline. Results also showed relationships between improved stress management over 6 months and heightened odds of improving on specific behaviors as well as improving one's overall behavioral risk profile. Particularly strong links between stress management and energy balance and other affective behaviors were observed. PMID:24165862

  16. Trait Anxiety Reductions in a Substance Abuse Population Trained in Stress Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlesworth, Edward A.; Dempsey, George

    1982-01-01

    Investigated a stress management training program for 11 hospitalized drug-abusing patients, compared to a control group in different psychotherapy programs. Results indicated that the stress management treatment group produced significant decreases in trait anxiety. Subjects used the stress management techniques to overcome insomnia, anger, and…

  17. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition Relationships between Feeding Intolerance and Stress Biomarkers in Preterm Infants

    E-print Network

    French, Jeffrey A.

    and Stress Biomarkers in Preterm Infants --Manuscript Draft-- Manuscript Number: JPGN-NA-12-284R1 Full Title: Relationships between Feeding Intolerance and Stress Biomarkers in Preterm Infants Article Type: Original variables and biomarker levels at each time and over time for the sample; describe/compare variables

  18. Effects of total parenteral nutrition on endotoxin translocation and extent of the stress response in burned rats.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, T; Tashiro, T; Yamamori, H; Takagi, K; Hayashi, N; Itabashi, T; Toyoda, Y; Sano, W; Nitta, H; Hirano, J; Nakajima, N; Ito, I

    1999-01-01

    Postburn endotoxin translocation has been well documented. However, the relationship between the secretion of catabolic hormones, degree of endotoxin translocation, and intestinal atrophy has not been previously demonstrated. In this experiment, modulation of the secretion of catabolic hormones according to the route of nutrient administration was examined in burned animals. A total of 55 rats, with and without a burn injury, were orally or parenterally fed. Urinary excretion of epinephrine and norepinephrine (U-EN) of each rat was measured for 48 h after burn injury as an indicator of the stress response. Evaluations of intestinal atrophy and endotoxin contents in the liver and spleen were also done 48 h after burn injury. U-EN after burn injury in rats administered total parenteral nutrition (TPN) was higher than in those fed orally. Endotoxin translocation and intestinal atrophy after thermal injury were also augmented by TPN. A significant positive correlation between U-EN and endotoxin content of the liver, and a negative correlation between U-EN and weight of the intestine, were observed. TPN enhances the stress response after burn injury. An increase in endotoxin translocation and intestinal atrophy by TPN are closely related to enhancement of the stress response. PMID:10422088

  19. Expanding research to provide an evidence base for nutritional interventions for the management of inborn errors of metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Kathryn M.; Lloyd-Puryear, Michele A.; Yao, Lynne; Groft, Stephen C.; Parisi, Melissa A.; Mulberg, Andrew; Gopal-Srivastava, Rashmi; Cederbaum, Stephen; Enns, Gregory M.; Ershow, Abby G.; Frazier, Dianne M.; Gohagan, John; Harding, Cary; Howell, R. Rodney; Regan, Karen; Stacpoole, Peter W.; Venditti, Charles; Vockley, Jerry; Watson, Michael; Coates, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    A trans-National Institutes of Health initiative, Nutrition and Dietary Supplement Interventions for Inborn Errors of Metabolism (NDSI-IEM), was launched in 2010 to identify gaps in knowledge regarding the safety and utility of nutritional interventions for the management of inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) that need to be filled with evidence-based research. IEM include inherited biochemical disorders in which specific enzyme defects interfere with the normal metabolism of exogenous (dietary) or endogenous protein, carbohydrate, or fat. For some of these IEM, effective management depends primarily on nutritional interventions. Further research is needed to demonstrate the impact of nutritional interventions on individual health outcomes and on the psychosocial issues identified by patients and their families. A series of meetings and discussions were convened to explore the current United States’ funding and regulatory infrastructure and the challenges to the conduct of research for nutritional interventions for the management of IEM. Although the research and regulatory infrastructure are well-established, a collaborative pathway that includes the professional and advocacy rare disease community and federal regulatory and research agencies will be needed to overcome current barriers. PMID:23806236

  20. Stress management training for women on public assistance.

    PubMed

    Tablemann, B; Marciniak, D; Johnson, D; Rodgers, R R

    1982-06-01

    A life-coping skills training package for women supported by public assistance was designed to enhance self-esteem and teach life planning and stress management strategies. Ten weeks of training resulted in significant changes in scores on measures reflective of psychological distress, depression, anxiety, inadequacy, self-confidence, and ego strength. A rationale for the impact of the training is suggested. PMID:7113997

  1. Nutrigenomic profiling of transcriptional processes affected in liver and distal intestine in response to a soybean meal-induced nutritional stress in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    De Santis, Christian; Bartie, Kerry L; Olsen, Rolf E; Taggart, John B; Tocher, Douglas R

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to generate an experimental model to characterize the nutrigenomic profile of a plant-derived nutritional stress. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) was used as the model species. The nutritional stress was induced by inclusion of dietary defatted soybean meal (SBM), as this ingredient had been previously demonstrated to induce enteropathy in the distal intestine and reduce growth in salmon. Triplicate groups of Atlantic salmon were fed concentrations of 0, 100, 200 and 300 g kg(-1) SBM for 12 weeks and reduced growth performance was used as the indicator of nutritional stress. The transcriptome was analyzed in two tissues, liver and distal intestine, with the hypothesis being that the liver transcriptome would be characterized by gene expression responses related to overall growth and health performance, whereas intestinal gene expression would be dominated by specific responses to SBM. A set of 133 genes was differentially expressed in liver including 44 genes in common with the intestinal response. The liver-specific response included up-regulation of genes involved in protein digestion, energy metabolism and immune functions, whereas genes in other metabolic pathways were generally anabolic and down-regulated. These responses may be more related to general nutritional stress than to SBM per se. The transcriptomic profile in the distal intestine was consistent with the enteritis response as described previously. This study provides a comprehensive report on the profiles of liver and distal intestine transcriptomes, specifically highlighting the role of the liver in fish undergoing SBM-induced nutritional stress. PMID:25916579

  2. To Be or Not to Be (Stressed): The Critical Role of a Psychologically Healthy Workplace in Effective Stress Management.

    PubMed

    Grawitch, Matthew J; Ballard, David W; Erb, Kaitlyn R

    2015-10-01

    This article explains how key practices pertaining to the psychologically healthy workplace can be used to develop a comprehensive approach to stress management in contemporary organizations. Specifically, we demonstrate the ways in which employee involvement, recognition, work-life balance, health and safety, and growth and development practices can be used to assist in the reduction of work stress and the proactive management of strain. Although many organizations strive to establish a positive environment conducive to work and well-being, identifying where to begin can often seem like a daunting task. Currently, many stress management efforts emphasize individual-level interventions that are simply implemented alongside existing organizational practices. We propose that a broader perspective allows for a better understanding of the stress process, resulting in the ability to consider a wider range of changes to organizational processes. Combining knowledge regarding psychologically healthy workplace practices, stress management intervention levels and the personal resource allocation framework, we present a comprehensive framework for approaching workplace stress management, which can be tailored to the unique needs of various organizations, departments and employees. By adopting this broader perspective, we believe organizations can more strategically address employee stress, resulting in more effective stress management and a profound impact on stress-related outcomes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26468001

  3. Translating Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines Into a Summary of Recommendations for the Nutrition Management of Upper Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yangyang; Carey, Sharon

    2014-05-01

    Background: Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) cancer has a profound effect on the function of major digestive organs with resulting deterioration in nutrition status. There are currently no known evidence-based guidelines specific to the nutrition management of people with UGI cancer. This article aimed to review the current guidelines related to the nutrition management of surgical and nonsurgical cancer patients with the aim to collate similar findings to produce a summary of recommendations for clinicians. Gaps in current evidence were also identified. Methods: Guidelines with evidence grading systems were identified from CINAHL, Medline, Web of Science, and a manual search. The quality of guidelines was assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation (AGREE) tool. Results: Twenty-six guidelines were retrieved. Most guidelines showed strong rigor, but only 23% were considered current, having been developed or reviewed in the past 3 years. A summary of recommendations was extrapolated from retrieved guidelines, based on a standardized evidence grading system and the quality score for each guideline. Conclusion: This review of current guidelines shows that many areas of nutrition management still require more evidence to support high-level recommendations. These include immunonutrition, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, and postdischarge complication management. More research is needed before evidence-based guidelines can be developed. PMID:24803486

  4. Esophago-gastric motility and nutritional management in a child with ATR-X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshihiko; Arai, Katsuhiro; Takahashi, Masataka; Ohno, Michinobu; Sato, Kaori; Fuchimoto, Yasushi; Wada, Takahiko; Ida, Shinobu; Kawahara, Hisayoshi; Kanamori, Yutaka

    2014-08-01

    X-linked alpha thalassemia mental retardation (ATR-X) syndrome is an X-linked recessive disorder that often involves gastrointestinal symptoms. Aspiration pneumonia related to gastroesophageal reflux has been reported as the major cause of death, but gastrointestinal function has not been well investigated. The present report describes a child with ATR-X syndrome who suffered from periodical episodes of refractory vomiting. We investigated the function of upper alimentary tract and found that esophago-gastric dysmotility and severe gastric volvulus were the major causes of gastrointestinal symptoms. This child was surgically treated with anterior gastropexy and jejunal alimentation through gastrostomy, and the symptoms were relieved with good weight gain. This report may provide insight into the gastrointestinal function and nutritional management in children with ATR-X syndrome. PMID:25252072

  5. The economic value of enteral medical nutrition in the management of disease-related malnutrition: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Freijer, Karen; Bours, Martijn J L; Nuijten, Mark J C; Poley, Marten J; Meijers, Judith M M; Halfens, Ruud J G; Schols, Jos M G A

    2014-01-01

    Economic evaluations for medical nutrition, such as oral nutritional supplements (ONS), are relatively uncommon compared with other health technologies, and represent an area that has not been reviewed so far. In this systematic review, economic evaluations of enteral medical nutrition in the management of disease-related malnutrition (DRM) were reviewed and qualified to estimate the economic value. Initially, 481 studies were found, of which 37 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility and were rated on their quality using the Quality of Health Economic Studies (QHES) instrument. The final review focused on the high QHES quality economic evaluation studies. As both the studied medical nutrition intervention and the form of the economic evaluation varied, a quantitative synthesis (meta-analysis) was not attempted but a critical analysis and comparison of the individual study results were performed. ONS was the most studied intervention, covering several patient populations and different health care settings. Outcomes included cost savings (n = 3), no significant extra costs per unit of clinical and/or functional improvement (n = 1), or significantly higher costs per unit of clinical and/or functional improvement but still cost-effective for the used threshold (n = 4). This review shows that the use of enteral medical nutrition in the management of DRM can be efficient from a health economic perspective. PMID:24239013

  6. Neonatal nutrition.

    PubMed

    Denne, Scott C

    2015-04-01

    Optimal nutrition in infancy is the foundation of health in later life. Based on the demonstrated health benefits of human milk, breastfeeding should be the primary means of nutrition for most infants. Although many mothers experience some problems with breastfeeding, health professionals can use simple strategies to overcome most of these problems. For infants who cannot breastfeed, standard infant formulas support adequate nutrition and growth. Gastroesophageal reflux is a common feeding-related event and occurs in most infants; it is part of normal physiology and requires no intervention. Gastroesophageal reflux disease occurs in a small number of infants necessitating the use of an algorithm-based evaluation and management strategy. PMID:25836706

  7. Effectiveness of Stress Management Skill Training on the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Levels in Drug Addicts after Drug Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Zahra; Tourani, Somayeh; Sadeghi, Hasan; Abolghasemi, Abbass

    2013-01-01

    Background Stressful life events may cause initiation of drug use among people. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of stress management skill training on depression, anxiety and stress levels in drug addicts after withdrawal. Objectives The population included all drug addicts after withdrawal in 2012 in Alborz province. Materials and Methods The study was quasi-experimental with pretest-posttest design with a control group. Levels of emotional reactions (depression, anxiety and stress) in all referrals to a counseling center for drug withdrawal in 2012 using the Depression, Anxiety, Stress (DASS-21) questionnaire was assessed. The study population included drug addicts after withdrawal. The sampling method was available sampling and random assignment. Thirty people who had higher emotional reactions were randomly selected and divided into two test (n = 15) and control (n = 15) groups. For the test group, a stress management skill training course was held in twelve 90-minute sessions, but the control group received no intervention. The obtained data were analyzed using SPSS-19 software with analysis of covariance. Results The results showed that stress management skill training has a significant effect on reducing emotional reactions (P < 0.01). It was noted that after 2 months test group follow-up, stress management training has retained its effect. Conclusion Apparently, training addicts about life skills, particularly stress management seems to be a good idea. PMID:24971280

  8. Nutrition.gov

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search Tips Browse by Subject What's In Food Smart Nutrition 101 Life Stages Weight Management Nutrition and Health Issues Shopping, Cooking & Meal Planning Dietary Supplements Food Assistance Programs Home Providing easy, online access to government information on ...

  9. Defining and measuring the concept of 'community stress' for nutrition and physical activity interventions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Community-based research suggests that our physical and social environment makes a difference in our health status and that a key mechanism that relates one's context to their individual health status is stress. A better understanding of this relationship is important to healthcare providers, resear...

  10. Nutritional immunomodulation as an approach to decreasing the negative effects of stress in poultry production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stress can lead to changes in the immune response resulting in both increased and decreased resistance to opportunistic bacterial pathogens. Growth-promoting antibiotics have been a major tool in modulating host-pathogen interactions and limiting clinical and sub-clinical bacterial infection in conf...

  11. A Stress Management Classroom Tool for Teachers of Children with BD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, James T.; Owens, James L.

    1999-01-01

    This article discusses how stress may affect the lives of children with behavior disorders, provides educators with a model for introducing stress management techniques, and closes with strategies for managing stress in the classroom, including listening to relaxing music, manipulating the environment, and providing a morning physical education…

  12. A Systematic Review of Stress-Management Programs for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiralkar, Malan T.; Harris, Toi B.; Eddins-Folensbee, Florence F.; Coverdale, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Because medical students experience a considerable amount of stress during training, academic leaders have recognized the importance of developing stress-management programs for medical students. The authors set out to identify all controlled trials of stress-management interventions and determine the efficacy of those interventions.…

  13. Stress Management for Special Educators: The Self-Administered Tool for Awareness and Relaxation (STAR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Krista; Poel, Elissa Wolfe

    2006-01-01

    The Self-Administered Tool for Awareness and Relaxation (STAR) is a stress management strategy designed to facilitate awareness of the physical, mental, emotional, and physiological effects of stress through the interconnectedness of the brain, body, and emotions. The purpose of this article is to present a stress-management model for teachers,…

  14. Prevention and management of type 2 diabetes: dietary components and nutritional strategies.

    PubMed

    Ley, Sylvia H; Hamdy, Osama; Mohan, Viswanathan; Hu, Frank B

    2014-06-01

    In the past couple of decades, evidence from prospective observational studies and clinical trials has converged to support the importance of individual nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. The quality of dietary fats and carbohydrates consumed is more crucial than is the quantity of these macronutrients. Diets rich in wholegrains, fruits, vegetables, legumes, and nuts; moderate in alcohol consumption; and lower in refined grains, red or processed meats, and sugar-sweetened beverages have been shown to reduce the risk of diabetes and improve glycaemic control and blood lipids in patients with diabetes. With an emphasis on overall diet quality, several dietary patterns such as Mediterranean, low glycaemic index, moderately low carbohydrate, and vegetarian diets can be tailored to personal and cultural food preferences and appropriate calorie needs for weight control and diabetes prevention and management. Although much progress has been made in development and implementation of evidence-based nutrition recommendations in developed countries, concerted worldwide efforts and policies are warranted to alleviate regional disparities. PMID:24910231

  15. Nutrition Management of School Age Children with Special Needs: A Resource Manual for School Personnel, Families, and Health Professionals. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horsley, Janet W.; Allen, Elizabeth R.; Daniel, Patricia White

    This guide is intended to help school personnel facilitate the management of special diets and nutrition education in the school curriculum in accordance with requirements of the National School Lunch Act, the Child Nutrition Act, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504), and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. After the introduction,…

  16. Medical Nutrition Therapy Is Effective in the Management of Hypoglycemia Caused by Insulin Antibodies: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Li, Rongrong; Mao, Jiangfeng; Yu, Kang; Wang, Lilin; Hu, Mingming; Xu, Lingling

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune antibodies, induced by exogenous insulin preparations, may result in labile glucose control and frequent hypoglycemia in some rare cases. In addition to insulin cessation, immune suppressants and/or plasmapheresis have been used as the primary remedies for these patients. Some previous studies also indicate that the condition tends to remit spontaneously after discontinuation of insulin exposure. Because of this, the clinical importance of nutritional interventions and behavioral approaches, which may play a role in ameliorating the symptoms, should also be emphasized. Herein, we report on a 64-year-old man with hypoglycemia induced by insulin antibodies (IAs), whose hypoglycemic symptoms significantly improved after the implementation of nutrition therapy. This rare case expands our knowledge of the management of hypoglycemia, and for the first time highlights the significance of nutritional and lifestyle intervention in treatment of IA-induced hypoglycemia.   Key teaching points: • Exogenous insulin administration may induce autoimmune antibodies to insulin, leading to frequent hypoglycemia. • We report a case with frequent hypoglycemia caused by IAs after exogeneous insulin exposure. • The patient's symptoms were alleviated by nutrition therapy. • We demonstrate for the first time the significance of dietary and behavioral interventions in management of IA-induced hypoglycemia. PMID:26273793

  17. Effectiveness of a Comprehensive Stress Management Program to Reduce Work-Related Stress in a Medium-Sized Enterprise

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the effectiveness of a comprehensive workplace stress management program consisting of participatory action-oriented training (PAOT) and individual management. Methods A comprehensive workplace stress management program was conducted in a medium-sized enterprise. The baseline survey was conducted in September 2011, using the Korean Occupational Stress Scale (KOSS) and Worker’s Stress Response Inventory (WSRI). After implementing both organizational and individual level interventions, the follow up evaluation was conducted in November 2011. Results Most of the workers participated in the organizational level PAOT and made Team-based improvement plans. Based on the stress survey, 24 workers were interviewed by a researcher. After the organizational and individual level interventions, there was a reduction of several adverse psychosocial factors and stress responses. In the case of blue-collar workers, psychosocial factors such as the physical environment, job demands, organizational system, lack of rewards, and occupational climate were significantly improved; in the case of white-collar workers, the occupational climate was improved. Conclusions In light of these results, we concluded that the comprehensive stress management program was effective in reducing work-related stress in a short-term period. A persistent long-term follow up is necessary to determine whether the observed effects are maintained over time. Both team-based improvement activities and individual interviews have to be sustainable and complementary to each other under the long-term plan. PMID:24524591

  18. Chill Out! Helping Gifted Youth Deal with Stress: What Are Some Specific, Practical Ways to Teach Stress Management?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Terry

    2006-01-01

    What causes stress in gifted youth and what specific skills do they need to manage it? Although stress is a real presence in all people's lives, it can be more intense for the gifted because they are usually more sensitive, introspective, and emotional. Growing up gifted is a qualitatively different experience, which can manifest itself in the…

  19. Stressful Dieting: Nutritional Conditions but Not Compensatory Growth Elevate Corticosterone Levels in Zebra Finch Nestlings and Fledglings

    PubMed Central

    Honarmand, Mariam; Goymann, Wolfgang; Naguib, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Unfavourable conditions throughout the period of parental care can severely affect growth, reproductive performance, and survival. Yet, individuals may be affected differently, depending on the developmental period during which constraints are experienced. Here we tested whether the nestling phase compared to the fledgling phase is more susceptible to nutritional stress by considering biometry, physiology, sexually selected male ornaments and survival using zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) as a model species. As nestlings (day 0–17) or fledglings (day 17–35), subjects were raised either on low or high quality food. A low quality diet resulted in significantly elevated baseline corticosterone titres in both nestlings and fledglings. Subjects showed substantial compensatory growth after they had experienced low quality food as nestlings but catch-up growth did neither lead to elevated baseline corticosterone titres nor did we detect long term effects on biometry, male cheek patch, or survival. The compensation for temporally unfavourable environmental conditions reflects substantial phenotypic plasticity and the results show that costs of catch-up growth were not mediated via corticosterone as a physiological correlate of allostatic load. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms and plasticity with which animals respond to periods of constraints during development as they may occur in a mistiming of breeding. PMID:20927394

  20. Examining occupational stress, sources of stress and stress management strategies through the eyes of management consultants: a multiple correspondence analysis for latent constructs.

    PubMed

    von Humboldt, Sofia; Leal, Isabel; Laneiro, Tito; Tavares, Patrícia

    2013-12-01

    To date, little research has yet focused in broad assessment for management consultancy professionals. This investigation aims to analyse management consultants' self-perceptions of occupational stress (SPoOS), sources of stress (SoS) and stress management strategies (SMS) and to find latent constructs that can work as major determinants in consultants' conceptualization of SPoOS, SoS and SMS. Measures were completed, including demographics and interviews. Complete data were available for 39 management consultants, 53.8% male and aged between 23 and 56?years (M?=?38.0; SD?=?9.2). The data were subjected to content analysis. Representation of the associations and latent constructs were analysed by a multiple correspondence analysis. Results indicated that 'intellectual disturber' (31.4%) was the most referred SPoOS, 'high workload' (15.1%) was identified as the most prevalent perceived SoS and 'coaching' (19.0%) was the most mentioned SMS. No significant differences between the two gender groups were found regarding the three total scores. SPoOS was explained by a two-factor model: 'organization-oriented' and 'person-oriented'. A three-dimension model formed by 'job concerns', 'organizational constraints' and 'career expectations' was indicated as a best-fit solution for SoS, and SMS was best explained in a three-dimension model by 'group dynamics strategies', 'organizational culture strategies' and 'individual support strategies'. This research makes a unique contribution for a better understanding of what defines SPoOS, SoS and SMS for management consultants. PMID:23401311

  1. Management of intestinal failure in inflammatory bowel disease: small intestinal transplantation or home parenteral nutrition?

    PubMed

    Harrison, Elizabeth; Allan, Philip; Ramu, Amrutha; Vaidya, Anil; Travis, Simon; Lal, Simon

    2014-03-28

    Inflammatory bowel disease and Crohn's disease in particular, is a common cause of intestinal failure. Current therapeutic options include home parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation. For most patients, home intravenous therapy including parenteral nutrition, with a good probability of long-term survival, is the favoured choice. However, in selected patients, with specific features that may shorten survival or complicate home parenteral nutrition, intestinal transplantation presents a viable alternative. We present survival, complications, quality of life and economic considerations that currently influence individualised decision-making between home parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation. PMID:24696601

  2. Management of intestinal failure in inflammatory bowel disease: Small intestinal transplantation or home parenteral nutrition?

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Elizabeth; Allan, Philip; Ramu, Amrutha; Vaidya, Anil; Travis, Simon; Lal, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease and Crohn’s disease in particular, is a common cause of intestinal failure. Current therapeutic options include home parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation. For most patients, home intravenous therapy including parenteral nutrition, with a good probability of long-term survival, is the favoured choice. However, in selected patients, with specific features that may shorten survival or complicate home parenteral nutrition, intestinal transplantation presents a viable alternative. We present survival, complications, quality of life and economic considerations that currently influence individualised decision-making between home parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation. PMID:24696601

  3. Effects of Nutritional Stress on the Storage Proteins of Soybeans 1

    PubMed Central

    Gayler, Kenwyn R.; Sykes, Geoffrey E.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of sulfur deficiency on the complement of proteins laid down in developing seeds of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr) have been examined. Sulfur deficiency caused a 40% decrease in the level of glycinins and a contrasting elevation in the level of ?-conglycinins. The subunit composition of these proteins was also affected. There was in particular a 3-fold increase in the ?-subunit of ?-conglycinins in the sulfur-deficient seeds, and this accumulated largely as the B0-isomer of ?-conglycinins, a protein which while virtually devoid of methionine and cysteine retains the physical properties of a normal 7S storage protein. These data demonstrate that a high degree of selectivity can be exerted by environmental stress over the accumulation of proteins in developing seeds. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16664286

  4. Vector Control and Foliar Nutrition for Management of Huanglongbing in Florida Citrus Philip A. Stansly, H. Alejandro Arevalo, Jawwad A. Qureshi, Moneen M. Jones, Katherine

    E-print Network

    Ma, Lena

    7.4 Vector Control and Foliar Nutrition for Management of Huanglongbing in Florida Citrus Philip A, And Fritz M. Roka Huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening is a bacterial disease vectored by the Asian citrus

  5. Evaluation of subclinical laminitis in a dairy herd and observations on associated nutritional and management factors.

    PubMed

    Greenough, P R; Vermunt, J J

    1991-01-01

    The hind claws of 10 heifers, 10 second-calf cows, and 10 mature cows in the University of Saskatchewan's dairy herd were examined on four consecutive occasions, four and two months before calving, at calving, and two months after calving. A high prevalence of haemorrhages was observed in the sole of the claws, and these lesions were most prevalent near calving; the haemorrhages were detected in the heifers up to four months before calving. After calving, the haemorrhages tended to disappear rapidly from the claws of the heifers, but no such recovery was evident in the second calvers and mature cows. A scoring system for sole haemorrhages was developed, and the different scores were linked with sole ulcer (pododermatitis circumscripta), toe ulcer, white zone lesions, and heel erosion. Factors associated with nutrition and management, such as rapid rearing (average daily weight gain from birth to breeding greater than 800 g), the sudden introduction into the dry group after they had been confirmed pregnant, confrontation by dominant cows, and housing on concrete in a cubicle system appeared to play a role in the occurrence of haemorrhages in the claws of heifers well before calving. PMID:1848379

  6. Job Stress in Disaster Case Managers Working with Hurricane Ike Recovery 

    E-print Network

    Forman, Megan Hajecate

    2011-10-21

    resources. The purpose of this study was to evaluate stress levels of the disaster case managers employed through the ten smaller faith-based organizations that make up one of the larger recipient organizations providing case management services to victims...

  7. European adolescents' level of perceived stress is inversely related to their diet quality: the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study.

    PubMed

    De Vriendt, Tineke; Clays, Els; Huybrechts, Inge; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Moreno, Luis A; Patterson, Emma; Molnár, Dénes; Mesana, María I; Beghin, Laurent; Widhalm, Kurt; Manios, Yannis; De Henauw, Stefaan

    2012-07-01

    As stress is hypothesised to influence dietary behaviour, the relationship between perceived stress and diet quality in European adolescents was investigated. Within the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study, adolescents (n 704, aged 12-17 years) from schools in five European cities (Ghent, Stockholm, Zaragoza, Athens and Vienna) completed a 2 d 24 h dietary recall assessment and an Adolescent Stress Questionnaire. Measurements and information were taken on height, weight, pubertal stage, parental education level, the level of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sleep duration. The Diet Quality Index for Adolescents (DQI-A) was calculated from the dietary data, which comprised three components reflecting dietary diversity, quality and equilibrium. Hierarchical linear models were performed to investigate the relationship between the adolescents' level of perceived stress and the DQI-A and its components, adjusting for relevant covariates (age, BMI z-score, pubertal stage and parental education). These models were additionally adjusted for MVPA or sleep duration. In both boys and girls, perceived stress was a significant independent negative predictor for their overall DQI-A. This inverse relationship was observed for all dietary components, except for dietary diversity in boys, and it was unaltered when additionally adjusted for MVPA or sleep duration. The observed inverse relationship between stress and diet quality within these European adolescents supports the hypothesis that stress influences dietary behaviour, thus emphasising the need for preventive stress-coping strategies for adolescents. PMID:22054044

  8. Nutritional management of very low birthweight infants: effects of different feeding regimens on calcium absorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adequate nutrition is a key aspect of care for very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. However, it is difficult to provide adequate nutrition to VLBW infants who have health problems that require fluid restriction and increased caloric density feedings. The effects of these changes on growth, calcium ...

  9. Management of recurrent stress incontinence following a sling.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Genevičve; Herschorn, Sender

    2014-08-01

    Management of recurrent or persistent stress urinary incontinence (RSI) following primary insertion of a synthetic midurethral sling (MUS) remains a challenge for the urologist since no consensus is available to favor one treatment over another. Complete workup should be carried out, including cystoscopy, urodynamics and potentially a pelvic floor ultrasound as a diagnostic adjunct. Various surgical options have been described for RSI, apart from another MUS, including tightening of or shortening a previously placed MUS, a mini-sling, a salvage spiral sling, a colposuspension, the ACT® system, an artificial urinary sphincter or ultimately a urinary diversion. Treatment depends ultimately on the experience and the expertise of the surgeon but it appears most reasonable to offer a repeat MUS (retropubic or transobturator), a pubovaginal sling or bulking agents to women with RSI. Appropriate counseling of patients to set realistic outcomes is key as it may be more practical to aim more for symptomatic improvement than cure. PMID:24930033

  10. Worksite stress management training: moderated effects and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Flaxman, Paul E; Bond, Frank W

    2010-10-01

    Psychologically healthy participants may dilute the observed effects of worksite stress management training (SMT) programs, therefore hiding the true effectiveness of these interventions for more distressed workers. To examine this issue, 311 local government employees were randomly assigned to SMT based on acceptance and commitment therapy (SMT, n = 177) or to a waitlist control group (n = 134). The SMT program consisted of three half-day training sessions, and imparted a mixture of mindfulness and values-based action skills. Across a 6-month assessment period, SMT resulted in a significant reduction in employee distress. As predicted, the impact of SMT was significantly moderated by baseline distress, such that meaningful effects were found only among a subgroup of initially distressed workers. Furthermore, a majority (69%) of these initially distressed SMT participants improved to a clinically significant degree. The study highlights the importance of accounting for sample heterogeneity when evaluating and classifying worksite SMT programs. PMID:21058850

  11. Peri-operative nutrition.

    PubMed

    Ali Abdelhamid, Y; Chapman, M J; Deane, A M

    2016-01-01

    Patients are frequently malnourished or are at risk of malnutrition before surgery. Peri-operative nutritional support can improve their outcomes. This review focuses on new developments in peri-operative nutrition, including: patient preparation and pre-operative fasting; the role of nutritional supplementation; the optimal route and timing of nutrient delivery; and the nutritional management of specific groups including critically ill, obese and elderly patients. PMID:26620142

  12. Guidelines for Stress Management and Life Style Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, John D.

    1979-01-01

    Focuses on some guidelines for facilitating healthful life-style changes including the cultivation of good nutritional habits, good exercise habits, self-awareness, letting-go techniques, and personal planning. (Author/IRT)

  13. Principals Responding to Constant Pressure: Finding a Source of Stress Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Caryn M.

    2013-01-01

    This conceptual article presents a review of the research concerning the stress level of principals over the past three decades, with emphasis on the occupational stress that principals encounter because of heightened accountability and expectations for student achievement. Mindfulness meditation, as a stress management intervention, provides the…

  14. Effects of Organizationally Based and Individually Based Stress Management Efforts in Elementary School Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milstein, Mike M.; Golaszewski, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    Identifies potential organizationally based stressors and isolates those that elementary teachers in an urban school district report as most stressful. Also explores (1) how teachers manifest their stress and (2) the effectiveness of various stress management intervention strategies in modifying teachers' perceptions of the intensity of…

  15. Coping with Stress. The Best of ERIC on Educational Management, Number 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management, Eugene, OR.

    The twelve items in this annotated bibliography are entries in the ERIC system intended to help administrators in coping with stress. The publications cited deal with causes of stress, how to manage stress, how to make life style changes, how to recognize stressors, and work patterns associated with Type A behavior. The publications listed also…

  16. Theoretical Foundations of Yoga Meditation: A Contribution to Self-Actualization and Stress Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janowiak, John J.

    Recent evidence purporting that stress contributes to the development of disorders ranging from depression to cancer to general immunological dysfunction suggests that a concise understanding of stress and stress management techniques is needed in order to develop efficacious interventions. What is needed is an effective, easy-to-learn technique…

  17. Stress management in a military health promotion program: effectiveness and cost efficiency.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, R H; Bernheim, C; Tomlinson, J P

    1991-02-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine the impact of a stress management course within a health promotion program. Assessments were made of stress related symptoms, perception of stress, and blood pressure. Costs of the program per benefit were calculated. PMID:1900586

  18. Experts stress both wellness and amenity aspects of food and nutrition services in assisted living facilities for older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been no consensus on best practices in food and nutrition services in assisted living facilities (ALFs) for older adults. We documented experts’ views on optimal food and nutrition services emphases in ALFs, and factors affecting their views. One hundred thirty-five national experts speci...

  19. Pediatric nutrition.

    PubMed

    Greco, Deborah S

    2014-03-01

    This article discusses pediatric nutrition in puppies and kittens. Supplementation of basic nutrients such as fat, protein, minerals, vitamins, and essential fatty acids of the bitch is essential for the proper growth and development of puppies during the lactation period. Milk replacers are compared for use in puppies and kittens. Supplements such as colostrum and probiotics for promotion of a healthy immune system and prevention or treatment of stress-induced and weaning diarrhea are also discussed. PMID:24580990

  20. Challenges in the nutrition and management of herbivores in the temperate zone.

    PubMed

    van Vuuren, A M; Chilibroste, P

    2013-03-01

    The expected higher global demand for animal proteins and the competition for starch and sugars between food, fuel and feed seem to favour herbivores that convert solar energy captured in fibrous plants into animal products. However, the required higher production level of herbivores questions the sustainability of this conversion. An increase in herbivore production can be achieved by increasing the number of animals associated with the increasing demand of plant biomass or by improving the efficiency with which plant biomass is converted into meat and milk. The potential to increase food production by cattle, the main food-producing herbivore in the temperate zones outside China, was considered in three production systems: grassland-based, mixed rain-fed and mixed irrigated systems. The potential to increase plant biomass production in grassland-based systems seems limited, unless fertiliser is imported in large quantities and crop production is increased, sacrificing valuable, high-quality grasslands, which often conflicts with sustainable production methods. Also, in mixed systems with high inputs of fertiliser or water, improvements in plant biomass production seem marginal and the main challenges for these systems are in breeding high-quality plant biomass at lower levels of fertiliser and the use of new co-products from food processing and bio-based economies. Consequently, the main challenge in herbivore nutrition management is to improve the efficiency of plant biomass utilisation. Stocking rate management along with seasonal variation in the grazing capacity of grasslands and moderate use of fertiliser may increase meat production in grassland-based systems by 400%. Improving plant biomass utilisation in the more industrialised mixed rain-fed systems seems possible by better feed storage technologies and for dairy cattle by improving animal health and lifetime production level. Managing the transition period seems crucial to achieve more sustainable mixed rain-fed and mixed irrigated dairy production systems. Whether sustainable production methods will be implemented also depends on macro-economic conditions and awareness of regional and global environmental concerns. PMID:23031652

  1. Training Programmes for Stress Management in Small Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treven, Sonja; Potocan, Vojko

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present: the problem of stress employees might encounter; the individual inclination to stress; the individual methods for reducing stress; and the authors' model of training for stress prevention. Design/Methodology/Approach: The paper uses both descriptive and analytical approaches to research and…

  2. The effect of stress management training on stress and depression in women with depression disorders: Using cognitive-behavioral techniques

    PubMed Central

    Abbasian, Farahzad; Najimi, Arash; Meftagh, Sayyed Davood; Ghasemi, Gholamreza; Afshar, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study aimed to investigate the effect of stress management training through cognitive-behavioral techniques on stress, social adaptability and depression in women with depression disorders. Materials and Methods: In this study, 40 patients diagnosed with depression who had referred to psychiatry and consultation clinics of Isfahan were randomly selected and assigned to intervention and control groups (20 patients in each group). The intervention group received eight 90-min sessions of stress training through cognitive–behavioral techniques. Data collection tools included Cooper's stress questionnaire, Bell's social adaptability questionnaire and Hamilton's depression scale questionnaire. The participants completed the questionnaires before the intervention and 1 month after the same. Data analysis was performed using covariance analysis. Results: Based on the results, considering variables of stress, social adaptability and depression, the equal variance hypothesis was confirmed. The relationship between pre- and post-test scores on stress, social adaptability and depression was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The modified mean difference was F = 12.45, P < 0.001 on stress; F = 6.88, P < 0.01 on social adaptability; and F = 5.36, P < 0.02 on depression, all of which were significant. Conclusion: Stress management training through cognitive behavioral techniques can play a main role in depression reduction and development of social adaptability through modifying inappropriate social information-processing patterns. PMID:25077163

  3. Nutritional management of infants and children with specific diseases or other conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cystic fibrosis is characterized by progressive deterioration of pulmonary and pancreatic function. The former may increase nutrient requirements somewhat, but probably affects nutrition more by adversely affecting intake, particularly during acute exacerbations and in older children with severe pul...

  4. Stress in crisis managers: evidence from self-report and psychophysiological assessments.

    PubMed

    Janka, A; Adler, C; Fischer, L; Perakakis, P; Guerra, P; Duschek, S

    2015-12-01

    Directing disaster operations represents a major professional challenge. Despite its importance to health and professional performance, research on stress in crisis management remains scarce. The present study aimed to investigate self-reported stress and psychophysiological stress responses in crisis managers. For this purpose, 30 crisis managers were compared with 30 managers from other disciplines, in terms of self-reported stress, health status and psychophysiological reactivity to crisis-related and non-specific visual and acoustic aversive stimuli and cognitive challenge. Crisis managers reported lower stress levels, a more positive strain-recuperation-balance, greater social resources, reduced physical symptoms, as well as more physical exercise and less alcohol consumption. They exhibited diminished electrodermal and heart rate responses to crisis-related and non-specific stressors. The results indicate reduced stress and physical complaints, diminished psychophysiological stress reactivity, and a healthier life-style in crisis managers. Improved stress resistance may limit vulnerability to stress-related performance decline and facilitate preparedness for major incidents. PMID:26156118

  5. Neonatal Body Composition: Measuring Lean Mass as a Tool to Guide Nutrition Management in the Neonate.

    PubMed

    Rice, Melissa S; Valentine, Christina J

    2015-10-01

    Neonatal nutrition adequacy is often determined by infant weight gain. The aim of this review is to summarize what is currently known about neonatal body composition and the use of body composition as a measure for adequate neonatal nutrition. Unlike traditional anthropometric measures of height and weight, body composition measurements account for fat vs nonfat mass gains. This provides a more accurate picture of neonatal composition of weight gain. Providing adequate neonatal nutrition in the form of quantity and composition can be a challenge, especially when considering the delicate balance of providing adequate nutrition to preterm infants for catch-up growth. Monitoring weight gain as fat mass and nonfat mass while documenting dietary intake of fat, protein, and carbohydrate in formulas may help provide the medical community the tools to provide optimal nutrition for catch-up growth and for improved neurodevelopmental outcomes. Tracking body composition in term and preterm infants may also provide critical future information concerning the nutritional state of infants who go on to develop future disease such as obesity, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia as adolescents or adults. PMID:25908606

  6. Reprint of: Nutrition in the Management of Cirrhosis and its Neurological Complications.

    PubMed

    Bémeur, Chantal; Butterworth, Roger F

    2015-03-01

    Malnutrition is a common feature of chronic liver diseases that is often associated with a poor prognosis including worsening of clinical outcome, neuropsychiatric complications as well as outcome following liver transplantation. Nutritional assessment in patients with cirrhosis is challenging owing to confounding factors related to liver failure. The objectives of nutritional intervention in cirrhotic patients are the support of liver regeneration, the prevention or correction of specific nutritional deficiencies and the prevention and/or treatment of the complications of liver disease per se and of liver transplantation. Nutritional recommendations target the optimal supply of adequate substrates related to requirements linked to energy, protein, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins and minerals. Some issues relating to malnutrition in chronic liver disease remain to be addressed including the development of an appropriate well-validated nutritional assessment tool, the identification of mechanistic targets or therapy for sarcopenia, the development of nutritional recommendations for obese cirrhotic patients and liver-transplant recipients and the elucidation of the roles of vitamin A hepatotoxicity, as well as the impact of deficiencies in riboflavin and zinc on clinical outcomes. Early identification and treatment of malnutrition in chronic liver disease has the potential to lead to better disease outcome as well as prevention of the complications of chronic liver disease and improved transplant outcomes. PMID:26041952

  7. Burnout/stress management: how to reduce burnout and stress in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Matula, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We all encounter various forms of stress every single day. Stress can be caused by family issues, relationships, children and especially work. With the ever-growing demands that are placed on Healthcare Security professionals today, career burnout associated with stress is becoming more and more common. In this article, the author discusses some signs and symptoms, as well as giving some stress reduction exercises that may be able to help your officers reduce their stress. PMID:23513709

  8. Using biofeedback while immersed in a stressful videogame increases the effectiveness of stress management skills in soldiers.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Stéphane; Bernier, François; Boivin, Eric; Morin, Brian; Robillard, Genevičve

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of using visual and auditory biofeedback while immersed in a tridimensional videogame to practice a stress management skill (tactical breathing). All 41 participants were soldiers who had previously received basic stress management training and first aid training in combat. On the first day, they received a 15-minute refresher briefing and were randomly assigned to either: (a) no additional stress management training (SMT) for three days, or (b) 30-minute sessions (one per day for three days) of biofeedback-assisted SMT while immersed in a horror/first-person shooter game. The training was performed in a dark and enclosed environment using a 50-inch television with active stereoscopic display and loudspeakers. On the last day, all participants underwent a live simulated ambush with an improvised explosive device, where they had to provide first aid to a wounded soldier. Stress levels were measured with salivary cortisol collected when waking-up, before and after the live simulation. Stress was also measured with heart rate at baseline, during an apprehension phase, and during the live simulation. Repeated-measure ANOVAs and ANCOVAs confirmed that practicing SMT was effective in reducing stress. Results are discussed in terms of the advantages of the proposed program for military personnel and the need to practice SMT. PMID:22558370

  9. Using Biofeedback while Immersed in a Stressful Videogame Increases the Effectiveness of Stress Management Skills in Soldiers

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Stéphane; Bernier, François; Boivin, Éric; Morin, Brian; Robillard, Genevičve

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of using visual and auditory biofeedback while immersed in a tridimensional videogame to practice a stress management skill (tactical breathing). All 41 participants were soldiers who had previously received basic stress management training and first aid training in combat. On the first day, they received a 15-minute refresher briefing and were randomly assigned to either: (a) no additional stress management training (SMT) for three days, or (b) 30-minute sessions (one per day for three days) of biofeedback-assisted SMT while immersed in a horror/first-person shooter game. The training was performed in a dark and enclosed environment using a 50-inch television with active stereoscopic display and loudspeakers. On the last day, all participants underwent a live simulated ambush with an improvised explosive device, where they had to provide first aid to a wounded soldier. Stress levels were measured with salivary cortisol collected when waking-up, before and after the live simulation. Stress was also measured with heart rate at baseline, during an apprehension phase, and during the live simulation. Repeated-measure ANOVAs and ANCOVAs confirmed that practicing SMT was effective in reducing stress. Results are discussed in terms of the advantages of the proposed program for military personnel and the need to practice SMT. PMID:22558370

  10. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: standards of practice and standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in adult weight management.

    PubMed

    Jortberg, Bonnie; Myers, Eileen; Gigliotti, Linda; Ivens, Barbara J; Lebre, Monica; Burke March, Susan; Nogueira, Isadora; Nwankwo, Robin; Parkinson, Meredith R; Paulsen, Barbara; Turner, Tonya

    2015-04-01

    Weight management encompasses the inter-relationship of nutrition, physical activity, and health behavior change. Nutrition is key for the prevention and treatment of obesity and chronic disease and maintenance of overall health. Thus, the Weight Management Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs) in Adult Weight Management as a resource for RDNs working in weight management. This document allows RDNs to assess their current skill levels and to identify areas for further professional development in this expanding practice area. This document describes the current standards for weight management practice for RDNs. The Standards of Practice represent the four steps in the Nutrition Care Process as applied to the care of patients/clients. The Standards of Professional Performance consist of six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. Within each standard, specific indicators provide measurable action statements that illustrate how the standard can be applied to practice. The indicators describe three skill levels (competent, proficient, and expert) for RDNs working in weight management. The Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance are complementary resources for the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist in weight management. PMID:25819519

  11. Stress in Adults after a Disaster: Warning Signs and Management 

    E-print Network

    Warren, Judith L.

    2005-09-30

    Experiencing a disaster can lead to erratic behavior, changes in mood, and even physical symptoms. The warning signs of post-disaster stress are explained in this publication. There are suggestions for helping victims deal with stress...

  12. Stress Management in Education: Warning Signs and Coping Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorenson, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Only in recent years have researchers begun to study stress in the workplace. Psychologists and other stress analysts have discovered that the most trying professions are those that involve high pressure and serious responsibilities, often beyond the control of the individuals employed. Most interesting, the American Institute of Stress revealed…

  13. Non-Invasive Assessment of the Interrelationships of Diet, Pregnancy Rate, Group Composition, and Physiological and Nutritional Stress of Barren-Ground Caribou in Late Winter

    PubMed Central

    Joly, Kyle; Wasser, Samuel K.; Booth, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The winter diet of barren-ground caribou may affect adult survival, timing of parturition, neonatal survival, and postpartum mass. We used microhistological analyses and hormone levels in feces to determine sex-specific late-winter diets, pregnancy rates, group composition, and endocrine-based measures of physiological and nutritional stress. Lichens, which are highly digestible but contain little protein, dominated the diet (> 68%) but were less prevalent in the diets of pregnant females as compared to non-pregnant females and males. The amount of lichens in the diets of pregnant females decreased at higher latitudes and as winter progressed. Pregnancy rates (82.1%, 95% CI = 76.0 – 88.1%) of adult cows were within the expected range for a declining herd, while pregnancy status was not associated with lichen abundance in the diet. Most groups (80%) were of mixed sex. Male: female ratios (62:100) were not skewed enough to affect the decline. Levels of hormones indicating nutritional stress were detected in areas of low habitat quality and at higher latitudes. Levels of hormones indicated that physiological stress was greatest for pregnant cows, which faced the increasing demands of gestation in late winter. These fecal-based measures of diet and stress provided contextual information for the potential mechanisms of the ongoing decline. Non-invasive techniques, such as monitoring diets, pregnancy rates, sex ratios and stress levels from fecal samples, will become increasingly important as monitoring tools as the industrial footprint continues to expand in the Arctic. PMID:26061003

  14. Non-Invasive Assessment of the Interrelationships of Diet, Pregnancy Rate, Group Composition, and Physiological and Nutritional Stress of Barren-Ground Caribou in Late Winter.

    PubMed

    Joly, Kyle; Wasser, Samuel K; Booth, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The winter diet of barren-ground caribou may affect adult survival, timing of parturition, neonatal survival, and postpartum mass. We used microhistological analyses and hormone levels in feces to determine sex-specific late-winter diets, pregnancy rates, group composition, and endocrine-based measures of physiological and nutritional stress. Lichens, which are highly digestible but contain little protein, dominated the diet (> 68%) but were less prevalent in the diets of pregnant females as compared to non-pregnant females and males. The amount of lichens in the diets of pregnant females decreased at higher latitudes and as winter progressed. Pregnancy rates (82.1%, 95% CI = 76.0 - 88.1%) of adult cows were within the expected range for a declining herd, while pregnancy status was not associated with lichen abundance in the diet. Most groups (80%) were of mixed sex. Male: female ratios (62:100) were not skewed enough to affect the decline. Levels of hormones indicating nutritional stress were detected in areas of low habitat quality and at higher latitudes. Levels of hormones indicated that physiological stress was greatest for pregnant cows, which faced the increasing demands of gestation in late winter. These fecal-based measures of diet and stress provided contextual information for the potential mechanisms of the ongoing decline. Non-invasive techniques, such as monitoring diets, pregnancy rates, sex ratios and stress levels from fecal samples, will become increasingly important as monitoring tools as the industrial footprint continues to expand in the Arctic. PMID:26061003

  15. Caregiver Stress and Physical Health: The Case for Stress Management Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, C.; Krisztal, E.; Rabinowitz, Y.; Gillispie, Z.; Oportot, M.; Tse, C.; Singer, L.; Gallagher-Thompson, D.

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that providing care for a loved one with memory problems puts a person at risk for both mental and physical health problems. In the last several decades, research on chronic stress suggests that the body's physical response to stress becomes severely dysregulated as a result of chronic stress lifestyles such as caregiving. This…

  16. Academic Major as a Perceived Stress Indicator: Extending Stress Management Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Ross W.; Casazza, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research that has explored stress differences between "hard" and "soft" academic majors did not provide clear criteria for categorizing "hard" and "soft" majors, used a single item to measure reported stress, and reported contradictory stress differences between academic majors (Myrtek, Hilgenberg, Brugner, & Muller, 1997). With an…

  17. Stress Management Strategies for Students: The Immediate Effects of Yoga, Humor, and Reading on Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizzolo, Denise; Zipp, Genevieve Pinto; Stiskal, Doreen; Simpkins, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Health science programs can be demanding and difficult for many students, leading to high levels of stress. High levels of stress can have a negative effect on students and subsequently the practicing clinician. Research suggests that yoga, humor, and reading are simple, effective methods to help reduce stress. To date no research…

  18. Menorrhagia: A synopsis of management focusing on herbal and nutritional supplements, and chiropractic.

    PubMed Central

    Livdans-Forret, Anna B.; Harvey, Phyllis J.; Larkin-Thier, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction To make chiropractors more aware of menorrhagia and how they can serve a role in their patient’s care and education since women make up 60% of the population seeking chiropractic care. Method A review of the biomedical literature on menorrhagia was conducted. Items that were retrieved were synthesized and interpreted in order to give the best information to practicing chiropractors. Discussion Most of the information available relative to menorrhagia is medically oriented. Other treatment options can include: chiropractic, various types of herbs, and nutritional supplements. Conclusion Knowledge of medical treatment, nutritional supplements, along with chiropractic treatment options may be beneficial to doctors in their practice. PMID:18060009

  19. A Delphi survey on diagnosis and management of stress velopharyngeal insufficiency in wind musicians.

    PubMed

    Evans, Alison; Driscoll, Tim; Ackermann, Bronwen

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify current trends in clinical assessment and management of stress velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) in wind musicians. This was an online two-round Delphi survey of health practitioners familiar with assessing and treating musicians with stress VPI. Fourteen specialists (seven otolaryngologists and seven speech-language pathologists) from four countries participated in the Delphi survey. From the first round questionnaire, 32 items were identified as being causes, assessment tools, diagnostic indicators, and treatment methods for stress VPI. The second round questionnaire revealed that prolonged exposure to high intra-oral pressures was important in determining the cause of stress VPI. The most important assessment tools for stress VPI were case history and nasendoscopy. The most important indicator for stress VPI was self-reported symptoms. There was no clear agreement identified on the management methods for stress VPI for musicians. However, the trend followed by most of the survey participants was a combination of conservative management approaches (including rest or watch and wait, speech-language pathology intervention, velopharyngeal muscle training, and changes to the instrument or reed), and then, if symptoms persist, to use injection pharyngoplasty or pharyngeal flap. This survey demonstrates that no standard management protocol currently exists for musicians diagnosed with stress VPI, but provides current trends in the assessment and management which can be used in future guidelines for health professionals who treat wind musicians. PMID:24007387

  20. Stress

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2 items) Treatments (2 items) Fact Sheet on Stress Q&A on Stress for Adults: How it affects your health and ... to avoid more serious health effects. What is stress? Stress can be defined as the brain's response ...

  1. Nutritional and Weight Management Behaviors: Public and Private High School Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearman, Silas N., III; Thatcher, William G.; Valois, Robert F.; Drane, J. Wanzer

    2000-01-01

    Examined private and public high school adolescents' weight control and nutrition behaviors, using Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System data. Private school females were more likely to diet and exercise than public school females. Public school males were more likely to attempt weight gain than private high school males. Private school students…

  2. Student Well-Being Interventions: The Effects of Stress Management Techniques and Gratitude Journaling in the Management Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flinchbaugh, Carol L.; Moore, E. Whitney G.; Chang, Young K.; May, Douglas R.

    2012-01-01

    Student well-being in the management classroom is of concern to both educators and managers. Well-being is conceptualized here as students' reduction in stress, enhanced experienced meaning and engagement in the classroom, and, ultimately, heightened satisfaction with life. The authors investigated whether purposeful semester-long classroom…

  3. The influence of maternal prenatal and early childhood nutrition and maternal prenatal stress on offspring immune system development and neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; O'Connor, Thomas G.; Roth, Christine; Susser, Ezra; Bjřrke-Monsen, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    The developing immune system and central nervous system in the fetus and child are extremely sensitive to both exogenous and endogenous signals. Early immune system programming, leading to changes that can persist over the life course, has been suggested, and other evidence suggests that immune dysregulation in the early developing brain may play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. The timing of immune dysregulation with respect to gestational age and neurologic development of the fetus may shape the elicited response. This creates a possible sensitive window of programming or vulnerability. This review will explore the effects of maternal prenatal and infant nutritional status (from conception until early childhood) as well as maternal prenatal stress and anxiety on early programming of immune function, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. We will describe fetal immune system development and maternal-fetal immune interactions to provide a better context for understanding the influence of nutrition and stress on the immune system. Finally, we will discuss the implications for prevention of neurodevelopmental disorders, with a focus on nutrition. Although certain micronutrient supplements have shown to both reduce the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders and enhance fetal immune development, we do not know whether their impact on immune development contributes to the preventive effect on neurodevelopmental disorders. Future studies are needed to elucidate this relationship, which may contribute to a better understanding of preventative mechanisms. Integrating studies of neurodevelopmental disorders and prenatal exposures with the simultaneous evaluation of neural and immune systems will shed light on mechanisms that underlie individual vulnerability or resilience to neurodevelopmental disorders and ultimately contribute to the development of primary preventions and early interventions. PMID:23914151

  4. Design and fabrication of a stress-managed Nb3Sn wind and react dipole 

    E-print Network

    Noyes, Patrick Daniel

    2007-09-17

    strength can be extended to 25 Tesla. The new design incorporates several innovations, including stress management, flux plate suppression of multipoles, and bladder preload. A series of model dipoles is being built and tested to validate and optimize each...

  5. ADOLESCENT SELF-MANAGEMENT OF PSYCHOTROPIC MEDICATIONS FOR POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER

    E-print Network

    Talley, Jan Anderson

    2010-07-29

    for psychotropic drugs. This study examined an intervention to increase skills for self-management of psychotropic medications prescribed for post traumatic stress disorder with adolescents who lived in a residential program for emotionally disturbed adolescents....

  6. Management of protein-energy malnutrition in Nigeria: an evaluation of the regimen at the Kersey Nutrition Rehabilitation Centre, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ibekwe, V E; Ashworth, A

    1994-01-01

    An evaluation of the performance of the Kersey Nutrition Rehabilitation Centre in Nigeria was undertaken with particular focus on mortality, rate of weight gain, and the management strategy. During 1987-1991 the total number of admissions for protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) was 803. The age group most commonly represented were those aged 12-29 months. Kwashiorkor cases formed the largest proportion of admissions (66%). Marasmic cases consistently predominated among children aged < 18 months. Average mortality was 22% during the 5 years. Mortality among oedematous patients was 25% compared with 15% among marasmic cases. The rate of weight gain averaged 7 g/kg/d for marasmic and marasmic-kwashiorkor cases and 6 g/kg/d for kwashiorkor cases. Specific recommendations are made to improve case-management, focusing particularly on the prevention of deaths in the first few days after admission. PMID:7992350

  7. Coping with Mathematics Anxiety: Stress Management and Academic Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sime, Wesley E.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Administered the Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale to Introductory Statistics college students. A high mathematics anxiety was associated with lower performance on a statistics examination. Classroom stress-coping intervention reduced anxiety and physiological stress responses, but did not improve academic performance. (Author/KS)

  8. Evaluation of a Stress Management Program in a Child Protection Agency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Janet; Feldman, Lenard H.

    High stress levels experienced by child protection workers have been well documented. This study examined the effectiveness of a stress management program in a child protection agency. Subjects were case workers, immediate supervisors, and clerical staff; 320 subjects participated in pretesting and 279 subjects participated in posttesting.…

  9. An Experimental Evaluation of Stress-Management Training for the Airborne Soldier. Technical Report 550.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, William P.

    A project was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the stress-management training given to students in the jumpmaster training course at Fort Benning, Georgia. The course, which trains airborne personnel to conduct landings of men and equipment, features relatively stressful training programs during which instructors grade the performance of…

  10. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Alternative Stress Management Interventions in Persons with HIV Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCain, Nancy L.; Gray, D. Patricia; Elswick, R. K., Jr.; Robins, Jolynne W.; Tuck, Inez; Walter, Jeanne M.; Rausch, Sarah M.; Ketchum, Jessica McKinney

    2008-01-01

    Research in psychoneuroimmunology suggests that immunosuppression associated with perceived stress may contribute to disease progression in persons with HIV infection. While stress management interventions may enhance immune function, few alternative approaches have yet been tested. This randomized clinical trial was conducted to test effects of…

  11. Holistic Stress Management for Faculty: How To Prevent Burnout and Promote Self-Renewal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, Edward J.

    This paper outlines a workshop that faculty development staff can offer to professors interested in preventing burnout and promoting self-renewal. The stress management workshop which is outlined is based on an adaptation of the Lazurus multimodal model. The fundamental assumption underlying the workshop content is that stress and burnout are…

  12. Virtually Stress Free: Keeping Online Graduate Management Students Healthy from Afar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinak, M. Linda

    2012-01-01

    This article examines stress experienced by graduate management students in an online learning environment. I use qualitative methodology to examine data collected from 32 students in 2 sections of a graduate online course. Findings identify 6 categories of stressors experienced by the students as well as 6 categories of stress relief agents.…

  13. The Effects of a Stress Management Course on Counselors-in-Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abel, Holly; Abel, Annette; Smith, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of a stress management course on the stress knowledge and coping techniques of 101 graduate students in counseling were examined. Participants, drawn from various racial groups, were typically female (79%) and 21 to 55 years of age. Seven of the 8 null hypotheses were rejected. There were significant differences on 6 of the 7 dependent…

  14. School-Based Stress Management Training for Adolescents: Longitudinal Results from an Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampel, Petra; Meier, Manuela; Kummel, Ursula

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a school-based universal preventive stress management training program for early and middle adolescents in comparison with a no-treatment control group. The study examined the intervention effects of age (early versus middle adolescents) and gender on perceived stress, interpersonal coping, and…

  15. A Case Study: An ACT Stress Management Group in a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daltry, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) stress management group in a college counseling center setting. This study explored (a) the effectiveness of ACT in increasing participants' ability to tolerate distress, which directly affects their ability to function in a stressful college…

  16. TechTuning: Stress Management For 3D Through-Silicon-Via Stacking Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radojcic, Riko; Nowak, Matt; Nakamoto, Mark

    2011-09-01

    The concerns with managing mechanical stress distributions and the consequent effects on device performance and material integrity, for advanced TSV based technologies 3D are outlined. A model and simulation based Design For Manufacturability (DFM) type of a flow for managing the mechanical stresses throughout Si die, stack and package design is proposed. The key attributes of the models and simulators required to fuel the proposed flow are summarized. Finally, some of the essential infrastructure and the Supply Chain support items are described.

  17. Stress management: corpus-based insights into vernacular interpretations of stress.

    PubMed

    Stvan, Laurel Smith

    2013-01-01

    Examination of the term stress in naturally occurring vernacular prose provides evidence of three separate senses being conflated. A corpus analysis of 818 instances of stress from non-academic texts in the Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA) and the Corpus of American Discourses on Health (CADOH) shows a negative prosody for stress, which is portrayed variously as a source outside the body, a physical symptom within the body and an emotional state. The data show that contemporary speakers intermingle the three senses, making more difficult a discussion between doctors and patients of ways to 'reduce stress: when stress might be interpreted as a stressor, a symptom, or state of anxiety. This conflation of senses reinforces the impression that stress is pervasive and increasing. In addition, a semantic shift is also refining a new sense for stress, as post-traumatic stress develops as a specific subtype of emotional stress whose use has increased in circulation in the past 20 years. PMID:24851519

  18. Position Description for a Post-Doctorate Fellow The Department of Nutrition, Hospitality, and Retail Management at Texas Tech University

    E-print Network

    Rock, Chris

    in human nutrition, public health, community nutrition or closely related field to conduct community College of Human Sciences Department of Nutrition, Hospitality, and Retailing Box 41240 Lubbock, TX 79409Position Description for a Post-Doctorate Fellow The Department of Nutrition, Hospitality

  19. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND LONG-TERM RESPONSES TO ULTRAVIOLET-B RADIATION STRESS IN A MARINE DIATOM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influences of nutrition status on the photoinhibitory effects of ultraviolet-B radiation (UVBR:290 to 320nm)on the specific growth rates (Uobs )and biomass of Phaeodactylum tricornutum were determined using nutrient-replete batch cultures and nutrient-limited continuous cultures....

  20. Early-life adversity programs emotional functions and the neuroendocrine stress system: the contribution of nutrition, metabolic hormones and epigenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yam, Kit-Yi; Naninck, Eva F G; Schmidt, Mathias V; Lucassen, Paul J; Korosi, Aniko

    2015-05-01

    Clinical and pre-clinical studies have shown that early-life adversities, such as abuse or neglect, can increase the vulnerability to develop psychopathologies and cognitive decline later in life. Remarkably, the lasting consequences of stress during this sensitive period on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and emotional function closely resemble the long-term effects of early malnutrition and suggest a possible common pathway mediating these effects. During early-life, brain development is affected by both exogenous factors, like nutrition and maternal care as well as by endogenous modulators including stress hormones. These elements, while mostly considered for their independent actions, clearly do not act alone but rather in a synergistic manner. In order to better understand how the programming by early-life stress takes place, it is important to gain further insight into the exact interplay of these key elements, the possible common pathways as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms that mediate their effects. We here review evidence that exposure to both early-life stress and early-life under-/malnutrition similarly lead to life-long alterations on the neuroendocrine stress system and modify emotional functions. We further discuss how the different key elements of the early-life environment interact and affect one another and next suggest a possible role for the early-life adversity induced alterations in metabolic hormones and nutrient availability in shaping later stress responses and emotional function throughout life, possibly via epigenetic mechanisms. Such knowledge will help to develop intervention strategies, which gives the advantage of viewing the synergistic action of a more complete set of changes induced by early-life adversity. PMID:26260665

  1. Real-life setting in data collection. The role of nutrition knowledge whilst selecting food products for weight management purposes in a supermarket environment.

    PubMed

    Saarela, Anna-Maria; Lapveteläinen, Anja T; Mykkänen, Hannu M; Kantanen, Teuvo T; Rissanen, Riitta L

    2013-12-01

    The aim was to explore the role of consumers' nutrition knowledge while selecting foods for weight management and the predominating food selection factors by combining quantitative and qualitative methodology in a real-life setting during two consecutive shopping tasks given in a supermarket. Thirty-six consumers were given a list of 11 products and asked to think-aloud while selecting (i) a product they usually buy and (ii) a product they use for weight management. After the consecutive shopping tasks, the subjects were interviewed and asked to answer a nutrition knowledge questionnaire. The subjects were categorized by the difference in the energy contents of their selections and the food selection criteria. The energy contents of the selections for weight management were reduced by 10-46%. Ten subjects with the greatest difference between the energy contents of their selections had higher level in nutrition knowledge and mentioned less nutritional issues during the selections than ten subjects with the smallest such differences. Taste was an important product selection criterion by the former group, while the latter focused primarily on price. Nutrition knowledge is interrelated with personal factors and selection goals. It is not necessarily utilized consistently when selecting food products. PMID:23994504

  2. Global Gradients of Coral Exposure to Environmental Stresses and Implications for Local Management

    PubMed Central

    Maina, Joseph; McClanahan, Tim R.; Venus, Valentijn; Ateweberhan, Mebrahtu; Madin, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Background The decline of coral reefs globally underscores the need for a spatial assessment of their exposure to multiple environmental stressors to estimate vulnerability and evaluate potential counter-measures. Methodology/Principal Findings This study combined global spatial gradients of coral exposure to radiation stress factors (temperature, UV light and doldrums), stress-reinforcing factors (sedimentation and eutrophication), and stress-reducing factors (temperature variability and tidal amplitude) to produce a global map of coral exposure and identify areas where exposure depends on factors that can be locally managed. A systems analytical approach was used to define interactions between radiation stress variables, stress reinforcing variables and stress reducing variables. Fuzzy logic and spatial ordinations were employed to quantify coral exposure to these stressors. Globally, corals are exposed to radiation and reinforcing stress, albeit with high spatial variability within regions. Based on ordination of exposure grades, regions group into two clusters. The first cluster was composed of severely exposed regions with high radiation and low reducing stress scores (South East Asia, Micronesia, Eastern Pacific and the central Indian Ocean) or alternatively high reinforcing stress scores (the Middle East and the Western Australia). The second cluster was composed of moderately to highly exposed regions with moderate to high scores in both radiation and reducing factors (Caribbean, Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Central Pacific, Polynesia and the western Indian Ocean) where the GBR was strongly associated with reinforcing stress. Conclusions/Significance Despite radiation stress being the most dominant stressor, the exposure of coral reefs could be reduced by locally managing chronic human impacts that act to reinforce radiation stress. Future research and management efforts should focus on incorporating the factors that mitigate the effect of coral stressors until long-term carbon reductions are achieved through global negotiations. PMID:21860667

  3. Update on the management of post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Duncan; Cooper, John

    2015-01-01

    Summary Post-traumatic stress disorder occurs in people exposed to life-threatening trauma. GPs may be seeing more patients with post-traumatic stress disorder as military personnel return from overseas deployments. The condition can present in various ways. To reduce the likelihood of missed or delayed diagnosis GPs can screen at-risk populations. A comprehensive assessment is recommended. Specialist referral may be required, particularly if there are other mental health problems. Trauma-focused psychological therapies should be offered as the first line of treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. Usually 8–12 sessions are needed for a therapeutic effect. If drug treatment is needed, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the first line. Other drugs used in post-traumatic stress disorder include antipsychotics, anticonvulsants and prazosin. PMID:26648617

  4. Update on the management of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Duncan; Cooper, John

    2015-04-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder occurs in people exposed to life-threatening trauma. GPs may be seeing more patients with post-traumatic stress disorder as military personnel return from overseas deployments. The condition can present in various ways. To reduce the likelihood of missed or delayed diagnosis GPs can screen at-risk populations. A comprehensive assessment is recommended. Specialist referral may be required, particularly if there are other mental health problems. Trauma-focused psychological therapies should be offered as the first line of treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. Usually 8-12 sessions are needed for a therapeutic effect. If drug treatment is needed, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the first line. Other drugs used in post-traumatic stress disorder include antipsychotics, anticonvulsants and prazosin. PMID:26648617

  5. Graduate Procedures Master of Science in Food and Nutrition Services and Coordinated Program

    E-print Network

    Tchumper, Gregory S.

    1 Graduate Procedures Master of Science in Food and Nutrition Services in nutrition, food service management, dietetics, and child nutrition program management. · The Coordinated with emphasis option of Child and Adolescent Nutrition (CAN) or Food Service Administration (FSA). Department

  6. Nutrition and nutritional supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Manissier, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Skin acts as a natural barrier between internal and external environments thus plays an important role in vital biological functions such as protection against mechanical/chemical damages, micro-organisms, ultraviolet damage. Nutrition has a critical impact on strengthening skin’s capabilities to fight against these multiple aggressions. Nutritional deficiencies are often associated with skin health disorders, while diets can either positively or negatively influence skin condition. More recently, the concept of nutritional supplementation has emerged as a new strategy in the daily practice of dermatology as well as a complementary approach to topical cosmetics in the field of beauty. Focusing on human clinical data, this paper proposes to illustrate the link between skin health and nutrition and to exemplify the beneficial actions of nutritional supplementation in skin health and beauty. PMID:20808515

  7. An 8-week stress management program in pathological gamblers: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Linardatou, C; Parios, A; Varvogli, L; Chrousos, G; Darviri, C

    2014-09-01

    Stress plays a major role at the onset and relapse of pathological gambling (PG), but at the same time it can also be the aftermath of gambling behavior, thus revealing a reciprocal relationship. Although the role of stress has been well-documented, there is a paucity of studies investigating the effect of an adjunctive stress management program on PG. In this 8-week parallel randomized waitlist controlled trial pathological gamblers, already in the gamblers anonymous (GA) group, were assigned randomly in two groups, with the intervention group (n = 22) receiving an additional stress management program (consisting of education on diet and exercise, stress coping methods, relaxation breathing -RB- and progressive muscle relaxation -PMR). Self-reported measures were used in order to evaluate stress, depression, anxiety, sleep quality/disturbances, life-satisfaction and daily routine. The statistical analyses for the between group differences concerning the main psychosocial study outcomes revealed a statistically significant amelioration of stress, depression, anxiety symptoms and an increase of life-satisfaction and a better daily routine in participants of the intervention group. We hope that these will encourage researchers and clinicians to adopt stress management in their future work. PMID:24912736

  8. Chronic stress, cortisol dysfunction, and pain: a psychoneuroendocrine rationale for stress management in pain rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Kara E; Bishop, Mark D

    2014-12-01

    Pain is a primary symptom driving patients to seek physical therapy, and its attenuation commonly defines a successful outcome. A large body of evidence is dedicated to elucidating the relationship between chronic stress and pain; however, stress is rarely addressed in pain rehabilitation. A physiologic stress response may be evoked by fear or perceived threat to safety, status, or well-being and elicits the secretion of sympathetic catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinepherine) and neuroendocrine hormones (cortisol) to promote survival and motivate success. Cortisol is a potent anti-inflammatory that functions to mobilize glucose reserves for energy and modulate inflammation. Cortisol also may facilitate the consolidation of fear-based memories for future survival and avoidance of danger. Although short-term stress may be adaptive, maladaptive responses (eg, magnification, rumination, helplessness) to pain or non-pain-related stressors may intensify cortisol secretion and condition a sensitized physiologic stress response that is readily recruited. Ultimately, a prolonged or exaggerated stress response may perpetuate cortisol dysfunction, widespread inflammation, and pain. Stress may be unavoidable in life, and challenges are inherent to success; however, humans have the capability to modify what they perceive as stressful and how they respond to it. Exaggerated psychological responses (eg, catastrophizing) following maladaptive cognitive appraisals of potential stressors as threatening may exacerbate cortisol secretion and facilitate the consolidation of fear-based memories of pain or non-pain-related stressors; however, coping, cognitive reappraisal, or confrontation of stressors may minimize cortisol secretion and prevent chronic, recurrent pain. Given the parallel mechanisms underlying the physiologic effects of a maladaptive response to pain and non-pain-related stressors, physical therapists should consider screening for non-pain-related stress to facilitate treatment, prevent chronic disability, and improve quality of life. PMID:25035267

  9. Stress Prevention through a Time Management Training Intervention: An Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Häfner, Alexander; Stock, Armin; Pinneker, Lydia; Ströhle, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a short-term time management training programme on perceived control of time and perceived stress. The sample of 177 freshmen was randomly assigned to a time management training (n?=?89) and an active control group (CG) (n?=?88). We expected that an increase in external demands during the…

  10. Special Food and Nutrition Needs in School Nutrition Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molaison, Elaine Fontenot; Nettles, Mary Frances

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the prevalence of special food and/or nutrition needs in school nutrition programs. In addition, researchers focused on the issues surrounding these needs and the role of the school nutrition (SN) directors and managers in meeting these needs. Methods: An expert panel was used to…

  11. Biomarker assessment in nutritional modulation of oxidative stress-induced cancer development by lipid-related bioactive molecules.

    PubMed

    Defagó, María D; Soria, Elio A

    2010-11-01

    Cancer, a leading cause of death, can be prevented by different nutrients, in accordance to epidemiological and experimental data. Cancer chemoprevention might involve different dietary substances, which can counteract genetic damage and modulate the acquisition of a neoplastic phenotype. Critical to this process is redox cellular homeostasis, with antioxidants and essential biomolecules being the most promising functional compounds of the diet. Nutritional interventions require accurate biomarkers in order to evaluate their appropriateness. Such parameters may be biological targets involved in the oncogenetic process, and biochemical changes deriving from the organic response to tumours, which can be considered as endpoints of dietary interventions. This review will thus focus on patents on recent progress in the development of redox-related anticancer nutritional interventions involving lipophilic compounds, and of biological markers for evaluating them, with their scientific basis being reviewed. PMID:20594184

  12. Bicarbonate supplementation enhanced biofuel production potential as well as nutritional stress mitigation in the microalgae Scenedesmus sp. CCNM 1077.

    PubMed

    Pancha, Imran; Chokshi, Kaumeel; Ghosh, Tonmoy; Paliwal, Chetan; Maurya, Rahulkumar; Mishra, Sandhya

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to find out the optimum sodium bicarbonate concentration to produce higher biomass with higher lipid and carbohydrate contents in microalgae Scenedesmus sp. CCNM 1077. The role of bicarbonate supplementation under different nutritional starvation conditions was also evaluated. The results clearly indicate that 0.6 g/L sodium bicarbonate was optimum concentration resulting in 20.91% total lipid and 25.56% carbohydrate along with 23% increase in biomass production compared to normal growth condition. Addition of sodium bicarbonate increased the activity of nutrient assimilatory enzymes, biomass, lipid and carbohydrate contents under different nutritional starvation conditions. Nitrogen starvation with bicarbonate supplementation resulted in 54.03% carbohydrate and 34.44% total lipid content in microalgae Scenedesmus sp. CCNM 1077. These findings show application of bicarbonate grown microalgae Scenedesmus sp. CCNM 1077 as a promising feedstock for biodiesel and bioethanol production. PMID:26142998

  13. Stress management as an enabling technology for high-field superconducting dipole magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holik, Eddie Frank, III

    This dissertation examines stress management and other construction techniques as means to meet future accelerator requirement demands by planning, fabricating, and analyzing a high-field, Nb3Sn dipole. In order to enable future fundamental research and discovery in high energy accelerator physics, bending magnets must access the highest fields possible. Stress management is a novel, propitious path to attain higher fields and preserve the maximum current capacity of advanced superconductors by managing the Lorentz stress so that strain induced current degradation is mitigated. Stress management is accomplished through several innovative design features. A block-coil geometry enables an Inconel pier and beam matrix to be incorporated in the windings for Lorentz Stress support and reduced AC loss. A laminar spring between windings and mica paper surrounding each winding inhibit any stress transferral through the support structure and has been simulated with ALGORRTM. Wood's metal filled, stainless steel bladders apply isostatic, surface-conforming preload to the pier and beam support structure. Sufficient preload along with mica paper sheer release reduces magnet training by inhibiting stick-slip motion. The effectiveness of stress management is tested with high-precision capacitive stress transducers and strain gauges. In addition to stress management, there are several technologies developed to assist in the successful construction of a high-field dipole. Quench protection has been designed and simulated along with full 3D magnetic simulation with OPERARTM. Rutherford cable was constructed, and cable thermal expansion data was analysed after heat treatment. Pre-impregnation analysis techniques were developed due to elemental tin leakage in varying quantities during heat treatment from each coil. Robust splicing techniques were developed with measured resistivites consistent with nO joints. Stress management has not been incorporated by any other high field dipole research laboratory and has not yet been put to a definitive high-field test. The TAMU Physics Accelerator Research Laboratory has constructed a Nb 3Sn dipole, TAMU3, that is specially designed to provide a test bed for high-field stress management.

  14. Bibliotherapy Revisited: Issues in Classroom Management. Developing Teachers' Awareness and Techniques to Help Children Cope Effectively with Stressful Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Marilyn N. Malloy

    2006-01-01

    Are teachers aware of the stress in their classrooms? Do teachers plan for stress control? Educators need to understand why stress is a part of classroom life and how it affects the teacher-student relationship. Bibliotherapy can be an intervention in stress management through books. The use of appropriate reading material to help solve emotional…

  15. Factors Affecting Deer Diets and Nutrition 

    E-print Network

    Richardson, Calvin

    2000-04-25

    Knowledge of deer diets and nutrition can benefit ranchers who are interested in deer management and who want to coordinate vegetation management practices with changes in nutritional value of the habitat. Three important considerations...

  16. Nutritional armor for the warfighter: can omega-3 fatty acids enhance stress resilience, wellness, and military performance?

    PubMed

    Deuster, Patricia

    2014-11-01

    This panel discussion, moderated by Dr. Deuster, illustrates the thinking of selected military leaders on the approach that must be taken to ensure the relationship between nutrition and performance. Insights and challenges these leaders face are provided, with consideration of the complex issues relating to sufficient scientific evidence, timing for Department of Defense policy, and the unique needs of service members. The discussion resulted in several recommendations. First, more nutritionists in uniform should be placed in/on the battlefield on every base and camp in Afghanistan and Iraq. Second, nutritionists/dietitians need to be working in the preventive arena, using the health promotion model and marketing to help shift behavior. Third, contract dietitians should be hired to work primarily in tertiary care. Dietitians must forward-deploy to implement preventive medicine and human performance optimization as it relates to nutrition and dietary supplementation. Unfortunately, almost all military dietitians are constrained within the medical model and we think of them just as "hospital providers." Finally, line units need to decide that dietitians are a requisite part of their force structure. Putting many dieticians in line units will allow our active duty members to believe diet and nutrition are important for performance. PMID:25373105

  17. The management of sacral stress fractures: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Longhino, Valentina; Bonora, Cristina; Sansone, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    Summary Sacral stress fractures are an unusual but curable cause of low-back pain that should be considered in differential diagnosis, particularly in elderly osteoporotic patients. Rarely, they may occur in young women during the last trimester of pregnancy or a few weeks after delivery. Encompassing fatigue and insufficiency fractures, the occurrence of sacral stress fractures appears to be relatively under-reported, because of the general lack of awareness of this condition and the non-specificity of symptoms. Plain radiographs of the pelvis are the first exam performed but they are often inconclusive, whereas MRI and CT scans are the examinations of choice to establish the diagnosis. The purpose of this review is to increase awareness of this condition so that clinicians may consider sacral stress fracture in the differential diagnosis of low-back and pelvic pain, particularly in elderly patients without a history of trauma. PMID:22461824

  18. Meta-Analysis and Functional Validation of Nutritional Requirements of Solventogenic Clostridia Growing under Butanol Stress Conditions and Coutilization of d-Glucose and d-Xylose ?

    PubMed Central

    Heluane, Humberto; Evans, Matthew R.; Dagher, Sue F.; Bruno-Bárcena, José M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in systems biology, omics, and computational studies allow us to carry out data mining for improving biofuel production bioprocesses. Of particular interest are bioprocesses that center on microbial capabilities to biotransform both the hexose and pentose fractions present in crop residues. This called for a systematic exploration of the components of the media to obtain higher-density cultures and more-productive fermentation operations than are currently found. By using a meta-analysis approach of the transcriptional responses to butanol stress, we identified the nutritional requirements of solvent-tolerant strain Clostridium beijerinckii SA-1 (ATCC 35702). The nutritional requirements identified were later validated using the chemostat pulse-and-shift technique. C. beijerinckii SA-1 was cultivated in a two-stage single-feed-stream continuous production system to test the proposed validated medium formulation, and the coutilization of d-glucose and d-xylose was evaluated by taking advantage of the well-known ability of solventogenic clostridia to utilize a large variety of carbon sources such as mono-, oligo-, and polysaccharides containing pentose and hexose sugars. Our results indicated that C. beijerinckii SA-1 was able to coferment hexose/pentose sugar mixtures in the absence of a glucose repression effect. In addition, our analysis suggests that the solvent and acid resistance mechanisms found in this strain are differentially regulated compared to strain NRRL B-527 and are outlined as the basis of the analysis toward optimizing butanol production. PMID:21602379

  19. Enhanced biofuel production potential with nutritional stress amelioration through optimization of carbon source and light intensity in Scenedesmus sp. CCNM 1077.

    PubMed

    Pancha, Imran; Chokshi, Kaumeel; Mishra, Sandhya

    2015-03-01

    Microalgal mixotrophic cultivation is one of the most potential ways to enhance biomass and biofuel production. In the present study, first of all ability of microalgae Scenedesmus sp. CCNM 1077 to utilize various carbon sources under mixotrophic growth condition was evaluated followed by optimization of glucose concentration and light intensity to obtain higher biomass, lipid and carbohydrate contents. Under optimized condition i.e. 4 g/L glucose and 150 ?mol m(-2) s(-1) light intensity, Scenedesmus sp. CCNM 1077 produced 1.2g/L dry cell weight containing 23.62% total lipid and 42.68% carbohydrate. Addition of glucose shown nutritional stress ameliorating effects and around 70% carbohydrate and 25% total lipid content was found with only 21% reduction in dry cell weight under nitrogen starved condition. This study shows potential application of mixotrophically grown Scenedesmus sp. CCNM 1077 for bioethanol and biodiesel production feed stock. PMID:25579231

  20. 'People-Work': Emotion Management, Stress and Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Sandi

    2004-01-01

    Workers involved in 'people-work' are expected to engage in a great deal of emotion management as they attempt to convey the appropriate emotions (which they may not genuinely feel) to their clients or customers whilst perhaps suppressing inappropriate ones. Should this emotion management be unsuccessful within some industries, a customer may be…

  1. Nutritional management of very low birth weight infants: effects of different feeding regimens on calcium absorption and growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adequate nutrition is a key aspect of care for very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. However, it is difficult to provide adequate nutrition to VLBW infants who require fluid restriction and increased caloric density feedings due to bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The effects of these nutritional c...

  2. Responses of nitrogen metabolism and seed nutrition to drought stress in soybean genotypes differing in slow-wilting phenotype1

    PubMed Central

    Bellaloui, Nacer; Gillen, Anne M.; Mengistu, Alemu; Kebede, Hirut; Fisher, Daniel K.; Smith, James R.; Reddy, Krishna N.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in soybean breeding have resulted in genotypes that express the slow-wilting phenotype (trait) under drought stress conditions. The physiological mechanisms of this trait remain unknown due to the complexity of trait × environment interactions. The objective of this research was to investigate nitrogen metabolism and leaf and seed nutrients composition of the slow-wilting soybean genotypes under drought stress conditions. A repeated greenhouse experiment was conducted using check genotypes: NC-Roy (fast wilting), Boggs (intermediate in wilting); and NTCPR94-5157 and N04-9646 (slow-wilting, SLW) genotypes. Plants were either well-watered or drought stressed. Results showed that under well-watered conditions, nitrogen fixation (NF), nitrogen assimilation (NA), and leaf and seed composition differed between genotypes. Under drought stress, NF and NA were higher in NTCPR94-5157 and N04-9646 than in NC-Roy and Boggs. Under severe water stress, however, NA was low in all genotypes. Leaf water potential was significantly lower in checks (?2.00 MPa) than in the SLW genotypes (?1.68 MPa). Leaf and seed concentrations of K, P, Ca, Cu, Na, B were higher in SLW genotypes than in the checks under drought stress conditions. Seed protein, oleic acid, and sugars were higher in SLW genotypes, and oil, linoleic and linolenic acids were lower in SLW genotypes. This research demonstrated that K, P, Ca, Cu, Na, and B may be involved in SLW trait by maintaining homeostasis and osmotic regulation. Maintaining higher leaf water potential in NTCPR94-5157 and N04-9646 under drought stress could be a possible water conservation mechanism to maintain leaf turgor pressure. The increase in osmoregulators such as minerals, raffinose, and stachyose, and oleic acid could be beneficial for soybean breeders in selecting for drought stress tolerance. PMID:24339829

  3. Reproductive and nutritional management on ovarian response and embryo quality on rabbit does.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, P L; García-García, R M; Árias-Álvarez, M; Rebollar, P G

    2014-10-01

    Rabbit does in modern rabbitries are under intensive reproductive rhythms. Females are high milk producers with high energetic expenses due to the extensive overlap between lactation and gestation. This situation leads to a negative energy balance with a mobilization of body fat especially in primiparous rabbit does. Poor body condition and poor health status severely affect the reproductive features (fertility rate and lifespan of the doe as well as ovarian physiology). This paper reviews some reproductive and nutritional approaches used in the last years to improve the reproductive performance of rabbit females, mainly focusing on the influence on ovarian response and embryo quality and with emphasis on epigenetic modifications in pre-implantation embryos and offspring consequences. PMID:25277432

  4. The Effect of Stress Management Model in Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Women

    PubMed Central

    Khodabakhshi Koolaee, Anahita; Falsafinejad, Mohammad Reza; Akbari, Mohammd Esmaeil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer associates with severs severe distress and stress. Since Because of that, the stress management program can train necessary skills to cope with stress; therefore, the current study investigates the effectiveness of stress management on enhancement of quality of life. Objectives: The aim of the current study is to examine the effectiveness of stress management model in quality of life for breast cancer patients. Patients and Methods: This research is a quasi-experimental study with pre and post-tests. The 21 subjects were selected from cancer institute of Imam Khomeini in Tehran in 2014. The participants were allocated to two matched groups based on their pre-test scores. They were assigned randomly to the control and experimental groups. Stress management was conducted with the experimental group during 10 sessions. Then the questionnaire was administered at post-test. Statistical analysis was conducted by using the independent t-test and analysis of variance. The research instrument was the core quality of life questionnaire QLQ-C30. Results: The results of the independent t-test showed that there is a significant difference between the pretest and post-test scores in the experimental group (P < 0.05). Also, there is no significant difference between means of quality of life subscales and socio demographic of the patients such as; age, education and disease stage (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The results indicate that stress management can change the irrational and distortion thoughts. So, it enhances the quality of life in breast cancer patients. PMID:26478793

  5. The endosymbiont Hamiltonella increases the growth rate of its host Bemisia tabaci during periods of nutritional stress.

    PubMed

    Su, Qi; Xie, Wen; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Liu, Baiming; Fang, Yong; Xu, Baoyun; Zhang, Youjun

    2014-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) harbors several bacterial symbionts. Among the secondary (facultative) symbionts, Hamiltonella has high prevalence and high infection frequencies, suggesting that it may be important for the biology and ecology of its hosts. Previous reports indicated that Hamiltonella increases whitefly fitness and, based on the complete sequencing of its genome, may have the ability to synthesize cofactors and amino acids that are required by its host but that are not sufficiently synthesized by the host or by the primary endosymbiont, Portiera. Here, we assessed the effects of Hamiltonella infection on the growth of B. tabaci reared on low-, standard-, or high-nitrogen diets. When B. tabaci was reared on a standard-nitrogen diet, no cost or benefit was associated with Hamiltonella infection. But, if we reared whiteflies on low-nitrogen diets, Hamiltonella-infected whiteflies often grew better than uninfected whiteflies. Furthermore, nitrogen levels in field-collected whiteflies indicated that the nutritional conditions in the field were comparable to the low-nitrogen diet in our laboratory experiment. These data suggest that Hamiltonella may play a previously unrecognized role as a nutritional mutualist in B. tabaci. PMID:24558462

  6. A review of heat stress and its management in the power industry

    SciTech Connect

    Waner, N.S.

    1986-06-01

    The effects of heat stress on plant operator performance is discussed. Sources of heat stress are reviewed, in particular, those unique to the Nuclear Power Industry. Measurement techniques correlating environmental conditions with physiological responses are covered, along with suggested assessment indices to establish criteria for worker health and safety. Available major countermeasures are described and include those categorized as, procedural, personal support systems, and plant betterment/engineering programs. Data, recommended standards, and industry practices are presented as viable guidelines along with references and information resources to assist the reader in establishing and implementing programs for managing heat stress.

  7. Nature-based stress management course for individuals at risk of adverse health effects from work-related stress-effects on stress related symptoms, workability and sick leave.

    PubMed

    Sahlin, Eva; Ahlborg, Gunnar; Matuszczyk, Josefa Vega; Grahn, Patrik

    2014-06-01

    Sick leave due to stress-related disorders is increasing in Sweden after a period of decrease. To avoid that individuals living under heavy stress develop more severe stress-related disorders, different stress management interventions are offered. Self-assessed health, burnout-scores and well-being are commonly used as outcome measures. Few studies have used sick-leave to compare effects of stress interventions. A new approach is to use nature and garden in a multimodal stress management context. This study aimed to explore effects on burnout, work ability, stress-related health symptoms, and sick leave for 33 women participating in a 12-weeks nature based stress management course and to investigate how the nature/garden activities were experienced. A mixed method approach was used. Measures were taken at course start and three follow-ups. Results showed decreased burnout-scores and long-term sick leaves, and increased work ability; furthermore less stress-related symptoms were reported. Tools and strategies to better handle stress were achieved and were widely at use at all follow-ups. The garden and nature content played an important role for stress relief and for tools and strategies to develop. The results from this study points to beneficial effects of using garden activities and natural environments in a stress management intervention. PMID:25003175

  8. Nature-Based Stress Management Course for Individuals at Risk of Adverse Health Effects from Work-Related Stress—Effects on Stress Related Symptoms, Workability and Sick Leave

    PubMed Central

    Sahlin, Eva; Ahlborg, Gunnar; Vega Matuszczyk, Josefa; Grahn, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    Sick leave due to stress-related disorders is increasing in Sweden after a period of decrease. To avoid that individuals living under heavy stress develop more severe stress-related disorders, different stress management interventions are offered. Self-assessed health, burnout-scores and well-being are commonly used as outcome measures. Few studies have used sick-leave to compare effects of stress interventions. A new approach is to use nature and garden in a multimodal stress management context. This study aimed to explore effects on burnout, work ability, stress-related health symptoms, and sick leave for 33 women participating in a 12-weeks nature based stress management course and to investigate how the nature/garden activities were experienced. A mixed method approach was used. Measures were taken at course start and three follow-ups. Results showed decreased burnout-scores and long-term sick leaves, and increased work ability; furthermore less stress-related symptoms were reported. Tools and strategies to better handle stress were achieved and were widely at use at all follow-ups. The garden and nature content played an important role for stress relief and for tools and strategies to develop. The results from this study points to beneficial effects of using garden activities and natural environments in a stress management intervention. PMID:25003175

  9. The Comparison of the Effects of a Didactic Stress Management Program and Group Counselling on the Coping Strategies of School Counsellors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coban, Aysel Esen; Hamamci, Zeynep

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a didactic stress management program, group counselling, and a control group on school counsellors' stress coping strategies. Thirty-four school counsellors were randomly assigned to either a didactic stress management group, group counselling, or a control group. The didactic stress management

  10. [Physiological characteristics of nitrogen nutrition and stress-resistance of film-mulched rice in various ecological regions of Zhejiang Province].

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinghua; Wu, Lianghuan; Zheng, Zhaisheng; Kong, Xiangjun; Zhang, Fusuo

    2005-02-01

    The study showed that different ecological environment and cultivation system in various ecological regions of Zhejiang Province resulted in some different physiological characteristics of nitrogen nutrition and stress-resistance, especially in the aspect of NO3(-)-N and NH4+-N concentrations, between film-mulched and conventional flooded rice. Owing to the heat stress in Hangjiahu plain, the NO3(-)-N concentration of film-mulched rice decreased to some extent, but NH4+-N concentration increased markedly at tillering, jointing and booting stages, compared to conventional flooded rice. In Jinqu basin, the NO3(-)-N concentration of film-mulched rice at booting stage was higher, while the NH4+-N concentration in its roots was notably lower than those of conventional flooded rice, with NH4+-N concentration in its basal stems and leaves somewhat increased. Generally, the glutamine synthetase (GS) and nitrate reductase (NR) activities in film-mulched rice leaves were enhanced at booting stage, while malondiadehyde (MDA), soluble sugar (SS) and proline (Pro) concentrations had little changes. In conclusion, film-mulched cultivation was beneficial to the rice growth and its high yielding. PMID:15852922

  11. Different Kinds of Stress

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Stress: The different kinds of stress EMAIL PRINT Stress: The different kinds of stress Stress management can be complicated and confusing because ... treatment approaches. Let's look at each one. Acute stress Acute stress is the most common form of ...

  12. Bone Stress Injuries in Runners.

    PubMed

    Tenforde, Adam S; Kraus, Emily; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Bone stress injuries (BSIs) are common running injuries and may occur at a rate of 20% annually. Both biological and biomechanical risk factors contribute to BSI. Evaluation of a runner with suspected BSI includes completing an appropriate history and physical examination. MRI grading classification for BSI has been proposed and may guide return to play. Management includes activity modification, optimizing nutrition, and addressing risk factors, including the female athlete triad. BSI prevention strategies include screening for risk factors during preparticipation evaluations, optimizing nutrition (including adequate caloric intake, calcium, and vitamin D), and promoting ball sports during childhood and adolescence. PMID:26616181

  13. Stress Management-Augmented Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention for African American Women: A Pilot, Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Tiffany L.; Krukowski, Rebecca; Love, ShaRhonda J.; Eddings, Kenya; DiCarlo, Marisha; Chang, Jason Y.; Prewitt, T. Elaine; West, Delia Smith

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between chronic stress and weight management efforts may be a concern for African American (AA) women, who have a high prevalence of obesity, high stress levels, and modest response to obesity treatment. This pilot study randomly assigned 44 overweight/obese AA women with moderate to high stress levels to either a 12-week…

  14. Stress management and sexual health of young adults: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dimou, P A; Bacopoulou, F; Darviri, C; Chrousos, G P

    2014-01-01

    Young people often experience excessive stress that definitely undermines their sexual life and leads them to adopt risky sexual behaviours. As such, the design and application of a stress management programme in this particular age group is, undoubtedly, a crucial matter. In this parallel randomised controlled trial, 60 psychology students of the Panteion University of Athens, aged 18–20, were randomly assigned to undergo either an 8-week stress management programme (n = 30; diaphragmatic breathing–progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery, twice a day) or not (n = 30). Self-reported validated measures were used to evaluate stress, stressful life events, health locus of control, general health status, sexual behaviours, sexual desire, satisfaction from sexual life and interpersonal relationships. Between-group analyses revealed statistically significant differences in internal health locus of control and general health evaluation. Within the intervention group analyses showed reductions in BMI, stress, the ‘chance’ subscale of multidimensional health locus of control (MHLC) and greater satisfaction from sexual life. No other significant change was reported. We deem that our results should encourage relevant future studies. PMID:25436273

  15. Variation in Broccoli Cultivar Phytochemical Content under Organic and Conventional Management Systems: Implications in Breeding for Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Erica N. C.; Lammerts van Bueren, Edith T.; Myers, James R.; Paulo, Maria Joăo; van Eeuwijk, Fred A.; Zhu, Ning; Juvik, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Organic agriculture requires cultivars that can adapt to organic crop management systems without the use of synthetic pesticides as well as genotypes with improved nutritional value. The aim of this study encompassing 16 experiments was to compare 23 broccoli cultivars for the content of phytochemicals associated with health promotion grown under organic and conventional management in spring and fall plantings in two broccoli growing regions in the US (Oregon and Maine). The phytochemicals quantified included: glucosinolates (glucoraphanin, glucobrassicin, neoglucobrassin), tocopherols (?-, ?-, ?-tocopherol) and carotenoids (lutein, zeaxanthin, ?-carotene). For glucoraphanin (17.5%) and lutein (13%), genotype was the major source of total variation; for glucobrassicin, region (36%) and the interaction of location and season (27.5%); and for neoglucobrassicin, both genotype (36.8%) and its interactions (34.4%) with season were important. For ?- and ?- tocopherols, season played the largest role in the total variation followed by location and genotype; for total carotenoids, genotype (8.41–13.03%) was the largest source of variation and its interactions with location and season. Overall, phytochemicals were not significantly influenced by management system. We observed that the cultivars with the highest concentrations of glucoraphanin had the lowest for glucobrassicin and neoglucobrassicin. The genotypes with high concentrations of glucobrassicin and neoglucobrassicin were the same cultivars and were early maturing F1 hybrids. Cultivars highest in tocopherols and carotenoids were open pollinated or early maturing F1 hybrids. We identified distinct locations and seasons where phytochemical performance was higher for each compound. Correlations among horticulture traits and phytochemicals demonstrated that glucoraphanin was negatively correlated with the carotenoids and the carotenoids were correlated with one another. Little or no association between phytochemical concentration and date of cultivar release was observed, suggesting that modern breeding has not negatively influenced the level of tested compounds. We found no significant differences among cultivars from different seed companies. PMID:25028959

  16. Variation in broccoli cultivar phytochemical content under organic and conventional management systems: implications in breeding for nutrition.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Erica N C; Lammerts van Bueren, Edith T; Myers, James R; Paulo, Maria Joăo; van Eeuwijk, Fred A; Zhu, Ning; Juvik, John A

    2014-01-01

    Organic agriculture requires cultivars that can adapt to organic crop management systems without the use of synthetic pesticides as well as genotypes with improved nutritional value. The aim of this study encompassing 16 experiments was to compare 23 broccoli cultivars for the content of phytochemicals associated with health promotion grown under organic and conventional management in spring and fall plantings in two broccoli growing regions in the US (Oregon and Maine). The phytochemicals quantified included: glucosinolates (glucoraphanin, glucobrassicin, neoglucobrassin), tocopherols (?-, ?-, ?-tocopherol) and carotenoids (lutein, zeaxanthin, ?-carotene). For glucoraphanin (17.5%) and lutein (13%), genotype was the major source of total variation; for glucobrassicin, region (36%) and the interaction of location and season (27.5%); and for neoglucobrassicin, both genotype (36.8%) and its interactions (34.4%) with season were important. For ?- and ?-tocopherols, season played the largest role in the total variation followed by location and genotype; for total carotenoids, genotype (8.41-13.03%) was the largest source of variation and its interactions with location and season. Overall, phytochemicals were not significantly influenced by management system. We observed that the cultivars with the highest concentrations of glucoraphanin had the lowest for glucobrassicin and neoglucobrassicin. The genotypes with high concentrations of glucobrassicin and neoglucobrassicin were the same cultivars and were early maturing F1 hybrids. Cultivars highest in tocopherols and carotenoids were open pollinated or early maturing F1 hybrids. We identified distinct locations and seasons where phytochemical performance was higher for each compound. Correlations among horticulture traits and phytochemicals demonstrated that glucoraphanin was negatively correlated with the carotenoids and the carotenoids were correlated with one another. Little or no association between phytochemical concentration and date of cultivar release was observed, suggesting that modern breeding has not negatively influenced the level of tested compounds. We found no significant differences among cultivars from different seed companies. PMID:25028959

  17. Social Validity of the Critical Incident Stress Management Model for School-Based Crisis Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Julie Q.

    2007-01-01

    The Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) model for crisis intervention was developed for use with emergency service personnel. Research regarding the use of the CISM model has been conducted among civilians and high-risk occupation groups with mixed results. The purpose of this study is to examine the social validity of the CISM model for…

  18. How Stress Management Improves Quality of Life after Treatment for Breast Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antoni, Michael H.; Lechner, Suzanne C.; Kazi, Aisha; Wimberly, Sarah R.; Sifre, Tammy; Urcuyo, Kenya R.; Phillips, Kristin; Gluck, Stefan; Carver, Charles S.

    2006-01-01

    The range of effects of psychosocial interventions on quality of life among women with breast cancer remains uncertain. Furthermore, it is unclear which components of multimodal interventions account for such effects. To address these issues, the authors tested a 10-week group cognitive-behavioral stress management intervention among 199 women…

  19. Family Stress Management Following Acute Myocardial Infarction: An Educational and Skills Training Intervention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, David V.; Cleveland, Sidney E.; Baer, Paul E.

    1998-01-01

    Provides a conceptual background for specific behavioral-therapy approach to family stress management in dealing with the sequelae of acute myocardial infarction for all family members with the goal of reducing morbidity for all family members as they cope with ongoing survivorship issues. Describes the program and discusses its pilot…

  20. The Frazzled Principal's Wellness Plan: Reclaiming Time, Managing Stress, and Creating a Healthy Lifestyle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queen, J. Allen; Queen, Patsy S.

    2004-01-01

    This wellness guide for today's busy principals, school leaders, supervisors, and administrators has been custom crafted by the authors to address the stresses of managing workplace environments, juggling time and competing priorities, learning to delegate, balancing personal and professional agendas, and creating win-win situations. Special…

  1. Principal Time Management Skills: Explaining Patterns in Principals' Time Use, Job Stress, and Perceived Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grissom, Jason A.; Loeb, Susanna; Mitani, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Time demands faced by school principals make principals' work increasingly difficult. Research outside education suggests that effective time management skills may help principals meet job demands, reduce job stress, and improve their performance. The purpose of this paper is to investigate these hypotheses. Design/methodology/approach:…

  2. Stress Management in the Health Care Setting: Matching Interventions with Patient Coping Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martelli, Michael F.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Prospective preprosthetic oral surgery patients were presented with a problem-focused, emotion-focused, or mixed-focus stress management intervention. The mixed-focus intervention produced the best overall response to surgery; the emotion-focused intervention produced the lowest adjustment levels. Better adjustment and satisfaction and lower…

  3. School Programs Targeting Stress Management in Children and Adolescents: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraag, Gerda; Zeegers, Maurice P.; Kok, Gerjo; Hosman, Clemens; Abu-Saad, Huda Huijer

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: This meta-analysis evaluates the effect of school programs targeting stress management or coping skills in school children. Methods: Articles were selected through a systematic literature search. Only randomized controlled trials or quasi-experimental studies were included. The standardized mean differences (SMDs) between baseline…

  4. Yoga for Stress Management Program as a Complementary Alternative Counseling Resource in a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milligan, Colleen K.

    2006-01-01

    A Yoga for Stress Management Program (YSMP) that served as a complementary alternative therapy resource was successfully implemented at a midsize, predominantly undergraduate university. It was offered in addition to traditional treatments for student mental health. Counselors, Residence Life staff, and faculty found that the program was useful…

  5. A Systematic Review of Stress-Management Interventions for Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Reynard, Alison K.; Rae-Grant, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to identify stress-management interventions used for people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and systematically evaluate the efficacy of these interventions. Methods: Several strategies were used to search for studies reported in articles published up to 2013. Results: Our initial search retrieved 117 publications, of which 8 met our criteria for review. Of the eight studies, one provided Class I evidence, five provided Class III evidence, and two provided Class IV evidence for the efficacy of stress-management interventions according to the evidence classification established by the American Academy of Neurology. Most studies showed positive changes in outcomes assessed; however, the range of methodological quality among the published studies made it difficult to draw conclusions. Conclusions: The promising findings for stress-management interventions highlight the need for future studies. Additional large, prospective, multicenter studies will help to define the role of stress-management interventions in the treatment and course of MS. Furthermore, including outcome measures based on biological and clinical markers of disease will prove useful in understanding potential underlying mechanisms. PMID:25337056

  6. Self-Guided Multimedia Stress Management and Resilience Training for Flight Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, R. D.; Zbozinek, T. D.; Hentschel, P. G.; Smith, S, M.; O'Brien J.; Oftedal, A.; Craske, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    Stress and anxiety-related problems are among the most common and costly behavioral health problems in society, and for those working in operational environments (i.e. astronauts, flight controllers, military) this can seriously impact crew performance, safety, and wellbeing. Technology-based interventions are effective for treating behavioral health problems, and can significantly improve the delivery of evidence-based health care. This study is evaluating the effectiveness, usefulness, and usability of a self-guided multimedia stress management and resilience training program in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a sample of flight controllers at Johnson Space Center. The intervention, SMART-OP (Stress Management and Resilience Training for Optimal Performance), is a six-session, cognitive behavioral-based computer program that uses self-guided, interactive activities to teach skills that can help individuals build resilience and manage stress. In a prior RCT with a sample of stressed but otherwise healthy individuals, SMART-OP reduced perceived stress and increased perceived control over stress in comparison to an Attention Control (AC) group. SMART-OP was rated as "highly useful" and "excellent" in usability and acceptability. Based on a-amylase data, individuals in SMART-OP recovered quicker and more completely from a social stress test as compared to the AC group [1]. In the current study, flight controllers are randomized either to receive SMART-OP training, or to a 6-week waitlist control period (WLC) before beginning SMART-OP. Eligible participants include JSC flight controllers and instructors without any medical or psychiatric disorder, but who are stressed based on self-report. Flight controllers provide a valid analog sample to astronauts in that they work in an operational setting, use similar terminology to astronauts, are mission-focused, and work under the same broader work culture. The study began in December 2014, and to date 79 flight controllers and instructors have expressed interest in the study, 49 of those were cleared for participation, we have screened 44 for eligibility, and 23 have met inclusion criteria. Recruitment is ongoing and the study will continue until December 2016. Outcome measures include perceived stress, perceived control over stress, resilience, mood, personality, emotion regulation, sleep, health behaviors, and psychophysiological data such as 24-hour heart rate, alpha amylase, and urinary and salivary cortisol. We are also collecting user feedback such as usability, working alliance, usefulness, and treatment credibility.

  7. VINEYARD FLOOR MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES AFFECT SOIL PROPERTIES & MICROBIOLOGY, WATER RELATIONS, AND CROP NUTRITION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A long-term comparison of various vineyard floor management practices (weed control and cover crops) indicates that weed control treatments had no impact on soil microbial biomass, but had a significant interactive effect with the rye cover crop on mycorrhizal colonization of grapevine roots, presum...

  8. Organic blueberry production systems: management of plant nutrition, irrigation requirements, and weeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A long-term systems trial was established to evaluate management practices for organic production of northern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.). The factorial experiment included two planting bed treatments (flat and raised beds), source and rate of fertilizer (feather meal and fish emuls...

  9. Organic blueberry production systems: management of plant nutrition, irrigation requirements, and weeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A long-term systems trial was established to evaluate factorial management practices for organic production of highbush blueberry. The practices include: flat and raised planting beds; feather meal and fish emulsion fertilizer applied at 29 and 57 kg/ha N; sawdust mulch, compost topped with sawdust ...

  10. Organic highbush blueberry production systems research – management of plant nutrition, irrigation requirements, weeds, and economic sustainability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 0.4 ha planting was established in October 2006 to evaluate the effects of cultivar (Duke and Liberty), bed type ("flat ground" and raised beds), weed management [sawdust mulch and hand weed control; compost plus sawdust mulch with acetic acid, flaming, and hand control used as needed; and landsca...

  11. Four years of North American registry home parenteral nutrition outcome data and their implications for patient management

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, L.; Heaphey, L.; Fleming, C.R.; Lininger, L.; Steiger, E. )

    1991-07-01

    The OASIS Registry started annual collection of longitudinal data on patients on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in 1984. This report describes outcome profiles on 1594 HPN patients in seven disease categories. Analysis showed clinical outcome was principally a reflection of the underlying diagnosis. Patients with Crohn's disease, ischemic bowel disease, motility disorders, radiation enteritis, and congenital bowel dysfunction all had a fairly long-term clinical outcome, whereas those with active cancer and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) had a short-term outcome. The long-term group had a 3-year survival rate of 65 to 80%, they averaged 2.6 complications requiring hospitalization per year, and 49% experienced complete rehabilitation. The short-term group had a mean survival of 6 months; they averaged 4.6 complications per year and about 15% experienced complete rehabilitation. The registry data also indicated HPN was used for 19,700 patients in 1987 with therapy growth averaging about 8% per year. This growth was chiefly from new cancer patients. The number of new patients with long-term disorders in whom HPN was initiated appeared rather constant. The authors conclude that these clinical outcome assessments justify HPN for long-term patients, but the utility and appropriateness of HPN for the cancer and AIDS patients remains uncertain and requires further study. Medical, social, and fiscal aspects of HPN management in long-term and short-term patients appear to involve quite separate considerations.

  12. Montana State University 1 Food and Nutrition Major

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Montana State University 1 Food and Nutrition Major with Dietetics Option The dietetics by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics foundation in food and nutrition, food service management, and clinical nutrition. Registered dietitians may

  13. Development and application of a web-based nutritional management program to improve dietary behaviors for the prevention of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon; Lee, Min June; Kang, Hee Cheol; Lee, Mee Sook; Yoon, Sun

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a Web-based nutritional management program for the prevention of metabolic syndrome and to evaluate how the program affects health-related behaviors and the health status of office workers with metabolic syndrome risk factors. For the pilot test of the Web-based nutritional management program, 29 employees (19 males, 10 females) with more than one metabolic syndrome risk factor participated in the Web-based nutritional management program for 16 weeks. Participants visited the Web site more than two times per week and completed customized assessments of health status, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, dietary habits, food intake, ideal body weight, energy requirements, and exercise. Subjects had a significant decrease in body weight, waist circumference, body mass index (P < .01 in males, P < .05 in females), and body fat (P < .01 in males). The frequency of dietary habits such as eating snacks, eating out, and dining with others decreased, whereas the frequency of intake of foods such as whole grains, seaweed, fruit, and low-fat milk increased after intervention. After 16 weeks, program satisfaction was evaluated using a Web evaluation questionnaire, and most of the participants were highly satisfied with Web site components such as the loading speed, configuration, privacy, design, functionality, and contents. PMID:24651253

  14. Stress

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pressures of work, family, and other daily responsibilities Stress brought about by a sudden negative change, such as losing a job, divorce, or ... to know your limits when it comes to stress, so you can avoid more serious health effects. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  15. Pharmacotherapy of post-traumatic stress disorder: a family practitioners guide to management of the disease.

    PubMed

    Katzman, Martin A; Struzik, Lukasz; Vivian, Lisa L; Vermani, Monica; McBride, Joanna C

    2005-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder is a difficult to treat, yet common disorder, which is associated with significant morbidity, mortality and societal burden. Comprehensive management of post-traumatic stress disorder must include both psychotherapeutic and pharmacologic components. The current evidence-based pharmacologic management approaches to post-traumatic stress disorder, suggests that first-line treatments for monotherapy are the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, sertraline, paroxetine and fluoxetine. Other potential options include other monotherapies including venlafaxine, mirtazapine, tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, as well as adjunctive usage of atypical antipsychotics, lamotrigine, trazadone and a number of adrenergic agents. A trial of therapy should be at least 8 weeks and continue for at the very least 12 months, but is likely to be much longer. In light of the risks of untreated post-traumatic stress disorder (e.g., suicide and impaired psychosocial functioning), therapy may need to be continued for 2 years or more. Pharmacologic therapy instituted at the time of acute psychologic trauma shows promise for the prevention of post-traumatic stress disorder in the future and warrants further study. PMID:15853483

  16. Poor maternal nutrition followed by accelerated postnatal growth leads to alterations in DNA damage and repair, oxidative and nitrosative stress, and oxidative defense capacity in rat heart.

    PubMed

    Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Martin-Gronert, Malgorzata S; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S; Hargreaves, Iain; Alfaradhi, Maria Z; Land, John M; Aiken, Catherine E; Ozanne, Susan E

    2013-01-01

    Low birth weight and accelerated postnatal growth lead to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. We reported previously that rats exposed to a low-protein diet in utero and postnatal catch-up growth (recuperated) develop metabolic dysfunction and have reduced life span. Here we explored the hypothesis that cardiac oxidative and nitrosative stress leading to DNA damage and accelerated cellular aging could contribute to these phenotypes. Recuperated animals had a low birth weight (P<0.001) but caught up in weight to controls during lactation. At weaning, recuperated cardiac tissue had increased (P<0.05) protein nitrotyrosination and DNA single-stranded breaks. This condition was preceded by increased expression of DNA damage repair molecules 8-oxoguanine-DNA-glycosylase-1, nei-endonuclease-VIII-like, X-ray-repair-complementing-defective-repair-1, and Nthl endonuclease III-like-1 on d 3. These differences were maintained on d 22 and became more pronounced in the case of 8-oxoguanine-DNA-glycosylase-1 and nei-endonuclease-VIII-like. This was accompanied by increases in xanthine oxidase (P<0.001) and NADPH oxidase (P<0.05), major sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The detrimental effects of increased ROS in recuperated offspring may be exaggerated at 22 d by reductions (P<0.001) in the antioxidant enzymes peroxiredoxin-3 and CuZn-superoxide-dismutase. We conclude that poor fetal nutrition followed by accelerated postnatal growth results in increased cardiac nitrosative and oxidative-stress and DNA damage, which could contribute to age-associated disease risk. PMID:23024373

  17. Nutritional adequacy of plant-based diets for weight management: observations from the NHANES.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Bonnie

    2014-07-01

    Observational studies have shown that body mass indexes of vegetarians are lower than those of nonvegetarians and that caloric intake of vegetarians is typically lower than that of nonvegetarians, suggesting that a vegetarian diet could be an approach for weight management. However, vegetarians may be at risk of inadequate intakes of certain vitamins and minerals. Population-based studies indicate that vegetarians have lower mean intakes of vitamin B-12 and zinc and higher intakes of fiber, magnesium, and vitamins A, C, and E than do nonvegetarians. Usual intake data suggest a similar prevalence of inadequacy between vegetarians and nonvegetarians for magnesium and vitamins A, C, and E, with both groups at high risk of inadequate intakes of these nutrients. These same data report that vegetarians have a higher prevalence of inadequacy for iron, vitamin B-12, protein, and zinc than do nonvegetarians. Although mean intake data suggest that a vegetarian diet may be a useful approach for weight management, combined with energy restriction it may have a detrimental effect on diet quality. Mean intakes of fiber, vitamins A and C, magnesium, and iron were significantly lower for vegetarians with energy intakes ? 500 kcal below Estimated Energy Requirements than for vegetarians who did not restrict energy. Vegetarian diets should be recommended for weight management; however, care should be taken to optimize food intake to provide adequate intakes of nutrients of concern when energy restriction is used in conjunction with a vegetarian dietary pattern. At any caloric amount, vegetarians should optimize intakes of vitamin B-12, zinc, and protein; and both vegetarians and nonvegetarians need to increase intakes of calcium, magnesium, fiber, and vitamins A, C, and E. PMID:24871478

  18. Codon usage bias and tRNA over-expression in Buchnera aphidicola after aromatic amino acid nutritional stress on its host Acyrthosiphon pisum

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Hubert; Calevro, Federica; Vinuelas, José; Fayard, Jean-Michel; Rahbe, Yvan

    2006-01-01

    Codon usage bias and relative abundances of tRNA isoacceptors were analysed in the obligate intracellular symbiotic bacterium, Buchnera aphidicola from the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, using a dedicated 35mer oligonucleotide microarray. Buchnera is archetypal of organisms living with minimal metabolic requirements and presents a reduced genome with high-evolutionary rate. Codonusage in Buchnera has been overcome by the high mutational bias towards AT bases. However, several lines of evidence for codon usage selection are given here. A significant correlation was found between tRNA relative abundances and codon composition of Buchnera genes. A significant codon usage bias was found for the choice of rare codons in Buchnera: C-ending codons are preferred in highly expressed genes, whereas G-ending codons are avoided. This bias is not explained by GC skew in the bacteria and might correspond to a selection for perfect matching between codon–anticodon pairs for some essential amino acids in Buchnera proteins. Nutritional stress applied to the aphid host induced a significant overexpression of most of the tRNA isoacceptors in bacteria. Although, molecular regulation of the tRNA operons in Buchnera was not investigated, a correlation between relative expression levels and organization in transcription unit was found in the genome of Buchnera. PMID:16963497

  19. A Systematic Review of Biopsychosocial Training Programs for the Self-Management of Emotional Stress: Potential Applications for the Military

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Shawn S.; Jonas, Wayne B.; Walter, Joan A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Combat-exposed troops and their family members are at risk for stress reactions and related disorders. Multimodal biopsychosocial training programs incorporating complementary and alternative self-management techniques have the potential to reduce stress-related symptoms and dysfunction. Such training can preempt or attenuate the posttraumatic stress response and may be effectively incorporated into the training cycle for deploying and redeploying troops and their families. A large systematic review was conducted to survey the literature on multimodal training programs for the self-management of emotional stress. This report is an overview of the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) identified in this systematic review. Select programs such as mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Cognitive Behavioral Stress Management, Autogenic Training, Relaxation Response Training, and other meditation and mind-body skills practices are highlighted, and the feasibility of their implementation within military settings is addressed. PMID:24174982

  20. Nutritional Support

    MedlinePLUS

    Nutritional support is therapy for people who cannot get enough nourishment by eating or drinking. You may need ... absorb nutrients through your digestive system You receive nutritional support through a needle or catheter placed in your ...

  1. Nutrition Counter

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Counter: A Reference For The Kidney Patient AAKP Nutrition Counter: A Reference For The Kidney Patient Buy ... Harum RD, CSR, LD Certified Specialist in Renal Nutrition, Miami, Florida Reviewed by: 2005 – Maria Karalis, MBA, ...

  2. Innovative work behavior of managers: Implications regarding stressful challenges of modernized public- and private-sector organizations

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sudeshna Basu; Ray, Anjali

    2009-01-01

    Background: The present study was firstly aimed to find out the nature of stressful life events arising out of the innovative challenges in modernized organizations; and secondly, it tried to identify the relationship between innovative work behavior of managers and the levels of stress arising out of stressful events in modernized organizations (public and private) in West Bengal. Materials and Methods: Data was collected from a sample of 200 managers, by using 3 tools (General Information Schedule, Life Event Inventory and Innovative Work Behavior Scale) through a face-to-face interview. Responses were subjected to both quantitative and qualitative analyses. The data was statistically treated for ‘t’ and ANOVA. Results: Data highlighted the fact that the qualitative profile of stressful events in the lives of managers expressed specificity in terms of their organizational type (public- and private-sector modernized organizations), and levels of stress from stressful life events were significantly higher among the modernized private-sector managers than those among public-sector managers. The prevalence of innovative work behavior was moderately higher among managers of private-sector modernized organizations than their counterparts in public-sector organizations. The trends of innovative work behavior of the managers indicated much variability due to interaction of their level of perceived stressful challenges for innovation and the global forces of change that have unleashed dynamic, systematic and higher expectation level from them. PMID:21180486

  3. Nutrition Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauliac, Michel; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Nutrition education is the theme of this issue of "Children in the Tropics," which emphasizes an analysis of the situation of nutrition education programs, particularly in third world countries. It is noted that in most cases, it is necessary to integrate aspects of nutrition education into broader programs that encompass agricultural and food…

  4. Northern Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Territories Dept. of Education, Yellowknife.

    This guide contains nutrition information and nutrition education strategies aimed at residents of the Canadian Arctic. Section I: (1) defines nutrition terms; (2) describes the sources and functions of essential nutrients; (3) explains Canada's food guide and special considerations for the traditional northern Native diet and for lactose…

  5. Agri-environmental grass hay: nutritive value and intake in comparison with hay from intensively managed grassland.

    PubMed

    Fiems, L O; De Boever, J L; De Vliegher, A; Vanacker, J M; De Brabander, D L; Carlier, L

    2004-06-01

    Chemical composition, digestibility, nutritive value and intake of hay from an agri-environmental management (EH) were compared with those from hay (Lolium perenne) from an intensive management (IH). IH was of low to moderate quality because of unfavourable weather conditions. EH was harvested mid-June of 2000 (EH1) and 2001 (EH2) on the same sward that had not received mineral fertilizer for 10 years. The EH was characterized by a species-rich botanical composition. On average, it had lower contents of protein (32%), NDF (9%) and ash (35%), and a higher concentration of water-soluble carbohydrates (117%) than IH. Digestibility of dry and organic matter, determined with sheep, was not different between IH and EH and averaged 59 and 63%, respectively. Crude fibre and NDF digestibility were lower in EH (58 and 57%, respectively) than in IH (70 and 69%, respectively). Net energy value for lactation did not differ between IH and EH and amounted to 4.78 MJ per kg DM. True protein digested in the small intestine and rumen degraded protein balance were lower in EH (63 and -60 g per kg DM) than in IH (71 and -33 g per kg DM). Intake of hay was investigated in Holstein-Friesian heifers and Belgian Blue double-muscled heifers (mean BW 280 +/- 22 kg and 269 +/- 21 kg, respectively), and in Belgian Blue non-lactating and non-pregnant double-muscled cows (initial BW 642 +/- 82 kg), using a cross-over design. Hay was freely available. It was supplemented with 1 kg concentrate daily. Dry matter intake from hay was higher for EH than for IH in heifers (4% and 13%, respectively in Holstein-Friesian and Belgian Blue heifers) and in cows (22%). Hay from an agri-environmental management may be used for low-performing animals, as energy intake only exceeded maintenance requirements by 20 to 35%. Several characteristics of EH were different between years, such as dry matter digestibility, net energy value for lactation and fermentable organic matter content. PMID:15264672

  6. Role of School Meal Service in Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    School meal service programs are essential for children's long-term nutrition and health promotion. The programs vary in content, depending on the economic condition, health condition and the food supply situation in each country. Children are encouraged to improve their nutrition, and choose healthy foods and learn good dietary habits through school meals and nutrition education. In Japan, the school lunch program started in 1889. The percentage of elementary schools serving school lunches had reached 99.2% in 2014, and the Nutrition Teacher system started in 2004. Nutrition teachers are to play the roles of teachers on food and nutrition education in addition to managers of foodservice operations in schools. Nutrition teachers are expected to have effects on school nutrition programs by providing meal service together with nutrition education. And so, significant effort is needed from both academia and the field to raise the related nutritional issues. PMID:26598858

  7. Management of family and workplace stress experienced by women of colour from various cultural backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, B; Ladak, S

    1998-01-01

    Minority women identify finances and maintaining cultural values as their most commonly experienced stressors at home and in the work-place. A before and after study of ethnic minority women in focus group sessions led by a trained ethnic minority facilitator examined how social and workplace supports, or lack thereof, impact on the individuals' ability to manage daily life. Creative, effective solutions to stressors were identified by the participants. Outcomes were evaluated in terms of the impact of changes on the participants' coping styles in family and work life. Results indicate that a large percentage of women in this study felt discriminated against based on their culture/race, however, this perceived discrimination decreased after the focus groups. The predominant stress management techniques were prayer and music. Family support was the most influential factor in decreasing stress. The family is a major source of support for the working women, acting as a buffer to workplace pressures. PMID:9524391

  8. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-198. 2005. 123 Management of Ponderosa Pine Nutrition

    E-print Network

    fertilization appeared to be related to foliage potassium (K)/N ratio in some cases. The application of K studies incorporated potassium (K). During the establishment of the Forest Health and Nutrition study

  9. Nutrition and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Joseph Andrew; Underdown, Mary Jane; Clark, William Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Nutrition is one of the most basic of medical issues and is often ignored as a problem in the management of our chronic wound patients. Unfortunately, malnutrition is widespread in our geriatric patients even in nursing homes in developed countries. Attention to basic nutrition and providing appropriate supplements may assist in the healing of our chronic wounds. Recent Advances: Recent research has revealed the epidemiology of malnutrition in developed countries, the similarities to malnutrition in developing countries, and some of the physiologic and sociologic causes for this problem. More information is now available on the biochemical effects of nutrient deficiency and supplementation with macronutrients and micronutrients. In some cases, administration of isolated nutrients beyond recommended amounts for healthy individuals may have a pharmacologic effect to help wounds heal. Critical Issues: Much of the knowledge of the nutritional support of chronic wounds is based on information that has been obtained from trauma management. Due to the demographic differences of the patients and differences in the physiology of acute and chronic wounds, it is not logical to assume that all aspects of nutritional support are identical in these patient groups. Before providing specific nutritional supplements, appropriate assessments of patient general nutritional status and the reasons for malnutrition must be obtained or specific nutrient supplementation will not be utilized. Future Directions: Future research must concentrate on the biochemical and physiologic differences of the acute and chronic wounds and the interaction with specific supplements, such as antioxidants, vitamin A, and vitamin D. PMID:25371850

  10. Nutritional Status as the Key Modulator of Antioxidant Responses Induced by High Environmental Ammonia and Salinity Stress in European Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax)

    PubMed Central

    Zinta, Gaurav; Dasan, Antony Franklin; Rasoloniriana, Rindra; Asard, Han; Blust, Ronny; De Boeck, Gudrun

    2015-01-01

    Salinity fluctuation is one of the main factors affecting the overall fitness of marine fish. In addition, water borne ammonia may occur simultaneously with salinity stress. Additionally, under such stressful circumstances, fish may encounter food deprivation. The physiological and ion-osmo regulatory adaptive capacities to cope with all these stressors alone or in combination are extensively addressed in fish. To date, studies revealing the modulation of antioxidant potential as compensatory response to multiple stressors are rather lacking. Therefore, the present work evaluated the individual and combined effects of salinity challenge, ammonia toxicity and nutritional status on oxidative stress and antioxidant status in a marine teleost, European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Fish were acclimated to normal seawater (32 ppt), to brackish water (20 ppt and 10 ppt) and to hypo-saline water (2.5 ppt). Following acclimation to different salinities for two weeks, fish were exposed to high environmental ammonia (HEA, 20 mg/L representing 50% of 96h LC50 value for ammonia) for 12 h, 48 h, 84 h and 180 h, and were either fed (2% body weight) or fasted (unfed for 7 days prior to HEA exposure). Results show that in response to decreasing salinities, oxidative stress indices such as xanthine oxidase activity, levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde, MDA) increased in the hepatic tissue of fasted fish but remained unaffected in fed fish. HEA exposure at normal salinity (32 ppt) and at reduced salinities (20 ppt and 10 ppt) increased ammonia accumulation significantly (84 h–180 h) in both feeding regimes which was associated with an increment of H2O2 and MDA contents. Unlike in fasted fish, H2O2 and MDA levels in fed fish were restored to control levels (84 h–180 h); with a concomitant increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), components of the glutathione redox cycle (reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity and reduced ascorbate (ASC) content. On the contrary, fasted fish could not activate many of these protective systems and rely mainly on CAT and ASC dependent pathways as antioxidative sentinels. The present findings exemplify that in fed fish single factors and a combination of HEA exposure and reduced seawater salinities (upto 10 ppt) were insufficient to cause oxidative damage due to the highly competent antioxidant system compared to fasted fish. However, the impact of HEA exposure at a hypo-saline environment (2.5 ppt) also defied antioxidant defence system in fed fish, suggesting this combined factor is beyond the tolerance range for both feeding groups. Overall, our results indicate that the oxidative stress mediated by the experimental conditions were exacerbated during starvation, and also suggest that feed deprivation particularly at reduced seawater salinities can instigate fish more susceptible to ammonia toxicity. PMID:26241315

  11. Positive technology: a free mobile platform for the self-management of psychological stress.

    PubMed

    Gaggioli, Andrea; Cipresso, Pietro; Serino, Silvia; Campanaro, Danilo Marco; Pallavicini, Federica; Wiederhold, Brenda K; Riva, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    We describe the main features and preliminary evaluation of Positive Technology, a free mobile platform for the self-management of psychological stress (http://positiveapp.info/). The mobile platform features three main components: (i) guided relaxation, which provides the user with the opportunity of browsing a gallery of relaxation music and video-narrative resources for reducing stress; (ii) 3D biofeedback, which helps the user learning to control his/her responses, by visualizing variations of heart rate in an engaging 3D environment; (iii) stress tracking, by the recording of heart rate and self-reports. We evaluated the Positive Technology app in an online trial involving 32 participants, out of which 7 used the application in combination with the wrist sensor. Overall, feedback from users was satisfactory and the analysis of data collected online indicated the capability of the app for reducing perceived stress levels. A future goal is to improve the usability of the application and include more advanced stress monitoring features, based on the analysis of heart rate variability indexes. PMID:24875684

  12. Disruption of the salmon reproductive endocrine axis through prolonged nutritional stress: changes in circulating hormone levels and transcripts for ovarian genes involved in steroidogenesis and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoji; Adam Luckenbach, J; Goetz, Frederick W; Young, Graham; Swanson, Penny

    2011-07-01

    Mechanisms regulating the normal progression of ovarian follicular growth versus onset of atresia in fishes are poorly understood. To gain a better understanding of these processes, we exposed immature female coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to prolonged fasting to induce follicular atresia and monitored body growth, development of the ovarian follicles, changes in reproductive hormones, and transcripts for ovarian genes. Prolonged fasting reduced body and ovary weight and increased the appearance of atretic follicles relative to normally fed controls. Endocrine analyses showed that fasting reduced plasma insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), estradiol-17? (E2), and pituitary, but not plasma, levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Transcripts for ovarian fsh receptor (fshr) and steroidogenesis-related genes, such as steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (star), 3?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (hsd3b), and P450 aromatase (cyp19a1a) were significantly lower in fasted fish. Ovarian expression of apoptosis-related genes, such as Fas-associated death domain (fadd), caspase 8 (casp8), caspase 3 (casp3), and caspase 9 (casp9) were significantly elevated in fasted fish compared to fed fish, indicating that apoptosis is involved in the process of atresia in this species. Interestingly, some genes such as fadd, casp8, casp3, and hsd3b, were differentially expressed prior to increases in the number of atretic follicles and reductions in hormone levels induced by fasting, and may therefore have potential as early indicators of atresia. Together these results suggest that prolonged nutritional stress may disrupt the reproductive system and induce follicular atresia in part via reductions in ovarian IGF and FSH signaling, and downstream effects on steroidogenesis-related genes and E2 production. PMID:21447335

  13. Abscisic Acid-Regulated Growth Modulations and Its Application for Stress and Quality Management of Vegetable Transplants 

    E-print Network

    Agehara, Shinsuke

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a management tool for producing high quality, more stress tolerant vegetable transplants and for prolonging transplant marketability. This study primarily involves physiological and ...

  14. Stress management skills, cortisol awakening response, and post-exertional malaise in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hall, Daniel L; Lattie, Emily G; Antoni, Michael H; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Czaja, Sara; Perdomo, Dolores; Klimas, Nancy G

    2014-11-01

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is characterized in part by debilitating fatigue typically exacerbated by cognitive and/or physical exertion, referred to as post-exertional malaise (PEM). In a variety of populations, the cortisol awakening response (CAR) has stood out as a marker of endocrine dysregulation relevant to the experience of fatigue, and may therefore be particularly relevant in CFS. This is the first study to examine PEM and the CAR in a sample of individuals with CFS. The CAR has also been established as a stress-sensitive measure of HPA axis functioning. It follows that better management of stress could modulate the CAR, and in turn PEM. In this cross-sectional study, we hypothesized that greater Perceived Stress Management Skills (PSMS) would relate to lower reports of PEM, via the impact of PSMS on the CAR. A total of 117 adults (72% female) with a CFS diagnosis completed self-report measures of PSMS and PEM symptomatology and a two-day protocol of saliva collection. Cortisol values from awakening and 30 min post-awakening were used to compute the CAR. Regression analyses revealed that greater PSMS related to greater CAR and greater CAR related to less PEM severity. Bootstrapped analyses revealed an indirect effect of PSMS on PEM via the CAR, such that greater PSMS related to less PEM, via a greater CAR. Future research should examine these trends longitudinally and whether interventions directed at improving stress management skills are accompanied by improved cortisol regulation and less PEM in individuals with CFS. PMID:25049069

  15. Postgraduate Clinical Psychology Students' Perceptions of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Stress Management Intervention and Clinical Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pakenham, Kenneth I.; Stafford-Brown, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Background: Research into stress management interventions for clinical psychology trainees (CPTs) is limited, despite evidence indicating that these individuals are at risk for elevated stress, which can negatively impact personal and professional functioning. This study explored: (1) CPTs' perceptions of a previously evaluated Acceptance and…

  16. "Learn Young, Learn Fair", a Stress Management Program for Fifth and Sixth Graders: Longitudinal Results from an Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraag, Gerda; Van Breukelen, Gerard J. P.; Kok, Gerjo; Hosman, Clemens

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study examined the effects of a universal stress management program (Learn Young, Learn Fair) on stress, coping, anxiety and depression in fifth and sixth grade children. Methods: Fifty-two schools (1467 children) participated in a clustered randomized controlled trial. Data was collected in the fall of 2002, the spring of 2003,…

  17. The Association between Stress Level in Daily Life and Age at Natural Menopause in Korean Women: Outcomes of the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2010-2012

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byoung-O; Choi, Ji-Ho; Cho, Se-Wook; Im, Hyun-Jung; An, Jee-Eun

    2015-01-01

    Background Although several risk factors associated with reduced age at natural menopause (ANM) have been investigated, the results are inconsistent. Excessive stress, which leads to elevation of stress hormones, can also negatively affect reproductive ability, including by accelerating menopause. However, a direct association between stress level and ANM has not yet been demonstrated. Therefore, the object of this study was to investigate the association between stress level and ANM in Korean women. Methods Study participants were Korean women between 40 and 70 years old who were in natural menopause during the 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=3,176). The level of stress in daily life was estimated based on data from the mental health topics of the survey. We used the t-test and one-way analysis of variance to analyze the correlation between stress level and ANM. Regression (?) coefficients calculated by multiple regression analysis were used to estimate various factors affecting ANM. Results Women who experienced a high level of stress in daily life had a lower mean ANM than women with a low stress level (50.17±3.7 and 50.58±3.5 years, respectively), with a statistically significant correlation (P<0.05). This correlation was still observed after adjusting for age, body mass index, menstrual regularity, and personal income (P<0.05 for variables). Conclusion In Korean women between 40 and 70 years of age who are in natural menopause, there is a statistically significant correlation between stress level and ANM. In particular, women who experience a high level of stress in daily life have reduced ANM. PMID:26634097

  18. Interreality for the management and training of psychological stress: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychological stress occurs when an individual perceives that environmental demands tax or exceed his or her adaptive capacity. Its association with severe health and emotional diseases, points out the necessity to find new efficient strategies to treat it. Moreover, psychological stress is a very personal problem and requires training focused on the specific needs of individuals. To overcome the above limitations, the INTERSTRESS project suggests the adoption of a new paradigm for e-health - Interreality - that integrates contextualized assessment and treatment within a hybrid environment, bridging the physical and the virtual worlds. According to this premise, the aim of this study is to investigate the advantages of using advanced technologies, in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), based on a protocol for reducing psychological stress. Methods/Design The study is designed as a randomized controlled trial. It includes three groups of approximately 50 subjects each who suffer from psychological stress: (1) the experimental group, (2) the control group, (3) the waiting list group. Participants included in the experimental group will receive a treatment based on cognitive behavioral techniques combined with virtual reality, biofeedback and mobile phone, while the control group will receive traditional stress management CBT-based training, without the use of new technologies. The wait-list group will be reassessed and compared with the two other groups five weeks after the initial evaluation. After the reassessment, the wait-list patients will randomly receive one of the two other treatments. Psychometric and physiological outcomes will serve as quantitative dependent variables, while subjective reports of participants will be used as the qualitative dependent variable. Discussion What we would like to show with the present trial is that bridging virtual experiences, used to learn coping skills and emotional regulation, with real experiences using advanced technologies (virtual reality, advanced sensors and smartphones) is a feasible way to address actual limitations of existing protocols for psychological stress. Trial registration http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01683617 PMID:23806013

  19. Anticipating on amplifying water stress: Optimal crop production supported by anticipatory water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomeus, Ruud; van den Eertwegh, Gé; Simons, Gijs

    2015-04-01

    Agricultural crop yields depend largely on the soil moisture conditions in the root zone. Drought but especially an excess of water in the root zone and herewith limited availability of soil oxygen reduces crop yield. With ongoing climate change, more prolonged dry periods alternate with more intensive rainfall events, which changes soil moisture dynamics. With unaltered water management practices, reduced crop yield due to both drought stress and waterlogging will increase. Therefore, both farmers and water management authorities need to be provided with opportunities to reduce risks of decreasing crop yields. In The Netherlands, agricultural production of crops represents a market exceeding 2 billion euros annually. Given the increased variability in meteorological conditions and the resulting larger variations in soil moisture contents, it is of large economic importance to provide farmers and water management authorities with tools to mitigate risks of reduced crop yield by anticipatory water management, both at field and at regional scale. We provide the development and the field application of a decision support system (DSS), which allows to optimize crop yield by timely anticipation on drought and waterlogging situations. By using this DSS, we will minimize plant water stress through automated drainage and irrigation management. In order to optimize soil moisture conditions for crop growth, the interacting processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere system need to be considered explicitly. Our study comprises both the set-up and application of the DSS on a pilot plot in The Netherlands, in order to evaluate its implementation into daily agricultural practice. The DSS focusses on anticipatory water management at the field scale, i.e. the unit scale of interest to a farmer. We combine parallel field measurements ('observe'), process-based model simulations ('predict'), and the novel Climate Adaptive Drainage (CAD) system ('adjust') to optimize soil moisture conditions. CAD is used both for controlled drainage practices and for sub-irrigation. The DSS has a core of the plot-scale SWAP model (soil-water-atmosphere-plant), extended with a process-based module for the simulation of oxygen stress for plant roots. This module involves macro-scale and micro-scale gas diffusion, as well as the plant physiological demand of oxygen, to simulate transpiration reduction due to limited oxygen availability. Continuous measurements of soil moisture content, groundwater level, and drainage level are used to calibrate the SWAP model each day. This leads to an optimal reproduction of the actual soil moisture conditions by data assimilation in the first step in the DSS process. During the next step, near-future (+10 days) soil moisture conditions and drought and oxygen stress are predicted using weather forecasts. Finally, optimal drainage levels to minimize stress are simulated, which can be established by CAD. Linkage to a grid-based hydrological simulation model (SPHY) facilitates studying the spatial dynamics of soil moisture and associated implications for management at the regional scale. Thus, by using local-scale measurements, process-based models and weather forecasts to anticipate on near-future conditions, not only field-scale water management but also regional surface water management can be optimized both in space and time.

  20. Nutrition Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Lloyd E.

    Nutrition labeling regulations differ in countries around the world. The focus of this chapter is on nutrition labeling regulations in the USA, as specified by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). A major reason for analyzing the chemical components of foods in the USA is nutrition labeling regulations. Nutrition label information is not only legally required in many countries, but also is of increasing importance to consumers as they focus more on health and wellness.

  1. Current interventional management of male stress urinary incontinence following urological procedures

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Ireneusz; ?led?, Emil; Ciechan, Janusz; Bukowczan, Jakub; Przydacz, Mikolaj; Wiatr, Tomasz; Stangel-Wojcikiewicz, Klaudia; Ch?osta, Piotr L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite improvements in surgical techniques and implementation of minimally invasive procedures, male stress urinary incontinence affects a substantial number of patients after prostatic surgery. In response to increasing demand of optimal treatment modality, new alternatives to artificial urinary sphincter have recently been introduced. This review summarises the therapeutic surgical options with their outcomes in management of postprostatectomy stress incontinence. Material and methods We performed a literature review by searching the PubMed, Web of Science and Embase databases for articles published from January 2000 until April 2015 based on clinical relevance. Results Artificial urinary sphincter is currently considered the “gold standard” treatment of male stress urinary incontinence. Although the new devices in this group have recently been investigated, the AMS 800 remains the only widely used implant. Male slings and adjustable continence devices, achieve the social continence rates up to 60%. Periurethral injections of bulking agents, have limited efficacy of male stress incontinence. Argus sling and ProACT are both associated with substantial explantation rates. Stem cell therapy is a promising option but still requires additional testing. Conclusions The development of new alternatives to artificial urinary sphincter is constantly progressing. Although recently introduced minimally invasive treatment options have not yet surpassed the outcomes of the artificial urinary sphincter they should continue to be evaluated and compared against the gold standard. PMID:26568879

  2. Nutritional support in critically ill patients.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, J P

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The author reviews the newer nutritional substrates in use or under investigation for enteral and parenteral nutrition. Management of the critically ill patient remains a significant challenge to clinicians, and it is hoped that dietary manipulations, such as those outlined, may augment host barriers and immune function and improve survival. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The role of nutrition in patient well-being has long been recognized, but until the past 25 years, the technology to artificially provide nutrients when patients could not eat was not developed. With current, new methods for enteral and vascular access, patients can be fed nonvolitionally with little difficulty. Continued efforts have been directed toward identifying optimal feeding formulations, which have resulted in a multitude of commercially available products. In the past several years, attention has been turned to evaluation of four specialized nutrients and the use of other substrates as pharmacologic agents. METHODS: Pertinent laboratory and clinical data were reviewed to present the pros and cons for each nutritive substrate. CONCLUSIONS: Medium-chain fatty acids, branched-chain amino acids, and glutamine have been shown to be of clinical benefit and should be in common use in the near future. Short-chain fatty acids still are under investigation. Albumin, vitamins E and C, arginine, glutamine, and omega-3 fatty acids show great promise as pharmacologic agents to manipulate the stress response. Nucleotides remain investigational. CONTENTS SUMMARY: The application of some new nutritional substrates for use in critically ill patients, both as caloric sources and as pharmacologic agents, are reviewed. PMID:7979608

  3. Use the Nutrition Facts Label

    MedlinePLUS

    ... For Health Professionals Tools and Resources Promotional Materials Programming Materials Weight Management Nutrition Physical Activity Reduce Screen ... enough of these: potassium, fiber, vitamins A and C, calcium, and iron Use the Percent Daily Value (% ...

  4. Oxidative stress management in the filamentous, heterocystous, diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Anabaena PCC7120.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Manisha; Raghavan, Prashanth S; Ballal, Anand; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, S K

    2013-10-10

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are inevitably generated as by-products of respiratory/photosynthetic electron transport in oxygenic photoautotrophs. Unless effectively scavenged, these ROS can damage all cellular components. The filamentous, heterocystous, nitrogen-fixing strains of the cyanobacterium, Anabaena, serve as naturally abundant contributors of nitrogen biofertilizers in tropical rice paddy fields. Anabaena strains are known to tolerate several abiotic stresses, such as heat, UV, gamma radiation, desiccation, etc., that are known to generate ROS. ROS are detoxified by specific antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutases (SOD), catalases and peroxiredoxins. The genome of Anabaena PCC7120 encodes two SODs, two catalases and seven peroxiredoxins, indicating the presence of an elaborate antioxidant enzymatic machinery to defend its cellular components from ROS. This article summarizes recent findings and depicts important perspectives in oxidative stress management in Anabaena PCC7120. PMID:24122336

  5. Addressing Cultural Contexts in the Management of Stress via Narrative and Mobile Technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Matthew D; Kang, Xiao; Hanrahan, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    In developing applications for stress management and mental health, developers have largely ignored cultural context in design, opting instead to produce apps for a general audience. However, apps designed without a specific population in mind actually have limited reach. Generally stress trackers and socalled "therapists in your pocket", tend to be lost among a jungle of other generic apps that appeal only to the quantified self population and those already predisposed to help-seeking behavior. To reach a broader audience, designing for a specific population may have appeal. The AppHappy Project's Journey to the West is a mobile app being developed by a multidisciplinary group of students at the University of Pennsylvania. The objective is to promote better stress management and mental health among Asian international college students and facilitate their social integration with the general student population. With a prevalence of depression twice that of domestic college students, a reluctance to engage in help-seeking behavior due to stigma, and the challenge of cultural integration, creating interventions for this population requires a different approach to app-mediated therapy. Journey to the West packages bite-sized pieces of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques within the framework of a role-playing game. Every element of its design-from its characters to its art style, from its narrative to its mechanics to its approach to community features-is rooted in a culturally appropriate context. An avatar serves as a surrogate of self while experiencing externalized stressors. Each quest blends therapeutic elements into gameplay with the goal of building resilience towards stressful events. PMID:24875715

  6. Occupational Stress Management and Burnout Interventions in Nursing and Their Implications for Healthy Work Environments: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Nowrouzi, Behdin; Lightfoot, Nancy; Larivičre, Michael; Carter, Lorraine; Rukholm, Ellen; Schinke, Robert; Belanger-Gardner, Diane

    2015-07-01

    This article reports on a literature review of workplace interventions (i.e., creating healthy work environments and improving nurses' quality of work life [QWL]) aimed at managing occupational stress and burnout for nurses. A literature search was conducted using the keywords nursing, nurses, stress, distress, stress management, burnout, and intervention. All the intervention studies included in this review reported on workplace intervention strategies, mainly individual stress management and burnout interventions. Recommendations are provided to improve nurses' QWL in health care organizations through workplace health promotion programs so that nurses can be recruited and retained in rural and northern regions of Ontario. These regions have unique human resources needs due to the shortage of nurses working in primary care. PMID:26084675

  7. Work Stress and Risk Factors For Health Management Trainees in Canakkale, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Tan??man, Beyhan; Cevizci, Sibel; Çelik, Merve; Sevim, Sezgin

    2014-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to investigate the general mental health situation, work-related stress and risk factors of health management trainees. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on Health Management Musters students (N=96) in Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University Health Sciences Institute, May-June 2014. A total of 58 students who voluntarily participated in the study were reached (60.42%). Participants completed a 22-question sociodemographic survey form and a 12-item General Health Questionnaire in a face-to-face interview. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software version 20.0. Results: The average age of participants was 36.4±6.2 (Min:24-Max:62) years. Thirty five of the participants were female (60.3%), 23 were male (39.7%). The number of people using cigarettes and alcohol were 23 (39.7%) and 9 (15.8%) respectively. In our study group according to GHQ scale 32 people (55.2%) were in the group at risk of depression. Eighty-six percent of participants reported experiencing work stress. The most frequently reported sources of stress were superiors (56.8%), work itself (41.3%), and work colleagues (25.8%). There was no significant difference between those at risk of depression and those not at risk in terms of gender, marital status, educational level, age, work-related factors (daily work, computer use, duration of sitting at desk), sleep duration, presence of chronic disease, substance use (cigarettes, alcohol), regular exercise, regular meals, fast-food consumption, sufficient family time and vacations (p>0.05). Conclusions: Our study results indicated that majority of participants reported experiencing work stress with more than half at high risk of developing depression. The most reported risk factors were superiors, the work itself and colleagues in the present study. Psychosocial risk factors at work environment should be investigated in terms of psychological, sociological and ergonomics in more detail to reduce the risk of health management trainees experiencing work stress and mental health problems. PMID:25568633

  8. Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes is a five-class series covering basic nutrition and self-care management

    E-print Network

    Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes is a five-class series covering basic nutrition and self an average of 11 work days each year; women miss about 9 work days. Almost $1 of every $5 spent on health, lower educational and income levels, and poor access to transportation. The annual cost of diabetes

  9. Nutritional epigenetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter is intended to provide a timely overview of the current state of research at the intersection of nutrition and epigenetics. I begin by describing epigenetics and molecular mechanisms of eigenetic regulation, then highlight four classes of nutritional exposures currently being investiga...

  10. Nutritional Epidemiology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although observations on relationships between diet and health have always been recognized—the systematic science of nutritional epidemiology in populations is relatively recent. Important observations propelling the field of nutrition forward were numerous in the 18th and 19th centuries, as it was...

  11. Sports Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houtkooper, Linda; And Others

    This kit provides coaches, physical education teachers, and health professionals with current nutrition information and guidelines for applying that information in classes and athletic training programs. The kit contains four components. A "Key Terms" section provides an index to nutrition-fitness terminology and concepts. The instructional…

  12. Sports Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Health, Jefferson City.

    This guide deals with various aspects of sports and nutrition. Twelve chapters are included: (1) "Sports and Nutrition"; (2) "Eat to Compete"; (3) "Fit Folks Need Fit Food"; (4) "The Food Guide Pyramid"; (5) "Fat Finder's Guide"; (6) "Pre- and Post-Event Meals"; (7) "Tips for the Diabetic Athlete"; (8) "Pinning Down Your Optimal Weight"; (9)…

  13. Nutrition Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Kathy J.; Dawes, Marge

    Included in this booklet are nutrition learning activities intended to help elementary school students acquire knowledge that will enable them to select diets that meet their bodies' needs, both now and in the future. The learning activities correspond to specific nutrition education objectives and are presented separately for students in the…

  14. Stress velopharyngeal incompetence: Two case reports and options for diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Raol, Nikhila; Diercks, Gillian; Hersh, Cheryl; Hartnick, Christopher J

    2015-12-01

    Stress velopharyngeal incompetence (SVPI) commonly affects brass and wind musicians. We present a series of two patients who presented with nasal air emission following prolonged woodwind instrument practice. Neither patient demonstrated audible nasal air emission during speech, but endoscopy revealed localized air escape/bubbling from different sites for each patient with instrument playing only. Both underwent tailored surgical treatment with resolution of symptoms during performance. Diagnosis of SVPI requires examination during the action that induces VPI to allow for directed management. Treatment should be targeted based on nasopharyngoscopy findings. PMID:26531005

  15. [Enteral nutrition in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yutaka

    2014-10-01

    The significance of nutritional management in patients with malignant tumors is under-recognized due to the lack of clear evidence of a direct link with survival rate. However, for cancer patients, with markedly reduced food intake continuing for?7 days or intake of under 60% of estimated energy expenditure for?10 days, as referred to in the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, rapid implementation of nutritional support constitutes a clinically appropriate intervention. With regard to route of administration, as with other conditions, enteral nutritional management is recommended if the gastrointestinal tract is available. The utility of enteral immunonutrition formulae containing eicosapentaenoic acid and other forms of nutritional management has also recently been reported and further studies are anticipated. However, the principles of nutritional management for cancer patients comprise not simply weight increase or improvement in nutritional markers but the maintenance of patient QOL in ways that include alleviation of symptoms and antitumor therapy side-effects, and decreased risk of infection. Administration routes such as percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy should therefore also be discussed from this perspective. PMID:25335700

  16. Stress.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2008-01-01

    We all experience stress as a regular, and sometimes damaging and sometimes useful, part of our daily lives. In our normal ups and downs, we have our share of exhaustion, despondency, and outrage--matched with their corresponding positive moods. But burnout and workaholism are different. They are chronic, dysfunctional, self-reinforcing, life-shortening habits. Dentists, nurses, teachers, ministers, social workers, and entertainers are especially susceptible to burnout; not because they are hard-working professionals (they tend to be), but because they are caring perfectionists who share control for the success of what they do with others and perform under the scrutiny of their colleagues (they tend to). Workaholics are also trapped in self-sealing cycles, but the elements are ever-receding visions of control and using constant activity as a barrier against facing reality. This essay explores the symptoms, mechanisms, causes, and successful coping strategies for burnout and workaholism. It also takes a look at the general stress response on the physiological level and at some of the damage American society inflicts on itself. PMID:18846841

  17. Management of protein-energy wasting in non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease: reconciling low protein intake with nutritional therapy1234

    PubMed Central

    Kovesdy, Csaba P; Kopple, Joel D; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW), characterized by a decline in body protein mass and energy reserves, including muscle and fat wasting and visceral protein pool contraction, is an underappreciated condition in early to moderate stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and a strong predictor of adverse outcomes. The prevalence of PEW in early to moderate CKD is ?20–25% and increases as CKD progresses, in part because of activation of proinflammatory cytokines combined with superimposed hypercatabolic states and declines in appetite. This anorexia leads to inadequate protein and energy intake, which may be reinforced by prescribed dietary restrictions and inadequate monitoring of the patient's nutritional status. Worsening uremia also renders CKD patients vulnerable to potentially deleterious effects of uncontrolled diets, including higher phosphorus and potassium burden. Uremic metabolites, some of which are anorexigenic and many of which are products of protein metabolism, can exert harmful effects, ranging from oxidative stress to endothelial dysfunction, nitric oxide disarrays, renal interstitial fibrosis, sarcopenia, and worsening proteinuria and kidney function. Given such complex pathways, nutritional interventions in CKD, when applied in concert with nonnutritional therapeutic approaches, encompass an array of strategies (such as dietary restrictions and supplementations) aimed at optimizing both patients’ biochemical variables and their clinical outcomes. The applicability of many nutritional interventions and their effects on outcomes in patients with CKD with PEW has not been well studied. This article reviews the definitions and pathophysiology of PEW in patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD, examines the current indications for various dietary modification strategies in patients with CKD (eg, manufactured protein-based supplements, amino acids and their keto acid or hydroxyacid analogues), discusses the rationale behind their potential use in patients with PEW, and highlights areas in need of further research. PMID:23636234

  18. Development of clinical application for a nutritional prescription support system for total parenteral/enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Syuzo; Oka, Ryusho; Uwai, Koji; Matsuda, Yumi; Shiraishi, Tadashi; Nakagawa, Yoshito; Shoji, Tohru; Mihara, Chie; Takeshita, Mitsuhiro; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2009-09-01

    One of the important roles of pharmacists as members of a nutrition support team is nutritional prescription support. We developed a nutritional prescription support system (NPSS) that facilitates prescription support and analysis and evaluated its usefulness in nutritional therapy. An NPSS for prescription support and the management of patient information was created. With this NPSS, the nutritional status was assessed, and, on the basis of the results, such variables as the total energy expenditure were calculated. This system allows prescription support for parenteral nutrition (PN) therapy, enteral nutrition (EN) therapy, and the transition period between them. This system was used for 2 representative patients and evaluated. In a malnourished patient receiving oral warfarin, EN solutions were compared by means of the NPSS, and an appropriate EN solution was selected. In addition, the prothrombin time-international normalized ratio was monitored, and favorable results were obtained regarding the adjustment of the warfarin dose and nutritional management. In a patient with aspiration pneumonia, continuous nutritional management to EN from PN therapy was straightforwardly performed with the NPSS. This NPSS allows rapid, comprehensive nutritional management during the transition period to EN from PN therapy, despite these therapies being considered separately in conventional nutritional management. The NPSS is useful for simplifying prescription support and facilitating information sharing among members of a nutrition support team. PMID:19721384

  19. Animal Nutrition Minor Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences

    E-print Network

    Animal Nutrition Minor Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences 8/19/13 Dr. Pasha Lyvers nutrition is for students who wish to develop a greater understanding of nutritional physiology and fundamentals of nutrition and how to apply basic concepts learned to the management of animals. This minor

  20. Managing aquatic ecosystems and water resources under multiple stress--an introduction to the MARS project.

    PubMed

    Hering, Daniel; Carvalho, Laurence; Argillier, Christine; Beklioglu, Meryem; Borja, Angel; Cardoso, Ana Cristina; Duel, Harm; Ferreira, Teresa; Globevnik, Lidija; Hanganu, Jenica; Hellsten, Seppo; Jeppesen, Erik; Kodeš, Vit; Solheim, Anne Lyche; Nőges, Tiina; Ormerod, Steve; Panagopoulos, Yiannis; Schmutz, Stefan; Venohr, Markus; Birk, Sebastian

    2015-01-15

    Water resources globally are affected by a complex mixture of stressors resulting from a range of drivers, including urban and agricultural land use, hydropower generation and climate change. Understanding how stressors interfere and impact upon ecological status and ecosystem services is essential for developing effective River Basin Management Plans and shaping future environmental policy. This paper details the nature of these problems for Europe's water resources and the need to find solutions at a range of spatial scales. In terms of the latter, we describe the aims and approaches of the EU-funded project MARS (Managing Aquatic ecosystems and water Resources under multiple Stress) and the conceptual and analytical framework that it is adopting to provide this knowledge, understanding and tools needed to address multiple stressors. MARS is operating at three scales: At the water body scale, the mechanistic understanding of stressor interactions and their impact upon water resources, ecological status and ecosystem services will be examined through multi-factorial experiments and the analysis of long time-series. At the river basin scale, modelling and empirical approaches will be adopted to characterise relationships between multiple stressors and ecological responses, functions, services and water resources. The effects of future land use and mitigation scenarios in 16 European river basins will be assessed. At the European scale, large-scale spatial analysis will be carried out to identify the relationships amongst stress intensity, ecological status and service provision, with a special focus on large transboundary rivers, lakes and fish. The project will support managers and policy makers in the practical implementation of the Water Framework Directive (WFD), of related legislation and of the Blueprint to Safeguard Europe's Water Resources by advising the 3rd River Basin Management Planning cycle, the revision of the WFD and by developing new tools for diagnosing and predicting multiple stressors. PMID:25017638

  1. Monitoring nutritional status in the critically ill adult.

    PubMed

    Lakshman, K; Blackburn, G L

    1986-04-01

    Nutritional support is an important aspect of the multidisciplinary approach to critical care medicine. During stress, visceral protein turnover is increased. However, muscle and connective tissue proteolysis is obligatory if the stressful condition persists. Through nutritional support, peripheral protein breakdown is minimized and visceral protein synthesis maximized. A delivery system of 15% to 20% dietary protein, 30% fat, 50% to 55% carbohydrate, complemented by moderate amounts of vitamins and minerals, is considered best. Optimal nutritional care depends on objective assessment of the patient's nutritional status before and during nutritional support, particularly the nutritional status of the body cell mass and the energy required for maintenance and support of reparative processes. Indicators least disturbed by factors should be selected for assessment. Individual indicators vary in critical states. After resuscitation, excess body water may increase body weight; after surgery, stress may depress albumin levels. Biometric markers of nutritional status and measurements that adequately validate and evaluate response to nutritional support are discussed. PMID:3711947

  2. Test Results of a Nb3Sn Wind/React"Stress-Managed" Block Dipole

    SciTech Connect

    McInturff, A.; Blackburn, R.; Diaczenko, N.; Elliott, T.; Henchel, W.; Jaisle, A.; McIntyre, P.; Noyes, P.; Sattarov, A.; Lietzke, A.; Hafalia Jr., R.; Lau, W.; Nyman, M.; Bish, P.

    2007-06-01

    A second phase of a high field dipole technology development has been tested. A Nb{sub 3}Sn block-coil model dipole was fabricated, using magnetic mirror geometry and wind/react coil technology. The primary objective of this phase was to make a first experimental test of the stress-management strategy pioneered at Texas A&M. In this strategy a high-strength support matrix is integrated with the windings to intercept Lorentz stress from the inner winding so that it does not accumulate in the outer winding. The magnet attained a field that was consistent with short sample limit on the first quench; there was no training. The decoupling of Lorentz stress between inner and outer windings was validated. In ramp rate studies the magnet exhibited a remarkable robustness in rapid ramping operation. It reached 85% of short sample(ss) current even while ramping 2-3 T/s. This robustness is attributed to the orientation of the Rutherford cables parallel to the field in the windings, instead of the transverse orientation that characterizes common dipole designs. Test results are presented and the next development phase plans are discussed.

  3. Nutrition status of primary care patients with depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Adrienne K; Williams, Peter G; Deane, Frank P

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the nutrition status of people referred to a nutrition and physical activity program for the management of mental health in general practice. Patients currently being treated for depression and/or anxiety were referred by their GPs to a lifestyle intervention program. The nutrition status was assessed during a comprehensive assessment at the commencement of the program. The lifestyle intervention program, including all assessments, was offered at multiple sites including GP clinics in the Illawarra, and in clinic rooms at the University of Wollongong. Thirty-two men and seventy-seven women completed the assessment. Patients were referred with depression (52%), anxiety (19%) or both (28%). Eighty percent of participants were overweight or obese. All participants completed an assessment that included a diet history, anthropometric measurements and the completion of several questionnaires including the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS). Nutrition status was assessed using mean nutrient intakes and Australian modified Healthy Eating Index scores evaluated against the National Nutrition Survey intakes and DASS scores. Participants met the estimated average requirements for all nutrients except folate (17%), magnesium (78%) and calcium (57%). Intakes were similar to those reported in the National Nutrition Survey. Only magnesium intakes were significantly related to depression (r=-0.26). Australian modified Healthy Eating Index scores were significantly negatively correlated with DASS scores (P<0.01). The associations presented here support the existing body of literature. Nutrition recommendations for patients with depression and anxiety should be based on the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating with particular attention to fruit, vegetables and wholegrains. PMID:22551840

  4. EXERCISE AND STRESS MANAGEMENT TRAINING PRIOR TO HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION: BLOOD AND MARROW TRANSPLANT CLINICAL TRIALS NETWORK (BMT CTN) 0902

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Paul B.; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Jim, Heather; Syrjala, Karen; Wingard, John R.; Logan, Brent; Wu, Juan; Majhail, Navneet S.; Wood, William; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Geller, Nancy L.; Kitko, Carrie; Faber, Edward; Abidi, Muneer H.; Slater, Susan; Horowitz, Mary M.; Lee, Stephanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Studies show that engaging patients in exercise and/or stress management techniques during hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) improves quality of life. The Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network tested the efficacy of training patients to engage in self-directed exercise and stress management during their HCTs. The study randomized 711 patients at 21 centers to receive one of four training interventions before HCT: a self-directed exercise program, a self-administered stress management program, both or neither. Participants completed self-reported assessments at enrollment and up to 180 days after transplant. Randomization was stratified by center and transplant type. There were no differences in the primary endpoints of the physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) component scales of the SF36 at day 100 among the groups based on an intention-to-treat analysis. There were no differences observed in overall survival, hospital days through day 100 post-HCT, or in other patient-reported outcomes, including treatment-related distress, sleep quality, pain, and nausea. Patient randomized to training in stress management reported more use of those techniques; patients randomized to training in exercise did not report more physical activity. Although other studies have reported efficacy of more intensive interventions, brief training in an easy-to-disseminate format for either self-directed exercise or stress management was not effective in our trial. PMID:24910380

  5. Effects of short duration stress management training on self-perceived depression, anxiety and stress in male automotive assembly workers: a quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Edimansyah, BA; Rusli, BN; Naing, L

    2008-01-01

    To examine the effects of short duration stress management training (SMT) on self-perceived depression, anxiety and stress in male automotive assembly workers, 118 male automotive workers from Pekan, Pahang (n = 60, mean age = 40.0 years, SD = 6.67) and Kota Bharu, Kelantan (n = 58, mean age = 38.1 years, SD = 5.86) were assigned to experimental and control group, respectively. A SMT program consisting of aerobic exercise, stress management manual, video session, lecture, question and answer session, and pamphlet and poster session were conducted in the experimental group. A validated short-form Malay version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21) were self-administered before and after the intervention program in the experimental and control group and their time and group interaction effects were examined using the repeated measure ANOVA test. Results indicated that the mean (SD) scores for DASS-Depression (p = 0.036) and DASS-Anxiety (p = 0.011) were significantly decreased, respectively, after the intervention program in the experimental group as compared to the control group (significant time-group interaction effects). No similar effect was observed for the mean (SD) scores for DASS-Stress (p = 0.104). However, the mean (SD) scores for subscales of DASS-Depression (Dysphoria, p = 0.01), DASS-Anxiety (Subjective Anxiety, p = 0.007, Situational Anxiety, p = 0.048), and DASS-Stress (Nervous Arousal, p = 0.018, Easily Upset, p = 0.047) showed significant time and group interaction effects. These findings suggest that short duration SMT is effective in reducing some aspects of self-perceived depression, anxiety and stress in male automotive workers. PMID:19021918

  6. The design of a stress-management programme for nursing personnel.

    PubMed

    Lees, S; Ellis, N

    1990-08-01

    This study identifies the stressors and coping strategies of nursing staff (students, trained staff and those who had left the profession before qualification) in a variety of ward specialisms. The research instruments included an open-ended interview concerning pre-nursing experience, perceived stressors and satisfactions, and ways of coping, and psychometric tests of self-esteem, assertion, ways of coping and personality. The five most frequently cited stressors were understaffing, conflict with nurses, dealing with death and dying, overwork and conflict with doctors. Experience of stressors was related to role and seniority of respondents, with different aspects of the same stressor differentially affecting nurses at different levels of experience. Coping strategies also depended on experience. Trained staff showed more use of problem-focused ways of coping, whilst students and leavers relied more on emotion-focused strategies to deal with stressful situations. These differences were related to personality characteristics of respondents and to self-esteem as well as to situational characteristics of the stressful episode. Social support was important in times of work-related stress, with students in particular making good use of peer group support. Respondents were generally lacking in assertiveness and high in anxiety. Although self-esteem was generally high, leavers scored markedly less than other subject groups in the areas of personal and social self-esteem. Leavers had little prior knowledge or experience of nursing before entering training and knew few nurses or doctors: consequently, nursing failed to meet their expectations. Stress was identified as the major cause of attrition and the sources of stress are identified. This study informed a major programme of stress-management training for student nurses which began in 1988 at the North Wales School of Nursing and which is currently under evaluation. It includes relaxation therapy, assertiveness training, and on-going group discussions which foster peer-group support and which explore the stressors and coping strategies relevant to different stages of training and ward specialisms. PMID:2229692

  7. 7 CFR 246.13 - Financial management system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS SPECIAL SUPPLEMENTAL NUTRITION PROGRAM FOR WOMEN, INFANTS AND CHILDREN State Agency Provisions § 246.13 Financial management...

  8. 7 CFR 227.44 - Management evaluations and reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS NUTRITION EDUCATION AND TRAINING PROGRAM Miscellaneous § 227.44 Management...

  9. Prescribing Optimal Nutrition and Physical Activity as “First-Line” Interventions for Best Practice Management of Chronic Low-Grade Inflammation Associated with Osteoarthritis: Evidence Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Elizabeth; Gormsen Hansen, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    Low-grade inflammation and oxidative stress underlie chronic osteoarthritis. Although best-practice guidelines for osteoarthritis emphasize self-management including weight control and exercise, the role of lifestyle behavior change to address chronic low-grade inflammation has not been a focus of first-line management. This paper synthesizes the literature that supports the idea in which the Western diet and inactivity are proinflammatory, whereas a plant-based diet and activity are anti-inflammatory, and that low-grade inflammation and oxidative stress underlying osteoarthritis often coexist with lifestyle-related risk factors and conditions. We provide evidence-informed recommendations on how lifestyle behavior change can be integrated into “first-line” osteoarthritis management through teamwork and targeted evidence-based interventions. Healthy living can be exploited to reduce inflammation, oxidative stress, and related pain and disability and improve patients' overall health. This approach aligns with evidence-based best practice and holds the promise of eliminating or reducing chronic low-grade inflammation, attenuating disease progression, reducing weight, maximizing health by minimizing a patient's risk or manifestations of other lifestyle-related conditions hallmarked by chronic low-grade inflammation, and reducing the need for medications and surgery. This approach provides an informed cost effective basis for prevention, potential reversal, and management of signs and symptoms of chronic osteoarthritis and has implications for research paradigms in osteoarthritis. PMID:23346399

  10. NUTRITIONAL ASSESSMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutritional assessment is an essential component of the history and physical examination of children with gastrointestinal disorders. Protein-energy malnutrition, linear growth failure, overweight, and iron deficiency anemia frequently complicate the clinical course of common gastrointestinal proble...

  11. The nutrition advisor expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huse, Scott M.; Shyne, Scott S.

    1991-01-01

    The Nutrition Advisor Expert System (NAES) is an expert system written in the C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS). NAES provides expert knowledge and guidance into the complex world of nutrition management by capturing the knowledge of an expert and placing it at the user's fingertips. Specifically, NAES enables the user to: (1) obtain precise nutrition information for food items; (2) perform nutritional analysis of meal(s), flagging deficiencies based upon the U.S. Recommended Daily Allowances; (3) predict possible ailments based upon observed nutritional deficiency trends; (4) obtain a top ten listing of food items for a given nutrient; and (5) conveniently upgrade the data base. An explanation facility for the ailment prediction feature is also provided to document the reasoning process.

  12. Space Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2009-01-01

    Optimal nutrition will be critical for crew members who embark on space exploration missions. Nutritional assessment provides an opportunity to ensure that crewmembers begin their missions in optimal nutritional status, to document changes during a mission and, if necessary, to provide intervention to maintain that status throughout the mission, and to assesses changes after landing in order to facilitate the return to their normal status as soon as possible after landing. We report here the findings from our nutritional assessment of astronauts who participated in the International Space Station (ISS) missions, along with flight and ground-based research findings. We also present ongoing and planned nutrition research activities. These studies provide evidence that bone loss, compromised vitamin status, and oxidative damage are the critical nutritional concerns for space travelers. Other nutrient issues exist, including concerns about the stability of nutrients in the food system, which are exposed to longterm storage and radiation during flight. Defining nutrient requirements, and being able to provide and maintain those nutrients on exploration missions, will be critical for maintaining crew member health.

  13. Fetal nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Franz W.; Turshen, Meredeth

    1970-01-01

    The extensive literature on nutrition in pregnancy is reviewed with special reference to international experience, including observations on nutritional trials in pregnancy, pregnancy during famines caused by war, and studies of birth-weight in relation to pregnancy interval, parity and multiple pregnancies. Recent research on the significance of fetal nutrition suggests that ”small-for-dates” infants, i.e., those that are developmentally retarded in utero, suffer long-term developmental sequelae. A high world-wide incidence of small-for-dates births was reported by the World Health Organization in 1960. Although a definite correlation has been found between socio-economic status and birth-weight, it is not known to what extent the smaller birth-weights observed in the lower socio-economic groups can be improved by specific nutritional measures. In addition to the general advice given on maternal nutrition and family-planning, further studies are needed to determine the precise means of achieving improvement in fetal nutrition and a better outcome of pregnancy. PMID:5314013

  14. Balancing Work and Family Life is a four-part brown bag series designed to support families by providing information for various stages of family life including pregnancy disability benefits, nutrition

    E-print Network

    November 19 / 11:00 a.m. ­ 1:00 p.m. / HUB 367 UCR Child Development Center Time Management Tips Stress IV - Preparing Your Child for College December 2 / 11:00 a.m. ­ 1:00 p.m. / HUB 269 Financial Aid, nutrition and health, time and stress management, and preparing your child for college. Work and Family Life

  15. Fish oil-based lipid emulsion: current updates on a promising novel therapy for the management of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Shishira; Gohel, Tushar; Deen, Omer J.; DeChicco, Robert; Shatnawei, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal failure is characterized by loss of enteral function to absorb necessary nutrients and water to sustain life. Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a lifesaving therapeutic modality for patients with intestinal failure. Lifelong PN is also needed for patients who have short bowel syndrome due to extensive resection or a dysmotility disorder with malabsorption. However, prolonged PN is associated with short-term and long-term complications. Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is one of the long-term complications associated with the use of an intravenous lipid emulsion to prevent essential fatty acid deficiency in these patients. PNALD affects 30–60% of the adult population on long-term PN. Further, PNALD is one of the indications for isolated liver or combined liver and intestinal transplantation. There is no consensus on how to manage PNALD, but fish oil-based lipid emulsion (FOBLE) has been suggested to play an important role both in its prevention and reversal. There is significant improvement in liver function in those who received FOBLE as lipid supplement compared with those who received soy-based lipid emulsion. Studies have also demonstrated that FOBLE reverses hepatic steatosis and reduces markers of inflammation in patients on long-term PN. Future prospective studies with larger sample sizes are needed to further strengthen the positive role of FOBLE in PNALD. PMID:25858884

  16. Community-based nutrition monitoring.

    PubMed

    Campbell, C C

    1989-01-01

    A community-based nutrition monitoring system is an information system to generate, on a regular basis, an integrated picture of the nutritious condition of a community for local decision-makers. Community-based nutrition monitoring is an extension of international nutrition surveillance and national nutrition monitoring work to the community level where much of the substantive nutrition activity happens. It represents a constructive integration of familiar concepts related to needs assessment, evaluation and program management information systems. The objectives of community-based nutrition monitoring are to provide, in a timely manner, information pertinent to program targeting, funding, priority-setting decisions; to inform and educate decision-makers and enhance the visibility of nutrition-related activities in the community and to provide a vehicle for community-wide nutrition planning. Information about food access, the needs of specific life-cycle or risk groups and chronic disease prevention can all be part of a monitoring system. The specific foci of a system depend on the policy and programming decisions actually or potentially made in the specific community. The monitoring system utilizes multiple simple indicators collected routinely and reported on a regular basis. The development of such a system is a multi-year, inter-agency effort. It presents significant challenges and opportunities to local nutritionists. PMID:10293668

  17. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Consumer Approach Strand: Foods and Nutrition. Module I-C-2: Regulatory Agencies Responsible for Wholesomeness and Quality of Foods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mar, Evelyn

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on regulatory agencies responsible for wholesomeness and quality of foods is the second in a set of five modules on consumer education related to foods and nutrition. (This set is part of a larger series of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer…

  18. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Consumer Approach Strand: Foods and Nutrition. Module I-C-1: Technological, Sociological, Ecological, and Environmental Factors Related to Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newsome, Ratana

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on technological, sociological, ecological, and environmental factors related to food is the first in a set of five modules on consumer education related to foods and nutrition. (This set is part of a larger series of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching…

  19. Stress testing on silicon carbide electronic devices for prognostics and health management.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplar, Robert James; Brock, Reinhard C.; Marinella, Matthew; King, Michael Patrick; Smith, Mark A.; Atcitty, Stanley

    2011-01-01

    Power conversion systems for energy storage and other distributed energy resource applications are among the drivers of the important role that power electronics plays in providing reliable electricity. Wide band gap semiconductors such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN) will help increase the performance and efficiency of power electronic equipment while condition monitoring (CM) and prognostics and health management (PHM) will increase the operational availability of the equipment and thereby make it more cost effective. Voltage and/or temperature stress testing were performed on a number of SiC devices in order to accelerate failure modes and to identify measureable shifts in electrical characteristics which may provide early indication of those failures. Those shifts can be interpreted and modeled to provide prognostic signatures for use in CM and/or PHM. Such experiments will also lead to a deeper understanding of basic device physics and the degradation mechanisms behind failure.

  20. Management of ischiopubic stress fracture in patients with anorexia nervosa and excessive compulsive exercising.

    PubMed

    El Ghoch, Marwan; Bazzani, Paola; Dalle Grave, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes a 28-year-old non-athlete female patient with anorexia nervosa who was diagnosed with an ischiopubic ramus stress fracture and treated successfully as an inpatient with a cognitive behaviour-based therapy. The patient's clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment are described, and a brief review of the relevant literature is included. The importance of this case report stems from the rarity of descriptions of this kind of injury in such patients, despite their inherent risk, and the originality of the treatment applied. This, in addition to the usual approach to medical management, exploited specific cognitive and behavioural procedures and strategies to address the patient's excessive compulsive exercising, promoting rest and movement avoidance in order to allow the fracture to heal, while simultaneously addressing the underlying psychopathology. PMID:25301426

  1. An automated data management/analysis system for space shuttle orbiter tiles. [stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, G. L.; Ballas, M.

    1982-01-01

    An engineering data management system was combined with a nonlinear stress analysis program to provide a capability for analyzing a large number of tiles on the space shuttle orbiter. Tile geometry data and all data necessary of define the tile loads environment accessed automatically as needed for the analysis of a particular tile or a set of tiles. User documentation provided includes: (1) description of computer programs and data files contained in the system; (2) definitions of all engineering data stored in the data base; (3) characteristics of the tile anaytical model; (4) instructions for preparation of user input; and (5) a sample problem to illustrate use of the system. Description of data, computer programs, and analytical models of the tile are sufficiently detailed to guide extension of the system to include additional zones of tiles and/or additional types of analyses

  2. Managing Single-Stranded DNA during Replication Stress in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Sabatinos, Sarah A.; Forsburg, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork stalling generates a variety of responses, most of which cause an increase in single-stranded DNA. ssDNA is a primary signal of replication distress that activates cellular checkpoints. It is also a potential source of genome instability and a substrate for mutation and recombination. Therefore, managing ssDNA levels is crucial to chromosome integrity. Limited ssDNA accumulation occurs in wild-type cells under stress. In contrast, cells lacking the replication checkpoint cannot arrest forks properly and accumulate large amounts of ssDNA. This likely occurs when the replication fork polymerase and helicase units are uncoupled. Some cells with mutations in the replication helicase (mcm-ts) mimic checkpoint-deficient cells, and accumulate extensive areas of ssDNA to trigger the G2-checkpoint. Another category of helicase mutant (mcm4-degron) causes fork stalling in early S-phase due to immediate loss of helicase function. Intriguingly, cells realize that ssDNA is present, but fail to detect that they accumulate ssDNA, and continue to divide. Thus, the cellular response to replication stalling depends on checkpoint activity and the time that replication stress occurs in S-phase. In this review we describe the signs, signals, and symptoms of replication arrest from an ssDNA perspective. We explore the possible mechanisms for these effects. We also advise the need for caution when detecting and interpreting data related to the accumulation of ssDNA. PMID:26393661

  3. Test Results of a Nb3Sn Wind/React 'Stress-Managed' BlockDipole

    SciTech Connect

    McInturff, A.; Bish, P.; Blackburn, R.; Diaczenko, N.; Elliott,T.; Hafalia Jr., R.; Henchel, W.; Jaisle, A.; Lau, W.; Lietzke, A.; McIntyre, P.; Noyes, P.; Nyman, M.; Sattarov, A.; Sattarov, A.

    2006-08-25

    A second phase of a highfield dipole technology developmenthas been tested. A Nb3Sn block-coil model dipole was fabricated, usingmagnetic mirror geometry and wind/react coil technology. The primaryobjective of this phase was to make a first experimental test of thestress-management strategy pioneered at Texas A&M. In this strategy ahigh-strength support matrix is integrated with the windings to interceptLorentz stress from the inner winding so that it does not accumulate inthe outer winding. The magnet attained a field that was consistent withshort sample limit on the first quench; there was no training. Thedecoupling of Lorentz stress between inner and outer windings wasvalidated. In ramp rate studies the magnet exhibited a remarkablerobustness in rapid ramping operation. It reached 85 percent of shortsample(ss) current even while ramping 2-3 T/s. This robustness isattributed to the orientation of the Rutherford cables parallel to thefield in the windings, instead of the transverse orientation thatcharacterizes common dipole designs. Test results are presented and thenext development phase plans are discussed.

  4. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  5. Nutritional Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Lane, Helen W.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Adequate nutritional status is critical for maintenance of crew health during extended- duration space flight and postflight rehabilitation. Nutrition issues relate to intake of required nutrients, physiological adaptation to weightlessness, psychological adaptation to extreme environments, and countermeasures to ameliorate the negative effects of space flight. Thus, defining the nutrient requirements for space flight and ensuring provision and intake of those nutrients are critical issues for crew health and mission success. Specialized nutritional requirements have only been considered for what are referred to here as extended- duration flights, i.e., those greater than 30 days in length. While adequate nutrition is important on the 1- to 3-week Shuttle flights, intakes of specific nutrients above or below space specific requirements for this period will not produce cause for concern. Thus, Shuttle flights have always used the recognized nutritional requirements for adult men and women. In this chapter, long-duration flights will be further differentiated into orbital missions (e.g., International Space Station) and interplanetary exploration missions.

  6. Medical Issues: Nutrition

    MedlinePLUS

    ... support & care > living with sma > medical issues > nutrition Nutrition Good nutrition is essential to health and growth. ... must make decisions based on their own needs. Nutrition Considerations Since we are still waiting for clinical ...

  7. [Bone and Nutrition. Nutritional management of osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Hirota, Takako; Hirota, Kenji

    2015-07-01

    Calcium intake was negatively associated with bone resorption marker such as DPD, NTX, and P1NP in Japanese postmenopausal osteoporotic patients. Not only to suppress bone resorption but also to keep higher hip bone mineral density were observed in the patients with higher intake of calcium than 800mg/day and higher vitamin D condition (more than 50nmol/L of serum 25 (OH) D). Higher calcium intake than 800mg/day from dairy and Tofu products, higher intake of vitamin D than 10?g/day from fish, and higher intake of vitamin K from vegetables should be recommended in Japanese postmenopausal osteoporotic patients. We should also pay attention to their losing weight and excess intake of these nutrients from supplements. PMID:26119319

  8. Canadian clinical practice guidelines for the management of anxiety, posttraumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anxiety and related disorders are among the most common mental disorders, with lifetime prevalence reportedly as high as 31%. Unfortunately, anxiety disorders are under-diagnosed and under-treated. Methods These guidelines were developed by Canadian experts in anxiety and related disorders through a consensus process. Data on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment (psychological and pharmacological) were obtained through MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and manual searches (1980–2012). Treatment strategies were rated on strength of evidence, and a clinical recommendation for each intervention was made, based on global impression of efficacy, effectiveness, and side effects, using a modified version of the periodic health examination guidelines. Results These guidelines are presented in 10 sections, including an introduction, principles of diagnosis and management, six sections (Sections 3 through 8) on the specific anxiety-related disorders (panic disorder, agoraphobia, specific phobia, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder), and two additional sections on special populations (children/adolescents, pregnant/lactating women, and the elderly) and clinical issues in patients with comorbid conditions. Conclusions Anxiety and related disorders are very common in clinical practice, and frequently comorbid with other psychiatric and medical conditions. Optimal management requires a good understanding of the efficacy and side effect profiles of pharmacological and psychological treatments. PMID:25081580

  9. Taking Care of You: Body, Mind, Spirit--A Unique Stress Management Program That Improves Lifestyle Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vetter-Smith, Molly; Massey, Vera; Rellergert, Linda; Wissmann, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Taking Care of You: Body, Mind, Spirit is a multi-session group program developed by University of Missouri Extension that provides a unique and practical approach to helping adults better managing their stress and bounce back from life's challenges while improving lifestyle behaviors. The program combines mindfulness and a variety of other…

  10. Stress-wave energy management through material anisotropy Alireza V. Amirkhizi, Aref Tehranian, Sia Nemat-Nasser

    E-print Network

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    follow this gradually changing material direction. A fiber-reinforced composite is used to induceStress-wave energy management through material anisotropy Alireza V. Amirkhizi, Aref Tehranian, Sia Materials, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0416, USA a r t i c l e

  11. Factors Associated with High Use of a Workplace Web-Based Stress Management Program in a Randomized Controlled Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasson, H.; Brown, C.; Hasson, D.

    2010-01-01

    In web-based health promotion programs, large variations in participant engagement are common. The aim was to investigate determinants of high use of a worksite self-help web-based program for stress management. Two versions of the program were offered to randomly selected departments in IT and media companies. A static version of the program…

  12. Cognitive-Behavioral Stress Management Intervention Buffers Distress Responses and Immunologic Changes Following Notification of HIV-1 Seropositivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antoni, Michael H.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Randomly assigned 47 asymptomatic, healthy gay men to cognitive-behavioral stress management condition or assessment-only control group 5 weeks before notification of human immunodeficiency virus antibody status. Individual difference analyses suggest that psychological buffering and immunomodulating effects of treatment may be attributable, in…

  13. Exercise, Diet, and Stress Management as Mediators between Functional Disability and Health-Related Quality of Life in Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Connie; Chiu, Chung-Yi; Lee, Eun-Jeong; Bezyak, Jill; Chan, Fong; Muller, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the mediational and moderational effect of exercise, diet, and stress management on the relationship between functional disability and health-related quality of life. Quantitative descriptive research design using multiple regression and correlation techniques was used. Participants were 215…

  14. Beyond Stress to Effective Management. OSSC Bulletin Vol. 20, Nos. 9 and 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gmelch, Walter H.

    This publication provides an overview of the most recent ideas on psychological stress and ways to reduce it, with particular attention to the impact of stress on administrative personnel. Major sections of the publication focus on the nature of the educational administrator's job, definitions of stress, responses to stress, consequences of…

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi: Oxidative stress induces arginine kinase expression.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Mariana R; Canepa, Gaspar E; Bouvier, Leon A; Pereira, Claudio A

    2006-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi arginine kinase is a key enzyme in cell energy management and is also involved in pH and nutritional stress response mechanisms. T. cruzi epimastigotes treated with hydrogen peroxide presented a time-dependent increase in arginine kinase expression, up to 10-fold, when compared with untreated parasites. Among other oxidative stress-generating compounds tested, only nifurtimox produced more than 2-fold increase in arginine kinase expression. Moreover, parasites overexpressing arginine kinase showed significantly increased survival capability during hydrogen peroxide exposure. These findings suggest the participation of arginine kinase in oxidative stress response systems. PMID:16725140

  16. Firefighter feedback during active cooling: a useful tool for heat stress management?

    PubMed

    Savage, Robbie J; Lord, Cara; Larsen, Brianna L; Knight, Teagan L; Langridge, Peter D; Aisbett, Brad

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring an individual's thermic state in the workplace requires reliable feedback of their core temperature. However, core temperature measurement technology is expensive, invasive and often impractical in operational environments, warranting investigation of surrogate measures which could be used to predict core temperature. This study examines an alternative measure of an individual's thermic state, thermal sensation, which presents a more manageable and practical solution for Australian firefighters operating on the fireground. Across three environmental conditions (cold, warm, hot & humid), 49 Australian volunteer firefighters performed a 20-min fire suppression activity, immediately followed by 20 min of active cooling using hand and forearm immersion techniques. Core temperature (Tc) and thermal sensation (TS) were measured across the rehabilitation period at five minute intervals. Despite the decline in Tc and TS throughout the rehabilitation period, there was little similarity in the magnitude or rate of decline between each measure in any of the ambient conditions. Moderate to strong correlations existed between Tc and TS in the cool (0.41, p<0.05) and hot & humid (0.57, p<0.05) conditions, however this was resultant in strong correlation during the earlier stages of rehabilitation (first five minutes), which were not evident in the latter stages. Linear regression revealed TS to be a poor predictor of Tc in all conditions (SEE=0.45-0.54°C) with a strong trend for TS to over-predict Tc (77-80% of the time). There is minimal evidence to suggest that ratings of thermal sensation, which represent a psychophysical assessment of an individual's thermal comfort, are an accurate reflection of the response of an individual's core temperature. Ratings of thermal sensation can be highly variable amongst individuals, likely moderated by local skin temperature. In account of these findings, fire managers require a more reliable source of information to guide decisions of heat stress management. PMID:25455942

  17. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in total parenteral nutrition dependent children: description of 5 cases and practical tips for management.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Serena; Barbieri, Francesca; Di Leo, Grazia; Valencic, Erica; Tommasini, Alberto; Ventura, Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    Although total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is mandatory in children with intestinal failure, this treatment is not risk free. The main complications of TPN include catheter-related sepsis, thrombosis, hepatic cholestasis and cirrhosis, metabolic bone disease, and, rarely, reactive hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). The pathogenesis of HLH in patients with TPN is not known, although some authors hypothesized that it can result from the activation of macrophages because of "fat overload." We reported 5 cases of HLH that occurred in patients with 4 different underlying disorders, all requiring TPN for a long term. In our series, an underlying immunological defect or a serious infection (sepsis) can have triggered HLH. Therefore, it could be reasonable to hypothesize that besides TPN in itself, minor immune defects and infections may act together by overcoming a threshold of immune stimulation, which ultimately leads to HLH. PMID:23823121

  18. A case study in R and D productivity: Helping the program manager cope with job stress and improve communication effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodensteiner, W. D.; Gerloff, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    Certain structural changes in the Naval Material Command which resulted from a comparison of its operations to those of selected large-scale private sector companies are described. Central to the change was a reduction in the number of formal reports from systems commands to headquarters, and the provision of Program Management Assistance Teams (at the request of the program manager) to help resolve project problems. It is believed that these changes improved communication and information-processing, reduced program manager stress, and resulted in improved productivity.

  19. Multi-Scale Environment For Simulation And Materials Characterization In Stress Management For 3D IC TSV-Based Technologies—Effect Of Stress On The Device Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukharev, Valeriy; Zschech, Ehrenfried

    2011-09-01

    The paper addresses the growing need in a simulation-based design verification flow capable to analyze any design of 3D IC stacks and to determine across-die out-of-spec variations in device electrical characteristics caused by layout and through-silicon-via (TSV)/package-induced mechanical stress. The limited test and characterization capabilities of 3D IC stacks and a strict "good die" requirement make this type of analysis really critical for the achievement of an acceptable level of functional and parametric yield and reliability. The paper focuses on the development of a design-for-manufacturability (DFM) type of methodology for managing mechanical stresses during a sequence of designs of 3D TSV-based dies, stacks and packages. A set of physics-based compact models for a multi-scale simulation, to assess the mechanical stress across the device layers in silicon dies stacked and packaged with the 3D TSV technology, is proposed. A strategy for a materials data generation to feed simulation and a respective materials characterization approach are proposed, with the goal to establish a database for multi-scale materials parameters of wafer-level and package-level structures. A proposal for model validation based and a calibration approach based on fitting the simulation results to measured local stress components and to electrical characteristics of the test-chip devices are discussed.

  20. Nutrition for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2005-01-01

    Nutrition has proven to be critical throughout the history of human exploration, on both land and water. The importance of nutrition during long-duration space exploration is no different. Maintaining optimal nutritional status is critical for all bodily systems, especially in light of the fact that that many are also affected by space flight itself. Major systems of concern are bone, muscle, the cardiovascular system, the immune system, protection against radiation damage, and others. The task ahead includes defining the nutritional requirements for space travelers, ensuring adequacy of the food system, and assessing crew nutritional status before, during, and after flight. Accomplishing these tasks will provide significant contributions to ensuring crew health on long-duration missions. In addition, development and testing of nutritional countermeasures to effects of space flight is required, and assessment of the impact of other countermeasures (such as exercise and pharmaceuticals) on nutrition is also critical for maintaining overall crew health. Vitamin D stores of crew members are routinely low after long-duration space flight. This occurs even when crew members take vitamin D supplements, suggesting that vitamin D metabolism may be altered during space flight. Vitamin D is essential for efficient absorption of calcium, and has numerous other benefits for other tissues with vitamin D receptors. Protein is a macronutrient that requires additional study to define the optimal intake for space travelers. Administration of protein to bed rest subjects can effectively mitigate muscle loss associated with disuse, but too much or too little protein can also have negative effects on bone. In another bed rest study, we found that the ratio of protein to potassium was correlated with the level of bone resorption: the higher the ratio, the more bone resorption. These relationships warrant further study to optimize the beneficial effect of protein on both bone and muscle during space flight. Omega3 fatty acids are currently being studied as a means of protecting against radiation-induced cancer. They have also recently been implicated as having a role in mitigating the physical wasting, or cachexia, caused by cancer. The mechanism of muscle loss associated with this type of cachexia is similar to the mechanism of muscle loss during disuse or space flight. Omega3 fatty acids have already been shown to have protective effects on bone and cardiovascular function. Omega3 fatty acids could be an ideal countermeasure for space flight because they have protective effects on multiple systems. A definition of optimal nutrient intake requirements for long-duration space travel should also include antioxidants. Astronauts are exposed to numerous sources of oxidative stress, including radiation, elevated oxygen exposure during extravehicular activity, and physical and psychological stress. Elevated levels of oxidative damage are related to increased risk for cataracts, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Many groundbased studies show the protective effects of antioxidants against oxidative damage induced by radiation or oxygen. Balancing the diet with foods that have high levels of antioxidants would be another ideal countermeasure because it should have minimal side effects on crew health. Antioxidant supplements, however, are often used without having data on their effectiveness or side effects. High doses of supplements have been associated with bone and cardiovascular problems, but research on antioxidant effects during space flight has not been conducted. Much work must be done before we can send crews on exploration missions. Nutrition is often assumed to be the simple provision of food items that will be stable throughout the mission. As outlined briefly above, the situation is much more complex than food provision. As explorers throughout history have found, failure to truly understand the role of nutrition can be catastrophic. When huns are in environments unlike any they have seen before, this is more true than ever.

  1. Nutrition, diet and immunosenescence.

    PubMed

    Maijó, Mňnica; Clements, Sarah J; Ivory, Kamal; Nicoletti, Claudio; Carding, Simon R

    2014-01-01

    Ageing is characterized by immunosenescence and the progressive decline in immunity in association with an increased frequency of infections and chronic disease. This complex process affects both the innate and adaptive immune systems with a progressive decline in most immune cell populations and defects in activation resulting in loss of function. Although host genetics and environmental factors, such as stress, exercise and diet can impact on the onset or course of immunosenescence, the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. This review focusses on identifying the most significant aspects of immunosenescence and on the evidence that nutritional intervention might delay this process, and consequently improve the quality of life of the elderly. PMID:24373813

  2. Nutritional Needs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dramatic growth of infants during the 1st yr of life (a 3-fold increase in weight; a 50% increase in length) and continued growth, albeit at lower rates, from 1 yr of age through adolescence impose unique nutritional needs. The needs for growth are superimposed on relatively high maintenance nee...

  3. Nutritional requirements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dramatic growth of infants during the first year of life (e.g., a 3-fold increase in weight and a 2-fold increase in length) and continued growth, albeit at lower rates, from a year of age through adolescence impose unique nutritional needs. Moreover, these needs for growth are superimposed on ...

  4. Diet & Nutrition

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and the National School Lunch Program. Meals on Wheels America – Online search tool to locate home-delivered meal programs throughout the U.S. Share Smaller Text Larger Text Print Diet & Nutrition Take Control of Your Weight Portion Control Low Carb Omega-3 Publication Diet ...

  5. Development of relative thermal stress index (RTSI) for Monitoring and Management of Dry Deciduous Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Vijayan, D.

    Gir wildlife sanctuary located between 20 r 57 to 21 r 20 N and 70 r 28 to 71 r 13 E is the last home of Asiatic lions Its biodiversity comprises of 450 recorded flowering plant species 32 species of mammals 26 species of reptiles about 300 species of birds and more than 2000 species of insects As per 1995 census it has 304 lions and 268 leopards The movement of wildlife to thermally comfortable zones to reduce stress conditions forces the changes in management plan with reference to change in localized water demand This necessitates the use of space based thermal data available from AVHRR MODIS etc to monitor temperature of Gir-ecosystem for meso-scale level operational utility As the time scale of the variability of NDVI parameter is much higher than that for lower boundary temperature LBT the dense patch in riverine forest having highest NDVI value would not experience change in its vigour with the change in the season NDVI value of such patch would be near invariant over the year and temperature of this pixel could serve as reference temperature for developing the concept of relative thermal stress index RTSI which is defined as RTSI T p -T r T max -T r wherein T r T max and T p refer to LBT over the maximum NDVI reference point maximum LBT observed in the Gir ecosystem and the temperature of the pixel in the image respectively RTSI images were computed from AVHRR images for post-monsoon leaf-shedded and summer seasons Scatter plot between RTSI and NDVI for summer seasons

  6. Update on stress fractures in female athletes: epidemiology, treatment, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin-Ting; Tenforde, Adam S; Fredericson, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Stress fractures are a common type of overuse injury in athletes. Females have unique risk factors such as the female athlete triad that contribute to stress fracture injuries. We review the current literature on risk factors for stress fractures, including the role of sports participation and nutrition factors. Discussion of the management of stress fractures is focused on radiographic criteria and anatomic location and how these contribute to return to play guidelines. We outline the current recommendations for evaluating and treatment of female athlete triad. Technologies that may aid in recovery from a stress fracture including use of anti-gravity treadmills are discussed. Prevention strategies may include early screening of female athlete triad, promoting early participation in activities that improve bone health, nutritional strategies, gait modification, and orthotics. PMID:23536179

  7. Prevention and optimal management of sarcopenia: a review of combined exercise and nutrition interventions to improve muscle outcomes in older people

    PubMed Central

    Denison, Hayley J; Cooper, Cyrus; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Robinson, Sian M

    2015-01-01

    The growing recognition of sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, has highlighted the need to understand more about its etiology. Declines in muscle mass and strength are expected aspects of aging, but there is significant variability between individuals in rates of loss. Although some of these differences can be explained by fixed factors, such as sex, much of the remaining variation is unexplained. This has led to increasing interest in the influence of adult lifestyle, particularly in the effects of modifiable factors such as physical activity and diet, and in identifying intervention opportunities both to prevent and manage sarcopenia. A number of trials have examined the separate effects of increased exercise or dietary supplementation on muscle mass and physical performance of older adults, but less is known about the extent to which benefits of exercise training could be enhanced when these interventions are combined. In a comprehensive review of the literature, we consider 17 studies of older adults (?65 years) in which combined nutrition and exercise interventions were used to increase muscle strength and/or mass, and achieve improvements in physical performance. The studies were diverse in terms of the participants included (nutritional status, degree of physical frailty), supplementation strategies (differences in nutrients, doses), exercise training (type, frequency), as well as design (duration, setting). The main message is that enhanced benefits of exercise training, when combined with dietary supplementation, have been shown in some trials – indicating potential for future interventions, but that existing evidence is inconsistent. Further studies are needed, particularly of exercise training combined with dietary strategies that increase intakes of a range of nutrients, as well as bioactive non-nutrients, to provide the evidence on which public health and clinical recommendations can be based. PMID:25999704

  8. Do Italian Companies Manage Work-Related Stress Effectively? A Process Evaluation in Implementing the INAIL Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Di Tecco, Cristina; Ronchetti, Matteo; Ghelli, Monica; Russo, Simone; Persechino, Benedetta; Iavicoli, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Studies on Intervention Process Evaluation are attracting growing attention in the literature on interventions linked to stress and the wellbeing of workers. There is evidence that some elements relating to the process and content of an intervention may have a decisive role in implementing it by facilitating or hindering the effectiveness of the results. This study aimed to provide a process evaluation on interventions to assess and manage risks related to work-related stress using a methodological path offered by INAIL. The final sample is composed of 124 companies participating to an interview on aspects relating to each phase of the INAIL methodological path put in place to implement the intervention. INAIL methodology has been defined as useful in the process of assessing and managing the risks related to work-related stress. Some factors related to the process (e.g., implementation of a preliminary phase, workers' involvement, and use of external consultants) showed a role in significant differences that emerged in the levels of risk, particularly in relation to findings from the preliminary assessment. Main findings provide information on the key aspects of process and content that are useful in implementing an intervention for assessing and managing risks related to work-related stress. PMID:26504788

  9. Experiential Virtual Scenarios With Real-Time Monitoring (Interreality) for the Management of Psychological Stress: A Block Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pallavicini, Federica; Morganti, Luca; Serino, Silvia; Scaratti, Chiara; Briguglio, Marilena; Crifaci, Giulia; Vetrano, Noemi; Giulintano, Annunziata; Bernava, Giuseppe; Tartarisco, Gennaro; Pioggia, Giovanni; Raspelli, Simona; Cipresso, Pietro; Vigna, Cinzia; Grassi, Alessandra; Baruffi, Margherita; Wiederhold, Brenda; Riva, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent convergence between technology and medicine is offering innovative methods and tools for behavioral health care. Among these, an emerging approach is the use of virtual reality (VR) within exposure-based protocols for anxiety disorders, and in particular posttraumatic stress disorder. However, no systematically tested VR protocols are available for the management of psychological stress. Objective Our goal was to evaluate the efficacy of a new technological paradigm, Interreality, for the management and prevention of psychological stress. The main feature of Interreality is a twofold link between the virtual and the real world achieved through experiential virtual scenarios (fully controlled by the therapist, used to learn coping skills and improve self-efficacy) with real-time monitoring and support (identifying critical situations and assessing clinical change) using advanced technologies (virtual worlds, wearable biosensors, and smartphones). Methods The study was designed as a block randomized controlled trial involving 121 participants recruited from two different worker populations—teachers and nurses—that are highly exposed to psychological stress. Participants were a sample of teachers recruited in Milan (Block 1: n=61) and a sample of nurses recruited in Messina, Italy (Block 2: n=60). Participants within each block were randomly assigned to the (1) Experimental Group (EG): n=40; B1=20, B2=20, which received a 5-week treatment based on the Interreality paradigm; (2) Control Group (CG): n=42; B1=22, B2=20, which received a 5-week traditional stress management training based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT); and (3) the Wait-List group (WL): n=39, B1=19, B2=20, which was reassessed and compared with the two other groups 5 weeks after the initial evaluation. Results Although both treatments were able to significantly reduce perceived stress better than WL, only EG participants reported a significant reduction (EG=12% vs CG=0.5%) in chronic “trait” anxiety. A similar pattern was found for coping skills: both treatments were able to significantly increase most coping skills, but only EG participants reported a significant increase (EG=14% vs CG=0.3%) in the Emotional Support skill. Conclusions Our findings provide initial evidence that the Interreality protocol yields better outcomes than the traditionally accepted gold standard for psychological stress treatment: CBT. Consequently, these findings constitute a sound foundation and rationale for the importance of continuing future research in technology-enhanced protocols for psychological stress management. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01683617; http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01683617 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6QnziHv3h). PMID:25004803

  10. Nutritional management of the low birth weight/preterm infant in community settings: a perspective from the developing world.

    PubMed

    Imdad, Aamer; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2013-03-01

    Globally, about 20 million infants are born with low birth weight (LBW; <2500 g). Of all LBW infants, approximately 95% are born in developing countries. The greatest incidence of LBW occurs in South-Central Asia; the second greatest is in Africa. The two main reasons for LBW are preterm birth (<37 weeks) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), which are risk factors for increased morbidity and mortality in newborn infants. Maternal nutrition status is one of the most important risk factors for LBW/IUGR. Providing balanced protein energy and multiple micronutrient supplements to pregnant women will reduce incidence of IUGR. Calcium supplementation during pregnancy will reduce the incidence of pre-eclampsia and preterm birth in developing countries. Exclusive breastfeeding is protective for a mother and her infant and has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality in infancy. Kangaroo mother care for preterm infants will reduce severe morbidity and mortality as well. Community-based intervention packages are among the most effective methods of reducing morbidity and mortality in mothers and children. Future research should focus on improving triage of preterm and IUGR infants. Exclusive breastfeeding should be promoted, and appropriate alternative food supplements should be provided when breastfeeding is not possible. PMID:23445841

  11. Managing sales of beverages in schools to preserve profits and improve children's nutrition intake in 15 Mississippi schools.

    PubMed

    Brown, Denise M; Tammineni, Suresh K

    2009-12-01

    School environments that provide consistent and reliable nutrition information promote the development of healthful eating in children. High-energy, nutrient-poor beverages offered for sale to children during the school day compete with healthful choices. The primary objective of this prospective, quasiexperimental study was to encourage children to choose more healthful beverages during the school day without adversely affecting the profits realized from vending sales. Fifteen of 18 schools completed voluntary changes to beverage sales practices during the school day between August 2005 and May 2006. Twelve of 15 schools reported increased profits from the previous year (2004-2005) while offering more healthful beverage choices at discounted prices. Units of carbonated soft drinks sold declined when sports drinks, 100% fruit juice, and water were made available in their place. Passive marketing in the form of vending machine fronts, attractive pricing with a nominal 10% to 25% discount, and changing the types and proportions of beverages offered encouraged children to make more healthful choices. Local school administrators were receptive to making changes to beverage sales when local needs were incorporated into the study design. Profit information from this study informed state legislators and the Mississippi State Board of Education in the development and adoption of statewide snack and beverage vending guidelines. Registered dietitians serve as advocates to foster these collaborative efforts, inform key decision makers, and work in their local communities to develop and promote healthful practices in K-12 school settings. PMID:19942021

  12. Nutrition in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Recasens, M A Asunción; Puig, Celia; Ortiz-Santamaria, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a connective tissue disease characterized by inflammation and fibrosis of multiple organs (skin, gastrointestinal tract, lung, kidney and heart). After the skin, the organ most affected with a frequency of 75 to 90%, the gastrointestinal tract is more often involved. Gastrointestinal tract involvement is manifested by the appearance of oropharyngeal dysphagia, esophageal dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, gastroparesis, pseudo-obstruction, bacterial overgrowth and intestinal malabsorption, constipation, diarrhea and/or fecal incontinence. These effects influence food intake and intestinal absorption leading to the gradual emergence of nutritional deficiencies. About 30% of patients with systemic sclerosis are at risk of malnutrition. In 5-10%, gastrointestinal disorders are the leading cause of death. Therapeutic strategies currently available are limited and aimed at reducing clinical symptoms. The multidisciplinary management of these patients, including nutritional intervention, helps improve gastrointestinal symptoms, and avoid malnutrition, morbidity and improve quality of life. PMID:22197834

  13. Managing Perceived Stress among College Students: The Roles of Social Support and Dysfunctional Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Ruth Chu-Lien

    2012-01-01

    The author examined the conditions (i.e., social support and dysfunctional coping) under which perceived stress predicted psychological well-being in 459 college students. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated a significant 2-way interaction (Perceived Stress x Social Support) and a significant 3-way interaction (Perceived Stress x Social…

  14. Managing Stress and Maintaining Well-Being: Social Support, Problem-Focused Coping, and Avoidant Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Ruth Chu-Lien

    2011-01-01

    This study tested a model that links stress, social support, problem-focused coping, and well-being. First, it looks at how high support significantly moderated the association between stress and well-being. Next, the students' problem-focused coping was seen as mediating this moderated association. Finally, a 3-way interaction of stress, social…

  15. Nutritional stress in Northern gannets during an unprecedented low reproductive success year: can extreme sea surface temperature event and dietary change be the cause?

    PubMed

    Franci, Cynthia D; Vézina, François; Grégoire, François; Rail, Jean-François; Verreault, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Reproductive success of seabirds is tightly associated with availability of their prey for which the spatiotemporal distribution may be influenced by sea surface temperature (SST) fluctuations. The objective of this study was to investigate whether Northern gannets (Morus bassanus) from the largest colony in North America (Bonaventure Island, Quebec, Canada) were in negative nutritional state during the unprecedented low reproductive success year of 2012, and whether this was associated with changes in SST anomalies and diet. The incubation period of gannets in 2012 was characterized by a significant decline, from early to late incubation, in plasma triglyceride levels that was associated with an increase in plasma corticosterone levels. However, no changes in plasma glycerol and ?-hydroxybutyrate levels were noted. SST anomalies recorded in this area (south of the Gulf of St. Lawrence) during the breeding period were consistently higher in 2012 compared to the previous year (a better reproductive success year). Based on signatures of stable carbon (?(13)C) and nitrogen (?(15)N) isotopes in gannet red blood cells and in whole fish homogenates of three major preys (mackerel, herring, and capelin), a minor dietary shift was noted between those years and incubation periods. In light of these findings, it is suggested that the extreme warm-water perturbation event that prevailed in the Gulf of St. Lawrence during summer 2012 was associated with a rapid deterioration of nutritional condition of Bonaventure Island gannets during the incubation. These suboptimal physiological changes likely contributed to the dramatic decline in reproductive success reported in this colony. PMID:25449633

  16. Process and outcome evaluation of an organizational-level stress management intervention in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Gregor J; Brauchli, Rebecca; Inauen, Alice; Füllemann, Désirée; Fridrich, Annemarie; Bauer, Georg F

    2015-09-01

    This field study evaluates the process and outcome of an organizational-level stress management intervention (SMI) in eight companies, taking into account the lessons learned from previous evaluation research. It utilizes the RE-AIM evaluation framework to capture the Reach and Adoption of the intervention in the companies, the appraisal of the Implementation process and the project's Effectiveness and Maintenance with a range of qualitative and quantitative methods. It applies an adapted research design in the context of a field study involving entire organizations, retrospectively assigning study participants to comparison groups. The results of a longitudinal analysis (n = 1400) showed that the SMI had a positive impact on the participants' job demands and resources, when controlled for baseline levels. Qualitative data analysis revealed that the companies had built capacities for ongoing health promotion and showed what issues must be borne in mind when implementing such projects. The study also showed that participation in such interventions alone does not suffice to achieve the desired impact, but that the individual participants' appraisal of the intervention and the collective involvement of the teams must be further researched to fully understand how change occurs. PMID:24395958

  17. Modulation of the Maladaptive Stress Response to Manage Diseases of Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Daniela Martino; Hutt, Darren M.; Tong, Jiansong; Bouchecareilh, Marion; Wang, Ning; Seeley, Theo; Dekkers, Johanna F.; Beekman, Jeffrey M.; Garza, Dan; Drew, Lawrence; Masliah, Eliezer; Morimoto, Richard I.; Balch, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Diseases of protein folding arise because of the inability of an altered peptide sequence to properly engage protein homeostasis components that direct protein folding and function. To identify global principles of misfolding disease pathology we examined the impact of the local folding environment in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NPC1), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and cystic fibrosis (CF). Using distinct models, including patient-derived cell lines and primary epithelium, mouse brain tissue, and Caenorhabditis elegans, we found that chronic expression of misfolded proteins not only triggers the sustained activation of the heat shock response (HSR) pathway, but that this sustained activation is maladaptive. In diseased cells, maladaptation alters protein structure–function relationships, impacts protein folding in the cytosol, and further exacerbates the disease state. We show that down-regulation of this maladaptive stress response (MSR), through silencing of HSF1, the master regulator of the HSR, restores cellular protein folding and improves the disease phenotype. We propose that restoration of a more physiological proteostatic environment will strongly impact the management and progression of loss-of-function and gain-of-toxic-function phenotypes common in human disease. PMID:25406061

  18. Nutritional assessment in children with cystic fibrosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimal nutrition, including consuming 35–40% of calories (kcal) as fat, is a vital part of the management of cystic fibrosis (CF), and involves accurate assessment of dietary intake. We compared 3 methods of nutritional assessment in 8– to 14-year-old children (n=20) with CF: 1) a 24-h Dietary Reca...

  19. Nutritional Biochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the effects that space flight has on humans nutritional biochemistry. Particular attention is devoted to the study of protein breakdown, inflammation, hypercatabolism, omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin D, calcium, urine, folate and nutrient stability of certain vitamins, the fluid shift and renal stone risk, acidosis, iron/hematology, and the effects on bone of dietary protein, potassium. inflammation, and omega-3 fatty acids

  20. Nutrition and Health in Amphibian Husbandry

    PubMed Central

    Ferrie, Gina M.; Alford, Vance C.; Atkinson, Jim; Baitchman, Eric; Barber, Diane; Blaner, William S.; Crawshaw, Graham; Daneault, Andy; Dierenfeld, Ellen; Finke, Mark; Fleming, Greg; Gagliardo, Ron; Hoffman, Eric A.; Karasov, William; Klasing, Kirk; Koutsos, Elizabeth; Lankton, Julia; Lavin, Shana R.; Lentini, Andrew; Livingston, Shannon; Lock, Brad; Mason, Tom; McComb, Alejandra; Morris, Cheryl; Pessier, Allan P.; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Probst, Tom; Rodriguez, Carlos; Schad, Kristine; Semmen, Kent; Sincage, Jamie; Stamper, M. Andrew; Steinmetz, Jason; Sullivan, Kathleen; Terrell, Scott; Wertan, Nina; Wheaton, Catharine J.; Wilson, Brad; Valdes, Eduardo V.

    2015-01-01

    Amphibian biology is intricate, and there are many inter-related factors that need to be understood before establishing successful Conservation Breeding Programs (CBPs). Nutritional needs of amphibians are highly integrated with disease and their husbandry needs, and the diversity of developmental stages, natural habitats, and feeding strategies result in many different recommendations for proper care and feeding. This review identifies several areas where there is substantial room for improvement in maintaining healthy ex situ amphibian populations specifically in the areas of obtaining and utilizing natural history data for both amphibians and their dietary items, achieving more appropriate environmental parameters, understanding stress and hormone production, and promoting better physical and population health. Using a scientific or research framework to answer questions about disease, nutrition, husbandry, genetics, and endocrinology of ex situ amphibians will improve specialists’ understanding of the needs of these species. In general, there is a lack of baseline data and comparative information for most basic aspects of amphibian biology as well as standardized laboratory approaches. Instituting a formalized research approach in multiple scientific disciplines will be beneficial not only to the management of current ex situ populations, but also in moving forward with future conservation and reintroduction projects. This overview of gaps in knowledge concerning ex situ amphibian care should serve as a foundation for much needed future research in these areas. PMID:25296396

  1. Does a Community-Based Stress Management Intervention Affect Psychological Adaptation Among Underserved Black Breast Cancer Survivors?

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Nicole E.; Vargas, Sara; Annane, Debra W.; Robertson, Belinda R.; Carver, Charles S.; Kobetz, Erin; Antoni, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Background In this randomized trial, Project CARE, we examined whether participation in a cognitive-behavioral stress management and breast cancer wellness and education program improved psychological outcomes among a sample of underserved black breast cancer survivors. Methods Both complementary medicine interventions were 10-sessions, manualized, group-based, and were culturally adapted for black women in the community from evidence-based interventions. Participants were 114 black women (mean age = 51.1, 27–77 years) who had completed breast cancer treatment 0–12 months before enrollment (stages 0–IV, mean time since cancer diagnosis = 14.1 months). Women were enrolled upon completion of curative treatment (ie, surgical, chemotherapy, radiation oncology) and randomized to receive cognitive-behavioral stress management or cancer wellness and education program. Results There was a remarkable 95% retention rate from baseline to 6-month follow-up. Participants in both conditions showed statistically significant improvement on indices of psychological well-being, including overall quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast), intrusive thoughts (Impact of Event Scale-Revised), depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression), and stress levels (Perceived Stress Scale) over the 6-month postintervention follow-up (all repeated measures analysis of variance within-subjects time effects: P < .05, except for overall mood; Profile of Mood States-Short Version). Contrary to hypotheses, however, condition × time effects were not statistically significant. Conclusions Findings suggest that improvements in multiple measures over time may have been due to intensive training in stress management, extensive provision of breast cancer information, or participation in an ongoing supportive group of individuals from a similar racial background. Implications bear on decisions about appropriate control groups, the timing of intervention delivery during the treatment trajectory, and perceived support from the research team. PMID:25749598

  2. Development of the Nutrition and Swallowing Checklist, a Screening Tool for Nutrition Risk and Swallowing Risk in People with Intellectual Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Lyn

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses nutrition problems in people with intellectual disabilities, the need for nutrition risk screening, and the development of the Nutrition and Swallowing Checklist in New South Wales. The checklist ensures carer involvement in identifying risks and an interdisciplinary approach to the assessment and management of nutrition and…

  3. Construction challenges and solutions in TAMU3, a 14 T stress-managed Nb3Sn dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holik, E. F.; Garrison, R.; Diaczenko, N.; Elliott, T.; Jaisle, A.; McInturff, A. D.; McIntyre, P.; Sattarov, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Accelerator Research Laboratory at Texas A&M University is nearing completion of a Nb3Sn dipole that incorporates stress management directly in its windings. The windings utilize graded-cross-section cable made from 54/61 (54 out of a 61 subelement hexagonal pattern) Restacked Rod Processed® Nb3Sn/Cu conductor and fine-filament S-2 glass fabric insulation. Coil heat treatment and associated differential expansions have brought about some tin leakage, highresistance electrical shorts, and coil gaps. TAMU3b impregnation successfully increased the coil-to-ground resistance. Quench protection in TAMU3 was simulated using QUENCH. The tests of TAMU3 should provide the first examination of stress management at field intensities greater than 12 T.

  4. Construction challenges and solutions in TAMU3, a 14 T stress-managed Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Holik, E. F.; Garrison, R.; Diaczenko, N.; Elliott, T.; Jaisle, A.; McInturff, A. D.; McIntyre, P.; Sattarov, A.

    2014-01-29

    The Accelerator Research Laboratory at Texas A and M University is nearing completion of a Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole that incorporates stress management directly in its windings. The windings utilize graded-cross-section cable made from 54/61 (54 out of a 61 subelement hexagonal pattern) Restacked Rod Processed® Nb{sub 3}Sn/Cu conductor and fine-filament S-2 glass fabric insulation. Coil heat treatment and associated differential expansions have brought about some tin leakage, highresistance electrical shorts, and coil gaps. TAMU3b impregnation successfully increased the coil-to-ground resistance. Quench protection in TAMU3 was simulated using QUENCH. The tests of TAMU3 should provide the first examination of stress management at field intensities greater than 12 T.

  5. Nutrition in pediatrics: basic science and clinical applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The first edition of Nutrition in Pediatrics: Basic Science and Clinical Applications was published in 1985 to "...offer a comprehensive review of general concepts of nutrition as they pertain to pediatrics as well as relevant information on the nutritional management of specific disease states." A ...

  6. Queens College Department of Family, Nutrition, and Exercise

    E-print Network

    Engel, Robert

    Queens College Department of Family, Nutrition, and Exercise Major: Family and Consumer Sciences. * FNES 153: Family Resource Management 3 cr. (L) FNES 163: General Nutrition OR 3 cr. FNES 263 (CHEM 102.3&102 Prereq.) and 264 Nutrition (FNES 263 Prereq.) 6 cr. * FNES 248: Problems in Marriage and Family (FNES 147

  7. ["Symptomatic Treatment of Delirium, Anxiety and Stress, and Protocol Based Analgesia, Sedation and Management of Sleep in Intensive Care Patients"].

    PubMed

    Müller, Anika; Weiß, Björn; Spies, Claudia D

    2015-11-01

    Critically ill patients suffer from anxiety, stress, pain, sleep disturbance and delirium. The updated version of the German evidence and consensus based guideline "Analgesia, Sedation and Delirium management in Intensive Care - DAS 2015" contributes an improved therapeutic management and is aimed to improve clinical outcome based on the current state of evidence. The task force members were representatives from 17 national medical societies therefore have consented following guiding principle in common: "Patients in intensive care shall be awake, alert and free of pain, anxiety and delirium, to be able to participate in the healing process actively." PMID:26650949

  8. School-based nutrition education: lessons learned and new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rodrigo, C; Aranceta, J

    2001-02-01

    Nutrition is a major environmental influence on physical and mental growth and development in early life. Food habits during infancy can influence preferences and practices in later life and some evidence suggests fair to moderate tracking of food habits from childhood to adolescence. Studies support that good nutrition contributes to improving the wellbeing of children and their potential learning ability, thus contributing to better school performance. Children and young people who learn healthy eating habits, are encouraged to be physically active, to avoid smoking and to learn to manage stress, have the potential for reduced impact of chronic diseases in adulthood. Nutrition education is a key element to promoting lifelong healthy eating and exercise behaviours and should start from the early stages of life; it should also address the specific nutritional needs associated with pregnancy, including reinforcing breastfeeding. Food habits are complex in nature and multiple conditioning factors interact in their development. Young children do not choose what they eat, but their parents decide and prepare the food for them. During infancy and early childhood the family is a key environment for children to learn and develop food preferences and eating habits. As they grow and start school, teachers, peers and other people at school, together with the media and social leaders, become more important. Progressively children become more independent and start making their own food choices. The peer group is very important for adolescents and has a major influence in developing both food habits and lifestyles. Community trials suggest that nutrition education is an accessible effective tool in health promotion programmes with a focus on the development of healthy eating practices. PMID:11255503

  9. Discovering Vegetables: The Nutrition Education Guidebook for School Food Service Managers and Cooperators for use with Children Ages 5 through 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Nutrition Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This booklet is designed to help school food service personnel to familiarize young school children with a variety of cooked and raw vegetables. The nutritional importance of vegetables in children's diets is emphasized. Learning activities which focus on the visual qualities, nutritional value, and taste characteristics of different vegetables…

  10. Diagnosis and Management of Sleep Disorders in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder:A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mohsenin, Shahla

    2014-01-01

    Objective: International and societal conflicts and natural disasters can leave physical and mental scars in people who are directly affected by these traumatic experiences. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is the clinical manifestation of these experiences in the form of re-experiencing the trauma, avoidance of trauma-related stimuli, and persistent symptoms of hyperarousal. There is growing evidence that sleep disruption that occurs following trauma exposure may in fact contribute to the pathophysiology of PTSD and poor clinical outcomes. The purpose of this review is to highlight the importance of recognition and management of sleep disorders in patients with PTSD. Data Sources: English-language, adult research studies published between 1985 and April 2014 were identified via the PubMed database. The search terms used were PTSD AND sleep disorders. Study Selection: The search identified 792 original and review articles. Of these, 53 articles that discussed or researched sleep disorders in PTSD were selected. Fourteen randomized controlled trials of therapy for PTSD are included in this review. Results: Impaired sleep is a common complaint mainly in the form of nightmares and insomnia among people with PTSD. Sleep apnea and periodic limb movement disorder are particularly prevalent in patients with PTSD and, yet, remain unrecognized. Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are effective in improving PTSD global symptoms, they have a variable and modest effect on sleep disorder symptoms. Cognitive-behavioral treatment targeted to sleep and/or the use of the centrally acting selective ?1 antagonist prazosin have been more successful in treating insomnia and nightmares in PTSD than other classes of medications. In view of the high occurrence of sleep apnea and periodic leg movement disorder, a thorough sleep evaluation and treatment are warranted. Conclusions: Patients with PTSD have a high prevalence of sleep disorders and should be queried for insomnia, nightmares, periodic limb movement disorder, and sleep-disordered breathing. PMID:25834768

  11. Nutrition and Diet

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A-Wish Perspectives Newsletter Translated brochures Relevant Links Nutrition and Diet Nutritional deficiencies are common in thalassemia, ... gamma tocopherol, plasma ascorbate, and serum folate. (See nutrition table below.) Recommendations for dietary supplementation should be ...

  12. Food and Nutrition Service

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find A Report SNAP WIC Food Distribution Programs Food Security Nutrition Education Program Integrity Child Nutrition Programs Demos/Grant Projects FNS Strategic Plan Other Resources Food & Nutrition Information Center National Agriculture Library National Collaborative ...

  13. Nutritional effects of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Falck-Ytter, Y; McCullough, A J

    2000-08-01

    Alcohol is the most frequently used drug worldwide and remains a socially acceptable hepatotoxin. Although the toxic effects of alcohol on various organs (liver, pancreas, heart, and intestine) are well recognized, the role of alcohol in overall energy and protein metabolism is less well understood. In particular, the efficiency of alcohol as a source of calories and as a substrate for energy production appears to be influenced by the amount of both alcohol and fat consumption as well as by gender. The relationship between alcohol intake and body weight is complex, but it is a clinical dilemma with important nutritional implications for weight management in addition to specific organ toxicity. PMID:10981033

  14. Nutrition of aging cats.

    PubMed

    Laflamme, Dottie; Gunn-Moore, Daničlle

    2014-07-01

    At least one-third of cats seen by veterinarians are mature, defined as 7 years of age or older, and approximately 13% of cats are geriatric, defined as 12 years of age or older. The article reviews physiologic differences between these life stages and relates the changes to nutritional needs. Geriatric cats have increased requirements for dietary energy and protein. Feeding management addresses what, when, how, and where food is provided. This article provides an update on diet-sensitive conditions, including cognitive dysfunction, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, osteoarthritis, and hyperthyroidism. Although guidelines are provided, patients must be evaluated and fed according to their individual needs. PMID:24951345

  15. Standardised Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Simmer, Karen; Rakshasbhuvankar, Abhijeet; Deshpande, Girish

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) has become an integral part of clinical management of very low birth weight premature neonates. Traditionally different components of PN are prescribed individually considering requirements of an individual neonate (IPN). More recently, standardised PN formulations (SPN) for preterm neonates have been assessed and may have advantages including better provision of nutrients, less prescription and administration errors, decreased risk of infection, and cost savings. The recent introduction of triple-chamber bag that provides total nutrient admixture for neonates may have additional advantage of decreased risk of contamination and ease of administration. PMID:23538938

  16. Influence of nitrogen nutrition management on biomass partitioning and nitrogen use efficiency indices in hydroponically grown potato.

    PubMed

    Goins, Gregory D; Yorio, Neil C; Wheeler, Raymond M

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been conducting controlled environment research with potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) in recirculating nutrient film technique (NFT)-hydroponic systems as a human life support component during long-duration spaceflight. Standard nutrient solution management approaches include constant pH regulation with nitric acid (HNO3) and daily adjustment of electrical conductivity (EC) equivalent to half-strength modified Hoagland's solution, where nitrate (NO3-) is the sole nitrogen (N) source. Although tuber yields have been excellent with such an approach, N use efficiency indices are expected to be low relative to tuber biomass production. Furthermore, the high amount of N used in NFT-hydroponics, typically results in high inedible biomass, which conflicts with the need to minimize system mass, volume, and expenditure of resources for long-duration missions. More effective strategies of N fertilization need to be developed to more closely match N supply with demand of the crop. Hence, the primary objective of this study was to identify the optimal N management regime and plant N requirement to achieve high yields and to avoid inefficient use of N and excess inedible biomass production. In separate 84-day cropping experiments, three N management protocols were tested. Treatments which decreased NO3(-)-N supply indirectly through lowering nutrient solution EC (Expt. I), or disabling pH control, and/or supplying NH4(+)-N (Expt. III) did not significantly benefit tuber yield, but did influence N use efficiency indices. When supplied with an external 7.5 mM NO3(-)-N for the first 42 days after planting (DAP), lowered to 1.0 mM NO3(-)-N during the final 42 days (Expt. II), plants were able to achieve yields on par with plants which received constant 7.5 mM NO3(-)-N (control). By abruptly decreasing N supply at tuber initiation in Expt. II, less N was taken up and accumulated by plants compared to those which received high constant N (control). However, proportionately more plant accumulated N was used (N use efficiency) to produce tuber biomass when N supply was abruptly lowered at tuber initiation in Expt. II. Hence, a hydroponic nutrient solution N management system may be modified to elicit greater plant N-use while maintaining overall high tuber yield as opposed to achieving high tuber yields through excess N supply and shoot growth. PMID:15880890

  17. Influence of nitrogen nutrition management on biomass partitioning and nitrogen use efficiency indices in hydroponically grown potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goins, Gregory D.; Yorio, Neil C.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been conducting controlled environment research with potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) in recirculating nutrient film technique (NFT)-hydroponic systems as a human life support component during long-duration spaceflight. Standard nutrient solution management approaches include constant pH regulation with nitric acid (HNO3) and daily adjustment of electrical conductivity (EC) equivalent to half-strength modified Hoagland's solution, where nitrate (NO3-) is the sole nitrogen (N) source. Although tuber yields have been excellent with such an approach, N use efficiency indices are expected to be low relative to tuber biomass production. Furthermore, the high amount of N used in NFT-hydroponics, typically results in high inedible biomass, which conflicts with the need to minimize system mass, volume, and expenditure of resources for long-duration missions. More effective strategies of N fertilization need to be developed to more closely match N supply with demand of the crop. Hence, the primary objective of this study was to identify the optimal N management regime and plant N requirement to achieve high yields and to avoid inefficient use of N and excess inedible biomass production. In separate 84-day cropping experiments, three N management protocols were tested. Treatments which decreased NO3(-)-N supply indirectly through lowering nutrient solution EC (Expt. I), or disabling pH control, and/or supplying NH4(+)-N (Expt. III) did not significantly benefit tuber yield, but did influence N use efficiency indices. When supplied with an external 7.5 mM NO3(-)-N for the first 42 days after planting (DAP), lowered to 1.0 mM NO3(-)-N during the final 42 days (Expt. II), plants were able to achieve yields on par with plants which received constant 7.5 mM NO3(-)-N (control). By abruptly decreasing N supply at tuber initiation in Expt. II, less N was taken up and accumulated by plants compared to those which received high constant N (control). However, proportionately more plant accumulated N was used (N use efficiency) to produce tuber biomass when N supply was abruptly lowered at tuber initiation in Expt. II. Hence, a hydroponic nutrient solution N management system may be modified to elicit greater plant N-use while maintaining overall high tuber yield as opposed to achieving high tuber yields through excess N supply and shoot growth.

  18. Comprehensive Cancer Center Nutrition

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Paul R.

    Comprehensive Cancer Center Nutrition Bldg.Pedestrian Link from Ardmore Tower to Comprehensive Nutrition Education Wing Hanes Bldg. Gray Bldg. Library Creative Communications University Dental Associates

  19. Stress Management through Written Emotional Disclosure Improves Academic Performance among College Students with Physical Symptoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumley, Mark A.; Provenzano, Kimberly M.

    2003-01-01

    Tests whether writing about stressful events improves grade point averages (GPAs) and whether decreases in writing-induced negative mood from the first to last day of writing predicts GPA improvements. Results reveal that writing about general life stress leads to improved academic functioning, particularly among those who become less distressed…

  20. Relax for Success: An Educator's Guide to Stress Management. [With CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanz, Jeffrey

    This book is designed as a practical, concise, easy-to-read guide for relieving stress. It is written specifically for educators, with examples and anecdotes that relate to professional educators' experiences. It assumes a holistic approach to stress relief that incorporates thought, verbal and action strategies and techniques. The harm that…

  1. An Academic Approach to Stress Management for College Students in a Conventional Classroom Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnahan, Robert E.; And Others

    Since the identification of stress and the relationship of individual stress responses to physical and mental health, medical and behavioral professionals have been training individuals in coping strategies. To investigate the possibility of teaching cognitive coping skills to a nonclinical population in an academic setting, 41 college students…

  2. An Exploration of the Central Factors Influencing Teachers' Stress Management in Urban Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Kristen Lee

    2011-01-01

    In 1999, it was estimated that 50% of new teachers leave urban districts in less than five years. New urban teachers face a host of demands that can contribute towards stress and burnout. While some of the literature has focused upon teacher stress, to date none has focused upon new teachers who are enrolled in alternative licensure programs with…

  3. Providing Psychological Intervention Following Traumatic Events: Understanding and Managing Psychologists' Own Stress Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Ben; Frederickson, Norah

    2008-01-01

    The role of the educational psychology service in crisis support is well established. This paper examines a key aspect of this role, the impact on psychologists themselves, and reviews literature on secondary stress, considering the term "stress" itself as part of the discussion. It examines recommendations for professional practice and self care…

  4. The Influence of ?-Lipoic Acid and Garlic Administration on Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Rabbits Exposed to Oxidized Nutrition Oils

    PubMed Central

    Zalejska-Fiolka, Jolanta; Wielkoszy?ski, Tomasz; Rokicki, Wojciech; D?browska, Natalia; Strzelczyk, Joanna Katarzyna; Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Owczarek, Aleksander; B?aszczyk, Urszula; Kasperczyk, S?awomir; Stawiarska-Pi?ta, Barbara; Birkner, Ewa; Gamian, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that addition of substances with antioxidant activity could decrease the concentrations of biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammatory process, thus inhibiting nonalcoholic steatohepatitis development. We investigated the influence of ?-lipoic acid (ALA) and garlic administration on the development of adverse changes in rabbit liver and serum under oxidative stress conditions induced with HFD from oxidized oils. We determined 8-hydroxy-2?-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in liver homogenates, total oxidant status (TOS), lipid peroxides (LOO) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF?) in blood serum, and TNF? and IL-1? genes expression in liver. The results indicate that the intake of dietary ALA and garlic was significantly associated with decreases of 8OHdG and MDA levels in rabbits' liver tissue as well as TOS and LOO levels in rabbits' serum. Similarly, TNF? and IL-1? gene expressions were suppressed due to ALA and garlic supplementation. The histopathological analysis confirmed that HFD results in liver disorder leading to steatosis. This adverse effect of HFD was ameliorated by the supplementation of ALA and garlic. The obtained results indicate a beneficial effect of ALA and garlic administration by reducing the oxidative stress intensity and the levels of some proinflammatory cytokines in rabbits fed HFD. PMID:26634212

  5. Inhibitory Effect of a French Maritime Pine Bark Extract-Based Nutritional Supplement on TNF-?-Induced Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Kristine C. Y.; Li, Xiao-Hong; McRobb, Lucinda S.; Heather, Alison K.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation, leading to endothelial dysfunction, contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The popularity of natural product supplements has increased in recent years, especially those with purported anti-inflammatory and/or antioxidant effects. The efficacy and mechanism of many of these products are not yet well understood. In this study, we tested the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of a supplement, HIPER Health Supplement (HIPER), on cytokine-induced inflammation and oxidative stress in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). HIPER is a mixture of French maritime pine bark extract (PBE), honey, aloe vera, and papaya extract. Treatment for 24 hours with HIPER reduced TNF-?-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation that was associated with decreased NADPH oxidase 4 and increased superoxide dismutase-1 expression. HIPER inhibited TNF-? induced monocyte adhesion to HCAECs that was in keeping with decreased expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 and decreased nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) activation. Further investigation of mechanism showed HIPER reduced TNF-? induced I?B? and p38 and MEK1/2 MAP kinases phosphorylation. Our findings show that HIPER has potent inhibitory effects on HCAECs inflammatory and oxidative stress responses that may protect against endothelial dysfunction that underlies early atherosclerotic lesion formation. PMID:26664450

  6. The Influence of ?-Lipoic Acid and Garlic Administration on Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Rabbits Exposed to Oxidized Nutrition Oils.

    PubMed

    Zalejska-Fiolka, Jolanta; Wielkoszy?ski, Tomasz; Rokicki, Wojciech; D?browska, Natalia; Strzelczyk, Joanna Katarzyna; Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Owczarek, Aleksander; B?aszczyk, Urszula; Kasperczyk, S?awomir; Stawiarska-Pi?ta, Barbara; Birkner, Ewa; Gamian, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that addition of substances with antioxidant activity could decrease the concentrations of biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammatory process, thus inhibiting nonalcoholic steatohepatitis development. We investigated the influence of ?-lipoic acid (ALA) and garlic administration on the development of adverse changes in rabbit liver and serum under oxidative stress conditions induced with HFD from oxidized oils. We determined 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in liver homogenates, total oxidant status (TOS), lipid peroxides (LOO) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF?) in blood serum, and TNF? and IL-1? genes expression in liver. The results indicate that the intake of dietary ALA and garlic was significantly associated with decreases of 8OHdG and MDA levels in rabbits' liver tissue as well as TOS and LOO levels in rabbits' serum. Similarly, TNF? and IL-1? gene expressions were suppressed due to ALA and garlic supplementation. The histopathological analysis confirmed that HFD results in liver disorder leading to steatosis. This adverse effect of HFD was ameliorated by the supplementation of ALA and garlic. The obtained results indicate a beneficial effect of ALA and garlic administration by reducing the oxidative stress intensity and the levels of some proinflammatory cytokines in rabbits fed HFD. PMID:26634212

  7. Setting Up the Next Generation Biofeedback Program for Stress and Anxiety Management for College Students: A Simple and Cost-Effective Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratanasiripong, Paul; Sverduk, Kevin; Hayashino, Diane; Prince, Judy

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of stress and anxiety on college campuses along with limited resources and budget reductions for many campuses has prompted the need for innovative approaches to help students effectively manage their stress and anxiety. With college students becoming more and more technology-savvy, the authors present an innovative…

  8. Impact of ambient and supplemental ultraviolet-B stress on kidney bean plants: an insight into oxidative stress management.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suruchi; Sarkar, Abhijit; Agrawal, S B; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, the response of kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Pusa Komal) plants was evaluated under three different levels of ultraviolet-B (UV-B), i.e., excluded UV-B (eUV-B), ambient UV-B (aUV-B; 5.8 kJ m(-2) day(-1)), and supplemental UV-B (sUV-B; 280-315 nm; ambient?+?7.2 kJ m(-2) day(-1)), under near-natural conditions. eUV-B treatment clearly demonstrated that both aUV-B and sUV-B are capable of causing significant changes in the plant's growth, metabolism, economic yield, genome template stability, total protein, and antioxidative enzyme profiles. The experimental findings showed maximum plant height at eUV-B, but biomass accumulation was minimum. Significant reductions in quantum yield (Fv/Fm) were observed under both aUV-B and sUV-B, as compared to eUV-B. UV-B-absorbing flavonoids increased under higher UV-B exposures with consequent increments in phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activities. The final yield was significantly higher in plants grown under eUV-B, compared to those under aUV-B and sUV-B. Total protein profile through sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and analysis of isoenzymes, like superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POX), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), and glutathione reductase (GR), through native PAGE revealed major changes in the leaf proteome under aUV-B and sUV-B, depicting induction of some major stress-related proteins. The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profile of genomic DNA also indicated a significant reduction of genome template stability under UV-B exposure. Thus, it can be inferred that more energy is diverted for inducing protection mechanisms rather than utilizing it for growth under high UV-B level. PMID:24728984

  9. Mobile Mental Wellness Training for Stress Management: Feasibility and Design Implications Based on a One-Month Field Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahtinen, Aino; Välkkynen, Pasi; Kaipainen, Kirsikka; Vanhala, Toni; Ermes, Miikka; Sairanen, Essi; Myllymäki, Tero; Lappalainen, Raimo

    2013-01-01

    Background Prevention and management of work-related stress and related mental problems is a great challenge. Mobile applications are a promising way to integrate prevention strategies into the everyday lives of citizens. Objective The objectives of this study was to study the usage, acceptance, and usefulness of a mobile mental wellness training application among working-age individuals, and to derive preliminary design implications for mobile apps for stress management. Methods Oiva, a mobile app based on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), was designed to support active learning of skills related to mental wellness through brief ACT-based exercises in the daily life. A one-month field study with 15 working-age participants was organized to study the usage, acceptance, and usefulness of Oiva. The usage of Oiva was studied based on the usage log files of the application. Changes in wellness were measured by three validated questionnaires on stress, satisfaction with life (SWLS), and psychological flexibility (AAQ-II) at the beginning and at end of the study and by user experience questionnaires after one week’s and one month’s use. In-depth user experience interviews were conducted after one month’s use to study the acceptance and user experiences of Oiva. Results Oiva was used actively throughout the study. The average number of usage sessions was 16.8 (SD 2.4) and the total usage time per participant was 3 hours 12 minutes (SD 99 minutes). Significant pre-post improvements were obtained in stress ratings (mean 3.1 SD 0.2 vs mean 2.5 SD 0.1, P=.003) and satisfaction with life scores (mean 23.1 SD 1.3 vs mean 25.9 SD 0.8, P=.02), but not in psychological flexibility. Oiva was perceived easy to use, acceptable, and useful by the participants. A randomized controlled trial is ongoing to evaluate the effectiveness of Oiva on working-age individuals with stress problems. Conclusions A feasibility study of Oiva mobile mental wellness training app showed good acceptability, usefulness, and engagement among the working-age participants, and provided increased understanding on the essential features of mobile apps for stress management. Five design implications were derived based on the qualitative findings: (1) provide exercises for everyday life, (2) find proper place and time for challenging content, (3) focus on self-improvement and learning instead of external rewards, (4) guide gently but do not restrict choice, and (5) provide an easy and flexible tool for self-reflection. PMID:25100683

  10. Stress and Heart Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fit-Friendly Worksites Program Requirements Fit-Friendly Resources Stress and Heart Health Updated:Jun 13,2014 When ... Health and Heart Health Last reviewed 6/2014 Stress Management • Home • How Does Stress Affect You? Introduction ...

  11. sample plans of study 2014-2016 Food, Nutrition, and Dietetics

    E-print Network

    Branoff, Theodore J.

    3/7/2014 sample plans of study 2014-2016 Food, Nutrition, and Dietetics: Food and Nutrition of Human Nutrition (3) FCS 200 Practical Problem Solving in FCS (3) FCS 103 Management for Consumers (3 Nutrition Through the Life Cycle, Spring only (3) FCS 214 The Hospitality Industry, Fall only (3) HSC 350

  12. sample plans of study 2014-2016 Food, Nutrition, and Dietetics

    E-print Network

    Branoff, Theodore J.

    3/7/2014 sample plans of study 2014-2016 Food, Nutrition, and Dietetics: Food and Nutrition of Human Nutrition (3) Gen Ed Natural Science (NS-BSC 101 recommended) (3) FCS 103 Management for Consumers) FCS 217 Nutrition Though the Life Cycle (3) Gen Ed Course ­ Group 1 (UST) (3) HSC 350 Food Protection

  13. Combination of wearable multi-biosensor platform and resonance frequency training for stress management of the unemployed population.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wanqing; Gil, Yeongjoon; Lee, Jungtae

    2012-01-01

    Currently considerable research is being directed toward developing methodologies for controlling emotion or releasing stress. An applied branch of the basic field of psychophysiology, known as biofeedback, has been developed to fulfill clinical and non-clinical needs related to such control. Wearable medical devices have permitted unobtrusive monitoring of vital signs and emerging biofeedback services in a pervasive manner. With the global recession, unemployment has become one of the most serious social problems; therefore, the combination of biofeedback techniques with wearable technology for stress management of unemployed population is undoubtedly meaningful. This article describes a wearable biofeedback system based on combining integrated multi-biosensor platform with resonance frequency training (RFT) biofeedback strategy for stress management of unemployed population. Compared to commercial system, in situ experiments with multiple subjects indicated that our biofeedback system was discreet, easy to wear, and capable of offering ambulatory RFT biofeedback.Moreover, the comparative studies on the altered autonomic nervous system (ANS) modulation before and after three week RFT biofeedback training was performed in unemployed population with the aid of our wearable biofeedback system. The achieved results suggested that RFT biofeedback in combination with wearable technology was capable of significantly increasingoverall HRV, which indicated by decreasing sympathetic activities, increasing parasympathetic activities, and increasing ANS synchronization. After 3-week RFT-based respiration training, the ANS's regulating function and coping ability of unemployed population have doubled, and tended toward a dynamic balance. PMID:23201994

  14. Combination of Wearable Multi-Biosensor Platform and Resonance Frequency Training for Stress Management of the Unemployed Population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wanqing; Gil, Yeongjoon; Lee, Jungtae

    2012-01-01

    Currently considerable research is being directed toward developing methodologies for controlling emotion or releasing stress. An applied branch of the basic field of psychophysiology, known as biofeedback, has been developed to fulfill clinical and non-clinical needs related to such control. Wearable medical devices have permitted unobtrusive monitoring of vital signs and emerging biofeedback services in a pervasive manner. With the global recession, unemployment has become one of the most serious social problems; therefore, the combination of biofeedback techniques with wearable technology for stress management of unemployed population is undoubtedly meaningful. This article describes a wearable biofeedback system based on combining integrated multi-biosensor platform with resonance frequency training (RFT) biofeedback strategy for stress management of unemployed population. Compared to commercial system, in situ experiments with multiple subjects indicated that our biofeedback system was discreet, easy to wear, and capable of offering ambulatory RFT biofeedback.Moreover, the comparative studies on the altered autonomic nervous system (ANS) modulation before and after three week RFT biofeedback training was performed in unemployed population with the aid of our wearable biofeedback system. The achieved results suggested that RFT biofeedback in combination with wearable technology was capable of significantly increasingoverall HRV, which indicated by decreasing sympathetic activities, increasing parasympathetic activities, and increasing ANS synchronization. After 3-week RFT-based respiration training, the ANS's regulating function and coping ability of unemployed population have doubled, and tended toward a dynamic balance. PMID:23201994

  15. Stress Literacy in Australian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varlow, Megan; Wuthrich, Viviana; Murrihy, Rachael; Remond, Louise; Tuqiri, Rebekka; van Kessel, Jacobine; Wheatley, Anna; Dedousis-Wallace, Anna; Kidman, Antony

    2009-01-01

    Stress literacy is a term that refers to knowledge about stress and stress management techniques. Levels of stress literacy were examined in more than nine hundred Australian adolescents by providing a short stress-management education session and assessing stress literacy using a pre-post survey design. It was found that while adolescents had a…

  16. Nutrient Content of Foods, Nutritional Supplements, and Food Fallacies. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.; Stein, Joan Z.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  17. Selection of key stressors to develop virtual environments for practicing stress management skills with military personnel prior to deployment.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Stéphane; Baus, Oliver; Bernier, François; McCreary, Donald R

    2010-02-01

    Virtual environments (VEs) are presently being used to treat military personnel suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In an attempt to reduce the risk of PTSD, VEs may also be useful for stress management training (SMT) to practice skills under stress, but such use necessitates the development of relevant stress-inducing scenarios and storyboards. This article describes the procedures followed to select which VEs could be built for the Canadian Forces. A review and analysis of the available literature and of data collected postdeployment from 1,319 respondents on the frequency of stressors and their association with psychological injuries were pulled together to propose eight potential virtual stressors that can be used to practice SMT: seeing dead bodies or uncovering human remains; knowing someone being seriously injured or killed; receiving artillery fire; being unable to help ill or wounded civilians because of the rules of engagement; seeing destroyed homes and villages; clearing and searching homes, caves, or bunkers; receiving small-arms fire; and participating in demining operations. Information reported in this article could also be useful to document traumatic stressors experienced in theater of operations and their potential impact on psychological injuries. PMID:20528298

  18. Nutrition Interventions for Prevention and Management of Childhood Obesity: What Do Parents Want from an eHealth Program?

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Tracy; Hutchesson, Melinda; Kheng Chai, Li; Rollo, Megan; Skinner, Geoff; Collins, Clare

    2015-01-01

    With the growth of Internet technologies, offering interventions for child and family weight management in an online format may address barriers to accessing services. This study aimed to investigate (i) whether an eHealth family healthy lifestyle program would be of interest to parents; and (ii) preferences and/or expectations for program components and features. Parents of children aged four to18 years were recruited through social media and completed an online survey (54 items) including closed and open-ended questions. Responses were collated using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. Seventy-five participants were included (92% mothers, mean age 39.1 ± 8.6 years, mean BMI 27.6 ± 6.3 kg/m2). The index child had a mean age of 11 ± 6.2 years with 24% overweight/obese. The majority of parents (90.3%) reported interest in an online program, with preference expressed for a non-structured program to allow flexibility users to log-on and off as desired. Parents wanted a program that was easy to use, practical, engaging, endorsed by a reputable source, and able to provide individual tailoring and for their children to be directly involved. The current study supports the need for online delivery of a healthy lifestyle program that targets greater parental concerns of diet rather than child weight. PMID:26694456

  19. Nutrition Interventions for Prevention and Management of Childhood Obesity: What Do Parents Want from an eHealth Program?

    PubMed

    Burrows, Tracy; Hutchesson, Melinda; Kheng Chai, Li; Rollo, Megan; Skinner, Geoff; Collins, Clare

    2015-01-01

    With the growth of Internet technologies, offering interventions for child and family weight management in an online format may address barriers to accessing services. This study aimed to investigate (i) whether an eHealth family healthy lifestyle program would be of interest to parents; and (ii) preferences and/or expectations for program components and features. Parents of children aged four to18 years were recruited through social media and completed an online survey (54 items) including closed and open-ended questions. Responses were collated using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. Seventy-five participants were included (92% mothers, mean age 39.1 ± 8.6 years, mean BMI 27.6 ± 6.3 kg/m˛). The index child had a mean age of 11 ± 6.2 years with 24% overweight/obese. The majority of parents (90.3%) reported interest in an online program, with preference expressed for a non-structured program to allow flexibility users to log-on and off as desired. Parents wanted a program that was easy to use, practical, engaging, endorsed by a reputable source, and able to provide individual tailoring and for their children to be directly involved. The current study supports the need for online delivery of a healthy lifestyle program that targets greater parental concerns of diet rather than child weight. PMID:26694456

  20. Nutrition of the Fetus and Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Kennaugh, Jan M.; Hay, William W.

    1987-01-01

    Both the successful development of healthy, long-term animal models to study fetal nutrition and metabolism and the improved survival of low-birth-weight, preterm infants have focused interest and research on fetal and neonatal nutrition and metabolism. Such a focus is important, given the recent emphasis on promoting neonatal growth in preterm infants at “normal” in utero growth rates. Estimates of nutrient requirements for growth in a human fetus remain ill defined, however. Body composition data appear biased toward thin infants. Animal data suggest that fetal nutrition proceeds according to species-specific growth rates, with variations in fat content largely dependent on placental fat permeability and on maternal nutrient supply as regulated by the placenta. After birth, neonatal nutrition is affected primarily by food intake and the functional integrity and capacity of the gastrointestinal tract. Additionally, muscle activity, thermoregulation and stresses of various kinds and degrees modify a neonate's nutritional requirements. Functional deficits of the gastrointestinal tract have been circumvented by a more aggressive use of intravenous nutrition. Both intravenous and enteral nutrient mixtures have been substantially improved in the quantity of all nutrients and have been modified qualitatively toward compositions that are closer to those of human milk. These nutrient mixtures now produce plasma nutrient concentrations that approximate those of a healthy, breast-fed infant. Although such efforts to improve the nutritional balance and growth of preterm infants have been successful, much remains to be learned about the nutritional requirements of sick infants. PMID:3318138

  1. Survival, growth, metallothionein and glycogen levels of Nucella lapillus (L.) exposed to subchronic cadmium stress: the influence of nutritional state and prey type.

    PubMed

    Leung, K M; Furness, R W

    2001-08-01

    Dogwhelks Nucella lapillus feed mainly on mussels and barnacles, and may experience periods of starvation. We report effects of nutritional state and prey type on the survival, growth, cadmium (Cd) accumulation, metallothionein (MT) induction and glycogen stores in N. lapillus exposed to Cd in water. Adult dogwhelks, with similar shell length (30.0+/-1.5 mm), were either starved or fed to satiation with barnacles Semibalanus balanoides, mussels Mytilus edulis or Cd-dosed M. edulis, and kept in filtered natural seawater (< 0.01 microg Cd 1(-1)) or Cd-contaminated (400 microg Cd 1(-1)) seawater for 80 days. Mortality and individual growth rate were determined. Cd, MT and glycogen were measured in different tissues. Prolonged starvation and exposure to Cd significantly reduced the survivorship of N. lapillus, but feeding could help dogwhelks to combat Cd toxicity and minimise mortality. Extended starvation also caused tissue wastage, leading to higher concentrations of Cd and MT in tissues, whereas fed animals increased in weight and had lower Cd and MT concentrations because of the tissue dilution effect. Prey type significantly affected growth rate of dogwhelks and indirectly influenced Cd accumulation, MT induction and glycogen stores. Eating mussels promoted better growth and higher glycogen reserves than eating barnacles. Individual growth rate decreased with increasing Cd accumulation. Cd-exposed survivors grew faster and consumed more than control animals, implying that these survivors may have better fitness and greater tolerance to Cd toxicity. The use of growth, condition index, MT and glycogen as biomarkers of environmental pollution are discussed. These results indicate a need to incorporate biological data including growth (or at least condition index) and prey type into biomonitoring programmes to allow sound interpretation. PMID:11525429

  2. Eating for 1, Healthy and Active for 2; feasibility of delivering novel, compact training for midwives to build knowledge and confidence in giving nutrition, physical activity and weight management advice during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Women in Wales are more likely to be obese in pregnancy than in any other United Kingdom (UK) country. Midwives are ideally placed to explore nutrition, physical activity and weight management concerns however qualitative studies indicate they lack confidence in raising the sensitive issue of weight. Acknowledging this and the reality of finite time and resources, this study aimed to deliver compact training on nutrition, physical activity and weight management during pregnancy to increase the knowledge and confidence of midwives in this subject. Methods A compact training package for midwives was developed comprising of evidence based nutrition, physical activity and weight management guidance for pregnancy. Training was promoted via midwifery leads and delivered within the Health Board. Questionnaires based on statements from national public health guidance were used to assess changes in self-reported knowledge and confidence pre and post training. Descriptive statistics were applied and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results 43 midwives registered for training, 32 (74%) attended and completed the questionnaires. Although, pre training knowledge and confidence varied between participants, statistically significant improvements in self-reported knowledge and confidence were observed post training. 97% indicated knowledge of pregnancy specific food and nutrition messages as ‘better’ (95% CI 85 to 100), as opposed to 3% stating ‘stayed the same’ – 60% stated ‘much better’. 83% indicated confidence to explain the risks of raised BMI in pregnancy was either ‘much’ or ‘somewhat better’ (95% CI 66 to 93), as opposed to 17% stating ‘stayed the same’. 89% indicated confidence to discuss eating habits and physical activity was ‘much’ or ‘somewhat better’ (95% CI 73 to 97) as opposed to 11% stating ‘stayed the same’. Emergent themes highlighted that training was positively received and relevant to midwifery practice. Conclusions This study provides early indications that a compact nutrition, physical activity and weight management training package improves midwives self-reported knowledge and confidence. Cascading training across the midwifery service in the Health Board and conducting further studies to elicit longer term impact on midwifery practice and patient outcomes are recommended. PMID:24996422

  3. Changes in Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Biomarkers in Fragile Adults over Fifty Years of Age and in Elderly People Exclusively Fed Enteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Mesa, Maria D.; Olza, Josune; Gonzalez-Anton, Carolina; Aguilera, Concepcion M.; Moreno-Torres, Rosario; Jimenez, Africa; Perez de la Cruz, Antonio; Ruperez, Azahara I.; Gil, Angel

    2016-01-01

    We aim to evaluate whether exclusive feeding of an enteral formula enriched with n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFA) affects oxidative stress and the antioxidant defence system and may improve the levels of some relevant inflammatory, and cardiovascular biomarkers in frail adults over fifty years of age and in elderly subjects. Fifty-five patients were divided into two groups and were exclusively fed a newly designed normoproteic and isocaloric enteral formula enriched with eicosapentaenoic (98?mg/d) and docosahexaenoic acids (46?mg/d) (n = 26) or a reference enteral diet (n = 29). Oxidative, inflammatory and cardiovascular risk biomarkers and red blood cell fatty acid profiles were determined at the beginning and after 90 and 180 days of feeding. The n-3 LC-PUFA percentage tended to be higher (P = 0.053) in the experimental group than in the reference group. Administration of the n-3 LC-PUFA diet did not increase oxidative stress or modify plasma antioxidant capacity but decreased antioxidant enzymatic activities. MMP-9 plasma concentration decreased with both formulae, whereas tPAI-1 tended to decrease (P = 0.116) with the administration of the experimental formula. In conclusion, administration of the new n-3 LC-PUFA-enriched product for 6 months did not negatively alter the oxidative status and improved some cardiovascular risk biomarkers. PMID:26697137

  4. AutoEmotive: bringing empathy to the driving experience to manage stress

    E-print Network

    Hernandez Rivera, Javier

    With recent developments in sensing technologies, it's becoming feasible to comfortably measure several aspects of emotions during challenging daily life situations. This work describes how the stress of drivers can be ...

  5. [Cardiac scintigraphy-Pharmacological stress and appropriate management of pediatric radiopharmaceutical administration in patients after Kawasaki disease].

    PubMed

    Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Karasawa, Kensuke

    2014-09-01

    Cardiac scintigraphy accounted for 2.5 % of all 3,884 patients based on a survey ques- tionnaire of pediatric nuclear medicine examinations performed at 14 Japanese institutes in 2011. Myocardial perfusion imaging, classified as cardiac scintigraphy, is essential to detect myocardial ischemia in patients after Kawasaki disease (KD), although its less frequent performance is reported. Adenosine is widely noticed as a medication for pharma- cological stress testing in coronary arterial lesions after KD. We describe characteristics of adenosine including newly-devised administration protocol and pathway making of intravenous injection for stress testing. We comment on optimal radiopharmaceutical administered doses proposed in Japanese consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medi- cine. Their proposal doses approximate that calculated by Pediatric Dosage Card of Euro- pean Association of Nuclear Medicine. We hope myocardial perfusion imaging is performed under appropriate management of pediatric radiopharmaceutical administration. PMID:25518408

  6. GREENHOUSE NUTRITION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are 18 essential elements, including silicon, that need to be present for the plant to grow well and withstand typical stresses. Three of these, carbon (C), hydrogen (H), and oxygen (O) are acquired through the air (CO2 and O2) or water (H2O). Chlorine (Cl) and nickel (Ni) are usually presen...

  7. Perceptions of caregiver distress, health behaviors, and provider health-promoting communication and their relationship to stress management in MS caregivers.

    PubMed

    Penwell-Waines, Lauren; Goodworth, Marie-Christine Rutter; Casillas, Rhonda S; Rahn, Rebecca; Stepleman, Lara

    2016-04-01

    This study applied the Stress/Health Model to examine a novel approach for promoting stress management among 67 caregivers of persons with multiple sclerosis, who often face unique caregiving challenges. Hierarchical regressions indicated that caregiver distress (i.e., emotional burden) and engagement in other health-promoting activities (i.e., controlling alcohol use) were the best predictors of caregiver stress management. Communication with the MS care recipient's health provider about caregiver engagement in health-promoting activities was associated with caregiver stress management, but not significantly more so than explained by the other factors (i.e., caregiver distress and engagement in health-promoting behaviors). A more controlled study would be indicated to further explain how to encourage, within the medical setting, caregiver engagement in self-care activities. PMID:26400038

  8. Developing Research Programs in Clinical and Translational Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Frederick A.; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Heyland, Daren K.; Marik, Paul E.; Bistrian, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Most clinicians believe that nutrition support therapy improves outcome in hospitalized patients. Unfortunately, few patients receive optimal nutrition management. A lack of strong, well-designed research studies may prevent the medical/surgical community from fully embracing the practice. More quality research is needed. This article discusses 3 potential strategies to improve research activity in clinical nutrition: increase funding of nutrition research, foster young physician training in nutrition and research, and attract nutrition researchers to our national nutrition society meetings. The best chance for this process to succeed is for the national nutrition societies to partner with medical and surgical subspecialty societies to develop larger scale clinical and translational research programs. PMID:21149841

  9. Setting global research priorities for integrated community case management (iCCM): Results from a CHNRI (Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative) exercise

    PubMed Central

    Wazny, Kerri; Sadruddin, Salim; Zipursky, Alvin; Hamer, Davidson H.; Jacobs, Troy; Kallander, Karin; Pagnoni, Franco; Peterson, Stefan; Qazi, Shamim; Raharison, Serge; Ross, Kerry; Young, Mark; Marsh, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To systematically identify global research gaps and resource priorities for integrated community case management (iCCM). Methods An iCCM Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative (CHNRI) Advisory Group, in collaboration with the Community Case Management Operational Research Group (CCM ORG) identified experts to participate in a CHNRI research priority setting exercise. These experts generated and systematically ranked research questions for iCCM. Research questions were ranked using a “Research Priority Score” (RPS) and the “Average Expert Agreement” (AEA) was calculated for every question. Our groups of experts were comprised of both individuals working in Ministries of Health or Non Governmental Organizations (NGOs) in low– and middle–income countries (LMICs) and individuals working in high–income countries (HICs) in academia or NGO headquarters. A Spearman’s Rho was calculated to determine the correlation between the two groups’ research questions’ ranks. Results The overall RPS ranged from 64.58 to 89.31, with a median score of 81.43. AEA scores ranged from 0.54 to 0.86. Research questions involving increasing the uptake of iCCM services, research questions concerning the motivation, retention, training and supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs) and concerning adding additional responsibilities including counselling for infant and young child feeding (IYCF) and treatment of severe acute malnutrition (SAM) ranked highly. There was weak to moderate, statistically significant, correlation between scores by representatives of high–income countries and those working in–country or regionally (Spearman’s ??=?0.35034, P?

  10. Biofeedback-based training for stress management in daily hassles: an intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Kotozaki, Yuka; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Yuki; Shinada, Takamitsu; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Kei; Taki, Yasuyuki; Ogino, Takeshi; Kiguchi, Masashi; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-01-01

    Background The day-to-day causes of stress are called daily hassles. Daily hassles are correlated with ill health. Biofeedback (BF) is one of the tools used for acquiring stress-coping skills. However, the anatomical correlates of the effects of BF with long training periods remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate this. Methods Participants were assigned randomly to two groups: the intervention group and the control group. Participants in the intervention group performed a biofeedback training (BFT) task (a combination task for heart rate and cerebral blood flow control) every day, for about 5 min once a day. The study outcomes included MRI, psychological tests (e.g., Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, and Brief Job Stress Questionnaire), and a stress marker (salivary cortisol levels) before (day 0) and after (day 28) the intervention. Results We observed significant improvements in the psychological test scores and salivary cortisol levels in the intervention group compared to the control group. Furthermore, voxel-based morphometric analysis revealed that compared to the control group, the intervention group had significantly increased regional gray matter (GM) volume in the right lateral orbitofrontal cortex, which is an anatomical cluster that includes mainly the left hippocampus, and the left subgenual anterior cingulate cortex. The GM regions are associated with the stress response, and, in general, these regions seem to be the most sensitive to the detrimental effects of stress. Conclusions Our findings suggest that our BFT is effective against the GM structures vulnerable to stress. PMID:25161823

  11. Salmonella stress management and its relevance to behaviour during intestinal colonisation and infection.

    PubMed

    Rychlik, Ivan; Barrow, Paul A

    2005-11-01

    The enteric pathogen Salmonella enterica is exposed to a number of stressful environments during its life cycle within and outside its various hosts. During intestinal colonisation Salmonella is successively exposed to acid pH in the stomach, to the detergent-like activity of bile, to decreasing oxygen supply, to the presence of multiple metabolites produced by the normal gut microflora and finally it is exposed to cationic antimicrobial peptides present on the surface of epithelial cells. There are four major regulators controlling relevant stress responses in Salmonella, namely RpoS, PhoPQ, Fur and OmpR/EnvZ. Except for Fur, inactivation of genes encoding the other stress regulators results in attenuated virulence and such mutants can therefore be considered as vaccine candidates. In contrast, a decrease in oxygen supply monitored by Fnr and ArcAB, or oxidative stress controlled by OxyR and SoxRS is not regarded as a stress associated with host colonisation since inactivation of either of these systems does not result in reductions in colonisation. The role of quorum-sensing through luxS and sdiA is also considered as a regulator of virulence and colonisation. PMID:16023758

  12. Using finite element analysis and thermal stress monitoring to manage turbine defects without mechanical intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Otterlee, T.; Lindsay, G.

    1995-12-31

    Well over half of the steam turbines in the United States will be operating past their design life (typically 30 years) by the end of the decade. Utilities are looking to meet current and future power requirements using this existing equipment. To insure safe and economically justifiable operation until the projected unit decommissioning, utilities must seek the latest technology to provide repair options and operational strategies. The majority of turbine casing and rotor defects are initiated and propagated by thermal stress. These defects include low-cycle fatigue cracking, distortion, and creep rupture. In the past, defects of this nature were typically remedied through direct mechanical intervention such as grinding, welding, and machining. While these techniques are effective, they often require significant cost and time investments in order to implement, and the life of the repair may needlessly exceed the desired service life of the turbine itself. Evaluation techniques such as Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and Fracture Mechanics now allow for accurate determination of the effect of defects on the remaining life of turbine components. Thermal Stress Monitoring (TSM) provides the feedback necessary to ensure that the calculated maximum stress is not exceeded. Choosing this monitoring process over repairs can save valuable outage time and repair expense. This paper will review the background and history behind thermal stress monitoring, the theory behind it, and the process for implementing a modern thermal stress monitoring system.

  13. Stress management for 3D through-silicon-via stacking technologies - The next frontier -

    SciTech Connect

    Radojcic, Riko; Nowak, Matt; Nakamoto, Mark

    2014-06-19

    The status of the development of a Design-for-Stress simulation flow that captures the stress effects in packaged 3D-stacked Si products like integrated circuits (ICs) using advanced via-middle Through Si Via technology is outlined. The next set of challenges required to proliferate the methodology and to deploy it for making and dispositioning real Si product decisions are described here. These include the adoption and support of a Process Design Kit (PDK) that includes the relevant material properties, the development of stress simulation methodologies that operate at higher levels of abstraction in a design flow, and the development and adoption of suitable models required to make real product reliability decisions.

  14. Stress management for 3D through-silicon-via stacking technologies - The next frontier -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radojcic, Riko; Nowak, Matt; Nakamoto, Mark

    2014-06-01

    The status of the development of a Design-for-Stress simulation flow that captures the stress effects in packaged 3D-stacked Si products like integrated circuits (ICs) using advanced via-middle Through Si Via technology is outlined. The next set of challenges required to proliferate the methodology and to deploy it for making and dispositioning real Si product decisions are described here. These include the adoption and support of a Process Design Kit (PDK) that includes the relevant material properties, the development of stress simulation methodologies that operate at higher levels of abstraction in a design flow, and the development and adoption of suitable models required to make real product reliability decisions.

  15. Post-fire wood management alters water stress, growth, and performance of pine regeneration in a Mediterranean ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maranon-Jimenez, Sara; Castro, Jorge; Querejeta, José Ignacio; Fernandez-Ondono, Emilia; Allen, Craig D.

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research has focused on comparing the impacts of post-fire salvage logging versus those of less aggressive management practices on forest regeneration. However, few studies have addressed the effects of different burnt-wood management options on seedling/sapling performance, or the ecophysiological mechanisms underlying differences among treatments. In this study, we experimentally assess the effects of post-fire management of the burnt wood on the growth and performance of naturally regenerating pine seedlings (Pinus pinaster). Three post-fire management treatments varying in degree of intervention were implemented seven months after a high-severity wildfire burned Mediterranean pine forests in the Sierra Nevada, southeast Spain: (a) “No Intervention” (NI, all burnt trees left standing); (b) “Partial Cut plus Lopping” (PCL, felling most of the burnt trees, cutting off branches, and leaving all the biomass on site without mastication); and (c) “Salvage Logging” (SL, felling the burnt trees, piling up the logs and masticating the fine woody debris). Three years after the fire, the growth, foliar nutrient concentrations, and leaf carbon, nitrogen and oxygen isotopic composition (?13C, ?18O and ?15N) of naturally regenerating seedlings were measured in all the treatments. Pine seedlings showed greatest vigor and size in the PCL treatment, whereas growth was poorest in SL. The nutrient concentrations were similar among treatments, although greater growth in the two treatments with residual wood present indicated higher plant uptake. Seedlings in the SL treatment showed high leaf ?13C and ?18O values indicating severe water stress, in contrast to significantly alleviated water stress indications in the PCL treatment. Seedling growth and physiological performance in NI was intermediate between that of PCL and SL. After six growing seasons, P. pinaster saplings in PCL showed greater growth and cone production than SL saplings. In summary, salvage logging has a detrimental effect on the ecophysiological performance and growth of naturally regenerating pine seedlings, compared to alternative post-fire management practices in which burnt logs and branches are left in situ. Improved seedling growth and performance is associated with the amelioration of microsite/microclimate conditions by the presence of residual burnt wood, which alleviates seedling drought stress and improves nutrient availability through the decomposition of woody debris.

  16. Nutritional aspects of human lactation*

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, A. M.; Black, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the incidence and duration of breast-feeding in various countries, the volume and composition of breast milk, the health and nutrition of breast-fed babies as judged by growth and morbidity, maternal nutritional requirements during lactation, and the effect of prolonged lactation on maternal health. It appears that lactation can be as well sustained by impoverished as by affluent mothers, and that even in communities where malnutrition is common the average growth of infants is satisfactory up to the age of about 3 months on a diet of breast milk alone. Breast milk appears to have specific anti-infective properties, but prolonged breast-feeding will not prevent infections among older infants reared in a poor environment. The authors believe that breast-feeding is the best form of nutrition for the young infant and deplore its decline in modern industrial societies. The recommendations of various FAO/WHO Expert Groups on nutritional intakes during lactation are summarized. The need for an increased daily energy intake of 4.2 MJ (1 000 kcal) is questioned, and an increase of 2.5 MJ (600 kcal) is suggested. Data on the effect of prolonged lactation on the health of the mother are scanty; body weight appears to be maintained even among poorly nourished mothers. The authors stress the need for well-planned and technically adequate studies of the material and psychological factors involved in breast feeding. PMID:816479

  17. Growth, chlorophyll fluorescence and mineral nutrition in the halophyte Tamarix gallica cultivated in combined stress conditions: Arsenic and NaCl.

    PubMed

    Sghaier, Dhouha Belhaj; Duarte, Bernardo; Bankaji, Insaf; Caçador, Isabel; Sleimi, Noomene

    2015-08-01

    Trace metal elements can cause various environmental and health issues due to their accumulation and integration in the food chain. In the present study, we determined the major toxic effects of arsenic on physiological behaviour of plants. For this propose, several combinations of high salinity and arsenic (As) concentrations were applied to the halophytic shrub, Tamarix gallica, by growing for three months with an irrigation solution supplemented with different concentrations of As (0, 200, 500 and 800M) with and without 200mM NaCl. The effect of the combined stress conditions on growth, physiological patterns and biochemical parameters were also assessed. The results demonstrated that T. gallica is a tolerant plant regarding arsenic. The photosynthesis apparatus Fo, Fm and Fv fluorescence, as well as Fv/Fm were not affected by As nor by As combined with salt. Likewise, pigment and nutrient (K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) contents were not affected either. However, the study results revealed that As adversely and significantly influenced the growth with increasing the concentration of As. Despite shoots growth reduction, the present research demonstrates that T. gallica is able to cope with high external concentrations of As (under 500?M) alone or in combination with NaCl. PMID:26093232

  18. Cognitive Regulation and Skills Training in the Management of Anger: A Stress Inoculation Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novaco, Raymond W.

    Experimental interest in anger arousal has typically been incidental or secondary to the study of aggresssion. Novaco developed a cognitive behavior therapy approach to chronic anger problems. Clinical techniques have followed the work of Meichenbaum (1974, 1975) in the development of an approach called "stress inoculation" that has been applied…

  19. Multicomponent Behavioral Treatment for Chronic Combat-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Trauma Management Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Samuel M.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Frueh, B. Christopher

    2005-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a severe and chronic mental disorder that is highly prevalent within Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Centers. A severe psychiatric disorder, combat-related PTSD is typically accompanied by multiple comorbid psychiatric disorders, symptom chronicity, and extreme social maladjustment. Thus, PTSD is a complex…

  20. Managing Traumatic Stress: Tips for Recovering From Disasters and Other Traumatic Events

    E-print Network

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    such as aftershocks from earthquakes or the sounds of sirens, can trigger upsetting memories of the traumatic memories of the event. These flashbacks may occur for no apparent reason and may lead to physical reactions experience. These 'triggers' may be accompanied by fears that the stressful event will be repeated

  1. Stressed triangular lattices on microsized spherical surfaces and their defect management

    E-print Network

    Zexian, Cao

    ,1,a W. J. Dong,1 L. Gao,2 and Z. X. Cao2 1 Faculty of Science and Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile of electrons in a semicon- ductor junction by a few orders of magnitude. However, stress also can be used solution for making foldable electronic devices.4 In recent years, we have suc- ceeded in producing

  2. Biomarkers of Dissolved Oxygen Stress in Oysters: A Tool for Restoration and Management Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Heather K.; Boettcher, Anne; Carmichael, Ruth H.

    2014-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of anoxic and hypoxic events are increasing worldwide, creating stress on the organisms that inhabit affected waters. To understand the effects of low dissolved oxygen stress on oysters, hatchery-reared oysters were placed in cages and deployed along with continuously recording environmental data sondes at a reef site in Mobile Bay, AL that typically experiences low oxygen conditions. To detect and measure sublethal stress, we measured growth and survival of oysters as well as expression of three biomarkers, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) and phospho-p38 MAP kinase, in tissues from juvenile and adult oysters. Survival rates were high for both juvenile and adult oysters. Expression levels of each of the 3 isoforms of HSP 70 were negatively correlated to dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations, suggesting that HSP 70 is useful to quantify sublethal effects of DO stress. Results for HIF and phospho-p38 MAP kinase were inconclusive. Test deployments of oysters to assess expression of HSP 70 relative to environmental conditions will be useful, in addition to measuring abiotic factors, to identify appropriate sites for restoration, particularly to capture negative effects of habitat quality on biota before lethal impacts are incurred. PMID:25116465

  3. Levels of Stress among Secondary School Administrators and Its Implication in Education Management in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngari, S. M.; Ndungu, A.; Mwonya, R.; Ngumi, O.; Mumiukha, C.; Chepchieng, M.; Kariuki, M.

    2013-01-01

    Stress significantly affects performance and service delivery of workers. Given the important role that education plays in the society, coupled with the dynamic nature of the education sector there has been an increased social pressure on the education system in general and school administrators in particular. This influences their levels of…

  4. Biomarkers of dissolved oxygen stress in oysters: a tool for restoration and management efforts.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Heather K; Boettcher, Anne; Carmichael, Ruth H

    2014-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of anoxic and hypoxic events are increasing worldwide, creating stress on the organisms that inhabit affected waters. To understand the effects of low dissolved oxygen stress on oysters, hatchery-reared oysters were placed in cages and deployed along with continuously recording environmental data sondes at a reef site in Mobile Bay, AL that typically experiences low oxygen conditions. To detect and measure sublethal stress, we measured growth and survival of oysters as well as expression of three biomarkers, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) and phospho-p38 MAP kinase, in tissues from juvenile and adult oysters. Survival rates were high for both juvenile and adult oysters. Expression levels of each of the 3 isoforms of HSP 70 were negatively correlated to dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations, suggesting that HSP 70 is useful to quantify sublethal effects of DO stress. Results for HIF and phospho-p38 MAP kinase were inconclusive. Test deployments of oysters to assess expression of HSP 70 relative to environmental conditions will be useful, in addition to measuring abiotic factors, to identify appropriate sites for restoration, particularly to capture negative effects of habitat quality on biota before lethal impacts are incurred. PMID:25116465

  5. The Perfect Level of Stress -MSN Health & Fitness -Stress Management http://health.msn.com/health-topics/stress-management/articlepage.aspx... 1 of 2 5/21/2008 5:28 PM

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    a computer game for real cash. Those with greater insular activity--the more anxious ones--were better at learning how to avoid losing money in subsequent games. "Their anxiety over losing money perhaps led them to be more precise in the way they played the game," Samanez-Larkin says. Anxiety isn't the same as stress

  6. Nutritional Requirements for Space Station Freedom Crews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Rice, Barbara L.; Wogan, Christine F. (editor)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to set preliminary nutritional requirements for crewmembers flying from 90 to 180 day missions on Space Station Freedom. Specific recommendations included providing crewmembers with in flight feedback on nutritional intake, weight and strength, and incorporating issues of energy intake, body weight, body composition, strength, and protein intake in the flight medicine program. Exercise must be considered an integral part of any plan to maintain nutritional status, especially those modes that stress the skeleton and maintain body weight. Nutrient intake, amount of exercise, and drugs ingested must be recorded daily; high priority should be given to development of fully automated record systems that minimize astronauts' effort. A system of nutritional supplements should be developed to provide a method for reducing intake deficits that become apparent. Finally, post flight monitoring should include bone density, muscle mass and function, and iron status at three and six months after landing.

  7. Promoting Perioperative Metabolic and Nutritional Care.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Chelsia; Carli, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Surgery represents a major stressor that disrupts homeostasis and can lead to loss of body cell mass. Integrated, multidisciplinary medical strategies, including enhanced recovery programs and perioperative nutrition support, can mitigate the surgically induced metabolic response, promoting optimal patient recovery following major surgery. Clinical therapies should identify those who are poorly nourished before surgery and aim to attenuate catabolism while preserving the processes that promote recovery and immunoprotection after surgery. This review will address the impact of surgery on intermediary metabolism and describe the clinical consequences that ensue. It will also focus on the role of perioperative nutrition, including preoperative nutrition risk, carbohydrate loading, and early initiation of oral feeding (centered on macronutrients) in modulating surgical stress, as well as highlight the contribution of the anesthesiologist to nutritional care. Emerging therapeutic concepts such as preoperative glycemic control and prehabilitation will be discussed. PMID:26248016

  8. Effect of nutrition on pregnancy and lactation*

    PubMed Central

    Gopalan, C.

    1962-01-01

    Pregnancy and lactation constitute states of considerable physiological stress which impose increased nutritional demands. If these demands are not adequately met, it may be expected that not only the nutritional status of the subject will be affected, but also the course of pregnancy and lactation. While a great deal of work with experimental animals has been carried out to elucidate the role of nutrition in pregnancy and lactation, the question arises how far these experimental results are applicable to human subjects. The unfortunate nutritional situation prevalent in certain under-developed countries affords opportunities for the study of the effects of nutritional deficiencies on the course of pregnancy and lactation in the human subject. In this paper, the available literature on the effect of maternal nutrition on the course of pregnancy and the condition of the infant at birth is reviewed, as is the effect of the state of maternal nutrition on the output and chemical composition of milk in nursing mothers. The review reveals many important gaps in our knowledge and highlights the need for further work on this important problem. PMID:13900365

  9. Nutrition and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Torres, Nimbe; Guevara-Cruz, Martha; Velázquez-Villegas, Laura A; Tovar, Armando R

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a universal problem in modern society. Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of CVD resulting in high rate of mortality in the population. Nutrition science has focused on the role of essential nutrients in preventing deficiencies, at the present time, the nutritional strategies are crucial to promote health and intervene with these global noncommunicable diseases. In many cases, diet is a major driving force, which is much easier to change and follow than other factors. It is important to establish that the first strategy to treat atherosclerosis is to modify lifestyle habits, focusing on the beneficial properties of specific nutrients. In the last decades, epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated that diet plays a central role in the prevention of atherosclerosis. In this review we will focus on the effect of specific foods, nutrients and bioactive compounds, including epidemiological facts, potential mechanisms of action and dietary recommendations to reduce the risk of atherosclerosis. In particular, we include information about fiber, plant sterols and stanols, niacin, taurine, olive oil, omega 3 fatty acids, antioxidants, minerals, methyl nutrients and soy. In addition, we also show that dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota associated with a consumption of certain animal food sources can generate some metabolites that are involved in the development of atherosclerosis and its consequences on CVD. According to the epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies we suggest a recommendation for some dietary foods, nutrients and bioactive compounds to support the complementary clinical management of patients with atherosclerosis. PMID:26031780

  10. Internet-based remote counseling to support stress management: preventing interruptions to regular exercise in elderly people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Sayuri; Munakata, Tsunestugu; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Okunaka, Jyunzo; Koga, Tatsuzo

    2006-01-01

    Our research showed that a high degree of life-stress has a negative mental health effect that may interrupt regular exercise. We used an internet based, remotely conducted, face to face, preventive counseling program using video monitors to reduce the source of life-stresses that interrupts regular exercise and evaluated the preventative effects of the program in elderly people. NTSC Video signals were converted to the IP protocol and facial images were transmitted to a PC display using the exclusive optical network lines of JGN2. Participants were 22 elderly people in Hokkaido, Japan, who regularly played table tennis. A survey was conducted before the intervention in August 2003. IT remote counseling was conducted on two occasions for one hour on each occasion. A post intervention survey was conducted in February 2004 and a follow-up survey was conducted in March 2005. Network quality was satisfactory with little data loss and high display quality. Results indicated that self-esteem increased significantly, trait anxiety decreased significantly, cognition of emotional support by people other than family members had a tendency to increase, and source of stress had a tendency to decrease after the intervention. Follow-up results indicated that cognition of emotional support by family increased significantly, and interpersonal dependency decreased significantly compared to before the intervention. These results suggest that face to face IT remote counseling using video monitors is useful to keep elderly people from feeling anxious and to make them confident to continue exercising regularly. Moreover, it has a stress management effect.

  11. Enteral nutrition - child - managing problems

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is clogged or plugged: Flush the tube with warm water. If you have a nasogastric tube, remove and ... break. (Make sure you flush the tube with warm water in between breaks.) Check with your provider about ...

  12. EFFECT OF SEVERAL STRESS FACTORS ON THE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF THE PREDATORY INSECT, CHRYSOPERIA CARNEA, TO THE FUNGAL PATHOGEN BEAUVERIA BASSIANA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Temperature, starvation, and nutrition stresses, applied singly and in combination, significantly affected the susceptibility of chrysoperla carnea to Beauveria bassiana and varied in effectiveness according to insect age and gender. he nutrition stress caused the most significan...

  13. Nutrition Education for Elite Female Runners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Nancy; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A survey of the dietary habits of 115 elite female runners revealed that some did not eat wisely, pointing out nutrition education needs for these subjects in the areas of sweets, vitamin and mineral supplementation, intake of red meat, body weight and body image, eating disorders, calorie intake, and amenorrhea and stress fractures. (Author/CB)

  14. Creative Ways to Teach Nutrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitze, Hazel Taylor; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Presents activities, materials, and instructions for three classroom games developed in University of Illinois nutrition education workshops on new ways to teach nutrition: Vit-A-Vend, Nutrition Basketball, and Nutrition Baseball. (MF)

  15. Job satisfaction, stress and burnout in anaesthesia: relevant topics for anaesthesiologists and healthcare managers?

    PubMed

    Rama-Maceiras, Pablo; Parente, Suzana; Kranke, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Job satisfaction is defined as an employee's positive reaction towards his/her work. Changes in health policies, which are seen as a threat to the autonomy of health workers, are associated with a decrease in satisfaction levels, increase burnout among physicians, and may impair the quality and safety of care. The work environment of anaesthesiologists include stressful areas such as the operating theatre, the ICU, and the emergency setting, and this has been linked to higher levels of stress and lower satisfaction. We frequently lack feedback from patients and even our colleagues despite usually working within a team. Nevertheless, job satisfaction and burnout rates in anaesthesia are similar to other specialties. The most relevant factors in job satisfaction are worker autonomy, control of the working environment, recognition of our value, professional relationships, leadership and organisational justice. Although these can be manipulated for good or otherwise, there are additional, less malleable factors such as personality, expectations and motivation of the employee, that play a part. Within organisations there needs to be the will to evaluate employees' satisfaction, to improve their work environment and to develop strategies and coping mechanisms for professional stress. Personal wellness should also be nurtured, as a satisfactory work-life balance and an adequate social support network might act as a buffer for dissatisfaction and burnout. Improvement in satisfaction might create a positive work climate that would benefit both the safety of our patients and our profession. PMID:22472627

  16. Nutritional status and nutritional therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Corina; Eliakim, Rami; Shamir, Raanan

    2009-01-01

    Underweight and specific nutrient deficiencies are frequent in adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition, a significant number of children with IBD, especially Crohn’s disease (CD) have impaired linear growth. Nutrition has an important role in the management of IBD. In adults with CD, enteral nutrition (EN) is effective in inducing clinical remission of IBD, although it is less efficient than corticosteroids. Exclusive EN is an established primary therapy for pediatric CD. Limited data suggests that EN is as efficient as corticosteroids for induction of remission. Additional advantages of nutritional therapy are control of inflammation, mucosal healing, positive benefits to growth and overall nutritional status with minimal adverse effects. The available evidence suggests that supplementary EN may be effective also for maintenance of remission in CD. More studies are needed to confirm these findings. However, EN supplementation could be considered as an alternative or as an adjunct to maintenance drug therapy in CD. EN does not have a primary therapeutic role in ulcerative colitis. Specific compositions of enteral diets-elemental diets or diets containing specific components-were not shown to have any advantage over standard polymeric diets and their place in the treatment of CD or UC need further evaluation. Recent theories suggest that diet may be implicated in the etiology of IBD, however there are no proven dietary approaches to reduce the risk of developing IBD. PMID:19496185

  17. Diet and Nutrition

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Rings Frequently Asked Questions Definitions Transplantation Diet and Nutrition Food . . . . Adherence to a low copper diet is most important ... Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Generic Zinc Options Inheritence Diet & Nutrition Kayser-Fleischer Rings Wilson Disease FAQs Definitions Transplantation ...

  18. Total Parenteral Nutrition

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Print This Page Email This Page Total Parenteral Nutrition Brand Name(s): TPN WHY is this medicine prescribed? Your doctor has ordered total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for you. TPN will drip through a ...

  19. Mindfulness training for stress management: a randomised controlled study of medical and psychology students

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Distress and burnout among medical and psychology professionals are commonly reported and have implications for the quality of patient care delivered. Already in the course of university studies, medicine and psychology students report mental distress and low life satisfaction. There is a need for interventions that promote better coping skills in students in order to prevent distress and future burnout. This study examines the effect of a seven-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) programme on mental distress, study stress, burnout, subjective well-being, and mindfulness of medical and psychology students. Methods A total of 288 students (mean age =?23 years, 76% female) from the University of Oslo and the University of Tromsř were randomly allocated to an intervention or control group. The control group continued with their standard university courses and received no intervention. Participants were evaluated using self-reported measures both before and after the intervention. These were: the ‘General Health Questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory Student version, Perceived Medical School Stress, Subjective Well-being, and Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire’ and additional indices of compliance. Results Following the intervention, a moderate effect on mental distress (Hedges’g 0.65, CI =?.41, .88), and a small effect on both subjective well-being (Hedges’g 0.40, CI =?.27, .63) and the mindfulness facet ‘non-reacting’ (Hedges’g 0.33, CI =?.10, .56) were found in the intervention group compared with the control group. A higher level of programme attendance and reported mindfulness exercises predicted these changes. Significant effects were only found for female students who additionally reported reduced study stress and an increase in the mindfulness facet ‘non-judging’. Gender specific effects of participation in the MBSR programme have not previously been reported, and gender differences in the present study are discussed. Conclusion Female medical and psychology students experienced significant positive improvements in mental distress, study stress, subjective well-being and mindfulness after participating in the MBSR programme. Trial registration NCT00892138 PMID:23941053

  20. Testing of TAMU3: a Nb3Sn Block–Coil Dipole with Stress Management

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Peter

    2015-09-20

    The Accelerator Research Lab (ARL) at Texas A&M has recently concluded the construction and testing of a superconducting block-coil dipole TAMU3. TAMU3 reached 85% of the resistive-onset short sample critical current (0.1 ?V/cm criterion) that was measured on extracted strands at the National High Magnetic Field Lab. Peak magnet current was 6603 amps, and all with quenches originated in the vicinity of the hard-way chicane near the exit lead of the TAMU3c inner winding. Leading up to the testing we discovered that we had made two grievous mistakes in the fabrication (we mistakenly used the wrong superconducting wire for the cables of the inner windings) and the heat treatment (we used a heat treatment that was too hot and too long). We extracted strands from the leads of the inner and outer windings, and colleagues at NHMFL performed short-sample measurements upon them. The NHMFL measurements indicated RRR ~ 2-5, which gives very little stability against microquenches. The short-sample tests of the extracted strands exhibited a long resistive transition, in which there was a current Isc(B) beyond which it became resistive, then a higher current In(B) at which it went fully normal. Using the Isc(B) data we predicted a short-sample limit for the revised load line of TAMU3 of 7700 A (9 T) – a disappointing reduction from the 14 T objective. On those unhappy notes we undertook the testing of the dipole. The first quench occurred at 5695 A, and the dipole trained thereafter to a maximum quench current of 6600 A (7.6 T), 85% of the compromised short-sample limit. All quenches occurred at a single location, in the region of the S-bend transition and outer lead of one inner winding. Data was collected from stress transducers on the outer windings to evaluate stress management, and on the coil ends to evaluate capture of axial forces by staticfriction lock. The low field reached prevented us from extending those tests to the stress levels where they would have become most interesting, but the designed stress management appeared to be working at the level tested.