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Sample records for oak quercus suber

  1. Effects of cadmium on cork oak (Quercus suber L.) plants grown in hydroponics.

    PubMed

    Gogorcena, Yolanda; Larbi, Ajmi; Andaluz, Sofia; Carpena, Ramón O; Abadía, Anunciación; Abadía, Javier

    2011-12-01

    Cork oak (Quercus suber L.) is an autochthonous tree species that is being used for reforestation in heavy-metal-contaminated areas in Spain. A hydroponics experiment was carried out to characterize the effects of Cd on several morphological and physiological parameters in this species, including shoot length, nutrient concentrations and allocation in different organs, leaf pigment concentrations, photosynthetic efficiency, root ferric chelate reductase (FCR) activity and organic acid concentrations in xylem sap. Four different Cd treatments were applied, adding Cd chelated with EDTA or as chloride salt at two different concentrations (10 and 50 µM Cd). After 1 month of Cd treatment, plant growth was significantly inhibited in all treatments. Results indicate that Cd accumulates in all organs 7- to 500-fold when compared with control plants. The highest Cd concentration was found in the 50 µM CdCl(2) treatment, which led to concentrations of ~30, 123 and 1153 µg Cd g(-1) dry weight in leaves, stems and roots, respectively. In the strongest Cd treatments the concentrations of P and Ca decreased in some plant parts, whereas the Mn leaf concentrations decreased with three of the four Cd treatments applied. The concentrations of chlorophyll and carotenoids on an area basis decreased, whereas the (zeaxanthin plus antheraxanthin)/(total violaxanthin cycle carotenoids) ratio and the non-photochemical quenching increased significantly in all Cd treatments. Cadmium treatments caused significant increases in the activity of the enzyme FCR in roots and in the concentrations of organic acids in xylem sap. Some of the physiological changes found support the fact that Cd induces a deficiency of Fe in cork oak, although the plant Fe concentrations were not reduced significantly. At higher concentrations the effects of Cd were more pronounced, and were more marked when Cd was in the free ion form than when present in the form of Cd-EDTA. PMID:22121153

  2. Sewage sludge effects on mesofauna and cork oak (Quercus suber L.) leaves decomposition in a Mediterranean forest firebreak.

    PubMed

    Pernin, Céline; Cortet, Jérôme; Joffre, Richard; Le Petit, Jean; Torre, Franck

    2006-01-01

    Effects of sewage sludge on litter mesofauna communities (Collembola and Acari) and cork oak (Quercus suber L.) leaf litter decomposition have been studied during 18 mo using litterbags in an in situ experimental forest firebreak in southeastern France. The sludge (2.74 t DM ha(-1) yr(-1)) was applied to fertilize and maintain a pasture created on the firebreak. Litterbag colonization had similar dynamics on both the control and fertilized plots and followed a typical Mediterranean pattern showing a greater abundance in spring and autumn and a lower abundance in summer. After 9 mo of litter colonization, Collembola and Acari, but mainly Oribatida, were more abundant on the sludge-fertilized plot. Leaf litter decomposition showed a similar pattern on both plots, but it was faster on the control plot. Furthermore, leaves from the fertilized plot were characterized by greater nitrogen content. Both chemical composition of leaves and sludges and the decomposition state of leaves have significantly affected the mesofauna community composition from each plot. PMID:17071899

  3. Ancient and current gene flow between two distantly related Mediterranean oak species, Quercus suber and Q. ilex

    PubMed Central

    Lumaret, Roselyne; Jabbour-Zahab, Roula

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Quercus suber and Q. ilex are distantly related and their distributions partially overlap. They hybridize occasionally, but the complete replacement of Q. suber chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) by that of Q. ilex was identified in two specific geographical areas. The objective of this study was to determine whether the contrasting situation reflected current or recent geographical interspecies gene flow variation or was the result of ancient introgression. Methods cpDNA PCR-RFLPs (restriction fragment length polymorphisms) and variation at ten nuclear microsatellite loci were analysed in populations of each species, in 16 morphologically intermediate individuals and the progeny of several of them. Interspecies nuclear introgression was based on individual admixture rates using a Bayesian approach with no a priori species assignment, and on a maximum-likelihood (ML) method, using allele frequencies in the allopatric populations of each species as controls. Gene flow was compared specifically between populations located within and outside the specific areas. Key Results High interspecies nuclear genetic differentiation was observed, with twice the number of alleles in Q. ilex than in Q. suber. According to Bayesian assignment, approx. 1 % of individuals had a high probability of being F1 hybrids, and bidirectional nuclear introgression affected approx. 4 % of individuals in each species. Hybrid and introgressed individuals were identified predominantly in mixed stands and may have a recent origin. Higher proportions including allospecific genes recovered from past hybridization were obtained using the ML method. Similar rates of hybridization and of nuclear introgression, partially independent of cpDNA interspecies transfer suggestive of gene filtering, were obtained in the populations located within and outside the areas of complete cpDNA replacement. Conclusions The results did not provide evidence for geographical variation in interspecies gene flow. In

  4. Effects of partial defoliation on carbon and nitrogen partitioning and photosynthetic carbon uptake by two-year-old cork oak (Quercus suber) saplings.

    PubMed

    Cerasoli, S; Scartazza, A; Brugnoli, E; Chaves, M M; Pereira, J S

    2004-01-01

    At the end of the growing season in late July, 20-month-old cork oak (Quercus suber L.) saplings were partially defoliated (63% of leaf area) to evaluate their ability to recover leaf area after defoliation. At 18 and 127 days after defoliation, changes in starch and nitrogen pools were determined in leaves and perennial organs, and variations in photosynthetic carbon uptake were investigated. To determine the role of stored nitrogen in regrowth after defoliation, plant nitrogen was labeled in the previous winter by enriching the nutrient solution with 15N. Plants recovered the lost leaf area in 127 days. Although there was remobilization of starch and nitrogen from leaves and perennial organs, the availability of resources for growth in the following spring was not decreased by defoliation. On the contrary, starch concentration in coarse roots was higher in defoliated saplings than in control saplings, presumably as a result of the higher net CO2 exchange rate in newly developed leaves compared with pre-existing leaves. PMID:14652217

  5. Effects of fire temperature on the physical and chemical characteristics of the ash from two plots of Cork oak (Quercus Suber)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ubeda, X.; Pereira, P.; Outeiro, L.; Martin, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    Cork oak, (Quercus suber) is widely distributed in the Mediterranean region, an area subject to frequent fires. The ash produced by burning can have impacts on the soil status and water resources that can differ according to the temperature reached during fire and the characteristics of the litter, defined as the dead organic matter accumulated on the soil surface prior to the fire. The aim of this work is to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of ash produced in laboratory experiments to approximate conditions typical of fires in this region. The litter of Quercus suber collected from two different plots on the Iberian Peninsula, Mas Bassets (Catalonia) and Albufeira (Portugal), was combusted at different temperatures for 2h. We measured Mass Loss (ML per cent), ash colour and CaCO3 content, pH, Electrical Conductivity (EC) and the major cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+ and Na+) released from ash slurries created by mixing ash with deionized water. The results showed that ML per cent is higher at all temperatures in Albufeira samples compared to Mas Bassets samples, except at 550??C, and the rate of loss increases faster with temperature than the Mas Bassets samples. At 150??C the ash colour is yellowish, becoming reddish at 200- 250??C and black at 300??C. Above 400??C the ash is grey/white. This thermal degradation is mostly observed in Albufeira litter. The formation of CaCO3 was identified at a lower temperature in Albufeira litter. At temperatures <300??C, pH and EC values are lower, rising at higher temperatures, especially in Albufeira slurries. The concentration of cations at lower temperatures does not differ substantially from the unburned sample except for Mg2+. The cation concentration increases at medium temperatures and decrease at higher temperatures, especially the concentration of divalent cations. The monovalent cations showed a larger concentration at moderate temperatures, mainly in Albufeira ash slurries. The analysis of the Ca:Mg ratio

  6. [Effects of fire recurrence on fire behaviour in cork oak woodlands (Quercus suber L.) and Mediterranean shrublands over the last fifty years].

    PubMed

    Schaffhauser, Alice; Pimont, François; Curt, Thomas; Cassagne, Nathalie; Dupuy, Jean-Luc; Tatoni, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Past fire recurrence impacts the vegetation structure, and it is consequently hypothesized to alter its future fire behaviour. We examined the fire behaviour in shrubland-forest mosaics of southeastern France, which were organized along a range of fire frequency (0 to 3-4 fires along the past 50 years) and had different time intervals between fires. The mosaic was dominated by Quercus suber L. and Erica-Cistus shrubland communities. We described the vegetation structure through measurements of tree height, base of tree crown or shrub layer, mean diameter, cover, plant water content and bulk density. We used the physical model Firetec to simulate the fire behaviour. Fire intensity, fire spread, plant water content and biomass loss varied significantly according to fire recurrence and vegetation structure, mainly linked to the time since the last fire, then the number of fires. These results confirm that past fire recurrence affects future fire behaviour, with multi-layered vegetation (particularly high shrublands) producing more intense fires, contrary to submature Quercus woodlands that have not burnt since 1959 and that are unlikely to reburn. Further simulations, with more vegetation scenes according to shrub and canopy covers, will complete this study in order to discuss the fire propagation risk in heterogeneous vegetation, particularly in the Mediterranean area, with a view to a local management of these ecosystems. PMID:26646258

  7. A Neighborhood Analysis of the Consequences of Quercus suber Decline for Regeneration Dynamics in Mediterranean Forests

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, Beatriz; Gómez-Aparicio, Lorena; Stoll, Peter; Ávila, José M.; Pérez-Ramos, Ignacio M.; Marañón, Teodoro

    2015-01-01

    In forests, the vulnerable seedling stage is largely influenced by the canopy, which modifies the surrounding environment. Consequently, any alteration in the characteristics of the canopy, such as those promoted by forest dieback, might impact regeneration dynamics. Our work analyzes the interaction between canopy neighbors and seedlings in Mediterranean forests affected by the decline of their dominant species (Quercus suber). Our objective was to understand how the impacts of neighbor trees and shrubs on recruitment could affect future dynamics of these declining forests. Seeds of the three dominant tree species (Quercus suber, Olea europaea and Quercus canariensis) were sown in six sites during two consecutive years. Using a spatially-explicit, neighborhood approach we developed models that explained the observed spatial variation in seedling emergence, survival, growth and photochemical efficiency as a function of the size, identity, health, abundance and distribution of adult trees and shrubs in the neighborhood. We found strong neighborhood effects for all the performance estimators, particularly seedling emergence and survival. Tree neighbors positively affected emergence, independently of species identity or health. Alternatively, seedling survival was much lower in neighborhoods dominated by defoliated and dead Q. suber trees than in neighborhoods dominated by healthy trees. For the two oak species, these negative effects were consistent over the three years of the experimental seedlings. These results indicate that ongoing changes in species’ relative abundance and canopy trees’ health might alter the successional trajectories of Mediterranean oak-forests through neighbor-specific impacts on seedlings. The recruitment failure of dominant late-successional oaks in the gaps opened after Q. suber death would indirectly favor the establishment of other coexisting woody species, such as drought-tolerant shrubs. This could lead current forests to shift

  8. Effects of a low severity prescribed fire on water-soluble elements in ash from a cork oak (Quercus suber) forest located in the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pereira, P.; beda, X.; Martin, D.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Guerrero, C.

    2011-01-01

    Wildfire is the major disturbance in Mediterranean forests. Prescribed fire can be an alternative to reduce the amount of fuel and hence decrease the wildfire risk. However the effects of prescribed fire must be studied, especially on ash properties, because ash is an important nutrient source for ecosystem recovery. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of a low severity prescribed fire on water-soluble elements in ash including pH, electrical conductivity (EC), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), potassium (K), aluminum (Al), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), silica (SiO2) and total sulphur (TS). A prescribed fire was conducted in a cork oak (Quercus suber) (Q.S) forest located in the northeast part of the Iberian Peninsula. Samples were collected from a flat plot of 40??70m mainly composed of Q.S and Quercus robur (Q.R) trees. In order to understand the effects of the prescribed fire on the soluble elements in ash, we conducted our data analysis on three data groups: all samples, only Q.S samples and only Q.R samples. All three sample groups exhibited a significant increase in pH, EC (p<0.001), water-soluble Ca, Mg, Na, SiO2 and TS and a decrease in water-soluble Mn, Fe and Zn. Differences were identified between oak species for water-soluble K, Al and Fe. In Q.S samples we registered a significant increase in the first two elements p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively, and a non-significant impact in the third, at p<0.05. In Q.R data we identified a non-significant impact on water-soluble K and Al and a significant decrease in water-soluble Fe (p<0.05). These differences are probably due to vegetation characteristics and burn severity. The fire induced a higher variability in the ash soluble elements, especially in Q.S samples, that at some points burned with higher severity. The increase of pH, EC, Ca, Mg, Na and K will improve soil fertility, mainly in the study area where soils are acidic. The application of this low severity prescribed

  9. Effects of a low severity prescribed fire on water-soluble elements in ash from a cork oak (Quercus suber) forest located in the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Paulo; Ubeda, Xavier; Martin, Deborah; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Guerrero, César

    2011-02-01

    Wildfire is the major disturbance in Mediterranean forests. Prescribed fire can be an alternative to reduce the amount of fuel and hence decrease the wildfire risk. However the effects of prescribed fire must be studied, especially on ash properties, because ash is an important nutrient source for ecosystem recovery. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of a low severity prescribed fire on water-soluble elements in ash including pH, electrical conductivity (EC), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), potassium (K), aluminum (Al), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), silica (SiO(2)) and total sulphur (TS). A prescribed fire was conducted in a cork oak (Quercus suber) (Q.S) forest located in the northeast part of the Iberian Peninsula. Samples were collected from a flat plot of 40×70m mainly composed of Q.S and Quercus robur (Q.R) trees. In order to understand the effects of the prescribed fire on the soluble elements in ash, we conducted our data analysis on three data groups: all samples, only Q.S samples and only Q.R samples. All three sample groups exhibited a significant increase in pH, EC (p<0.001), water-soluble Ca, Mg, Na, SiO(2) and TS and a decrease in water-soluble Mn, Fe and Zn. Differences were identified between oak species for water-soluble K, Al and Fe. In Q.S samples we registered a significant increase in the first two elements p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively, and a non-significant impact in the third, at p<0.05. In Q.R data we identified a non-significant impact on water-soluble K and Al and a significant decrease in water-soluble Fe (p<0.05). These differences are probably due to vegetation characteristics and burn severity. The fire induced a higher variability in the ash soluble elements, especially in Q.S samples, that at some points burned with higher severity. The increase of pH, EC, Ca, Mg, Na and K will improve soil fertility, mainly in the study area where soils are acidic. The application of this low severity

  10. Studies on the ectomycorrhizal community in a declining Quercus suber L. stand.

    PubMed

    Lancellotti, Enrico; Franceschini, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    This survey was carried out in a Quercus suber L. stand with many trees affected by the disease "oak decline". Its aim was to obtain information about both the belowground ectomycorrhizal fungal community in a declining Q. suber stand as a whole, and the ectomycorrhizal fungal community of individual tree (EFT) detected in healthy and diseased plants. To this end, we first categorized the trees into four different decline classes (one for healthy plants and three for diseased plants) and then, by using morphological and molecular tools, we identified the ectomycorrhizas isolated from samples collected near the trees with different declining classes. The ectomycorrhizal community as a whole was seen to be composed of numerous ectomycorrhizal fungal species, only some of which appeared to be dominant (Cenococcum geophilum, Lactarius chrysorrheus, and some species of Tomentella genus), while most occurred sporadically. Results show that all root tips observed are mycorrhized and that decline class does not influence the number of ectomycorrhizal root tips found in the EFTs, thus oak decline does not impact the investment in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. However, some statistical differences can be observed in the values of evenness and taxonomic distinctness in the EFT associated with trees with different states of health. Finally, both the analysis of similarity test and the ordination technique highlight a compositional difference between the EFT associated with trees in different health conditions, but also suggest that other factors may play a role in causing these differences. PMID:23503869

  11. Evaluation of the presence of arabinogalactan proteins and pectins during Quercus suber male gametogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Mário Luís; Sobral, Rómulo; Costa, Maria Manuela Ribeiro; Amorim, Maria Isabel; Coimbra, Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Quercus suber (cork oak) is a dominant tree of the Fagaceae in forests of the south-west Iberian Peninsula. It is monoecious with a long progamic phase that provides a comprehensive system for comparative studies in development and sexual reproduction. In this study the distribution of arabinogalactan protein (AGPs) and pectin epitopes in anthers of Q. suber was assessed to map these hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins and the galacturonate-rich acidic polysaccharides during pollen development. Methods Immunolocalization in male flowers was performed with a set of monoclonal antibodies directed against the carbohydrate moiety that recognizes AGPs and pectins. To identify AGP genes involved in cork oak male flower development, a search was conducted for annotated AGP genes in the available transcriptome data of the Cork Oak EST Consortium database (www.corkoakdb.org). Key Results Ubiquitous labelling in all cell types was obtained with anti-homogalacturan antibodies for methyl-esterified pectins. In contrast, the antibody that labelled non-methyl-esterified homogalacturans had a preferential presence in microsporocyte cells walls at the beginning of pollen development. Intense labelling was obtained with anti-AGP antibodies both in the tapetum and in the intine wall near the pollen apertures and later in the generative cell wall and vegetative cell. Evaluation of the putative AGPs highly expressed in the male gametophyte was achieved by quantitative RT-PCR analysis in male and female cork oak flowers. Conclusions Four putative AGP genes were identified that are preferentially expressed in the male flower compared with the female flower. The putative Arabidopsis thaliana orthologues of these genes are associated with preferential expression in pollen, suggesting that the AGPs probably play a significant role in cork oak reproduction. PMID:25452249

  12. Purification of a new isoform of laccase from a Marasmius quercophilus strain isolated from a cork oak litter (Quercus suber L).

    PubMed

    Farnet, A M; Criquet, S; Pocachard, E; Gil, G; Ferre, E

    2002-01-01

    A new isoform of laccase from Marasmius quercophilus is described in this study. The strain of this white-rot fungus was isolated for the first time on a cork oak litter. This isoform exhibited certain common properties of laccases (a molecular weight of 65 Kda, an optimum pH of 6.2 with syringaldazine). But this laccase has also particularly novel features: the best activity measured was observed at high temperatures (80 C) and this isoform was not inhibited with EDTA. Furthermore, this induced laccase was able to transform most of the aromatic compounds tested without the addition of mediators to the reaction mixture, and the transformation of certain chlorophenols (2-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol) by a laccase isoform from M. quercophilus is reported here for the first time. We also demonstrate the importance of 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) as a mediator since it allowed veratryl alcohol and p-hydroxybenzoic acid transformation. Moreover, new products of transformation were observed using the combination of ABTS with this isoform of laccase. PMID:21156546

  13. Iowa's oldest oaks. [Quercus alba

    SciTech Connect

    Duvick, D.N.; Blasing, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    Tree-ring analysis revealed 33 living white oaks (Quercus alba) in Iowa that began growing before 1700. Core of wood 4 mm in diameter, each extracted from a radius of a tree trunk were analyzed. The oldest white oak, found in northeastern Warren County, began growing about 1570 and is thus over 410 years old. A chinkapin oak (Quercus muehlenbergii) was also found which was more than 300 years old. Ring widths from the white oaks are well correlated with total precipitation for the twelve months preceding completion of ring formation in July. Reconstructions of annual (August-July) precipitation for 1680-1979, based on the tree rings, indicate that the driest annual period in Iowa was August 1799-July 1800, and that the driest decade began about 1816. Climatic information of this kind, pre-dating written weather records, can be used to augment those records and provide a longer baseline of information for use by climatologists and hydrologic planners.

  14. Reference Gene Selection for Quantitative Real-time PCR Normalization in Quercus suber

    PubMed Central

    Marum, Liliana; Miguel, Andreia; Ricardo, Cândido P.; Miguel, Célia

    2012-01-01

    The use of reverse transcription quantitative PCR technology to assess gene expression levels requires an accurate normalization of data in order to avoid misinterpretation of experimental results and erroneous analyses. Despite being the focus of several transcriptomics projects, oaks, and particularly cork oak (Quercus suber), have not been investigated regarding the identification of reference genes suitable for the normalization of real-time quantitative PCR data. In this study, ten candidate reference genes (Act, CACs, EF-1α, GAPDH, His3, PsaH, Sand, PP2A, ß-Tub and Ubq) were evaluated to determine the most stable internal reference for quantitative PCR normalization in cork oak. The transcript abundance of these genes was analysed in several tissues of cork oak, including leaves, reproduction cork, and periderm from branches at different developmental stages (1-, 2-, and 3-year old) or collected in different dates (active growth period versus dormancy). The three statistical methods (geNorm, NormFinder, and CV method) used in the evaluation of the most suitable combination of reference genes identified Act and CACs as the most stable candidates when all the samples were analysed together, while ß-Tub and PsaH showed the lowest expression stability. However, when different tissues, developmental stages, and collection dates were analysed separately, the reference genes exhibited some variation in their expression levels. In this study, and for the first time, we have identified and validated reference genes in cork oak that can be used for quantification of target gene expression in different tissues and experimental conditions and will be useful as a starting point for gene expression studies in other oaks. PMID:22529976

  15. Quercus suber range dynamics by ecological niche modelling: from the Last Interglacial to present time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vessella, Federico; Simeone, Marco Cosimo; Schirone, Bartolomeo

    2015-07-01

    Ecological Niche Modelling (ENM) is widely used to depict species potential occurrence according to environmental variables under different climatic scenarios. We tested the ENM approach to infer past range dynamics of cork oak, a keystone species of the Mediterranean Biome, from 130 ka to the present time. Hindcasting implications would deal with a better species risk assessment and conservation management for the future. We modelled present and past occurrence of cork oak using seven ENM algorithms, starting from 63,733 spatially unique presence points at 30 arc-second resolution. Fourteen environmental variables were used and four time slices were considered (Last Interglacial, Last Glacial Maximum, mid-Holocene and present time). A threshold-independent evaluation of the goodness-of-fit of the models was evaluated by means of ROC curve and fossil or historical evidences were used to validate the results. Four weighted average maps depicted the dynamics of area suitability for cork oak in the last 130 ka. The derived species autoecology allowed its long-term occurrence in the Mediterranean without striking range reduction or shifting. Fossil and historical post-processing validation support the modelled past spatial extension and a neglected species presence at Levantine until the recent time. Despite the severe climatic oscillation since the Last Glacial Maximum, cork oak potential distribution area experienced limited range changes, confirming its strong link with the Mediterranean Basin. The ecological amplitude of Quercus suber could be therefore adopted as a reference to trace the Mediterranean bioclimate area. A better knowledge of the past events of Mediterranean vegetation, a wider range of study species and environmental determinants are essential to inform us about its current state, its sensitivity to human impact and the potential responses to future changes.

  16. Effect of tannins from Quercus suber and Quercus coccifera leaves on ethanol-induced gastric lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Khennouf, Seddik; Benabdallah, Hassiba; Gharzouli, Kamel; Amira, Smain; Ito, Hideyuki; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Yoshida, Takashi; Gharzouli, Akila

    2003-02-26

    The gastroprotective effects of 70% acetone extracts of Quercus suber and Quercus coccifera leaves and of tannins (pedunculagin, castalagin, phillyraeoidin A, and acutissimin B) purified from these extracts were examined in the mouse using the ethanol-induced gastric ulcer model. Both extracts (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg), given orally, prevented the formation of ethanol-induced lesions in the stomach. The percent protection varied between 68 and 91%. Purified tannins (50 mg/kg) were also effective in protecting the stomach against ethanol, and the percent protection varied from 66 to 83%. Castalagin was the most potent. Both extracts and all of the tannins tested (10, 25, and 50 microg/mL) strongly inhibited (55-65%) the lipid peroxidation of rabbit brain homogenate. These results suggest that the gastroprotective effects of extracts of Q. suber and Q. coccifera leaves and the purified tannins in this experimental model are related to their anti-lipoperoxidant properties. PMID:12590500

  17. Differences in fine-scale genetic structure and dispersal in Quercus ilex L. and Q. suber L.: consequences for regeneration of mediterranean open woods.

    PubMed

    Soto, A; Lorenzo, Z; Gil, L

    2007-12-01

    Cork oak (Quercus suber L.) and holm oak (Q. ilex L.) are among the most important tree species (economically and ecologically) in the Western Mediterranean region, where they define unique open woods (created and maintained by man) known as 'dehesas' in Spain. However, these formations are under increasing threat due to the lack of regeneration. We have analysed spatial genetic structure in a mixed parkland; inferences about gene dispersal have also been performed, according to the isolation by distance model. Noticeable differences have been detected between the species, despite their similar ecological roles. Restricted effective dispersal leads to kin structures in cork oak, up to 70 m, while no genetic structure is observed in holm oak. Our results suggest a very effective dispersal for the latter, with a local historical gene flow estimated between 55 and 95 m. This is the first time regeneration of Mediterranean oak parklands has been assessed from a genetic perspective. Effective gene flow detected for holm oaks allows us to discount the risk of inbreeding over successive generations. Thus, regeneration of Q. ilex dehesas will just require action directed to help the settlement of the saplings (such as limiting grazing). However, in those cases where densities are too low, more intense forestation (such as plantation and/or establishment of appropriate shelter) will be needed. The 'density threshold' for initiating regeneration will probably be higher for cork oak, due to its more limited dispersal and minor full-light tolerance. PMID:17971829

  18. Proteomic analysis from haploid and diploid embryos of Quercus suber L. identifies qualitative and quantitative differential expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Aranzazu; López, Juan Antonio; Pintos, Beatriz; Camafeita, Emilio; Bueno, Ma Angeles

    2009-09-01

    Quercus suber L. is a Mediterranean forest species with ecological, social and economic value. Clonal propagation of Q. suber elite trees has been successfully obtained from in vitro-derived somatic and gametic embryos. These clonal lines play a main role in breeding and genetic studies of Q. suber. To aid in unravelling diverse genetic and biological unknowns, a proteomic approach is proposed. The proteomic analysis of Q. suber somatic and gametic in vitro culture-derived embryos, based on DIGE and MALDI-MS, has produced for the first time proteomic data on this species. Seventeen differentially expressed proteins have been identified which display significantly altered levels between gametic and somatic embryos. These proteins are involved in a variety of cellular processes, most of which had been neither previously associated with embryo development nor identified in the genus Quercus. Some of these proteins are involved in stress and pollen development and others play a role in the metabolism of tannins and phenylpropanoids, which represent two of the major pathways for the synthesis of cork chemical components. Furthermore, the augmented expression levels found for specific proteins are probably related to the homozygous state of a doubled-haploid sample. Proteins involved in synthesis of cork components can be detected at such early stages of development, showing the potential of the method to be useful in searching for biomarkers related to cork quality. PMID:19662628

  19. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of male and female flowers of monoecious Quercus suber

    PubMed Central

    Rocheta, Margarida; Sobral, Rómulo; Magalhães, Joana; Amorim, Maria I.; Ribeiro, Teresa; Pinheiro, Miguel; Egas, Conceição; Morais-Cecílio, Leonor; Costa, Maria M. R.

    2014-01-01

    Monoecious species provide a comprehensive system to study the developmental programs underlying the establishment of female and male organs in unisexual flowers. However, molecular resources for most monoecious non-model species are limited, hampering our ability to study the molecular mechanisms involved in flower development of these species. The objective of this study was to identify differentially expressed genes during the development of male and female flowers of the monoecious species Quercus suber, an economically important Mediterranean tree. Total RNA was extracted from different developmental stages of Q. suber flowers. Non-normalized cDNA libraries of male and female flowers were generated using 454 pyrosequencing technology producing a total of 962,172 high-quality reads with an average length of 264 nucleotides. The assembly of the reads resulted in 14,488 contigs for female libraries and 10,438 contigs for male libraries. Comparative analysis of the transcriptomes revealed genes differentially expressed in early and late stages of development of female and male flowers, some of which have been shown to be involved in pollen development, in ovule formation and in flower development of other species with a monoecious, dioecious, or hermaphroditic sexual system. Moreover, we found differentially expressed genes that have not yet been characterized and others that have not been previously shown to be implicated in flower development. This transcriptomic analysis constitutes a major step toward the characterization of the molecular mechanisms involved in flower development in a monoecious tree with a potential contribution toward the knowledge of conserved developmental mechanisms in other species. PMID:25414713

  20. Molecular organization of the 25S-18S rDNA IGS of Fagus sylvatica and Quercus suber: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Inácio, Vera; Rocheta, Margarida; Morais-Cecílio, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    The 35S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) units, repeated in tandem at one or more chromosomal loci, are separated by an intergenic spacer (IGS) containing functional elements involved in the regulation of transcription of downstream rRNA genes. In the present work, we have compared the IGS molecular organizations in two divergent species of Fagaceae, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus suber, aiming to comprehend the evolution of the IGS sequences within the family. Self- and cross-hybridization FISH was done on representative species of the Fagaceae. The IGS length variability and the methylation level of 18 and 25S rRNA genes were assessed in representatives of three genera of this family: Fagus, Quercus and Castanea. The intergenic spacers in Beech and Cork Oak showed similar overall organizations comprising putative functional elements needed for rRNA gene activity and containing a non-transcribed spacer (NTS), a promoter region, and a 5'-external transcribed spacer. In the NTS: the sub-repeats structure in Beech is more organized than in Cork Oak, sharing some short motifs which results in the lowest sequence similarity of the entire IGS; the AT-rich region differed in both spacers by a GC-rich block inserted in Cork Oak. The 5'-ETS is the region with the higher similarity, having nonetheless different lengths. FISH with the NTS-5'-ETS revealed fainter signals in cross-hybridization in agreement with the divergence between genera. The diversity of IGS lengths revealed variants from ∼ 2 kb in Fagus, and Quercus up to 5.3 kb in Castanea, and a lack of correlation between the number of variants and the number of rDNA loci in several species. Methylation of 25S Bam HI site was confirmed in all species and detected for the first time in the 18S of Q. suber and Q. faginea. These results provide important clues for the evolutionary trends of the rDNA 25S-18S IGS in the Fagaceae family. PMID:24893289

  1. The impact of drought on leaf physiology of Quercus suber L. trees: comparison of an extreme drought event with chronic rainfall reduction.

    PubMed

    Grant, Olga M; Tronina, Lukasz; Ramalho, José Cochicho; Kurz Besson, Cathy; Lobo-do-Vale, Raquel; Santos Pereira, João; Jones, Hamlyn G; Chaves, M Manuela

    2010-10-01

    Understanding the responses of cork oak (Quercus suber L.) to actual and predicted summer conditions is essential to determine the future sustainability of cork oak woodlands in Iberia. Thermal imaging may provide a rapid method for monitoring the extent of stress. The ecophysiology of cork trees was studied over three years. Three treatments were applied by means of rainfall capture and irrigation, with plots receiving 120%, 100%, or 80% of natural precipitation. Despite stomatal closure, detected using both thermal imaging and porometry, leaf water potential fell during the summer, most drastically during the third year of accumulative stress. The quantum efficiency (ΦPSII) and the maximum efficiency Fv' /FM' of photosystem II also fell more intensely over the third summer, while non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) increased. The reduced precipitation treatment sporadically further reduced leaf water potential, stomatal conductance (gs), IG (an index of gs derived from thermal imaging), ΦPSII, and Fv' /FM', and increased leaf temperature and NPQ. It is concluded that these are very resilient trees since they were only severely affected in the third year of severe drought (the third year registering 45% less rainfall than average), and removing 20% of rainfall had a limited impact.. PMID:20685731

  2. Drought impact on carbon and water cycling in a Mediterranean Quercus suber L. woodland during the extreme drought event in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piayda, A.; Dubbert, M.; Rebmann, C.; Kolle, O.; Silva, F. Costa e.; Correia, A.; Pereira, J. S.; Werner, C.; Cuntz, M.

    2014-07-01

    Savannah-type ecosystems account for 26-30% of global gross primary productivity GPP with water being one of the major driving factors. In Europe, savannah-type woodlands cover an area of about 1.5 million ha. Here, the recent past has shown a significant decrease of precipitation P in winter and spring as well as decrease of total annual precipitation. Strong effects on local water balance and carbon sink strength have thus been reported due to changes in precipitation regime. The objective of this study is to quantify the impact of the extreme drought event in 2012 on the water balance, gross primary productivity and carbon sink strength of a typical Portuguese cork-oak woodland (montado) compared to the wet year 2011. Physiological responses of the dominant tree species Quercus suber (L.) are disentangled, employing combined photosynthesis and stomatal conductance modelling. Precipitation effectiveness ET / P increased from 86% in 2011 to 122% in the dry year 2012 due to deep soil or ground water access of the Q. suber trees leaving no water for ground water replenishment. Understorey and overstorey GPP were strongly reduced by 53% and 28%, respectively, in 2012 compared to 2011 due to the late onset of the autumn rains in 2011 and an additional severe winter/spring drought. However, the ecosystem was still a carbon sink in both years but with a 38% reduced sink strength under extreme drought in 2012 compared to 2011. The combined photosynthesis-stomatal conductance model yielded best results if it was allowed to adjust photosynthetic and stomatal parameters simultaneously. If stomatal response was modelled with the Leuning approach, which allows for a different sensitivity to vapour pressure deficit, the stomatal model parameters were highly coupled. A change in either of the parameters needed to be compensated by the other to guarantee a stable sensitivity of stomatal conductance to assimilation, independently from variations in vapour pressure deficit. The Q

  3. Drought impact on carbon and water cycling in a Mediterranean Quercus suber L. woodland during the extreme drought event in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piayda, Arndt; Dubbert, Maren; Rebmann, Corinna; Kolle, Olaf; Silva, Filipe Costa e.; Correia, Alexandra; Pereira, João S.; Werner, Christiane; Cuntz, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Savannah-type ecosystems account for 26-30% of global gross primary productivity GPP, with water being one of the major driving factors. In Europe, savannah-type woodlands cover an area of about 1.5 million ha. Here, the recent past has shown a significant decrease in precipitation P in winter and spring as well as a decrease in total annual precipitation. Strong effects on local water balance and carbon sink strength have thus been reported due to changes in precipitation regime. The objective of this study is to quantify the impact of the extreme drought event in 2012 on the water balance, gross primary productivity and carbon sink strength of a typical Portuguese cork-oak woodland (montado) compared to the wet year of 2011. Physiological responses of the dominant tree species Quercus suber (L.) are disentangled employing combined photosynthesis and stomatal conductance modelling. Precipitation effectiveness ET/P increased from 86% in 2011 to 122% in the 2012 dry year due to deep soil or groundwater access of the Q. suber trees leaving no water for groundwater replenishment. Understorey and overstorey GPP were strongly reduced, by 53 and 28%, respectively, in 2012 compared to 2011, due to the late onset of the autumn rains in 2011 and an additional severe winter/spring drought. However, the ecosystem was still a carbon sink in both years, but with a 38% reduced sink strength under extreme drought in 2012 compared to 2011. The combined photosynthesis-stomatal conductance model yielded the best results if it was allowed to adjust photosynthetic and stomatal parameters simultaneously. If stomatal response was modelled with the Leuning approach, which allows for a different sensitivity to vapour pressure deficit, the stomatal model parameters were highly coupled. A change in either of the parameters needed to be compensated by the other to guarantee a stable sensitivity of stomatal conductance to assimilation, independent of variations in vapour pressure deficit. The

  4. Drought impact on carbon and water cycling in a Mediterranean Quercus suber L. woodland during the extreme drought event in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piayda, A.; Dubbert, M.; Rebmann, C.; Kolle, O.; Silva, F. Costa e.; Correia, A.; Pereira, J. S.; Werner, C.; Cuntz, M.

    2014-12-01

    Savannah-type ecosystems account for 26-30% of global gross primary productivity GPP, with water being one of the major driving factors. In Europe, savannah-type woodlands cover an area of about 1.5 million ha. Here, the recent past has shown a significant decrease in precipitation P in winter and spring as well as a decrease in total annual precipitation. Strong effects on local water balance and carbon sink strength have thus been reported due to changes in precipitation regime. The objective of this study is to quantify the impact of the extreme drought event in 2012 on the water balance, gross primary productivity and carbon sink strength of a typical Portuguese cork-oak woodland (montado) compared to the wet year of 2011. Physiological responses of the dominant tree species Quercus suber (L.) are disentangled employing combined photosynthesis and stomatal conductance modelling. Precipitation effectiveness ET/P increased from 86% in 2011 to 122% in the 2012 dry year due to deep soil or groundwater access of the Q. suber trees leaving no water for groundwater replenishment. Understorey and overstorey GPP were strongly reduced, by 53 and 28%, respectively, in 2012 compared to 2011, due to the late onset of the autumn rains in 2011 and an additional severe winter/spring drought. However, the ecosystem was still a carbon sink in both years, but with a 38% reduced sink strength under extreme drought in 2012 compared to 2011. The combined photosynthesis-stomatal conductance model yielded the best results if it was allowed to adjust photosynthetic and stomatal parameters simultaneously. If stomatal response was modelled with the Leuning approach, which allows for a different sensitivity to vapour pressure deficit, the stomatal model parameters were highly coupled. A change in either of the parameters needed to be compensated by the other to guarantee a stable sensitivity of stomatal conductance to assimilation, independent of variations in vapour pressure deficit. The

  5. Regeneration Patterns of European Oak Species (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl., Quercus robur L.) in Dependence of Environment and Neighborhood

    PubMed Central

    Annighöfer, Peter; Beckschäfer, Philip; Vor, Torsten; Ammer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Quercus robur L. (pedunculate oak) and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl. (sessile oak) are two European oak species of great economic and ecological importance. Even though both oaks have wide ecological amplitudes of suitable growing conditions, forests dominated by oaks often fail to regenerate naturally. The regeneration performance of both oak species is assumed to be subject to a variety of variables that interact with one another in complex ways. The novel approach of this research was to study the effect of many ecological variables on the regeneration performance of both oak species together and identify key variables and interactions for different development stages of the oak regeneration on a large scale in the field. For this purpose, overstory and regeneration inventories were conducted in oak dominated forests throughout southern Germany and paired with data on browsing, soil, and light availability. The study was able to verify the assumption that the occurrence of oak regeneration depends on a set of variables and their interactions. Specifically, combinations of site and stand specific variables such as light availability, soil pH and iron content on the one hand, and basal area and species composition of the overstory on the other hand. Also browsing pressure was related to oak abundance. The results also show that the importance of variables and their combinations differs among the development stages of the regeneration. Light availability becomes more important during later development stages, whereas the number of oaks in the overstory is important during early development stages. We conclude that successful natural oak regeneration is more likely to be achieved on sites with lower fertility and requires constantly controlling overstory density. Initially sufficient mature oaks in the overstory should be ensured. In later stages, overstory density should be reduced continuously to meet the increasing light demand of oak seedlings and saplings

  6. Regeneration patterns of European oak species (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl., Quercus robur L.) in dependence of environment and neighborhood.

    PubMed

    Annighöfer, Peter; Beckschäfer, Philip; Vor, Torsten; Ammer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Quercus robur L. (pedunculate oak) and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl. (sessile oak) are two European oak species of great economic and ecological importance. Even though both oaks have wide ecological amplitudes of suitable growing conditions, forests dominated by oaks often fail to regenerate naturally. The regeneration performance of both oak species is assumed to be subject to a variety of variables that interact with one another in complex ways. The novel approach of this research was to study the effect of many ecological variables on the regeneration performance of both oak species together and identify key variables and interactions for different development stages of the oak regeneration on a large scale in the field. For this purpose, overstory and regeneration inventories were conducted in oak dominated forests throughout southern Germany and paired with data on browsing, soil, and light availability. The study was able to verify the assumption that the occurrence of oak regeneration depends on a set of variables and their interactions. Specifically, combinations of site and stand specific variables such as light availability, soil pH and iron content on the one hand, and basal area and species composition of the overstory on the other hand. Also browsing pressure was related to oak abundance. The results also show that the importance of variables and their combinations differs among the development stages of the regeneration. Light availability becomes more important during later development stages, whereas the number of oaks in the overstory is important during early development stages. We conclude that successful natural oak regeneration is more likely to be achieved on sites with lower fertility and requires constantly controlling overstory density. Initially sufficient mature oaks in the overstory should be ensured. In later stages, overstory density should be reduced continuously to meet the increasing light demand of oak seedlings and saplings

  7. Acute renal failure in 2 adult llamas after exposure to Oak trees (Quercus spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro, Manuel F.; Passler, Thomas; Joiner, Kellye; Poppenga, Robert H.; Bayne, Jenna; Walz, Paul H.

    2013-01-01

    Two adult llamas (Lama glama) previously exposed to oak trees (Quercus spp.) were presented with a history of depression and anorexia. Clinicopathological abnormalities included severe gastroenteritis, acute renal failure, and increased liver enzymes. This is believed to be the first report of oak toxicosis in South American camelids. PMID:23814303

  8. KINETICS OF LEAF TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATION AFFECT ISOPRENE EMISSION FROM RED OAK (QUERCUS RUBRA) LEAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the rate of isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) emission from plants is highly temperature-dependent, we investigated the natural fluctuations on leaf temperature and the effects of rapid temperature change on isoprene emission of red oak (Quercus rubra L.) leaves at the to...

  9. Complete chloroplast genome of the Oriental white oak: Quercus aliena Blume.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sihai; Hou, Meng; Du, Fang K; Li, Junqing; Yin, Kangquan

    2016-07-01

    The complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence of the Oriental white oak: Quercus aliena Blume, the first sequenced member of the section Quercus, is reported in this study. The length of cp genome size is 160,921 bp, with 36.9% GC content. A pair of 25,841 bp inverted repeat regions (IRs) is separated by a 90,258 bp large single copy region (LSC) and an 18,980 bp small single copy region (SSC). This genome contains 115 unique genes, including 89 coding genes, four rRNA genes, and 39 tRNA genes. Border analysis of cp genome of Quercus aliena and other 10 most closely related cp genomes revealed that most Fagaceae species have high similarity either in structure or distribution of these genes except for Trigonobalanus doichangensis. PMID:26114324

  10. Function of defensive volatiles in pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) is tricked by the moth Tortrix viridana.

    PubMed

    Ghirardo, Andrea; Heller, Werner; Fladung, Matthias; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Schroeder, Hilke

    2012-12-01

    The indirect defences of plants are comprised of herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) that among other things attract the natural enemies of insects. However, the actual extent of the benefits of HIPV emissions in complex co-evolved plant-herbivore systems is only poorly understood. The observation that a few Quercus robur L. trees constantly tolerated (T-oaks) infestation by a major pest of oaks (Tortrix viridana L.), compared with heavily defoliated trees (susceptible: S-oaks), lead us to a combined biochemical and behavioural study. We used these evidently different phenotypes to analyse whether the resistance of T-oaks to the herbivore was dependent on the amount and scent of HIPVs and/or differences in non-volatile polyphenolic leaf constituents (as quercetin-, kaempferol- and flavonol glycosides). In addition to non-volatile metabolic differences, typically defensive HIPV emissions differed between S-oaks and T-oaks. Female moths were attracted by the blend of HIPVs from S-oaks, showing significantly higher amounts of (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene (DMNT) and (E)-β-ocimene and avoid T-oaks with relative high fraction of the sesquiterpenes α-farnesene and germacrene D. Hence, the strategy of T-oaks exhibiting directly herbivore-repellent HIPV emissions instead of high emissions of predator-attracting HIPVs of the S-oaks appears to be the better mechanism for avoiding defoliation. PMID:22632165

  11. Genetic differentiation of oak populations within the Quercus robur/Quercus petraea complex in Central and Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Gömöry, D; Yakovlev, I; Zhelev, P; Jedináková, J; Paule, L

    2001-05-01

    Genetic structure of 25 indigenous populations of sessile and pedunculate oaks (Quercus petraea and Q. robur), originating from three geographical regions: Slovakia, Bulgaria and the Republic Mari-El (Russia), was investigated using isozyme markers. Mean number of alleles per locus ranged between 1.8 and 2.6 in Q. robur populations and from 2.0 to 3.0 in Q. petraea populations; slightly higher expected heterozygosity values were found in Q. robur compared to Q. petraea. One locus, coding for a substrate-nonspecific dehydrogenase, differentiated the two species. The interspecific component of gene diversity was 46.7% at this locus, compared to 0.4-7.8% at the remaining loci. PMID:11554972

  12. Climate change effect on Betula (birch) and Quercus (oak) pollen seasons in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Bielory, Leonard; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2014-07-01

    Climatic change is expected to affect the spatiotemporal patterns of airborne allergenic pollen, which has been found to act synergistically with common air pollutants, such as ozone, to cause allergic airway disease (AAD). Observed airborne pollen data from six stations from 1994 to 2011 at Fargo (North Dakota), College Station (Texas), Omaha (Nebraska), Pleasanton (California), Cherry Hill and Newark (New Jersey) in the US were studied to examine climate change effects on trends of annual mean and peak value of daily concentrations, annual production, season start, and season length of Betula (birch) and Quercus (oak) pollen. The growing degree hour (GDH) model was used to establish a relationship between start/end dates and differential temperature sums using observed hourly temperatures from surrounding meteorology stations. Optimum GDH models were then combined with meteorological information from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, and land use land coverage data from the Biogenic Emissions Land use Database, version 3.1 (BELD3.1), to simulate start dates and season lengths of birch and oak pollen for both past and future years across the contiguous US (CONUS). For most of the studied stations, comparison of mean pollen indices between the periods of 1994-2000 and 2001-2011 showed that birch and oak trees were observed to flower 1-2 weeks earlier; annual mean and peak value of daily pollen concentrations tended to increase by 13.6 %-248 %. The observed pollen season lengths varied for birch and for oak across the different monitoring stations. Optimum initial date, base temperature, and threshold GDH for start date was found to be 1 March, 8 °C, and 1,879 h, respectively, for birch; 1 March, 5 °C, and 4,760 h, respectively, for oak. Simulation results indicated that responses of birch and oak pollen seasons to climate change are expected to vary for different regions.

  13. Climate change effect on Betula (birch) and Quercus (oak) pollen seasons in the United States.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Bielory, Leonard; Georgopoulos, Panos G

    2014-07-01

    Climatic change is expected to affect the spatiotemporal patterns of airborne allergenic pollen, which has been found to act synergistically with common air pollutants, such as ozone, to cause allergic airway disease (AAD). Observed airborne pollen data from six stations from 1994 to 2011 at Fargo (North Dakota), College Station (Texas), Omaha (Nebraska), Pleasanton (California), Cherry Hill and Newark (New Jersey) in the US were studied to examine climate change effects on trends of annual mean and peak value of daily concentrations, annual production, season start, and season length of Betula (birch) and Quercus (oak) pollen. The growing degree hour (GDH) model was used to establish a relationship between start/end dates and differential temperature sums using observed hourly temperatures from surrounding meteorology stations. Optimum GDH models were then combined with meteorological information from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, and land use land coverage data from the Biogenic Emissions Land use Database, version 3.1 (BELD3.1), to simulate start dates and season lengths of birch and oak pollen for both past and future years across the contiguous US (CONUS). For most of the studied stations, comparison of mean pollen indices between the periods of 1994-2000 and 2001-2011 showed that birch and oak trees were observed to flower 1-2 weeks earlier; annual mean and peak value of daily pollen concentrations tended to increase by 13.6%-248%. The observed pollen season lengths varied for birch and for oak across the different monitoring stations. Optimum initial date, base temperature, and threshold GDH for start date was found to be 1 March, 8 °C, and 1,879 h, respectively, for birch; 1 March, 5 °C, and 4,760 h, respectively, for oak. Simulation results indicated that responses of birch and oak pollen seasons to climate change are expected to vary for different regions. PMID:23793955

  14. Probable toxicosis in cattle in Israel caused by the oak Quercus calliprinos.

    PubMed

    Yeruham, I; Avidar, Y; Perl, S; Yakobson, B; Shlosberg, A; Hanji, V; Bogin, E

    1998-12-01

    A probable outbreak of oak (Quercus calliprinos) toxicosis in a herd of beef cattle--heifers and first-calving cows--grazing in the Judean foothills of Israel is described. Toxicosis probably occurred because of the consumption of oak leaves and buds during a period of pasture scarcity without any feed supplementation. A progressive syndrome of wasting, dullness, anorexia, polyuria, nephrosis, constipation and recumbency, culminating in death, was seen. A high mortality rate of 83% (38/46 animals) was noted. The clinical-pathological findings revealed increases in blood urea, creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and inorganic phosphorus. Decreases were found in alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total serum protein, albumin (ALB), triglyceride (TG), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na) and chloride (CI). The main pathological findings were severe nephrosis, chronic interstitial nephritis, and occasional intestinal ulceration. On the basis of epidemiology, clinical signs, clinical-pathological and pathological findings and renal histology, a tentative diagnosis of oak toxicosis was made. PMID:9830693

  15. An evaluation of bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) decline in the urban forest of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catton, H.A.; St., George, S.; Remphrey, W.R.

    2007-01-01

    Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, has a large, indigenous population of bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.). In the 1980s, many of these trees were showing signs of decline, a disease caused by a complex of abiotic and secondary biotic stressing agents. Potential causal factors were investigated by comparing various aspects of 120 bur oaks visually rated as healthy or declined based on crown dieback levels. The results indicated that many selected bur oak trees predated surrounding urban development and that declined trees were significantly older with more severe stem wounds and competition from surrounding trees than healthy specimens. Average annual growth ring widths of healthy and declined trees were similar in the early part of the 20th century. However, decline actually began decades before symptoms were noticed, coinciding with a period of in tense city-wide urban development, as growth of declined trees was slower than that of healthy trees beginning sporadically in the 1940s and consistently from 1974 to 2001. During the early years of decline, the year-by-year separation in ring width between the two categories was significantly positively related to precipitation levels. This suggested that in wet years, declined trees may have been surrounded by unfavorable water-logged soils, possibly as a result of natural drainage patterns being impeded by urban development. ?? 2007 International Society of Arboriculture.

  16. Leaf morphological and physiological adaptations of a deciduous oak (Quercus faginea Lam.) to the Mediterranean climate: a comparison with a closely related temperate species (Quercus robur L.).

    PubMed

    Peguero-Pina, José Javier; Sisó, Sergio; Sancho-Knapik, Domingo; Díaz-Espejo, Antonio; Flexas, Jaume; Galmés, Jeroni; Gil-Pelegrín, Eustaquio

    2016-03-01

    'White oaks'--one of the main groups of the genus Quercus L.--are represented in western Eurasia by the 'roburoid oaks', a deciduous and closely related genetic group that should have an Arcto-Tertiary origin under temperate-nemoral climates. Nowadays, roburoid oak species such as Quercus robur L. are still present in these temperate climates in Europe, but others are also present in southern Europe under Mediterranean-type climates, such as Quercus faginea Lam. We hypothesize the existence of a coordinated functional response at the whole-shoot scale in Q. faginea under Mediterranean conditions to adapt to more xeric habitats. The results reveal a clear morphological and physiological segregation between Q. robur and Q. faginea, which constitute two very contrasting functional types in response to climate dryness. The most outstanding divergence between the two species is the reduction in transpiring area in Q. faginea, which is the main trait imposed by the water deficit in Mediterranean-type climates. The reduction in leaf area ratio in Q. faginea should have a negative effect on carbon gain that is partially counteracted by a higher inherent photosynthetic ability of Q. faginea when compared with Q. robur, as a consequence of higher mesophyll conductance, higher maximum velocity of carboxylation and much higher stomatal conductance (gs). The extremely high gs of Q. faginea counteracts the expected reduction in gs imposed by the stomatal sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit, allowing this species to diminish water losses maintaining high net CO2 assimilation values along the vegetative period under nonlimiting soil water potential values. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that Q. faginea can be regarded as an example of adaptation of a deciduous oak to Mediterranean-type climates. PMID:26496958

  17. Net Photosynthesis and Early Growth Trends of a Dominant White Oak (Quercus alba L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Phillip M.; Teskey, Robert O.; Phelps, John E.; Hinckley, Thomas M.

    1979-01-01

    Examination of the relationship between photosynthesis and growth of a dominant white oak (Quercus alba L.) tree has shown that most growth processes were either completed or well underway before the establishment of significant positive rates of net photosynthesis. Growth was initiated first in the root system (March 3), followed by stem cambial growth (March 26) and later by flower, leaf, and branch growth (April 10). During the period of rapid leaf and branch growth, root and cambial growth ceased and then resumed as the leaves approached maturity. The rapid rate of leaf maturation, the early appearance of positive rates of net photosynthesis in leaves (15% of final size) and the CO2-refixing capability of elongating branch tissue reduced the period of time that this white oak tree was dependent on stored reserves. Lower temperature optima and compensation points in developing leaves and stems indicated that the growth-temperature response was optimized for the lower seasonal temperatures observed during the spring. This temperature adaptation further reduced the time that this tree was dependent on stored reserves. Images PMID:16661108

  18. Weak trophic interactions among birds, insects and white oak saplings (Quercus alba)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lichtenberg, J.S.; Lichtenberg, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    We examined the interactions among insectivorous birds, arthropods and white oak saplings (Quercus alba L.) in a temperate deciduous forest under 'open' and 'closed' canopy environments. For 2 y, we compared arthropod densities, leaf damage and sapling growth. Saplings from each canopy environment were assigned to one of four treatments: (1) reference, (2) bird exclosure, (3) insecticide and (4) exclosure + insecticide. Sap-feeding insects were the most abundant arthropod feeding guild encountered and birds reduced sap-feeder densities in 1997, but not in 1998. Although there was no detectable influence of birds on leaf-chewer densities in either year, leaf damage to saplings was greater within bird exclosures than outside of bird exclosures in 1997. Insecticide significantly reduced arthropod densities and leaf damage to saplings, but there was no corresponding increase in sapling growth. Growth and biomass were greater for saplings in more open canopy environments for both years. Sap-feeder densities were higher on closed canopy than open canopy saplings in 1997, but canopy environment did not influence the effects of birds on lower trophic levels. Although previous studies have found birds to indirectly influence plant growth and biomass, birds did not significantly influence the growth or biomass of white oak saplings during our study.

  19. Comparative Pollen Morphological Analysis and Its Systematic Implications on Three European Oak (Quercus L., Fagaceae) Species and Their Spontaneous Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Danielewicz, Władysław; Bocianowski, Jan; Maliński, Tomasz; Janyszek, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Pollen morphology of three parental Quercus species (Q. robur L., Q. petraea (Matt) Liebl, Q. pubescens Willd.) and two spontaneous hybrids of these species (Q. ×calvescens Vuk. = Q. petraea × Q. pubescens and Q. ×rosacea Bechst. = Q. robur × Q. petraea) was investigated in this study. The pollen originated from 18 natural oak sites and 67 individuals (oak trees). Each individual was represented by 30 pollen grains. In total, 2010 pollen grains were measured. They were analysed for nine quantitative and four qualitative features. Pollen size and shape were important features to diagnosing Quercus parental species and hybrids. On the basis of exine ornamentation, it was possible to identify only Q. pubescens, while the remaining species and hybrids did not differ significantly with respect to this feature. The determination of the diagnostic value of endoaperture features requires further palynological studies. On the basis of pollen size and shape Q. robur × Q. petraea was clearly separated. Grouping of 67 oak trees on the basis of pollen grain features has shown that individuals from different as well as same taxa occurred in the same groups. Likewise, with respect to natural sites, oak trees originating from the same places as well as from geographically distant ones, grouped together. Pollen morphological features allow to distinguish a part of the studied Quercus taxa. Therefore, it can be used as an auxiliary feature in the taxonomy. PMID:27564015

  20. Comparative Pollen Morphological Analysis and Its Systematic Implications on Three European Oak (Quercus L., Fagaceae) Species and Their Spontaneous Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Wrońska-Pilarek, Dorota; Danielewicz, Władysław; Bocianowski, Jan; Maliński, Tomasz; Janyszek, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Pollen morphology of three parental Quercus species (Q. robur L., Q. petraea (Matt) Liebl, Q. pubescens Willd.) and two spontaneous hybrids of these species (Q. ×calvescens Vuk. = Q. petraea × Q. pubescens and Q. ×rosacea Bechst. = Q. robur × Q. petraea) was investigated in this study. The pollen originated from 18 natural oak sites and 67 individuals (oak trees). Each individual was represented by 30 pollen grains. In total, 2010 pollen grains were measured. They were analysed for nine quantitative and four qualitative features. Pollen size and shape were important features to diagnosing Quercus parental species and hybrids. On the basis of exine ornamentation, it was possible to identify only Q. pubescens, while the remaining species and hybrids did not differ significantly with respect to this feature. The determination of the diagnostic value of endoaperture features requires further palynological studies. On the basis of pollen size and shape Q. robur × Q. petraea was clearly separated. Grouping of 67 oak trees on the basis of pollen grain features has shown that individuals from different as well as same taxa occurred in the same groups. Likewise, with respect to natural sites, oak trees originating from the same places as well as from geographically distant ones, grouped together. Pollen morphological features allow to distinguish a part of the studied Quercus taxa. Therefore, it can be used as an auxiliary feature in the taxonomy. PMID:27564015

  1. Physiological Responses to Prolonged Drought Differ Among Three Oak (Quercus) Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. E.; Moore, G. W.; Vogel, J. G.; Muir, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The physiological response of plants to water stress provides insights into which species may survive in exceptional drought conditions. This study conducted on a remnant post oak savanna site in College Station, Texas, examined how drought affected the physiology of three native oak species. In June 2014, after a period of equal watering, we subjected three year old Quercus shumardii (Shumard oak; SO), Q. virginiana (live oak; LO), and Q. macrocarpa (bur oak; BO) saplings to one of two watering treatments: 1) watered, receiving the equivalent of theaverage precipitation rate and 2) droughted, receiving a 100% reduction in precipitation. We measured predawn (ΨPD) and midday (ΨMD) leaf water potential; midday gas exchange (MGE) parameters including photosynthesis (Al), transpiration (T), stomatal conductance (gsw); and leaf soluble (SS) and non-soluble sugar (NSS) concentrations monthly between June and October 2014. Drought stress responses were evident after only one month of induced drought. Droughted saplings showed reduced ΨPD, ΨMD, and MGE (P ≤ 0.05) in comparison to watered saplings of the same species. LO saplings exhibited greater MGE (P ≤ 0.05) while maintaining similar LWP to their respective watered and droughted BO and SO counterparts. Droughted LO exhibited MGE rates similar to those of watered BO and SO (P ≤ 0.05), while watered LO adjusted its MGE rates to changes in water availability better than BO and LO during short-term drought. Compared to water saplings, droughted saplings had greater leaf SS (P = 0.08) and lower NSS concentrations (P = 0.10), possibly due to the conversion of NSS to SS and other simple compounds and reduced consumption of SS for growth by the droughted saplings. Although SO and BO exhibited similar photosynthesis rates, leaf total sugar (SS+NSS) concentration was greater in SO (P ≤ 0.05). By displaying the greatest average photosynthesis rate (P ≤ 0.05), LO should have accumulated the greatest amount of carbon

  2. UV light impact on ellagitannins and wood surface colour of European oak ( Quercus petraea and Quercus robur)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahri, S.; Belloncle, C.; Charrier, F.; Pardon, P.; Quideau, S.; Charrier, B.

    2007-03-01

    Two European oak species ( Q. petraea and Q. robur) have a high content of phenols which may participate in the alteration of colour upon UV irradiation. To study the photodegradation process of oak surfaces, the two oak species extractives, vescalagin, castalagin, ellagic acid and gallic acid were analysed quantitatively by HPLC before and after UV irradiation. Irradiation time was altered between 3, 24, 72, 96, 120, 144, 192 and 216 h. In parallel, any colour changes of Oak wood surface was followed after 120 h of UV-irradiation by measuring CIELAB parameters (DL*, Da*, Db* and DE*). We observed that 60% of total phenol content of extractives decreased after the maximal exposure time. Our findings also showed that castalagin and gallic acid were destroyed after 216 h and vescalagin and ellagic acid after 72 h. This study proves the photosenibility of oakwood extractives which, supplementary to lignin degradation, would strongly result in the discolouration of oak heartwood.

  3. Paenibacillus shirakamiensis sp. nov., isolated from the trunk surface of a Japanese oak (Quercus crispula).

    PubMed

    Tonouchi, Akio; Tazawa, Daisuke; Fujita, Takashi

    2014-05-01

    A novel bacterial strain designated P-1T was isolated from the trunk surface of a Japanese oak (Quercus crispula) growing in the Shirakami Mountains in Japan. Cells of strain P-1T were Gram-stain-negative, ellipsoidal endospore-forming, aerobic, slightly acidophilic rods, 0.8×2-5 µm, and motile by means of peritrichous flagella. Various carbohydrates could be used as growth substrates, but none of the organic acids tested were used. The major cellular fatty acid was anteiso-C15:0, which accounted for 64.2% of the total fatty acids. The major respiratory quinone was menaquinone 7 (MK-7). Strain P-1T contained phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine, four unidentified aminolipids, an unidentified phospholipid and two unidentified polar lipids. Strain P-1T shared the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Paenibacillus pini S22T (96.6%), followed by Paenibacillus chibensis JCM 9905T (96.1%) and Paenibacillus anaericanus MH21T (95.9%). The DNA G+C content was 43.9 mol%. These data indicate that strain P-1T represents a novel species within the genus Paenibacillus, for which we propose the name Paenibacillus shirakamiensis sp. nov. The type strain is P-1T (NBRC 109471T=DSM 26806T=KCTC 33126T=CIP 110571T). PMID:24556633

  4. Cheiracanthium ilicis sp. n. (Araneae, Eutichuridae), a novel spider species associated with Holm Oaks (Quercus ilex).

    PubMed

    Morano, Eduardo; Bonal, Raul

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel species Cheiracanthium ilicis sp. n. (Araneae, Eutichuridae) collected in the province of Toledo (Central Spain). It was found during a systematic sampling campaign carried out in an agricultural landscape with isolated Holm oaks Quercus ilex and small forest patches. Its morphology and affinities with other species of the genus are discussed. Furthermore, one mitochondrial gene was sequenced to confirm species membership and its differentiation from other Cheiracanthium species. The molecular phylogenies based on mitochondrial and nuclear genes showed a close relationship of Cheiracanthium ilicis sp. n. with Cheiracanthium inclusum and Cheiracanthium mildei, with which it also shares morphological similarities. Nonetheless, the sparse sampling of the phylogeny, due to the low number of sequences available, impedes drawing any definitive conclusion about these relationships; it is first necessary to perform an extensive review of the genus worldwide and more thorough phylogenies. Cheiracanthium ilicis sp. n. also shares certain ecological and phenological characteristics with Cheiracanthium inclusum and Cheiracanthium mildei. Like them, Cheiracanthium ilicis sp. n. is an obligate tree dweller that prefers a tree canopy habitat and reproduces primarily in late spring and summer. From a conservation perspective, the present study suggests the need to preserve isolated trees in agricultural landscapes. They are not only the refuge of common forest organisms but also of novel species yet to be discovered. PMID:27551185

  5. Effect of Hydro-alcoholic Extract of Persian Oak (Quercus brantii) in Experimentally Gastric Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Shahrzad; Ghasemi Pirbalouti, Abdollah; Amirmohammadi, Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Persian oak (Quercus brantii Lindl.) belongs the family Fagaceae, is a medicinal plant which seed flour is used to treat inflammatory and gastric ulcers by the tribes in south western Iran. The current study was done to evaluate the effect of hydro-alcoholic extract of Q. brantii seed flour for treatment of gastric ulcers induced by ethanol in Wistar rats. The hydro-alcoholic extract of Q. brantii was tested orally at doses of 250, 500, and 1000 mg/Kg, control group and standard drug (omperazole) on experimentally gastric ulceration. At the 3, 6, 9, and 14th days, ulcer index in mm2 and histopathological findings were evaluated. Results indicated the size of ulcers significantly reduced at 9, and 14 days after of Q. brantii extract treatment. Curative effect in the hydro-alcoholic induced gastric damage was 100% at 1000 mg/Kg and omeprazole, 99.8 % at 500 mg/Kg, and 95.4% at 250 mg/Kg after 14 days. Results of histopathological investigation showed the thickness of ulcerated mucosa was similar to the normal mucosa with 1000 mg/Kg of Q. brantii hydro-alcoholic extract after 14 days but in the groups treated by 250, and 500 mg/Kg, superficial erosions were visible in the central portion of the healed ulcers. In conclusion, the hydro-alcoholic extract of Q. brantii had active components (tannin = 8.2%) that accelerates ulcer healing and thus supported its traditional use. PMID:25276198

  6. Cheiracanthium ilicis sp. n. (Araneae, Eutichuridae), a novel spider species associated with Holm Oaks (Quercus ilex)

    PubMed Central

    Morano, Eduardo; Bonal, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We describe a novel species Cheiracanthium ilicis sp. n. (Araneae, Eutichuridae) collected in the province of Toledo (Central Spain). It was found during a systematic sampling campaign carried out in an agricultural landscape with isolated Holm oaks Quercus ilex and small forest patches. Its morphology and affinities with other species of the genus are discussed. Furthermore, one mitochondrial gene was sequenced to confirm species membership and its differentiation from other Cheiracanthium species. The molecular phylogenies based on mitochondrial and nuclear genes showed a close relationship of Cheiracanthium ilicis sp. n. with Cheiracanthium inclusum and Cheiracanthium mildei, with which it also shares morphological similarities. Nonetheless, the sparse sampling of the phylogeny, due to the low number of sequences available, impedes drawing any definitive conclusion about these relationships; it is first necessary to perform an extensive review of the genus worldwide and more thorough phylogenies. Cheiracanthium ilicis sp. n. also shares certain ecological and phenological characteristics with Cheiracanthium inclusum and Cheiracanthium mildei. Like them, Cheiracanthium ilicis sp. n. is an obligate tree dweller that prefers a tree canopy habitat and reproduces primarily in late spring and summer. From a conservation perspective, the present study suggests the need to preserve isolated trees in agricultural landscapes. They are not only the refuge of common forest organisms but also of novel species yet to be discovered. PMID:27551185

  7. Sensory-directed identification of taste-active ellagitannins in American (Quercus alba L.) and European oak wood (Quercus robur L.) and quantitative analysis in bourbon whiskey and oak-matured red wines.

    PubMed

    Glabasnia, Arne; Hofmann, Thomas

    2006-05-01

    Aimed at increasing our knowledge on the sensory-active nonvolatiles migrating from oak wood into alcoholic beverages upon cooperaging, an aqueous ethanolic extract prepared from oak wood chips (Quercus alba L.) was screened for its key taste compounds by application of the taste dilution analysis. Purification of the compounds perceived with the highest sensory impacts, followed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry as well as one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR experiments, revealed the ellagitannins vescalagin, castalagin, and grandinin, the roburins A-E, and 33-deoxy-33-carboxyvescalagin as the key molecules imparting an astringent oral sensation. To the best of our knowledge, 33-deoxy-33-carboxyvescalagin has as yet not been reported as a phytochemical in Q. alba L. In addition, the sensory activity of these ellagitannins was determined for the first time on the basis of their human threshold concentrations and dose/response functions. Furthermore, the ellagitannins have been quantitatively determined in extracts prepared from Q. alba L. and Quercus robur L., respectively, as well as in bourbon whiskey and oak-matured red wines, and the sensory contribution of the individual compounds has been evaluated for the first time on the basis of dose/activity considerations. PMID:16637699

  8. French Oak Wood (Quercus robur) Extract (Robuvit) in Primary Lymphedema: A Supplement, Pilot, Registry Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Belcaro, Gianni; Dugall, Mark; Hu, Shu; Ledda, Andrea; Ippolito, Edmondo

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this pilot supplement study was the evaluation of an oak wood extract (Robuvit, Quercus robur [QR], Horphag Research) in an 8-week registry study on lymphatic signs in primary lymphedema. Subjects with primary lymphedema confined to a single leg without skin changes or ulcerations were followed for at least 8 weeks. Lymphedema was mainly present distally (below the knee). Three groups were formed: one group used only the standard management for lymphedema; one used the same management plus 300 mg Robuvit; and one used the standard management plus 600 mg of Robuvit. The three groups were comparable. After 8 weeks the variation in leg volume was on average -6.2% with standard management, -15% in the QR 300 mg group, and -18.9% in the 600 mg group. The edema score was also significantly lower at 8 weeks in the two QR groups. The variation in proteins in the interstitial fluid in comparison with initial values was -14.8% in controls in comparison with -29.9% in QR 300 mg group and -36.9% in QR 600 mg group. Skin flux significantly improved (increased) in the two QR groups. Ultrasound pretibial skin thickness was decreased on average 6% in controls versus 10.3% in the low-dose QR group and 11.8% in the higher dose group. Perimalleolar thickness was decreased 7% in controls and more in the two QR groups. Ankle circumference was decreased 4.4% in controls and more in the two supplement groups. This pilot registry indicates that Robuvit can be effective in the management of primary lymphedema. More patients and longer evaluation periods are needed. PMID:25780327

  9. Influence of pericarp, cotyledon and inhibitory substances on sharp tooth oak (Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata) germination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Liu, Guangquan; Li, Qingmei; Liu, Yong; Hou, Longyu; Li, Guolei

    2012-01-01

    In order to explore the mechanism of delayed and uneven germination in sharp tooth oak (Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata) (STO), mechanical scarification techniques were used to study STO root and shoot germination and growth. The techniques used were: removing cup scar (RS), removing the pericarp (RP), and cutting off 1/2 (HC) and 2/3 (TC) cotyledons. Germination percentage and root and shoot length for Chinese cabbage (Beassica pekinensis) seeds (CCS) were also investigated for CCS cultivated in a Sanyo growth cabinet watered by distilled water and 80% methanol extracts from the acorn embryo, cotyledon and pericarp with concentrations of 1.0 g, 0.8 g, 0.6 g and 0.4 g dry acorn weight per ml methanol. The results showed that the majority of roots and shoots from acorns with RP and HC treatment emerged two weeks earlier, more simultaneously, and their total emergencies were more than 46% and 28% higher, respectively. TC accelerated root and shoot emergence time and root length, but root and shoot germination rate and shoot height had no significant difference from the control. Positive consequences were not observed on all indices of RS treatment. The germination rates of CCS watered by 1.0 g · ml(-1) methanol extracts from the embryo and cotyledon were significantly lower than those from the pericarp, and all concentrations resulted in decreased growth of root and shoot. Methanol extracts from pericarp significantly reduced root length of CCS, but presented little response in germination percentage and shoot length. The inhibitory effect was gradually increased with the increasing concentration of the methanol extract. We conclude that both the mechanical restriction of the pericarp and the presence of germination inhibitors in the embryo, cotyledon and pericarp are the causes for delayed and asynchronous germination of STO acorns. PMID:23133517

  10. French Oak Wood (Quercus robur) Extract (Robuvit) in Primary Lymphedema: A Supplement, Pilot, Registry Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Belcaro, Gianni; Dugall, Mark; Hu, Shu; Ledda, Andrea; Ippolito, Edmondo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this pilot supplement study was the evaluation of an oak wood extract (Robuvit, Quercus robur [QR], Horphag Research) in an 8-week registry study on lymphatic signs in primary lymphedema. Subjects with primary lymphedema confined to a single leg without skin changes or ulcerations were followed for at least 8 weeks. Lymphedema was mainly present distally (below the knee). Three groups were formed: one group used only the standard management for lymphedema; one used the same management plus 300 mg Robuvit; and one used the standard management plus 600 mg of Robuvit. The three groups were comparable. After 8 weeks the variation in leg volume was on average −6.2% with standard management, −15% in the QR 300 mg group, and −18.9% in the 600 mg group. The edema score was also significantly lower at 8 weeks in the two QR groups. The variation in proteins in the interstitial fluid in comparison with initial values was −14.8% in controls in comparison with −29.9% in QR 300 mg group and −36.9% in QR 600 mg group. Skin flux significantly improved (increased) in the two QR groups. Ultrasound pretibial skin thickness was decreased on average 6% in controls versus 10.3% in the low-dose QR group and 11.8% in the higher dose group. Perimalleolar thickness was decreased 7% in controls and more in the two QR groups. Ankle circumference was decreased 4.4% in controls and more in the two supplement groups. This pilot registry indicates that Robuvit can be effective in the management of primary lymphedema. More patients and longer evaluation periods are needed. PMID:25780327

  11. Soil transfers from valley oak (Quercus lobata Nee) stands increase ectomycorrhizal diversity and alter root and shoot growth on valley oak seedlings.

    PubMed

    Berman, J T; Bledsoe, C S

    1998-02-01

    Soils from valley oak (Quercus lobata Nee) riparian areas of the Cosumnes River Nature Conservancy Preserve near Sacramento, California were added to growth medium of valley oak seedlings grown in a greenhouse or in agricultural fields at Cosumnes which probably once supported valley oak trees and are now replanted with native riparian vegetation or allowed to revegetate naturally. Agricultural field soil from the Cosumnes River Preserve was presumed to be low or lacking in ectomycorrhizal inoculum. The study was designed to (1) determine whether valley oak stand soil transfer could cause mycorrhizal infection on valley oak seedlings in an agricultural field and in a greenhouse, (2) describe ectomycorrhizal morphological types formed on valley oak seedlings, and (3) determine whether seedling growth is enhanced more by transfer of natural valley oak stand soil than agricultural field soil. In the field study, transfer of forest soil increased average ectomycorrhizal diversity (2.4 types) more than transfer of agricultural field soil (1.2 types). Valley oak seedlings were responsive to ectomycorrhizal infection in the field study. With increase in mycorrhizal infection there was an increase in shoot growth at the expense of root growth. In the greenhouse study, both percent mycorrhizal infection and mycorrhizal diversity were increased more by transfer of oak forest and woodland soils than agricultural field soil. Eight morphotypes occurred on seedlings in forest and woodland soils but only three morphotypes in agricultural soil. This result strongly suggests that the agricultural field also harbors ectomycorrhizal propagules but forest and woodland soils support a more abundant and diverse ectomycorrhizal flora. PMID:24578047

  12. Development of Molecular Markers for Determining Continental Origin of Wood from White Oaks (Quercus L. sect. Quercus).

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Hilke; Cronn, Richard; Yanbaev, Yulai; Jennings, Tara; Mader, Malte; Degen, Bernd; Kersten, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    To detect and avoid illegal logging of valuable tree species, identification methods for the origin of timber are necessary. We used next-generation sequencing to identify chloroplast genome regions that differentiate the origin of white oaks from the three continents; Asia, Europe, and North America. By using the chloroplast genome of Asian Q. mongolica as a reference, we identified 861 variant sites (672 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); 189 insertion/deletion (indel) polymorphism) from representative species of three continents (Q. mongolica from Asia; Q. petraea and Q. robur from Europe; Q. alba from North America), and we identified additional chloroplast polymorphisms in pools of 20 individuals each from Q. mongolica (789 variant sites) and Q. robur (346 variant sites). Genome sequences were screened for indels to develop markers that identify continental origin of oak species, and that can be easily evaluated using a variety of detection methods. We identified five indels and one SNP that reliably identify continent-of-origin, based on evaluations of up to 1078 individuals representing 13 white oak species and three continents. Due to the size of length polymorphisms revealed, this marker set can be visualized using capillary electrophoresis or high resolution gel (acrylamide or agarose) electrophoresis. With these markers, we provide the wood trading market with an instrument to comply with the U.S. and European laws that require timber companies to avoid the trade of illegally harvested timber. PMID:27352242

  13. Development of Molecular Markers for Determining Continental Origin of Wood from White Oaks (Quercus L. sect. Quercus)

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Hilke; Cronn, Richard; Yanbaev, Yulai; Jennings, Tara; Mader, Malte; Degen, Bernd; Kersten, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    To detect and avoid illegal logging of valuable tree species, identification methods for the origin of timber are necessary. We used next-generation sequencing to identify chloroplast genome regions that differentiate the origin of white oaks from the three continents; Asia, Europe, and North America. By using the chloroplast genome of Asian Q. mongolica as a reference, we identified 861 variant sites (672 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); 189 insertion/deletion (indel) polymorphism) from representative species of three continents (Q. mongolica from Asia; Q. petraea and Q. robur from Europe; Q. alba from North America), and we identified additional chloroplast polymorphisms in pools of 20 individuals each from Q. mongolica (789 variant sites) and Q. robur (346 variant sites). Genome sequences were screened for indels to develop markers that identify continental origin of oak species, and that can be easily evaluated using a variety of detection methods. We identified five indels and one SNP that reliably identify continent-of-origin, based on evaluations of up to 1078 individuals representing 13 white oak species and three continents. Due to the size of length polymorphisms revealed, this marker set can be visualized using capillary electrophoresis or high resolution gel (acrylamide or agarose) electrophoresis. With these markers, we provide the wood trading market with an instrument to comply with the U.S. and European laws that require timber companies to avoid the trade of illegally harvested timber. PMID:27352242

  14. Influence of host species on ectomycorrhizal communities associated with two co-occurring oaks (Quercus spp.) in a tropical cloud forest.

    PubMed

    Morris, Melissa H; Pérez-Pérez, Miguel A; Smith, Matthew E; Bledsoe, Caroline S

    2009-08-01

    Interactions between host tree species and ectomycorrhizal fungi are important in structuring ectomycorrhizal communities, but there are only a few studies on host influence of congeneric trees. We investigated ectomycorrhizal community assemblages on roots of deciduous Quercus crassifolia and evergreen Quercus laurina in a tropical montane cloud forest, one of the most endangered tropical forest ecosystems. Ectomycorrhizal fungi were identified by sequencing internal transcribed spacer and partial 28S rRNA gene. We sampled 80 soil cores and documented high ectomycorrhizal diversity with a total of 154 taxa. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that oak host was significant in explaining some of the variation in ectomycorrhizal communities, despite the fact that the two Quercus species belong to the same red oak lineage (section Lobatae). A Tuber species, found in 23% of the soil cores, was the most frequent taxon. Similar to oak-dominated ectomycorrhizal communities in temperate forests, Thelephoraceae, Russulaceae and Sebacinales were diverse and dominant. PMID:19508503

  15. Sensitivity of red oak (Quercus rubra L.) and American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) seedlings to sodium salts in solution culture.

    PubMed

    Thorton, F C; Schaedle, M; Raynal, D J

    1988-06-01

    Sodium salt sensitivity of red oak (Quercus rubra L.) and American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) was evaluated in solution culture. Both species showed symptoms of salt injury when grown in the presence of less than 10 mM Na. In red oak, leaf symptoms first appeared at a sodium concentration of 6.0 mM and leaf weight was significantly reduced at 7.5 mM Na. Leaf, stem and root dry weights of American beech were significantly reduced in the presence of 4.0 mM sodium. In both species, browning of leaf margins and necrosis were evident in the Na-treated plants. The observed symptoms were associated with high concentrations of sodium in the tissues. Neither species appears to have control over sodium uptake and translocation. PMID:14972826

  16. Seasonal photosynthate allocation and leaf chemistry in relation to herbivory in the coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia

    SciTech Connect

    Mauffette, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia Nee) is an evergreen tree species distributed along the coastal range of California. The seasonal photosynthate allocation and leaf chemistry were studied on fifteen oak trees from spring 1982 to spring 1984. Branches of Q. agrifolia were labeled with /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ at monthly intervals, to determine photosynthate allocation to growth and to defensive compounds throughout the year. Labeled leaves were chemically analyzed to determine the activity present in various metabolic fractions (sugar, lipid, starch, phenolic, tannin, protein, organic and amino acid, and cell wall material). The utilization of photosynthate for the different chemical fractions varied during the seasons. New leaves allocated a significant proportion of carbon to phenolics early in the growing season, whereas later in the season more carbon was allocated to cell wall material. Old leaves maintained more consistent allocation patterns throughout seasons, and a large proportion of carbon was devoted to storage products.

  17. The Geographic Distribution of a Tropical Montane Bird Is Limited by a Tree: Acorn Woodpeckers (Melanerpes formicivorus) and Colombian Oaks (Quercus humboldtii) in the Northern Andes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Species distributions are limited by a complex array of abiotic and biotic factors. In general, abiotic (climatic) factors are thought to explain species’ broad geographic distributions, while biotic factors regulate species’ abundance patterns at local scales. We used species distribution models to test the hypothesis that a biotic interaction with a tree, the Colombian oak (Quercus humboldtii), limits the broad-scale distribution of the Acorn Woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus) in the Northern Andes of South America. North American populations of Acorn Woodpeckers consume acorns from Quercus oaks and are limited by the presence of Quercus oaks. However, Acorn Woodpeckers in the Northern Andes seldom consume Colombian oak acorns (though may regularly drink sap from oak trees) and have been observed at sites without Colombian oaks, the sole species of Quercus found in South America. We found that climate-only models overpredicted Acorn Woodpecker distribution, suggesting that suitable abiotic conditions (e.g. in northern Ecuador) exist beyond the woodpecker’s southern range margin. In contrast, models that incorporate Colombian oak presence outperformed climate-only models and more accurately predicted the location of the Acorn Woodpecker’s southern range margin in southern Colombia. These findings support the hypothesis that a biotic interaction with Colombian oaks sets Acorn Woodpecker’s broad-scale geographic limit in South America, probably because Acorn Woodpeckers rely on Colombian oaks as a food resource (possibly for the oak’s sap rather than for acorns). Although empirical examples of particular plants limiting tropical birds’ distributions are scarce, we predict that similar biotic interactions may play an important role in structuring the geographic distributions of many species of tropical montane birds with specialized foraging behavior. PMID:26083262

  18. Unusually limited pollen dispersal and connectivity of Pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) refugial populations at the species' southern range margin.

    PubMed

    Moracho, E; Moreno, G; Jordano, P; Hampe, A

    2016-07-01

    Low-latitudinal range margins of temperate and boreal plant species typically consist of scattered populations that persist locally in microrefugia. It remains poorly understood how their refugial habitats affect patterns of gene flow and connectivity, key components for their long-term viability and evolution. We examine landscape-scale patterns of historical and contemporary gene flow in refugial populations of the widespread European forest tree Pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) at the species' southwestern range margin. We sampled all adult trees (n = 135) growing in a 20 km long valley and genotyped 724 acorns from 72 mother trees at 17 microsatellite loci. The ten oak stands that we identified were highly differentiated and formed four distinct genetic clusters, despite sporadic historical dispersal being detectable. By far most contemporary pollination occurred within stands, either between local mates (85.6%) or through selfing (6.8%). Pollen exchange between stands (2.6%) was remarkably rare given their relative proximity and was complemented by long-distance pollen immigration (4.4%) and hybridization with the locally abundant Quercus pyrenaica (0.6%). The frequency of between-stand mating events decreased with increasing size and spatial isolation of stands. Overall, our results reveal outstandingly little long-distance gene flow for a wind-pollinated tree species. We argue that the distinct landscape characteristics of oaks' refugial habitats, with a combination of a rugged topography, dense vegetation and humid microclimate, are likely to increase plant survival but to hamper effective long-distance pollen dispersal. Moreover, local mating might be favoured by high tree compatibility resulting from genetic purging in these long-term relict populations. PMID:27146553

  19. Molecular Characterization of Meloidogyne christiei Golden and Kaplan, 1986 (Nematoda, Meloidogynidae) Topotype Population Infecting Turkey Oak (Quercus laevies) in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Brito, J. A.; Subbotin, S. A.; Han, H.; Stanley, J. D.; Dickson, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    Meloidogyne christiei isolated from turkey oak, Quercus laevies, from the type locality in Florida was characterized using isozyme profiles and ribosomal and mitochondrial gene sequences. The phenotype N1a detected from a single egg-laying female of M. christiei showed one very strong band of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity; however, no esterase (EST) activity was identified from macerate of one or even 20 females per well. Phylogenetic relationships within the genus Meloidogyne as inferred from Bayesian analysis of partial 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), D2-D3 of 28S rRNA, internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rRNA, and cytochrome oxidase subunit II (COII)-16S rRNA of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene fragments showed that M. christiei formed a separate lineage within the crown group of Meloidogyne and its relationships with any of three Meloidogyne clades were not resolved. PMID:26527837

  20. First Report of Northern Root-Knot Nematode, Meloidogyne hapla, Parasitic on Oaks, Quercus brantii and Q. infectoria in Iran.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, Effat; Maafi, Zahra Tanha; Panahi, Parisa; Barooti, Shapour

    2015-03-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN) are the most serious plant parasitic nematodes having a broad host range exceeding 2,000 plant species. Quercus brantii Lindl. and Q. infectoria Oliv are the most important woody species of Zagros forests in west of Iran where favors sub-Mediterranean climate. National Botanical Garden of Iran (NBGI) is scheduled to be the basic center for research and education of botany in Iran. This garden, located in west of Tehran, was established in 1968 with an area of about 150 ha at altitude of 1,320 m. The Zagros collection has about 3-ha area and it has been designed for showing a small pattern of natural Zagros forests in west of Iran. Brant's oak (Q. brantii) and oak manna tree (Q. infectoria) are the main woody species in Zagros collection, which have been planted in 1989. A nematological survey on Zagros forest collection in NBGI revealed heavily infection of 24-yr-old Q. brantii and Q. infectoria to RKN, Meloidogyne hapla. The roots contained prominent galls along with egg sac on the surface of each gall. The galls were relatively small and in some parts of root several galls were conjugated, and all galls contained large transparent egg masses. The identification of M. hapla was confirmed by morphological and morphometric characters and amplification of D2-D3 expansion segments of 28S rRNA gene. The obtained sequences of large-subunit rRNA gene from M. hapla was submitted to the GenBank database under the accession number KP319025. The sequence was compared with those of M. hapla deposited in GenBank using the BLAST homology search program and showed 99% similarity with those KJ755183, GQ130139, DQ328685, and KJ645428. The second stage juveniles of M. hapla isolated from Brant's oak (Q. Brantii) showed the following morphometric characters: (n = 12), L = 394 ± 39.3 (348 to 450) µm; a = 30.9 ± 4 (24.4 to 37.6); b = 4.6 ± 0.44 (4 to 5.1); b΄ = 3.3 ± 0.3 (2.7 to 3.7), c = 8.0 ± 1 (6.2 to 10.3), ć = 5.3 ± 0.8 (3.5 to 6.3); Stylet = 12

  1. First Report of Northern Root-Knot Nematode, Meloidogyne hapla, Parasitic on Oaks, Quercus brantii and Q. infectoria in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sohrabi, Effat; Maafi, Zahra Tanha; Panahi, Parisa; Barooti, Shapour

    2015-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN) are the most serious plant parasitic nematodes having a broad host range exceeding 2,000 plant species. Quercus brantii Lindl. and Q. infectoria Oliv are the most important woody species of Zagros forests in west of Iran where favors sub-Mediterranean climate. National Botanical Garden of Iran (NBGI) is scheduled to be the basic center for research and education of botany in Iran. This garden, located in west of Tehran, was established in 1968 with an area of about 150 ha at altitude of 1,320 m. The Zagros collection has about 3-ha area and it has been designed for showing a small pattern of natural Zagros forests in west of Iran. Brant’s oak (Q. brantii) and oak manna tree (Q. infectoria) are the main woody species in Zagros collection, which have been planted in 1989. A nematological survey on Zagros forest collection in NBGI revealed heavily infection of 24-yr-old Q. brantii and Q. infectoria to RKN, Meloidogyne hapla. The roots contained prominent galls along with egg sac on the surface of each gall. The galls were relatively small and in some parts of root several galls were conjugated, and all galls contained large transparent egg masses. The identification of M. hapla was confirmed by morphological and morphometric characters and amplification of D2-D3 expansion segments of 28S rRNA gene. The obtained sequences of large-subunit rRNA gene from M. hapla was submitted to the GenBank database under the accession number KP319025. The sequence was compared with those of M. hapla deposited in GenBank using the BLAST homology search program and showed 99% similarity with those KJ755183, GQ130139, DQ328685, and KJ645428. The second stage juveniles of M. hapla isolated from Brant’s oak (Q. Brantii) showed the following morphometric characters: (n = 12), L = 394 ± 39.3 (348 to 450) µm; a = 30.9 ± 4 (24.4 to 37.6); b = 4.6 ± 0.44 (4 to 5.1); b΄ = 3.3 ± 0.3 (2.7 to 3.7), c = 8.0 ± 1 (6.2 to 10.3), ć = 5.3 ± 0.8 (3.5 to 6.3); Stylet

  2. A comparative study of physiological and morphological seedling traits associated with shade tolerance in introduced red oak (Quercus rubra) and native hardwood tree species in southwestern Germany.

    PubMed

    Kuehne, Christian; Nosko, Peter; Horwath, Tobias; Bauhus, Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    Northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), a moderately shade-tolerant tree species, is failing to regenerate throughout its native North American range, while successful recruitment in Central Europe has been observed since its introduction. To examine whether comparative photosynthetic performance could explain the regeneration success of this non-native species in Central Europe, we compared the physiological and morphological seedling traits of red oak with three co-occurring tree species under three canopy types in southwestern Germany. Native species included a moderately shade-tolerant native oak (Quercus robur L.) and two shade-tolerant species (Acer pseudoplatanus L. and Carpinus betulus L.). The photosynthetic traits of non-native red oak seedlings were similar to those reported for this species in the native range, where shade-tolerant competitors readily outperform red oak under low light conditions. However, compared with native shade-tolerant species in Europe, red oak seedlings photosynthesized efficiently, especially under closed canopies and in small canopy gaps, exhibiting high photosynthetic capacity, low leaf dark respiration and leaf-level light compensation points that were similar to the more shade-tolerant species. The superior net carbon gain of red oak seedlings at low and moderate light levels was likely facilitated by high leaf areas and reflected by seedling dry masses that were greater than the observed native European species. A competitive advantage for red oak was not evident because relative height growth was inferior to seedlings of co-occurring species. In North America, the inability of seedlings to compete with shade-tolerant tree species in deeply shaded understories is central to the problem of poor oak recruitment. Our study suggests that the ability of non-native red oak to perform equally well to native shade-tolerant species under a variety of light conditions could contribute to the consistent success of red oak regeneration

  3. The Roles of Dispersal, Fecundity, and Predation in the Population Persistence of an Oak (Quercus engelmannii) under Global Change

    PubMed Central

    Conlisk, Erin; Lawson, Dawn; Syphard, Alexandra D.; Franklin, Janet; Flint, Lorraine; Flint, Alan; Regan, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    A species’ response to climate change depends on the interaction of biotic and abiotic factors that define future habitat suitability and species’ ability to migrate or adapt. The interactive effects of processes such as fire, dispersal, and predation have not been thoroughly addressed in the climate change literature. Our objective was to examine how life history traits, short-term global change perturbations, and long-term climate change interact to affect the likely persistence of an oak species - Quercus engelmannii (Engelmann oak). Specifically, we combined dynamic species distribution models, which predict suitable habitat, with stochastic, stage-based metapopulation models, which project population trajectories, to evaluate the effects of three global change factors – climate change, land use change, and altered fire frequency – emphasizing the roles of dispersal and seed predation. Our model predicted dramatic reduction in Q. engelmannii abundance, especially under drier climates and increased fire frequency. When masting lowers seed predation rates, decreased masting frequency leads to large abundance decreases. Current rates of dispersal are not likely to prevent these effects, although increased dispersal could mitigate population declines. The results suggest that habitat suitability predictions by themselves may under-estimate the impact of climate change for other species and locations. PMID:22623955

  4. Evaluation of antioxidant interactions in combined extracts of green tea (Camellia sinensis), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) and oak fruit (Quercus branti).

    PubMed

    Ranjbar Nedamani, Elham; Sadeghi Mahoonak, Alireza; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Kashaninejad, Mehdi

    2015-07-01

    Green tea (Camellia sinensis), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) and oak fruit (Quercus branti) are of known medicinal plants used in traditional medicine. They provide substantial antioxidant activities but the possible antioxidant interaction between them has not been studied. In the present study first the bioactive compounds from these three plants were first extracted and thereafter assayed for total phenols, 2, 2-diphenyl-1- picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, total antioxidant capacity (TAOC) and reducing power. In addition, the antioxidant properties of the extracts individually and in combinations were evaluated in soy bean oil as food system. There was a direct relation between total phenolics and antioxidant activities of extracts. Green tea and oak fruit extracts had the highest and least activity, respectively. All three kinds of interactions (synergistic, antagonistic and additive) were observed. In soy bean oil, the only effect was antagonism but even with this effect, combined extract was significantly (P < 0.05) better than butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and control sample. Results showed that these three natural extracts and their combination can be effectively used as a substituent of synthetic antioxidant BHT. PMID:26139926

  5. Spatial heterogeneity in the relative impacts of foliar quality and predation pressure on red oak, Quercus rubra, arthropod communities.

    PubMed

    Zehnder, Caralyn B; Stodola, Kirk W; Cooper, Robert J; Hunter, Mark D

    2010-12-01

    Predation pressure and resource availability often interact in structuring herbivore communities, with their relative influence varying in space and time. The operation of multiple ecological pressures and guild-specific herbivore responses may combine to override simple predictions of how the roles of plant quality and predation pressure vary in space. For 2 years at the Coweeta LTER in the Southern Appalachian Mountains, we conducted a bird exclosure experiment on red oak (Quercus rubra) saplings to investigate the effects of bird predation on red oak arthropod communities. We established bird exclosures at six sites along an elevational gradient and estimated variation in foliar nitrogen and bird predation pressure along this gradient. Foliar nitrogen concentrations increased with elevation while our index of bird predation pressure was variable across sites. Greater arthropod densities were detected inside exclosures; however, this result was mainly driven by the response of phloem feeders which were much more prevalent inside exclosures than on control trees. There was little evidence for an effect of bird predation on the other arthropod guilds. Consequently, there was no evidence of a trophic cascade either in terms of leaf damage or tree growth. Finally, we found more variation in arthropod density among trees within sites than variation in arthropod density among sites, indicating the importance of micro-site variation in structuring arthropod communities. PMID:20711610

  6. [Mycobiota of Quercus robur L. from the oak forest in the Zhytomyr region].

    PubMed

    Kurchenko, I M; Sokolova, O V; Orlov, O O; Iur'ieva, O M; Ivaniuk, T M

    2009-01-01

    Different organs of 155 samples of conditionally healthy and sick oaks were examined for mycological contamination. The isolated microscopic fungi belonged to 129 species of different taxonomic groups. The pathogenic complex was represented by 30 fungi species, however most of these species were isolated in single cases. Roots, wood, bast and bark were not affected by the phytopathogenic fungi species that can cause the death of the trees. Mycobiota of branches and sprouts was similar to that ofbark and wood. But frequency of occurence of phytopathogenic fungi was higher on the branches and leaves of drying out and dried oaks. Phytopathogenic fungi Alternaria alternata, Ceratocystis sp. and Trichothecium roseum were isolated more often than others. More often occurrence of Ceratocystis sp.was observed during last two years, they could not be the basic cause of the oak drying. That is also confirmed by similarity of mycobiota of conditionally healthy and drying oaks. PMID:20458934

  7. Road systems, land use, and related patterns of valley oak (Quercus lobata Nee) populations, seedling recruitment, and herbivory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Bill Ahlering

    This research investigates the interactions of road systems and land use on the population dynamics and recruitment of a long-lived tree in Mediterranean climate California. In the case of Valley oak (Quercus lobata), habitat conversion and limited recruitment of new individuals has resulted in widespread declines throughout Santa Barbara County and California. This pattern contrasts with high recruitment rates along roadsides, offering a unique opportunity to examine the effects of roads on the population dynamics of a native species. The pattern of roadside recruits is described, mapped, and a complete survey of the biophysical environment along 109 kilometers of road was conducted. The biophysical factors of the road and road system were of four types: (1) the general roadside environment; (2) the acorn supply; (3) a measure of ungulate deterrence; and, (4) roadside management. Seven individual or aggregate factors were then related to the pattern of seedling and sapling densities along roads. Univariate analysis and regression trees determined that acorn supply and total woody cover within the roadside plots explained 49% of the variation in Valley oak seedling densities. These results support the conclusion that the recruitment pattern is due to the roadsides serving as refugia from browsers (cattle and deer). The change in Valley oak populations within roadsides, croplands, rangelands, and urban/suburban lands over a 59 year period is examined using georeferenced aerial photos from 1938 and 1997. While population per capita growth rates were less than one (declining) within both rangelands and croplands, rates were greater than one (increasing) in urban/suburban populations. While roadside growth rates were even higher than those in urban/suburban areas, high variance resulted in a rate neither positive nor negative. Finally, seedlings were planted along roadsides and within adjacent grazed and ungrazed uplands to test browsing pressure. Seedlings within

  8. Larvicidal activity of oak Quercus infectoria Oliv. (Fagaceae) gall extracts against Anopheles stephensi Liston.

    PubMed

    Aivazi, Ali-Ashraf; Vijayan, V A

    2009-06-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of botanical insecticides to reduce the use of synthetic pesticides in order to avoid environmental side effects. Anopheles stephensi is the primary vector of urban malaria, an endemic disease in India. So, an effort to assay An. stephensi larvae with gall extracts of Quercus infectoria was made under laboratory conditions at Mysore. Ethyl-acetate extract was found to be the most effective of all the five extracts tested for larvicidal activity against the fourth instar larvae, with LC(50) of 116.92 ppm followed by gallotannin, n-butanol, acetone, and methanol with LC(50) values of 124.62, 174.76, 299.26, and 364.61 ppm, respectively. The efficacy in killing mosquito larvae may make this plant promising for the development of new botanical larvicide. PMID:19148681

  9. Phenology, dichogamy, and floral synchronization in a northern red oak (Quercus Rubra L.) seed orchard

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We developed a novel scoring system to assess spring phenology in a northern red oak clonal seed orchard. The system was used to score between 304 and 364 ramets for three reproductive seasons and place clones into early, middle, and late phenology groups. While the absolute number of clones in ea...

  10. Response of sessile oak seedlings (Quercus petraea) to flooding: an integrated study.

    PubMed

    Folzer, Hélène; Dat, James F; Capelli, Nicolas; Rieffel, Dominique; Badot, Pierre-Marie

    2006-06-01

    Sessile oak is a species of great ecological and silvicultural importance in Europe; however, increased frequency and severity of flooding of forested areas pose a threat to its regeneration. We monitored water relations, root anatomical changes and the expression of two calmodulin genes (QpCaM) in sessile oak seedlings during a 14-day flooding treatment. The response followed two characteristic sequences. The first phase, in response to between 1 h and 3 days of flooding, was characterized by a dramatic but transient decline in water relations parameters followed by a recovery towards control values with no noticeable change in root cell morphology. During the second phase, in response to 3 to 14 days of flooding, water relations parameters gradually and continuously declined and hypertrophied lenticels developed at the base of the shoot. Concurrently, root cortical cells became larger and less spherical and the root cortex more porous. These cellular changes were accompanied by a transient rise in root transcript levels of QpCaM-2. We conclude that sessile oak seedlings are capable of withstanding a 3-day period of flooding without significant morphological alterations. In contrast, exposure to flooding for more than 3 days resulted in anatomical and morphological changes in the root system. These changes are, however, insufficient to provide sessile oak with long-term tolerance to flooding. PMID:16510391

  11. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic activities of edible red oak (Quercus spp.) infusions in rat colon carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Jimenez, Martha Rocío; Trujillo-Esquivel, Fátima; Gallegos-Corona, Marco A; Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalia; González-Laredo, Rubén Francisco; Gallegos-Infante, José Alberto; Rocha-Guzmán, Nuria Elizabeth; Ramos-Gomez, Minerva

    2015-06-01

    Red oak (Quercus spp.) leaves are traditionally used as food in Mexico, and some of their infusions have potential anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory effects; however, these properties have not yet been scientifically tested. The aim of this work was to explore the anti-inflammatory activity in HT-29 cells and anticarcinogenic effect in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis of red oak infusions. Quercus infusions were prepared and administered as the sole source of drink to male Sprague-Dawley rats (1% w/v) for the entire 26-week experimental period. On week 4, rats received 8 subcutaneous injections of DMH (21 mg/kg body weight) once a week. The results showed that mean tumor (0.9 ± 0.2 vs. 2.6 ± 0.3) and multiplicity (1.2 ± 0.1 vs. 2.0 ± 0.23), and β-catenin protein level (2.2-fold) in adenocarcinomas were significantly lower in Quercus  sideroxyla-treated group compared with DMH group. By contrast, Quercus  durifolia and Quercus  eduardii infusions had no protective effect. Additionally, the experiments in HT-29 cells confirmed that Q. sideroxyla infusion effectively decreased the levels of the inflammatory markers COX-2 and IL-8 by modulating the expression of NF-κB. These results highlight some of the molecular mechanisms related to the chemopreventive effect of Q. sideroxyla infusion and its potential value as a source of bioactive compounds. PMID:25795146

  12. Early Summer Drought Stress During the First Growing Year Stimulates Extra Shoot Growth in Oak Seedlings (Quercus petraea).

    PubMed

    Turcsán, Arion; Steppe, Kathy; Sárközi, Edit; Erdélyi, Éva; Missoorten, Marc; Mees, Ghislain; Mijnsbrugge, Kristine V

    2016-01-01

    More severe summer droughts are predicted for mid-latitudes in Europe. To evaluate the impact on forest ecosystems and more specifically on forest regeneration, we studied the response to summer drought in oak seedlings (Quercus petraea). Acorns were collected from different mother trees in three stands in Belgium, sown in pots and grown in non-heated greenhouse conditions. We imposed drought on the seedlings in early summer by first watering the pots to saturation and then stopping any watering. Weight of the pots and stomatal conductance were regularly measured. Re-watering followed this drought period of 5 weeks. Height of the seedlings and apical bud development were observed. Stomatal resistance increased toward the end of the experiment in the drought-treated group and was restored after re-watering. The seedlings from the drought treatment displayed a higher probability to produce additional shoot growth after re-watering (p ≤ 0.05). A higher competition for water (two plants per pot) increased this chance. Although this chance was also higher for smaller seedlings, the actual length of the extra growth after re-watering was higher for larger seedlings (p ≤ 0.01). Both in the drought-treated and in the control group the autochthonous provenance growing on a xeric site produced less extra shoots compared to the two other provenances. Finally, stressed plants showed less developed apical buds compared to the control group after re-watering, suggesting a phenological effect on the growth cycle of oaks (p ≤ 0.0001). The higher chance for an extra shoot growth after the drought period can be considered as a compensation for the induced growth arrest during the drought period. PMID:26941760

  13. Early Summer Drought Stress During the First Growing Year Stimulates Extra Shoot Growth in Oak Seedlings (Quercus petraea)

    PubMed Central

    Turcsán, Arion; Steppe, Kathy; Sárközi, Edit; Erdélyi, Éva; Missoorten, Marc; Mees, Ghislain; Mijnsbrugge, Kristine V.

    2016-01-01

    More severe summer droughts are predicted for mid-latitudes in Europe. To evaluate the impact on forest ecosystems and more specifically on forest regeneration, we studied the response to summer drought in oak seedlings (Quercus petraea). Acorns were collected from different mother trees in three stands in Belgium, sown in pots and grown in non-heated greenhouse conditions. We imposed drought on the seedlings in early summer by first watering the pots to saturation and then stopping any watering. Weight of the pots and stomatal conductance were regularly measured. Re-watering followed this drought period of 5 weeks. Height of the seedlings and apical bud development were observed. Stomatal resistance increased toward the end of the experiment in the drought-treated group and was restored after re-watering. The seedlings from the drought treatment displayed a higher probability to produce additional shoot growth after re-watering (p ≤ 0.05). A higher competition for water (two plants per pot) increased this chance. Although this chance was also higher for smaller seedlings, the actual length of the extra growth after re-watering was higher for larger seedlings (p ≤ 0.01). Both in the drought-treated and in the control group the autochthonous provenance growing on a xeric site produced less extra shoots compared to the two other provenances. Finally, stressed plants showed less developed apical buds compared to the control group after re-watering, suggesting a phenological effect on the growth cycle of oaks (p ≤ 0.0001). The higher chance for an extra shoot growth after the drought period can be considered as a compensation for the induced growth arrest during the drought period. PMID:26941760

  14. Patterns of stomatal conductance among blue oak (Quercus douglasii) size classes and populations: implications for seedling establishment.

    PubMed

    Matzner, Steven L; Rice, Kevin J; Richards, James H

    2003-08-01

    Quercus douglasii Hook. & Arn. (blue oak) is a deciduous white oak that is currently failing to regenerate throughout much of its range in California, USA. Patterns of water use were observed in adult trees, saplings and seedlings to determine if ontogenetic changes in water use occur, which might be important in the establishment of this long-lived perennial species in a Mediterranean-type system. Seasonal and diurnal stomatal conductance (g(s)), late-season predawn xylem water potentials (Psi(pre)), carbon isotopic ratio (delta(13)C) and soil water status were compared among the three size classes at three sites differing in mean precipitation and soil water characteristics. Comparisons were also made between microsites with and without regeneration (defined by the presence or absence of saplings). Overall patterns of water use were consistent among the three sites, except that, at the site with the highest rainfall, Q. douglasii plants had higher g(s) and more positive Psi(pre) values. Although no differences in water use patterns were found between regeneration and non-regeneration microsites, the observed ontogenetic differences in water use may have important implications for Q. douglasii establishment. Compared with adult trees and saplings, seedlings had higher gas exchange rates during periods of high soil water content (early in the season and in the morning). Seedling g(s) was correlated with percent extractable soil water (ESW) throughout the season; adult tree and sapling g(s) was correlated with ESW between June and September. Despite experiencing greater water stress (indicated by more negative Psi(pre) values) than older trees, seedlings had more negative delta(13)C values, implying lower water-use efficiencies. PMID:12839731

  15. Multilevel Nonlinear Mixed-Effect Crown Ratio Models for Individual Trees of Mongolian Oak (Quercus mongolica) in Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Liyong; Zhang, Huiru; Lu, Jun; Zang, Hao; Lou, Minghua; Wang, Guangxing

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an individual tree crown ratio (CR) model was developed with a data set from a total of 3134 Mongolian oak (Quercus mongolica) trees within 112 sample plots allocated in Wangqing Forest Bureau of northeast China. Because of high correlation among the observations taken from the same sampling plots, the random effects at levels of both blocks defined as stands that have different site conditions and plots were taken into account to develop a nested two-level nonlinear mixed-effect model. Various stand and tree characteristics were assessed to explore their contributions to improvement of model prediction. Diameter at breast height, plot dominant tree height and plot dominant tree diameter were found to be significant predictors. Exponential model with plot dominant tree height as a predictor had a stronger ability to account for the heteroskedasticity. When random effects were modeled at block level alone, the correlations among the residuals remained significant. These correlations were successfully reduced when random effects were modeled at both block and plot levels. The random effects from the interaction of blocks and sample plots on tree CR were substantially large. The model that took into account both the block effect and the interaction of blocks and sample plots had higher prediction accuracy than the one with the block effect and population average considered alone. Introducing stand density into the model through dummy variables could further improve its prediction. This implied that the developed method for developing tree CR models of Mongolian oak is promising and can be applied to similar studies for other tree species. PMID:26241912

  16. A method to quantify infection and colonization of holm oak (Quercus ilex) roots by Phytophthora cinnamomi

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands. is an important root rot pathogen widely distributed in the north hemisphere, with a large host range. Among others diseases, it is known to be a principal factor in the decline of holm oak and cork oak, the most important tree species in the “dehesa” ecosystem of south-western Spain. Previously, the focus of studies on P. cinnamomi and holm oak have been on molecular tools for identification, functional responses of the host, together with other physiological and morphological host variables. However, a microscopic index to describe the degree of infection and colonization in the plant tissues has not yet been developed. A colonization or infection index would be a useful tool for studies that examine differences between individuals subjected to different treatments or to individuals belonging to different breeding accessions, together with their specific responses to the pathogen. This work presents a methodology based on the capture and digital treatment of microscopic images, using simple and accessible software, together with a range of variables that quantify the infection and colonization process. PMID:22974221

  17. The bark of holm oak (Quercus ilex, L.) for airborne Cr(VI) monitoring.

    PubMed

    Minganti, Vincenzo; Drava, Giuliana; De Pellegrini, Rodolfo; Anselmo, Marco; Modenesi, Paolo; Malaspina, Paola; Giordani, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the bark of holm oak was used as a bioindicator to study the atmospheric distribution of Cr(VI). The chosen method (alkaline extraction and atomic absorption determination) was found in the literature, adapted for use with the matrix involved, and validated. The method had some limits, but provided an excellent estimation of Cr(VI) concentrations with good sensitivity and a reasonable time of analysis and cost. Thirty-four samples of holm oak collected in three areas characterised by different possible sources of pollution (the area near a former chromate production plant, an urban area, and a rural "reference" area) were analysed, obtaining concentrations ranging from 1.54 to 502 μg g(-1) near the industrial plant, ranging from 0.22 to 1.35 μg g(-1) in the urban area, and mostly below the detection limit (0.04 μg g(-1)) in the rural area. The bark of holm oak proved to be a good bioindicator to detect Cr(VI) in the environment. The extraction procedure followed by atomic absorption analysis is simple, provides good sensitivity, and it is suitable for environmental studies. PMID:24630451

  18. Oak powdery mildew (Erysiphe alphitoides) induced volatile emissions scale with the degree of infection in Quercus robur

    PubMed Central

    Copolovici, Lucian; Väärtnõu, Fred; Estrada, Miguel Portillo; Niinemets, Ülo

    2015-01-01

    Oak powdery mildew (Erysiphe alphitoides) is a major foliar pathogen of Quercus robur often infecting entire tree stands. In this study, foliage photosynthetic characteristics and constitutive and induced volatile emissions were studied in Q. robur leaves asking whether the changes in foliage physiological traits are quantitatively associated with the degree of leaf infection, and whether infection changes the light responses of physiological traits. Infection by E. alphitoides reduced net assimilation rate by 3.5-fold, and isoprene emission rate by 2.4-fold and increased stomatal conductance by 1.6-fold in leaves with the largest degree of infection of ca. 60%. These alterations in physiological activity were quantitatively associated with the fraction of leaf area infected. In addition, light-saturation of net assimilation and isoprene emission was reached at lower light intensity in infected leaves, and infection also reduced the initial quantum yield of isoprene emission. Infection-induced emissions of lipoxygenase pathway volatiles and monoterpenes were light-dependent and scaled positively with the degree of infection. Overall, this study indicates that the reduction of foliage photosynthetic activity and constitutive emissions and the onset of stress volatile emissions scales with the degree of infection, but also that infection modifies the light responses of foliage physiological activities. PMID:25428827

  19. The effect of drought stress on heterozygosity–fitness correlations in pedunculate oak (Quercus robur)

    PubMed Central

    Vranckx, Guy; Jacquemyn, Hans; Mergeay, Joachim; Cox, Karen; Janssens, Pieter; Gielen, Bie An Sofie; Muys, Bart; Honnay, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The interaction between forest fragmentation and predicted climate change may pose a serious threat to tree populations. In small and spatially isolated forest fragments, increased homozygosity may directly affect individual tree fitness through the expression of deleterious alleles. Climate change-induced drought stress may exacerbate these detrimental genetic consequences of forest fragmentation, as the fitness response to low levels of individual heterozygosity is generally thought to be stronger under environmental stress than under optimal conditions. Methods To test this hypothesis, a greenhouse experiment was performed in which various transpiration and growth traits of 6-month-old seedlings of Quercus robur differing in multilocus heterozygosity (MLH) were recorded for 3 months under a well-watered and a drought stress treatment. Heterozygosity–fitness correlations (HFC) were examined by correlating the recorded traits of individual seedlings to their MLH and by studying their response to drought stress. Key Results Weak, but significant, effects of MLH on several fitness traits were obtained, which were stronger for transpiration variables than for the recorded growth traits. High atmospheric stress (measured as vapour pressure deficit) influenced the strength of the HFCs of the transpiration variables, whereas only a limited effect of the irrigation treatment on the HFCs was observed. Conclusions Under ongoing climate change, increased atmospheric stress in the future may strengthen the negative fitness responses of trees to low MLH. This indicates the necessity to maximize individual multilocus heterozygosity in forest tree breeding programmes. PMID:24638819

  20. Provenance-specific growth responses to drought and air warming in three European oak species (Quercus robur, Q. petraea and Q. pubescens).

    PubMed

    Arend, Matthias; Kuster, Thomas; Günthardt-Goerg, Madeleine S; Dobbertin, Matthias

    2011-03-01

    Provenance-specific growth responses to experimentally applied drought and air warming were studied in saplings of three European oak species: Quercus robur, Quercus petraea and Quercus pubescens. Four provenances of each species were grown in large open-top chambers and subjected to four climates: control, periodic drought, air warming or their combination in 3 subsequent years. Overall growth responses were found among species and provenances, with drought reducing shoot height growth and stem diameter growth and air warming stimulating shoot height growth but reducing stem diameter growth and root length growth. Differential growth responses in shoots, stems and roots resulted in altered allometric growth relations. Root length growth to shoot height growth increased in response to drought but decreased in response to air warming. Stem diameter growth to shoot height growth decreased in response to air warming. The growth responses in shoots and stems were highly variable among provenances indicating provenance-specific sensitivity to drought and air warming, but this response variability did not reflect local adaptation to climate conditions of provenance origin. Shoot height growth was found to be more sensitive to drought in provenances from northern latitudes than in provenances from southern latitudes, suggesting that genetic factors related to the postglacial immigration history of European oaks might have interfered with selective pressure at provenance origins. PMID:21422189

  1. Severe winter rings of oak trees ( Quercus robur L.) from Central European Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasanov, B. F.

    2013-11-01

    Oak trees were sampled in a flood plain forest in the valley of the Zapadnaya Dvina (Daugava) river (Tver region, Russia). Annual rings of the time period from 1826 to 2010 were studied. Anatomically distinct rings with a stripe of small-sized cells in the innermost part and narrow earlywood vessels located in three to four rows occurred in 1861, 1862, 1929, 1940, 1942, 1956 and 1979. Deviations of earlywood development were associated with the drop of winter temperature below -42 °C. The percentage of severe winter ring (SWR) occurrence depends upon tree age and decreases from 75.6 % in younger specimens (under 41 years old at the time of the severe winter) to 27.1 % in middle-aged ones (from 41 to 80 years) to 3.5 % in trees older than 80 years. Described anatomical features can be used in the reconstruction of severe winter frequency in the past.

  2. Seasonal trends in photosynthetic parameters and stomatal conductance of blue oak (Quercus douglasii) under prolonged summer drought and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liukang; Baldocchi, Dennis D

    2003-09-01

    Understanding seasonal changes in photosynthetic parameters and stomatal conductance is crucial for modeling long-term carbon uptake and energy fluxes of ecosystems. Gas exchange measurements of CO2 and light response curves on blue oak leaves (Quercus douglasii H. & A.) were conducted weekly throughout the growing season to study the seasonality of photosynthetic capacity (Vcmax) and Ball-Berry slope (m) under prolonged summer drought and high temperature. A leaf photosynthetic model was used to determine Vcmax. There was a pronounced seasonal pattern in Vcmax. The maximum value of Vcmax, 127 micromol m(-2) s(-1), was reached shortly after leaf expansion in early summer, when air temperature was moderate and soil water availability was high. Thereafter, Vcmax declined as the soil water profile became depleted and the trees experienced extreme air temperatures, exceeding 40 degrees C. The decline in Vcmax was gradual in midsummer, however, despite extremely low predawn leaf water potentials (Psipd, approximately -4.0 MPa). Overall, temporal changes in Vcmax were well correlated with changes in leaf nitrogen content. During spring leaf development, high rates of leaf dark respiration (Rd, 5-6 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) were observed. Once a leaf reached maturity, Rd remained low, around 0.5 micromol m(-2) s(-1). In contrast to the strong seasonality of Vcmax, m and marginal water cost per unit carbon gain (partial partial differential E/ partial partial differential A) were relatively constant over the season, even when leaf Psipd dropped to -6.8 MPa. The constancy of partial partial differential E/ partial partial differential A suggests that stomata behaved optimally under severe water-stress conditions. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of modeling carbon and water vapor exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere. PMID:14532010

  3. Leaf-age effects on temperature responses of photosynthesis and respiration of an alpine oak, Quercus aquifolioides, in southwestern China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haoran; Xu, Ming; Pan, Hongli; Yu, Xiubo

    2015-11-01

    Temperature responses and sensitivity of photosynthesis (A(n_)T) and respiration for leaves at different ages are crucial to modeling ecosystem carbon (C) cycles and productivity of evergreen forests. Understanding the mechanisms and processes of temperature sensitivity may further shed lights on temperature acclimation of photosynthesis and respiration with leaf aging. The current study examined temperature responses of photosynthesis and respiration of young leaves (YLs) (fully expanded in current growth season) and old leaves (OLs) (fully expanded in last growth season) of Quercus aquifolioides Rehder and E.H. Wilson in an alpine oak forest, southwestern China. Temperature responses of dark respiration (R(dark)), net assimilation (A(n)), maximal velocity of carboxylation (V(cmax)) and maximum rate of electron transport (J(max)) were significantly different between the two leaf ages. Those differences implied different temperature response parameters should be used for leaves of different ages in modeling vegetation productivity and ecosystem C cycles in Q. aquifolioides forests and other evergreen forests. We found that RuBP carboxylation determined the downward shift of A(n_)T in OLs, while RuBP regeneration and the balance between Rubisco carboxylation and RuBP regeneration made little contribution. Sensitivity of stomatal conductance to vapor pressure deficit changed in OLs and compensated part of the downward shift. We also found that OLs of Q. aquifolioides had lower An due to lower stomatal conductance, higher stomatal conductance limitation and deactivation of the biochemical processes. In addition, the balance between R(dark) and A(n) changed between OLs and YLs, which was represented by a higher R(dark)/A(n) ratio for OLs. PMID:26452765

  4. Seasonal trend of photosynthetic parameters and stomatal conductance of blue oak (Quercus douglasii) under prolonged summer drought and high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, L; Baldocchi, DD

    2003-09-01

    OAK-B135 Understanding seasonal changes in photosynthetic parameters and stomatal conductance is crucial for modeling long-term carbon uptake and energy fluxes of ecosystems. Gas exchange measurements of CO{sub 2} and light response curves on blue oak leaves (Quercus douglasii H. & A.) were conducted weekly throughout the growing season to study the seasonality of photosynthetic capacity (V{sub cmax}) and Ball-Berry slope (m) under prolonged summer drought and high temperature. A leaf photosynthetic model was used to determine V{sub cmax}. There was a pronounced seasonal pattern in V{sub cmax}. The maximum value of V{sub cmax}, 127 {micro}molm{sup -2} s{sup -1},was reached shortly after leaf expansion in early summer, when air temperature was moderate and soil water availability was high. Thereafter, V{sub cmax} declined as the soil water profile became depleted and the trees experienced extreme air temperatures, exceeding 40 C. The decline in V{sub cmax} was gradual in midsummer, however, despite extremely low predawn leaf water potentials ({Psi}{sub pd}, {approx} -4.0 MPa). Overall, temporal changes in V{sub cmax} were well correlated with changes in leaf nitrogen content. During spring leaf development, high rates of leaf dark respiration (R{sub d}, 5-6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) were observed. Once a leaf reached maturity, R{sub d} remained low, around 0.5 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. In contrast to the strong seasonality of V{sub cmax}, m and marginal water cost per unit carbon gain ({partial_derivative}E/{partial_derivative}A) were relatively constant over the season, even when leaf {Psi}{sub pd} dropped to -6.8 MPa. The constancy of {partial_derivative}E/{partial_derivative}A suggests that stomata behaved optimally under severe water-stress conditions. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of modeling carbon and water vapor exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere.

  5. Precipitation, throughfall, soil solution and streamwater chemistry in a holm-oak ( Quercus ilex) forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodà, Ferran; Avila, Anna; Bonilla, David

    1990-08-01

    Bulk precipitation, throughfall, soil solution at 20 and 40 cm depths, and stream water were monitored for 2-4 years in a holm-oak forest on schists in the Montseny Mountains (NE Spain). Bulk precipitation was mildly acidic, with Ca 2+ and SO 2-4 as dominant ions. Canopy interactions produced a throughfall less acidic than bulk precipitation and enriched in all other ions. Large amounts of K + were leached from the canopy. Magnesium in net throughfall behaved similarly to K +, and it is concluded that leaching makes a major contribution to Mg 2+ enrichment beneath the canopy. Judging from the moderate increase of Na + and Ca 2+ in throughfall, dry deposition rates for both marine and continental aerosols were low in the studied stand, probably because of its sheltered topographic position within a well-vegetated massif, coupled with moderate tree height and low canopy roughness. Soil solution in the mineral soil was less acidic than throughfall. In common with most temperate forests, SO 2-4 was the dominant mobile anion in the soil water, being largely accompanied by Ca 2+. Potassium and NO -3 were depleted within the soil water with respect to throughfall, probably owing to biological uptake and cation exchange, and incorporation of K + into clay lattices. Subsurface flow dominated the hydrology of the small forested catchment studied. Stream water was basic and rich in bicarbonate. Its chemistry revealed fast rates of weathering of sodium- and magnesium-bearing silicates (mainly albite and chlorite, respectively). Soil respiration and silicate hydrolysis resulted in HCO -3 being the dominant mobile anion in stream water. Calcium to chloride ratios were similar in bulk precipitation and in stream water, indicating that Ca 2+ release from weathering has been counteracted by plant uptake. Nutrient uptake by this aggrading forest strongly influences the solution dynamics of K +, NO 3 and Ca 2+. It is concluded that: (1) this forest does not currently receive acidic

  6. Volatile compounds and sensorial characterization of wines from four Spanish denominations of origin, aged in Spanish Rebollo (Quercus pyrenaica Willd.) oak wood barrels.

    PubMed

    Fernández de Simón, Brígida; Cadahía, Estrella; Sanz, Miriam; Poveda, Pilar; Perez-Magariño, Silvia; Ortega-Heras, Miriam; González-Huerta, Carlos

    2008-10-01

    The evolution of almost 40 oak-related volatile compounds and the sensorial characteristics of red wines from four Spanish denominations of origin (DOs) (Bierzo, Toro, Ribera de Duero, and Rioja) during aging in barrels made of Rebollo oak wood, Quercus pyrenaica, were studied and compared to the same wines aged in American and French oak barrels. Each oak wood added unique and special characteristics to the wine, and in addition, each wine showed a different ability to extract the compounds, which result in these characteristics from the oak wood. In general, wines aged in Q. pyrenaica wood were characterized by high levels of eugenol, guaiacol, and other volatile phenols. In regards to compounds like cis-whiskylactone or maltol, the behavior of this wood is very similar to that of American oaks. When considering phenolic aldehydes and ketones, the levels of these compounds are intermediate between those of French and American woods and depend greatly on the type of wine. The type of oak, on the other hand, does not affect the chromatic characteristics of the wines. In sensory analysis, the biggest differences are found in the olfactory phase. Among the four DOs studied, wine aged in Q. pyrenaica presented the highest notes of wood, with more aromas of roasting, toasting, milky coffee, spices, or wine-wood interactions. The wines aged in barrels made of Q. pyrenaica wood were highly regarded, and preference was shown for them over those same wines when they had been aged in barrels of American or French oak. PMID:18778067

  7. Stomatal patchiness in the Mediterranean holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) under water stress in the nursery and in the forest.

    PubMed

    Guàrdia, Mercè; Fernàndez, Jordi; Elena, Georgina; Fleck, Isabel

    2012-07-01

    The evergreen holm oak Quercus ilex L. is the most representative tree in Mediterranean forests. Accurate estimation of the limiting factors of photosynthesis for Q. ilex and the prediction of ecosystem water-use efficiency by mechanistic models can be achieved only by establishing whether this species shows heterogenic stomatal aperture, and, if so, the circumstances in which this occurs. Here, we collected gas-exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence data in Q. ilex leaves from a nursery to measure the effects of stomatal oscillations on PSII quantum yield (Φ(PSII)) under water stress. Stomatal conductance (g(s)) was used as an integrative indicator of the degree of water stress. Images of chlorophyll fluorescence showed heterogeneous Φ(PSII) when g(s) was <50 mmol H(2)O m(-2) s(-1), representative of severe drought and corresponding to a container capacity <45%. Stomatal patchiness was related to a coefficient of variation (CV) of Φ(PSII) values >2.5%. A parallel study in the forest confirmed heterogeneous Φ(PSII) values in leaves in response to declining water availability. Three kinds of Q. ilex individuals were distinguished: those resprouting after a clear-cut (resprouts, R); intact individuals growing in the same clear-cut area as resprouts (controls, C); and intact individuals in a nearby, undisturbed area (forest controls, CF). Patchiness increased in C and CF in response to increasing drought from early May to late July, whereas in R, Φ(PSII) values were maintained as a result of their improved water relations since the pre-existing roots were associated with a smaller aerial biomass. Patchiness was related to a % CV of Φ(PSII) values >4 and associated in the summer with mean g(s) values of 30 mmol H(2)O m(-2) s(-1). Under milder drought in spring, Φ(PSII) patchiness was less strictly related to g(s) variations, pointing to biochemical limitants of photosynthesis. The occurrence of heterogenic photosynthesis caused by patchy stomatal closure in Q

  8. An Investigation on Forage Yield Capacity of Kermes Oak (Quercus coccifera L.) and Grazing Planning of Mediterranean Maquis Scrublands for Traditional Goat Farming

    PubMed Central

    Tolunay, Ahmet; Adıyaman, Elif; İnce, Duygu; Ayhan, Veysel

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated grazing capacities of maquis scrubland and preparation principles of grazing management in forest resources. Kermes oak (Quercus coccifera L.), which is widespread as a main shrub species in maquis vegetation in Turkey, and pure hair goats (Capra hircus L.) feeding on shoots and leaves of this shrub were selected for study. The study was conducted in two stages. Green leaf and shoot samples were taken from kermes oaks in the first stage and the amount of green herbage yield (g∗m−1) and dry matter yield (kg∗ha−1) that may be obtained per unit area from these samples was identified. The considered amount of dry matter consumed by pure hair goats daily and the number of goats being fed within 1 year on land of 1 ha according to different land coverage rates of kermes oaks (goat head∗ha∗yr) were calculated. In the second stage, grazing capacities of sample areas where kermes oak spread were identified and compared with the grazing plan prepared by the forestry administration for this area. Forage yield variance according to land coverage rates of maquis scrublands should be considered when determining optimum animal numbers for grazing per area for sustainable goat farming. PMID:25379526

  9. Climatic origins predict variation in photoprotective leaf pigments in response to drought and low temperatures in live oaks (Quercus series Virentes).

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Valiente, Jose A; Koehler, Kari; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine

    2015-05-01

    Climate is a major selective force in nature. Exploring patterns of inter- and intraspecific genetic variation in functional traits may explain how species have evolved and may continue evolving under future climate change. Photoprotective pigments play an important role in short-term responses to climate stress in plants but knowledge of their long-term role in adaptive processes is lacking. In this study, our goal was to determine how photoprotective mechanisms, morphological traits and their plasticity have evolved in live oaks (Quercus series Virentes) in response to different climatic conditions. For this purpose, seedlings originating from 11 populations from four live oak species (Quercus virginiana, Q. geminata, Q. fusiformis and Q. oleoides) were grown under contrasting common environmental conditions of temperature (tropical vs temperate) and water availability (droughted vs well-watered). Xanthophyll cycle pigments, anthocyanin accumulation, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and leaf anatomical traits were measured. Seedlings originating from more mesic source populations of Q. oleoides and Q. fusiformis increased the xanthophyll de-epoxidation state under water-limiting conditions and showed higher phenotypic plasticity for this trait, suggesting adaptation to local climate. Likewise, seedlings originating from warmer climates had higher anthocyanin concentration in leaves under cold winter conditions but not higher de-epoxidation state. Overall, our findings suggest that (i) climate has been a key factor in shaping species and population differences in stress tolerance for live oaks, (ii) anthocyanins are used under cold stress in species with limited freezing tolerance and (iii) xanthophyll cycle pigments are used when photoprotection under drought conditions is needed. PMID:25939867

  10. Genetic consequences of habitat fragmentation in long-lived tree species: the case of the mediterranean Holm Oak (Quercus ilex, L.).

    PubMed

    Ortego, Joaquín; Bonal, Raúl; Muñoz, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale forest fragmentation can increase interpopulation genetic differentiation and erode the genetic variability of remnant plant populations. In this study, we analyze the extent of clonality and the genetic variability and structure within a holm oak (Quercus ilex) population from Central Spain at 3 patches showing different degrees of fragmentation. For this purpose, we have typed 191 individuals (105 adults and 86 saplings) at 9 microsatellite loci. Microsatellite markers revealed an extensive clonal structure in this species, with most analyzed clumps constituting a single "genet", which in some cases extended over a considerable area (up to 318 m(2)). The maximum distance between "ramets" tended to be higher in the extremely fragmented patch, suggesting that intensive management and environmental perturbation has favored clonal propagation. We have also found evidence that fragmentation has contributed to reduce genetic variability and increase genetic differentiation in holm oak saplings, indicating that the younger cohorts are suffering some negative genetic consequences of long-term population fragmentation. Finally, analyses of fine spatial genetic structure have revealed significant kinship structures up to 20-50 m that were particularly patent in the 2 less fragmented patches. Overall, our findings point to long-term genetic shifts in population structure of holm oaks in fragmented landscapes; however, further research is required on pollen dispersal and gene flow in this species. PMID:20624756

  11. A flux-based assessment of above and below ground biomass of Holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) seedlings after one season of exposure to high ozone concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerosa, Giacomo; Fusaro, Lina; Monga, Robert; Finco, Angelo; Fares, Silvano; Manes, Fausto; Marzuoli, Riccardo

    2015-07-01

    Young plants of Holm oak (Quercus ilex) were exposed in non-limiting water conditions to four different levels of ozone (O3) concentrations in Open-Top Chambers during one growing season to evaluate biomass losses on roots, stems and leaves in relation to O3 exposure (AOT40) and phytotoxical ozone dose (POD1) absorbed. The exposure-effect and dose-effect relationships for the total biomass were statistically significant and indicated a reduction of 4% and 5.2% of the total biomass for each increase step of 10000 ppb h of AOT40 and 10 mmol m-2 of POD1, respectively. The results indicate a critical level for Holm oak protection of 7 mmol m-2 of POD1, which corresponds to 4% of total biomass reduction. The linear regressions based on the POD1 were significant for roots and stem biomass losses, but not significant for leaf biomass. The biomass loss rate at increasing POD1 was higher for roots than for stems and leaves, suggesting that stem growth under high levels of O3 is less affected than root growth. Because of the scarcity of data from the Mediterranean area, these results can be relevant for the O3 risk assessment models and for the definition of new O3 critical levels for forests in Europe.

  12. Gene movement and genetic association with regional climate gradients in California valley oak (Quercus lobata Née) in the face of climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sork, Victoria L.; Davis, Frank W.; Westfall, Robert; Flint, Alan L.; Ikegami, Makihiko; Wang, Hongfang; Grivet, Delphine

    2010-01-01

    Rapid climate change jeopardizes tree populations by shifting current climate zones. To avoid extinction, tree populations must tolerate, adapt, or migrate. Here we investigate geographic patterns of genetic variation in valley oak, Quercus lobata N??e, to assess how underlying genetic structure of populations might influence this species' ability to survive climate change. First, to understand how genetic lineages shape spatial genetic patterns, we examine historical patterns of colonization. Second, we examine the correlation between multivariate nuclear genetic variation and climatic variation. Third, to illustrate how geographic genetic variation could interact with regional patterns of 21st Century climate change, we produce region-specific bioclimatic distributions of valley oak using Maximum Entropy (MAXENT) models based on downscaled historical (1971-2000) and future (2070-2100) climate grids. Future climatologies are based on a moderate-high (A2) carbon emission scenario and two different global climate models. Chloroplast markers indicate historical range-wide connectivity via colonization, especially in the north. Multivariate nuclear genotypes show a strong association with climate variation that provides opportunity for local adaptation to the conditions within their climatic envelope. Comparison of regional current and projected patterns of climate suitability indicates that valley oaks grow in distinctly different climate conditions in different parts of their range. Our models predict widely different regional outcomes from local displacement of a few kilometres to hundreds of kilometres. We conclude that the relative importance of migration, adaptation, and tolerance are likely to vary widely for populations among regions, and that late 21st Century conditions could lead to regional extinctions. ?? 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Differences in photosynthesis and isoprene emission in post oak (Quercus stellata) and sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) trees along an urban-to-rural gradient in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossett, C.; Lahr, E.; Haas, G.; Schade, G. W.

    2014-12-01

    Many plants produce isoprene, a volatile organic compound that can mitigate damage to photosynthetic systems during short- or long-term increases in leaf temperature. After its production within leaves, isoprene is emitted to the atmosphere and influences regional atmospheric chemistry. Here, we use an urban-to-rural gradient to explore future effects of climate change on tree eco-physiology and feedbacks to atmospheric chemistry. Urban areas mimic many of the conditions expected to occur in the future; in particular, cities have warmer temperatures due to the urban heat island (UHI) effect, and less water availability relative to rural areas. Along a 90 km urban-to-rural gradient, we measured photosynthesis and isoprene emission from trees at three sites in eastern Texas: Houston (urban), The Woodlands (suburban) and Sam Houston National Forest (rural). Isoprene emission from post oak (Quercus stellata) was higher in Houston than the other sites, and when leaf temperatures were increased above ambient conditions, trees produced more isoprene. Leaves produced more isoprene at high leaf temperatures in early summer than in late summer, suggesting gradual acclimation of photosynthetic processes over the course of the summer. We also found that sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) emitted more isoprene than post oak, but when leaf temperatures were increased, isoprene emission was exhausted more quickly in sweetgum relative to post oak. At the same time, post oak maintained higher levels of photosynthesis seasonally and during short-term temperature increases. Both post oak and sweetgum are significant isoprene emitters and represent approximately two and four percent crown cover in the United States, respectively. Our results suggest that in a warming climate, we can expect trees to produce more isoprene seasonally and in response to short-term temperature extremes, and that species-specific differences in photosynthesis and isoprene emission may play an important role

  14. Effects of growth irradiance, nitrogen nutrition and watering regime on photosynthesis, leaf conductance and isoprene emission in leaves of Post Oak, Quercus stellata

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, P.; Archer, S.; Guenther, A. Texas A M Univ., College Station )

    1994-06-01

    Seedlings of Post Oak (Quercus stellata), the dominant woody species of oak savannas of east-central Texas, were grown outside in College Station, TX from April to November 1993. Plants were randomly placed in one cell of a 3 [times] 2 [times] 2 factorial experiment, employing 3 nitrogen fertilization (25, 100 and 225 ppm NH[sub 4]NO[sub 23]), 2 light levels (70% and 20% of full sun) and 2 watering regimes (to maintain 80-100% or 30-50% of field capacity). In November, net photosynthesis, leaf conductance and leaf isoprene emission rates at 30[degrees]C and PPFD=1000 [mu]mol m[sup [minus]2]s[sup [minus]1] were determined for two mature leaves on each of four plants from eight growth treatments and data were analyzed stastically. For plants grown under the lower watering regime, photosynthesis and isoprene emission increased with both increasing PPFD and nitrogen (effects significant at p<0.01). For plants grown at 70% full sun, effects of nitrogen treatment on photosynthesis, conductance and isoprene emission were significant (p<0.0001) while effects of watering treatment were not significant (p<0.2). Although watering treatment did not lead to significant differences between treatments, in a short-term drying experiment conducted on four plants, isoprene emissions increased through the drying period in previously well-watered plants, but decreased in previously droughted plants. Measurements were also made on two leaves to determine the effects of varying PPFD and temperature on rates of isoprene emission.

  15. RNA-Seq and Gene Network Analysis Uncover Activation of an ABA-Dependent Signalosome During the Cork Oak Root Response to Drought

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Alexandre P.; Verde, Nuno; Reis, Francisca; Martins, Inês; Costa, Daniela; Lino-Neto, Teresa; Castro, Pedro H.; Tavares, Rui M.; Azevedo, Herlânder

    2016-01-01

    Quercus suber (cork oak) is a West Mediterranean species of key economic interest, being extensively explored for its ability to generate cork. Like other Mediterranean plants, Q. suber is significantly threatened by climatic changes, imposing the need to quickly understand its physiological and molecular adaptability to drought stress imposition. In the present report, we uncovered the differential transcriptome of Q. suber roots exposed to long-term drought, using an RNA-Seq approach. 454-sequencing reads were used to de novo assemble a reference transcriptome, and mapping of reads allowed the identification of 546 differentially expressed unigenes. These were enriched in both effector genes (e.g., LEA, chaperones, transporters) as well as regulatory genes, including transcription factors (TFs) belonging to various different classes, and genes associated with protein turnover. To further extend functional characterization, we identified the orthologs of differentially expressed unigenes in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana, which then allowed us to perform in silico functional inference, including gene network analysis for protein function, protein subcellular localization and gene co-expression, and in silico enrichment analysis for TFs and cis-elements. Results indicated the existence of extensive transcriptional regulatory events, including activation of ABA-responsive genes and ABF-dependent signaling. We were then able to establish that a core ABA-signaling pathway involving PP2C-SnRK2-ABF components was induced in stressed Q. suber roots, identifying a key mechanism in this species’ response to drought. PMID:26793200

  16. Determination of the natural mortality age of an holm oak ( Quercus ilex L.) stand in Corsica (Mediterranean Island)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaïotis, Christophe; Carcaillet, Christopher; M'Hamedi, Myriam

    Determination of old forest stand age and forestry history is problematic due to the difficulties which arise in obtaining core samples from trees. In the present paper, the natural mortality age and forestry history of a Corsican holm oak stand are estimated using the methods described below. Firstly, the correlation between stem age estimated from healthy stump count in fellings and stem diameter is determined using a second order polynomial equation. Secondly, the distribution of stand diameter classes is analyzed by the BHATTACHARYA (1967) method. This method allows the identification of cohorts as well as the estimation of cohort mean diameters and theoretical tree count numbers. Using cohort mean diameters, we are able to estimate their age and discuss stand forestry history. Finally, the analysis of thirty broken stumps originating from senescent holm oak natural falls, is used to determine the mean natural mortality age of trees based on their mean diameter. This natural mortality is estimated to occur at 170±46 years of age. The causes of holm oak mortality and the capacity of old stumps to renew the ecosystem are discussed in order to contribute to the conservation and management of these woodland communities.

  17. - A case study for sessile oak (Quercus petraea) distribution - Preliminarly results of a Decision Support System for climate impact analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyás, Krisztina; Gálos, Borbála; Berki, Imre; Czimber, Kornél

    2014-05-01

    Rainfed sectors of forestry are threatened by projected climate change especially in low-elevation regions in Southeast Europe, where precipitation is the limiting factor of production and ecosystem stability. To initiate preparation for frequency increase of extreme events, disasters and economic losses, a Decision Support System is under development, which provides GIS-supported information about the most important regional and local risks and mitigation options regarding climate change impacts. The case study will focus on the following aspects: • For the time period 1961-2010, precipitation and temperature means and extreme events have been analyzed in the Carpathian basin, using gridded station data from the EU-project CARPATCLIM (http://www.carpatclim-eu.org). • The climate indicators have been identified that characterize and determine the distribution, healty status and vitality of sessile oak. • As a product of the Decision Support System a distribution model is under development, which describes the connection between climate conditions and the distribution of sessile oak. The case study shows, how climate data can be used for impact analyses in the forestry sector. Applying different climate change scenarios, the expected distribution of tree species can be simulated. Acknowledgements: The development of the Decision Support System "Agrárklíma" is supported by TÁMOP-4.2.2.A-11/1/KONV and 4.2.2.B-10/1-2010-0018 "Talentum" joint EU-national research projects. Keywords: climate change, decision support system, distribution model, sessile oak

  18. Effect of the administration of young leaves of Quercus pyrenaica on rumen fermentation in relation to oak tannin toxicosis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Doce, R R; Belenguer, A; Toral, P G; Hervás, G; Frutos, P

    2013-02-01

    Three experiments were conducted to study the effect of the administration of young leaves of Quercus pyrenaica (OL) on in vivo ruminal fermentation in relation to oak tannin toxicosis in cattle. In Experiment 1, six bulls were fed up to 5 kg fresh matter (FM) of OL per animal and day for 14 days. In Experiment 2, another six bulls were first subjected to severe feed restriction for 8 days and then fed a higher amount of OL (approximately 10 kg FM daily) for 3 days. In Experiment 3, three bulls received the same amount of OL as in Experiment 1 for 6 days, but adding a severe feed restriction as in Experiment 2. In situ DM disappearance of grass hay and OL, and pH and ammonia and volatile fatty acid concentrations were recorded throughout the three assays. Daily administration of up to 5 kg OL did not considerably affect ruminal fermentation, unless it was preceded by a severe feed restriction period. Administration of 10 kg OL preceded by undernutrition triggered a critical reduction in rumen fermentation activity concomitantly with an acute intoxication. Interestingly, some results differ from those observed previously in vitro, which highlights the importance of validating in vitro data with in vivo measurements, given the complexity of extrapolation in ruminants. PMID:21992033

  19. Drivers of radial growth and carbon isotope discrimination of bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.) across continental gradients in precipitation, vapour pressure deficit and irradiance.

    PubMed

    Voelker, Steven L; Meinzer, Frederick C; Lachenbruch, Barbara; Brooks, J Renée; Guyette, Richard P

    2014-03-01

    Tree-ring characteristics are commonly used to reconstruct climate variables, but divergence from the assumption of a single biophysical control may reduce the accuracy of these reconstructions. Here, we present data from bur oaks (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.) sampled within and beyond the current species bioclimatic envelope to identify the primary environmental controls on ring-width indices (RWIs) and carbon stable isotope discrimination (Δ(13) C) in tree-ring cellulose. Variation in Δ(13) C and RWI was more strongly related to leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficit (VPD) at the centre and western edge of the range compared with the northern and wettest regions. Among regions, Δ(13) C of tree-ring cellulose was closely predicted by VPD and light responses of canopy-level Δ(13) C estimated using a model driven by eddy flux and meteorological measurements (R(2)  = 0.96, P = 0.003). RWI and Δ(13) C were positively correlated in the drier regions, while they were negatively correlated in the wettest region. The strength and direction of the correlations scaled with regional VPD or the ratio of precipitation to evapotranspiration. Therefore, the correlation strength between RWI and Δ(13) C may be used to infer past wetness or aridity from paleo wood by determining the degree to which carbon gain and growth have been more limited by moisture or light. PMID:24004466

  20. Differential radial growth patterns between beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and oak (Quercus robur L.) on periodically waterlogged soils.

    PubMed

    Scharnweber, Tobias; Manthey, Michael; Wilmking, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Climate scenarios for northern Central Europe project rising temperatures and increasing frequency and intensity of droughts but also a shift in precipitation pattern with more humid winters. This in turn may result in soil waterlogging during the following spring, leading to increasing stress for trees growing on hydric sites. The influence of waterlogging on growth of common beech and pedunculate oak has been studied intensively on seedlings under experimental conditions. However, the question remains whether results of these studies can be transferred to mature trees growing under natural conditions. To test this, we investigated general growth patterns and climate-growth relationships in four mature stands of beech and oak growing on hydromorphic soils (Stagnosols) in northeast Germany using dendrochronological methods. Our results confirmed the expected tolerance of oak to strong water-level fluctuations. Neither extremely wet conditions during spring nor summer droughts significantly affected its radial growth. Oak growth responded positively to warmer temperatures during previous year October and March of the current year of ring formation. Contrary to our expectations, also beech showed relatively low sensitivity to periods of high soil water saturation. Instead, summer drought turned out to be the main climatic factor influencing ring width of beech even under the specific periodically wet soil conditions of our study. This became evident from general climate-growth correlations over the last century as well as from discontinuous (pointer year) analysis with summer drought being significantly correlated to the occurrence of growth depressions. As ring width of the two species is affected by differing climate parameters, species-specific chronologies show no coherence in high-frequency variations even for trees growing in close proximity. We assume differences in rooting depth as the main reason for the differing growth patterns and climate correlations of

  1. Identification and sensory evaluation of dehydro- and deoxy-ellagitannins formed upon toasting of oak wood (Quercus alba L.).

    PubMed

    Glabasnia, Arne; Hofmann, Thomas

    2007-05-16

    Traditionally, spirits such as whiskey are matured in toasted wood barrels to improve the sensory quality of the final beverage. In order to gain first insight into the puzzling road map of thermal ellagitannin transformation chemistry and provide evidence for the changes in sensory active nonvolatiles in oak wood during toasting, the purified oak ellagitannins castalagin and vescalagin, their corresponding dimers roburin A and roburin D, and 33-carboxy-33-deoxyvescalagin were thermally treated in model experiments. Besides mouth-coating and golden-brown colored melanoidin-type polymers, individual major reaction products were produced as transient intermediates which were identified for the first time by means of LC-MS/MS and 1D/2D-NMR spectroscopy. Depending strongly on the stereochemistry, castalagin is oxidized to the previously unreported dehydrocastalagin, whereas its diastereomer vescalagin, differing only in the stereochemistry at carbon C-1, is most surprisingly converted into deoxyvescalagin. Comparative model experiments with 33-carboxy-33-deoxyvescalagin revealed castalagin, vescalagin, dehydrocastalagin, and deoxyvescalagin as typical reaction products, thus indicating decarboxylation as a key step in the thermal degradation of that ellagitannin. Similar to the ellagitannin monomers, LC-MS/MS analyses gave strong evidence that the corresponding dimer roburin A, containing the vescalagin configuration at C-1, was converted into the deoxyroburin A, whereas roburin D, exhibiting the castalagin configuration at C-1, was oxidized to give the dehydroroburin D. Human sensory experiments revealed that the ellagitannin derivatives imparted an astringent mouth-coating sensation with threshold concentrations ranging from 1.1 to 126.0 micromol/L, depending strongly on their chemical structure. PMID:17444655

  2. Water use Efficiency in a Blue oak ( Quercus douglasii) Savanna - a Combined Analysis of Stable Isotopes and Eddy Covariance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mambelli, S.; Tu, K. P.; Knohl, A.; Ma, S.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Dawson, T. E.

    2007-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between carbon assimilation and water consumption by natural vegetation is needed to assess how changes in climate will affect plant carbon and water exchange as well as the energy fluxes of ecosystems. While climate change is expected to cause significant warming, most models also suggest changes in the timing and amount of precipitation received; thus implications of this type of change are particularly acute in Mediterranean regions of the world. Blue oak savannas are already exposed to broad variation in water availability and to severe droughts during the summer months. Our objective was to evaluate the trade-off between carbon gain and water loss (Water Use Efficiency) in this ecosystem at both the leaf and at the ecosystem scales. We monitored the ratio of the partial pressures of CO2 inside the leaf (Ci) and in the outside air (Ca) or Ci/Ca, during the summer months of three subsequent years. This ratio is determined by the balance between photosynthetic capacity and stomatal conductance to water loss. Leaf-level estimates for individual trees were based on the carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of bulk leaf tissue and of recently fixed carbohydrates (leaf soluble sugars). These leaf and individual tree based estimates were then compared with canopy-level estimates derived from continuous eddy covariance measurements of fluxes of CO2, water vapor and meteorological variables from two eddy covariance systems, one above (23m) and one below (2m) the tree canopy. We found that savanna Blue oak trees cope with severe drought through coordinated down-regulation of carbon and water fluxes, i.e. the ratio Ci/Ca remained stable over four summer months, despite decreasing soil water content and leaf water potentials. Stable C isotope composition of leaf soluble sugars is the most robust measure of Ci/Ca because it reflects the initial discrimination of photosynthetic products, without the confounding effects ascribed to storage, tissue

  3. Critical factors in the limited occurrence of the Japanese tree sap mite Hericia sanukiensis (Acari: Astigmata: Algophagidae) inhabiting the sap of the oak Quercus acutissima.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kyohei; Ichikawa, Toshihide; Yasui, Yukio

    2011-08-01

    Hericia sanukiensis (Astigmata: Algophagidae) is a semi-aquatic mite inhabiting fermented sap flux of the Japanese sawtooth oak (Quercus acutissima) and utilizes Nitidulidae (Coleoptera) as the dispersal (phoretic) carrier. Although nitidulid beetles are commonly found in sap flux, the occurrence of H. sanukiensis has been extremely limited to a few trees in Shikoku Island, Kagawa Prefecture, Japan. To elucidate the critical factors limiting the occurrence of this species, we compared several physical and biological characteristics of sap-exudation points, including the structure and temperature of tree trunks, period and abundance of sap exudation, and seasonal occurrence and dispersal behavior of nitidulid beetles between environments with and without mites. During the two consecutive years of field research, we found that only sap-exudation points with obvious tree holes (ringent area >10 cm², depth >10 cm) had sustained mite populations throughout the observation period. In contrast, for the sap-exudation points lacking tree holes, H. sanukiensis temporally (from spring to autumn) colonized only when the sap production was considerably high. Thus, we suggest that the settlement of H. sanukiensis populations requires tree holes as an overwintering habitat. Nitidulid beetles also concentrated in areas with high sap production and did not disperse from such habitats during the sap flow season. This indicates that H. sanukiensis mites may only disperse and colonize new habitats at very limited opportunities, such as drastic habitat deterioration, which may promote the movement of their carrier. Taken together, these findings may explain the limited occurrence of this mite species. PMID:21479774

  4. Field monoterpene emission of Mediterranean oak (Quercus ilex) in the central Iberian Peninsula measured by enclosure and micrometeorological techniques: Observation of drought stress effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza, J.; NúñEz, L.; Pujadas, M.; PéRez-Pastor, R.; Bermejo, V.; GarcíA-Alonso, S.; Elvira, S.

    2005-02-01

    An experimental characterization of biogenic emission from Quercus ilex ssp. rotundifolia in a forest near Madrid, Spain, was carried out in the early autumn of the years 2000-2003. A dynamic branch enclosure technique was implemented to determine the monoterpene emission rates of this evergreen oak species during the 2000 and 2001 campaigns. Major compounds emitted during both measurement periods were limonene, α-pinene, β-pinene, sabinene, and myrcene. In the 2000 field campaign the light- and temperature-dependent model of [1993] did not fit the data due to drastic reductions of emission rates (and leaf gas exchange related parameters) observed at high air temperature and low air humidity (high water vapor pressure deficit). This plant physiological activity depletion and the subsequent emission reduction were attributed to severe water soil deficit conditions, as precipitation was very scarce during the growing season. In contrast, during the 2001 field campaign, neither emission nor physiological activity showed strong decreases in hot days. A good fit of experimental data to Guenther model was achieved in this field campaign (r2 = 0.90), and linear regression gave a standard emission factor (ES) of 14.0 μg gdw-1 h-1 (gdw is grams dry weight). Soil moisture was presumably higher than during the 2000 campaign due to recent rain events. With the purpose of documenting the drought stress effect at canopy level, monoterpene oak fluxes were measured by the modified Bowen ratio micrometeorological technique throughout the 2001 field campaign and in the late summer of 2002 and 2003. The measured emission by both techniques showed a reasonably good correlation, although micrometeorological fluxes were, in general, lower than upscaled branch emission rates. According to Guenther's parameterization, standard emission fluxes (FS) of 0.30 μg m-2 s-1 (r2 = 0.61) and 0.28 μg m-2 s-1 (r2 = 0.67) were derived for the 2001 and 2002 field campaigns, respectively. However

  5. Spatial pattern analysis in Persian oak (Quercus brantii var. persica) forests on B&W aerial photographs.

    PubMed

    Erfanifard, Yousef; Feghhi, Jahangir; Zobeiri, Mahmoud; Namiranian, Manouchehr

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop a method to determine the spatial pattern of trees as a robust indicator to monitor changes from B&W aerial photographs in Persian oak forests of Zagros, Iran. A 500 x 600 m study area was selected in Servak forests next to Yasuj city in Kohgiluyeh-Va-BuyerAhmad Province. All the trees were tagged in the study area and the point map of stems were prepared. The spatial distribution of trees was determined as "dispersed" using nearest neighbour technique. Then the index of "C" calculated by T-square sampling method was applied to the point map of the study area in 30 systematic sample points in a 100 x 100 m network. Comparing the results of this method with the true spatial pattern of the study area showed that "C" can detect the spatial arrangement of trees. Thereafter the index was used on the air photo of the study area that was made of B&W aerial photographs. The method suggested in this study provides a suitable approach for detecting the spatial pattern of trees in Zagros forests on B&W air photos. PMID:18351437

  6. Human contribution to trace elements in urban areas as measured in holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) bark.

    PubMed

    Minganti, Vincenzo; Drava, Giuliana; Giordani, Paolo; Malaspina, Paola; Modenesi, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    The effect of human activities on the presence of trace elements in the atmosphere was evaluated by analyzing samples of holm oak bark, collected in Italy in a large city, in a small town, and in a reference area, scarcely inhabited. In all cases, point sources of pollution were excluded (e.g., industries and incinerators). The concentrations of As, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn were measured using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The element concentrations in the small town are not different from the reference area, except for Pb and Cu, while the samples collected in the large city show higher concentrations of Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn with respect to the rural area. In particular, the Pb levels in the large city are approximately 16 times higher than in the reference site, and five times higher than in the small town. Most element concentrations are correlated in the large city, while in the reference site, only a few significant correlations between elements were found. Even in the absence of specific sources of pollution, populations living in big cities are exposed to higher concentrations of trace elements than those living in rural environments or in small urban centers. PMID:27000118

  7. Habitat Fragmentation can Modulate Drought Effects on the Plant-soil-microbial System in Mediterranean Holm Oak (Quercus ilex) Forests.

    PubMed

    Flores-Rentería, Dulce; Curiel Yuste, Jorge; Rincón, Ana; Brearley, Francis Q; García-Gil, Juan Carlos; Valladares, Fernando

    2015-05-01

    Ecological transformations derived from habitat fragmentation have led to increased threats to above-ground biodiversity. However, the impacts of forest fragmentation on soils and their microbial communities are not well understood. We examined the effects of contrasting fragment sizes on the structure and functioning of soil microbial communities from holm oak forest patches in two bioclimatically different regions of Spain. We used a microcosm approach to simulate the annual summer drought cycle and first autumn rainfall (rewetting), evaluating the functional response of a plant-soil-microbial system. Forest fragment size had a significant effect on physicochemical characteristics and microbial functioning of soils, although the diversity and structure of microbial communities were not affected. The response of our plant-soil-microbial systems to drought was strongly modulated by the bioclimatic conditions and the fragment size from where the soils were obtained. Decreasing fragment size modulated the effects of drought by improving local environmental conditions with higher water and nutrient availability. However, this modulation was stronger for plant-soil-microbial systems built with soils from the northern region (colder and wetter) than for those built with soils from the southern region (warmer and drier) suggesting that the responsiveness of the soil-plant-microbial system to habitat fragmentation was strongly dependent on both the physicochemical characteristics of soils and the historical adaptation of soil microbial communities to specific bioclimatic conditions. This interaction challenges our understanding of future global change scenarios in Mediterranean ecosystems involving drier conditions and increased frequency of forest fragmentation. PMID:25724140

  8. Using a down-scaled bioclimate envelope model to determine long-term temporal connectivity of Garry oak (Quercus garryana) habitat in western North America: implications for protected area planning.

    PubMed

    Pellatt, Marlow G; Goring, Simon J; Bodtker, Karin M; Cannon, Alex J

    2012-04-01

    Under the Canadian Species at Risk Act (SARA), Garry oak (Quercus garryana) ecosystems are listed as "at-risk" and act as an umbrella for over one hundred species that are endangered to some degree. Understanding Garry oak responses to future climate scenarios at scales relevant to protected area managers is essential to effectively manage existing protected area networks and to guide the selection of temporally connected migration corridors, additional protected areas, and to maintain Garry oak populations over the next century. We present Garry oak distribution scenarios using two random forest models calibrated with down-scaled bioclimatic data for British Columbia, Washington, and Oregon based on 1961-1990 climate normals. The suitability models are calibrated using either both precipitation and temperature variables or using only temperature variables. We compare suitability predictions from four General Circulation Models (GCMs) and present CGCM2 model results under two emissions scenarios. For each GCM and emissions scenario we apply the two Garry oak suitability models and use the suitability models to determine the extent and temporal connectivity of climatically suitable Garry oak habitat within protected areas from 2010 to 2099. The suitability models indicate that while 164 km(2) of the total protected area network in the region (47,990 km(2)) contains recorded Garry oak presence, 1635 and 1680 km(2) of climatically suitable Garry oak habitat is currently under some form of protection. Of this suitable protected area, only between 6.6 and 7.3% will be "temporally connected" between 2010 and 2099 based on the CGCM2 model. These results highlight the need for public and private protected area organizations to work cooperatively in the development of corridors to maintain temporal connectivity in climatically suitable areas for the future of Garry oak ecosystems. PMID:22350431

  9. Diplopyrone, a new phytotoxic tetrahydropyranpyran-2-one produced by Diplodia mutila, a fungus pathogen of cork oak.

    PubMed

    Evidente, Antonio; Maddau, Lucia; Spanu, Emanuela; Franceschini, Antonio; Lazzaroni, Silvia; Motta, Andrea

    2003-02-01

    A new phytotoxic monosubstituted tetrahydropyranpyran-2-one, named diplopyrone (1), was isolated from the liquid culture filtrates of Diplodia mutila, a plant pathogenic fungus causing a form of canker disease of cork oak (Quercus suber). Diplopyrone was characterized, using spectroscopic and chemical methods, as 6-[(1S)-1-hydroxyethyl]-2,4a,6,8a-tetrahydropyran[3,2-b]pyran-2-one. The absolute stereochemistry of the chiral secondary hydroxylated carbon (C-9), determined by application of Mosher's method, proved to be S. Diplopyrone assayed at a 0.01-0.1 mg/mL concentration range caused necrosis and wilting on cork oak cuttings. On a nonhost plant, tomato, diplopyrone caused brown discoloration or stewing on the stem. PMID:12608876

  10. Repeated Summer Drought and Re-watering during the First Growing Year of Oak (Quercus petraea) Delay Autumn Senescence and Bud Burst in the Following Spring

    PubMed Central

    Vander Mijnsbrugge, Kristine; Turcsán, Arion; Maes, Jorne; Duchêne, Nils; Meeus, Steven; Steppe, Kathy; Steenackers, Marijke

    2016-01-01

    Climate change predicts harsher summer droughts for mid-latitudes in Europe. To enhance our understanding of the putative impacts on forest regeneration, we studied the response of oak seedlings (Quercus petraea) to water deficit. Potted seedlings originating from three locally sourced provenances were subjected to two successive drought periods during the first growing season each followed by a plentiful re-watering. Here, we describe survival and phenological responses after the second drought treatment, applying general linear mixed modeling. From the 441 drought treated seedlings 189 subsisted with higher chances of survival among smaller plants and among single plants per pot compared to doubles. Remarkably, survival was independent of the provenance, although relatively more plants had died off in two provenances compared to the third one with mean plant height being higher in one provenance and standard deviation of plant height being higher in the other. Timing of leaf senescence was clearly delayed after the severe drought treatment followed by re-watering, with two seedlings per pot showing a lesser retardation compared to single plants. This delay can be interpreted as a compensation time in which plants recover before entering the subsequent developmental process of leaf senescence, although it renders seedlings more vulnerable to early autumn frosts because of the delayed hardening of the shoots. Onset of bud flush in the subsequent spring still showed a significant but small delay in the drought treated group, independent of the number of seedlings per pot, and can be considered as an after effect of the delayed senescence. In both phenological models significant differences among the three provenances were detected independent from the treatment. The only provenance that is believed to be local of origin, displayed the earliest leaf senescence and the latest flushing, suggesting an adaptation to the local maritime climate. This provenance also

  11. Comparative anatomical analysis of the cotyledonary region in three Mediterranean Basin Quercus (Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Pascual, Gemma; Molinas, Marisa; Verdaguer, Dolors

    2002-03-01

    Anatomical changes at the cotyledonary node from the embryo to the seedling stage in Quercus coccifera, Q. ilex, and Q. humilis were investigated by light and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Mature embryos of Q. humilis possess 2-3 pairs of leaf primordia and a pair of cotyledonary buds, whereas in Q. coccifera and Q. ilex there are two incipient primordia, and cotyledonary buds are not observed until 1 wk after germination. In all three species the cotyledonary buds multiply, forming bud clusters, and a vascular connection is well established within 5-6 wk after germination. As development proceeds, the cotyledonary region becomes woody, but buds, which are exogenous in origin, never become embedded in the periderm. In comparison with Q. suber, another native Mediterranean Basin oak, the cotyledonary node is short and axillary buds are not present below the insertion of cotyledons. In addition, starch accumulation in the cotyledonary region is not observed from histological analysis in the three oaks. Therefore, in Q. coccifera, Q. ilex, and Q. humilis seedlings the cotyledonary node can be considered to be an important regenerative structure enabling them to resprout after the elimination of the shoot above the cotyledons, despite the absence of a lignotuberous structure. PMID:21665633

  12. Cork Oak Vulnerability to Fire: The Role of Bark Harvesting, Tree Characteristics and Abiotic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Catry, Filipe X.; Moreira, Francisco; Pausas, Juli G.; Fernandes, Paulo M.; Rego, Francisco; Cardillo, Enrique; Curt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Forest ecosystems where periodical tree bark harvesting is a major economic activity may be particularly vulnerable to disturbances such as fire, since debarking usually reduces tree vigour and protection against external agents. In this paper we asked how cork oak Quercus suber trees respond after wildfires and, in particular, how bark harvesting affects post-fire tree survival and resprouting. We gathered data from 22 wildfires (4585 trees) that occurred in three southern European countries (Portugal, Spain and France), covering a wide range of conditions characteristic of Q. suber ecosystems. Post-fire tree responses (tree mortality, stem mortality and crown resprouting) were examined in relation to management and ecological factors using generalized linear mixed-effects models. Results showed that bark thickness and bark harvesting are major factors affecting resistance of Q. suber to fire. Fire vulnerability was higher for trees with thin bark (young or recently debarked individuals) and decreased with increasing bark thickness until cork was 3–4 cm thick. This bark thickness corresponds to the moment when exploited trees are debarked again, meaning that exploited trees are vulnerable to fire during a longer period. Exploited trees were also more likely to be top-killed than unexploited trees, even for the same bark thickness. Additionally, vulnerability to fire increased with burn severity and with tree diameter, and was higher in trees burned in early summer or located in drier south-facing aspects. We provided tree response models useful to help estimating the impact of fire and to support management decisions. The results suggested that an appropriate management of surface fuels and changes in the bark harvesting regime (e.g. debarking coexisting trees in different years or increasing the harvesting cycle) would decrease vulnerability to fire and contribute to the conservation of cork oak ecosystems. PMID:22787521

  13. [Tree-ring growth responses of Mongolian oak (Quercus mongolica) to climate change in southern northeast: a case study in Qianshan Mountains].

    PubMed

    Teng, Li; Xing-Yuan, He; Zhen-Ju, Chen

    2014-07-01

    Mongolian oak is one of the most important broad-leaved tree species in forests, Northeast China. Based on the methodology of dendrochronology, the variations of tree ring radial growth of Mongolian oak in Qianshan Mountains, south of Northeast China, were analyzed. Combined with the temperature and precipitation data from meteorological stations since 1951, the relationships between standardized tree ring width chronology and main climatic factors were analyzed. In this region, the precipitation between April and July of the current year had an significant relationship with the tree ring width of Mongolian oak, and was the main factor limiting the radial growth. The extreme maximum temperature of May was also a key factor influencing the tree ring width, which had a significant on the tree ring width of Mongolian oak. The precipitation in April had a significant and stable relationship with the growth of Mongolian oak since the 1950s. The 'divergence problem' was found in the study area, which the sensitivity of tree growth to summer temperature reduced since the 1980s. The tree growth response to temperature showed a seasonal change from summer to spring. PMID:25345030

  14. The description of Zapatella davisae, new species, (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) a pest gall wasp of black oak (Quercus velutina) in New England

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many species of gall wasp (Cynipidae) essentially co-exist with their host oak tree species. Occasionally, the association becomes destructive to the tree, as is the case with Zapatella davisae, new species. This species is a twig galler, and as such, in the cases of heavy infestation, cause flagg...

  15. Desiccation sensitivity of white and black (red) oak embryonic axes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Quercus is the most important aggregation of hardwoods found on the North American and European continents. Quercus is generally divided into two categories black (red) and white oak groups though a third category of live oaks is sometimes recognized as well. Natural populations of oaks a...

  16. Identification of Quercus agrifolia (coast live oak) resistant to the invasive pathogen Phytophthora ramorum in native stands using Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Anna O.; Rodriguez-Saona, Luis E.; McPherson, Brice A.; Wood, David L.; Bonello, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades coast live oak (CLO) dominance in many California coastal ecosystems has been threatened by the alien invasive pathogen Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of sudden oak death. In spite of high infection and mortality rates in some areas, the presence of apparently resistant trees has been observed, including trees that become infected but recover over time. However, identifying resistant trees based on recovery alone can take many years. The objective of this study was to determine if Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, a chemical fingerprinting technique, can be used to identify CLO resistant to P. ramorum prior to infection. Soft independent modeling of class analogy identified spectral regions that differed between resistant and susceptible trees. Regions most useful for discrimination were associated with carbonyl group vibrations. Additionally, concentrations of two putative phenolic biomarkers of resistance were predicted using partial least squares regression; >99% of the variation was explained by this analysis. This study demonstrates that chemical fingerprinting can be used to identify resistance in a natural population of forest trees prior to infection with a pathogen. FT-IR spectroscopy may be a useful approach for managing forests impacted by sudden oak death, as well as in other situations where emerging or existing forest pests and diseases are of concern. PMID:25352852

  17. Analysis of the expression of putative heat-stress related genes in relation to thermotolerance of cork oak.

    PubMed

    Correia, Barbara; Rodriguez, José Luis; Valledor, Luis; Almeida, Tânia; Santos, Conceição; Cañal, Maria Jesús; Pinto, Glória

    2014-03-15

    Cork oak (Quercus suber L.) is a research priority in the Mediterranean area and because of cork oaks' distribution these stands are experiencing daily stress. Based on projections of intensifying climate change and considering the key role of exploring the recovery abilities, cork oak seedlings were subjected to a cumulative temperature increase from 25°C to 55°C and subsequent recovery. CO2 assimilation rate, chlorophyll fluorescence, anthocyanins, proline and lipid peroxidation were used to evaluate plant performance, while the relative abundance of seven genes encoding for proteins of cork oak with a putative role in thermal/stress regulation (POX1, POX2, HSP10.4, HSP17a.22, CHS, MTL and RBC) was analyzed by qPCR (quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction). A temperature change to 35°C showed abundance alterations in the tested genes; at 45°C, the molecular changes were associated with an antioxidant response, possibly modulated by anthocyanins. At 55°C, HSP17a.22, MTL and proline accumulation were evident. After recovery, physiological balance was restored, whereas POX1, HSP10.4 and MTL abundances were suggested to be involved in increased thermotolerance. The data presented here are expected to pinpoint some pathways changes occurring during such stress and further recovery in this particular Mediterranean species. PMID:24594391

  18. Seasonal variation of leaf wax n-alkane production and δ(2)H values from the evergreen oak tree, Quercus agrifolia.

    PubMed

    Sachse, Dirk; Dawson, Todd E; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the timing of leaf wax synthesis in higher plants, we analysed the variability in leaf wax n-alkane concentration, composition (expressed as average chain length (ACL)), and δ(2)Hwax values as well as plant source water δ(2)H values (xylem and leaf water) in the evergreen tree Quercus agrifolia over a period of 9 months, beginning with leaf flush. We identified three distinct periods of leaf development with the first month following leaf flush being characterized by de novo synthesis and possibly removal of n-alkanes. During the following 3 months, n-alkane concentrations increased sevenfold and δ(2)Hwax and ACL values increased, suggesting this period was the major leaf wax n-alkane formation period. During the remaining 4 months of the experiment, stable values suggest cessation of leaf wax n-alkane formation. We find that n-alkane synthesis in Q. agrifolia takes place over 4 months, substantially longer than that observed for deciduous trees. PMID:25704898

  19. Mapping the Distribution of Sand Live Oak (Quercus geminata) and Determining Growth Responses to Hurricane Katrina (2005) on Cat Island, Mississippi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funderburk, W.; Carter, G. A.; Harley, G. L.

    2013-12-01

    William R. Funderburk, Gregory A. Carter, Grant Harley Gulf Coast Geospatial Center, University of Southern Mississippi Department of Geography and Geology Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 U.S.A. william.funderburk@usm.edu The Mississippi-Alabama barrier islands serve to buffer mainland coastal areas from the impacts of hurricanes and other extreme weather events. On August 29, 2005, they were impacted heavily by the wind, waves, and storm surges of Hurricane Katrina. The purpose of this study is to determine the growth responses of Quercus geminata, a dominant tree species on Cat Island, MS, in relation to the impact of Hurricane Katrina. Remotely sensed data was utilized in conjunction with ground data to assess growth response post Hurricane Katrina. The main objectives of this study were: 1) determine growth response of Q. geminata through tree ring analysis; 2) understand how Q. geminata adapted to intense weather and climatic phenomena on Cat Island. The hypotheses tested were: 1) growth rates of Q. geminata on Cat Island were decreased by the impact of Hurricane Katrina 2) trees at higher elevations survived or recovered while trees at lower elevations did not recover or died. Decadal scale stability is required for forest stand development on siliciclastic barrier islands. Thus, monitoring the distribution of forest climax community species is key to understanding siliciclastic, subsiding, barrier island geomorphic processes and their relationships to successional patterns and growth rates. Preliminary results indicate that Q. geminata produces a faint growth ring, survive for at least two to three hundred years and is well-adapted to frequent salt water flooding. Cat Island: False color Image

  20. Did the late spring frost in 2007 and 2011 affect tree-ring width and earlywood vessel size in Pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) in northern Poland?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchałka, Radosław; Koprowski, Marcin; Przybylak, Julia; Przybylak, Rajmund; Dąbrowski, Henryk P.

    2015-11-01

    Trees are sensitive to extreme weather and environmental conditions. This sensitivity is visible in tree-ring widths and cell structure. In our study, we hypothesized that the sudden frost noted at the beginning of May in both 2007 and 2011 affected cambial activity and, consequently, the number and size of vessels in the tree rings. It was decided to test this hypothesis after damage to leaves was observed. The applied response function model did not show any significant relationships between spring temperature and growth. However, this method uses average values for long periods and sometimes misses the short-term effects. This is why we decided to study each ring separately, comparing them with rings unaffected by the late frost. Our study showed that the short-term effect of sudden frost in late spring did not affect tree rings and selected cell parameters. The most likely reasons for this are (i) cambial activity producing the earlywood vessels before the occurrence of the observed leaf damage, (ii) the forest micro-climate protecting the trees from the harsh frost and (iii) the temperature decline being too short-lived an event to affect the oaks. On the other hand, the visible damage may be occasional and not affect cambium activity and tree vitality at all. We conclude that oak is well-adapted to this phenomenon.

  1. Did the late spring frost in 2007 and 2011 affect tree-ring width and earlywood vessel size in Pedunculate oak ( Quercus robur) in northern Poland?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchałka, Radosław; Koprowski, Marcin; Przybylak, Julia; Przybylak, Rajmund; Dąbrowski, Henryk P.

    2016-08-01

    Trees are sensitive to extreme weather and environmental conditions. This sensitivity is visible in tree-ring widths and cell structure. In our study, we hypothesized that the sudden frost noted at the beginning of May in both 2007 and 2011 affected cambial activity and, consequently, the number and size of vessels in the tree rings. It was decided to test this hypothesis after damage to leaves was observed. The applied response function model did not show any significant relationships between spring temperature and growth. However, this method uses average values for long periods and sometimes misses the short-term effects. This is why we decided to study each ring separately, comparing them with rings unaffected by the late frost. Our study showed that the short-term effect of sudden frost in late spring did not affect tree rings and selected cell parameters. The most likely reasons for this are (i) cambial activity producing the earlywood vessels before the occurrence of the observed leaf damage, (ii) the forest micro-climate protecting the trees from the harsh frost and (iii) the temperature decline being too short-lived an event to affect the oaks. On the other hand, the visible damage may be occasional and not affect cambium activity and tree vitality at all. We conclude that oak is well-adapted to this phenomenon.

  2. Did the late spring frost in 2007 and 2011 affect tree-ring width and earlywood vessel size in Pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) in northern Poland?

    PubMed

    Puchałka, Radosław; Koprowski, Marcin; Przybylak, Julia; Przybylak, Rajmund; Dąbrowski, Henryk P

    2016-08-01

    Trees are sensitive to extreme weather and environmental conditions. This sensitivity is visible in tree-ring widths and cell structure. In our study, we hypothesized that the sudden frost noted at the beginning of May in both 2007 and 2011 affected cambial activity and, consequently, the number and size of vessels in the tree rings. It was decided to test this hypothesis after damage to leaves was observed. The applied response function model did not show any significant relationships between spring temperature and growth. However, this method uses average values for long periods and sometimes misses the short-term effects. This is why we decided to study each ring separately, comparing them with rings unaffected by the late frost. Our study showed that the short-term effect of sudden frost in late spring did not affect tree rings and selected cell parameters. The most likely reasons for this are (i) cambial activity producing the earlywood vessels before the occurrence of the observed leaf damage, (ii) the forest micro-climate protecting the trees from the harsh frost and (iii) the temperature decline being too short-lived an event to affect the oaks. On the other hand, the visible damage may be occasional and not affect cambium activity and tree vitality at all. We conclude that oak is well-adapted to this phenomenon. PMID:26607274

  3. Relevance of genetics for conservation policies: the case of Minorcan cork oaks

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Zaida; Burgarella, Concetta; de Heredia, Unai López; Lumaret, Roselyne; Petit, Rémy J.; Soto, Álvaro; Gil, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Marginal populations of widely distributed species can be of high conservation interest when they hold a significant or unique portion of the genetic diversity of the species. However, such genetic information is frequently lacking. Here the relevance of genetic surveys to develop efficient conservation strategies for such populations is illustrated using cork oak (Quercus suber) from Minorca (Balearic Islands, Spain) as a case study. Cork oak is highly endangered on the island, where no more than 67 individuals live in small, isolated stands in siliceous sites. As a consequence, it was recently granted protected status. Methods Two Bayesian clustering approaches were used to analyse the genetic structure of the Minorcan population, on the basis of nuclear microsatellite data. The different groups within the island were also compared with additional island and continental populations surrounding Minorca. Key Results Very high genetic diversity was found, with values comparable with those observed in continental parts of the species' range. Furthermore, the Minorcan oak stands were highly differentiated from one another and were genetically related to different continental populations of France and Spain. Conclusions The high levels of genetic diversity and inter-stands differentiation make Minorcan cork oak eligible for specific conservation efforts. The relationship of Minorcan stands to different continental populations in France and Spain probably reflects multiple colonization events. However, discrepancy between chloroplast DNA- and nuclear DNA-based groups does not support a simple scenario of recent introduction. Gene exchanges between neighbouring cork oak stands and with holm oak have created specific and exceptional genetic combinations. They also constitute a wide range of potential genetic resources for research on adaptation to new environmental conditions. Conservation guidelines that take into account these findings are provided

  4. Adsorption of Disperse Orange 30 dye onto activated carbon derived from Holm Oak (Quercus Ilex) acorns: A 3(k) factorial design and analysis.

    PubMed

    Tezcan Un, Umran; Ates, Funda; Erginel, Nihal; Ozcan, Oznur; Oduncu, Emre

    2015-05-15

    In this study, samples of activated carbon were prepared from Holm Oak acorns by chemical activation with H3PO4, ZnCl2 and KOH as activating agents. The samples were characterized by SEM, BET, FTIR and elemental analysis, and were then evaluated for the removal of Disperse Orange 30 (DO30) dyes from aqueous solutions. A 3(k) factorial design was used to determine the interaction effects of carbonization temperature, pH, dosage of adsorbent and type of activating agent on the amount of dye removal. Also, level of effectiveness factors were determined by conducting regression models for maximum adsorption efficiency. Of all the samples, the sample generated using ZnCl2 as an activating agent showed a maximum dye removal efficiency of 93.5% at a carbonization temperature of 750 °C, a pH of 2 and an adsorbent dosage of 0.15 g/25 ml. The analysis shows that the adsorption process depends significantly on the type of activating agent used in the preparation of activated carbon. PMID:25776797

  5. Why Is Seed Production So Variable among Individuals? A Ten-Year Study with Oaks Reveals the Importance of Soil Environment

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Ramos, Ignacio M.; Aponte, Cristina; García, Luis V.; Padilla-Díaz, Carmen M.; Marañón, Teodoro

    2014-01-01

    Mast-seeding species exhibit not only a large inter-annual variability in seed production but also considerable variability among individuals within the same year. However, very little is known about the causes and consequences for population dynamics of this potentially large between-individual variability. Here, we quantified seed production over ten consecutive years in two Mediterranean oak species – the deciduous Quercus canariensis and the evergreen Q. suber - that coexist in forests of southern Spain. First, we calibrated likelihood models to identify which abiotic and biotic variables best explain the magnitude (hereafter seed productivity) and temporal variation of seed production at the individual level (hereafter CVi), and infer whether reproductive effort results from the available soil resources for the plant or is primarily determined by selectively favoured strategies. Second, we explored the contribution of between-individual variability in seed production as a potential mechanism of satiation for predispersal seed predators. We found that Q. canariensis trees inhabiting moister and more fertile soils were more productive than those growing in more resource-limited sites. Regarding temporal variation, individuals of the two studied oak species inhabiting these resource-rich environments also exhibited larger values of CVi. Interestingly, we detected a satiating effect on granivorous insects at the tree level in Q. suber, which was evident in those years where between-individual variability in acorn production was higher. These findings suggest that individual seed production (both in terms of seed productivity and inter-annual variability) is strongly dependent on soil resource heterogeneity (at least for one of the two studied oak species) with potential repercussions for recruitment and population dynamics. However, other external factors (such as soil heterogeneity in pathogen abundance) or certain inherent characteristics of the tree might be

  6. Use of an airborne lidar system to model plant species composition and diversity of Mediterranean oak forests.

    PubMed

    Simonson, William D; Allen, Harriet D; Coomes, David A

    2012-10-01

    Airborne lidar is a remote-sensing tool of increasing importance in ecological and conservation research due to its ability to characterize three-dimensional vegetation structure. If different aspects of plant species diversity and composition can be related to vegetation structure, landscape-level assessments of plant communities may be possible. We examined this possibility for Mediterranean oak forests in southern Portugal, which are rich in biological diversity but also threatened. We compared data from a discrete, first-and-last return lidar data set collected for 31 plots of cork oak (Quercus suber) and Algerian oak (Quercus canariensis) forest with field data to test whether lidar can be used to predict the vertical structure of vegetation, diversity of plant species, and community type. Lidar- and field-measured structural data were significantly correlated (up to r= 0.85). Diversity of forest species was significantly associated with lidar-measured vegetation height (R(2) = 0.50, p < 0.001). Clustering and ordination of the species data pointed to the presence of 2 main forest classes that could be discriminated with an accuracy of 89% on the basis of lidar data. Lidar can be applied widely for mapping of habitat and assessments of habitat condition (e.g., in support of the European Species and Habitats Directive [92/43/EEC]). However, particular attention needs to be paid to issues of survey design: density of lidar points and geospatial accuracy of ground-truthing and its timing relative to acquisition of lidar data. PMID:22731687

  7. Not all oak gall wasps gall oaks: the description of Dryocosmus rileypokei, a new, apostate species of Cynipini from California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cynipini gall wasps are commonly known as oak gall wasps for their almost exclusive use of oak (Quercus spp.) as their host plant. Previously, only three of the nearly1000 species of Cynipini have been recorded from a host plant other than Quercus. These three species are known from western chinqu...

  8. Evaluation of spectral light management on growth of container-grown willow oak, nuttall oak and summer red maple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant response to blue, red, gray or black shade cloth was evaluated with willow oak (Quercus phellos L.), Nuttall oak (Quercus nuttallii Palmer, Nuttall) and Summer Red maple (Acer rubrum L. ‘Summer Red’) liners. Light transmitted through the colored shade cloth had no influence on germination of ...

  9. Monitoring drought impact on Mediterranean oak savanna vegetation using remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Dugo, Maria P.; Carpintero, Elisabet; Andreu, Ana

    2015-04-01

    A holm oak savanna, known as dehesa in Spain and montado in Portugal, is the largest agroforest ecosystem in Europe, covering about 3 million hectares in the Iberian Peninsula and Greece (Papanastasis et al., 2004). It is considered an example of sustainable land use, supporting a large number of species and diversity of habitats and for its importance in rural development and economy (Plieninger et al., 2001). It is a combination between an agricultural and a naturally vegetated ecosystem, consisting of widely-spaced oak trees (mostly Quercus Ilex and Quercus suber) combined with a sub-canopy composed by crops, annual grassland and/or shrubs. It has a Mediterranean climate with severe periodic droughts. In the last decades, this system is being exposed to multiple threats derived from socio-economic changes and intensive agricultural use, which have caused environmental degradation, including tree decline, changes in soil properties and hydrological processes, and an increase of soil erosion (Coelho et al., 2004). Soil water dynamics plays a central role in the current decline and reduction of forested areas that jeopardizes the preservation of the system. In this work, a series of remotely sensed images since 1990 to present was used to evaluate the effect of several drought events occurred in the study area (1995, 2009, 2010/2011) on the tree density and water status. Data from satellites Landsat and field measurements have been combined in a spectral mixture model to assess separately the evolution of tree, dry grass and bare soil ground coverage. Only summer images have been used to avoid the influence of the green herbaceous layer on the analysis. Thermal data from the same sensors and meteorological information are integrated in a two source surface energy balance model to compute the Evaporative Stress Index (ESI) and evaluate the vegetation water status. The results have provided insights about the severity of each event and the spatial distribution of

  10. Pre-exposure to ozone predisposes oak leaves to attacks by Diplodia corticola and Biscogniauxia mediterranea.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Elena; Anselmi, Naldo; Franceschini, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    One-year-old cork oak (Quercus suber) and turkey oak (Q. cerris) seedlings were exposed to ozone (110 ppb, 5 h day(-1), for 30 days) and were inoculated with Diplodia corticola and Biscogniauxia mediterranea, respectively, by spraying a suspension of spores on the leaves. Both fungi are endophytic and may act as weak parasites, contributing to oak decline. Ozone exposure stimulated leaf attacks after inoculation, although the physiological, visible, and structural responses of both oaks to O3 exposure were weak. In fact, steady-state gas exchange, leaf waxes, and wettability were not significantly affected by O3. In Q. cerris, O3 altered the structure of stomata, as observed by scanning microscopy, and reduced the leaf relative water content. No hyphal entry through stomata or growth towards stomata was, however, observed. Inoculations were performed in a humid chamber at low light; stomata were likely to be closed. When Q. cerris was inoculated in natural conditions, i.e., in a forest infected by B. mediterranea, seedlings pre-exposed to the enhanced O3 regime had a higher number of B. mediterranea isolates than the controls. This suggests that pre-exposure to O3 predisposed Q. cerris leaves to attacks by B. mediterranea independent of stomata. The hyphae of both fungi were able to enter the leaf through the cuticle, either by gradual in-growth into the cuticle or erosion of a hollow in the cuticle at the point of contact. The primary cause of increased leaf injury in O3-exposed seedlings appeared to be higher germination of spores than on control leaves. PMID:17450300

  11. Population variation and natural selection on leaf traits in cork oak throughout its distribution range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Valiente, José Alberto; Valladares, Fernando; Sánchez-Gómez, David; Delgado, Antonio; Aranda, Ismael

    2014-07-01

    A central issue in evolutionary biology is the exploration of functional trait variation among populations and the extent to which this variation has adaptive value. It was recently proposed that specific leaf area (SLA), leaf nitrogen concentration per mass (Nmass) and water use efficiency in cork oak play an important role in adaptation to water availability in the environment. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we explored, first, whether there was population-level variation in cork oak (Quercus suber) for these functional traits throughout its distribution range; if this were the case, it would be consistent with the hypothesis that different rainfall patterns have led to ecotypic differentiation in this species. Second, we studied whether the population-level variation matched short-term selection on these traits under different water availability conditions using two fitness components: survival and growth. We found high population-level differentiation in SLA and Nmass, with populations from dry places exhibiting the lowest values for SLA and Nmass. Likewise, reduced SLA had fitness benefits in terms of growth for plants under dry conditions. However, contrary to our expectations, we did not find any pattern of association between functional traits and survival in nine-year-old saplings despite considerable drought during one year of the study period. These results together with findings from the literature suggest that early stages of development are the most critical period for this species. Most importantly, these findings suggest that cork oak saplings have a considerable potential to cope with dry conditions. This capacity to withstand aridity has important implications for conservation of cork oak woodlands under the ongoing climate change.

  12. Plastome data reveal multiple geographic origins of Quercus Group Ilex

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Guido W.; Papini, Alessio; Vessella, Federico; Cardoni, Simone; Tordoni, Enrico; Piredda, Roberta; Franc, Alain; Denk, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences from the plastome are currently the main source for assessing taxonomic and phylogenetic relationships in flowering plants and their historical biogeography at all hierarchical levels. One major exception is the large and economically important genus Quercus (oaks). Whereas differentiation patterns of the nuclear genome are in agreement with morphology and the fossil record, diversity patterns in the plastome are at odds with established taxonomic and phylogenetic relationships. However, the extent and evolutionary implications of this incongruence has yet to be fully uncovered. The DNA sequence divergence of four Euro-Mediterranean Group Ilex oak species (Quercus ilex L., Q. coccifera L., Q. aucheri Jaub. & Spach., Q. alnifolia Poech.) was explored at three chloroplast markers (rbcL, trnK/matK, trnH-psbA). Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed including worldwide members of additional 55 species representing all Quercus subgeneric groups. Family and order sequence data were harvested from gene banks to better frame the observed divergence in larger taxonomic contexts. We found a strong geographic sorting in the focal group and the genus in general that is entirely decoupled from species boundaries. High plastid divergence in members of Quercus Group Ilex, including haplotypes shared with related, but long isolated oak lineages, point towards multiple geographic origins of this group of oaks. The results suggest that incomplete lineage sorting and repeated phases of asymmetrical introgression among ancestral lineages of Group Ilex and two other main Groups of Eurasian oaks (Cyclobalanopsis and Cerris) caused this complex pattern. Comparison with the current phylogenetic synthesis also suggests an initial high- versus mid-latitude biogeographic split within Quercus. High plastome plasticity of Group Ilex reflects geographic area disruptions, possibly linked with high tectonic activity of past and modern distribution ranges, that did not

  13. Plastome data reveal multiple geographic origins of Quercus Group Ilex.

    PubMed

    Simeone, Marco Cosimo; Grimm, Guido W; Papini, Alessio; Vessella, Federico; Cardoni, Simone; Tordoni, Enrico; Piredda, Roberta; Franc, Alain; Denk, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences from the plastome are currently the main source for assessing taxonomic and phylogenetic relationships in flowering plants and their historical biogeography at all hierarchical levels. One major exception is the large and economically important genus Quercus (oaks). Whereas differentiation patterns of the nuclear genome are in agreement with morphology and the fossil record, diversity patterns in the plastome are at odds with established taxonomic and phylogenetic relationships. However, the extent and evolutionary implications of this incongruence has yet to be fully uncovered. The DNA sequence divergence of four Euro-Mediterranean Group Ilex oak species (Quercus ilex L., Q. coccifera L., Q. aucheri Jaub. & Spach., Q. alnifolia Poech.) was explored at three chloroplast markers (rbcL, trnK/matK, trnH-psbA). Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed including worldwide members of additional 55 species representing all Quercus subgeneric groups. Family and order sequence data were harvested from gene banks to better frame the observed divergence in larger taxonomic contexts. We found a strong geographic sorting in the focal group and the genus in general that is entirely decoupled from species boundaries. High plastid divergence in members of Quercus Group Ilex, including haplotypes shared with related, but long isolated oak lineages, point towards multiple geographic origins of this group of oaks. The results suggest that incomplete lineage sorting and repeated phases of asymmetrical introgression among ancestral lineages of Group Ilex and two other main Groups of Eurasian oaks (Cyclobalanopsis and Cerris) caused this complex pattern. Comparison with the current phylogenetic synthesis also suggests an initial high- versus mid-latitude biogeographic split within Quercus. High plastome plasticity of Group Ilex reflects geographic area disruptions, possibly linked with high tectonic activity of past and modern distribution ranges, that did not

  14. Gene Expression Associated with Tuber Wound-Healing/Suberization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wounding of potatoes during harvest and handling operations results in tuber shrinkage, market quality defects and infection. Suberization and other wound-healing processes that mitigate these losses are of great agricultural importance. Previously, we determined that suberin poly(phenolics) and s...

  15. The macromolecular aromatic domain in suberized tissue: a changing paradigm.

    PubMed

    Bernards, M A; Lewis, N G

    1998-03-01

    As a structural feature of specialized cell walls, suberization remains an enigma, despite its obvious importance both during normal growth and development and as a stress response in plants. While it is clear that suberized tissues contain both polyaromatic and polyaliphatic domains, and that each of these has its own unique characteristics, whether there is a contiguous macromolecule that can be called suberin is an open question. From a structural perspective, the aromatic domain is unique and distinct from lignin, and is apparently comprised primarily of (poly)hydroxycinnamates, such as amides (e.g., feruloyltyramine). The aliphatic domain is also unique, being quite distinct from cutin in terms of both its chemical composition and cellular location. In the present paper, histochemical, structural and biochemical data, particularly, regarding the polyaromatic domain of suberized tissues, are critically reviewed. A revised description of the polyaromatic domain of suberized tissues, based on the consensus that is emerging from the current data, is presented and especially includes a spatially distinct (poly)hydroxycinnamoyl-containing macromolecule. PMID:11536868

  16. The macromolecular aromatic domain in suberized tissue: a changing paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernards, M. A.; Lewis, N. G.

    1998-01-01

    As a structural feature of specialized cell walls, suberization remains an enigma, despite its obvious importance both during normal growth and development and as a stress response in plants. While it is clear that suberized tissues contain both polyaromatic and polyaliphatic domains, and that each of these has its own unique characteristics, whether there is a contiguous macromolecule that can be called suberin is an open question. From a structural perspective, the aromatic domain is unique and distinct from lignin, and is apparently comprised primarily of (poly)hydroxycinnamates, such as amides (e.g., feruloyltyramine). The aliphatic domain is also unique, being quite distinct from cutin in terms of both its chemical composition and cellular location. In the present paper, histochemical, structural and biochemical data, particularly, regarding the polyaromatic domain of suberized tissues, are critically reviewed. A revised description of the polyaromatic domain of suberized tissues, based on the consensus that is emerging from the current data, is presented and especially includes a spatially distinct (poly)hydroxycinnamoyl-containing macromolecule.

  17. Miocene Oaks from Eastern Zhejiang, China and their Paleoenvironmental Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Hui; Ferguson, David

    2015-04-01

    The intertrappean fluvial-lacustrine beds belonging to the Upper Miocene Shengxian Formation in eastern China contain many exquisitely preserved plant fossils, e.g., leaves, fruits and seeds as well as plentiful pollen. The Fagaceae is the dominant taxon represented by 5 genera and 15 species, four of which belong to Quercus subgenus Cyclobalanopsis. Quercus species (oaks) are highly sensitive to environmental changes. The correlation between climate and trichome base density of Quercus glauca and Quercus delavayi of subg. Cyclobalanopsis, which are the NLRs of two fossil species, Quercus paraglauca and Quercus aff. delavayi, indicates that the trichome base density of Quercus glauca is comprehensively affected by various climate factors, but most influenced by solar radiation and latitude. The trichome base parametrics of Quercus paraglauca and the comparison of epidermal cell characteristics between Quercus paraglauca and Quercus aff. delavayi and their NLR species of subg. Cyclobalanopsis, show that the climate was warmer and more humid in the late Miocene than that of today in eastern Zhejiang, China. A study of the stomatal index of Quercus glauca and Quercus delavayi, collected in different years, demonstrates that they are very sensitive to the variation of atmospheric CO2 concentration. By comparing the stomatal ratio between the two fossil species and their NLRs, the paleoatmospheric CO2 concentration in the late Miocene is reconstructed as ca. 400 ppmv, i.e. higher than the present natural CO2 concentration eliminating the industrial influence.

  18. By-products of electrochemical synthesis of suberic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Shirobokova, O.I.; Adamov, A.A.; Freidlin, G.N.; Antonenko, N.S.; Grudtsyn, Yu.D.

    1988-05-10

    By-products of the electrochemical synthesis of dimethyl suberate from glutaric anhydride were studied. This is isolated by thermal dehydration of a mixture of lower dicarboxylic acids that are wastes from the production of adipic acid. To isolate the by-products, they used the methods of vacuum rectification and preparative gas-liquid chromatography, and for their identification, PMR, IR spectroscopy, gas-liquid chromatography, and other known physicochemical methods of investigation.

  19. [Cytogenetic characteristics of seed progeny of common oak trees (Quercus robur L.) exposed to the irradiation after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station and growing at the territories with different levels of anthropogenic contamination].

    PubMed

    Artiukhov, V G; Kalaev, V N

    2005-01-01

    The examination of cytogenetic characteristics (the mitotic activity, the time of passing of the mitotic stages by cells, the level and the spectrum of mitosis disturbances, the nucleoli characteristics) of seed progeny of common oak trees, exposed to the radiation exposure after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station and growing at the territories with different levels of anthropogenic contamination was held. In spite of the normalization of the radioactive level at the examined territories the changes of the cytogenetic characteristics of common oak seed progeny in comparison with the control were noticed. Obtained results are explained from the position of the radiation induced genomic instable and of the wave kinetic of the mutation process. The questions of the advisability and of the validity of using of the seed progeny of the common oak trees, exposed to the radiation exposure, in forest restoration measures are discussed. PMID:16304780

  20. Induced phenylpropanoid metabolism during suberization and lignification: a comparative analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernards, M. A.; Susag, L. M.; Bedgar, D. L.; Anterola, A. M.; Lewis, N. G.

    2000-01-01

    Induction of the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids was monitored at the enzyme level through measurement of the temporal change in the activity of two marker enzymes of phenylpropanoid metabolism, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, (PAL, E.C. 4.1.3.5) and 4-coumaryl-CoA ligase (4-CL, E.C. 6.2.1.12) and two marker enzymes for hydroxycinnamyl alcohol biosynthesis, cinnamoyl-CoA:NADP+ oxidoreductase (CCR, E.C. 1.2.1.44) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD, E.C. 1.1.1.195) in both suberizing potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers and lignifying loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) cell cultures. While measurable activities of PAL, 4-CL and CAD increased upon initiation of suberization in potato tubers, that of CCR did not. By contrast, all four enzymes were induced upon initiation of lignification in pine cell cultures. The lack of CCR induction in potato by wound treatment is consistent with the channelling of hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA derivatives away from monolignol formation and toward other hydroxycinnamoyl derivatives such as those that accumulate during suberization.

  1. Identification of a new source of contamination of Quercus sp. oak wood by 2,4,6-trichloroanisole and its impact on the contamination of barrel-aged wines.

    PubMed

    Chatonnet, Pascal; Fleury, Antoine; Boutou, Stéphane

    2010-10-13

    Thanks to practical experience in various wineries in recent years, it is now clear that, similarly to the well-known phenomenon in corks, there are several sources of unpredictable contamination of oak wood by 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA). TCA affects staves in the same barrel very sporadically, with extremely limited contaminated areas on the surface that may reach several millimeters in depth. The precise origin of the TCP and TCA in oak wood is not known at this stage. Available data indicate that the phase where stavewood is naturally dried and seasoned is the source of these undesirable organochlorine contaminants. The strictly chemical formation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP), derived from organochlorine biocides, was demonstrated to be impossible under traditional cooperage conditions, and its accumulation remained highly improbable. Similarly to previous discoveries in corks, all the analyses of oak wood suggested that the TCP was of biochemical origin. The capacity to biomethylate chlorophenols is well-known and relatively widespread among the usual microflora in stavewood, but the precise origin of the intermediary leading to TCP formation is still unknown. One probable hypothesis is that this reaction involves chloroperoxidase (CPO). Several ideas have been proposed, but the microorganisms responsible for the formation of the TCA precursor in oak wood have not yet been identified. The extent of this problem is still severely underestimated by coopers and barrel-users, due to the extremely unpredictable, localized contamination of the staves. PMID:20845985

  2. Analysis of oak tannins by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mämmelä, P; Savolainen, H; Lindroos, L; Kangas, J; Vartiainen, T

    2000-09-01

    Extractable tannins were analysed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry in two oak species, North American white oak (Quercus alba) and European red oak (Quercus robur). They mainly included various glucose gallic and ellagic acid esters. The structures were partially determined, and they included grandinin/roburin E, castalagin/vescalagin, gallic acid, valoneic acid bilactone, monogalloyl glucose, digalloyl glucose, trigalloyl glucose, ellagic acid rhamnose, quercitrin and ellagic acid. PMID:10999626

  3. The Physiology of Suberization: Roles in Resistance to Infection During Wound-Healing and in the Pink Eye Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The suberized cells of potato native periderm and wound periderm provide broad and durable protection against infection, dehydration and other problems affecting tuber market quality. Suberization and maintenance of the resulting suberin barrier involve complex processes of great economic importanc...

  4. Soil carbon storage as influenced by tree cover in the Dehesa cork oak silvopasture of central-western Spain.

    PubMed

    Howlett, David Scott; Moreno, Gerardo; Mosquera Losada, Maria Rosa; Nair, P K Ramachandran; Nair, Vimala D

    2011-07-01

    The extent of carbon (C) stored in soils depends on a number of factors including soil characteristics, climatic and other environmental conditions, and management practices. Such information, however, is lacking for silvopastoral systems in Spain. This study quantified the amounts of soil C stored at various depths (0-25, 25-50, 50-75, and 75-100 cm) under a Dehesa cork oak (Quercus suber L.) silvopasture at varying distances (2, 5, and 15 m) to trees. Soil C in the whole soil and three soil fractions (<53, 53-250, and 250-2000 μm) was determined. Results showed soil depth to be a significant factor in soil C stocks in all soil particle sizes. Distance to tree was a significant factor determining soil C stocks in the whole soil and the 250-2000 μm soil fraction. To 1 m depth, mean total C storage at 2, 5, and 15 m from cork oak was 50.2, 37, and 26.5 Mg ha(-1), respectively. Taking into account proportions of land surface area containing these C stocks at varying distances to trees to 1 m depth, with a tree density of 35 stems ha(-1), estimated landscape soil C is 29.9 Mg ha(-1). Greater soil C stocks directly underneath the tree canopy suggest that maintaining or increasing tree cover, where lost from disease or management, may increase long term storage of soil C in Mediterranean silvopastoral systems. The results also demonstrate the use of soil aggregate characteristics as better indicators of soil C sequestration potential and thus a tool for environmental monitoring. PMID:21643613

  5. Pharmacology of Quercus infectoria.

    PubMed

    Dar, M S; Ikram, M; Fakouhi, T

    1976-12-01

    The galls of Quercus infectoria (Fagaceae), a commonly available plant in Iran, were studied pharmacologically. Two fractions were employed, a dried acetone-treated methanol extract dissolved in water (Fraction A) and a subfraction prepared by chloroform-methanol extraction (Fraction B). Fraction A was active as an analgesic in rats and significantly reduced blood sugar levels in rabbits. Fraction B had CNS depressant activity. Data obtained with a treadmill indicated a decreased activity ratio by Fraction B, suggesting a possible interference in motor coordination. It potentiated the barbiturate sleeping time significantly without changing the onset time or the loss of the righting reflex. In addition, Fraction B exhibited a moderate antitremorine activity by causing a delay in the onset and a decrease in the severity of tremorine-induced tremors. The local anesthetic action of Fraction B was evident due to the complete blockade of the isolated frog sciatic nerve conduction. PMID:1032663

  6. Gene expression profiles of different breast cancer cells compared with their responsiveness to fermented mistletoe (Viscum album L.) extracts Iscador from oak (Quercus), pine (Pinus), white fir (Abies) and apple tree (Malus) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Eggenschwiler, Jenny; Patrignani, Andrea; Wagner, Ulrich; Rehrauer, Hubert; Schlapbach, Ralph; Rist, Lukas; Ramos, Mac H; Viviani, Angelika

    2006-06-01

    Cytotoxicity assays in vitro (MTT test) showed that the different breast cancer cell lines Kpl-1, MCF-7 and Mfm-223 respond differently to the mistletoe (Viscum album L.) preparations Iscador. Quercus (Qu), Abies (A), Malus (M) and Pinus (P). In order to determine the differences in the responsiveness of the cells more exactly, the gene expression profiles were determined by cells, which were treated with Mistletoe extracts, compared with untreated control cells. Such differences can be analysed in more detail by looking at the gene expression using Human Whole Genome microarray chips (41,000 genes). The results of the transcriptome analyses suggested that Iscador preparations influenced the overregulation of genes regarding immune defense, stress response, apoptosis and cell-cell adhesion pathways. Within the Mfm-223-Zellen was the Genexpression in MCF-7 and Kpl-1. The MCF-7 cells were affected on the genes which are involved in cell-cell contacts whereas Kpl-1 responded to the mistletoe extracts by changing the mRNA levels of the immune and stress response pathways. Concerning the effects of the mistletoe extract, we conclude that Iscador Qu and M have a greater influence on the immune defense and stress response genes whereas Iscador A tends to affect the cell-cell adhesion and cytoskeleton pathways. In summary, cDNA microarray analyses give us information on whether a cancer cell is sensitive to mistletoe extracts in relation to how many genes are significantly overrepresented after mistletoe treatment, and whether a particular mistletoe extract is more effective on a specific cancer cell than the other preparation. PMID:16927530

  7. Acorns containing deeper plumule survive better: how white oaks counter embryo excision by rodents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingming; Dong, Zhong; Yi, Xianfeng; Bartlow, Andrew W

    2014-01-01

    Several squirrel species excise the embryo of acorns of most white oak species to arrest germination for long-term storage. However, it is not clear how these acorns counter embryo excision and survive in the arms race of coevolution. In this study, we simulated the embryo excision behavior of squirrels by removing 4 mm of cotyledon from the apical end of white oak acorns differing in embryo depths to investigate the effects of embryo excision on acorn germination and seedling performance of white oak species. The embryo depth in the cotyledons was significantly different among white oak acorns, with Quercus mongolica containing the embryo most deeply in the acorns. We found that artificial embryo excision significantly decreased acorn germination rates of Quercus variabilis, Quercus acutissima, Quercus aliena, Quercus aliena var. acutiserrata, Quercus serrata. var. brevipetiolata but not Q. mongolica. Artificial embryo excision exerted significant negative impacts on seedling performance of all oak species except Quercus aliena. Our study demonstrates the role of embryo depth of acorns in countering embryo excision by squirrels and may explain the fact that squirrels do not perform embryo excision in acorns of Q. mongolica with deeper embryos. This apparent adaptation of acorns sheds light on the coevolutionary dynamics between oaks and their seed predators. PMID:24455161

  8. Draft genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa supsp. multiplex strain Griffin-1 from Quercus rubra in Georgia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The draft genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. multiplex Strain Griffin-1 isolated from a red oak tree (Quercus rubra) in Georgia, U.S.A. is reported. The bacterium has a genome size of 2,387,314 bp with 51.7% G+C content and comprises 2,903 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), and 50 RNA g...

  9. First discovery of Quercus feeding Nepticulidae (Lepidoptera) in Central America.

    PubMed

    Stonis, Jonas R; Diškus, Arūnas; Remeikis, Andrius; Schuster, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Despite the high taxonomic diversity of oaks in Mexico and Central America, no Quercus feeding Nepticulidae have ever been recorded from the region. Here, we present seven species whose larvae are leaf-miners of Quercus (section Lobatae) in Guatemala. Except Stigmella nigriverticella (Chambers 1875), which was previously known from the United States, all other discovered species are new. We describe and name five new species (Stigmella jaguari Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov., S. lauta Diškus & Stonis, sp. nov., S. sublauta Remeikis & Stonis, sp. nov., S. aurifasciata Diškus & Stonis, sp. nov. and S. guatemalensis Diškus & Stonis, sp. nov.); the remaining new species is described but left unnamed because of lack of adults (i. e. moths and genitalia are described from developed pupae). All seven treated species are illustrated with photographs of the leaf-mines, adults, and genitalia. PMID:25112733

  10. Competitive suppression of Quercus douglasii (Fagaceae) seedling emergence and growth.

    PubMed

    Gordon, D R; Rice, K J

    2000-07-01

    Reduced recruitment of blue oak (Quercus douglasii) seedlings in California grasslands and woodlands may result from shifts in seasonal soil water availability coincident with replacement of the native perennial herbaceous community by Mediterranean annuals. We used a combination of container and field experiments to examine the interrelationships between soil water potential, herbaceous neighborhood composition, and blue oak seedling shoot emergence and growth. Neighborhoods of exotic annuals depleted soil moisture more rapidly than neighborhoods of a perennial grass or "no-neighbor" controls. Although effects of neighborhood composition on oak seedling root elongation were not statistically significant, seedling shoot emergence was significantly inhibited in the annual neighborhoods where soil water was rapidly depleted. Seedling water status directly reflected soil water potential, which also determined the extent and duration of oak seedling growth during the first year. End-of-season seedling height significantly influenced survival and growth in subsequent years. While growth and survival of blue oak seedlings may be initially constrained by competition with herbaceous species, subsequent competition with adult blue oak trees may further contribute to reduced sapling recruitment. PMID:10898776

  11. Seed-mass effects in four Mediterranean Quercus species (Fagaceae) growing in contrasting light environments.

    PubMed

    Quero, José Luis; Villar, Rafael; Marañón, Teodoro; Zamora, Regino; Poorter, Lourens

    2007-11-01

    Three hypotheses have been proposed to explain the functional relationship between seed mass and seedling performance: the reserve effect (larger seeds retain a larger proportion of reserves after germinating), the metabolic effect (seedlings from larger seeds have slower relative growth rates), and the seedling-size effect (larger seeds produce larger seedlings). We tested these hypotheses by growing four Mediterranean Quercus species under different light conditions (3, 27, and 100% of available radiation). We found evidence for two of the three hypotheses, but none of the four species complied with all three hypotheses at the same time. The reserve effect was not found in any species, the metabolic effect was found in three species (Q. ilex, Q. pyrenaica, and Q. suber), and the seedling-size effect in all species. Light availability significantly affected the relationships between seed size and seedling traits. For Q. ilex and Q. canariensis, a seedling-size effect was found under all three light conditions, but only under the lowest light (3%) for Q. suber and Q. pyrenaica. In all species, the correlation between seed mass and seedling mass increased with a decrease in light, suggesting that seedlings growing in low light depend more upon their seed reserves. A causal model integrates the three hypotheses, suggesting that larger seeds generally produced larger seedlings. PMID:21636374

  12. Antileishmanial, antioxidant, and cytotoxic activities of Quercus infectoria Olivier extract.

    PubMed

    Kheirandish, Farnaz; Delfan, Bahram; Mahmoudvand, Hossein; Moradi, Nasim; Ezatpour, Behrouz; Ebrahimzadeh, Farzad; Rashidipour, Marzieh

    2016-08-01

    Currently, there is no effective vaccine available, and chemotherapy is the main approach for treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). During recent decades, studies have demonstrated that a number of plant-derived compounds may act as new therapeutic tools against leishmaniasis. This study was evaluated the antileishmanial, antioxidant, and cytotoxic activities of Quercus infectoria Olivier (oak) extract. The total amount of phenolic and flavonoid compounds was measured in oak extract. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis was also performed to determine the amount of quercetin and gallic acid in this plant. This extract (0-80g/mL) was evaluated in vitro against promastigote and intracellular amastigote forms of Leishmania major (MRHO/IR/75/ER) using MTT assay and in a macro-phage model, respectively. Then oak extract was tested on CL in infected male BALB/c mice with L. major in order to evaluate the antileishmanial activity topically. Moreover, cytotoxicity effects of oak in murine macrophage cells were tested by MTT assay. Antioxidative activity of oak was also determined by the 2,2-diphenyl-1,1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging test. The amount of phenolic and flavonoid compounds in the oak extract was 57.50 and 1.86%, respectively. The amount of quercetin and gallic acid in the oak extract was 0.0064 and 0.22%, respectively. The findings revealed that oak significantly (P<0.05) inhibited the growth rate of promastigote of (IC50 12.65μg/mL) and amastigotes (IC50 10.31μg/mL) as a dose-dependent response. In the in vivo assay, after 4 weeks of treatment, 91.6, 66.66, and 50% recovery was observed in the infected mice treated with 20, 10, and 5mg/kg of oak extract, respectively. After treatment of the infected mice with the concentration of 10 and 20mg/kg of oak, the mean diameter of lesions, parasite load and mean number of parasites was significantly (P<0.05) reduced. Selectivity index of greater than 10 for oak revealed that oak extract had

  13. Self-shading in cork oak seedlings: Functional implications in heterogeneous light environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteso-Martínez, Jordán; Peguero-Pina, José Javier; Valladares, Fernando; Morales, Fermín; Gil-Pelegrín, Eustaquio

    2010-07-01

    The high self-shading found in Quercus suber seedlings has been interpreted as a feature common for plants growing in high light environments. But many studies reveal that Q. suber has high survival rates under low-light conditions, so a high degree of self-shading could be the consequence of a foliage composed of many small leaves, with no drawbacks for coping with low light. A characterization of the light environment in a Q. suber stand together with a study of photosynthetic parameters of full sunlight-exposed (FSLE) and self-shaded (SS) leaves were carried out to tackle this apparent contradiction. Although the number of sunflecks longer than 120 min during the 3 months of measurements was low, the occurrence of at least one sunfleck longer than 120 min per day in the understory of the forest studied was very common. Sunflecks shorter than 30 min promoted an increase in net photosynthesis ( A) in FSLE leaves, but not in SS leaves. However, sunflecks longer than 60 min led to a very strong decrease in A and in actual photosystem II efficiency (Φ PSII) in FSLE leaves, when compared to sunflecks shorter than 30 min. In SS leaves, changes were, again, negligible. The multi-layered foliage of Q. suber seedlings allowed i) FSLE leaves to obtain the maximum photosynthetic yield for short sunflecks, and ii) SS leaves to increase their contribution to the photosynthesis of the whole plant for long sunflecks, thus, optimizing the use of light by FSLE and SS leaves during short and long sunflecks respectively. Therefore, shoot architecture of Q. suber seedlings involving high levels of self-shading allows to adequately cope with the low but highly heterogeneous light conditions of the understory, particularly when sunflecks of contrasting durations take place as it is frequently the case for evergreen Mediterranean forests.

  14. Comparative Analysis of the Complete Chloroplast Genomes of Five Quercus Species

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanci; Zhou, Tao; Duan, Dong; Yang, Jia; Feng, Li; Zhao, Guifang

    2016-01-01

    Quercus is considered economically and ecologically one of the most important genera in the Northern Hemisphere. Oaks are taxonomically perplexing because of shared interspecific morphological traits and intraspecific morphological variation, which are mainly attributed to hybridization. Universal plastid markers cannot provide a sufficient number of variable sites to explore the phylogeny of this genus, and chloroplast genome-scale data have proven to be useful in resolving intractable phylogenetic relationships. In this study, the complete chloroplast genomes of four Quercus species were sequenced, and one published chloroplast genome of Quercus baronii was retrieved for comparative analyses. The five chloroplast genomes ranged from 161,072 bp (Q. baronii) to 161,237 bp (Q. dolicholepis) in length, and their gene organization and order, and GC content, were similar to those of other Fagaceae species. We analyzed nucleotide substitutions, indels, and repeats in the chloroplast genomes, and found 19 relatively highly variable regions that will potentially provide plastid markers for further taxonomic and phylogenetic studies within Quercus. We observed that four genes (ndhA, ndhK, petA, and ycf1) were subject to positive selection. The phylogenetic relationships of the Quercus species inferred from the chloroplast genomes obtained moderate-to-high support, indicating that chloroplast genome data may be useful in resolving relationships in this genus. PMID:27446185

  15. Preserving oak (Quercus sp.) germplasm to promote ex situ conservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Germplasm banks are increasingly used as an ex situ conservation strategy. Germplasm banks are able to maintain extraordinary levels of diversity for long periods at relatively low cost. Studies using seeds – the preferred propagules in plant germplasm banks – have revealed the underlying reasons wh...

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. multiplex Strain Griffin-1 from Quercus rubra in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianchi; Huang, Hong; Chang, Chung-Jan; Stenger, Drake C

    2013-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. multiplex strain Griffin-1, isolated from a red oak tree (Quercus rubra) in Georgia, is reported here. The bacterium has a genome size of 2,387,314 bp, with a G+C content of 51.7%. The Griffin-1 strain genome contains 2,903 predicted open reading frames and 50 RNA genes. PMID:24115539

  17. Pb uptake and tolerance in the two selected mangroves with different root lignification and suberization.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao; Wang, You-Shao; Liu, Yong; Ye, Zhi-Hong; Wu, Mei-Lin; Sun, Cui-Ci

    2015-10-01

    Metal pollution has been widely reported in mangrove wetlands; however, the mechanisms involved in metal detoxification by mangroves are still poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate the possible function of root lignification/suberization on Pb uptake and tolerance in mangroves. Two mangroves, Acanthus ilicifolius and Rhizophora stylosa with different root lignification/suberization were selected as plant materials; the former exhibits a thin exodermis and low lignification/suberization, while the latter possesses a thick exodermis and high lignification/suberization. A pot trial with addition of Pb was conducted to investigate the differences in Pb uptake and tolerance between the two mangroves. The experiment of rhizobox was designed to explore Pb dynamics and availabilities in the rhizosphere soils, besides, the ability of Pb uptake by the excised roots and X-ray analysis for Pb distribution within roots were also detected. The results revealed that R. stylosa exhibited relatively higher Pb tolerance together with less Pb accumulations when compared to A. ilicifolius. For both species, lower proportion of exchangeable and Carbonate Pb and higher higher Fe-Mn oxides Pb were observed in the rhizosphere zone when compared to the respective non-rhizosphere zone. The results from metal uptake by the excised roots and X-ray analysis clearly showed that the thick lignified/suberized exodermis of R. stylosa could more efficiently delay Pb entering into the roots, leading to less Pb accumulation. In summary, the present study proposes a barrier property of the lignified/suberized exodermis in dealing with the stresses of Pb. PMID:25956982

  18. Tree-ring growth and wood chemistry response to manipulated precipitation variation for two temperate Quercus species

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Rebekah J.; Kaye, Margot W.; Abrams, Marc D.; Hanson, Paul J; Martin, Madhavi Z

    2012-01-01

    We examined the relationship among ambient and manipulated precipitation, wood chemistry, and their relationship with radial growth for two oak species in eastern Tennessee. The study took place on the Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment (TDE) site, located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, TN. Two dominant species, white oak (Quercus alba) and chestnut oak (Quercus prinus), were selected for study from a 13-year experiment of whole-stand precipitation manipulation (wet, ambient and dry). The relationships between tree-ring width and climate were compared for both species to determine the impact of precipitation manipulations on ring width index. This study used experimental spectroscopy techniques to measure the sensitivity of tree-ring responses to directional changes in precipitation over 13 years, and the results suggest that oaks at this study site are resilient to imposed changes, but sensitive to inter-annual variations in climate. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) allowed us to measure nutrient intensities (similar to element concentrations) at 0.5-1.0 mm spacing along the radial growth axis of trees growing in the wet, ambient, and dry treatment sites. A difference in stemwood nutrient levels was observed between the two oak species and among the three treatments. Significant variation in element intensity was observed across treatments for some elements (Ca, K, Mg, Na, N and P) suggesting the potential for long-term impacts on growth under a changing climate regimes for southeastern oaks.

  19. Susceptibility of sprouted oak acorns to Phytophthora ramorum zoospores

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum is a recently emerged pathogen, having established in Europe and several western U.S. states, including California and Oregon. It has a wide host range and is a threat to forest ecology and the nursery industry. In California, coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia) is a major host...

  20. EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS ON ISOPRENE EMISSION FROM LIVE OAK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Live-oak plants (Quercus virginia) were subjected to various levels of CO2, water stress or photosynthetic photon flux density to test the hypothesis that isoprene biosynthesis occurred only under conditions of restricted CO2 availability. Isoprene emission increases as the ambie...

  1. Anatomical and developmental study of petrified Quercus (Fagaceae) fruits from the Middle Miocene, Yakima Canyon, Washington, USA.

    PubMed

    Borgardt, S J; Pigg, K B

    1999-03-01

    The first reported petrified acorns to show internal anatomical structure are here described from Middle Miocene (∼15.6 million years old) chert of the Columbia River Basalt Group in Yakima Canyon, Washington. Quercus hiholensis Borgardt et Pigg sp. nov. is described from anatomical and morphological fruit features, as well as a little recognized anatomical feature, the umbilical complex. Acorns, each comprising a nut and its cupule, are up to 15.3 mm long and 18.8 mm wide with helically arranged, imbricate, tuberculate cupule scales. They show basal aborted ovules, short styles, broad stigmas, and lack grooves in their cotyledons. These characters and the developmental pattern seen in these fossil acorns demonstrate that Q. hiholensis conforms to genus Quercus (Fagaceae), subgenus Quercus, section Quercus (the white oaks). The correspondence of Q. hiholensis to the modern section Quercus reveals that the derived floral and fruit characters that distinguish section Quercus within the genus had evolved by the Middle Miocene. PMID:10077494

  2. Monoterpene field emission from Quercus ilex near Madrid (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, L.; Plaza, J.; Pujadas, M.; Pérez-Pastor, R.; García-Alonso, S.; Bezares, J. C.

    2003-04-01

    A great extension of Quercus ilex natural forest is found in the close vicinity to Madrid metropolitan area. This work presents the results obtained in a three-year field emission experimental study on this evergreen oak species (2000--02). Monoterpene emission has been documented during summer and early autumn seasons using a branch enclosure technique. Main features of this emission study focus on speciation, light and temperature dependence, and relationship with carbon assimilation and water stress. Severe soil water deficit induced a physiological depletion at high temperature in this sclerophyll and monoterpene non-storing oak species, reducing emission at minimum levels. In the opposite, if soil was enough wetted emission was reasonably well described by the isoprene model of Guenther although assimilation was reduced at high temperature. A field experiment designed to ascertain the role of air humidity on emission revealed no influence of this parameter under no soil water deficit conditions. Canopy emission fluxes were calculated from the modified Bowen-ratio technique using a micrometeorological tower deployed within the oak forest. A standard emission flux of 0.3 μg m-2s-1 according to the model of Guenther (30^oC and 1000 μmol m-2s-1 of PAR) was obtained (r^2= 0.67).

  3. Perspective on Open-Access Publishing: An Interview with Peter Suber

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornwell, Reid; Suber, Peter

    2008-01-01

    In this edition of Perspectives, Reid Cornwell discusses open-access publishing with Peter Suber, senior researcher at the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition, senior research professor of philosophy at Earlham College, and currently visiting fellow at Yale Law School. Open access means that scholarly work is freely and openly…

  4. Antioxidant Characterization of Oak Extracts Combining Spectrophotometric Assays and Chemometrics

    PubMed Central

    Popović, Boris M.; Štajner, Dubravka; Orlović, Saša; Galić, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Antioxidant characteristics of leaves, twigs, and acorns from two Serbian oak species Quercus robur L. and Quercus petraea L. from Vojvodina province (northern Serbia) were investigated. 80% ethanol (in water) extracts were used for antiradical power (ARP) determinations against DPPH•, •NO, and O2•− radicals, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), total phenol, tannin, flavonoid, and proanthocyanidin contents. Permanganate reducing antioxidant capacity (PRAC) was determined using water extracts. Beside, mentioned parameters, soluble proteins, lipid peroxidation (LP), pigments and proline contents were also determined. The data of different procedures were compared and analyzed by multivariate techniques (correlation matrix calculation and principal component analysis (PCA)). PCA found that investigated organs of two different oak tree species possess similar antioxidant characteristics. The superior antioxidant characteristics showed oak leaves over twigs and acorns and seem to be promising source of antioxidants with possible use in industry and pharmacy. PMID:24453789

  5. MEASUREMENT OF OAK TREE DENSITY WITH LANDSAT TM DATA FOR ESTIMATING BIOGENIC ISOPRENE EMISSIONS IN TENNESSEE, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isoprene emissions from oak trees in the eastern USA play an important role in tropospheric ozone pollution. Oak trees (Quercus) emit an order of magnitude more isoprene than most other emitting tree species and are by far the largest source of biogenic isoprene in the eastern US...

  6. A simple method for improved visualization of the lamellated structure of cutinized and suberized plant cell walls by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Heumann, H G

    1990-01-01

    By treating ultrathin sections with H2O2 prior to normal uranyl acetate and lead citrate staining, a strong increase in contrast of cutinized and suberized plant cell walls can be achieved. PMID:1699304

  7. Seasonal variations of isoprene emissions from five oak tree species in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yong-Jae; Armendariz, Al; Son, Youn-Suk; Kim, Jo-Chun

    2011-04-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) from trees can enhance the photochemical production of tropospheric ozone. Isoprene is one of the most environmentally important BVOCs, since its emission rate from certain tree species can be high and its chemical structure gives it high ozone forming potential. Understanding of isoprene emission rates from many tree species is limited, including influences of tree age, season, and other factors. Five oak species were studied which represent approximately 85 percent of the deciduous trees in South Korean forests. In general, there were obvious seasonal variations of isoprene emissions from five oak trees. Especially, Quercus aliena B. and Quercus mongolica F showed substantial seasonal variations of isoprene emissions; However, Quercus serrata T. and Quercus acutissima C. generally did not. It was found that Q. serrata T. showed the highest isoprene emission rates among the species tested (up to 130.5 μgC gdw -1 h -1) and its emission rates were highest during spring followed by summer and fall. The emission rates from two ( Q. acutissima C., Quercus variabilis B.) of the other tested oak species were lower by more than 3 orders of magnitude. Besides, two oak species, Q. aliena B. and Q. mongolica F. were chosen to determine the effect of tree age on isoprene emissions. Trees at the age of 21˜30 years had significantly higher isoprene emission rates than those at the age of 41˜50.

  8. Isolation of the orthologue of the cerato-ulmin gene in Ophiostoma quercus and characterization of the purified protein.

    PubMed

    Carresi, Lara; Comparini, Cecilia; Bettini, Priscilla P; Pazzagli, Luigia; Cappugi, Gianni; Scala, Felice; Scala, Aniello

    2008-10-01

    Ophiostoma quercus is an ophiostomatoid fungus strictly related to the Ophiostoma's (O. ulmi, O. novo-ulmi, and O. himal-ulmi) that cause Dutch elm disease (DED). O. quercus has a number of morphological characteristics in common with the DED pathogens, and is a well-known and economically important sapstaining fungus occurring worldwide on hardwoods and commercially produced pines, and causes typical cankers on oak stems. In elm trees O. quercus can survive for months without causing any disease symptoms. DED fungi produce cerato-ulmin (CU), a class II hydrophobin, which is generally considered as the main toxin potentially involved in various phases of the DED pathogenesis. In the present work we isolated and sequenced the orthologue of the cu gene in the O. quercus isolates H988, H1042, and H2053. Moreover the CU protein from O. quercus isolate H988 was also purified and characterized. Sequence analysis showed that there is a pronounced difference between the whole cu gene region of O. quercus and the homologous fragments of the DED-causing species O. ulmi, O. novo-ulmi, and O. himal-ulmi. It also appeared that differences in the structural conformation of the promoter were unlikely to play a role in the modulation of the transcript level and that, for O. quercus, differences in CU production did not result from the potential different regulation levels. Clear differences were shown in the transcriptional unit of the cu genes and in the amino acid sequences among all the CUs. The purified O. quercus CU was separated using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight (MALDI-TOF) spectrometry into seven forms of increasing molecular weight from 7190 to 7724Da. The hydrophobicity profiles indicated that two regions of the O. quercus CU protein were more hydrophobic than the corresponding regions of the CUs of the DED fungi. The O. quercus CUs had theoretical isoelectric point values similar to those of the DED fungi. Finally, the contradiction between

  9. Biochemical characterization of the suberization-associated anionic peroxidase of potato.

    PubMed

    Bernards, M A; Fleming, W D; Llewellyn, D B; Priefer, R; Yang, X; Sabatino, A; Plourde, G L

    1999-09-01

    The anionic peroxidase associated with the suberization response in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers during wound healing has been purified and partially characterized at the biochemical level. It is a 45-kD, class III (plant secretory) peroxidase that is localized to suberizing tissues and shows a preference for feruloyl (o-methoxyphenol)-substituted substrates (order of substrate preference: feruloyl > caffeoyl > p-coumaryl approximately syringyl) such as those that accumulate in tubers during wound healing. There was little influence on oxidation by side chain derivatization, although hydroxycinnamates were preferred over the corresponding hydroxycinnamyl alcohols. The substrate specificity pattern is consistent with the natural substrate incorporation into potato wound suberin. In contrast, the cationic peroxidase(s) induced in response to wound healing in potato tubers is present in both suberizing and nonsuberizing tissues and does not discriminate between hydroxycinnamates and hydroxycinnamyl alcohols. A synthetic polymer prepared using E-[8-(13)C]ferulic acid, H(2)O(2), and the purified anionic enzyme contained a significant amount of cross-linking through C-8, albeit with retention of unsaturation. PMID:10482668

  10. Partitioning water and carbon fluxes in a Mediterranean oak woodland using stable oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbert, Maren; Piayda, Arndt; Cuntz, Matthias; Correia, Alexandra; Silva, Filipe Costa e.; Pereira, Joao; Werner, Christiane

    2014-05-01

    Water is a key factor driving ecosystem productivity, especially in water-limited ecosystems. A separation of the component fluxes is needed to gain a functional understanding on the development of net ecosystem water fluxes and their coupling with biogeochemical cycles. Oxygen isotope signatures are valuable tracers for water movements within the ecosystem because of the distinct isotopic compositions of water in soil and vegetation. In the past, determination of isotopic signatures of evaporative or transpirational fluxes has been challenging since measurements of water vapor isotopes were difficult to obtain using cold-trap methods, delivering data with low time resolution. Recent developments in laser spectroscopy now enable direct high frequency measurements of the isotopic composition of atmospheric water vapor (δv), evapotranspiration (δET), and its components and allow validations of common modeling approaches for estimating δE and δT based on Craig and Gordon (1965). Here, a novel approach was used, combining a custom build flow-through gas-exchange branch chamber with a Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer in a Mediteranean cork-oak woodland where two vegetation layers respond differently to drought: oak-trees (Quercus suber L.) avoid drought due to their access to ground water while herbaceous plants survive the summer as seeds. We aimed at 1) testing the Craig and Gordon equation for soil evaporation against directly measured δE and 2) quantifying the role of non-steady-state transpiration under natural conditions. Thirdly, we used this approach to quantify the impact of the understory herbaceous vegetation on ecosystem carbon and water fluxes throughout the year and disentangle how ET components of the ecosystem relate to carbon dioxide exchange. We present one year data comparing modeled and measured stable oxygen isotope signatures (δ18O) of soil evaporation, confirming that the Craig and Gordon equation leads to good agreement with measured δ18O of

  11. Metal (Pb, Zn and Cu) uptake and tolerance by mangroves in relation to root anatomy and lignification/suberization.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao; Jiang, Zhao-Yu; Liu, Yong; Ye, Zhi-Hong; Wu, Mei-Lin; Sun, Cui-Ci; Sun, Fu-Lin; Fei, Jiao; Wang, You-Shao

    2014-06-01

    Metal pollution has been widely reported in mangrove wetlands; however, the mechanisms involved in metal detoxification by mangroves are still poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate the possible function of root anatomy and lignification/suberization on metal uptake and tolerance in seedlings of six species of mangroves. The results revealed that the three rhizophoraceous species (Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (L.) Poir, Kandelia obovata Sheue, Liu & Yong and Rhizophora stylosa Griff) consistently exhibited higher metal tolerances than the three pioneer species (Aegiceras corniculatum (Linn.) Blanco, Acanthus ilicifolius L. and Avicennia marina (Forsk.) Viern.). Moreover, metal-tolerant species often exhibited a thick exodermis with high lignification and suberization. The tolerance indices of the mangroves were found to be positively correlated with the amounts of lignin and suberin deposition within the exodermal cell walls. The observed metal uptake by the excised roots further illustrated that a lignified/suberized exodermis directly delayed the entry of metals into the roots, and thereby contributed to a higher tolerance to heavy metals. In summary, the present study proposes a barrier property of the lignified/suberized exodermis in dealing with the stresses of heavy metals, such that the mangroves which possessed more extensive lignification/suberization within the exodermis appeared to exhibit higher metal tolerance. PMID:24965807

  12. Impact of herbaceous understory vegetation to ecosystem water cycle, productivity and infiltration in a semi arid oak woodland assessed by stable oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbert, Maren; Piayda, Arndt; Silva, Filipe Costa e.; Correia, Alexandra C.; Pereira, Joao S.; Cuntz, Matthias; Werner, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Water is one of the key factors driving ecosystem productivity, especially in water-limited ecosystems. Thus a separation of these component fluxes is needed to gain a functional understanding on the development of net ecosystem water and carbon fluxes. Oxygen isotope signatures are valuable tracers for such water movements within the ecosystem because of the distinct isotopic compositions of water in the soil and vegetation. Here, a novel approach was used (Dubbert et al., 2013), combining a custom build flow-through gas-exchange branch chamber with a Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer in a Mediterranean cork-oak woodland where two vegetation layers respond differently to drought: oak-trees (Quercus suber L.) avoid drought due to their access to ground water while herbaceous plants survive the summer as seeds. We used this approach to quantify the impact of the understory herbaceous vegetation on ecosystem carbon and water fluxes throughout the year and disentangle how ET components of the ecosystem relate to carbon dioxide exchange. Partitioning ecosystem ET and NEE into its three sources revealed that understory vegetation contributed markedly to ecosystem ET and gross primary production (GPP; max. 43 and 51%, respectively). It reached similar water-use efficiencies (WUE) as cork-oak trees and significantly contributed to the ecosystem sink-strength in spring and fall. The understory vegetation layer further strongly inhibited soil evaporation (E) and, although E was large during wet periods, it did not diminish ecosystem WUE during water-limited times (Dubbert et al., 2014a). Although, during most of the year, interactions with trees neither facilitated nor hampered the development of the understory vegetation, strong competition for water could be observed at the end of the growing period, which shortened the life-cycle of understory plants and significantly reduced the carbon uptake of the ecosystem in spring (Dubbert et al., 2014b). Finally, herbaceous understory

  13. soil carbon pools within oak forest is endangered by global climate change in central mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Oliva, Felipe; Merino, Agustín; González-Rodriguez, Antonio; Chávez-Vergara, Bruno; Tapia-Torres, Yunuen; Oyama, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Forest soil represents the main C pool in terrestrial ecosystems. In particular, temperate forest ecosystems play an important role in the C budget among tropical countries, such as Mexico. For example, the temperate forest ecosystem contains higher C contents on average (295 Mg C ha-1) than the soil C associated with other ecosystems in Mexico (between 56 to 287 Mg C ha-1). At a regional scale, oak forest has the highest C content (460 Mg C ha-1) among the forest ecosystem in Michoacán State at Central Mexico. At the local scale, the soil C content is strongly affected by the composition of organic matter produced by the plant species. The oak species are very diverse in Mexico, distributed within two sections: Quercus sensu stricto and Lobatae. The oak species from Quercus s.s. section produced litterfall with lower concentrations of recalcitrant and thermostable compounds than oak species from Lobatae section, therefore the soil under the former species had higher microbial activity and nutrient availability than the soil under the later species. However, the forest fragment with higher amount of oak species from Quercus s.s. section increases the amount of soil C contents. Unfortunately, Quercus species distribution models for the central western region of Mexico predict a decrease of distribution area of the majority of oak species by the year 2080, as a consequence of higher temperatures and lower precipitation expected under climate change scenarios. Additionally to these scenarios, the remnant oak forest fragments suffer strong degradation due to uncontrolled wood extraction and deforestation. For this reason, the conservation of oak forest fragments is a priority to mitigate the greenhouse gases emission to the atmosphere. In order to enhance the protection of these forest fragments it is required that the society identify the ecosystem services that are provided by these forest fragments.

  14. Responses of evergreen and deciduous Quercus species to enhanced ozone levels.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Vicent; Cerveró, Júlia; Calvo, Esperanza; García-Breijo, Francisco-José; Reig-Armiñana, José; Sanz, María José

    2011-01-01

    Plants of one evergreen oak (Quercus ilex) and three deciduous oaks (Q. faginea, with small leaves; Q. pyrenaica and Q. robur, with large leaves) were exposed both to filtered air and to enhanced ozone levels in Open-Top Chambers. Q. faginea and Q. pyrenaica were studied for the first time. Based on visible injury, gas exchange, chlorophyll content and biomass responses, Q. pyrenaica was the most sensitive species, and Q. ilex was the most tolerant, followed by Q. faginea. Functional leaf traits of the species were related to differences in sensitivity, while accumulated ozone flux via stomata (POD1.6) partly contributed to the observed differences. For risk assessment of Mediterranean vegetation, the diversity of responses detected in this study should be taken into account, applying appropriate critical levels. PMID:20974507

  15. Phenological responses of juvenile pecan and white oak on an upland site

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pecan (Carya illinoiensis) and white oak (Quercus alba) produce multiple products and wildlife values, but their phenological responses to N fertilization have not been well characterized in an mixed species agroforestry practice. We compared tree height at planting and for six consecutive growing ...

  16. Propagation container and timing of propagation affects growth and quality of oak seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the container effect and the timeline of seed propagation on germination and subsequent shoot and root development for container-grown oaks. Quercus nigra and Q. texana had equal or better growth and better root ratings when acorns were sown in Anderson t...

  17. Large Drought-Induced Variations in Oak Leaf Volatile Organic Compound Emissions during PINOT NOIR 2012

    EPA Science Inventory

    Leaf-level isoprene and monoterpene emissions were collected and analyzed from five of the most abundant oak (Quercus) species in Central Missouri’s Ozarks Region in 2012 during PINOT NOIR (Particle Investigations at a Northern Ozarks Tower ‐ NOx, Oxidants, Isoprene Research). Ju...

  18. VOC emissions from beech, birch, and oak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildt, J.; Folkers, A.; Koch, N.; Kleist, E.

    2003-04-01

    VOC emissions from beech (Fagus sylvatica), birch (Betula pendula), and oak (Quercus robur) were studied in continuously stirred tank reactors. Oak emitted nearly exclusively isoprene. The dependence of these isoprene emissions on temperature and photosynthetic radiation (PAR) could quite well be described with existing algorithms and the emission factors were fairly constant. Beech and birch emitted mainly short chained oxygenated VOC and monoterpenes. Temperature and PAR dependence of monoterpene emissions were superimposed by a slow frequency modulation. Hence, descriptions of these emissions with existing algorithms were not successful. Moreover, in some cases the emission pattern switched drastically. For birch it was observed that the plant switched from a sesquiterpene emitter to a monoterpene emitter. emission pattern plants. Emissions of ethanol, acetaldehyde, and methanol were not affected by PAR. Here, the emission factors are determined by other factors not included in existing algorithms.

  19. Effects of Cattle Management on Oak Regeneration in Northern Californian Mediterranean Oak Woodlands

    PubMed Central

    López-Sánchez, Aida; Schroeder, John; Roig, Sonia; Sobral, Mar; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    Oak woodlands of Mediterranean ecosystems, a major component of biodiversity hotspots in Europe and North America, have undergone significant land-use change in recent centuries, including an increase in grazing intensity due to the widespread presence of cattle. Simultaneously, a decrease in oak regeneration has been observed, suggesting a link between cattle grazing intensity and limited oak regeneration. In this study we examined the effect of cattle grazing on coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia Née) regeneration in San Francisco Bay Area, California. We studied seedling, sapling and adult density of coast live oak as well as vertebrate herbivory at 8 independent sites under two grazing conditions: with cattle and wildlife presence (n = 4) and only with wildlife (n = 4). The specific questions we addressed are: i) to what extent cattle management practices affect oak density, and ii) what is the effect of rangeland management on herbivory and size of young oak plants. In areas with cattle present, we found a 50% reduction in young oak density, and plant size was smaller, suggesting that survival and growth young plants in those areas are significantly limited. In addition, the presence of cattle raised the probability and intensity of herbivory (a 1.5 and 1.8-fold difference, respectively). These results strongly suggest that the presence of cattle significantly reduced the success of young Q. agrifolia through elevated herbivory. Given the potential impact of reduced recruitment on adult populations, modifying rangeland management practices to reduce cattle grazing pressure seems to be an important intervention to maintain Mediterranean oak woodlands. PMID:25126939

  20. Effects of cattle management on oak regeneration in northern Californian Mediterranean oak woodlands.

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, Aida; Schroeder, John; Roig, Sonia; Sobral, Mar; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    Oak woodlands of Mediterranean ecosystems, a major component of biodiversity hotspots in Europe and North America, have undergone significant land-use change in recent centuries, including an increase in grazing intensity due to the widespread presence of cattle. Simultaneously, a decrease in oak regeneration has been observed, suggesting a link between cattle grazing intensity and limited oak regeneration. In this study we examined the effect of cattle grazing on coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia Née) regeneration in San Francisco Bay Area, California. We studied seedling, sapling and adult density of coast live oak as well as vertebrate herbivory at 8 independent sites under two grazing conditions: with cattle and wildlife presence (n = 4) and only with wildlife (n = 4). The specific questions we addressed are: i) to what extent cattle management practices affect oak density, and ii) what is the effect of rangeland management on herbivory and size of young oak plants. In areas with cattle present, we found a 50% reduction in young oak density, and plant size was smaller, suggesting that survival and growth young plants in those areas are significantly limited. In addition, the presence of cattle raised the probability and intensity of herbivory (a 1.5 and 1.8-fold difference, respectively). These results strongly suggest that the presence of cattle significantly reduced the success of young Q. agrifolia through elevated herbivory. Given the potential impact of reduced recruitment on adult populations, modifying rangeland management practices to reduce cattle grazing pressure seems to be an important intervention to maintain Mediterranean oak woodlands. PMID:25126939

  1. Fossil oak galls preserve ancient multitrophic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Graham N; van der Ham, Raymond W.J.M; Brewer, Jan G

    2008-01-01

    Trace fossils of insect feeding have contributed substantially to our understanding of the evolution of insect–plant interactions. The most complex phenotypes of herbivory are galls, whose diagnostic morphologies often allow the identification of the gall inducer. Although fossil insect-induced galls over 300 Myr old are known, most are two-dimensional impressions lacking adequate morphological detail either for the precise identification of the causer or for detection of the communities of specialist parasitoids and inquilines inhabiting modern plant galls. Here, we describe the first evidence for such multitrophic associations in Pleistocene fossil galls from the Eemian interglacial (130 000–115 000 years ago) of The Netherlands. The exceptionally well-preserved fossils can be attributed to extant species of Andricus gallwasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) galling oaks (Quercus), and provide the first fossil evidence of gall attack by herbivorous inquiline gallwasps. Furthermore, phylogenetic placement of one fossil in a lineage showing obligate host plant alternation implies the presence of a second oak species, Quercus cerris, currently unknown from Eemian fossils in northwestern Europe. This contrasts with the southern European native range of Q. cerris in the current interglacial and suggests that gallwasp invasions following human planting of Q. cerris in northern Europe may represent a return to preglacial distribution limits. PMID:18559323

  2. Wound-induced suberization genes are differentially expressed, patially and temporally, during closing layer and wound periderm formation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum L.) wounds incurred at harvest and upon seed cutting require rapid suberization as a major part of the healing process to prevent infection and desiccation. However, little is known about the induction and expression of genes that are essential for these processes an...

  3. Process-based modelling of isoprenoid emissions from evergreen leaves of Quercus ilex (L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grote, R.; Mayrhofer, S.; Fischbach, R. J.; Steinbrecher, R.; Staudt, M.; Schnitzler, J.-P.

    Monoterpenes play an important role in regulating the trace gas composition of the lower troposphere. Therefore, realistic estimates of the daily as well as seasonal variations of monoterpene emission source strength on the Earth surface are required. Monoterpenes are emitted by Holm oak ( Quercus ilex L.) and other species lacking specific foliar terpene storage structures and their development is dependent on light and temperature. In the present work we describe a process-based emission model taking into account the physiological/phenological state of Holm oak leaves and biochemical processes leading to the formation of monoterpenes. The model 'seasonal isoprenoid synthase model-biochemical isoprenoid biosynthesis model' (SIM-BIM2) is developed based on a previous version which was used to simulate isoprene emissions from deciduous oaks. The current model considers additional enzymatic reactions in Holm oak chloroplasts that lead to the formation of monoterpenes. The comparison of simulated and measured biochemical properties as well as emission rates displayed that the ability of the model to dynamically adjust monoterpene biosynthesis capacity by modulating the amount of monoterpene synthase activities in dependence of the weather pattern led to realistic simulations of light-dependent monoterpene emission rates. Differences to simulation results obtained by a widely used alternative model [Guenther, A.B., Zimmerman, P.R., Harley, P.C., Monson, R.K., Fall, R., 1993. Isoprene and monoterpene emission rate variability—model evaluations and sensitivity analyses. Journal of Geophysical Research 98, 12609-12617] are discussed.

  4. Mortality due to Japanese oak wilt disease and surrounding forest compositions

    PubMed Central

    Oguro, Michio; Imahiro, Sawako; Saito, Shoichi; Nakashizuka, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Japanese oak wilt (Raffaelea quercivora) is a vector-borne disease transmitted by the flying ambrosia beetle, Platypus quercivorus, and causes mass mortality in the fagaceous species of Japan. The data described in this article are available in Mendeley Data, DOI: 10.17632/xwj98nb39r.1 [1] and include the mortality status of 1089 Quercus crispula and 846 Quercus serrata trees and surrounding forest conditions. The findings using this dataset were published in M. Oguro, S. Imahiro, S. Saito, T. Nakashizuka, Relative importance of multiple scale factors to oak tree mortality due to Japanese oak wilt disease, For. Ecol. Manag. (2015) doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2015.07.016 [2]. PMID:26543883

  5. Mortality due to Japanese oak wilt disease and surrounding forest compositions.

    PubMed

    Oguro, Michio; Imahiro, Sawako; Saito, Shoichi; Nakashizuka, Tohru

    2015-12-01

    Japanese oak wilt (Raffaelea quercivora) is a vector-borne disease transmitted by the flying ambrosia beetle, Platypus quercivorus, and causes mass mortality in the fagaceous species of Japan. The data described in this article are available in Mendeley Data, DOI: 10.17632/xwj98nb39r.1 [1] and include the mortality status of 1089 Quercus crispula and 846 Quercus serrata trees and surrounding forest conditions. The findings using this dataset were published in M. Oguro, S. Imahiro, S. Saito, T. Nakashizuka, Relative importance of multiple scale factors to oak tree mortality due to Japanese oak wilt disease, For. Ecol. Manag. (2015) doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2015.07.016 [2]. PMID:26543883

  6. Seasonal and inter-annual variability of bud development as related to climate in two coexisting Mediterranean Quercus species

    PubMed Central

    Alla, Arben Q.; Camarero, J. Julio; Montserrat-Martí, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims In trees, bud development is driven by endogenous and exogenous factors such as species and climate, respectively. However, knowledge is scarce on how these factors drive changes in bud size across different time scales. Methods The seasonal patterns of apical bud enlargement are related to primary and secondary growth in two coexisting Mediterranean oaks with contrasting leaf habit (Quercus ilex, evergreen; Quercus faginea, deciduous) over three years. In addition, the climatic factors driving changes in bud size of the two oak species were determined by correlating bud mass with climatic variables at different time scales (from 5 to 30 d) over a 15-year period. Key Results The maximum enlargement rate of buds was reached between late July and mid-August in both species. Moreover, apical bud size increased with minimum air temperatures during the period of maximum bud enlargement rates. Conclusions The forecasted rising minimum air temperatures predicted by climatic models may affect bud size and consequently alter crown architecture differentially in sympatric Mediterranean oaks. However, the involvement of several drivers controlling the final size of buds makes it difficult to predict the changes in bud size as related to ongoing climate warming. PMID:23179859

  7. Reduced translocation of current photosynthate precedes changes in gas exchange for Quercus rubra seedlings under flooding stress.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Joshua L; Islam, M Anisul; Jacobs, Douglass F

    2016-01-01

    Northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedlings are frequently planted on suboptimal sites in their native range in North America, subjecting them to environmental stresses, such as flooding, for which they may not be well adapted. Members of the genus Quercus exhibit a wide range of responses to flooding, and responses of northern red oak to flooding remain inadequately described. To better understand the physiological effects of root system inundation in post-transplant northern red oak seedlings and the effects of flooding on endogenous patterns of resource allocation within the plant, we observed the effects of short-term flooding initiated at the linear shoot growth stage on net photosynthetic rates, dark respiration, chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm) and translocation of (13)C-labeled current photosynthate. Downward translocation of current photosynthate declined after 4 days of flooding and was the first measured physiological response to flooding; net photosynthetic rates decreased and dark respiration rates increased after 7 days of flooding. Short-term flooding did not affect maximal potential efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm). The finding that decreased downward translocation of (13)C-labeled current photosynthate preceded reduced net photosynthesis and increased dark respiration during flooding suggests the occurrence of sink-limited photosynthesis under these conditions. PMID:26655380

  8. Seasonal trends in photosynthesis and electron transport during the Mediterranean summer drought in leaves of deciduous oaks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Osuna, Jessica L.; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Kobayashi, Hideki; Dawson, Todd E.

    2015-04-08

    The California Mediterranean savanna has harsh summer conditions with minimal soil moisture, high temperature, high incoming solar radiation and little or no precipitation. Deciduous blue oaks, Quercus douglasii Hook. and Arn., are winter-deciduous obligate phreatophytes, transpiring mostly groundwater throughout the summer drought. Our objective for this work is to fully characterize the seasonal trends of photosynthesis in blue oaks as well as the mechanistic relationships between leaf structure and function.

  9. Development of oak plantations established for wildlife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twedt, D.J.; Wilson, R.R.

    2002-01-01

    Extensive areas that are currently in agricultural production within the Mississippi Alluvial Valley are being restored to bottomland hardwood forests. Oaks (Quercus sp.), sown as seeds (acorns) or planted as seedlings, are the predominant trees established on most afforested sites. To compare stand development and natural invasion on sites afforested by planting seedlings or by sowing acorns, we sampled woody vegetation on ten 14- to 18-year-old oak plantations established to provide wildlife habitat. Stem densities of about 900 oaks/ha were comparable between stands established by sowing 4000 acorns/ha and stands established by planting 900 seedlings/ha. Densities of oaks in stands established from seedlings increased 38% from densities detected when these stands were 4- to 8-year-old. Densities of oaks established from field-sown acorns increased >100% during this same 10-year span. Oaks that were planted as seedlings were larger than those established from acorns, but trees resulting from either afforestation method were larger than trees naturally colonizing these sites. Natural invasion of woody species varied greatly among afforested sites, but was greater and more diverse on sites sown with acorns. Afforested stands were dominated by planted species, whereas naturally invading species were rare among dominant canopy trees. When afforestation objectives are primarily to provide wildlife habitat, we recommend, sowing acorns rather than planting seedlings. Additionally, planting fewer seeds or seedlings, diversifying the species planted, and leaving non-planted gaps will increase diversity of woody species and promote a more complex forest structure that enhances the suitability of afforested sites for wildlife.

  10. Hybridization and Introgression in a Sympatric Pair of Oak Species (Fagaceae) Studied with Morphology and Chloroplast and Nuclear SSR Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chloroplast and nuclear SSR markers and morphology were used to study hybridization and introgression between Quercus douglasii and Q. lobata, two sympatric oak species native to California. Chloroplast SSR markers provided strong evidence of gene exchange via ongoing introgression between these sp...

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Raffaelea quercivora JCM 11526, a Japanese Oak Wilt Pathogen Associated with the Platypodid Beetle, Platypus quercivorus

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Ohkuma, Moriya; Endoh, Rikiya

    2016-01-01

    The Japanese oak wilt pathogen Raffaelea quercivora and the platypodid beetle, Platypus quercivorus, cause serious mass mortality of Quercus spp. in Japan. Here, we present the first draft genome sequence of R. quercivora JCM 11526 to increase our understanding of the mechanism of pathogenicity and symbiosis with the ambrosia beetle. PMID:27469944

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Raffaelea quercivora JCM 11526, a Japanese Oak Wilt Pathogen Associated with the Platypodid Beetle, Platypus quercivorus.

    PubMed

    Masuya, Hayato; Manabe, Ri-Ichiroh; Ohkuma, Moriya; Endoh, Rikiya

    2016-01-01

    The Japanese oak wilt pathogen Raffaelea quercivora and the platypodid beetle, Platypus quercivorus, cause serious mass mortality of Quercus spp. in Japan. Here, we present the first draft genome sequence of R. quercivora JCM 11526 to increase our understanding of the mechanism of pathogenicity and symbiosis with the ambrosia beetle. PMID:27469944

  13. Pollen morphology and plant taxonomy of red oaks in eastern North America

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A.M.

    1983-04-01

    Identification of Quercus (oak) pollen taxa could enhance Quaternary palynological interpretations from eastern North America. A first step is to determine a morphological and taxonomic basis for such identifications. Scanning electron microscopy was utilized to examine exine-surface features of 266 specimens representing 21 red oak (subgen. Erythrobalanus) species from eastern North America, and two intermediate oak (subgen. Protobalanus) species from the desert southwest. Twenty pollen morphological characteristics defined previously were tabulated for each of 324 pollen grains. The data were subjected to cluster analyses. Cluster diagrams were compared with traditional oak systematics. Pollen morphology and plant taxonomy compared poorly with respect to series and species relationships among the red oaks, apparently due as much to high intraspecific and low interspecific variability in pollen-morphological characters as to the uncertain taxonomy of red oaks. Pollen morphology, however, does support the hypothesis of subgeneric oak evolution from intermediate oaks to the series Virentes of white oaks, and from more advanced white oaks to the red oak species. 19 references, 25 figures, 1 table.

  14. Microevolution of European temperate oaks in response to environmental changes.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    This review reconstructs microevolutionary processes that allowed long-lived species as temperate oaks (Quercus petraea and Q. robur) to cope with climate change since the last glacial maximum, by assembling insights from complementary synchronic and allochronic approaches. Paleobotanical and genetic investigations show that oaks migrated at larger velocities than expected, thanks to long-distance rare events and most likely human interferences. Hybridization was a key mechanism accelerating migration and enhancing species succession. Common garden experiments and genome wide association studies demonstrated that diversifying selection across large environmental gradients contributed to rapid local adaptation. Finally the review explores how lessons taken from past evolutionary scenarios may help to predict future responses of oaks to ongoing climate change. PMID:27263361

  15. Influence of geographical origin and botanical species on the content of extractives in American, French, and East European oak woods.

    PubMed

    Prida, Andrei; Puech, Jean-Louis

    2006-10-18

    The chemical composition of East European (Republic of Moldova, Ukraine, and Romania) oaks was investigated profoundly for the first time in the present study and compared with American and French counterparts. Taking into account the high natural variability of oak extractives contents, the wide-ranging sampling was performed for all oak origins: 276 French oaks, 102 East European oaks of both species (Quercus robur L. and Quercus petraea Liebl.), and 56 American oaks (Quercus alba). These oaks were compared with great attention paid to the extractives, which are most important for sensorial impact in wine or spirit maturation, such as ellagitannins and principal odorant substances (aromatic aldehydes, lactones and phenols). The substances in question were studied by application of HPLC and GC-MS techniques. The pattern of all studied extractive contents allowed adequate separation of oak samples according to their geographical origin or botanical species. The highest separation rate was for American and French oaks, whereas East European samples could be partially misclassified in two sets mentioned above. The most important variables for species discrimination were whiskey lactone related variables and ellagitannins, whereas the most important features for distinguishing the origin were eugenol, 2-phenylethanol, vanillin, and syringaldehyde. These substances allowed the distinction of French and East European woods of the same species. With regard to chemical composition, East European wood held the intermediary place between American and French oaks according to their ellagitannin and whiskey lactone levels; nevertheless, it was characterized by specific high values of eugenol, aromatic aldehydes, and 2-phenylethanol. PMID:17032018

  16. Masting in oaks: Disentangling the effect of flowering phenology, airborne pollen load and drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Martínez, Marcos; Belmonte, Jordina; Maria Espelta, Josep

    2012-08-01

    Quercus species exhibit an extreme inter-annual variability in seed production often synchronized over large geographical areas (masting). Since this reproductive behavior is mostly observed in anemophilous plants, pollination efficiency is suggested as one hypothesis to explain it, although resource-based hypotheses are also suggested as alternatives. We analyzed the effect of flowering phenology, airborne pollen presence and meteorological conditions in the pattern of acorn production in mixed evergreen-deciduous oak forests (Quercus ilex and Quercus pubescens) in NE Spain for twelve years (1998-2009). In both oaks, higher temperatures advanced the onset of flowering and increased the amount of airborne pollen. Nevertheless, inter-annual differences in pollen production did not influence acorn crop size. Acorn production was enhanced by a delay in flowering onset in Q. ilex but not in Q. pubescens. This suggests that in perennial oaks a larger number of photosynthates produced before flowering could benefit reproduction while the lack of effects on deciduous oaks could be because these species flush new leaves and flowers at the same time. Notwithstanding this effect, spring water deficit was the most relevant factor in explaining inter-annual variability in acorn production in both species. Considering that future climate scenarios predict progressive warmer and dryer spring seasons in the Mediterranean Basin, this might result in earlier onsets of flowering and higher water deficits that would constrain acorn production.

  17. Differential responses of grapevine rootstocks to water stress are associated with adjustments in fine root hydraulic physiology and suberization.

    PubMed

    Barrios-Masias, F H; Knipfer, T; McElrone, A J

    2015-09-01

    Water deficits are known to alter fine root structure and function, but little is known about how these responses contribute to differences in drought resistance across grapevine rootstocks. The ways in which water deficit affects root anatomical and physiological characteristics were studied in two grapevine rootstocks considered as low-medium (101-14Mgt) and highly (110R) drought resistant. Rootstocks were grown under prolonged and repeated drying cycles or frequent watering ('dry' and 'wet' treatments, respectively), and the following parameters were evaluated: root osmotic and hydrostatic hydraulic conductivity (Lp os and Lp hyd, respectively), suberization, steady-state root pressure (P rs), sap exudation rates, sap osmotic potential, and exosmotic relaxation curves. For both rootstocks, the 'dry' treatment reduced fine root Lp, elicited earlier root suberization and higher sap osmotic potential, and generated greater P rs after rewatering, but the rootstocks responded differently under these conditions. Lp os, Lp hyd, and sap exudation rates were significantly higher in 110R than in 101-14Mgt, regardless of moisture treatment. Under 'dry' conditions, 110R maintained a similar Lp os and decreased the Lp hyd by 36% compared with 'wet' conditions, while both parameters were decreased by at least 50% for 101-14Mgt under 'dry' conditions. Interestingly, build-up of P rs in 110R was 34% lower on average than in 101-14Mgt, suggesting differences in the development of suberized apoplastic barriers between the rootstocks as visualized by analysis of suberization from fluorescence microscopy. Consistent with this pattern, 110R exhibited the greatest exosmotic Lp os (i.e. Lp os of water flowing from roots to the soil) as determined from relaxation curves under wet conditions, where backflow may have limited its capacity to generate positive xylem pressure. The traits studied here can be used in combination to provide new insights needed for screening drought resistance

  18. Differential responses of grapevine rootstocks to water stress are associated with adjustments in fine root hydraulic physiology and suberization

    PubMed Central

    Barrios-Masias, F.H.; Knipfer, T.; McElrone, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Water deficits are known to alter fine root structure and function, but little is known about how these responses contribute to differences in drought resistance across grapevine rootstocks. The ways in which water deficit affects root anatomical and physiological characteristics were studied in two grapevine rootstocks considered as low–medium (101-14Mgt) and highly (110R) drought resistant. Rootstocks were grown under prolonged and repeated drying cycles or frequent watering (‘dry’ and ‘wet’ treatments, respectively), and the following parameters were evaluated: root osmotic and hydrostatic hydraulic conductivity (Lp os and Lp hyd, respectively), suberization, steady-state root pressure (P rs), sap exudation rates, sap osmotic potential, and exosmotic relaxation curves. For both rootstocks, the ‘dry’ treatment reduced fine root Lp, elicited earlier root suberization and higher sap osmotic potential, and generated greater P rs after rewatering, but the rootstocks responded differently under these conditions. Lp os, Lp hyd, and sap exudation rates were significantly higher in 110R than in 101-14Mgt, regardless of moisture treatment. Under ‘dry’ conditions, 110R maintained a similar Lp os and decreased the Lp hyd by 36% compared with ‘wet’ conditions, while both parameters were decreased by at least 50% for 101-14Mgt under ‘dry’ conditions. Interestingly, build-up of P rs in 110R was 34% lower on average than in 101-14Mgt, suggesting differences in the development of suberized apoplastic barriers between the rootstocks as visualized by analysis of suberization from fluorescence microscopy. Consistent with this pattern, 110R exhibited the greatest exosmotic Lp os (i.e. Lp os of water flowing from roots to the soil) as determined from relaxation curves under wet conditions, where backflow may have limited its capacity to generate positive xylem pressure. The traits studied here can be used in combination to provide new insights needed for

  19. High-density linkage mapping and distribution of segregation distortion regions in the oak genome.

    PubMed

    Bodénès, Catherine; Chancerel, Emilie; Ehrenmann, François; Kremer, Antoine; Plomion, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    We developed the densest single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based linkage genetic map to date for the genus Quercus An 8k gene-based SNP array was used to genotype more than 1,000 full-sibs from two intraspecific and two interspecific full-sib families of Quercus petraea and Quercus robur A high degree of collinearity was observed between the eight parental maps of the two species. A composite map was then established with 4,261 SNP markers spanning 742 cM over the 12 linkage groups (LGs) of the oak genome. Nine genomic regions from six LGs displayed highly significant distortions of segregation. Two main hypotheses concerning the mechanisms underlying segregation distortion are discussed: genetic load vs. reproductive barriers. Our findings suggest a predominance of pre-zygotic to post-zygotic barriers. PMID:27013549

  20. High-density linkage mapping and distribution of segregation distortion regions in the oak genome

    PubMed Central

    Bodénès, Catherine; Chancerel, Emilie; Ehrenmann, François; Kremer, Antoine; Plomion, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    We developed the densest single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based linkage genetic map to date for the genus Quercus. An 8k gene-based SNP array was used to genotype more than 1,000 full-sibs from two intraspecific and two interspecific full-sib families of Quercus petraea and Quercus robur. A high degree of collinearity was observed between the eight parental maps of the two species. A composite map was then established with 4,261 SNP markers spanning 742 cM over the 12 linkage groups (LGs) of the oak genome. Nine genomic regions from six LGs displayed highly significant distortions of segregation. Two main hypotheses concerning the mechanisms underlying segregation distortion are discussed: genetic load vs. reproductive barriers. Our findings suggest a predominance of pre-zygotic to post-zygotic barriers. PMID:27013549

  1. Dry deposition of sulfate to Quercus rubra and Liriodendron tulipifera foliage

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenberg, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Estimates were made of the rate of dry deposition to red oak (Quercus rubra) and tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) foliage. In the laboratory, radioactive ammonium sulfate aerosols were generated in an exposure chamber. These aerosols were dry deposited onto leaves that were sequentially washed to examine the efficacy of washing procedures in removal of surface deposits. Over 90% of dry deposited sulfate was removed after a 30 second wash duration. Laboratory procedures also estimated the magnitude of foliar sulfur that leached into leaf wash solutions. The majority of laboratory leaves demonstrated no leaching of sulfur from the internal pool. However, some leaves showed significant sulfur leaching. It was concluded that leaching of internal sulfur was highly leaf specific. This indicated that each leaf used in field experiments needed to be individually examined for leaching.

  2. Aluminum and temperature alteration of cell membrane permeability of Quercus rubra

    SciTech Connect

    Junping Chen; Sucoff, E.I.; Stadelmann, E.J. )

    1991-06-01

    Al toxicity is the major factor limiting plant growth in acid soils. This report extends research on Al-induced changes in membrane behavior of intact root cortex cells of Northern red oak (Quercus rubra). Membrane permeability was determined by the plasmometric method for individual intact cells at temperatures from 2 or 4 to 35 C. Al (0.37 millimolar) significantly increased membrane permeability to urea and monoethyl urea and decreased permeability to water. Al significantly altered the activation energy required to transport water (+ 32%), urea (+ 9%), and monoethyl urea ({minus}7%) across cell membranes. Above 9 C, Al increased the lipid partiality of the cell membranes; below 7 C, Al decreased it. Al narrowed by 6 C the temperature range over which plasmolysis occurred without membrane damage. These changes in membrane behavior are explainable if Al reduced membrane lipid fluidity and kink frequency and increases packing density and the occurrence of straight lipid chains.

  3. Assemblages of saproxylic beetles on large downed trunks of oak.

    PubMed

    Milberg, Per; Bergman, Karl-Olof; Sancak, Kerem; Jansson, Nicklas

    2016-03-01

    Old living oaks (Quercus robur) are known as a very species-rich habitat for saproxylic beetles, but it is less clear to what extent such veteran trees differ from an even rarer feature: downed trunks of large oaks. In this study, we set out to sample this habitat, using window traps, with two aims: (1) to describe the variation of assemblages among downed trunks of different type and (2) to compare beetles on downed oaks with data from veteran standing trees. The results showed that trunk volume and sun exposure better explained assemblages as well as species numbers on downed trunks than did decay stage. Furthermore, species classified as facultative saproxylic species showed weak or no differentiation among downed trunks. Species with different feeding habits showed no apparent differentiation among downed trunks. Furthermore, species composition on dead, downed oak trunks differed sharply from that of living, veteran oaks. Wood or bark feeders were more common on veterans than downed trunks, but there was no difference for those species feeding on fungi or those feeding on insects and their remains. In conclusion, for a successful conservation of the saproxylic beetle fauna it is important to keep downed oak trunks, and particularly large ones, in forest and pastures as they constitute a saproxylic habitat that differs from that of living trees. PMID:26904184

  4. Densities of Agrilus auroguttatus and Other Borers in California and Arizona Oaks

    PubMed Central

    Haavik, Laurel J.; Coleman, Tom W.; Flint, Mary Louise; Venette, Robert C.; Seybold, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated within-tree population density of a new invasive species in southern California, the goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus auroguttatus Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), with respect to host species and the community of other borers present. We measured emergence hole densities of A. auroguttatus and other borers on the lower stem (bole) of naïve oaks at 18 sites in southern California and on co-evolved oaks at seven sites in southeastern Arizona. We sampled recently dead oaks in an effort to quantify the community of primary and secondary borers associated with mortality—species that were likely to interact with A. auroguttatus. Red oaks (Section Lobatae) produced greater densities of A. auroguttatus than white oaks (Section Quercus). On red oaks, A. auroguttatus significantly outnumbered native borers in California (mean ± SE of 9.6 ± 0.7 versus 4.5 ± 0.6 emergence holes per 0.09 m2 of bark surface), yet this was not the case in Arizona (0.9 ± 0.2 versus 1.1 ± 0.2 emergence holes per 0.09 m2). In California, a species that is taxonomically intermediate between red and white oaks, Quercus chrysolepis (Section Protobalanus), exhibited similar A. auroguttatus emergence densities compared with a co-occurring red oak, Q. kelloggii. As an invasive species in California, A. auroguttatus may affect the community of native borers (mainly Buprestidae and Cerambycidae) that feed on the lower boles of oaks, although it remains unclear whether its impact will be positive or negative. PMID:26462589

  5. Tree bark suber-included particles: A long-term accumulation site for elements of atmospheric origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catinon, Mickaël; Ayrault, Sophie; Spadini, Lorenzo; Boudouma, Omar; Asta, Juliette; Tissut, Michel; Ravanel, Patrick

    2011-02-01

    The deposition of atmospheric elements on and into the bark of 4-year-old Fraxinus excelsior L. was studied. The elemental composition of the suber tissue was established through ICP-MS analysis and the presence of solid mineral particles included in this suber was established and described through SEM-EDX. Fractionation of the suber elements mixture was obtained after ashing at 550 °C through successive water (C fraction) and HNO 3 2 M (D fraction) extraction, leading to an insoluble residue mainly composed of the solid mineral particles (E fraction). The triplicated % weight of C, D and E were respectively 34.4 ± 2.7, 64.8 ± 2.7 and 0.8 ± 0.1% of the suber ashes weight. The main component of C was K, of D was Ca. Noticeable amounts of Mg were also observed in D. The E fraction, composed of insoluble particles, was mostly constituted of geogenic products, with elements such as Si, Al, K, Mg, representing primary minerals. E also contained Ca 3(PO 4) 2 and concentrated the main part of Pb and Fe. Moreover, The SEM-EDX analysis evidenced that this fraction also concentrated several types of fly ashes of industrial origin. The study of the distribution between C, D and E was analysed through ICP-MS with respect to their origin. The origin of the elements found in such bark was either geogenic (clay, micas, quartz…), anthropogenic or biogenic (for instance large amounts of solid Ca organic salts having a storage role). As opposed to the E fraction, the C fraction, mainly composed of highly soluble K+ is characteristic of a biological pool of plant origin. In fraction D, the very high amount of Ca++ corresponds to two different origins: biological or acid soluble minerals such as calcite. Furthermore, the D fraction contains the most part of pollutants of anthropic origin such as Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Cd. As a whole, the fractionation procedure of the suber samples allows to separate elements as a function of their origin but also gives valuable information on

  6. Medium Density Fiberboard from Quercus robur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Mehmet; Copur, Yalcin; Guler, Cengiz; Tozluoglu, Ayhan; Buyuksari, Umit

    The objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of oak (Ouercus robur L.) wood fibers from Turkey as a raw material for medium density fiberboard. In this study, some of the oak wood parts that are especially not suitable for other forest industries was utilized to produce fiberboards in laboratory environment. Test panels of varying densities (0.6, 0.7 and 0.8 g cm-3) were produced at 18 mm thickness using urea-formaldehyde adhesive. Mechanical, water resistance and dimensional stability properties of the test panels were determined according to Turkish standards. The results indicated that laboratory MDF panels produced using oak fibers resulted in mechanical properties that exceed (except panel type A) levels specified in the appropriate existing standards for the general propose fiberboards.

  7. Complex climate controls on 20th century oak growth in Central-West Germany.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, Dagmar A; Büntgen, Ulf; Frank, David C; Esper, Jan; Neuwirth, Burkhard; Löffler, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    We analyze interannual to multi-decadal growth variations of 555 oak trees from Central-West Germany. A network of 13 pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) and 33 sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) site chronologies is compared with gridded temperature, precipitation, cloud-cover, vapor pressure and drought (i.e., Palmer Drought Severity Index, PDSI) fluctuations. A hierarchic cluster analysis identifies three groups for each oak species differentiated by ecologic settings. When high precipitation is primarily a characteristic for one Q. robur and one Q. petraea cluster, the other clusters are more differentiated by prevailing temperature conditions. Correlation analysis with precipitation and vapor pressure reveals statistically significant (P < or = 0.05) correlations for June (r = 0.51) and annual (r = 0.43) means. Growth of both species at dry sites correlates strongly with PDSI (r = 0.39, P < or = 0.05), and weakly with temperature and cloud-cover. In natural stands, Q. robur responds more strongly to water depletion than Q. petraea. Twenty-one-year moving correlations show positive significant growth response to both PDSI and precipitation throughout the 20th century, except for the 1940s - an anomalously warm decade during which all oak sites are characterized by an increased growth and an enhanced association with vapor pressure and temperature. We suggest that the wider oak rings that are exhibited during this period may be indicative of a nonlinear or threshold-induced growth response to drought and vapor pressure, and run counter to the general response of oak to drought and precipitation that normally would result in suppressed growth in a warmer and drier environment. As the wide rings are formed during the severe drought period of the 20th century, a complex model seems to be required to fully explain the widespread oak growth. Our results indicate uncertainty in estimates of future growth trends of Central European oak forests in a warming and

  8. Fuel values of stems and branches in post oak and red maple

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    In red maple (Acer rubrum), there was n.s.d. in higher heating value (HHV) between stem wood and branch wood or between stem bark and branch bark. In post oak (Quercus stellata) the HHV of stem bark was significantly higher than that of branch bark, but there was n.s.d. between stem wood and branch wood. For both species the wood had a significantly higher HHV than the bark. 1 reference.

  9. Oak ecosystem succession of the Northern Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalaya, Elena; Slepykh, Victor; Efimenko, Natalia; Povolotskaya, Nina

    2014-05-01

    English oak (Quercus robur L.) along with its well-known good properties has a high sanitary-hygienic and curative potential. Its volatile metabolites (VM) influence bacteriostatically Staphylococcus aureus 209r, oppressing it in vitro by 85% compared with the control, and Escherichia coli by 45%. There is the least amount of epiphytic microorganisms on the leaves of Q. robur L. compared with some tree species [1]. In addition, VM of Q. robur L. have direct milieu (hypotensive) effects on the organism under its canopy, lowering blood pressure by 20-25 mm Hg [2]. A.P. Kazankin (1993) [4] calculated the prehistoric formula of forest species composition of Caucasian Mineral Waters region (Northern Caucasus): 6Qr3Crp1Fr which was based on the theory of calcium-magnesium absorption complex. According to the theory, underground mineral water, soil, forest litter and the leaves of ground vegetation of the area have the same ratio of the cations Ca and Mg - calcium-magnesium index [3]. Hence oldgrowth in the region consisted of oak (Qr) by 60%, hornbeam (Carpinus-Crp) by 30% and ash (Fraxinus-Fr) only by 10%. Currently, the formula of the forests of the region has been changed by man: 5Fr3Crp2Qr. The proportion of oak forests has decreased to 20%, the proportion of ash has increased by 50%, but the proportion of hornbeam hasn't changed. So it is relevant to restore oak forests of the region in the former ratio to other forest-forming species - ash and hornbeam. Taking into consideration the change of economic formation of society in Russia, it is extremely important to restore natural seed oak forests. Therein the luminance of surface areal is a limiting factor. We have calculated that the natural recovery of oak forests is possible providing observation of optimal moisture standards and soil fertility in combination with solar light within 10-24% from the light of open space. Measures for promotion of oak natural regeneration in mountain resorts of the Northern Caucasus

  10. Large drought-induced variations in oak leaf volatile organic compound emissions during PINOT NOIR 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Geron, Chris; Gu, Lianhong; Daly, Ryan; Harley, Peter; Rasmussen, Rei; Seco, Roger; Guenther, Alex; Karl, Thomas

    2015-12-17

    Here, leaf-level isoprene and monoterpene emissions were collected and analyzed from five of the most abundant oak (Quercus) species in Central Missouri's Ozarks Region in 2012 during PINOT NOIR (Particle Investigations at a Northern Ozarks Tower – NOx, Oxidants, Isoprene Research). June measurements, prior to the onset of severe drought, showed isoprene emission rates and leaf temperature responses similar to those previously reported in the literature and used in Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) emission models. During the peak of the drought in August, isoprene emission rates were substantially reduced, and response to temperature was dramatically altered, especially for the species in the red oak subgenus (Erythrobalanus).

  11. Genetic Diversity Increases Insect Herbivory on Oak Saplings

    PubMed Central

    Castagneyrol, Bastien; Lagache, Lélia; Giffard, Brice; Kremer, Antoine; Jactel, Hervé

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence from community genetics studies suggests that ecosystem functions supported by plant species richness can also be provided by genetic diversity within plant species. This is not yet true for the diversity-resistance relationship as it is still unclear whether damage by insect herbivores responds to genetic diversity in host plant populations. We developed a manipulative field experiment based on a synthetic community approach, with 15 mixtures of one to four oak (Quercus robur) half-sib families. We quantified genetic diversity at the plot level by genotyping all oak saplings and assessed overall damage caused by ectophagous and endophagous herbivores along a gradient of increasing genetic diversity. Damage due to ectophagous herbivores increased with the genetic diversity in oak sapling populations as a result of higher levels of damage in mixtures than in monocultures for all families (complementarity effect) rather than because of the presence of more susceptible oak genotypes in mixtures (selection effect). Assemblages of different oak genotypes would benefit polyphagous herbivores via improved host patch location, spill over among neighbouring saplings and diet mixing. By contrast, genetic diversity was a poor predictor of the abundance of endophagous herbivores, which increased with individual sapling apparency. Plant genetic diversity may not provide sufficient functional contrast to prevent tree sapling colonization by specialist herbivores while enhancing the foraging of generalist herbivores. Long term studies are nevertheless required to test whether the effect of genetic diversity on herbivory change with the ontogeny of trees and local adaptation of specialist herbivores. PMID:22937168

  12. Modeling suberization with peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization of hydroxycinnamic acids: cross-coupling and dimerization reactions.

    PubMed

    Arrieta-Baez, Daniel; Stark, Ruth E

    2006-04-01

    An anionic potato peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7, APP) thought to be involved in suberization after wounding was isolated from slices of Solanum tuberosum in order to elucidate the first steps of dehydrogenative polymerization between pairs of different hydroxycinnamic acids (FA, CafA, CA and SA) present in wound-healing plant tissues. Use of a commercial horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-H2O2 catalytic system gave the identical major products in these coupling reactions, providing sufficient quantities for purification and structural elucidation. Using an equimolar mixture of pairs of hydroxycinnamic acid suberin precursors, only caffeic acid is coupled to ferulic acid and sinapic acid in separate cross-coupling reactions. For the other systems, HRP and APP reacted as follows: (1) preferentially with ferulic acid in a reaction mixture that contained p-coumaric and ferulic acids; (2) with sinapic acid in a mixture of p-coumaric and sinapic acids; (3) with sinapic acid in a mixture of ferulic and sinapic acids; (4) with caffeic acid in a reaction mixture of p-coumaric and caffeic acids. The resulting products, isolated and identified by NMR and MS analysis, had predominantly beta-beta-gamma-lactone and beta-5 benzofuran molecular frameworks. Five cross-coupling products are described for the first time, whereas the beta-O-4 dehydrodimers identified from the caffeic acid and sinapic acid cross-coupling reaction are known materials that are highly abundant in plants. These reactivity trends lead to testable hypotheses regarding the molecular architecture of intractable suberin protective plant materials, complementing prior analysis of monomeric constituents by GC-MS and polymer functional group identification from solid-state NMR, respectively. PMID:16524605

  13. PAH detection in Quercus robur leaves and Pinus pinaster needles: A fast method for biomonitoring purpose.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, F; Concha Graña, E; Aboal, J R; Carballeira, A; Fernández, J Á; López Mahía, P; Prada Rodríguez, D; Muniategui Lorenzo, S

    2016-06-01

    Due to the complexity and heterogeneity of plant matrices, new procedure should be standardized for each single biomonitor. Thus, here is described a matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction method, previously used for moss samples, improved and modified for the analyses of PAHs in Quercus robur leaves and Pinus pinaster needles, species widely used in biomonitoring studies across Europe. The improvements compared to the previous procedure are the use of Florisil added with further clean-up sorbents, 10% deactivated silica for pine needles and PSA for oak leaves, being these matrices rich in interfering compounds, as shown by the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses acquired in full scan mode. Good trueness, with values in the range 90-120% for the most of compounds, high precision (intermediate precision between 2% and 12%) and good sensitivity using only 250mg of samples (limits of quantification lower than 3 and 1.5ngg(-1), respectively for pine and oak) were achieved by the selected procedures. These methods proved to be reliable for PAH analyses and, having advantage of fastness, can be used in biomonitoring studies of PAH air contamination. PMID:27130099

  14. Pollen morphology and plant taxonomy of white oaks in eastern North America

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A.M.

    1983-04-01

    An evaluation of possible approaches to fossil oak pollen identification utilized scanning electron microscopy to examine exine-surface features of 171 collections, representing 16 Quercus subgenus Lepidobalanus species and varieties of eastern North America. Twenty qualitative pollen morphological characters were defined and tabulated for each of 217 pollen grains. The data were subjected to cluster analysis and cluster diagrams were compared with published white oak taxonomy. Pollen morphology and plant taxonomy compared well in series of the subgenus Lepidobalanus due primarily to consistency of character presence and absence within species and varieties. Pollen morphology of white oaks appears to reflect plant systematics above the species level. Use of routine SEM analysis to identify series of white oaks among fossil pollen grains likely will yield valid results. 38 references.

  15. The fauna of cynipid oak gall wasps and their parasitoids in Lorestan province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Azizkhani, E; Rasoulian, G R; Kharazi-Pakdel, A; Omid, R; Moniri, V R; Melika, G

    2006-01-01

    This study was carried out in the period 2003-2005 to collect and identify gall wasps and their parasitoids on oak species in Lorestan province. There are two oak species, Quercus brantii and Q. infectoria, with different dispersion patterns in the province. Thus, 3 study sampling sites were selected to cover distributional pattern of oak forests. Collected galls maintained in the laboratory condition. Based on results obtained, overall, 26 different galls-formed on various plant parts (catkins, buds, fruits, leaves) were collected on two oak species; of which, 11 gall wasps are active on Q. brantii and 13 gall wasps on Q. infectoria. 19 parasitoid wasps of 12 genera and 6 families belong to Chalcidoidea superfamily with various frequency and dispersal were collected from mentioned galls. PMID:17385504

  16. A Pleistocene Clone of Palmer's Oak Persisting in Southern California

    PubMed Central

    May, Michael R.; Provance, Mitchell C.; Sanders, Andrew C.; Ellstrand, Norman C.; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Background The distribution of Palmer's oak (Quercus palmeri Engelm.) includes numerous isolated populations that are presumably relicts of a formerly larger range that has contracted due to spreading aridity following the end of the Pleistocene. Principal Findings We investigated a recently discovered disjunct population of Palmer's oak in the Jurupa Mountains of Riverside County, California. Patterns of allozyme polymorphism, morphological homogeneity, widespread fruit abortion, and evidence of fire resprouting all strongly support the hypothesis that the population is a single clone. The size of the clone and estimates of annual growth from multiple populations lead us to conclude that the clone is in excess of 13,000 years old. Conclusions The ancient age of the clone implies it originated during the Pleistocene and is a relict of a vanished vegetation community. Range contraction after climate change best explains the modern disjunct distribution of Q. palmeri and perhaps other plants in California. PMID:20041136

  17. [Quantitative analysis on sharp-tooth oak stands in Qinling Mountains].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yonghua; Lei, Ruide; Jia, Xia; He, Xingyuan; Chen, Wei

    2003-12-01

    The arbor stratum of Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata stands included two substratums. Phanerophyta synusium was in first position, and hemicryptophyta was inferior to it. The DBH structures of Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata and Pinus armandii were sinister normal school, which could finish self-regeneration under the natural conditions. The small DBH class individuals of Pinus tabulaeformis were dominant, their DBH classes being distributed irregularly and absent very much. The large DBH classes of Toxicodendron vernicifluum took biggish proportion, belonging to declining population. Young trees were the principal individuals of Castanea mollissima, and in transitional age stage from the young to the middle. Populus davidiana was in the transitional stage from progressive to stable and young-middle age stands. The stands DBH structure was mainly influenced by the DBH variety of Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata population. Quantitative classification (ward's method ward) and ordination (PCA) were used to study the community types of sharp-tooth oak. The results showed that the community could be divided into 6 types: 1. Ass. Smilax stans + Rosa multiflora-Quercus variabilis + Ulmus glaucescens-Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata; 2. Ass. Smilax stans + Lespedeza bicolor-Castanea mollissima-Q. aliena var. acuteserrata; 3. Ass. Corylus mandshurica-Populus davidiana + Dendrobenthamia angustata-Q. aliena var. acuteserrata; 4. Ass. Prunus pseudoccrasus + Corylus mandshurica-Toxicodendron vernicifluum-Q. aliena var. acuteserrata; 5. Ass. Corylus mandshurica + Rosa multiflora-Pinus armandii-Q. aliena var. acuteserrata; and 6. Ass. Sinarundinaria nitida-Pinus armandii + Pinus tabulaeformis-Q. aliena var. acuteserrata. Ward's method ward was better for classifying community types than the other clustering analyses in Qinling Mountains. The PCA results were consistent with the clustering, and demonstrated that the sharp-tooth oak stands were influenced by the altitude, site

  18. Characterization of volatile constituents in commercial oak wood chips.

    PubMed

    Fernández de Simón, Brígida; Muiño, Iria; Cadahía, Estrella

    2010-09-01

    The volatile composition of the different oak wood pieces (chips of Quercus spp.) that can be found on the market to be used as alternatives to barrels for aging wines, as well as of chips of Quercus pyrenaica which are being introduced, was studied, evaluating the contents of volatile phenols, lactones, furanic compounds, pyranones, phenolic aldehydes, phenolic ketones, and others. In regard to the overall results, the volatile composition of these products varies widely and has not been clearly laid out according to either the oak species or the wood toasting intensity. Taking into account that the different characteristics of alternatives to barrel products are reflected in the wine treated with them and that an oenological profile based on these variables (origin and toasting level) cannot be defined, only an appropriate chemical analysis would reveal the quality of alternative-to-barrel products and allow us to attempt to foresee its effects on the chemical and organoleptic characteristics of the wines treated with them. On the other hand, the Q. pyrenaica alternative products are very similar to those of other species, with some aromatic particularities, such as their high levels of furanic compounds, eugenol, Furaneol, and cis-whiskylactone, and low levels of vanillin. PMID:20687559

  19. Effect of Habitat Size, Quality, and Isolation on Functional Groups of Beetles in Hollow Oaks.

    PubMed

    Pilskog, Hanne Eik; Birkemoe, Tone; Framstad, Erik; Sverdrup-Thygeson, Anne

    2016-01-01

    One of the largest threats to biodiversity is land use change and habitat loss. Hollow oaks (Quercus spp. L.) are well-defined patches that are hotspots for biodiversity and red-listed species, but they are often rare and fragmented in the landscape. We investigated the effect of patch size, habitat quality, and isolation on functional groups and red-listed saproxylic beetles in hollow oaks (n = 40) in Norway. The groups were defined by host tree association, trophic grouping, and red-listed status. Habitat quality, represented by tree form was most important in explaining species richness for most groups. Patch size, represented by circumference and amount of dead branches, was most important in explaining abundance. Isolation, that is single oaks compared with oaks in groups, had a negative effect on the abundance of beetles feeding both on wood and fungi (xylomycethopagous), as well as on species associated with broadleaved trees (oak semi-specialists), but did not affect species richness. This indicates that at this scale and in this landscape, isolated oaks are as species rich and valuable for conservation as other oaks, although some functional groups may be more vulnerable to isolation than others. The red-listed species only responded to patch size, indicating that oaks with large circumference and many dead branches are especially important for red-listed species and for conservation. PMID:26945089

  20. Effect of Habitat Size, Quality, and Isolation on Functional Groups of Beetles in Hollow Oaks

    PubMed Central

    Pilskog, Hanne Eik; Birkemoe, Tone; Framstad, Erik; Sverdrup-Thygeson, Anne

    2016-01-01

    One of the largest threats to biodiversity is land use change and habitat loss. Hollow oaks (Quercus spp. L.) are well-defined patches that are hotspots for biodiversity and red-listed species, but they are often rare and fragmented in the landscape. We investigated the effect of patch size, habitat quality, and isolation on functional groups and red-listed saproxylic beetles in hollow oaks (n = 40) in Norway. The groups were defined by host tree association, trophic grouping, and red-listed status. Habitat quality, represented by tree form was most important in explaining species richness for most groups. Patch size, represented by circumference and amount of dead branches, was most important in explaining abundance. Isolation, that is single oaks compared with oaks in groups, had a negative effect on the abundance of beetles feeding both on wood and fungi (xylomycethopagous), as well as on species associated with broadleaved trees (oak semi-specialists), but did not affect species richness. This indicates that at this scale and in this landscape, isolated oaks are as species rich and valuable for conservation as other oaks, although some functional groups may be more vulnerable to isolation than others. The red-listed species only responded to patch size, indicating that oaks with large circumference and many dead branches are especially important for red-listed species and for conservation. PMID:26945089

  1. Oaks were the historical foundation genus of the east-central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanberry, Brice B.; Nowacki, Gregory J.

    2016-08-01

    Foundation tree species are dominant and define ecosystems. Because of the historical importance of oaks (Quercus) in east-central United States, it was unlikely that oak associates, such as pines (Pinus), hickories (Carya) and chestnut (Castanea), rose to this status. We used 46 historical tree studies or databases (ca. 1620-1900) covering 28 states, 1.7 million trees, and 50% of the area of the eastern United States to examine importance of oaks compared to pines, hickories, and chestnuts. Oak was the most abundant genus, ranging from 40% to 70% of total tree composition at the ecological province scale and generally increasing in dominance from east to west across this area. Pines, hickories, and chestnuts were co-dominant (ratio of oak composition to other genera of <2) in no more than five of 70 ecological subsections and two of 20 ecological sections in east-central United States, and thus by definition, were not foundational. Although other genera may be called foundational because of localized abundance or perceptions resulting from inherited viewpoints, they decline from consideration when compared to overwhelming oak abundance across this spatial extent. The open structure and high-light conditions of oak ecosystems uniquely supported species-rich understories. Loss of oak as a foundation genus has occurred with loss of open forest ecosystems at landscape scales.

  2. Oak Conservation and Restoration on Private Forestlands: Negotiating a Social-Ecological Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoot, Tricia G.; Schulte, Lisa A.; Rickenbach, Mark

    2010-01-01

    In the midwestern United States, oak ( Quercus spp.) forests are considered critical habitat for conserving biodiversity and are a declining resource. Ecological conditions, such as deer herbivory and competition from more mesic broad-leaved deciduous species, have been linked to poor oak regeneration. In the Midwest, where up to 90% of forestland is privately owned, a greater understanding of social dimensions of oak regeneration success is especially critical to designing effective restoration strategies. We sought to determine factors that serve as direct and indirect constraints to oak restoration and identify policy mechanisms that could improve the likelihood for restoration success. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 32 natural resource professionals working in the Midwest Driftless Area. We found that most professionals anticipate that oak will remain only a component of the future forest. Furthermore, they identified the general unwillingness of landowners to adopt oak restoration practices as a primary driving force of regional forest change. The professionals pointed to interdependent ecological and social factors, occurring at various scales (e.g., economic cost of management, deer herbivory, and exurban residential development) as influencing landowner oak restoration decisions. Professionals emphasized the importance of government cost-share programs and long-term personal relationships to securing landowner acceptance of oak restoration practices. However, given finite societal resources, ecologically- and socially-targeted approaches were viewed as potential ways to optimize regional success.

  3. Assessment of Quercus flowering trends in NW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jato, V.; Rodríguez-Rajo, F. J.; Fernandez-González, M.; Aira, M. J.

    2015-05-01

    This paper sought to chart airborne Quercus pollen counts over the last 20 years in the region of Galicia (NW Spain) with a view to detecting the possible influence of climate change on the Quercus airborne pollen season (APS). Pollen data from Ourense, Santiago de Compostela, Vigo and Lugo were used. The Quercus airborne pollen season was characterized in terms of the following parameters: pollen season start and end dates, peak pollen count, pollen season length and pollen index. Several methods, dates and threshold temperatures for determining the chill and heat requirements needed to trigger flowering were applied. A diverse APS onset timing sequence was observed for the four cities as Quercus flowers few days in advance in Vigo. The variations observed could be related to differences in the meteorological conditions or the thermal requirements needed for flowering. Thermal requirements differed depending on local climate conditions in the study cities: the lowest values for chilling accumulation were recorded in Vigo and the highest in Lugo, whereas the lowest heat accumulation was achieved in Vigo. Differences in APS trends between cities may reflect variations in weather-related trends. A significant trend towards rising Quercus pollen indices and higher maximum daily mean pollen counts was observed in Ourense, linked to the more marked temperature increase across southern Galicia. A non-uniform trend towards increased temperatures was noted over the study period, particularly in late summer and early autumn in all four study cities. Additionally, an increase in spring temperatures was observed in south-western Galicia.

  4. Hyperdiversity of ectomycorrhizal fungus assemblages on oak seedlings in mixed forests in the southern Appalachian Mountains.

    PubMed

    Walker, John F; Miller, Orson K; Horton, Jonathan L

    2005-03-01

    Diversity of ectotrophic mycobionts on outplanted seedlings of two oak species (Quercus rubra and Quercus prinus) was estimated at two sites in mature mixed forests in the southern Appalachian Mountains by sequencing nuclear 5.8S rRNA genes and the flanking internal transcribed spacer regions I and II (ITS). The seedlings captured a high diversity of mycorrhizal ITS-types and late-stage fungi were well represented. Total richness was 75 types, with 42 types having a frequency of only one. The first and second order jackknife estimates were 116 and 143 types, respectively. Among Basidiomycetes, tomentelloid/thelephoroid, russuloid, and cortinarioid groups were the richest. The ascomycete Cenococcum geophilum was ubiquitously present. Dominant fungi included a putative Tuber sp. (Ascomycetes), and Basidiomycetes including a putative Craterellus sp., and Laccaria cf. laccata. Diversity was lower at a drier high elevation oak forest site compared to a low elevation mesic cove--hardwood forest site. Fungal specificity for red oak vs. white oak seedlings was unresolved. The high degree of rarity in this system imposes limitations on the power of community analyses at finer scales. The high mycobiont diversity highlights the potential for seedlings to acquire carbon from mycelial networks and confirms the utility of using outplanted seedlings to estimate ectomycorrhizal diversity. PMID:15723674

  5. Effect of flooding on C metabolism of flood-tolerant (Quercus robur) and non-tolerant (Fagus sylvatica) tree species.

    PubMed

    Ferner, Eleni; Rennenberg, Heinz; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen

    2012-02-01

    Flooding is assumed to cause an energy crisis in plants because-due to a lack of O(2)-mitochondrial respiration is replaced by alcoholic fermentation which yields considerably less energy equivalents. In the present study, the effect of flooding on the carbon metabolism of flooding-tolerant pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) and flooding-sensitive European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seedlings was characterized. Whereas soluble carbohydrate concentrations dropped in roots of F. sylvatica, they were constant in Q. robur during flooding. At the same time, root alcohol dehydrogenase activities were decreased in beech but not in oak, suggesting substrate limitation of alcoholic fermentation in beech roots. Surprisingly, leaf and phloem sap sugar concentrations increased in both species but to a much higher degree in beech. This finding suggests that the phloem unloading process in flooding-sensitive beech was strongly impaired. It is assumed that root-derived ethanol is transported to the leaves via the transpiration stream. This mechanism is considered an adaptation to flooding because it helps avoid the accumulation of toxic ethanol in the roots and supports the whole plant's carbon metabolism by channelling ethanol into the oxidative metabolism of the leaves. A labelling experiment demonstrated that in the leaves of flooded trees, ethanol metabolism does not differ between flooded beech and oak, indicating that processes in the roots are crucial for the trees' flooding tolerance. PMID:22367762

  6. Morphological and physiological divergences within Quercus ilex support the existence of different ecotypes depending on climatic dryness

    PubMed Central

    Peguero-Pina, José Javier; Sancho-Knapik, Domingo; Barrón, Eduardo; Camarero, Julio Jesús; Vilagrosa, Alberto; Gil-Pelegrín, Eustaquio

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Several studies show apparently contradictory findings about the functional convergence within the Mediterranean woody flora. In this context, this study evaluates the variability of functional traits within holm oak (Quercus ilex) to elucidate whether provenances corresponding to different morphotypes represent different ecotypes locally adapted to the prevaling stress levels. Methods Several morphological and physiological traits were measured at leaf and shoot levels in 9-year-old seedlings of seven Q. ilex provenances including all recognized morphotypes. Plants were grown in a common garden for 9 years under the same environmental conditions to avoid possible biases due to site-specific characteristics. Key Results Leaf morphometry clearly separates holm oak provenances into ‘ilex’ (more elongated leaves with low vein density) and ‘rotundifolia’ (short and rounded leaves with high vein density) morphotypes. Moreover, these morphotypes represent two consistent and very contrasting functional types in response to dry climates, mainly in terms of leaf area, major vein density, leaf specific conductivity, resistance to drought-induced cavitation and turgor loss point. Conclusions The ‘ilex’ and ‘rotundifolia’ morphotypes correspond to different ecotypes as inferred from their contrasting functional traits. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the combined use of morphological and physiological traits has provided support for the concept of these two holm oak morphotypes being regarded as two different species. PMID:24941998

  7. Hydrologic effects on diameter growth phenology for Celtis laevigata and Quercus lyrata in the floodplain of the lower White River, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Scott T; Cochran, Wesley; Krauss, Ken W.; Keim, Richard F.; King, Sammy L.

    2016-01-01

    Bottomland hardwood (BLH) forests represent an extensive wetland system in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley and southeastern USA, and it is currently undergoing widespread transition in species composition. One such transition involves increased establishment of sugarberry (Celtis laevigata), and decreased establishment of overcup oak (Quercus lyrata). The ecological mechanisms that control this transition are not well understood. We measured monthly diameter growth with dendrometer bands on 86 sugarberry and 42 overcup oak trees at eight sites in the floodplain of the White River (AR, USA) with differing hydrologic regimes. For both species, growth attenuated earlier at drier sites compared to wetter sites. Overcup oak grew slightly longer through late August, suggesting its growth period extends across both wet and dry periods. In contrast, sugarberry growth rate decreased substantially by mid-July. While these results did not necessarily indicate a mechanism for increased prominence of sugarberry, they suggest sugarberry growing season does not as much coincide with the typically drier period of late summer and may be less affected by these conditions. Overcup oak grows later into the dry season and water table conditions during this period may determine if overcup oak benefits from this relatively extended growth period.

  8. Emission of short chained organic acids, aldehydes and monoterpenes from Quercus ilex L. and Pinus pinea L. in relation to physiological activities, carbon budget and emission algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesselmeier, J.; Bode, K.; Hofmann, U.; Müller, H.; Schäfer, L.; Wolf, A.; Ciccioli, P.; Brancaleoni, E.; Cecinato, A.; Frattoni, M.; Foster, P.; Ferrari, C.; Jacob, V.; Fugit, J. L.; Dutaur, L.; Simon, V.; Torres, L.

    We report on the emission of monoterpenes, short-chained organic acids and aldehydes from Mediterranean oak ( Quercus ilex L.) and pine (Pinus pinea L.). All studies were done with dynamic cuvettes enclosing intact branches at the top of the canopy flushed with ambient air. Daily trends are compared with the photosynthetic active radiation (PAR), leaf temperature and the physiological activities of the enclosed branches, i.e. assimilation and transpiration, with special attention on the carbon budget. Oak emits monoterpenes in high amounts, up to 2% of the assimilated carbon. As compared with monoterpenes, short-chained organic acids and aldehydes are of minor importance for oak. However, on a leaf dry-weight basis equal amounts of acids and aldehydes are released from oak and pine. As pine emitted only low amounts of terpenes (below 0.2% of the assimilated carbon) the release of terpenes and oxygenated compounds is of equal importance for this species. A comparison of a modelled light and temperature driven emission with the observed volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions showed good agreement for monoterpenes as well as for organic acids emitted in the case of oak. For pine only the release of acids showed an adequate relation to the algorithm data, whereas the terpene emissions seemed to be dominated by temperature effects.

  9. Interactions of drought and shade effects on seedlings of four Quercus species: physiological and structural leaf responses.

    PubMed

    Quero, José Luis; Villar, Rafael; Marañón, Teodoro; Zamora, Regino

    2006-01-01

    Here, we investigated the physiological and structural leaf responses of seedlings of two evergreen and two deciduous Quercus species, grown in a glasshouse and subjected to contrasted conditions of light (low, medium and high irradiance) and water (continuous watering vs 2-months drought). The impact of drought on photosynthetic rate was strongest in high irradiance, while the impact of shade on photosynthetic rate was strongest with high water supply, contradicting the hypothesis of allocation trade-off. Multivariate causal models were evaluated using d-sep method. The model that best fitted the dataset proposed that the variation in specific leaf area affects photosynthetic rate and leaf nitrogen concentration, and this trait determines stomatal conductance, which also affects photosynthetic rate. Shade conditions seemed to ameliorate, or at least not aggravate, the drought impact on oak seedlings, therefore, the drought response on leaf performance depended on the light environment. PMID:16684241

  10. Molecular and morphological characterization of a Xiphinema chambersi population from live oak trees in Jekyll Island, Georgia, with a redescription of the species and comments on its morphometric variations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A population of Xiphinema chambersi from the root zone around live oak (Quercus virginiana Mill.) trees on Jekyll Island, Georgia, USA is described using both morphological and molecular tools and compared with descriptions of type specimens. Initially, because of a few morphological differences thi...

  11. Primary Fatty Alcohols Are Major Components of Suberized Root Tissues of Arabidopsis in the Form of Alkyl Hydroxycinnamates.

    PubMed

    Delude, Camille; Fouillen, Laetitia; Bhar, Palash; Cardinal, Marie-Josée; Pascal, Stephanie; Santos, Patricia; Kosma, Dylan K; Joubès, Jérôme; Rowland, Owen; Domergue, Frédéric

    2016-07-01

    Suberin is a complex hydrophobic polymer that acts as a barrier controlling water and solute fluxes and restricting pathogen infections. Suberin is deposited immediately outside of the plasmalemma in the cell wall of certain tissues such as endodermis of roots, aerial and underground periderms, and seed coats. Suberin consists of a variety of fatty acid derivatives polymerized with glycerol and phenolics. In this study, we show using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques that most of the fatty alcohols not covalently linked to the suberin polymer are in the form of alkyl hydroxycinnamates (AHCs), with alkyl caffeates predominating. Such compounds are not restricted to the periderm of mature roots but also are present in the endodermis of younger roots, where they are not extracted by rapid dipping in chloroform. Analysis of several mutants affected in key enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and export of suberin monomers suggests that the formation of the suberin polymer and associated waxes involves common pathways and occurs concomitantly in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots. Although fatty alcohols represent only minor components of the suberin polymer in Arabidopsis roots, this study demonstrates that they constitute the major aliphatics of suberin-associated waxes in the form of AHCs. Therefore, our results indicate that esterified fatty alcohols, both soluble and polymerized forms, represent major constituents of Arabidopsis root suberized barriers, being as abundant as α,ω-dicarboxylic and unsubstituted fatty acids. In addition, our results show that suberized layers represent a major sink for acyl-lipid metabolism in Arabidopsis roots. PMID:27231100

  12. Primary Fatty Alcohols Are Major Components of Suberized Root Tissues of Arabidopsis in the Form of Alkyl Hydroxycinnamates1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Delude, Camille; Fouillen, Laetitia; Bhar, Palash; Cardinal, Marie-Josée; Pascal, Stephanie; Kosma, Dylan K.; Joubès, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Suberin is a complex hydrophobic polymer that acts as a barrier controlling water and solute fluxes and restricting pathogen infections. Suberin is deposited immediately outside of the plasmalemma in the cell wall of certain tissues such as endodermis of roots, aerial and underground periderms, and seed coats. Suberin consists of a variety of fatty acid derivatives polymerized with glycerol and phenolics. In this study, we show using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques that most of the fatty alcohols not covalently linked to the suberin polymer are in the form of alkyl hydroxycinnamates (AHCs), with alkyl caffeates predominating. Such compounds are not restricted to the periderm of mature roots but also are present in the endodermis of younger roots, where they are not extracted by rapid dipping in chloroform. Analysis of several mutants affected in key enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and export of suberin monomers suggests that the formation of the suberin polymer and associated waxes involves common pathways and occurs concomitantly in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots. Although fatty alcohols represent only minor components of the suberin polymer in Arabidopsis roots, this study demonstrates that they constitute the major aliphatics of suberin-associated waxes in the form of AHCs. Therefore, our results indicate that esterified fatty alcohols, both soluble and polymerized forms, represent major constituents of Arabidopsis root suberized barriers, being as abundant as α,ω-dicarboxylic and unsubstituted fatty acids. In addition, our results show that suberized layers represent a major sink for acyl-lipid metabolism in Arabidopsis roots. PMID:27231100

  13. Episodic migration of oaks to Iceland: Evidence for a North Atlantic "land bridge" in the latest Miocene.

    PubMed

    Denk, Thomas; Grímsson, Friðgeir; Zetter, Reinhard

    2010-02-01

    Dating the subsidence history of the North Atlantic Land Bridge (NALB) is crucial for understanding intercontinental disjunctions of northern temperate trees. Traditionally, the NALB has been assumed to have functioned as a corridor for plant migration only during the early Cenozoic, but recent findings of plant fossils and inferences from molecular studies are challenging this view. Here, we report dispersed pollen of Quercus from Late Miocene sediments in Iceland that shows affinities with extant northern hemispheric white oaks and North American red oaks. Older (15 to 10 Ma) sediments do not contain pollen of Quercus suggesting it arrived after that time. Pollen from the 9-8 Ma Hrútagil locality is indistinguishable from morphotypes common among white and red oaks. In contrast, pollen from the 5.5 Ma Selárgil locality has a tectum that is at present confined to North American white and red oaks, indicating a second episode of migration to Iceland. These findings suggest that transatlantic migration of temperate plant taxa may not have been limited by vast areas of sea or by cold climates during the Miocene. Furthermore, our results offer a plausible explanation for the remarkably low degree of genetic differentiation between modern disjunct European and North American oaks. PMID:21622388

  14. Assessment of Quercus flowering trends in NW Spain.

    PubMed

    Jato, V; Rodríguez-Rajo, F J; Fernandez-González, M; Aira, M J

    2015-05-01

    This paper sought to chart airborne Quercus pollen counts over the last 20 years in the region of Galicia (NW Spain) with a view to detecting the possible influence of climate change on the Quercus airborne pollen season (APS). Pollen data from Ourense, Santiago de Compostela, Vigo and Lugo were used. The Quercus airborne pollen season was characterized in terms of the following parameters: pollen season start and end dates, peak pollen count, pollen season length and pollen index. Several methods, dates and threshold temperatures for determining the chill and heat requirements needed to trigger flowering were applied. A diverse APS onset timing sequence was observed for the four cities as Quercus flowers few days in advance in Vigo. The variations observed could be related to differences in the meteorological conditions or the thermal requirements needed for flowering. Thermal requirements differed depending on local climate conditions in the study cities: the lowest values for chilling accumulation were recorded in Vigo and the highest in Lugo, whereas the lowest heat accumulation was achieved in Vigo. Differences in APS trends between cities may reflect variations in weather-related trends. A significant trend towards rising Quercus pollen indices and higher maximum daily mean pollen counts was observed in Ourense, linked to the more marked temperature increase across southern Galicia. A non-uniform trend towards increased temperatures was noted over the study period, particularly in late summer and early autumn in all four study cities. Additionally, an increase in spring temperatures was observed in south-western Galicia. PMID:25108375

  15. Genetic variability and structure of Quercus brantii assessed by ISSR, IRAP and SCoT markers.

    PubMed

    Alikhani, Leila; Rahmani, Mohammad-Shafie; Shabanian, Naghi; Badakhshan, Hedieh; Khadivi-Khub, Abdollah

    2014-11-15

    Persian oak (Quercus brantii Lindl.) is one of the most important woody species of the Zagros forests in Iran. Three molecular marker techniques: start codon targeted (SCoT), inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism (IRAP) markers were compared for fingerprinting of 125 individuals of this species collected from different geographical locations of north-west of Iran. A total of 233 bands were amplified by 18 ISSR primers, of which 224 (96.10%) were polymorphic, and 126 polymorphic bands (97.65%) were observed in 129 bands amplified by 10 IRAP primers. Besides, 118 bands were observed for all 10 SCoT primers, of which 113 were polymorphic (95.71%). Average polymorphism information content (PIC) for ISSR, IRAP and SCoT markers was 0.30, 0.32 and 0.38, respectively, and this revealed that SCoT markers were more informative than IRAP and ISSR for the assessment of diversity among individuals. Based on the three different molecular types, cluster analysis revealed that 125 individuals taken for the analysis can be divided into three distinct clusters. The Jaccard's genetic similarity based on the combined data ranged from 0.23 to 0.76. These results suggest that efficiency of SCoT, IRAP and ISSR markers was relatively the same in fingerprinting of individuals. All molecular marker types revealed a low genetic differentiation among populations, indicating the possibility of gene flow between the studied populations. These results have an important implication for Persian oak (Q. brantii) germplasm characterization, improvement, and conservation. PMID:25241382

  16. Foliage nitrogen turnover: differences among nitrogen absorbed at different times by Quercus serrata saplings

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Miki U.; Mizumachi, Eri; Tokuchi, Naoko

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Nitrogen turnover within plants has been intensively studied to better understand nitrogen use strategies. However, differences among the nitrogen absorbed at different times are not completely understood and the fate of nitrogen absorbed during winter is largely uncharacterized. In the present study, nitrogen absorbed at different times of the year (growing season, winter and previous growing season) was traced, and the within-leaf nitrogen turnover of a temperate deciduous oak Quercus serrata was investigated. Methods The contributions of nitrogen absorbed at the three different times to leaf construction, translocation during the growing season, and the leaf-level resorption efficiency during leaf senescence were compared using 15N. Key Results Winter- and previous growing season-absorbed nitrogen significantly contributed to leaf construction, although the contribution was smaller than that of growing season-absorbed nitrogen. On the other hand, the leaf-level resorption efficiency of winter- and previous growing season-absorbed nitrogen was higher than that of growing season-absorbed nitrogen, suggesting that older nitrogen is better retained in leaves than recently absorbed nitrogen. Conclusions The results demonstrate that nitrogen turnover in leaves varies with nitrogen absorption times. These findings are important for understanding plant nitrogen use strategies and nitrogen cycles in forest ecosystems. PMID:21515608

  17. Variations in Quercus sp. pollen seasons (1996-2011) in Poznań, Poland, in relation to meteorological parameters.

    PubMed

    Grewling, Lukasz; Jackowiak, Bogdan; Smith, Matt

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to supply detailed information about oak (Quercus sp.) pollen seasons in Poznań, Poland, based on a 16-year aerobiological data series (1996-2011). The pollen data were collected using a volumetric spore trap of the Hirst design located in Poznań city center. The limits of the pollen seasons were calculated using the 95 % method. The influence of meteorological parameters on temporal variations in airborne pollen was examined using correlation analysis. Start and end dates of oak pollen seasons in Poznań varied markedly from year-to-year (14 and 17 days, respectively). Most of the pollen grains (around 75 % of the seasonal pollen index) were recorded within the first 2 weeks of the pollen season. The tenfold variation was observed between the least and the most intensive pollen seasons. These fluctuations were significantly related to the variation in the sum of rain during the period second fortnight of March to first fortnight of April the year before pollination (r = 0.799; p < 0.001). During the analyzing period, a significant advance in oak pollen season start dates was observed (-0.55 day/year; p = 0.021), which was linked with an increase in the mean temperature during the second half of March and first half of April (+0.2 °C; p = 0.014). Daily average oak pollen counts correlated positively with mean and maximum daily temperatures, and negatively with daily rainfall and daily mean relative humidity. PMID:24817783

  18. Variations in physiological and biochemical traits of oak seedlings grown under drought and ozone stress.

    PubMed

    Cotrozzi, Lorenzo; Remorini, Damiano; Pellegrini, Elisa; Landi, Marco; Massai, Rossano; Nali, Cristina; Guidi, Lucia; Lorenzini, Giacomo

    2016-05-01

    Despite the huge biodiversity characterizing the Mediterranean environment, environmental constraints, such as high sunlight and high temperatures alongside with dry periods, make plant survival hard. In addition, high irradiance leads to increasing ozone (O3 ) concentrations in ambient air. In this era of global warming, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms that allow native species to tolerate these environmental constraints and how such mechanisms interact. Three Mediterranean oak species (Quercus ilex, Quercus pubescens and Quercus cerris) with different features (drought tolerant, evergreen or deciduous species) were selected to assess their biometrical, physiological and biochemical responses under drought and/or O3 stress (80-100 nl l(-1) of O3 for 5 h day(-1) for 77 consecutive days). Leaf visible injury appeared only under drought stress (alone or combined with O3 ) in all three species. Drought × O3 induced strong reductions in leaf dry weight in Q. pubescens and Q. cerris (-70 and -75%, respectively). Alterations in physiological (i.e. decrease in maximum carboxylation rate) and biochemical parameters (i.e. increase in proline content and build-up of malondialdehyde by-products) occurred in all the three species, although drought represented the major determinant. Quercus ilex and Q. pubescens, which co-occur in dry environments, were more tolerant to drought and drought × O3 . Quercus ilex was the species in which oxidative stress occurred only when drought was applied with O3 . High plasticity at a biochemical level (i.e. proline content) and evergreen habitus are likely on the basis of the higher tolerance of Q. ilex. PMID:26541269

  19. Aroma potential of oak battens prepared from decommissioned oak barrels.

    PubMed

    Li, Sijing; Crump, Anna M; Grbin, Paul R; Cozzolino, Daniel; Warren, Peter; Hayasaka, Yoji; Wilkinson, Kerry L

    2015-04-01

    During barrel maturation, volatile compounds are extracted from oak wood and impart aroma and flavor to wine, enhancing its character and complexity. However, barrels contain a finite pool of extractable material, which diminishes with time. As a consequence, most barrels are decommissioned after 5 or 6 years. This study investigated whether or not decommissioned barrels can be "reclaimed" and utilized as a previously untapped source of quality oak for wine maturation. Oak battens were prepared from staves of decommissioned French and American oak barrels, and their composition analyzed before and after toasting. The oak lactone glycoconjugate content of untoasted reclaimed oak was determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, while the concentrations of cis- and trans-oak lactone, guaiacol, 4-methlyguaiacol, vanillin, eugenol, furfural, and 5-methylfurfural present in toasted reclaimed oak were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Aroma potential was then evaluated by comparing the composition of reclaimed oak with that of new oak. Comparable levels of oak lactone glycoconjugates and oak volatiles were observed, demonstrating the aroma potential of reclaimed oak and therefore its suitability as a raw material for alternative oak products, i.e., chips or battens, for the maturation of wine. The temperature profiles achieved during toasting were also measured to evaluate the viability of any yeast or bacteria present in reclaimed oak. PMID:25771908

  20. Potential of ultrasonic pulse velocity for evaluating the dimensional stability of oak and chestnut wood.

    PubMed

    Dündar, Türker; Wang, Xiping; As, Nusret; Avcı, Erkan

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the potential of ultrasonic velocity as a rapid and nondestructive method to predict the dimensional stability of oak (Quercus petraea (Mattuschka) Lieblein) and chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.) that are commonly used in flooring industry. Ultrasonic velocity, specific gravity, and radial, tangential and volumetric shrinkages were measured on seventy-four 20×20×30-mm(3) specimens obtained from freshly cut oak and chestnut stems. The ultrasonic velocities of the specimens decreased with increasing moisture content (MC). We found that specific gravity was not a good predictor of the transverse shrinkages as indicated by relatively weak correlations. Ultrasonic velocity, on the other hand, was found to be a significant predictor of the transverse shrinkages for both oak and chestnut. The best results for prediction of shrinkages of oak and chestnut were obtained when the ultrasonic velocity and specific gravity were used together. The multiple regression models we developed in this study explained 77% of volumetric shrinkages in oak and 72% of volumetric shrinkages in chestnut. It is concluded that ultrasonic velocity coupled with specific gravity can be employed as predicting parameters to evaluate the dimensional stability of oak and chestnut wood during manufacturing process. PMID:26678790

  1. Production of anticandidal cotton textiles treated with oak gall extract.

    PubMed

    Tayel, Ahmed A; El-Tras, Wael F; Abdel-Monem, Omnia A; El-Sabbagh, Sabha M; Alsohim, Abdullah S; El-Refai, Elham M

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans, one of the most dreadful fungal pathogens threatening humans, could not be easily prevented. The anticandidal activity of oak gall extract, Quercus infectoria (QIE), was investigated as a potential natural alternative to synthetic and chemical fungicides. QIE anticandidal potentiality was confirmed using both qualitative and quantitative assays. Cotton textiles were treated with QIE and then evaluated as anticandidal fabrics. QIE-treated textiles had a potent anticandidal activity, which could completely inhibit the inoculated C. albicans cells. The durability of anticandidal activity in QIE-treated textiles almost completely disappeared after the fourth laundering cycle. QIE could be recommended, however, as a potent anticandidal agent for preparing antiseptic solutions and emulsions and as a finishing agent for manufacturing anticandidal disposable diapers and hygienic clothes. PMID:24401783

  2. Fluorescent indices of oak and wheat leaves in dependence on chlorophyll content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmatskaya, Olesya Ð. ń.; Karavaev, Vladimir A.; Gunar, Lyudmila E.

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescence spectra and fluorescence induction curves of the leaves of two plant species in dependence on chlorophyll content were studied. Red oak (Quercus rubra L.) leaves upon the autumn chlorophyll degradation, as well as wheat leaves (Triticum aestivum L.) at various stages of ontogenesis showed linear dependence between the ratio ω = F740 / F685 (the ratio of the maximum values of fluorescence at respective wavelengths) and chlorophyll content. In both cases, parameter Fv / Fm (the relative value of the variable fluorescence) remained almost unchanged up to significant reduction of chlorophyll content, indicating on maintaining the high photochemical activity of photosystem 2.

  3. Large drought-induced variations in oak leaf volatile organic compound emissions during PINOT NOIR 2012.

    PubMed

    Geron, Chris; Daly, Ryan; Harley, Peter; Rasmussen, Rei; Seco, Roger; Guenther, Alex; Karl, Thomas; Gu, Lianhong

    2016-03-01

    Leaf-level isoprene and monoterpene emissions were collected and analyzed from five of the most abundant oak (Quercus) species in Central Missouri's Ozarks Region in 2012 during PINOT NOIR (Particle Investigations at a Northern Ozarks Tower - NOx, Oxidants, Isoprene Research). June measurements, prior to the onset of severe drought, showed isoprene emission rates and leaf temperature responses similar to those previously reported in the literature and used in Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) emission models. During the peak of the drought in August, isoprene emission rates were substantially reduced, and response to temperature was dramatically altered, especially for the species in the red oak subgenus (Erythrobalanus). Quercus stellata (in the white oak subgenus Leucobalanus), on the other hand, increased its isoprene emission rate during August, and showed no decline at high temperatures during June or August, consistent with its high tolerance to drought and adaptation to xeric sites at the prairie-deciduous forest interface. Mid-late October measurements were conducted after soil moisture recharge, but were affected by senescence and cooler temperatures. Isoprene emission rates were considerably lower from all species compared to June and August data. The large differences between the oaks in response to drought emphasizes the need to consider BVOC emissions at the species level instead of just the whole canopy. Monoterpene emissions from Quercus rubra in limited data were highest among the oaks studied, while monoterpene emissions from the other oak species were 80-95% lower and less than assumed in current BVOC emission models. Major monoterpenes from Q. rubra (and in ambient air) were p-cymene, α-pinene, β-pinene, d-limonene, γ-terpinene, β-ocimene (predominantly1,3,7-trans-β-ocimene, but also 1,3,6-trans-β-ocimene), tricyclene, α-terpinene, sabinene, terpinolene, and myrcene. Results are discussed in the context of canopy flux studies

  4. Integrated transcriptomics and metabolomics decipher differences in the resistance of pedunculate oak to the herbivore Tortrix viridana L.

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The interaction between insect pests and their host plants is a never-ending race of evolutionary adaption. Plants have developed an armament against insect herbivore attacks, and attackers continuously learn how to address it. Using a combined transcriptomic and metabolomic approach, we investigated the molecular and biochemical differences between Quercus robur L. trees that resisted (defined as resistant oak type) or were susceptible (defined as susceptible oak type) to infestation by the major oak pest, Tortrix viridana L. Results Next generation RNA sequencing revealed hundreds of genes that exhibited constitutive and/or inducible differential expression in the resistant oak compared to the susceptible oak. Distinct differences were found in the transcript levels and the metabolic content with regard to tannins, flavonoids, and terpenoids, which are compounds involved in the defence against insect pests. The results of our transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses are in agreement with those of a previous study in which we showed that female moths prefer susceptible oaks due to their specific profile of herbivore-induced volatiles. These data therefore define two oak genotypes that clearly differ on the transcriptomic and metabolomic levels, as reflected by their specific defensive compound profiles. Conclusions We conclude that the resistant oak type seem to prefer a strategy of constitutive defence responses in contrast to more induced defence responses of the susceptible oaks triggered by feeding. These results pave the way for the development of biomarkers for an early determination of potentially green oak leaf roller-resistant genotypes in natural pedunculate oak populations in Europe. PMID:24160444

  5. Mycorrhization of Quercus robur L., Quercus cerris L. and Corylus avellana L. seedlings with Tuber macrosporum Vittad.

    PubMed

    Benucci, Gian Maria Niccolò; Gógán Csorbai, Andrea; Baciarelli Falini, Leonardo; Bencivenga, Mattia; Di Massimo, Gabriella; Donnini, Domizia

    2012-11-01

    Tuber macrosporum Vittad. is not a common truffle species, but with remarkable organoleptic qualities and much economic interest. After the addition of truffle spore slurry, 30 seedlings of Quercus robur L., Quercus cerris L. and Corylus avellana L. were grown inside a greenhouse for 11 months before evaluation of the mycorrhizal level. Two different potting mixes were used: a natural soil-based potting mix for Q. robur, Q. cerris and C. avellana and a peat-based potting mix for Q. robur. Quercus robur planted in soil potting mix was the most receptive towards the truffle spore inoculum, with a level of formation of T. macrosporum ectomycorrhizas (ECMs) of approximately 14 %, ranging from a minimum of ∼4 % to a maximum of ∼44 % in different seedlings. No T. macrosporum ECMs developed on Q. cerris (soil potting mix) or on Q. robur (peat potting mix), whereas a low percentage of ECMs was detected on only three C. avellana (soil potting mix) seedlings. The fungus Sphaerosporella brunnea (Alb. & Schwein.) Svrček & Kubička was also detected as a contaminant on almost half the truffle-inoculated seedlings. A new detailed description of the morphological and anatomical characteristics of T. macrosporum ECMs and their DNA-based verification with species-specific markers were also reported. PMID:22565651

  6. Evaluation of wildlife-habitat relationships data base for predicting bird community composition in central California chaparral and blue oak woodlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Avery, M.L.; van Riper, Charles, III

    1990-01-01

    The California Wildlife-Habitat Relationships (WHR) database can be used to assist resource managers to evaluate effects of habitat manipulations on wildlife. The accuracy of predictions from WHR was evaluated using data from bird surveys conducted during winter and spring 1984 and 1985 in chamise (Adenostema fasciculata) chaparral, mixed chaparral and blue oak (Quercus douglasii) woodland. Considerable variability between habitat types was found for errors both of commission and of omission.

  7. Gypsy moth (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) consumption and utilization of northern red oak and white oak foliage exposed to simulated acid rain and ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, W.N. Jr. )

    1993-06-01

    Two-year-old seedlings of white oak, Quercus alba L., and red oak, Q. rubra L., were exposed to ozone (O[sub 3]) fumigations in four continuously stirred tank reactor chambers in the greenhouse for 8 h/d, 3 d/wk for 6 wk. Fumigation treatments were charcoal-filtered air (CFA) and CFA + 0.15 ppm O[sub 3]. Two simulated rain treatments, pH 4.2 and pH 3.0, of-1.25 cm were applied once each week in rain-simulation chambers. Gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), third instars were allowed to feed on leaf disks from treated seedlings for 24 h. Leaf area consumed, food assimilated, weight gain, and relative growth rate (RGR) were examined. Overall, larvae fed white oak foliage consumed more foliage and gained more weight than those fed red oak foliage. Response to the fumigation and rain treatments was different for each oak species. On white oak foliage, larvae consumed significantly less foliage treated with CFA + pH 3.0 rain, but the lowest RGR occurred with the 0.15 ppm O[sub 3] + pH 4.2 rain treatment. The most food assimilated, greatest weight gain, and highest RGR occurred with the CFA + pH 4.2 rain control. Red oak foliage consumed was equivalent for all treatments, but foliage exposed to CFA + pH 3.0 rain resulted in more food assimilated, greater weight gain, and higher RGR for that species.

  8. [Effects of simulating acid rain on photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters of Quercus glauca Quercus glauca].

    PubMed

    Wang, Sai; Yi, Li-Ta; Yu, Shu-Quan; Zhang, Chao; Shi, Jing-Jing

    2014-08-01

    At three levels of simulated acid rainfall intensities with pH values of 2.5 (severe), 40 (medium) and 5.6 (light) respectively, the responses of chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters of Quercus glauca seedlings were studied in three acid rainfall treatments, i. e. only the aboveground of seedlings exposed to acid rain (T1), both of the seedlings and soil exposed to acid rain (T2), only the soil exposed to acid rain (T3) compared with blank control (CK). Under the severe acid rainfall, T1 significantly inhibited chlorophyll synthesis, and thus reduced the primary photochemical efficiency of PS II ( F(v)/F(m)), potential activity of PS II (F(v)/F(o)) , apparent quantum (Y), net photosynthetic rate (P(n)), and transpiration rate (T(r)), but increased the light compensation point (LCP) and dark respiration rate (R(d)) of Q. glauca seedlings. T2 inhibited, but T3 played a little enhancement on the aforementioned parameters of Q. glauca seedlings. Under the conditions of medium and light acid rainfall intensities, the above parameters in the three treatments were higher than that of CK, except with lower R(d). The chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters showed a similar tendency in the three treatments, i. e. T2>T3 >T1. It indicated that T1 had the strongest inhibition on seedlings in condition of the severe acid rainfall, while T2 had the most dramatic facilitating effect on seedlings under the medium and light acid rainfall. Intensity of acid rainfall had significant influences on SPAD, F(v)/F(m), F(v)/F(o), Y, P(n), T(r), and maximum photosynthetic rate (A(max)), whereas treatments of acid rainfall affected SPAD, F(v)/F(m), Y, P(n), T(r), A(max) and light saturation point (LSP). The interaction of acid rainfall intensities and treatments played significant effects on SPAD, F(v)/F(m), Y, P(n) and A(max). PMID:25509066

  9. Countervailing effects on pine and oak leaf litter decomposition in human-altered Mediterranean ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Sheffer, Efrat; Canham, Charles D; Kigel, Jaime; Perevolotsky, Avi

    2015-04-01

    Species affect the dynamics of litter decay through the intrinsic properties of their litter, but also by influencing the environmental conditions imposed by their canopy, roots, and litter layers. We examined how human-induced changes in the relative abundances of two dominant Mediterranean trees-Pinus halepensis and Quercus calliprinos-impact leaf litter decomposition. A reciprocal transplant experiment tested decomposition of pine, oak, and mixed leaf litter in oak woodland and pine forest ecosystems with different relative abundances of pine and oak. Using likelihood methods, we tested the importance and magnitude of the environmental effects of local species abundance, litter layer composition, and soil properties on litter mass loss. Oak litter decomposition was slower than pine, and had an antagonistic effect on mixed litter decay. These results differ from other reported pine-oak associations, and are probably associated with a higher content of tannins and phenols in oak compared to pine litter in our study sites. The environmental effects of the two species were opposite to their litter decomposition dynamics. An increased proportion of pine in the oak woodlands and a higher content of pine needles in the litter layer of pine forests reduced decay rates. The presence of more oak and broadleaf litter in the litter layer accelerated decomposition in pine forests. Our results highlight the importance of considering multidimensional species effects mediated by both chemical and physical properties, and imply that man-made changes in the composition and configuration of plant communities may result in complex unpredicted consequences to ecosystem biogeochemistry. PMID:25680333

  10. Impacts of alternative timber harvest practices on leaf-chewing herbivores of oak.

    PubMed

    Forkner, Rebecca E; Marquis, Robert J; Lill, John T; Le Corff, Josiane

    2006-04-01

    Studies of the effects of logging on Lepidoptera rarely address landscape-level effects or effects on larval, leaf-feeding stages. We examined the impacts of uneven-aged and even-aged logging on the abundance, richness, and community structure of leaf-chewing insects of white (Quercus alba L.) and black (Q. velutina L.) oak trees remaining in unharvested areas by sampling 3 years before and 7 years after harvest. After harvest, white oaks in uneven-aged sites had 32% fewer species of leaf-chewing insects than control sites. This reduction in species richness may have resulted from changes in microclimate (reducing plant quality and/or changing leaf phenology) that affected a much larger total area of each site than did even-aged cuts. For black oak after harvest, species richness in uneven- and even-aged sites increased relative to levels before harvest. Harvesting did not alter total insect density or community structure in the unlogged habitat for either oak species with one exception: insect density on black oak increased in the oldest forest block. Community structure of herbivores of black and white oaks in clearcut gaps differed from that of oaks in intact areas of even-aged sites. Furthermore, both richness and total insect density of black oaks were reduced in clearcut gaps. We suggest that low-level harvests alter herbivore species richness at the landscape level. Treatment effects were subtle because we sampled untreated areas of logged landscapes, only one harvest had occurred, and large temporal and spatial variation in abundance and richness existed. Although the effects of logging were greater in uneven-aged sites, the effects of even-aged management are likely to increase as harvesting continues. PMID:16903104