Science.gov

Sample records for objective evaluation framework

  1. Framework for objective evaluation of privacy filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, Pavel; Melle, Andrea; Dugelay, Jean-Luc; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2013-09-01

    Extensive adoption of video surveillance, affecting many aspects of our daily lives, alarms the public about the increasing invasion into personal privacy. To address these concerns, many tools have been proposed for protection of personal privacy in image and video. However, little is understood regarding the effectiveness of such tools and especially their impact on the underlying surveillance tasks, leading to a tradeoff between the preservation of privacy offered by these tools and the intelligibility of activities under video surveillance. In this paper, we investigate this privacy-intelligibility tradeoff objectively by proposing an objective framework for evaluation of privacy filters. We apply the proposed framework on a use case where privacy of people is protected by obscuring faces, assuming an automated video surveillance system. We used several popular privacy protection filters, such as blurring, pixelization, and masking and applied them with varying strengths to people's faces from different public datasets of video surveillance footage. Accuracy of face detection algorithm was used as a measure of intelligibility (a face should be detected to perform a surveillance task), and accuracy of face recognition algorithm as a measure of privacy (a specific person should not be identified). Under these conditions, after application of an ideal privacy protection tool, an obfuscated face would be visible as a face but would not be correctly identified by the recognition algorithm. The experiments demonstrate that, in general, an increase in strength of privacy filters under consideration leads to an increase in privacy (i.e., reduction in recognition accuracy) and to a decrease in intelligibility (i.e., reduction in detection accuracy). Masking also shows to be the most favorable filter across all tested datasets.

  2. The Sloan-C Pillars and Boundary Objects As a Framework for Evaluating Blended Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laumakis, Mark; Graham, Charles; Dziuban, Chuck

    2009-01-01

    The authors contend that blended learning represents a boundary object; a construct that brings together constituencies from a variety of backgrounds with each of these cohorts defining the object somewhat differently. The Sloan-C Pillars (learning effectiveness, access, cost effectiveness, student satisfaction, and faculty satisfaction) provide…

  3. A quality assurance framework for the fully automated and objective evaluation of image quality in cone-beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Steiding, Christian; Kolditz, Daniel; Kalender, Willi A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Thousands of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners for vascular, maxillofacial, neurological, and body imaging are in clinical use today, but there is no consensus on uniform acceptance and constancy testing for image quality (IQ) and dose yet. The authors developed a quality assurance (QA) framework for fully automated and time-efficient performance evaluation of these systems. In addition, the dependence of objective Fourier-based IQ metrics on direction and position in 3D volumes was investigated for CBCT. Methods: The authors designed a dedicated QA phantom 10 cm in length consisting of five compartments, each with a diameter of 10 cm, and an optional extension ring 16 cm in diameter. A homogeneous section of water-equivalent material allows measuring CT value accuracy, image noise and uniformity, and multidimensional global and local noise power spectra (NPS). For the quantitative determination of 3D high-contrast spatial resolution, the modulation transfer function (MTF) of centrally and peripherally positioned aluminum spheres was computed from edge profiles. Additional in-plane and axial resolution patterns were used to assess resolution qualitatively. The characterization of low-contrast detectability as well as CT value linearity and artifact behavior was tested by utilizing sections with soft-tissue-equivalent and metallic inserts. For an automated QA procedure, a phantom detection algorithm was implemented. All tests used in the dedicated QA program were initially verified in simulation studies and experimentally confirmed on a clinical dental CBCT system. Results: The automated IQ evaluation of volume data sets of the dental CBCT system was achieved with the proposed phantom requiring only one scan for the determination of all desired parameters. Typically, less than 5 min were needed for phantom set-up, scanning, and data analysis. Quantitative evaluation of system performance over time by comparison to previous examinations was also

  4. Evaluation of maritime object detection methods for full motion video applications using the PASCAL VOC Challenge framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaszewski, Martin; Parameswaran, Shibin; Hallenborg, Eric; Bagnall, Bryan

    2015-03-01

    We present an initial target detection performance evaluation system for the RAPid Image Exploitation Resource (RAPIER) Full Motion Video (RFMV) maritime target tracking software. We test and evaluate four statistical target detection methods using 30 Hz full motion video from aerial platforms. Using appropriate algorithm performance criteria inspired by the PASCAL Visual Object Classes (VOC) Challenge, we address the tradeoffs between detection fidelity and computational speed/throughput.

  5. Object-oriented Geographic Information System Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Lurie, Gordon

    2003-03-01

    JeoViewer is an intelligent object-oriented geographic information system (GIS) framework written in Java that provides transparent linkage to any object’s data, behaviors, and optimized spatial geometry representation. Tools are provided for typical GIS functionality, data ingestion, data export, and integration with other frameworks. The primary difference between Jeo Viewer and traditional GIS systems is that traditional GIS systems offer static views of geo-spatial data while JeoViewer can be dynamically coupled to models and live data streams which dynamically change the state of the object which can be immediately represented in JeoViewer. Additionally, JeoViewer’s object-oriented paradigm provides a more natural representation of spatial data. A rich layer hierarchy allows arbitrary grouping of objects based on any relationship as well as the traditional GIS vertical ordering of objects. JeoViewer can run as a standalone product, extended with additional analysis functionality, or embedded in another framework.

  6. Object-oriented Geographic Information System Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-03-01

    JeoViewer is an intelligent object-oriented geographic information system (GIS) framework written in Java that provides transparent linkage to any object’s data, behaviors, and optimized spatial geometry representation. Tools are provided for typical GIS functionality, data ingestion, data export, and integration with other frameworks. The primary difference between Jeo Viewer and traditional GIS systems is that traditional GIS systems offer static views of geo-spatial data while JeoViewer can be dynamically coupled to models and live datamore » streams which dynamically change the state of the object which can be immediately represented in JeoViewer. Additionally, JeoViewer’s object-oriented paradigm provides a more natural representation of spatial data. A rich layer hierarchy allows arbitrary grouping of objects based on any relationship as well as the traditional GIS vertical ordering of objects. JeoViewer can run as a standalone product, extended with additional analysis functionality, or embedded in another framework.« less

  7. Performance Objectives: Foundation for Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Floyd L.; Mannebach, Alfred J.

    1970-01-01

    Only when agricultural educators and others evaluate agricultural education programs on the basis of student's performance in relation to valid and realistic performance objectives will progress be made in educational program improvement. (Authors)

  8. Evaluation Framework for NASA's Educational Outreach Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Rick; Booker, Angela; Linde, Charlotte; Preston, Connie

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the proposed work is to develop an evaluation framework for NASA's educational outreach efforts. We focus on public (rather than technical or scientific) dissemination efforts, specifically on Internet-based outreach sites for children.The outcome of this work is to propose both methods and criteria for evaluation, which would enable NASA to do a more analytic evaluation of its outreach efforts. The proposed framework is based on IRL's ethnographic and video-based observational methods, which allow us to analyze how these sites are actually used.

  9. Evaluation Framework for Search Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Smith, Leon E.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Kaye, William R.

    2005-10-23

    A framework for quantitatively evaluating current and proposed gamma-ray search instrument designs has been developed. The framework is designed to generate a large library of “virtual neighborhoods” that can be used to test and evaluate nearly any gamma-ray sensor type. Calculating nuisance-source emissions and combining various sources to create a large number of random virtual scenes places a significant computational burden on the development of the framework. To reduce this burden, a number of radiation transport simplifications have been made which maintain the essential physics ingredients for the quantitative assessment of search instruments while significantly reducing computational times. The various components of the framework, from the simulation and benchmarking of nuisance source emissions to the computational engine for generating the gigabytes of simulated search scenes, are discussed.

  10. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-02-14

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and 1/0 through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample 1/0 drivers. This is a Framework library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modelling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, suchmore » as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Ha) applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed« less

  11. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    2014-02-14

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and 1/0 through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample 1/0 drivers. This is a Framework library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modelling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Ha) applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed

  12. Rethinking modeling framework design: object modeling system 3.0

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Object Modeling System (OMS) is a framework for environmental model development, data provisioning, testing, validation, and deployment. It provides a bridge for transferring technology from the research organization to the program delivery agency. The framework provides a consistent and efficie...

  13. Matrix evaluation of science objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessen, Randii R.

    1994-01-01

    The most fundamental objective of all robotic planetary spacecraft is to return science data. To accomplish this, a spacecraft is fabricated and built, software is planned and coded, and a ground system is designed and implemented. However, the quantitative analysis required to determine how the collection of science data drives ground system capabilities has received very little attention. This paper defines a process by which science objectives can be quantitatively evaluated. By applying it to the Cassini Mission to Saturn, this paper further illustrates the power of this technique. The results show which science objectives drive specific ground system capabilities. In addition, this process can assist system engineers and scientists in the selection of the science payload during pre-project mission planning; ground system designers during ground system development and implementation; and operations personnel during mission operations.

  14. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-10-20

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and I/O through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample I/O drivers. This is a library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modeling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such asmore » time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Has applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed for anomalies.« less

  15. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-20

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and I/O through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample I/O drivers. This is a library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modeling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Has applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed for anomalies.

  16. A Configurable, Object-Oriented, Transportation System Software Framework

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY,SUZANNE M.; MYRE,JOHN W.; PRICE,MARK H.; RUSSELL,ERIC D.; SCOTT,DAN W.

    2000-08-01

    The Transportation Surety Center, 6300, has been conducting continuing research into and development of information systems for the Configurable Transportation Security and Information Management System (CTSS) project, an Object-Oriented Framework approach that uses Component-Based Software Development to facilitate rapid deployment of new systems while improving software cost containment, development reliability, compatibility, and extensibility. The direction has been to develop a Fleet Management System (FMS) framework using object-oriented technology. The goal for the current development is to provide a software and hardware environment that will demonstrate and support object-oriented development commonly in the FMS Central Command Center and Vehicle domains.

  17. Making Just Tenure and Promotion Decisions Using the Objective Knowledge Growth Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitpin, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to utilize the Objective Knowledge Growth Framework (OKGF) to promote a better understanding of the evaluating tenure and promotion processes. Design/Methodology/Approach: A scenario is created to illustrate the concept of using OKGF. Findings: The framework aims to support decision makers in identifying the…

  18. Framework for Development of Object-Oriented Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Poveda, Gus; Ciavarella, Tony; Nieten, Dan

    2004-01-01

    The Real-Time Control (RTC) Application Framework is a high-level software framework written in C++ that supports the rapid design and implementation of object-oriented application programs. This framework provides built-in functionality that solves common software development problems within distributed client-server, multi-threaded, and embedded programming environments. When using the RTC Framework to develop software for a specific domain, designers and implementers can focus entirely on the details of the domain-specific software rather than on creating custom solutions, utilities, and frameworks for the complexities of the programming environment. The RTC Framework was originally developed as part of a Space Shuttle Launch Processing System (LPS) replacement project called Checkout and Launch Control System (CLCS). As a result of the framework s development, CLCS software development time was reduced by 66 percent. The framework is generic enough for developing applications outside of the launch-processing system domain. Other applicable high-level domains include command and control systems and simulation/ training systems.

  19. Organizing and Typing Persistent Objects Within an Object-Oriented Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madany, Peter W.; Campbell, Roy H.

    1991-01-01

    Conventional operating systems provide little or no direct support for the services required for an efficient persistent object system implementation. We have built a persistent object scheme using a customization and extension of an object-oriented operating system called Choices. Choices includes a framework for the storage of persistent data that is suited to the construction of both conventional file system and persistent object system. In this paper we describe three areas in which persistent object support differs from file system support: storage organization, storage management, and typing. Persistent object systems must support various sizes of objects efficiently. Customizable containers, which are themselves persistent objects and can be nested, support a wide range of object sizes in Choices. Collections of persistent objects that are accessed as an aggregate and collections of light-weight persistent objects can be clustered in containers that are nested within containers for larger objects. Automated garbage collection schemes are added to storage management and have a major impact on persistent object applications. The Choices persistent object store provides extensible sets of persistent object types. The store contains not only the data for persistent objects but also the names of the classes to which they belong and the code for the operation of the classes. Besides presenting persistent object storage organization, storage management, and typing, this paper discusses how persistent objects are named and used within the Choices persistent data/file system framework.

  20. Evaluation Framework for Telemedicine Using the Logical Framework Approach and a Fishbone Diagram

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Technological advances using telemedicine and telehealth are growing in healthcare fields, but the evaluation framework for them is inconsistent and limited. This paper suggests a comprehensive evaluation framework for telemedicine system implementation and will support related stakeholders' decision-making by promoting general understanding, and resolving arguments and controversies. Methods This study focused on developing a comprehensive evaluation framework by summarizing themes across the range of evaluation techniques and organized foundational evaluation frameworks generally applicable through studies and cases of diverse telemedicine. Evaluation factors related to aspects of information technology; the evaluation of satisfaction of service providers and consumers, cost, quality, and information security are organized using the fishbone diagram. Results It was not easy to develop a monitoring and evaluation framework for telemedicine since evaluation frameworks for telemedicine are very complex with many potential inputs, activities, outputs, outcomes, and stakeholders. A conceptual framework was developed that incorporates the key dimensions that need to be considered in the evaluation of telehealth implementation for a formal structured approach to the evaluation of a service. The suggested framework consists of six major dimensions and the subsequent branches for each dimension. Conclusions To implement telemedicine and telehealth services, stakeholders should make decisions based on sufficient evidence in quality and safety measured by the comprehensive evaluation framework. Further work would be valuable in applying more comprehensive evaluations to verify and improve the comprehensive framework across a variety of contexts with more factors and participant group dimensions. PMID:26618028

  1. Etomica: an object-oriented framework for molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Andrew J; Kofke, David A

    2015-03-30

    We describe the design of an object-oriented library of software components that are suitable for constructing simulations of systems of interacting particles. The emphasis of the discussion is on the general design of the components and how they interact, and less on details of the programming interface or its implementation. Example code is provided as an aid to understanding object-oriented programming structures and to demonstrate how the framework is applied. PMID:25565378

  2. A Sustainable Evaluation Framework and Its Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Robert B.; Stern, Marc J.; Ardoin, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a framework for developing internally sustainable evaluation systems for environmental education organizations, although the framework can be applied to other types of organizations. The authors developed a sustainable evaluation framework (SEF) with the intent of creating an evaluation system that could be self-administered…

  3. Design of single object model of software reuse framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liu

    2011-12-01

    In order to embody the reuse significance of software reuse framework fully, this paper will analyze in detail about the single object model mentioned in the article "The overall design of software reuse framework" and induce them as add and delete and modify mode, check mode, and search and scroll and display integrated mode. Three modes correspond to their own interface design template, class and database design concept. The modelling idea helps developers clear their minds and speed up. Even laymen can complete the development task easily.

  4. A unified framework for optimal multiple video object bit allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhenzhong; Ngan, King Ngi

    2005-07-01

    MPEG-4 supports object-level video coding. It is a challenge to design an optimal bit allocation strategy which considers not only how to distribute bits among multiple video objects (MVO's) but also how to achieve optimization between the texture and shape information. In this paper, we present a uniform framework for optimal multiple video object bit allocation in MPEG-4. We combine the rate-distortion (R-D) models for the texture and shape information of arbitrarily shaped video objects to develop the joint texture-shape rate-distortion models. The dynamic programming (DP) technique is applied to optimize the bit allocation for the multiple video objects. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed joint texture-shape optimization algorithm outperforms the MPEG-4 verification model on the decoded picture quality.

  5. An Object Oriented, Finite Element Framework for Linear Wave Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, J M

    2004-08-12

    This dissertation documents an object oriented framework which can be used to solve any linear wave equation. The linear wave equations are expressed in the differential forms language. This differential forms expression allows a strict discrete interpretation of the system. The framework is implemented using the Galerkin Finite Element Method to define the discrete differential forms and operators. Finite element basis functions including standard scalar Nodal and vector Nedelec basis functions are used to implement the discrete differential forms resulting in a mixed finite element system. Discretizations of scalar and vector wave equations in the time and frequency domains will be demonstrated in both differential forms and vector calculi. This framework conserves energy, maintains physical continuity, is valid on unstructured grids, conditionally stable and second order accurate. Examples including linear electrodynamics, acoustics, elasticity and magnetohydrodynamics are demonstrated.

  6. Tecolote: An Object-Oriented Framework for Hydrodynamics Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Holian, K.S.; Ankeny, L.A.; Clancy, S.P.; Hall, J.H.; Marshall, J.C.; McNamara, G.R.; Painter, J.W.; Zander, M.E.

    1997-12-31

    Tecolote is an object-oriented framework for both developing and accessing a variety of hydrodynamics models. It is written in C++, and is in turn built on another framework - Parallel Object-Oriented Methods and Applications (POOMA). The Tecolote framework is meant to provide modules (or building blocks) to put together hydrodynamics applications that can encompass a wide variety of physics models, numerical solution options, and underlying data storage schemes, although with only those modules activated at runtime that are necessary. Tecolote has been designed to separate physics from computer science, as much as humanly possible. The POOMA framework provides fields in C++ to Tecolote that are analogous to Fortran-9O-like arrays in the way that they are used, but that, in addition, have underlying load balancing, message passing, and a special scheme for compact data storage. The POOMA fields can also have unique meshes associated with them that can allow more options than just the normal regularly-spaced Cartesian mesh. They also permit one-, two, and three-dimensions to be immediately accessible to the code developer and code user.

  7. A unified framework of unsupervised subjective optimized bit allocation for multiple video object coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhenzhong; Han, Junwei; Ngan, King Ngi

    2005-10-01

    MPEG-4 treats a scene as a composition of several objects or so-called video object planes (VOPs) that are separately encoded and decoded. Such a flexible video coding framework makes it possible to code different video object with different distortion scale. It is necessary to analyze the priority of the video objects according to its semantic importance, intrinsic properties and psycho-visual characteristics such that the bit budget can be distributed properly to video objects to improve the perceptual quality of the compressed video. This paper aims to provide an automatic video object priority definition method based on object-level visual attention model and further propose an optimization framework for video object bit allocation. One significant contribution of this work is that the human visual system characteristics are incorporated into the video coding optimization process. Another advantage is that the priority of the video object can be obtained automatically instead of fixing weighting factors before encoding or relying on the user interactivity. To evaluate the performance of the proposed approach, we compare it with traditional verification model bit allocation and the optimal multiple video object bit allocation algorithms. Comparing with traditional bit allocation algorithms, the objective quality of the object with higher priority is significantly improved under this framework. These results demonstrate the usefulness of this unsupervised subjective quality lifting framework.

  8. Toward Objectivity in Faculty Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, H. W.

    2008-01-01

    The productivity of faculty members often figures prominently in annual evaluations, post-tenure reviews, and decisions about tenure, promotion, merit pay, release time, awards, and other kinds of recognition. Yet the procedures and instruments that institutions use to assess productivity and merit vary, leaving little that unifies the evaluation…

  9. Evaluation of Frameworks for HSCT Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, Ramki

    1998-01-01

    This report is an evaluation of engineering frameworks that could be used to augment, supplement, or replace the existing FIDO 3.5 (Framework for Interdisciplinary Design and Optimization Version 3.5) framework. The report begins with the motivation for this effort, followed by a description of an "ideal" multidisciplinary design and optimization (MDO) framework. The discussion then turns to how each candidate framework stacks up against this ideal. This report ends with recommendations as to the "best" frameworks that should be down-selected for detailed review.

  10. Overture: An Object-Oriented Framework for Overlapping Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W.D.

    2002-04-04

    The Overture framework is an object-oriented environment for solving partial differential equations on over-lapping grids. We describe some of the tools in Overture that can be used to generate grids and solve partial differential equations (PDEs). Overture contains a collection of C++ classes that can be used to write PDE solvers either at a high level or at a lower level for efficiency. There are also a number of tools provided with Overture that can be used with no programming effort. These tools include capabilities to: repair computer-aided-design (CAD) geometries and build global surface triangulations; generate surface and volume grids with hyperbolic grid generation; generate composite overlapping grids; generate hybrid (unstructured) grids; and solve particular PDEs such as the incompressible and compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  11. An Object Oriented Framework for Customizable Physics Education Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, Hürol

    2007-04-01

    The learning improvements resulting from employing computers in physics education may be insufficient to convince many instructors to follow the trend leading to learner-centered education models. The instructors who are not willing to invest time and resources to create their own educational software will be able to contribute to the digital learning environment of future if they can easily produce interactive simulations accompanied by their own explanations. Software developers should design according to the needs of the instructors in order to help more students to benefit from the educational potential of computers. This paper describes how the capabilities of object-oriented languages can be utilized to produce customizable educational applets that can reach across language barriers and can be modified without writing additional code. The methods outlined here forms the framework of an ongoing programming project intended to help instructors create interactive educational materials with still graphics and animations.

  12. Faunus: An object oriented framework for molecular simulation

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Mikael; Trulsson, Martin; Persson, Björn

    2008-01-01

    Background We present a C++ class library for Monte Carlo simulation of molecular systems, including proteins in solution. The design is generic and highly modular, enabling multiple developers to easily implement additional features. The statistical mechanical methods are documented by extensive use of code comments that – subsequently – are collected to automatically build a web-based manual. Results We show how an object oriented design can be used to create an intuitively appealing coding framework for molecular simulation. This is exemplified in a minimalistic C++ program that can calculate protein protonation states. We further discuss performance issues related to high level coding abstraction. Conclusion C++ and the Standard Template Library (STL) provide a high-performance platform for generic molecular modeling. Automatic generation of code documentation from inline comments has proven particularly useful in that no separate manual needs to be maintained. PMID:18241331

  13. A Synoptic Framework for School Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Charles A.

    1978-01-01

    A broad-based conceptual scheme, termed the Synoptic Evaluation Framework (SEF), provides school program evaluation services. The SEF allows for the design and conduct of a range of program evaluation studies within the school context, and has been used as a basis for training doctoral school psychology students in program evaluation. (Author)

  14. Frameworks for evaluating health research capacity strengthening: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Health research capacity strengthening (RCS) projects are often complex and hard to evaluate. In order to inform health RCS evaluation efforts, we aimed to describe and compare key characteristics of existing health RCS evaluation frameworks: their process of development, purpose, target users, structure, content and coverage of important evaluation issues. A secondary objective was to explore what use had been made of the ESSENCE framework, which attempts to address one such issue: harmonising the evaluation requirements of different funders. Methods We identified and analysed health RCS evaluation frameworks published by seven funding agencies between 2004 and 2012, using a mixed methods approach involving structured qualitative analyses of documents, a stakeholder survey and consultations with key contacts in health RCS funding agencies. Results The frameworks were intended for use predominantly by the organisations themselves, and most were oriented primarily towards funders’ internal organisational performance requirements. The frameworks made limited reference to theories that specifically concern RCS. Generic devices, such as logical frameworks, were typically used to document activities, outputs and outcomes, but with little emphasis on exploring underlying assumptions or contextual constraints. Usage of the ESSENCE framework appeared limited. Conclusions We believe that there is scope for improving frameworks through the incorporation of more accessible information about how to do evaluation in practice; greater involvement of stakeholders, following evaluation capacity building principles; greater emphasis on explaining underlying rationales of frameworks; and structuring frameworks so that they separate generic and project-specific aspects of health RCS evaluation. The third and fourth of these improvements might assist harmonisation. PMID:24330628

  15. The MEPPP Framework: A Framework for Monitoring and Evaluating Participatory Planning Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassenforder, Emeline; Pittock, Jamie; Barreteau, Olivier; Daniell, Katherine Anne; Ferrand, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating participatory processes, participatory planning processes especially, can be challenging. Due to their complexity, these processes require a specific approach to evaluation. This paper proposes a framework for evaluating projects that have adopted a participatory planning approach: the monitoring and evaluation of participatory planning processes (MEPPP) framework. The MEPPP framework is applied to one case study, a participatory planning process in the Rwenzori region in Uganda. We suggest that this example can serve as a guideline for researchers and practitioners to set up the monitoring and evaluation of their participatory planning process of interest by following six main phases: (1) description of the case, (2) clarification of the M&E viewpoint(s) and definition of the M&E objective(s), (3) identification of the context, process and outputs/outcomes analytical variables, (4) development of the M&E methods and data collection, (5) data analysis, and (6) sharing of the M&E results. Results of the application of the MEPPP framework in Uganda demonstrate the ability of the framework to tackle the complexity of participatory planning processes. Strengths and limitations of the MEPPP framework are also discussed.

  16. Tecolote: An object-oriented framework for physics development

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, J.; Ankeny, L.; Clancy, S.

    1998-12-31

    The authors describe a C++ physics development environment, called the Tecolote Framework, which allows model developers to work more efficiently and accurately. This Framework contains a variety of meshes, operators, and parallel fields, as well as an input/output (I/O) subsystem and graphics capabilities. Model developers can inherit Tecolote`s generic model interface and use the Framework`s high-level field and operator components to write parallel physics equations. New Tecolote models are easily registered with the Framework, and they can be built and called directly from the input file, which greatly expedites model installation. In the process of developing an extensible and robust framework, they have found appealing solutions to some of the serious problems they encounter when parallelizing and extending the older codes. They also discuss memory and performance issues for a large hydrodynamics application built in this Framework.

  17. Evaluating the Learning in Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Robin H.; Knaack, Liesel

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive review of the literature on the evaluation of learning objects revealed a number of problem areas, including emphasizing technology ahead of learning, an absence of reliability and validity estimates, over-reliance on informal descriptive data, a tendency to embrace general impressions of learning objects rather than focusing on…

  18. REEF: Retainable Evaluator Execution Framework

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Markus; Chen, Yingda; Chun, Byung-Gon; Condie, Tyson; Curino, Carlo; Douglas, Chris; Lee, Yunseong; Majestro, Tony; Malkhi, Dahlia; Matusevych, Sergiy; Myers, Brandon; Narayanamurthy, Shravan; Ramakrishnan, Raghu; Rao, Sriram; Sears, Russell; Sezgin, Beysim; Wang, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Resource Managers like Apache YARN have emerged as a critical layer in the cloud computing system stack, but the developer abstractions for leasing cluster resources and instantiating application logic are very low-level. This flexibility comes at a high cost in terms of developer effort, as each application must repeatedly tackle the same challenges (e.g., fault-tolerance, task scheduling and coordination) and re-implement common mechanisms (e.g., caching, bulk-data transfers). This paper presents REEF, a development framework that provides a control-plane for scheduling and coordinating task-level (data-plane) work on cluster resources obtained from a Resource Manager. REEF provides mechanisms that facilitate resource re-use for data caching, and state management abstractions that greatly ease the development of elastic data processing work-flows on cloud platforms that support a Resource Manager service. REEF is being used to develop several commercial offerings such as the Azure Stream Analytics service. Furthermore, we demonstrate REEF development of a distributed shell application, a machine learning algorithm, and a port of the CORFU [4] system. REEF is also currently an Apache Incubator project that has attracted contributors from several instititutions.1 PMID:26819493

  19. FOSE: a framework for open science evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Alexander; van den Bosch, Jasper J. F.

    2012-01-01

    Pre-publication peer review of scientific literature in its present state suffers from a lack of evaluation validity and transparency to the community. Inspired by social networks, we propose a framework for the open exchange of post-publication evaluation to complement the current system. We first formulate a number of necessary conditions that should be met by any design dedicated to perform open scientific evaluation. To introduce our framework, we provide a basic data standard and communication protocol. We argue for the superiority of a provider-independent framework, over a few isolated implementations, which allows the collection and analysis of open evaluation content across a wide range of diverse providers like scientific journals, research institutions, social networks, publishers websites, and more. Furthermore, we describe how its technical implementation can be achieved by using existing web standards and technology. Finally, we illustrate this with a set of examples and discuss further potential. PMID:22754522

  20. Framework for Evaluation of Equity Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bexley, Emmaline; Harris, Kerri-Lee; James, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The Framework for Evaluation of Equity Initiatives has been prepared to support the Go8 Equity Strategy. Its purpose is to assist Group of Eight (Go8) universities to evaluate the effectiveness of their equity initiatives and interventions in the context of federal policies and the distinctive missions and responsibilities of the individual Go8…

  1. A Generalized Decision Framework Using Multi-objective Optimization for Water Resources Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basdekas, L.; Stewart, N.; Triana, E.

    2013-12-01

    Colorado Springs Utilities (CSU) is currently engaged in an Integrated Water Resource Plan (IWRP) to address the complex planning scenarios, across multiple time scales, currently faced by CSU. The modeling framework developed for the IWRP uses a flexible data-centered Decision Support System (DSS) with a MODSIM-based modeling system to represent the operation of the current CSU raw water system coupled with a state-of-the-art multi-objective optimization algorithm. Three basic components are required for the framework, which can be implemented for planning horizons ranging from seasonal to interdecadal. First, a water resources system model is required that is capable of reasonable system simulation to resolve performance metrics at the appropriate temporal and spatial scales of interest. The system model should be an existing simulation model, or one developed during the planning process with stakeholders, so that 'buy-in' has already been achieved. Second, a hydrologic scenario tool(s) capable of generating a range of plausible inflows for the planning period of interest is required. This may include paleo informed or climate change informed sequences. Third, a multi-objective optimization model that can be wrapped around the system simulation model is required. The new generation of multi-objective optimization models do not require parameterization which greatly reduces problem complexity. Bridging the gap between research and practice will be evident as we use a case study from CSU's planning process to demonstrate this framework with specific competing water management objectives. Careful formulation of objective functions, choice of decision variables, and system constraints will be discussed. Rather than treating results as theoretically Pareto optimal in a planning process, we use the powerful multi-objective optimization models as tools to more efficiently and effectively move out of the inferior decision space. The use of this framework will help CSU

  2. Proposal of a Framework for Internet Based Licensing of Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Osvaldo A.; Ramos, Fernando M. S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a proposal of a framework whose main objective is to manage the delivery and rendering of learning objects in a digital rights controlled environment. The framework is based on a digital licensing scheme that requires each learning object to have the proper license in order to be rendered by a trusted player. A conceptual model…

  3. Object-oriented data analysis framework for neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Jiro; Nakatani, Takeshi; Ohhara, Takashi; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Yonemura, Masao; Morishima, Takahiro; Aoyagi, Tetsuo; Manabe, Atsushi; Otomo, Toshiya

    2009-02-01

    Materials and Life Science Facility (MLF) of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) is one of the facilities that provided the highest intensity pulsed neutron and muon beams. The MLF computing environment design group organizes the computing environments of MLF and instruments. It is important that the computing environment is provided by the facility side, because meta-data formats, the analysis functions and also data analysis strategy should be shared among many instruments in MLF. The C++ class library, named Manyo-lib, is a framework software for developing data reduction and analysis softwares. The framework is composed of the class library for data reduction and analysis operators, network distributed data processing modules and data containers. The class library is wrapped by the Python interface created by SWIG. All classes of the framework can be called from Python language, and Manyo-lib will be cooperated with the data acquisition and data-visualization components through the MLF-platform, a user interface unified in MLF, which is working on Python language. Raw data in the event-data format obtained by data acquisition systems will be converted into histogram format data on Manyo-lib in high performance, and data reductions and analysis are performed with user-application software developed based on Manyo-lib. We enforce standardization of data containers with Manyo-lib, and many additional fundamental data containers in Manyo-lib have been designed and developed. Experimental and analysis data in the data containers can be converted into NeXus file. Manyo-lib is the standard framework for developing analysis software in MLF, and prototypes of data-analysis softwares for each instrument are being developed by the instrument teams.

  4. Adapting the Mathematical Task Framework to Design Online Didactic Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Janet; Bezuk, Nadine; Aguilar, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Designing didactic objects involves imagining how students can conceive of specific mathematical topics and then imagining what types of classroom discussions could support these mental constructions. This study investigated whether it was possible to design Java applets that might serve as didactic objects to support online learning where…

  5. Toward Advancing Nano-Object Count Metrology: A Best Practice Framework

    PubMed Central

    Boyko, Volodymyr; Meyers, Greg; Voetz, Matthias; Wohlleben, Wendel

    2013-01-01

    Background: A movement among international agencies and policy makers to classify industrial materials by their number content of sub–100-nm particles could have broad implications for the development of sustainable nanotechnologies. Objectives: Here we highlight current particle size metrology challenges faced by the chemical industry due to these emerging number percent content thresholds, provide a suggested best-practice framework for nano-object identification, and identify research needs as a path forward. Discussion: Harmonized methods for identifying nanomaterials by size and count for many real-world samples do not currently exist. Although particle size remains the sole discriminating factor for classifying a material as “nano,” inconsistencies in size metrology will continue to confound policy and decision making. Moreover, there are concerns that the casting of a wide net with still-unproven metrology methods may stifle the development and judicious implementation of sustainable nanotechnologies. Based on the current state of the art, we propose a tiered approach for evaluating materials. To enable future risk-based refinements of these emerging definitions, we recommend that this framework also be considered in environmental and human health research involving the implications of nanomaterials. Conclusion: Substantial scientific scrutiny is needed in the area of nanomaterial metrology to establish best practices and to develop suitable methods before implementing definitions based solely on number percent nano-object content for regulatory purposes. Strong cooperation between industry, academia, and research institutions will be required to fully develop and implement detailed frameworks for nanomaterial identification with respect to emerging count-based metrics. Citation: Brown SC, Boyko V, Meyers G, Voetz M, Wohlleben W. 2013. Toward advancing nano-object count metrology: a best practice framework. Environ Health Perspect 121:1282–1291;

  6. PICO: An Object-Oriented Framework for Branch and Bound

    SciTech Connect

    ECKSTEIN,JONATHAN; HART,WILLIAM E.; PHILLIPS,CYNTHIA A.

    2000-12-01

    This report describes the design of PICO, a C++ framework for implementing general parallel branch-and-bound algorithms. The PICO framework provides a mechanism for the efficient implementation of a wide range of branch-and-bound methods on an equally wide range of parallel computing platforms. We first discuss the basic architecture of PICO, including the application class hierarchy and the package's serial and parallel layers. We next describe the design of the serial layer, and its central notion of manipulating subproblem states. Then, we discuss the design of the parallel layer, which includes flexible processor clustering and communication rates, various load balancing mechanisms, and a non-preemptive task scheduler running on each processor. We describe the application of the package to a branch-and-bound method for mixed integer programming, along with computational results on the ASCI Red massively parallel computer. Finally we describe the application of the branch-and-bound mixed-integer programming code to a resource constrained project scheduling problem for Pantex.

  7. Optimal object association in theDempster-Shafer framework.

    PubMed

    Denoux, Thierry; El Zoghby, Nicole; Cherfaoui, Véronique; Jouglet, Antoine

    2014-12-01

    Object association is a crucial step in target tracking and data fusion applications. This task can be formalized as the search for a relation between two sets (e.g., a sets of tracks and a set of observations) in such a way that each object in one set is matched with at most one object in the other set. In this paper, this problem is tackled using the formalism of belief functions. Evidence about the possible association of each object pair, usually obtained by comparing the values of some attributes, is modeled by a Dempster-Shafer mass function defined in the frame of all possible relations. These mass functions are combined using Dempster's rule, and the relation with maximal plausibility is found by solving an integer linear programming problem. This problem is shown to be equivalent to a linear assignment problem, which can be solved in polynomial time using, for example, the Hungarian algorithm. This method is demonstrated using simulated and real data. The 3-D extension of this problem (with three object sets) is also formalized and is shown to be NP-Hard. PMID:24801831

  8. A Framework for Assessing Computer Competence: Defining Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assessment of Educational Progress, Princeton, NJ.

    Computer skills objectives have been developed for the 1986 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). These items will be administered to a large number of American students aged 9, 13, and 17 in grades 3, 7, and 11. For this first national assessment of computer skills, it was necessary to consider the existing expertise of school…

  9. Evaluation framework for carotid bifurcation lumen segmentation and stenosis grading.

    PubMed

    Hameeteman, K; Zuluaga, M A; Freiman, M; Joskowicz, L; Cuisenaire, O; Valencia, L Flórez; Gülsün, M A; Krissian, K; Mille, J; Wong, W C K; Orkisz, M; Tek, H; Hoyos, M Hernández; Benmansour, F; Chung, A C S; Rozie, S; van Gils, M; van den Borne, L; Sosna, J; Berman, P; Cohen, N; Douek, P C; Sánchez, I; Aissat, M; Schaap, M; Metz, C T; Krestin, G P; van der Lugt, A; Niessen, W J; van Walsum, T

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes an evaluation framework that allows a standardized and objective quantitative comparison of carotid artery lumen segmentation and stenosis grading algorithms. We describe the data repository comprising 56 multi-center, multi-vendor CTA datasets, their acquisition, the creation of the reference standard and the evaluation measures. This framework has been introduced at the MICCAI 2009 workshop 3D Segmentation in the Clinic: A Grand Challenge III, and we compare the results of eight teams that participated. These results show that automated segmentation of the vessel lumen is possible with a precision that is comparable to manual annotation. The framework is open for new submissions through the website http://cls2009.bigr.nl. PMID:21419689

  10. Adapting the mathematical task framework to design online didactic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Janet; Bezuk, Nadine; Aguilar, Karen

    2011-06-01

    Designing didactic objects involves imagining how students can conceive of specific mathematical topics and then imagining what types of classroom discussions could support these mental constructions. This study investigated whether it was possible to design Java applets that might serve as didactic objects to support online learning where 'discussions' are broadly defined as the conversations students have with themselves as they interact with the dynamic mathematical representations on the screen. Eighty-four pre-service elementary teachers enrolled in hybrid mathematics courses were asked to interact with a series of applets designed to support their understanding of qualitative graphing. The results of the surveys indicate that various design features of the applets did in fact cause perturbations and opportunities for resolutions that enabled the users to 'discuss' their learning by reflecting on their in-class discussions and online activities. The discussion includes four design features for guiding future applet creation.

  11. Depth perception in the framework of General Object Constancy.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jiehui; Petrov, Yury

    2013-01-01

    Size constancy is a well-known example of perceptual stabilization accounting for the effect of viewing distance on retinal image size. In a recent study (Qian & Petrov, 2012), we demonstrated a similar stabilization mechanism for contrast perception and suggested that the brain accounts for effects of perceived distance on various other object features in a similar way, a hypothesis that we called General Object Constancy. Here we report a new illusion of depth further supporting this hypothesis. Pairs of disks moved across the screen in a pattern of radial optic flow. A pair comprised a small black disk floating in front of a large white disk, creating the percept of a pencil tip viewed head on. As these "pencils" moved away, they appeared to grow in contrast, in diameter, and also appeared to be getting "sharper." The contrast and size illusions replicated our previous findings, while the depth gradient (sharpness) illusion revealed a depth constancy phenomenon. We discovered that depth and size constancies were related, e.g., the two illusions were strongly correlated across observers. Whereas the illusory diameter increase could not be canceled by any degree of depth modulation, decreasing the diameter of the "pencils" during optic flow motion (thus increasing their disparity gradient) weakened the illusory depth gradient increase. This paradoxical result, as well as our other results, is explained by the General Object Constancy model: Besides using the same scaling factor to account for size, contrast, and depth variations with distance, the brain uses the apparent object size to additionally scale contrast and depth signals. PMID:24023274

  12. Community health program evaluation using accreditation as a framework.

    PubMed

    Severance, Janet Hahn

    2009-03-01

    Increasingly, health system leaders seek to determine whether community health interventions make a difference to individuals in the community. However, community health improvement is difficult to measure, and health system staff may not be familiar with evaluation research methods. Health care organizations can improve their evaluation efforts relatively easily by building on what they already know: the Joint Commission accreditation process. By using accreditation as a framework, community health evaluation may be seen as more approachable when viewed through that lens. This article provides a framework for practical approaches to program planning, evaluation, and sustainability. Joint Commission accreditation functions (chapters) are similar to health program goals. Standards are similar to program objectives. Elements of performance are similar to activities or methods. Scoring comparisons are similar to measures. PMID:19116229

  13. A framework for qualitative reasoning about solid objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, E.

    1987-01-01

    Predicting the behavior of a qualitatively described system of solid objects requires a combination of geometrical, temporal, and physical reasoning. Methods based upon formulating and solving differential equations are not adequate for robust prediction, since the behavior of a system over extended time may be much simpler than its behavior over local time. A first-order logic, in which one can state simple physical problems and derive their solution deductively, without recourse to solving the differential equations, is discussed. This logic is substantially more expressive and powerful than any previous AI representational system in this domain.

  14. A Framework for Realistic Modeling and Display of Object Surface Appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Benjamin A.

    With advances in screen and video hardware technology, the type of content presented on computers has progressed from text and simple shapes to high-resolution photographs, photorealistic renderings, and high-definition video. At the same time, there have been significant advances in the area of content capture, with the development of devices and methods for creating rich digital representations of real-world objects. Unlike photo or video capture, which provide a fixed record of the light in a scene, these new technologies provide information on the underlying properties of the objects, allowing their appearance to be simulated for novel lighting and viewing conditions. These capabilities provide an opportunity to continue the computer display progression, from high-fidelity image presentations to digital surrogates that recreate the experience of directly viewing objects in the real world. In this dissertation, a framework was developed for representing objects with complex color, gloss, and texture properties and displaying them onscreen to appear as if they are part of the real-world environment. At its core, there is a conceptual shift from a traditional image-based display workflow to an object-based one. Instead of presenting the stored patterns of light from a scene, the objective is to reproduce the appearance attributes of a stored object by simulating its dynamic patterns of light for the real viewing and lighting geometry. This is accomplished using a computational approach where the physical light sources are modeled and the observer and display screen are actively tracked. Surface colors are calculated for the real spectral composition of the illumination with a custom multispectral rendering pipeline. In a set of experiments, the accuracy of color and gloss reproduction was evaluated by measuring the screen directly with a spectroradiometer. Gloss reproduction was assessed by comparing gonio measurements of the screen output to measurements of the

  15. Evaluating risk propensity using an objective instrument.

    PubMed

    Sueiro Abad, Manuel J; Sánchez-Iglesias, Ivan; Moncayo de Tella, Alejandra

    2011-05-01

    Risk propensity is the stable tendency to choose options with a lower probability of success, but greater rewards. Its evaluation has been approached from various perspectives: from self-report questionnaires to objective tests. Self-report questionnaires have often been criticized due to interference from voluntary and involuntary biases, in addition to their lack of predictive value. Objective tests, on the other hand, require resources that make them difficult to administer to large samples. This paper presents an easy-to-administer, 30-item risk propensity test. Each item is itself an objective test describing a hypothetical situation in which the subject must choose between three options, each with a different gain function but equivalent in expected value. To assess its psychometric fit, the questionnaire was administered to 222 subjects, and we performed a test of its reliability as well as exploratory factor analysis. The results supported a three-factor model of risk (Sports and Gambling, Long-term Plans, and Loss Management). After making the necessary adjustments and incorporating a global factor of risk propensity, confirmatory factor analysis was done, revealing that the data exhibited adequate goodness of fit. PMID:21568196

  16. A Framework for the Objective Assessment of Registration Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Simonetti, Flavio; Foroni, Roberto Israel

    2014-01-01

    Validation and accuracy assessment are the main bottlenecks preventing the adoption of image processing algorithms in the clinical practice. In the classical approach, a posteriori analysis is performed through objective metrics. In this work, a different approach based on Petri nets is proposed. The basic idea consists in predicting the accuracy of a given pipeline based on the identification and characterization of the sources of inaccuracy. The concept is demonstrated on a case study: intrasubject rigid and affine registration of magnetic resonance images. Both synthetic and real data are considered. While synthetic data allow the benchmarking of the performance with respect to the ground truth, real data enable to assess the robustness of the methodology in real contexts as well as to determine the suitability of the use of synthetic data in the training phase. Results revealed a higher correlation and a lower dispersion among the metrics for simulated data, while the opposite trend was observed for pathologic ones. Results show that the proposed model not only provides a good prediction performance but also leads to the optimization of the end-to-end chain in terms of accuracy and robustness, setting the ground for its generalization to different and more complex scenarios. PMID:24659997

  17. Objective evaluation of generic drug information.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Hisashi; Kamei, Miwako; Koshimizu, Toshimasa; Shiragami, Makoto

    2004-06-01

    Pharmacists active in health care venues need to be able to evaluate generic drugs in terms of effectiveness, safety, and economy to ensure that they are used appropriately. As part of the ongoing study of these factors, we carried out an objective evaluation of information provided for generics. A minimum of 20 commercially available products was considered for each pharmaceutical ingredient. The information subjected to evaluation consisted of the text of drug package inserts and information noted on interview forms. Using our own criteria for evaluating drug information, we attempted to quantify the amounts of information provided. Then, based on the numerical values obtained, we calculated information quantities with reference to drug prices to study the relationship between prices and available information for original drugs and their later-developed, generic equivalents. A total of 14 different pharmaceutical ingredients (327 product items) were considered, with the information quantity for generics amounting to 27.9+/-17.8-46.3+/-21.4% (Mean+/-S.D.) that for the original drugs. Examined on the basis of individual pharmaceutical companies, the corresponding ratio came to 15.1+/-7.8-62.4+/-6.4% (Mean+/-S.D.). For generics, the relationship between drug price (expressed against a value of 1.0 for original drugs) and information quantity (Qua(i)) came to 0.79+/-0.46-1.90+/-0.79% (Mean+/-S.D.). These results clearly point to the importance of evaluating information quantity for generic drugs on a maker-by-maker basis. PMID:15170069

  18. An evaluation framework for comparing geocoding systems

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Geocoding, the process of converting textual information describing a location into one or more digital geographic representations, is a routine task performed at large organizations and government agencies across the globe. In a health context, this task is often a fundamental first step performed prior to all operations that take place in a spatially-based health study. As such, the quality of the geocoding system used within these agencies is of paramount concern to the agency (the producer) and researchers or policy-makers who wish to use these data (consumers). However, geocoding systems are continually evolving with new products coming on the market continuously. Agencies must develop and use criteria across a number axes when faced with decisions about building, buying, or maintaining any particular geocoding systems. To date, published criteria have focused on one or more aspects of geocode quality without taking a holistic view of a geocoding system’s role within a large organization. The primary purpose of this study is to develop and test an evaluation framework to assist a large organization in determining which geocoding systems will meet its operational needs. Methods A geocoding platform evaluation framework is derived through an examination of prior literature on geocoding accuracy. The framework developed extends commonly used geocoding metrics to take into account the specific concerns of large organizations for which geocoding is a fundamental operational capability tightly-knit into its core mission of processing health data records. A case study is performed to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of five geocoding platforms currently available in the Australian geospatial marketplace. Results The evaluation framework developed in this research is proven successful in differentiating between key capabilities of geocoding systems that are important in the context of a large organization with significant investments in geocoding

  19. An evaluation framework for participatory modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, T.; Inman, A.; Chilvers, J.

    2012-04-01

    Strong arguments for participatory modelling in hydrology can be made on substantive, instrumental and normative grounds. These arguments have led to increasingly diverse groups of stakeholders (here anyone affecting or affected by an issue) getting involved in hydrological research and the management of water resources. In fact, participation has become a requirement of many research grants, programs, plans and policies. However, evidence of beneficial outcomes of participation as suggested by the arguments is difficult to generate and therefore rare. This is because outcomes are diverse, distributed, often tacit, and take time to emerge. In this paper we develop an evaluation framework for participatory modelling focussed on learning outcomes. Learning encompasses many of the potential benefits of participation, such as better models through diversity of knowledge and scrutiny, stakeholder empowerment, greater trust in models and ownership of subsequent decisions, individual moral development, reflexivity, relationships, social capital, institutional change, resilience and sustainability. Based on the theories of experiential, transformative and social learning, complemented by practitioner experience our framework examines if, when and how learning has occurred. Special emphasis is placed on the role of models as learning catalysts. We map the distribution of learning between stakeholders, scientists (as a subgroup of stakeholders) and models. And we analyse what type of learning has occurred: instrumental learning (broadly cognitive enhancement) and/or communicative learning (change in interpreting meanings, intentions and values associated with actions and activities; group dynamics). We demonstrate how our framework can be translated into a questionnaire-based survey conducted with stakeholders and scientists at key stages of the participatory process, and show preliminary insights from applying the framework within a rural pollution management situation in

  20. Borg: an auto-adaptive many-objective evolutionary computing framework.

    PubMed

    Hadka, David; Reed, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces the Borg multi-objective evolutionary algorithm (MOEA) for many-objective, multimodal optimization. The Borg MOEA combines ε-dominance, a measure of convergence speed named ε-progress, randomized restarts, and auto-adaptive multioperator recombination into a unified optimization framework. A comparative study on 33 instances of 18 test problems from the DTLZ, WFG, and CEC 2009 test suites demonstrates Borg meets or exceeds six state of the art MOEAs on the majority of the tested problems. The performance for each test problem is evaluated using a 1,000 point Latin hypercube sampling of each algorithm's feasible parameterization space. The statistical performance of every sampled MOEA parameterization is evaluated using 50 replicate random seed trials. The Borg MOEA is not a single algorithm; instead it represents a class of algorithms whose operators are adaptively selected based on the problem. The adaptive discovery of key operators is of particular importance for benchmarking how variation operators enhance search for complex many-objective problems. PMID:22385134

  1. PEAPOL (Program Evaluation at the Performance Objective Level) Outside Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auvil, Mary S.

    In evaluating this pilot project, which developed a computer system for assessing student progress and cost effectiveness as related to achievement of performance objectives, interviews were conducted with project participants, including project staff, school administrators, and the auto shop instructors. Project documents were reviewed and a…

  2. Spectrum of Objectivity-Credibility in Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Unhai R.; And Others

    Evaluation roles used in the Department of Research and Development in the Cincinnati Public Schools are identified and described. These include: project evaluator, local-school evaluator, independent program evaluator, external evaluator and external auditors. The merits of each evaluation role will be discussed as to its relationship with…

  3. Report on objective ride quality evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wambold, J. C.; Park, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    The correlation of absorbed power as an objective ride measure to the subjective evaluation for the bus data was investigated. For some individual bus rides the correlations were poor, but when a sufficient number of rides was used to give reasonable sample base, an excellent correlation was obtained. The following logarithmical function was derived: S = 1.7245 1n (39.6849 AP), where S = one subjective rating of the ride; and AP = the absorbed power in watts. A six-degree-of-freedom method developed for aircraft data was completed. Preliminary correlation of absorbed power with ISO standards further enhances the bus ride and absorbed power correlation numbers since the AP's obtained are of the same order of magnitude for both correlations. While it would then appear that one could just use ISO standards, there is no way to add the effect of three degrees of freedom. The absorbed power provides a method of adding the effects due to the three major directions plus the pitch and roll.

  4. Objective evaluation of cutaneous thermal sensivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanbeaumont, W.

    1972-01-01

    The possibility of obtaining reliable and objective quantitative responses was investigated under conditions where only temperature changes in localized cutaneous areas evoked measurable changes in remote sudomotor activity. Both male and female subjects were studied to evaluate sex difference in thermal sensitivity. The results discussed include: sweat rate responses to contralateral cooling, comparison of sweat rate responses between men and women to contralateral cooling, influence of the menstrual cycle on the sweat rate responses to contralateral cooling, comparison of threshold of sweating responses between men and women, and correlation of latency to threshold for whole body sweating. It is concluded that the quantitative aspects of the reflex response is affected by both the density and activation of receptors as well as the rate of heat loss; men responded 8-10% more frequently than women to thermode cooling, the magnitude of responses being greater for men; and women responded 7-9% more frequently to thermode cooling on day 1 of menstruation, as compared to day 15.

  5. ROSE: The Design of a General Tool for the Independent Optimization of Object-Oriented Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, K.; Philip, B.; Quinlan, D.

    1999-05-18

    ROSE represents a programmable preprocessor for the highly aggressive optimization of C++ object-oriented frameworks. A fundamental feature of ROSE is that it preserves the semantics, the implicit meaning, of the object-oriented framework's abstractions throughout the optimization process, permitting the framework's abstractions to be recognized and optimizations to capitalize upon the added value of the framework's true meaning. In contrast, a C++ compiler only sees the semantics of the C++ language and thus is severely limited in what optimizations it can introduce. The use of the semantics of the framework's abstractions avoids program analysis that would be incapable of recapturing the framework's full semantics from those of the C++ language implementation of the application or framework. Just as no level of program analysis within the C++ compiler would not be expected to recognize the use of adaptive mesh refinement and introduce optimizations based upon such information. Since ROSE is programmable, additional specialized program analysis is possible which then compliments the semantics of the framework's abstractions. Enabling an optimization mechanism to use the high level semantics of the framework's abstractions together with a programmable level of program analysis (e.g. dependence analysis), at the level of the framework's abstractions, allows for the design of high performance object-oriented frameworks with uniquely tailored sophisticated optimizations far beyond the limits of contemporary serial F0RTRAN 77, C or C++ language compiler technology. In short, faster, more highly aggressive optimizations are possible. The resulting optimizations are literally driven by the framework's definition of its abstractions. Since the abstractions within a framework are of third party design the optimizations are similarly of third party design, specifically independent of the compiler and the applications that use the framework. The interface to ROSE is

  6. Cryptographic framework for document-objects resulting from multiparty collaborative transactions.

    PubMed

    Goh, A

    2000-01-01

    Multiparty transactional frameworks--i.e. Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) or Health Level (HL) 7--often result in composite documents which can be accurately modelled using hyperlinked document-objects. The structural complexity arising from multiauthor involvement and transaction-specific sequencing would be poorly handled by conventional digital signature schemes based on a single evaluation of a one-way hash function and asymmetric cryptography. In this paper we outline the generation of structure-specific authentication hash-trees for the the authentication of transactional document-objects, followed by asymmetric signature generation on the hash-tree value. Server-side multi-client signature verification would probably constitute the single most compute-intensive task, hence the motivation for our usage of the Rabin signature protocol which results in significantly reduced verification workloads compared to the more commonly applied Rivest-Shamir-Adleman (RSA) protocol. Data privacy is handled via symmetric encryption of message traffic using session-specific keys obtained through key-negotiation mechanisms based on discrete-logarithm cryptography. Individual client-to-server channels can be secured using a double key-pair variation of Diffie-Hellman (DH) key negotiation, usage of which also enables bidirectional node authentication. The reciprocal server-to-client multicast channel is secured through Burmester-Desmedt (BD) key-negotiation which enjoys significant advantages over the usual multiparty extensions to the DH protocol. The implementation of hash-tree signatures and bi/multidirectional key negotiation results in a comprehensive cryptographic framework for multiparty document-objects satisfying both authentication and data privacy requirements. PMID:11187485

  7. A Multi-Component Model for Assessing Learning Objects: The Learning Object Evaluation Metric (LOEM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Robin H.; Knaack, Liesel

    2008-01-01

    While discussion of the criteria needed to assess learning objects has been extensive, a formal, systematic model for evaluation has yet to be thoroughly tested. The purpose of the following study was to develop and assess a multi-component model for evaluating learning objects. The Learning Object Evaluation Metric (LOEM) was developed from a…

  8. A Framework for the Flexible Content Packaging of Learning Objects and Learning Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukasiak, Jason; Agostinho, Shirley; Burnett, Ian; Drury, Gerrard; Goodes, Jason; Bennett, Sue; Lockyer, Lori; Harper, Barry

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a platform-independent method for packaging learning objects and learning designs. The method, entitled a Smart Learning Design Framework, is based on the MPEG-21 standard, and uses IEEE Learning Object Metadata (LOM) to provide bibliographic, technical, and pedagogical descriptors for the retrieval and description of learning…

  9. Adult Roles & Functions. Objective Based Evaluation System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia State Vocational Curriculum Lab., Cedar Lakes.

    This book of objective-based test items is designed to be used with the Adult Roles and Functions curriculum for a non-laboratory home economic course for grades eleven and twelve. It contains item banks for each cognitive objective in the curriculum. In addition, there is a form for the table of specifications to be developed for each unit. This…

  10. Objectives, Evaluation, and the Improvement of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Lorin W.

    2005-01-01

    For five years, from 1995 until 2000, a group of eight educators and researchers met twice annually in Syracuse, NY, for the purpose of revising Bloom's Taxonomy. Based in part on the structure of educational objectives, in part on advances in cognitive psychology, and in part on numerous other attempts to classify educational objectives that were…

  11. Design of a Model Execution Framework: Repetitive Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (ROSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Justin S.; Briggs, Jeffery L.

    2008-01-01

    The ROSE framework was designed to facilitate complex system analyses. It completely divorces the model execution process from the model itself. By doing so ROSE frees the modeler to develop a library of standard modeling processes such as Design of Experiments, optimizers, parameter studies, and sensitivity studies which can then be applied to any of their available models. The ROSE framework accomplishes this by means of a well defined API and object structure. Both the API and object structure are presented here with enough detail to implement ROSE in any object-oriented language or modeling tool.

  12. An efficient two-objective automatic SAR image segmentation framework using artificial immune system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dongdong; Niu, Ruican; Fei, Rong; Jiang, Qiaoyong; Li, Hongye; Cao, Zijian

    2015-12-01

    Here, an efficient multi-objective automatic segmentation framework (MASF) is formulated and applied to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image unsupervised classification. In the framework, three important issues are presented: 1) two reasonable image preprocessing techniques, including spatial filtering and watershed operator, are discussed at the initial stage of the framework; 2)then, an efficient immune multi-objective optimization algorithm with uniform clone, adaptive selection by online nondominated solutions, and dynamic deletion in diversity maintenance is proposed; 3 two very simple, but very efficient conflicting clustering validity indices are incorporated into the framework and simultaneously optimized. Two simulated SAR data and two complicated real images are used to quantitatively validate its effectiveness. In addition, four other state-of-the-art image segmentation methods are employed for comparison.

  13. A Framework for Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA) based on geographic ontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, H. Y.; Li, H. T.; Yan, L.; Lu, X. J.

    2015-06-01

    GEOBIA (Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis) is not only a hot topic of current remote sensing and geographical research. It is believed to be a paradigm in remote sensing and GIScience. The lack of a systematic approach designed to conceptualize and formalize the class definitions makes GEOBIA a highly subjective and difficult method to reproduce. This paper aims to put forward a framework for GEOBIA based on geographic ontology theory, which could implement "Geographic entities - Image objects - Geographic objects" true reappearance. It consists of three steps, first, geographical entities are described by geographic ontology, second, semantic network model is built based on OWL(ontology web language), at last, geographical objects are classified with decision rule or other classifiers. A case study of farmland ontology was conducted for describing the framework. The strength of this framework is that it provides interpretation strategies and global framework for GEOBIA with the property of objective, overall, universal, universality, etc., which avoids inconsistencies caused by different experts' experience and provides an objective model for mage analysis.

  14. A Systematic Evaluation of Learning Objects for Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Robin

    2007-01-01

    Empirical research evaluating the effectiveness of learning objects is noticeably absent. No formal research has been done on the use of learning objects in secondary schools. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of learning objects by high school students. The evaluation metric used to assess benefits and quality of learning objects…

  15. Evaluation in a Management by Objectives System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goddu, Roland

    Management and supervision in a management by objectives system do not focus on the quality or efficiency of a list of activities. Rather, the manager and supervisor validate progress in reaching agreed outcomes. The implementation of a management and supervision by results approach requires (a) agreement on a statement of mission; (b) agreement…

  16. A framework for evaluation of technology transfer programs. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The objective of this volume is to describe a framework with which DOE can develop a program specific methodology to evaluate it`s technology transfer efforts. This approach could also be applied to an integrated private sector technology transfer organization. Several benefits will be realized from the application of this work. While the immediate effect will be to assist program managers in evaluating and improving program performance, the ultimate benefits will accrue to the producing industry, the states, and the nation in the form of sustained or increased domestic oil production. This benefit depends also, of course, on the effectiveness of the technology being transferred. The managers of the Technology Transfer program, and the larger federal oil and gas R&D programs, will be provided with a means to design and assess the effectiveness of program efforts as they are developed, tested and performed. The framework allows deficiencies in critical aspects of the program to be quickly identified, allowing for timely corrections and improvements. The actual process of developing the evaluation also gives the staff of the Oil R&D Program or Technology Transfer subprogram the opportunity to become oriented to the overall program goals. The structure and focus imposed by the evaluation paradigm will guide program staff in selecting activities which are consistent with achieving the goals of the overall R&D program.

  17. An Evaluation of the Effects of Experimenter Control of Objects on Individuals' Engagement in Object Stereotypy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stangeland, Lindsay A.; Smith, Dean P.; Rapp, John T.

    2012-01-01

    In two experiments, the authors evaluated the extent to which (a) individuals preferred engaging in object stereotypy versus observing an experimenter while the experimenter engaged in object stereotypy and (b) an experimenter's engagement in object stereotypy decreased the participants' engagement in object stereotypy. Results of Experiment 1…

  18. Quantile equivalence to evaluate compliance with habitat management objectives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cade, Brian S.; Johnson, Pamela R.

    2011-01-01

    Equivalence estimated with linear quantile regression was used to evaluate compliance with habitat management objectives at Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge based on monitoring data collected in upland (5,781 ha; n = 511 transects) and riparian and meadow (2,856 ha, n = 389 transects) habitats from 2005 to 2008. Quantiles were used because the management objectives specified proportions of the habitat area that needed to comply with vegetation criteria. The linear model was used to obtain estimates that were averaged across 4 y. The equivalence testing framework allowed us to interpret confidence intervals for estimated proportions with respect to intervals of vegetative criteria (equivalence regions) in either a liberal, benefit-of-doubt or conservative, fail-safe approach associated with minimizing alternative risks. Simple Boolean conditional arguments were used to combine the quantile equivalence results for individual vegetation components into a joint statement for the multivariable management objectives. For example, management objective 2A required at least 809 ha of upland habitat with a shrub composition ≥0.70 sagebrush (Artemisia spp.), 20–30% canopy cover of sagebrush ≥25 cm in height, ≥20% canopy cover of grasses, and ≥10% canopy cover of forbs on average over 4 y. Shrub composition and canopy cover of grass each were readily met on >3,000 ha under either conservative or liberal interpretations of sampling variability. However, there were only 809–1,214 ha (conservative to liberal) with ≥10% forb canopy cover and 405–1,098 ha with 20–30%canopy cover of sagebrush ≥25 cm in height. Only 91–180 ha of uplands simultaneously met criteria for all four components, primarily because canopy cover of sagebrush and forbs was inversely related when considered at the spatial scale (30 m) of a sample transect. We demonstrate how the quantile equivalence analyses also can help refine the numerical specification of habitat objectives and explore

  19. ORCHESTRA: an object-oriented framework for implementing chemical equilibrium models.

    PubMed

    Meeussen, Johannes C L

    2003-03-15

    This work presents a new object-oriented structure for chemical equilibrium calculations that is used in the modeling framework ORCHESTRA (Objects Representing CHEmical Speciation and TRAnsport). In contrast to standard chemical equilibrium algorithms, such as MINEQL, MINTEQ2A, PHREEQC, and ECOSAT, model equations are not hard-coded in the source code, but instead all equations are defined in text format and read by the ORCHESTRA calculation kernel at run time. This makes model definitions easily accessible and extendible by users. Furthermore, it results in a very compact and efficient calculation kernel that is easy to use as a submodel within mass transport or kinetic models. Finally, the object-oriented structure of the chemical model definitions makes it possible to implement a new object-oriented framework for implementing chemical models. This framework consists of three basic object types, entities, reactions, and phases, that form the building blocks from which other chemical models are composed. The hierarchical approach ensures consistent and compact model definitions and is illustrated here by discussing the implementation of a number of commonly used chemical models such as aqueous complexation, activity correction, precipitation, surface complexation ion exchange, and several more sophisticated adsorption models including electrostatic interactions, NICA, and CD-MUSIC. The ORCHESTRA framework is electronically available from www.macaulay.ac.uk/ORCHESTRA. PMID:12680672

  20. A classification framework for content-based extraction of biomedical objects from hierarchically decomposed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thies, Christian; Schmidt Borreda, Marcel; Seidl, Thomas; Lehmann, Thomas M.

    2006-03-01

    Multiscale analysis provides a complete hierarchical partitioning of images into visually plausible regions. Each of them is formally characterized by a feature vector describing shape, texture and scale properties. Consequently, object extraction becomes a classification of the feature vectors. Classifiers are trained by relevant and irrelevant regions labeled as object and remaining partitions, respectively. A trained classifier is applicable to yet uncategorized partitionings to identify the corresponding region's classes. Such an approach enables retrieval of a-priori unknown objects within a point-and-click interface. In this work, the classification pipeline consists of a framework for data selection, feature selection, classifier training, classification of testing data, and evaluation. According to the no-free-lunch-theorem of supervised learning, the appropriate classification pipeline is determined experimentally. Therefore, each of the steps is varied by state-of-the-art methods and the respective classification quality is measured. Selection of training data from the ground truth is supported by bootstrapping, variance pooling, virtual training data, and cross validation. Feature selection for dimension reduction is performed by linear discriminant analysis, principal component analysis, and greedy selection. Competing classifiers are k-nearest-neighbor, Bayesian classifier, and the support vector machine. Quality is measured by precision and recall to reflect the retrieval task. A set of 105 hand radiographs from clinical routine serves as ground truth, where the metacarpal bones have been labeled manually. In total, 368 out of 39.017 regions are identified as relevant. In initial experiments for feature selection with the support vector machine have been obtained recall, precision and F-measure of 0.58, 0.67, and 0,62, respectively.

  1. A Framework for Including Family Health Spillovers in Economic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Janabi, Hareth; van Exel, Job; Brouwer, Werner; Coast, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Health care interventions may affect the health of patients’ family networks. It has been suggested that these “health spillovers” should be included in economic evaluation, but there is not a systematic method for doing this. In this article, we develop a framework for including health spillovers in economic evaluation. We focus on extra-welfarist economic evaluations where the objective is to maximize health benefits from a health care budget (the “health care perspective”). Our framework involves adapting the conventional cost-effectiveness decision rule to include 2 multiplier effects to internalize the spillover effects. These multiplier effects express the ratio of total health effects (for patients and their family networks) to patient health effects. One multiplier effect is specified for health benefit generated from providing a new intervention, one for health benefit displaced by funding this intervention. We show that using multiplier effects to internalize health spillovers could change the optimal funding decisions and generate additional health benefits to society. PMID:26377370

  2. A Framework Relating Outcomes Based Education and the Taxonomy of Educational Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrich, David

    2002-01-01

    Articulates a framework that can place the Outcomes Based Education movement in a historical context and by so doing advance its discourse on assessment. Reviews the development and structure of the Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (B. Bloom et al., 1956) and the structure of Student Outcome Statements in Western Australia and explores the…

  3. Objective evaluation of slanted edge charts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornung, Harvey (.

    2015-01-01

    Camera objective characterization methodologies are widely used in the digital camera industry. Most objective characterization systems rely on a chart with specific patterns, a software algorithm measures a degradation or difference between the captured image and the chart itself. The Spatial Frequency Response (SFR) method, which is part of the ISO 122331 standard, is now very commonly used in the imaging industry, it is a very convenient way to measure a camera Modulation transfer function (MTF). The SFR algorithm can measure frequencies beyond the Nyquist frequency thanks to super-resolution, so it does provide useful information on aliasing and can provide modulation for frequencies between half Nyquist and Nyquist on all color channels of a color sensor with a Bayer pattern. The measurement process relies on a chart that is simple to manufacture: a straight transition from a bright reflectance to a dark one (black and white for instance), while a sine chart requires handling precisely shades of gray which can also create all sort of issues with printers that rely on half-toning. However, no technology can create a perfect edge, so it is important to assess the quality of the chart and understand how it affects the accuracy of the measurement. In this article, I describe a protocol to characterize the MTF of a slanted edge chart, using a high-resolution flatbed scanner. The main idea is to use the RAW output of the scanner as a high-resolution micro-densitometer, since the signal is linear it is suitable to measure the chart MTF using the SFR algorithm. The scanner needs to be calibrated in sharpness: the scanner MTF is measured with a calibrated sine chart and inverted to compensate for the modulation loss from the scanner. Then the true chart MTF is computed. This article compares measured MTF from commercial charts and charts printed on printers, and also compares how of the contrast of the edge (using different shades of gray) can affect the chart MTF

  4. Rubrics for Evaluating Open Education Resource (OER) Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achieve, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    The rubrics presented in this report represent an evaluation system for objects found within Open Education Resources. An object could include images, applets, lessons, units, assessments and more. For the purpose of this evaluation, any component that can exist as a stand-alone qualifies as an object. The rubrics in this packet can be applied…

  5. Designing a Workable Framework for Evaluating Distance Language Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madyarov, Irshat

    2009-01-01

    Teaching foreign languages at distance is now becoming widespread; so is the need for evaluating online language courses. This article discusses an example of a framework that was applied to evaluate an online English as a foreign language (EFL) course at a Middle Eastern university. The development of the framework investigated areas of interest…

  6. Checklist for Evaluating SREB-SCORE Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2007

    2007-01-01

    This checklist is based on "Evaluation Criteria for SREB-SCORE Learning Objects" and is designed to help schools and colleges determine the quality and effectiveness of learning objects. It is suggested that each learning object be rated to the extent to which it meets the criteria and the SREB-SCORE definition of a learning object. A learning…

  7. BioInt: an integrative biological object-oriented application framework and interpreter.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sanket; Burra, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    BioInt, a biological programming application framework and interpreter, is an attempt to equip the researchers with seamless integration, efficient extraction and effortless analysis of the data from various biological databases and algorithms. Based on the type of biological data, algorithms and related functionalities, a biology-specific framework was developed which has nine modules. The modules are a compilation of numerous reusable BioADTs. This software ecosystem containing more than 450 biological objects underneath the interpreter makes it flexible, integrative and comprehensive. Similar to Python, BioInt eliminates the compilation and linking steps cutting the time significantly. The researcher can write the scripts using available BioADTs (following C++ syntax) and execute them interactively or use as a command line application. It has features that enable automation, extension of the framework with new/external BioADTs/libraries and deployment of complex work flows. PMID:26561020

  8. Toward Fortran 77 performance from object-oriented C++ scientific frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Bassetti, F.; Davis, K.; Quinlan, D.

    1998-12-01

    The use of object-oriented C{sup 2} frameworks has significantly simplified the development of numerous complex parallel scientific applications at Los Alamos National Laboratory and elsewhere. In spite of considerable use of, and commitment to, these frameworks, concerns about performance are nonetheless a significant issue; performance very close to that of FORTRAN 77 with message passing must be realized before the acceptance and use of such frameworks will be truly widespread. This paper identifies the primary source of inefficiency in using C or C{sup 2} for numerical codes with stencil- or stencil-like operations, and demonstrates two solutions--one portable, one not--to give genuine FORTRAN 77 performance.

  9. On the Evaluation of Higher-Order Science Instructional Objectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambleton, Ronald K.; Sheehan, Daniel S.

    1977-01-01

    Advocates the use of a free-sort categorization technique for evaluation of higher-order science instructional objectives. An explanation and demonstration of the use of the evaluation technique with 284 ninth-grade science students is provided. (CP)

  10. Addressing the real-time synchronization requirements of multimedia in an object-oriented framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papathomas, Michael; Blair, Gordon S.; Coulson, Geoff; Robin, Philippe

    1995-03-01

    It is now recognized that object-oriented techniques are well suited to the design and implementation of multimedia applications. Objects may be used to encapsulate the great variety of hardware devices used in such applications and to abstract over the details of low level interfaces. Furthermore, complex media processing algorithms, such as compression/decompression, may be encapsulated within objects making them easier to reuse across applications. Real-time synchronization is also an essential aspect of multimedia which arises from the inherently temporal properties of media such as audio and video. In this paper, we propose a set of programming abstractions and an approach to address real-time synchronization requirements in an object-oriented framework. In our approach, active objects encapsulate media processing activities. Real-time synchronization is maintained by reactive objects that control the execution of media processing objects. A key advantage of our approach is that it allows the separation of synchronization from the behavior of objects. Both objects and synchronization specifications may be reused in different contexts. In addition, the approach enables the specification of real-time synchronization in a high-level notation that has proven well suited to this task.

  11. Implementation of Two-Dimensional Polycrystalline Grains in Object Oriented Micromagnetic Framework

    PubMed Central

    Lau, J. W.; McMichael, R. D.; Donahue, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    In response to the growing need for a more accurate micromagnetic model to understand switching phenomenon in nanoscale magnets, we developed the capability to simulate two-dimensional polycrystalline grains using the Object Oriented Micromagnetic Framework (OOMMF). This addition allows users full flexibility in determining the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and axe in each grain as well as the inter- and intragranular exchange coupling strength. PMID:27504213

  12. An advanced object-based software framework for complex ecosystem modeling and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sydelko, P. J.; Dolph, J. E.; Majerus, K. A.; Taxon, T. N.

    2000-06-29

    Military land managers and decision makers face an ever increasing challenge to balance maximum flexibility for the mission with a diverse set of multiple land use, social, political, and economic goals. In addition, these goals encompass environmental requirements for maintaining ecosystem health and sustainability over the long term. Spatiotemporal modeling and simulation in support of adaptive ecosystem management can be best accomplished through a dynamic, integrated, and flexible approach that incorporates scientific and technological components into a comprehensive ecosystem modeling framework. The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) integrates ecological models and decision support techniques through a geographic information system (GIS)-based backbone. Recently, an object-oriented (OO) architectural framework was developed for IDLAMS (OO-IDLAMS). This OO-IDLAMS Prototype was built upon and leverages from the Dynamic Information Architecture System (DIAS) developed by Argonne National Laboratory. DIAS is an object-based architectural framework that affords a more integrated, dynamic, and flexible approach to comprehensive ecosystem modeling than was possible with the GIS-based integration approach of the original IDLAMS. The flexibility, dynamics, and interoperability demonstrated through this case study of an object-oriented approach have the potential to provide key technology solutions for many of the military's multiple-use goals and needs for integrated natural resource planning and ecosystem management.

  13. User's Manual for the Object User Interface (OUI): An Environmental Resource Modeling Framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markstrom, Steven L.; Koczot, Kathryn M.

    2008-01-01

    The Object User Interface is a computer application that provides a framework for coupling environmental-resource models and for managing associated temporal and spatial data. The Object User Interface is designed to be easily extensible to incorporate models and data interfaces defined by the user. Additionally, the Object User Interface is highly configurable through the use of a user-modifiable, text-based control file that is written in the eXtensible Markup Language. The Object User Interface user's manual provides (1) installation instructions, (2) an overview of the graphical user interface, (3) a description of the software tools, (4) a project example, and (5) specifications for user configuration and extension.

  14. Evaluating Learning Objects across Boundaries: The Semantics of Localization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jerry Z.; Nesbit, John C.; Richards, Griff

    2006-01-01

    Learning object repositories and evaluation tools have the potential to serve as sites for interaction among different cultures and communities of practice. This article outlines Web-based learning object evaluation tools that we have developed, describes our current efforts to extend those tools to a wider range of user communities, and considers…

  15. Mathematical model of bisubject qualimetric arbitrary objects evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, A.

    2016-04-01

    An analytical basis and the process of formalization of arbitrary objects bisubject qualimetric evaluation mathematical model information spaces are developed. The model is applicable in solving problems of control over both technical and socio-economic systems for objects evaluation using systems of parameters generated by different subjects taking into account their performance and priorities of decision-making.

  16. Contributions to Objective Measurement and Evaluation of Trainee Competency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moonan, William J.

    The purpose of this paper is to lay a basis for and discuss the components of a system, called COMET, designed to objectively measure and evaluate the competency of trainees in military training enterprises. COMET is an acronym for "Computerized Objective Measurement and Evaluation of Trainees." These goals will be accomplished by: (a) describing…

  17. Evaluating the Use of Learning Objects for Secondary School Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Robin; Knaack, Liesel

    2007-01-01

    A learning object is an interactive web-based tool that supports learning by enhancing, amplifying, and guiding the cognitive processes of a learner. To date, no formal research has been done on the use of learning objects in secondary school science classrooms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of learning objects developed for…

  18. A Framework for Outreach Evaluation Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raven, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Much importance is now placed upon the evaluation of outreach interventions by higher education institutions (HEIs). Accompanying this focus are requests that HEIs prepare evaluation plans. Yet, whilst some now have plans in place, others do not. One of the challenges for those preparing such documents is that official guidance is not prescriptive…

  19. An Ethical Framework for Evaluating Experimental Technology.

    PubMed

    van de Poel, Ibo

    2016-06-01

    How are we to appraise new technological developments that may bring revolutionary social changes? Currently this is often done by trying to predict or anticipate social consequences and to use these as a basis for moral and regulatory appraisal. Such an approach can, however, not deal with the uncertainties and unknowns that are inherent in social changes induced by technological development. An alternative approach is proposed that conceives of the introduction of new technologies into society as a social experiment. An ethical framework for the acceptability of such experiments is developed based on the bioethical principles for experiments with human subjects: non-maleficence, beneficence, respect for autonomy, and justice. This provides a handle for the moral and regulatory assessment of new technologies and their impact on society. PMID:26573302

  20. Multi-object segmentation framework using deformable models for medical imaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Namías, Rafael; D'Amato, Juan Pablo; Del Fresno, Mariana; Vénere, Marcelo; Pirró, Nicola; Bellemare, Marc-Emmanuel

    2016-08-01

    Segmenting structures of interest in medical images is an important step in different tasks such as visualization, quantitative analysis, simulation, and image-guided surgery, among several other clinical applications. Numerous segmentation methods have been developed in the past three decades for extraction of anatomical or functional structures on medical imaging. Deformable models, which include the active contour models or snakes, are among the most popular methods for image segmentation combining several desirable features such as inherent connectivity and smoothness. Even though different approaches have been proposed and significant work has been dedicated to the improvement of such algorithms, there are still challenging research directions as the simultaneous extraction of multiple objects and the integration of individual techniques. This paper presents a novel open-source framework called deformable model array (DMA) for the segmentation of multiple and complex structures of interest in different imaging modalities. While most active contour algorithms can extract one region at a time, DMA allows integrating several deformable models to deal with multiple segmentation scenarios. Moreover, it is possible to consider any existing explicit deformable model formulation and even to incorporate new active contour methods, allowing to select a suitable combination in different conditions. The framework also introduces a control module that coordinates the cooperative evolution of the snakes and is able to solve interaction issues toward the segmentation goal. Thus, DMA can implement complex object and multi-object segmentations in both 2D and 3D using the contextual information derived from the model interaction. These are important features for several medical image analysis tasks in which different but related objects need to be simultaneously extracted. Experimental results on both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging show that the proposed

  1. Decision analysis framework for evaluating CTBT seismic verification options

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, B.R.; Strait, R.S.; Younker, L.W.

    1986-09-01

    This report describes a decision analysis framework for evaluating seismic verification options for a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). In addition to providing policy makers with insights into the relative merits of different options, the framework is intended to assist in formulating and evaluating political decisions - such as responses to evidence of violations - and in setting research priorities related to the options. To provide these broad analytical capabilities to decision makers, the framework incorporates a wide variety of issues. These include seismic monitoring capabilities, evasion possibilities, evidence produced by seismic systems, US response to the evidence, the dependence between US and Soviet decision-making, and the relative values of possible outcomes to the US and the Soviet Union. An added benefit of the framework is its potential use to improve communication about these CTBT verification issues among US experts and decision makers. The framework has been implemented on a portable microcomputer to facilitate this communication through demonstration and rapid evaluation of alternative judgments and policy choices. The report presents the framework and its application in four parts. The first part describes the decision analysis framework and the types of analytical results produced. In the second part, the framework is used to evaluate representative seismic verification options. The third part describes the results of sensitivity analyses that determine the relative importance of the uncertainties or subjective judgments that influence the evaluation of the options. The fourth (and final) part summaries conclusions and presents implications of the sample analytical results for further research and for policy-making related to CTBT verification. The fourth section also describes the next steps in the development and use of the decision analysis framework.

  2. Evaluation Framework for Collaborative Educational Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsiatsos, Thrasyvoulos; Andreas, Konstantinidis; Pomportsis, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we will focus on a specific category of Collaborative Virtual Environments that aims to support Collaborative Learning. We call these environments Collaborative Educational Virtual Environments. Our aim is to analyze the evaluation process through the study of relevant bibliography and by doing so reveal the existing research gap…

  3. Framework for Evaluating Educational Systemic Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikegulu, T. Nelson

    This paper describes the implementation of the Holistic Systemic Evaluation (HSE), a component of an Education Systemic Initiative's strategic management. The HSE provides general guidance for the implementation and continual improvement of an Education Systemic Initiative Reform (ESIR). The implementation of the education system initiative plan:…

  4. Evaluation Framework for Dependable Mobile Learning Scenarios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensassi, Manel; Laroussi, Mona

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the dependability analysis is to predict inconsistencies and to reveal ambiguities and incompleteness in the designed learning scenario. Evaluation, in traditional learning design, is generally planned after the execution of the scenario. In mobile learning, this stage becomes too difficult and expensive to apply due to the complexity…

  5. Generalized multiple kernel framework for multiclass geospatial objects detection in high-resolution remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangjuan; Sun, Xian; Sun, Hao; Li, Yu; Wang, Hongqi

    2012-01-01

    Multiclass geospatial objects detection within complex environments is a challenging problem in remote-sensing areas. In this paper we propose a novel, generalized kernel-based learning framework for the purpose of enhanced object detection. There are two novel areas. (1) Multisource information, including shape, feature points, and appearance, was extracted to give a comprehensive representation of the objects. We improved a shape descriptor and introduced a two-level spatial pyramid to represent appearance, both global and local. Therefore, basis kernels were formed, one for each feature. (2) In order to illustrate the effect of each kind of feature on each pyramid level, a generalized and weighted combination method was first used to combine all of the levels and then the features. The weights and the classifier model are based on the support vector machine framework for obtaining balance between all basis kernels. This classifier was transformed into a powerful detector by using a sliding window. The reported results are for the detection on high-resolution remote-sensing images. This study demonstrates that the proposed generalized and weighted combination of kernels can yield better performance compared with traditional single-kernel classifier and other combination methods.

  6. More performance results and implementation of an object oriented track reconstruction model in different OO frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaines, Irwin; Qian, Sijin

    2001-08-01

    This is an update of the report about an Object Oriented (OO) track reconstruction model, which was presented in the previous AIHENP'99 at Crete, Greece. The OO model for the Kalman filtering method has been designed for high energy physics experiments at high luminosity hadron colliders. It has been coded in the C++ programming language and successfully implemented into a few different OO computing environments of the CMS and ATLAS experiments at the future Large Hadron Collider at CERN. We shall report: (1) more performance result: (2) implementing the OO model into the new SW OO framework "Athena" of ATLAS experiment and some upgrades of the OO model itself.

  7. Holistic Evaluation of ESL Compositions: Can It Be Validated Objectively?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homburg, Taco Justus

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between subjective evaluation and objective measures of ESL writing proficiency. Objective measures used in this study accounted for 84 percent of the variance of subjective grades assigned to a sample of compositions. Author suggests that training readers can be important to the reliability and the validity of the…

  8. Learning Objects and Virtual Learning Environments Technical Evaluation Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurilovas, Eugenijus; Dagiene, Valentina

    2009-01-01

    The main scientific problems investigated in this article deal with technical evaluation of quality attributes of the main components of e-Learning systems (referred here as DLEs--Digital Libraries of Educational Resources and Services), i.e., Learning Objects (LOs) and Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs). The main research object of the work is…

  9. A Computational Framework for Quantitative Evaluation of Movement during Rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yinpeng; Duff, Margaret; Lehrer, Nicole; Sundaram, Hari; He, Jiping; Wolf, Steven L.; Rikakis, Thanassis

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a novel generalized computational framework for quantitative kinematic evaluation of movement in a rehabilitation clinic setting. The framework integrates clinical knowledge and computational data-driven analysis together in a systematic manner. The framework provides three key benefits to rehabilitation: (a) the resulting continuous normalized measure allows the clinician to monitor movement quality on a fine scale and easily compare impairments across participants, (b) the framework reveals the effect of individual movement components on the composite movement performance helping the clinician decide the training foci, and (c) the evaluation runs in real-time, which allows the clinician to constantly track a patient's progress and make appropriate adaptations to the therapy protocol. The creation of such an evaluation is difficult because of the sparse amount of recorded clinical observations, the high dimensionality of movement and high variations in subject's performance. We address these issues by modeling the evaluation function as linear combination of multiple normalized kinematic attributes y = Σwiφi(xi) and estimating the attribute normalization function φi(ṡ) by integrating distributions of idealized movement and deviated movement. The weights wi are derived from a therapist's pair-wise comparison using a modified RankSVM algorithm. We have applied this framework to evaluate upper limb movement for stroke survivors with excellent results—the evaluation results are highly correlated to the therapist's observations.

  10. Quality in Learning Objects: Evaluating Compliance with Metadata Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, C. Christian; Segura, N. Alejandra; Campos, S. Pedro; Sánchez-Alonso, Salvador

    Ensuring a certain level of quality of learning objects used in e-learning is crucial to increase the chances of success of automated systems in recommending or finding these resources. This paper aims to present a proposal for implementation of a quality model for learning objects based on ISO 9126 international standard for the evaluation of software quality. Features indicators associated with the conformance sub-characteristic are defined. Some instruments for feature evaluation are advised, which allow collecting expert opinion on evaluation items. Other quality model features are evaluated using only the information from its metadata using semantic web technologies. Finally, we propose an ontology-based application that allows automatic evaluation of a quality feature. IEEE LOM metadata standard was used in experimentation, and the results shown that most of learning objects analyzed do not complain the standard.

  11. Static-dynamic multi-scale structural damage identification in a multi-objective framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Ricardo; Marin, Roberto; Ruiz, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    Although either static or dynamic measurements have been used for model updating in a damage identification procedure, when a generally valid and accurate model is sought, different types of measurements should be combined. While modal characteristics give information about the global response of structures, static measurements are more concerned with the local response. Their combination would allow considering different scale levels in the detection through the simultaneous optimization of several objectives. In this work, a damage identification methodology is presented which allows combining static and dynamic measurements within a model updating procedure posed in a multi-objective framework solved by using evolutionary algorithms. Unlike other global-local multi-stage procedures developed in the past, the proposed method is solved as a simplified one-stage procedure.

  12. The ventral visual pathway: An expanded neural framework for the processing of object quality

    PubMed Central

    Kravitz, Dwight J.; Saleem, Kadharbatcha S.; Baker, Chris I.; Ungerleider, Leslie G.; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2012-01-01

    Since the original characterization of the ventral visual pathway our knowledge of its neuroanatomy, functional properties, and extrinsic targets has grown considerably. Here we synthesize this recent evidence and propose that the ventral pathway is best understood as a recurrent occipitotemporal network containing neural representations of object quality both utilized and constrained by at least six distinct cortical and subcortical systems. Each system serves its own specialized behavioral, cognitive, or affective function, collectively providing the raison d’etre for the ventral visual pathway. This expanded framework contrasts with the depiction of the ventral visual pathway as a largely serial staged hierarchy that culminates in singular object representations for utilization mainly by ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and, more parsimoniously than this account, incorporates attentional, contextual, and feedback effects. PMID:23265839

  13. The ventral visual pathway: an expanded neural framework for the processing of object quality.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, Dwight J; Saleem, Kadharbatcha S; Baker, Chris I; Ungerleider, Leslie G; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2013-01-01

    Since the original characterization of the ventral visual pathway, our knowledge of its neuroanatomy, functional properties, and extrinsic targets has grown considerably. Here we synthesize this recent evidence and propose that the ventral pathway is best understood as a recurrent occipitotemporal network containing neural representations of object quality both utilized and constrained by at least six distinct cortical and subcortical systems. Each system serves its own specialized behavioral, cognitive, or affective function, collectively providing the raison d'être for the ventral visual pathway. This expanded framework contrasts with the depiction of the ventral visual pathway as a largely serial staged hierarchy culminating in singular object representations and more parsimoniously incorporates attentional, contextual, and feedback effects. PMID:23265839

  14. A New Object-Oriented MODFLOW Framework for Coupling Multiple Hydrologic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langevin, C.; Hughes, J. D.; Panday, S. M.; Banta, E. R.; Niswonger, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    MODFLOW is a popular open-source groundwater flow model distributed by the U.S. Geological Survey. For 30 years, the MODFLOW program has been widely used by academic researchers, private consultants, and government scientists to accurately, reliably, and efficiently simulate groundwater flow. With time, growing interest in surface and groundwater interactions, local refinement with nested and unstructured grids, karst groundwater flow, solute transport, and saltwater intrusion, has led to the development of numerous MODFLOW versions. Although these MODFLOW versions are often based on the core version (presently MODFLOW-2005), there are often incompatibilities that restrict their use with one another. In many cases, development of these alternative versions has been challenging due to the underlying MODFLOW structure, which was designed for simulation with a single groundwater flow model using a rectilinear grid. A new object-oriented framework is being developed for MODFLOW to provide a platform for supporting multiple models and multiple types of models within the same simulation. In the new design, any number of numerical models can be tightly coupled at the matrix level by adding them to the same numerical solution, or they can be iteratively coupled until there is convergence between them. Transfer of information between models is isolated to exchange objects, which allow models to be developed and used independently. For existing MODFLOW users, this means that the program can function in the same way it always has for a single groundwater flow model. Within this new framework, a regional-scale groundwater model may be coupled with multiple local-scale groundwater models. Or, a surface water flow model can be coupled to multiple groundwater flow models. The framework naturally allows for the simulation of solute transport. Presently, unstructured control-volume finite-difference models have been implemented in the framework for three-dimensional groundwater

  15. Change detection of built-up land: A framework of combining pixel-based detection and object-based recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Pengfeng; Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Dongguang; Yuan, Min; Feng, Xuezhi; Kelly, Maggi

    2016-09-01

    This study proposed a new framework that combines pixel-level change detection and object-level recognition to detect changes of built-up land from high-spatial resolution remote sensing images. First, an adaptive differencing method was designed to detect changes at the pixel level based on both spectral and textural features. Next, the changed pixels were subjected to a set of morphological operations to improve the completeness and to generate changed objects, achieving the transition of change detection from the pixel level to the object level. The changed objects were further recognised through the difference of morphological building index in two phases to indicate changed objects on built-up land. The transformation from changed pixels to changed objects makes the proposed framework distinct with both the pixel-based and the object-based change detection methods. Compared with the pixel-based methods, the proposed framework can improve the change detection capability through the transformation and successive recognition of objects. Compared with the object-based method, the proposed framework avoids the issue of multitemporal segmentation and can generate changed objects directly from changed pixels. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the transformation from changed pixels to changed objects and the successive object-based recognition on improving the detection accuracy, which justify the application potential of the proposed change detection framework.

  16. Framework for the Evaluation of an IT Project Portfolio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tai, W. T.

    2010-01-01

    The basis for evaluating projects in an organizational IT project portfolio includes complexity factors, arguments/criteria, and procedures, with various implications. The purpose of this research was to develop a conceptual framework for IT project proposal evaluation. The research involved using a heuristic roadmap and the mind-mapping method to…

  17. A Framework for Evaluation and Use of Automated Scoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, David M.; Xi, Xiaoming; Breyer, F. Jay

    2012-01-01

    A framework for evaluation and use of automated scoring of constructed-response tasks is provided that entails both evaluation of automated scoring as well as guidelines for implementation and maintenance in the context of constantly evolving technologies. Consideration of validity issues and challenges associated with automated scoring are…

  18. Long-term Science Data Curation Using a Digital Object Model and Open-Source Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, J.; Lenhardt, W.; Wilson, B. E.; Palanisamy, G.; Cook, R. B.

    2010-12-01

    Scientific digital content, including Earth Science observations and model output, has become more heterogeneous in format and more distributed across the Internet. In addition, data and metadata are becoming necessarily linked internally and externally on the Web. As a result, such content has become more difficult for providers to manage and preserve and for users to locate, understand, and consume. Specifically, it is increasingly harder to deliver relevant metadata and data processing lineage information along with the actual content consistently. Readme files, data quality information, production provenance, and other descriptive metadata are often separated in the storage level as well as in the data search and retrieval interfaces available to a user. Critical archival metadata, such as auditing trails and integrity checks, are often even more difficult for users to access, if they exist at all. We investigate the use of several open-source software frameworks to address these challenges. We use Fedora Commons Framework and its digital object abstraction as the repository, Drupal CMS as the user-interface, and the Islandora module as the connector from Drupal to Fedora Repository. With the digital object model, metadata of data description and data provenance can be associated with data content in a formal manner, so are external references and other arbitrary auxiliary information. Changes are formally audited on an object, and digital contents are versioned and have checksums automatically computed. Further, relationships among objects are formally expressed with RDF triples. Data replication, recovery, metadata export are supported with standard protocols, such as OAI-PMH. We provide a tentative comparative analysis of the chosen software stack with the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) reference model, along with our initial results with the existing terrestrial ecology data collections at NASA’s ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center for

  19. Extending the infoway benefits evaluation framework for health information systems.

    PubMed

    Lau, Francis

    2009-01-01

    A proposal is made that extends the current Canada Health Infoway Benefits Evaluation (BE) Framework for Health Information Systems (HIS) being deployed in Canada. The current BE framework takes a micro view of HIS quality, use and impact at the local level whereas the extended framework takes into account the broader socio-organizational and contextual aspects known as the meso and macro views of HIS deployment. The meso view addresses the people, organization, network and implementation dimensions. The macro view focuses on the contextual dimensions of technology standard, funding/incentive, legislation/policy and professional practice. Validation of this extended BE framework is being planned through a comparative review of recent HIS evaluation literature, a Delphi-consensus process with HIS experts and users, and multiple validation studies with recent HIS implementation projects in British Columbia. PMID:19380969

  20. POET (parallel object-oriented environment and toolkit) and frameworks for scientific distributed computing

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, R.; Cheung, A.

    1997-01-01

    Frameworks for parallel computing have recently become popular as a means for preserving parallel algorithms as reusable components. Frameworks for parallel computing in general, and POET in particular, focus on finding ways to orchestrate and facilitate cooperation between components that implement the parallel algorithms. Since performance is a key requirement for POET applications, CORBA or CORBA-like systems are eschewed for a SPMD message-passing architecture common to the world of distributed-parallel computing. Though the system is written in C++ for portability, the behavior of POET is more like a classical framework, such as Smalltalk. POET seeks to be a general platform for scientific parallel algorithm components which can be modified, linked, mixed and matched to a user`s specification. The purpose of this work is to identify a means for parallel code reuse and to make parallel computing more accessible to scientists whose expertise is outside the field of parallel computing. The POET framework provides two things: (1) an object model for parallel components that allows cooperation without being restrictive; (2) services that allow components to access and manage user data and message-passing facilities, etc. This work has evolved through application of a series of real distributed-parallel scientific problems. The paper focuses on what is required for parallel components to cooperate and at the same time remain ``black-boxes`` that users can drop into the frame without having to know the exquisite details of message-passing, data layout, etc. The paper walks through a specific example of a chemically reacting flow application. The example is implemented in POET and the authors identify component cooperation, usability and reusability in an anecdotal fashion.

  1. Web of Objects Based Ambient Assisted Living Framework for Emergency Psychiatric State Prediction.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Golam Rabiul; Abedin, Sarder Fakhrul; Al Ameen, Moshaddique; Hong, Choong Seon

    2016-01-01

    Ambient assisted living can facilitate optimum health and wellness by aiding physical, mental and social well-being. In this paper, patients' psychiatric symptoms are collected through lightweight biosensors and web-based psychiatric screening scales in a smart home environment and then analyzed through machine learning algorithms to provide ambient intelligence in a psychiatric emergency. The psychiatric states are modeled through a Hidden Markov Model (HMM), and the model parameters are estimated using a Viterbi path counting and scalable Stochastic Variational Inference (SVI)-based training algorithm. The most likely psychiatric state sequence of the corresponding observation sequence is determined, and an emergency psychiatric state is predicted through the proposed algorithm. Moreover, to enable personalized psychiatric emergency care, a service a web of objects-based framework is proposed for a smart-home environment. In this framework, the biosensor observations and the psychiatric rating scales are objectified and virtualized in the web space. Then, the web of objects of sensor observations and psychiatric rating scores are used to assess the dweller's mental health status and to predict an emergency psychiatric state. The proposed psychiatric state prediction algorithm reported 83.03 percent prediction accuracy in an empirical performance study. PMID:27608023

  2. An Object-Oriented Finite Element Framework for Multiphysics Phase Field Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R Tonks; Derek R Gaston; Paul C Millett; David Andrs; Paul Talbot

    2012-01-01

    The phase field approach is a powerful and popular method for modeling microstructure evolution. In this work, advanced numerical tools are used to create a phase field framework that facilitates rapid model development. This framework, called MARMOT, is based on Idaho National Laboratory's finite element Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment. In MARMOT, the system of phase field partial differential equations (PDEs) are solved simultaneously with PDEs describing additional physics, such as solid mechanics and heat conduction, using the Jacobian-Free Newton Krylov Method. An object-oriented architecture is created by taking advantage of commonalities in phase fields models to facilitate development of new models with very little written code. In addition, MARMOT provides access to mesh and time step adaptivity, reducing the cost for performing simulations with large disparities in both spatial and temporal scales. In this work, phase separation simulations are used to show the numerical performance of MARMOT. Deformation-induced grain growth and void growth simulations are included to demonstrate the muliphysics capability.

  3. Supervised Evaluation of Image Segmentation and Object Proposal Techniques.

    PubMed

    Pont-Tuset, Jordi; Marques, Ferran

    2016-07-01

    This paper tackles the supervised evaluation of image segmentation and object proposal algorithms. It surveys, structures, and deduplicates the measures used to compare both segmentation results and object proposals with a ground truth database; and proposes a new measure: the precision-recall for objects and parts. To compare the quality of these measures, eight state-of-the-art object proposal techniques are analyzed and two quantitative meta-measures involving nine state of the art segmentation methods are presented. The meta-measures consist in assuming some plausible hypotheses about the results and assessing how well each measure reflects these hypotheses. As a conclusion of the performed experiments, this paper proposes the tandem of precision-recall curves for boundaries and for objects-and-parts as the tool of choice for the supervised evaluation of image segmentation. We make the datasets and code of all the measures publicly available. PMID:26415155

  4. Framework for dynamic background modeling and shadow suppression for moving object segmentation in complex wavelet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Alok Kumar Singh; Srivastava, Rajeev

    2015-09-01

    Moving object segmentation using change detection in wavelet domain under continuous variations of lighting condition is a challenging problem in video surveillance systems. There are several methods proposed in the literature for change detection in wavelet domain for moving object segmentation having static backgrounds, but it has not been addressed effectively for dynamic background changes. The methods proposed in the literature suffer from various problems, such as ghostlike appearance, object shadows, and noise. To deal with these issues, a framework for dynamic background modeling and shadow suppression under rapidly changing illumination conditions for moving object segmentation in complex wavelet domain is proposed. The proposed method consists of eight steps applied on given video frames, which include wavelet decomposition of frame using complex wavelet transform; use of change detection on detail coefficients (LH, HL, and HH), use of improved Gaussian mixture-based dynamic background modeling on approximate coefficient (LL subband); cast shadow suppression; use of soft thresholding for noise removal; strong edge detection; inverse wavelet transformation for reconstruction; and finally using closing morphology operator. A comparative analysis of the proposed method is presented both qualitatively and quantitatively with other standard methods available in the literature for six datasets in terms of various performance measures. Experimental results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method.

  5. Quality framework proposal for Component Material Evaluation (CME) projects.

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Naomi G.; Arfman, John F.; Limary, Siviengxay

    2008-09-01

    This report proposes the first stage of a Quality Framework approach that can be used to evaluate and document Component Material Evaluation (CME) projects. The first stage of the Quality Framework defines two tools that will be used to evaluate a CME project. The first tool is used to decompose a CME project into its essential elements. These elements can then be evaluated for inherent quality by looking at the subelements that impact their level of quality maturity or rigor. Quality Readiness Levels (QRLs) are used to valuate project elements for inherent quality. The Framework provides guidance for the Principal Investigator (PI) and stakeholders for CME project prerequisites that help to ensure the proper level of confidence in the deliverable given its intended use. The Framework also Provides a roadmap that defined when and how the Framework tools should be applied. Use of these tools allow the Principal Investigator (PI) and stakeholders to understand what elements the project will use to execute the project, the inherent quality of the elements, which of those are critical to the project and why, and the risks associated to the project's elements.

  6. An object-based interaction framework for the operation of multiple field robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Henry Lee, II

    Today's field robots, such as the Sojourner Mars rover or the Predator unmanned aerial vehicle, work alone to accomplish dirty, dull, or dangerous missions. Plans for the next generation of robotic systems call for multiple field robots to conduct these missions cooperatively under the direction of a single operator. This research examines the role of the operator in multiple-robot missions and creates a human-robot interaction framework that supports this role---a vital step toward the successful deployment of these future robots. In a typical user-centered approach to the development of a human-robot interaction framework, the work practices of the robot operator would be observed, characterized, and integrated into the design. Unfortunately, there are no settings where one can study the operator of multiple robots at work because no such systems have been deployed. As an alternative, this research incorporated a surrogate setting that could be used to inform the early interaction design of multiple-robot systems. Police Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) teams were chosen as this setting, and an ethnographic study of SWAT commanders was conducted. Concepts from the interdisciplinary study of geographically distributed work, including common ground, shared mental models, and information sharing, were used to understand and characterize the ethnographic observations. Using lessons learned from the surrogate setting, an implementation of a new human-robot interaction framework was demonstrated on the Micro Autonomous Rovers (MAR) platform in the Aerospace Robotics Laboratory at Stanford University. This interaction framework, which is based on the sensing and manipulation of physical objects by the robots, was derived from the finding that references to physical objects serve as an essential communication and coordination tool for SWAT commanders. A human-computer interface that utilizes direct manipulation techniques and three-dimensional computer graphics was

  7. A framework for evaluating and utilizing medical terminology mappings.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Sajjad; Sun, Hong; Sinaci, Anil; Erturkmen, Gokce Banu Laleci; Mead, Charles; Gray, Alasdair J G; McGuinness, Deborah L; Prud'Hommeaux, Eric; Daniel, Christel; Forsberg, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    Use of medical terminologies and mappings across them are considered to be crucial pre-requisites for achieving interoperable eHealth applications. Built upon the outcomes of several research projects, we introduce a framework for evaluating and utilizing terminology mappings that offers a platform for i) performing various mappings strategies, ii) representing terminology mappings together with their provenance information, and iii) enabling terminology reasoning for inferring both new and erroneous mappings. We present the results of the introduced framework from SALUS project where we evaluated the quality of both existing and inferred terminology mappings among standard terminologies. PMID:25160255

  8. Integrated test evaluation decision framework for the Yucca Moutain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, B.R.; Hoxie, D.T.; Mattson, S.R.; Younker, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    An Integrated Test Evaluation decision framework and computer model were developed to help prioritize site-characterization tests at Yucca Mountain. An initial application of the framework evaluated studies described in the Department of Energy`s Site Characterization Plan. Priorities were based on the ability of tests to detect unsuitable site conditions, to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements, and to build confidence and support within the scientific community. Testing costs were also considered. Results showed priorities to depend most on estimates of the abilities of tests to build scientific confidence and least on estimates of the ability to detect unsuitable site conditions.

  9. A framework to support preceptors' evaluation and development of new nurses' clinical judgment.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Ann; Lasater, Kathie; Stock, Mary

    2016-07-01

    In today's complex, fast-paced world of hospital nursing, new graduate nurses do not have well-developed clinical judgment skills. Nurse preceptors are charged with bridging the gap between new graduates' learning in school and their autonomous practice as RNs. In one large, urban medical center in the U.S., a clinical judgment model and rubric were used as a framework for a new evaluation and orientation process. Preceptors of new graduate nurses who had used the former and new processes described their experiences using the framework. The findings indicated that having a structured framework provided objective ways to evaluate and help develop new graduate nurses' clinical judgment. It is hypothesized that academic clinical supervisors may find such a framework useful to prepare students for transition to practice. PMID:27428698

  10. Evaluating genomic tests from bench to bedside: a practical framework

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The development of genomic tests is one of the most significant technological advances in medical testing in recent decades. As these tests become increasingly available, so does the need for a pragmatic framework to evaluate the evidence base and evidence gaps in order to facilitate informed decision-making. In this article we describe such a framework that can provide a common language and benchmarks for different stakeholders of genomic testing. Each stakeholder can use this framework to specify their respective thresholds for decision-making, depending on their perspective and particular needs. This framework is applicable across a broad range of test applications and can be helpful in the application and communication of a regulatory science for genomic testing. Our framework builds upon existing work and incorporates principles familiar to researchers involved in medical testing (both diagnostic and prognostic) generally, as well as those involved in genomic testing. This framework is organized around six phases in the development of genomic tests beginning with marker identification and ending with population impact, and highlights the important knowledge gaps that need to be filled in establishing the clinical relevance of a test. Our framework focuses on the clinical appropriateness of the four main dimensions of test research questions (population/setting, intervention/index test, comparators/reference test, and outcomes) rather than prescribing a hierarchy of study designs that should be used to address each phase. PMID:23078403

  11. A framework for developing objective and measurable recovery criteria for threatened and endangered species.

    PubMed

    Himes Boor, Gina K

    2014-02-01

    For species listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Marine Fisheries Service are tasked with writing recovery plans that include "objective, measurable criteria" that define when a species is no longer at risk of extinction, but neither the act itself nor agency guidelines provide an explicit definition of objective, measurable criteria. Past reviews of recovery plans, including one published in 2012, show that many criteria lack quantitative metrics with clear biological rationale and are not meeting the measureable and objective mandate. I reviewed how objective, measureable criteria have been defined implicitly and explicitly in peer-reviewed literature, the ESA, other U.S. statutes, and legal decisions. Based on a synthesis of these sources, I propose the following 6 standards be used as minimum requirements for objective, measurable criteria: contain a quantitative threshold with calculable units, stipulate a timeframe over which they must be met, explicitly define the spatial extent or population to which they apply, specify a sampling procedure that includes sample size, specify a statistical significance level, and include justification by providing scientific evidence that the criteria define a species whose extinction risk has been reduced to the desired level. To meet these 6 standards, I suggest that recovery plans be explicitly guided by and organized around a population viability modeling framework even if data or agency resources are too limited to complete a viability model. When data and resources are available, recovery criteria can be developed from the population viability model results, but when data and resources are insufficient for model implementation, extinction risk thresholds can be used as criteria. A recovery-planning approach centered on viability modeling will also yield appropriately focused data-acquisition and monitoring plans and will facilitate a seamless transition

  12. A Global Hypothesis Verification Framework for 3D Object Recognition in Clutter.

    PubMed

    Aldoma, Aitor; Tombari, Federico; Stefano, Luigi Di; Vincze, Markus

    2016-07-01

    Pipelines to recognize 3D objects despite clutter and occlusions usually end up with a final verification stage whereby recognition hypotheses are validated or dismissed based on how well they explain sensor measurements. Unlike previous work, we propose a Global Hypothesis Verification (GHV) approach which regards all hypotheses jointly so as to account for mutual interactions. GHV provides a principled framework to tackle the complexity of our visual world by leveraging on a plurality of recognition paradigms and cues. Accordingly, we present a 3D object recognition pipeline deploying both global and local 3D features as well as shape and color. Thereby, and facilitated by the robustness of the verification process, diverse object hypotheses can be gathered and weak hypotheses need not be suppressed too early to trade sensitivity for specificity. Experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposal, which significantly improves over the state-of-art and attains ideal performance (no false negatives, no false positives) on three out of the six most relevant and challenging benchmark datasets. PMID:26485476

  13. Real-time framework for tensor-based image enhancement for object classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyganek, Bogusław; Smołka, Bogdan

    2016-04-01

    In many practical situations visual pattern recognition is vastly burdened by low quality of input images due to noise, geometrical distortions, as well as low quality of the acquisition hardware. However, although there are techniques of image quality improvements, such as nonlinear filtering, there are only few attempts reported in the literature that try to build these enhancement methods into a complete chain for multi-dimensional object recognition such as color video or hyperspectral images. In this work we propose a joint multilinear signal filtering and classification system built upon the multi-dimensional (tensor) approach. Tensor filtering is performed by the multi-dimensional input signal projection into the tensor subspace spanned by the best-rank tensor decomposition method. On the other hand, object classification is done by construction of the tensor sub-space constructed based on the Higher-Order Singular Value Decomposition method applied to the prototype patters. In the experiments we show that the proposed chain allows high object recognition accuracy in the real-time even from the poor quality prototypes. Even more importantly, the proposed framework allows unified classification of signals of any dimensions, such as color images or video sequences which are exemplars of 3D and 4D tensors, respectively. The paper discussed also some practical issues related to implementation of the key components of the proposed system.

  14. FACET: an object-oriented software framework for modeling complex social behavior patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Dolph, J. E.; Christiansen, J. H.; Sydelko, P. J.

    2000-06-30

    The Framework for Addressing Cooperative Extended Transactions (FACET) is a flexible, object-oriented architecture for implementing models of dynamic behavior of multiple individuals, or agents, in a simulation. These agents can be human (individuals or organizations) or animal and may exhibit any type of organized social behavior that can be logically articulated. FACET was developed by Argonne National Laboratory's (ANL) Decision and Information Sciences Division (DIS) out of the need to integrate societal processes into natural system simulations. The FACET architecture includes generic software components that provide the agents with various mechanisms for interaction, such as step sequencing and logic, resource management, conflict resolution, and preemptive event handling. FACET components provide a rich environment within which patterns of behavior can be captured in a highly expressive manner. Interactions among agents in FACET are represented by Course of Action (COA) object-based models. Each COA contains a directed graph of individual actions, which represents any known pattern of social behavior. The agents' behavior in a FACET COA, in turn, influences the natural landscape objects in a simulation (i.e., vegetation, soil, and habitat) by updating their states. The modular design of the FACET architecture provides the flexibility to create multiple and varied simulation scenarios by changing social behavior patterns, without disrupting the natural process models. This paper describes the FACET architecture and presents several examples of FACET models that have been developed to assess the effects of anthropogenic influences on the dynamics of the natural environment.

  15. Semantic framework for mapping object-oriented model to semantic web languages.

    PubMed

    Ježek, Petr; Mouček, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with and discusses two main approaches in building semantic structures for electrophysiological metadata. It is the use of conventional data structures, repositories, and programming languages on one hand and the use of formal representations of ontologies, known from knowledge representation, such as description logics or semantic web languages on the other hand. Although knowledge engineering offers languages supporting richer semantic means of expression and technological advanced approaches, conventional data structures and repositories are still popular among developers, administrators and users because of their simplicity, overall intelligibility, and lower demands on technical equipment. The choice of conventional data resources and repositories, however, raises the question of how and where to add semantics that cannot be naturally expressed using them. As one of the possible solutions, this semantics can be added into the structures of the programming language that accesses and processes the underlying data. To support this idea we introduced a software prototype that enables its users to add semantically richer expressions into a Java object-oriented code. This approach does not burden users with additional demands on programming environment since reflective Java annotations were used as an entry for these expressions. Moreover, additional semantics need not to be written by the programmer directly to the code, but it can be collected from non-programmers using a graphic user interface. The mapping that allows the transformation of the semantically enriched Java code into the Semantic Web language OWL was proposed and implemented in a library named the Semantic Framework. This approach was validated by the integration of the Semantic Framework in the EEG/ERP Portal and by the subsequent registration of the EEG/ERP Portal in the Neuroscience Information Framework. PMID:25762923

  16. Semantic framework for mapping object-oriented model to semantic web languages

    PubMed Central

    Ježek, Petr; Mouček, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with and discusses two main approaches in building semantic structures for electrophysiological metadata. It is the use of conventional data structures, repositories, and programming languages on one hand and the use of formal representations of ontologies, known from knowledge representation, such as description logics or semantic web languages on the other hand. Although knowledge engineering offers languages supporting richer semantic means of expression and technological advanced approaches, conventional data structures and repositories are still popular among developers, administrators and users because of their simplicity, overall intelligibility, and lower demands on technical equipment. The choice of conventional data resources and repositories, however, raises the question of how and where to add semantics that cannot be naturally expressed using them. As one of the possible solutions, this semantics can be added into the structures of the programming language that accesses and processes the underlying data. To support this idea we introduced a software prototype that enables its users to add semantically richer expressions into a Java object-oriented code. This approach does not burden users with additional demands on programming environment since reflective Java annotations were used as an entry for these expressions. Moreover, additional semantics need not to be written by the programmer directly to the code, but it can be collected from non-programmers using a graphic user interface. The mapping that allows the transformation of the semantically enriched Java code into the Semantic Web language OWL was proposed and implemented in a library named the Semantic Framework. This approach was validated by the integration of the Semantic Framework in the EEG/ERP Portal and by the subsequent registration of the EEG/ERP Portal in the Neuroscience Information Framework. PMID:25762923

  17. The effect of object-valence relations on automatic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Moran, Tal; Bar-Anan, Yoav

    2013-01-01

    Two experiments tested the effect of co-occurrence of a target object with affective stimuli on automatic evaluation of the target when the relation between the target and the affective stimuli suggests that they have opposite valence. Participants learned about targets that ended an unpleasant noise or a pleasant music. The valence of such targets is opposite to the valence of the affective stimuli that co-occur with them. Participants reported preference for targets that ended noise over targets that ended music, but automatic evaluation measures revealed the opposite preference. This suggests that automatic evaluation is sensitive to co-occurrence between stimuli more than to the relation between the stimuli, and that relational information has a stronger influence on deliberate evaluation than on automatic evaluation. These conclusions support the associative-propositional evaluation model (Gawronski & Bodenhausen, 2006), and add evidence regarding the sensitivity of the evaluative-conditioning effect to relational information. PMID:23072334

  18. Evaluation of the virtual learning object "Diagnostic reasoning in nursing applied to preterm newborns".

    PubMed

    Góes, Fernanda dos Santos Nogueira de; Fonseca, Luciana Mara Monti; Furtado, Maria Cândida de Carvalho; Leite, Adriana Moraes; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan

    2011-01-01

    The potential use of computer technology in teaching and continuous education for nursing motivated the development of this study to evaluate the virtual learning object, "Diagnostic Reasoning in Nursing Applied to Preterm Newborns" at an intermediate neonatal care unit. This descriptive study evaluates the appearance and content of the virtual object concerning aspects related to presentation, organization, usability and overall impression. Experts from the fields of computer technology (12) and nursing (31) participated in the evaluation process. Each sub-item of the instrument was assessed on a Likert scale and blank space was provided for comments/suggestions. All items were positively evaluated by over 80% of the experts, except for the 'informational density' criterion in the evaluation performed by computer technology experts. The developed product is considered adequate to be used for teaching for nursing students and in continuous education of diagnostic reasoning in the development of Nursing Diagnoses for preterm newborns, in the problem-posing pedagogical framework. PMID:21876941

  19. Development of an Object-Oriented Turbomachinery Analysis Code within the NPSS Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    During the preliminary or conceptual design phase of an aircraft engine, the turbomachinery designer has a need to estimate the effects of a large number of design parameters such as flow size, stage count, blade count, radial position, etc. on the weight and efficiency of a turbomachine. Computer codes are invariably used to perform this task however, such codes are often very old, written in outdated languages with arcane input files, and rarely adaptable to new architectures or unconventional layouts. Given the need to perform these kinds of preliminary design trades, a modern 2-D turbomachinery design and analysis code has been written using the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) framework. This paper discusses the development of the governing equations and the structure of the primary objects used in OTAC.

  20. MObIUS (Massive Object Integrated Universal Store): A Survey Toward a More General Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Sirp, J K; Brugger, S T

    2004-06-07

    General frameworks for distributed computing are slowly evolving out of Grid, Peer Architecture, and Web Services. The following results from a summer long survey into distributing computing practices have revealed three things. One, that Legion and Cactus-G have achieved the most in terms of providing an all-purpose application environment. Two, that extending a local programming environment to operate in a highly distributed fashion can be facilitated with toolkits like Globus. Three, that building a new system from the ground up could be realized, in part, by using some of the following components; an Object Oriented Database, Tapestry, JXTA, BOINC, Globus, component architecture technology, XML and related libraries, Condor-G, Proteus, and ParMETIS.

  1. Object-oriented fault tree evaluation program for quantitative analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson-Hine, F. A.; Koen, B. V.

    1988-01-01

    Object-oriented programming can be combined with fault free techniques to give a significantly improved environment for evaluating the safety and reliability of large complex systems for space missions. Deep knowledge about system components and interactions, available from reliability studies and other sources, can be described using objects that make up a knowledge base. This knowledge base can be interrogated throughout the design process, during system testing, and during operation, and can be easily modified to reflect design changes in order to maintain a consistent information source. An object-oriented environment for reliability assessment has been developed on a Texas Instrument (TI) Explorer LISP workstation. The program, which directly evaluates system fault trees, utilizes the object-oriented extension to LISP called Flavors that is available on the Explorer. The object representation of a fault tree facilitates the storage and retrieval of information associated with each event in the tree, including tree structural information and intermediate results obtained during the tree reduction process. Reliability data associated with each basic event are stored in the fault tree objects. The object-oriented environment on the Explorer also includes a graphical tree editor which was modified to display and edit the fault trees.

  2. Objective evaluation of oral presentation skills using Inertial Measurement Units.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Salvatore; Kong, Weisheng; Zhang, Di; Cosentino, Sarah; Manawadu, Udara; Kawasaki, Motoji; Thomas, George Thuruthel; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Tsumura, Ryosuke; Takanishi, Atsuo

    2015-01-01

    Oral presentation is considered as one of the most sought after skills by companies and professional organizations and program accreditation agencies. However, both learning process and evaluation of this skill are time demanding and complex tasks that need dedication and experience. Furthermore, the role of the instructor is fundamental during the presentation assessment. The instructor needs to consider several verbal and nonverbal communications cues sent in parallel and this kind of evaluation is often subjective. Even if there are oral presentation rubrics that try to standardize the evaluation, they are not an optimal solution because they do not provide the presenter a real-time feedback. In this paper, we describe a system for behavioral monitoring during presentations. We propose an ecological measurement system based on Inertial Measurement Units to evaluate objectively the presenter's posture through objective parameters. The system can be used to provide a real-time feedback to the presenters unobtrusively. PMID:26736952

  3. Development and application of a modular watershed-scale hydrologic model using the object modeling system: runoff response evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study reports on: 1) the integration of the European J2K model (an object-oriented, modular hydrological system for fully distributed simulation of the water balance in large watersheds) under the Object Modeling System (OMS) environmental modeling framework; and 2) evaluation of OMS-J2K perfor...

  4. The AgMIP Framework to Evaluate Agricultural Pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruane, Alex

    2015-01-01

    This talk will describe the community and research framework that AgMIP has built to enable evidence-based adaptation investment. We provide expertise on the ground and connect various disciplines in order to allow specific adaptations to be evaluated for their biophysical and socio-economic ramifications.

  5. Methodology Evaluation Framework for Component-Based System Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahanayake, Ajantha; Sol, Henk; Stojanovic, Zoran

    2003-01-01

    Explains component-based development (CBD) for distributed information systems and presents an evaluation framework, which highlights the extent to which a methodology is component oriented. Compares prominent CBD methods, discusses ways of modeling, and suggests that this is a first step towards a components-oriented systems development…

  6. Evaluating QR Code Case Studies Using a Mobile Learning Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rikala, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of Quick Response (QR) codes and mobile devices in the context of Finnish basic education. The feasibility was analyzed through a mobile learning framework, which includes the core characteristics of mobile learning. The study is part of a larger research where the aim is to develop a…

  7. ESDORA: A Data Archive Infrastructure Using Digital Object Model and Open Source Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Biva; Pan, Jerry; Green, Jim; Palanisamy, Giriprakash; Wei, Yaxing; Lenhardt, W.; Cook, R. Bob; Wilson, B. E.; Leggott, M.

    2011-12-01

    There are an array of challenges associated with preserving, managing, and using contemporary scientific data. Large volume, multiple formats and data services, and the lack of a coherent mechanism for metadata/data management are some of the common issues across data centers. It is often difficult to preserve the data history and lineage information, along with other descriptive metadata, hindering the true science value for the archived data products. In this project, we use digital object abstraction architecture as the information/knowledge framework to address these challenges. We have used the following open-source frameworks: Fedora-Commons Repository, Drupal Content Management System, Islandora (Drupal Module) and Apache Solr Search Engine. The system is an active archive infrastructure for Earth Science data resources, which include ingestion, archiving, distribution, and discovery functionalities. We use an ingestion workflow to ingest the data and metadata, where many different aspects of data descriptions (including structured and non-structured metadata) are reviewed. The data and metadata are published after reviewing multiple times. They are staged during the reviewing phase. Each digital object is encoded in XML for long-term preservation of the content and relations among the digital items. The software architecture provides a flexible, modularized framework for adding pluggable user-oriented functionality. Solr is used to enable word search as well as faceted search. A home grown spatial search module is plugged in to allow user to make a spatial selection in a map view. A RDF semantic store within the Fedora-Commons Repository is used for storing information on data lineage, dissemination services, and text-based metadata. We use the semantic notion "isViewerFor" to register internally or externally referenced URLs, which are rendered within the same web browser when possible. With appropriate mapping of content into digital objects, many

  8. Formative Evaluation of Lectures; An Application of Stake's Evaluation Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westphal, Walter W.; And Others

    The problem of major concern to the Physics Education Evaluation Project (P.E.E.P.) involved the improvement of university physics teaching and learning. The present paper describes instruments and procedures developed for systematic formative evaluation of physics lectures. The data was drawn from two sections of a first year university physics…

  9. Metadata Evaluation: The Road toward Meeting Our Objectives (SIG LAN)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuddy, Colleen

    2000-01-01

    Lists the three presentation titles that were part of this technical session on metadata evaluation, including "An Update on the Dublin Core" (Stuart Weibel; "Metadata Development Update" (Kathleen Burnett and Jeong-Mee Lee); and "Metadata Standards for Discovery and Retrieval of Learning Objects" (Stuart Sutton). (LRW)

  10. Object-Oriented Algorithm For Evaluation Of Fault Trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson-Hine, F. A.; Koen, B. V.

    1992-01-01

    Algorithm for direct evaluation of fault trees incorporates techniques of object-oriented programming. Reduces number of calls needed to solve trees with repeated events. Provides significantly improved software environment for such computations as quantitative analyses of safety and reliability of complicated systems of equipment (e.g., spacecraft or factories).

  11. Training Objectives, Transfer, Validation and Evaluation: A Sri Lankan Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickramasinghe, Vathsala M.

    2006-01-01

    Using a stratified random sample, this paper examines the training practices of setting objectives, transfer, validation and evaluation in Sri Lanka. The paper further sets out to compare those practices across local, foreign and joint-venture companies based on the assumption that there may be significant differences across companies of different…

  12. Methodology for Evaluating Quality and Reusability of Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurilovas, Eugenijus; Bireniene, Virginija; Serikoviene, Silvija

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to present the scientific model and several methods for the expert evaluation of quality of learning objects (LOs) paying especial attention to LOs reusability level. The activities of eQNet Quality Network for a European Learning Resource Exchange (LRE) aimed to improve reusability of LOs of European Schoolnet's LRE…

  13. Evaluating cloud retrieval algorithms with the ARM BBHRP framework

    SciTech Connect

    Mlawer,E.; Dunn,M.; Mlawer, E.; Shippert, T.; Troyan, D.; Johnson, K. L.; Miller, M. A.; Delamere, J.; Turner, D. D.; Jensen, M. P.; Flynn, C.; Shupe, M.; Comstock, J.; Long, C. N.; Clough, S. T.; Sivaraman, C.; Khaiyer, M.; Xie, S.; Rutan, D.; Minnis, P.

    2008-03-10

    Climate and weather prediction models require accurate calculations of vertical profiles of radiative heating. Although heating rate calculations cannot be directly validated due to the lack of corresponding observations, surface and top-of-atmosphere measurements can indirectly establish the quality of computed heating rates through validation of the calculated irradiances at the atmospheric boundaries. The ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) project, a collaboration of all the working groups in the program, was designed with these heating rate validations as a key objective. Given the large dependence of radiative heating rates on cloud properties, a critical component of BBHRP radiative closure analyses has been the evaluation of cloud microphysical retrieval algorithms. This evaluation is an important step in establishing the necessary confidence in the continuous profiles of computed radiative heating rates produced by BBHRP at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites that are needed for modeling studies. This poster details the continued effort to evaluate cloud property retrieval algorithms within the BBHRP framework, a key focus of the project this year. A requirement for the computation of accurate heating rate profiles is a robust cloud microphysical product that captures the occurrence, height, and phase of clouds above each ACRF site. Various approaches to retrieve the microphysical properties of liquid, ice, and mixed-phase clouds have been processed in BBHRP for the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) and the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. These retrieval methods span a range of assumptions concerning the parameterization of cloud location, particle density, size, shape, and involve different measurement sources. We will present the radiative closure results from several different retrieval approaches for the SGP site, including those from Microbase, the current 'reference' retrieval approach in BBHRP. At the NSA, mixed-phase clouds and

  14. Objective climate classification as a framework for assessing projected climate change in High Mountain Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsythe, Nathan; Fowler, Hayley; Pritchard, David; Blenkinsop, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    This study builds upon foundational work by Forsythe et al (2015, doi: 10.5194/esd-6-311-2015) which used principal component analysis (PCA) and k-means clustering to derive objective present climate classifications over High Mountain Asia and adjacent regions (60E to 100E, 20N to 40N) based on global meteorological reanalyses' estimates of the drivers of water resources availability and variability (precipitation, surface shortwave radiation, daily mean near surface air temperature and its diurnal range). This study refines Forsythe et al (2015) by testing the potential for spatially disaggregating coarse global reanalyses (and climate model outputs) using iterative classification and regression processing to achieve a 5km (0.05 decimal degree) horizontal resolution in order better capture the severe topographic range and gradients of the HMA domain. This spatial refinement should allow for better intercomparability of resultant classifications derived from datasets with different native resolutions. This intercomparability is critical because the second stage of this assesses climate change projections from a range regional climate model experiments - UK Hadley Centre RQUMP 25km South Asia perturbed physics ensemble, CORDEX South Asia domain and (pending dataset availability) NextData EC-Earth 15km high resolution HMA domain - using derived objective classifications as a framework for aggregation. By establishing sub-regional units of relative homogeneity, the objective classification approach allows twofold assessment of project future climate scenarios, i.e. change can be quantified not only as perturbation of key variables (e.g. precipitation, temperature, etc) but also in terms of the spatial descriptors (areal extent, surface elevation range and mean, latitudinal and longitudinal bounds) of the identified climate zones. It is expected that this novel approach, and in particular the very high target spatial resolution, will yield important insights into the

  15. An Evaluation of Database Solutions to Spatial Object Association

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V S; Kurc, T; Saltz, J; Abdulla, G M; Kohn, S; Matarazzo, C

    2008-06-24

    Object association is a common problem encountered in many applications. Spatial object association, also referred to as crossmatch of spatial datasets, is the problem of identifying and comparing objects in two datasets based on their positions in a common spatial coordinate system--one of the datasets may correspond to a catalog of objects observed over time in a multi-dimensional domain; the other dataset may consist of objects observed in a snapshot of the domain at a time point. The use of database management systems to the solve the object association problem provides portability across different platforms and also greater flexibility. Increasing dataset sizes in today's applications, however, have made object association a data/compute-intensive problem that requires targeted optimizations for efficient execution. In this work, we investigate how database-based crossmatch algorithms can be deployed on different database system architectures and evaluate the deployments to understand the impact of architectural choices on crossmatch performance and associated trade-offs. We investigate the execution of two crossmatch algorithms on (1) a parallel database system with active disk style processing capabilities, (2) a high-throughput network database (MySQL Cluster), and (3) shared-nothing databases with replication. We have conducted our study in the context of a large-scale astronomy application with real use-case scenarios.

  16. Training snakes to find object boundaries and evaluating them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenster, Samuel D.; Kender, John R.

    2000-08-01

    We describe how to teach deformable models (snakes) to find object boundaries based on user-specified criteria, and we present a method for evaluating which criteria work best. These methods prove indispensable in abdominal CT images. Further work is needed in heart ultrasound images. The methods apply in any domain with consistent image conditions characterizing object boundaries, for which automated identification is nontrivial, perhaps due to interfering detail. A traditional strongest-edge-seeking snake fails to find an object's boundary when the strongest nearby image edges are not the ones sought. But we show how to instead learn, from training data, the relation between a shape and any image feature, as the probability distribution (PDF) of a function of image and shape. An important but neglected task has always been to select image qualities to guide a model. Because success depends on the relation of objective function (PDF) output to shape correctness, it is evaluated using a sampling of ground truth, a random model of the range of shapes tried during optimization, and a measure of shape closeness. The test results are evaluated for incidence of 'false positives' (scoring better than ground truth) versus incorrectness, and for the objective function's monotonicity with respect to incorrectness. Monotonicity is measured using correlation coefficient and using the newly introduced distance from closest increasing function. Domain-dependent choices must be tested. We analyze several Gaussian models fitting image intensity and perpendicular gradient at the object boundary, as well as the traditional sum of gradient magnitudes. The latter model is found inadequate in our domains; some of the former succeed.

  17. An Evaluative Review of Simulated Dynamic Smart 3d Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeijn, H.; Sheth, F.; Pettit, C. J.

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) modelling of plants can be an asset for creating agricultural based visualisation products. The continuum of 3D plants models ranges from static to dynamic objects, also known as smart 3D objects. There is an increasing requirement for smarter simulated 3D objects that are attributed mathematically and/or from biological inputs. A systematic approach to plant simulation offers significant advantages to applications in agricultural research, particularly in simulating plant behaviour and the influences of external environmental factors. This approach of 3D plant object visualisation is primarily evident from the visualisation of plants using photographed billboarded images, to more advanced procedural models that come closer to simulating realistic virtual plants. However, few programs model physical reactions of plants to external factors and even fewer are able to grow plants based on mathematical and/or biological parameters. In this paper, we undertake an evaluation of plant-based object simulation programs currently available, with a focus upon the components and techniques involved in producing these objects. Through an analytical review process we consider the strengths and weaknesses of several program packages, the features and use of these programs and the possible opportunities in deploying these for creating smart 3D plant-based objects to support agricultural research and natural resource management. In creating smart 3D objects the model needs to be informed by both plant physiology and phenology. Expert knowledge will frame the parameters and procedures that will attribute the object and allow the simulation of dynamic virtual plants. Ultimately, biologically smart 3D virtual plants that react to changes within an environment could be an effective medium to visually represent landscapes and communicate land management scenarios and practices to planners and decision-makers.

  18. Assessing Vital Signs: Applying Two Participatory Evaluation Frameworks to the Evaluation of a College of Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Susan C.; Magilvy, Joan K.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation research has been in progress to clarify the concept of participatory evaluation and to assess its impact. Recently, two theoretical frameworks have been offered--Daigneault and Jacob's participatory evaluation measurement index and Champagne and Smits' model of practical participatory evaluation. In this case report, we apply these…

  19. An ecosystem evaluation framework for global seamount conservation and management.

    PubMed

    Taranto, Gerald H; Kvile, Kristina Ø; Pitcher, Tony J; Morato, Telmo

    2012-01-01

    In the last twenty years, several global targets for protection of marine biodiversity have been adopted but have failed. The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) aims at preserving 10% of all the marine biomes by 2020. For achieving this goal, ecologically or biologically significant areas (EBSA) have to be identified in all biogeographic regions. However, the methodologies for identifying the best suitable areas are still to be agreed. Here, we propose a framework for applying the CBD criteria to locate potential ecologically or biologically significant seamount areas based on the best information currently available. The framework combines the likelihood of a seamount constituting an EBSA and its level of human impact and can be used at global, regional and local scales. This methodology allows the classification of individual seamounts into four major portfolio conservation categories which can help optimize management efforts toward the protection of the most suitable areas. The framework was tested against 1000 dummy seamounts and satisfactorily assigned seamounts to proper EBSA and threats categories. Additionally, the framework was applied to eight case study seamounts that were included in three out of four portfolio categories: areas highly likely to be identified as EBSA with high degree of threat; areas highly likely to be EBSA with low degree of threat; and areas with a low likelihood of being EBSA with high degree of threat. This framework will allow managers to identify seamount EBSAs and to prioritize their policies in terms of protecting undisturbed areas, disturbed areas for recovery of habitats and species, or both based on their management objectives. It also identifies seamount EBSAs and threats considering different ecological groups in both pelagic and benthic communities. Therefore, this framework may represent an important tool to mitigate seamount biodiversity loss and to achieve the 2020 CBD goals. PMID:22905190

  20. An Ecosystem Evaluation Framework for Global Seamount Conservation and Management

    PubMed Central

    Taranto, Gerald H.; Kvile, Kristina Ø.; Pitcher, Tony J.; Morato, Telmo

    2012-01-01

    In the last twenty years, several global targets for protection of marine biodiversity have been adopted but have failed. The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) aims at preserving 10% of all the marine biomes by 2020. For achieving this goal, ecologically or biologically significant areas (EBSA) have to be identified in all biogeographic regions. However, the methodologies for identifying the best suitable areas are still to be agreed. Here, we propose a framework for applying the CBD criteria to locate potential ecologically or biologically significant seamount areas based on the best information currently available. The framework combines the likelihood of a seamount constituting an EBSA and its level of human impact and can be used at global, regional and local scales. This methodology allows the classification of individual seamounts into four major portfolio conservation categories which can help optimize management efforts toward the protection of the most suitable areas. The framework was tested against 1000 dummy seamounts and satisfactorily assigned seamounts to proper EBSA and threats categories. Additionally, the framework was applied to eight case study seamounts that were included in three out of four portfolio categories: areas highly likely to be identified as EBSA with high degree of threat; areas highly likely to be EBSA with low degree of threat; and areas with a low likelihood of being EBSA with high degree of threat. This framework will allow managers to identify seamount EBSAs and to prioritize their policies in terms of protecting undisturbed areas, disturbed areas for recovery of habitats and species, or both based on their management objectives. It also identifies seamount EBSAs and threats considering different ecological groups in both pelagic and benthic communities. Therefore, this framework may represent an important tool to mitigate seamount biodiversity loss and to achieve the 2020 CBD goals. PMID:22905190

  1. Attitudes as Object-Evaluation Associations of Varying Strength

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Russell H.

    2009-01-01

    Historical developments regarding the attitude concept are reviewed, and set the stage for consideration of a theoretical perspective that views attitude, not as a hypothetical construct, but as evaluative knowledge. A model of attitudes as object-evaluation associations of varying strength is summarized, along with research supporting the model’s contention that at least some attitudes are represented in memory and activated automatically upon the individual’s encountering the attitude object. The implications of the theoretical perspective for a number of recent discussions related to the attitude concept are elaborated. Among these issues are the notion of attitudes as “constructions,” the presumed malleability of automatically-activated attitudes, correspondence between implicit and explicit measures of attitude, and postulated dual or multiple attitudes. PMID:19424447

  2. Object-oriented framework for rapid development of image analysis applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Weidong; Zhang, Xiangmin; Sonka, Milan

    1997-04-01

    Image analysis applications are usually composed of a set of graphic objects, a set of image processing algorithms, and a graphic user interface (GUI). Typically, developing an image analysis application is time-consuming and the developed programs are hard to maintain. We have developed a framework called IMANAL that aims at reducing the development costs by improving system maintainability, design change flexibility, component reusability, and human-computer interaction. IMANAL decomposes an image analysis application into three models; data model, process model, and GUI model. The three models as well as the collaboration among them are standardized into a unified system architecture. A new application can be developed rapidly by customizing task- specific building blocks within the unified architecture. IMANAL maintains a class library of more than 100,000 lines of C/C++ code that are highly reusable for creating the three above mentioned models. Software components from other sources such as Khoros can also be easily included in the applications. IMANAL was used for development of image analysis applications utilizing a variety of medical images such as x-ray coronary angiography, intracardiac, intravascular and brachial ultrasound, and pulmonary CT. In all the above listed applications, the development overhead is removed and the developer is able to fully focus on the image analysis algorithms. IMANAL has proven to be a useful tool for image analysis research as well as the prototype development tool for commercial image analysis applications.

  3. Blogging for Evaluating Objectives in an International Nursing Course.

    PubMed

    Strang, Sharon; Knopp, Andrea; Schubert, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Nursing educators need to adapt to meet students in new technological spaces and in the increasingly global environment. This article provides background on blogging as an educational tool and the use of a blogging assignment for evaluation of course objectives in an international graduate nursing course. The blog is a part of a study-abroad experience in Kenya, where graduate nursing students learn about Kenyan culture and work in the health care system. PMID:25888104

  4. A portfolio evaluation framework for air transportation improvement projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Hyeoncheol

    This thesis explores the application of portfolio theory to the Air Transportation System (ATS) improvement. The ATS relies on complexly related resources and different stakeholder groups. Moreover, demand for air travel is significantly increasing relative to capacity of air transportation. In this environment, improving the ATS is challenging. Many projects, which are defined as technologies or initiatives, for improvement have been proposed and some have been demonstrated in practice. However, there is no clear understanding of how well these projects work in different conditions nor of how they interact with each other or with existing systems. These limitations make it difficult to develop good project combinations, or portfolios that maximize improvement. To help address this gap, a framework for identifying good portfolios is proposed. The framework can be applied to individual projects or portfolios of projects. Projects or portfolios are evaluated using four different groups of factors (effectiveness, time-to-implement, scope of applicability, and stakeholder impacts). Portfolios are also evaluated in terms of interaction-determining factors (prerequisites, co-requisites, limiting factors, and amplifying factors) because, while a given project might work well in isolation, interdependencies between projects or with existing systems could result in lower overall performance in combination. Ways to communicate a portfolio to decision makers are also introduced. The framework is unique because (1) it allows using a variety of available data, and (2) it covers diverse benefit metrics. For demonstrating the framework, an application to ground delay management projects serves as a case study. The portfolio evaluation approach introduced in this thesis can aid decision makers and researchers at universities and aviation agencies such as Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD), in

  5. Evaluating the inverse reasoning account of object discovery.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Christopher D; Kemp, Charles

    2015-06-01

    People routinely make inferences about unobserved objects. A hotel guest with welts on his arms, for example, will often worry about bed bugs. The discovery of unobserved objects almost always involves a backward inference from some observed effects (e.g., welts) to unobserved causes (e.g., bed bugs). The inverse reasoning account, which is typically formalized as Bayesian inference, posits that the strength of a backward inference is closely connected to the strength of the corresponding forward inference from the unobserved causes to the observed effects. We evaluated the inverse reasoning account of object discovery in three experiments where participants were asked to discover the unobserved "attractors" and "repellers" that controlled a "particle" moving within an arena. Experiments 1 and 2 showed that participants often failed to provide the best explanations for various particle motions, even when the best explanations were simple and when participants enthusiastically endorsed these explanations when presented with them. This failure demonstrates that object discovery is critically dependent on the processes that support hypothesis generation-processes that the inverse reasoning account does not explain. Experiment 3 demonstrated that people sometimes generate explanations that are invalid even according to their own forward inferences, suggesting that the psychological processes that support forward and backward inference are less intertwined than the inverse reasoning account suggests. The experimental findings support an alternative account of object discovery in which people rely on heuristics to generate possible explanations. PMID:25824861

  6. A Patient-Centered Framework for Evaluating Digital Maturity of Health Services: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Ryan; Darzi, Ara; Mayer, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Background Digital maturity is the extent to which digital technologies are used as enablers to deliver a high-quality health service. Extensive literature exists about how to assess the components of digital maturity, but it has not been used to design a comprehensive framework for evaluation. Consequently, the measurement systems that do exist are limited to evaluating digital programs within one service or care setting, meaning that digital maturity evaluation is not accounting for the needs of patients across their care pathways. Objective The objective of our study was to identify the best methods and metrics for evaluating digital maturity and to create a novel, evidence-based tool for evaluating digital maturity across patient care pathways. Methods We systematically reviewed the literature to find the best methods and metrics for evaluating digital maturity. We searched the PubMed database for all papers relevant to digital maturity evaluation. Papers were selected if they provided insight into how to appraise digital systems within the health service and if they indicated the factors that constitute or facilitate digital maturity. Papers were analyzed to identify methodology for evaluating digital maturity and indicators of digitally mature systems. We then used the resulting information about methodology to design an evaluation framework. Following that, the indicators of digital maturity were extracted and grouped into increasing levels of maturity and operationalized as metrics within the evaluation framework. Results We identified 28 papers as relevant to evaluating digital maturity, from which we derived 5 themes. The first theme concerned general evaluation methodology for constructing the framework (7 papers). The following 4 themes were the increasing levels of digital maturity: resources and ability (6 papers), usage (7 papers), interoperability (3 papers), and impact (5 papers). The framework includes metrics for each of these levels at each

  7. Evaluating metal-organic frameworks for natural gas storage

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, JA; Veenstra, M; Long, JR

    2014-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks have received significant attention as a new class of adsorbents for natural gas storage; however, inconsistencies in reporting high-pressure adsorption data and a lack of comparative studies have made it challenging to evaluate both new and existing materials. Here, we briefly discuss high-pressure adsorption measurements and review efforts to develop metal-organic frameworks with high methane storage capacities. To illustrate the most important properties for evaluating adsorbents for natural gas storage and for designing a next generation of improved materials, six metal-organic frameworks and an activated carbon, with a range of surface areas, pore structures, and surface chemistries representative of the most promising adsorbents for methane storage, are evaluated in detail. High-pressure methane adsorption isotherms are used to compare gravimetric and volumetric capacities, isosteric heats of adsorption, and usable storage capacities. Additionally, the relative importance of increasing volumetric capacity, rather than gravimetric capacity, for extending the driving range of natural gas vehicles is highlighted. Other important systems-level factors, such as thermal management, mechanical properties, and the effects of impurities, are also considered, and potential materials synthesis contributions to improving performance in a complete adsorbed natural gas system are discussed.

  8. A multi-objective optimization framework to model 3D river and landscape evolution processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzi, Simone; Castelletti, Andrea; Cominola, Andrea; Mason, Emanuele; Paik, Kyungrock

    2013-04-01

    Water and sediment interactions shape hillslopes, regulate soil erosion and sedimentation, and organize river networks. Landscape evolution and river organization occur at various spatial and temporal scale and the understanding and modelling of them is highly complex. The idea of a least action principle governing river networks evolution has been proposed many times as a simpler approach among the ones existing in the literature. These theories assume that river networks, as observed in nature, self-organize and act on soil transportation in order to satisfy a particular "optimality" criterion. Accordingly, river and landscape weathering can be simulated by solving an optimization problem, where the choice of the criterion to be optimized becomes the initial assumption. The comparison between natural river networks and optimized ones verifies the correctness of this initial assumption. Yet, various criteria have been proposed in literature and there is no consensus on which is better able to explain river network features observed in nature like network branching and river bed profile: each one is able to reproduce some river features through simplified modelling of the natural processes, but it fails to characterize the whole complexity (3D and its dynamic) of the natural processes. Some of the criteria formulated in the literature partly conflict: the reason is that their formulation rely on mathematical and theoretical simplifications of the natural system that are suitable for specific spatial and temporal scale but fails to represent the whole processes characterizing landscape evolution. In an attempt to address some of these scientific questions, we tested the suitability of using a multi-objective optimization framework to describe river and landscape evolution in a 3D spatial domain. A synthetic landscape is used to this purpose. Multiple, alternative river network evolutions, corresponding to as many tradeoffs between the different and partly

  9. A novel objective evaluation method for trunk function

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Kazuaki; Hashimoto, Masashi; Ishida, Kazunari; Yoneda, Yuki; Naka, Yuta; Kitanishi, Hideyuki; Oyagi, Hirotaka; Hoshino, Yuichi; Shibanuma, Nao

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate whether an objective evaluation method for trunk function, namely the “trunk righting test”, is reproducible and reliable by testing on different observers (from experienced to beginners) and by confirming the test-retest reliability. [Subjects] Five healthy subjects were evaluated in this correlation study. [Methods] A handheld dynamometer was used in the assessments. The motor task was a trunk righting motion by moving the part with the sensor pad 10 cm outward from the original position. During measurement, the posture was held at maximum effort for 5 s. Measurement was repeated three times. Interexaminer reproducibility was examined in two physical therapists with 1 year experience and one physical therapist with 7 years of experience. The measured values were evaluated for reliability by using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC 1.1) and interclass correlation coefficients (ICC 2.1). [Results] The test-retest reliability ICC 1.1 and ICC 2.1 were all high. The ICC 1.1 was >0.90. The ICC 2.1 was 0.93. [Conclusion] We developed the trunk righting test as a novel objective evaluation method for trunk function. As the study included inexperienced therapists, the results suggest that the trunk righting test could be used in the clinic, independent of the experience of the therapists. PMID:26157279

  10. Improvement of the R-SWAT-FME framework to support multiple variables and multi-objective functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Yiping; Liu, Shu-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Application of numerical models is a common practice in the environmental field for investigation and prediction of natural and anthropogenic processes. However, process knowledge, parameter identifiability, sensitivity, and uncertainty analyses are still a challenge for large and complex mathematical models such as the hydrological/water quality model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). In this study, the previously developed R program language-SWAT-Flexible Modeling Environment (R-SWAT-FME) was improved to support multiple model variables and objectives at multiple time steps (i.e., daily, monthly, and annually). This expansion is significant because there is usually more than one variable (e.g., water, nutrients, and pesticides) of interest for environmental models like SWAT. To further facilitate its easy use, we also simplified its application requirements without compromising its merits, such as the user-friendly interface. To evaluate the performance of the improved framework, we used a case study focusing on both streamflow and nitrate nitrogen in the Upper Iowa River Basin (above Marengo) in the United States. Results indicated that the R-SWAT-FME performs well and is comparable to the built-in auto-calibration tool in multi-objective model calibration. Overall, the enhanced R-SWAT-FME can be useful for the SWAT community, and the methods we used can also be valuable for wrapping potential R packages with other environmental models.

  11. MRBrainS Challenge: Online Evaluation Framework for Brain Image Segmentation in 3T MRI Scans

    PubMed Central

    Mendrik, Adriënne M.; Vincken, Koen L.; Kuijf, Hugo J.; Breeuwer, Marcel; Bouvy, Willem H.; de Bresser, Jeroen; Alansary, Amir; de Bruijne, Marleen; Carass, Aaron; El-Baz, Ayman; Jog, Amod; Katyal, Ranveer; Khan, Ali R.; van der Lijn, Fedde; Mahmood, Qaiser; Mukherjee, Ryan; van Opbroek, Annegreet; Paneri, Sahil; Pereira, Sérgio; Rajchl, Martin; Sarikaya, Duygu; Smedby, Örjan; Silva, Carlos A.; Vrooman, Henri A.; Vyas, Saurabh; Wang, Chunliang; Zhao, Liang; Biessels, Geert Jan; Viergever, Max A.

    2015-01-01

    Many methods have been proposed for tissue segmentation in brain MRI scans. The multitude of methods proposed complicates the choice of one method above others. We have therefore established the MRBrainS online evaluation framework for evaluating (semi)automatic algorithms that segment gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on 3T brain MRI scans of elderly subjects (65–80 y). Participants apply their algorithms to the provided data, after which their results are evaluated and ranked. Full manual segmentations of GM, WM, and CSF are available for all scans and used as the reference standard. Five datasets are provided for training and fifteen for testing. The evaluated methods are ranked based on their overall performance to segment GM, WM, and CSF and evaluated using three evaluation metrics (Dice, H95, and AVD) and the results are published on the MRBrainS13 website. We present the results of eleven segmentation algorithms that participated in the MRBrainS13 challenge workshop at MICCAI, where the framework was launched, and three commonly used freeware packages: FreeSurfer, FSL, and SPM. The MRBrainS evaluation framework provides an objective and direct comparison of all evaluated algorithms and can aid in selecting the best performing method for the segmentation goal at hand. PMID:26759553

  12. The challenge of evaluating complex interventions: a framework for evaluating media advocacy.

    PubMed

    Stead, Martine; Hastings, Gerard; Eadie, Douglas

    2002-06-01

    New health promotion and public health approaches such as media advocacy pose particular evaluation challenges. Evaluation is important to provide feedback to media advocacy practitioners on how to enhance their efforts, and to funders and researchers seeking to assess media advocacy's effectiveness as a health promotion strategy. The media advocacy evaluation literature contains some examples of promising evaluation approaches but is still evolving. A comprehensive framework for the evaluation of media advocacy is presented. Building on existing approaches to evaluation in media advocacy and on current thinking regarding evaluation in health promotion, it proposes a series of indicators and research methods for evaluating media advocacy at the levels of formative, process and outcome evaluation. The framework can be used to encourage strategic reflection on the media advocacy process, to guide evaluation of specific interventions, and to demonstrate to funders the importance and complexity of evaluation in this promising field. PMID:12120850

  13. Genetic Counseling Milestones: A Framework for Student Competency Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Guy, Carrie

    2016-08-01

    Graduate medical education has recently increased focus on the development of medical specialty competency milestones to provide a targeted tool for medical resident evaluation. Milestones provide developmental assessment of the attainment of competencies over the course of an educational program. An educational framework is described to explore the development of Genetic Counseling Milestones for the evaluation of the development of genetic counseling competencies by genetic counseling students. The development of Genetic Counseling Milestones may provide a valuable tool to assess genetic counseling students across all program activities. Historical educational context, current practices, and potential benefits and challenges in the development of Genetic Counseling Milestones are discussed. PMID:26462934

  14. Benefit From Directional Microphone Hearing Aids: Objective and Subjective Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee-Sung; Jin, Sun Hwa; Choi, Ji Eun; Cho, Yang-Sun; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to find and compare the effect of directional (DIR) processing of two different hearing aids via both subjective and objective methods, to determine the association between the results of the subjective and objective evaluations, and to find out individual predictive factors influencing the DIR benefit. Methods Twenty-six hearing aid users fitted unilaterally with each two different experimental hearing aid performed modified Korean Hearing in Noise Test (K-HINT) in three DIR conditions; omnidirectional (OMNI) mode, OMNI plus noise reduction feature, fixed DIR mode. In order to determine benefits from DIR benefit within a hearing aid and compare performance of the DIR processing between hearing aids, a subjective questionnaire was administrated on speech quality (SQ) and discomfort in noise (DN) domain. Correlation analysis of factors influencing DIR benefit was accomplished. Results Benefits from switching OMNI mode to DIR mode within both hearing aids in K-HINT were about 2.8 (standard deviation, 3.5) and 2.1 dB SNR (signal to ratio; SD, 2.5), but significant difference in K-HINT results between OMNI and OMNI plus noise reduction algorithm was not shown. The subjective evaluation resulted in the better SQ and DN scores in DIR mode than those in OMNI mode. However, the difference of scores on both SQ and DN between the two hearing aids with DIR mode was not statistically significant. Any individual factors did not significantly affect subjective and objective DIR benefits. Conclusion DIR benefit was found not only in the objective measurement performed in the laboratory but also in the subjective questionnaires, but the subjective results was failed to have significant correlation with the DIR benefit obtained in the K-HINT. Factors influencing individual variation in perceptual DIR benefit were still hard to explain. PMID:26330918

  15. A flexible object-based software framework for modeling complex systems with interacting natural and societal processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, J. H.

    2000-06-15

    The Dynamic Information Architecture System (DIAS) is a flexible, extensible, object-based framework for developing and maintaining complex multidisciplinary simulations. The DIAS infrastructure makes it feasible to build and manipulate complex simulation scenarios in which many thousands of objects can interact via dozens to hundreds of concurrent dynamic processes. The flexibility and extensibility of the DIAS software infrastructure stem mainly from (1) the abstraction of object behaviors, (2) the encapsulation and formalization of model functionality, and (3) the mutability of domain object contents. DIAS simulation objects are inherently capable of highly flexible and heterogeneous spatial realizations. Geospatial graphical representation of DIAS simulation objects is addressed via the GeoViewer, an object-based GIS toolkit application developed at ANL. DIAS simulation capabilities have been extended by inclusion of societal process models generated by the Framework for Addressing Cooperative Extended Transactions (FACET), another object-based framework developed at Argonne National Laboratory. By using FACET models to implement societal behaviors of individuals and organizations within larger DIAS-based natural systems simulations, it has become possible to conveniently address a broad range of issues involving interaction and feedback among natural and societal processes. Example DIAS application areas discussed in this paper include a dynamic virtual oceanic environment, detailed simulation of clinical, physiological, and logistical aspects of health care delivery, and studies of agricultural sustainability of urban centers under environmental stress in ancient Mesopotamia.

  16. Marine monitoring: Its shortcomings and mismatch with the EU Water Framework Directive's objectives.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, V N; Elliott, M; Brauer, V S

    2006-01-01

    The main goal of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) is to achieve good ecological status across European surface waters by 2015 and as such, it offers the opportunity and thus the challenge to improve the protection of our coastal systems. It is the main example for Europe's increasing desire to conserve aquatic ecosystems. Ironically, since c. 1975 the increasing adoption of EU directives has been accompanied by a decreasing interest of, for example, the Dutch government to assess the quality of its coastal and marine ecosystems. The surveillance and monitoring started in NL in 1971 has declined since the 1980s resulting in a 35% reduction of sampling stations. Given this and interruptions the remaining data series is considered to be insufficient for purposes other than trend analysis and compliance. The Dutch marine managers have apparently chosen a minimal (cost-effective) approach despite the WFD implicitly requiring the incorporation of the system's 'ecological complexity' in indices used to evaluate the ecological status of highly variable systems such as transitional and coastal waters. These indices should include both the community structure and system functioning and to make this really cost-effective a new monitoring strategy is required with a tailor-made programme. Since the adoption of the WFD in 2000 and the launching of the European Marine Strategy in 2002 (and the recently proposed Marine Framework Directive) we suggest reviewing national monitoring programmes in order to integrate water quality monitoring and biological monitoring and change from 'station oriented monitoring' to 'basin or system oriented monitoring' in combination with specific 'cause-effect' studies for highly dynamic coastal systems. Progress will be made if the collected information is integrated and aggregated in valuable tools such as structure- and functioning-oriented computer simulation models and Decision Support Systems. The development of ecological indices

  17. Development of a Dynamically Configurable, Object-Oriented Framework for Distributed, Multi-modal Computational Aerospace Systems Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afjeh, Abdollah A.; Reed, John A.

    2003-01-01

    The following reports are presented on this project:A first year progress report on: Development of a Dynamically Configurable,Object-Oriented Framework for Distributed, Multi-modal Computational Aerospace Systems Simulation; A second year progress report on: Development of a Dynamically Configurable, Object-Oriented Framework for Distributed, Multi-modal Computational Aerospace Systems Simulation; An Extensible, Interchangeable and Sharable Database Model for Improving Multidisciplinary Aircraft Design; Interactive, Secure Web-enabled Aircraft Engine Simulation Using XML Databinding Integration; and Improving the Aircraft Design Process Using Web-based Modeling and Simulation.

  18. Objective evaluation of the visual acuity in human eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales, M. A.; López-Olazagasti, E.; Ramírez-Zavaleta, G.; Varillas, G.; Tepichín, E.

    2009-08-01

    Traditionally, the quality of the human vision is evaluated by a subjective test in which the examiner asks the patient to read a series of characters of different sizes, located at a certain distance of the patient. Typically, we need to ensure a subtended angle of vision of 5 minutes, which implies an object of 8.8 mm high located at 6 meters (normal or 20/20 visual acuity). These characters constitute what is known as the Snellen chart, universally used to evaluate the spatial resolution of the human eyes. The mentioned process of identification of characters is carried out by means of the eye - brain system, giving an evaluation of the subjective visual performance. In this work we consider the eye as an isolated image-forming system, and show that it is possible to isolate the function of the eye from that of the brain in this process. By knowing the impulse response of the eye´s system we can obtain, in advance, the image of the Snellen chart simultaneously. From this information, we obtain the objective performance of the eye as the optical system under test. This type of results might help to detect anomalous situations of the human vision, like the so called "cerebral myopia".

  19. Approach to proliferation risk assessment based on multiple objective analysis framework

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, A.; Kuptsov, I.

    2013-07-01

    The approach to the assessment of proliferation risk using the methods of multi-criteria decision making and multi-objective optimization is presented. The approach allows the taking into account of the specifics features of the national nuclear infrastructure, and possible proliferation strategies (motivations, intentions, and capabilities). 3 examples of applying the approach are shown. First, the approach has been used to evaluate the attractiveness of HEU (high enriched uranium)production scenarios at a clandestine enrichment facility using centrifuge enrichment technology. Secondly, the approach has been applied to assess the attractiveness of scenarios for undeclared production of plutonium or HEU by theft of materials circulating in nuclear fuel cycle facilities and thermal reactors. Thirdly, the approach has been used to perform a comparative analysis of the structures of developing nuclear power systems based on different types of nuclear fuel cycles, the analysis being based on indicators of proliferation risk.

  20. An Economic Evaluation Framework for Assessing Renewable Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Badiru, Adedeji B

    2012-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly imperative to integrate renewable energy, such as solar and wind, into electricity generation due to increased regulations on air and water pollution and a sociopolitical desire to develop more clean energy sources. This increased spotlight on renewable energy requires evaluating competing projects using either conventional economic analysis techniques or other economics-based models and approaches in order to select a subset of the projects to be funded. Even then, there are reasons to suspect that techniques applied to renewable energy projects may result in decisions that will reject viable projects due to the use of a limited number of quantifiable and tangible attributes about the projects. This paper presents a framework for economic evaluation of renewable energy projects. The framework is based on a systems approach in which the processes within the entire network of the system, from generation to consumption, are accounted for. Furthermore, the framework uses the concept of fuzzy system to calculate the value of information under conditions of uncertainty.

  1. Electronic immunization data collection systems: application of an evaluation framework

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Evaluating the features and performance of health information systems can serve to strengthen the systems themselves as well as to guide other organizations in the process of designing and implementing surveillance tools. We adapted an evaluation framework in order to assess electronic immunization data collection systems, and applied it in two Ontario public health units. Methods The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Guidelines for Evaluating Public Health Surveillance Systems are broad in nature and serve as an organizational tool to guide the development of comprehensive evaluation materials. Based on these Guidelines, and informed by other evaluation resources and input from stakeholders in the public health community, we applied an evaluation framework to two examples of immunization data collection and examined several system attributes: simplicity, flexibility, data quality, timeliness, and acceptability. Data collection approaches included key informant interviews, logic and completeness assessments, client surveys, and on-site observations. Results Both evaluated systems allow high-quality immunization data to be collected, analyzed, and applied in a rapid fashion. However, neither system is currently able to link to other providers’ immunization data or provincial data sources, limiting the comprehensiveness of coverage assessments. We recommended that both organizations explore possibilities for external data linkage and collaborate with other jurisdictions to promote a provincial immunization repository or data sharing platform. Conclusions Electronic systems such as the ones described in this paper allow immunization data to be collected, analyzed, and applied in a rapid fashion, and represent the infostructure required to establish a population-based immunization registry, critical for comprehensively assessing vaccine coverage. PMID:24423014

  2. 78 FR 52933 - Strengthening the Operating Framework and Furthering the Objectives of Coalition for Accelerating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... Objectives of Coalition for Accelerating Standards and Therapies Initiative (U24) AGENCY: Food and Drug... Objectives The CFAST Initiative aims to accelerate clinical research and medical product development...

  3. A software engineering perspective on environmental modeling framework design: The object modeling system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The environmental modeling community has historically been concerned with the proliferation of models and the effort associated with collective model development tasks (e.g., code generation, data provisioning and transformation, etc.). Environmental modeling frameworks (EMFs) have been developed to...

  4. An Evaluation Framework for Obesity Prevention Policy Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Janice; Vu, Maihan; Jernigan, Jan; Payne, Gayle; Thompson, Diane; Heiser, Claire; Farris, Rosanne; Ammerman, Alice

    2012-01-01

    As the emphasis on preventing obesity has grown, so have calls for interventions that extend beyond individual behaviors and address changes in environments and policies. Despite the need for policy action, little is known about policy approaches that are most effective at preventing obesity. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and others are funding the implementation and evaluation of new obesity prevention policies, presenting a distinct opportunity to learn from these practice-based initiatives and build the body of evidence-based approaches. However, contributions from this policy activity are limited by the incomplete and inconsistent evaluation data collected on policy processes and outcomes. We present a framework developed by the CDC-funded Center of Excellence for Training and Research Translation that public health practitioners can use to evaluate policy interventions and identify the practice-based evidence needed to fill the gaps in effective policy approaches to obesity prevention. PMID:22742594

  5. Evaluation of a performance appraisal framework for radiation therapists in planning and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Jillian; Bridge, Pete; Brown, Elizabeth; Lusk, Ryan; Ferrari-Anderson, Janet

    2015-06-15

    Constantly evolving technology and techniques within radiation therapy require practitioners to maintain a continuous approach to professional development and training. Systems of performance appraisal and adoption of regular feedback mechanisms are vital to support this development yet frequently lack structure and rely on informal peer support. A Radiation Therapy Performance Appraisal Framework (RT-PAF) for radiation therapists in planning and simulation was developed to define expectations of practice and promote a supportive and objective culture of performance and skills appraisal. Evaluation of the framework was conducted via an anonymous online survey tool. Nine peer reviewers and fourteen recipients provided feedback on its effectiveness and the challenges and limitations of the approach. Findings from the evaluation were positive and suggested that both groups gained benefit from and expressed a strong interest in embedding the approach more routinely. Respondents identified common challenges related to the limited ability to implement suggested development strategies; this was strongly associated with time and rostering issues. This framework successfully defined expectations for practice and provided a fair and objective feedback process that focussed on skills development. It empowered staff to maintain their skills and reach their professional potential. Management support, particularly in regard to provision of protected time was highlighted as critical to the framework's ongoing success. The demonstrated benefits arising in terms of staff satisfaction and development highlight the importance of this commitment to the modern radiation therapy workforce.

  6. Method and apparatus for evaluating multilayer objects for imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor); Abedin, Nurul (Inventor); Sun, Kuen J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A multilayer object having multiple layers arranged in a stacking direction is evaluated for imperfections such as voids, delaminations and microcracks. First, an acoustic wave is transmitted into the object in the stacking direction via an appropriate transducer/waveguide combination. The wave propagates through the multilayer object and is received by another transducer/waveguide combination preferably located on the same surface as the transmitting combination. The received acoustic wave is correlated with the presence or absence of imperfections by, e.g., generating pulse echo signals indicative of the received acoustic wave, wherein the successive signals form distinct groups over time. The respective peak amplitudes of each group are sampled and curve fit to an exponential curve, wherein a substantial fit of approximately 80-90% indicates an absence of imperfections and a significant deviation indicates the presence of imperfections. Alternatively, the time interval between distinct groups can be measured, wherein equal intervals indicate the absence of imperfections and unequal intervals indicate the presence of imperfections.

  7. Method and Apparatus for Evaluating Multilayer Objects for Imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor); Abedin, Nurul (Inventor); Sun, Kuen J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A multilayer object having multiple layers arranged in a stacking direction is evaluated for imperfections such as voids, delaminations and microcracks. First. an acoustic wave is transmitted into the object in the stacking direction via an appropriate transducer/waveguide combination. The wave propagates through the multilayer object and is received by another transducer/waveguide combination preferably located on the same surface as the transmitting combination. The received acoustic wave is correlated with the presence or absence of imperfections by, e.g., generating pulse echo signals indicative of the received acoustic wave. wherein the successive signals form distinct groups over time. The respective peak amplitudes of each group are sampled and curve fit to an exponential curve. wherein a substantial fit of approximately 80-90% indicates an absence of imperfections and a significant deviation indicates the presence of imperfections. Alternatively, the time interval between distinct groups can be measured. wherein equal intervals indicate the absence of imperfections and unequal intervals indicate the presence of imperfections.

  8. Developing a monitoring and evaluation framework to integrate and formalize the informal waste and recycling sector: the case of the Philippine National Framework Plan.

    PubMed

    Serrona, Kevin Roy B; Yu, Jeongsoo; Aguinaldo, Emelita; Florece, Leonardo M

    2014-09-01

    The Philippines has been making inroads in solid waste management with the enactment and implementation of the Republic Act 9003 or the Ecological Waste Management Act of 2000. Said legislation has had tremendous influence in terms of how the national and local government units confront the challenges of waste management in urban and rural areas using the reduce, reuse, recycle and recovery framework or 4Rs. One of the sectors needing assistance is the informal waste sector whose aspiration is legal recognition of their rank and integration of their waste recovery activities in mainstream waste management. To realize this, the Philippine National Solid Waste Management Commission initiated the formulation of the National Framework Plan for the Informal Waste Sector, which stipulates approaches, strategies and methodologies to concretely involve the said sector in different spheres of local waste management, such as collection, recycling and disposal. What needs to be fleshed out is the monitoring and evaluation component in order to gauge qualitative and quantitative achievements vis-a-vis the Framework Plan. In the process of providing an enabling environment for the informal waste sector, progress has to be monitored and verified qualitatively and quantitatively and measured against activities, outputs, objectives and goals. Using the Framework Plan as the reference, this article developed monitoring and evaluation indicators using the logical framework approach in project management. The primary objective is to institutionalize monitoring and evaluation, not just in informal waste sector plans, but in any waste management initiatives to ensure that envisaged goals are achieved. PMID:25052014

  9. A Conceptual Framework for Evaluation of Public Health and Primary Care System Performance in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Jahanmehr, Nader; Rashidian, Arash; Khosravi, Ardeshir; Farzadfar, Farshad; Shariati, Mohammad; Majdzadeh, Reza; Sari, Ali Akbari; Mesdaghinia, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The main objective of this study was to design a conceptual framework, according to the policies and priorities of the ministry of health to evaluate provincial public health and primary care performance and to assess their share in the overall health impacts of the community. Methods: We used several tools and techniques, including system thinking, literature review to identify relevant attributes of health system performance framework and interview with the key stakeholders. The PubMed, Scopus, web of science, Google Scholar and two specialized databases of Persian language literature (IranMedex and SID) were searched using main terms and keywords. Following decision-making and collective agreement among the different stakeholders, 51 core indicators were chosen from among 602 obtained indicators in a four stage process, for monitoring and evaluation of Health Deputies. Results: We proposed a conceptual framework by identifying the performance area for Health Deputies between other determinants of health, as well as introducing a chain of results, for performance, consisting of Input, Process, Output and Outcome indicators. We also proposed 5 dimensions for measuring the performance of Health Deputies, consisting of efficiency, effectiveness, equity, access and improvement of health status. Conclusion: The proposed Conceptual Framework illustrates clearly the Health Deputies success in achieving best results and consequences of health in the country. Having the relative commitment of the ministry of health and Health Deputies at the University of Medical Sciences is essential for full implementation of this framework and providing the annual performance report. PMID:25946937

  10. Objective Fidelity Evaluation in Multisensory Virtual Environments: Auditory Cue Fidelity in Flight Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Georg F.; Wong, Li Ting; Timson, Emma; Perfect, Philip; White, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    We argue that objective fidelity evaluation of virtual environments, such as flight simulation, should be human-performance-centred and task-specific rather than measure the match between simulation and physical reality. We show how principled experimental paradigms and behavioural models to quantify human performance in simulated environments that have emerged from research in multisensory perception provide a framework for the objective evaluation of the contribution of individual cues to human performance measures of fidelity. We present three examples in a flight simulation environment as a case study: Experiment 1: Detection and categorisation of auditory and kinematic motion cues; Experiment 2: Performance evaluation in a target-tracking task; Experiment 3: Transferrable learning of auditory motion cues. We show how the contribution of individual cues to human performance can be robustly evaluated for each task and that the contribution is highly task dependent. The same auditory cues that can be discriminated and are optimally integrated in experiment 1, do not contribute to target-tracking performance in an in-flight refuelling simulation without training, experiment 2. In experiment 3, however, we demonstrate that the auditory cue leads to significant, transferrable, performance improvements with training. We conclude that objective fidelity evaluation requires a task-specific analysis of the contribution of individual cues. PMID:22957068

  11. A common evaluation framework for the African Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The African Health Initiative includes highly diverse partnerships in five countries (Ghana, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Zambia), each of which is working to improve population health by strengthening health systems and to evaluate the results. One aim of the Initiative is to generate cross-site learning that can inform implementation in the five partnerships during the project period and identify lessons that may be generalizable to other countries in the region. Collaborators in the Initiative developed a common evaluation framework as a basis for this cross-site learning. Methods This paper describes the components of the framework; this includes the conceptual model, core metrics to be measured in all sites, and standard guidelines for reporting on the implementation of partnership activities and contextual factors that may affect implementation, or the results it produces. We also describe the systems that have been put in place for data management, data quality assessments, and cross-site analysis of results. Results and conclusions The conceptual model for the Initiative highlights points in the causal chain between health system strengthening activities and health impact where evidence produced by the partnerships can contribute to learning. This model represents an important advance over its predecessors by including contextual factors and implementation strength as potential determinants, and explicitly including equity as a component of both outcomes and impact. Specific measurement challenges include the prospective documentation of program implementation and contextual factors. Methodological issues addressed in the development of the framework include the aggregation of data collected using different methods and the challenge of evaluating a complex set of interventions being improved over time based on continuous monitoring and intermediate results. PMID:23819778

  12. A Framework and Model for Evaluating Clinical Decision Support Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a four-phase model for evaluating architectures for clinical decision support that focuses on: defining a set of desirable features for a decision support architecture; building a proof-of-concept prototype; demonstrating that the architecture is useful by showing that it can be integrated with existing decision support systems and comparing its coverage to that of other architectures. We apply this framework to several well-known decision support architectures, including Arden Syntax, GLIF, SEBASTIAN and SAGE PMID:18462999

  13. Identifying Anomalous Citations for Objective Evaluation of Scholarly Article Impact.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiaomei; Xia, Feng; Lee, Ivan; Zhang, Jun; Ning, Zhaolong

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating the impact of a scholarly article is of great significance and has attracted great attentions. Although citation-based evaluation approaches have been widely used, these approaches face limitations e.g. in identifying anomalous citations patterns. This negligence would inevitably cause unfairness and inaccuracy to the article impact evaluation. In this study, in order to discover the anomalous citations and ensure the fairness and accuracy of research outcome evaluation, we investigate the citation relationships between articles using the following factors: collaboration times, the time span of collaboration, citing times and the time span of citing to weaken the relationship of Conflict of Interest (COI) in the citation network. Meanwhile, we study a special kind of COI, namely suspected COI relationship. Based on the COI relationship, we further bring forward the COIRank algorithm, an innovative scheme for accurately assessing the impact of an article. Our method distinguishes the citation strength, and utilizes PageRank and HITS algorithms to rank scholarly articles comprehensively. The experiments are conducted on the American Physical Society (APS) dataset. We find that about 80.88% articles contain contributed citations by co-authors in 26,366 articles and 75.55% articles among these articles are cited by the authors belonging to the same affiliation, indicating COI and suspected COI should not be ignored for evaluating impact of scientific papers objectively. Moreover, our experimental results demonstrate COIRank algorithm significantly outperforms the state-of-art solutions. The validity of our approach is verified by using the probability of Recommendation Intensity. PMID:27606817

  14. An evaluation framework and comparative analysis of the widely used first programming languages.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad Shoaib; Khan, Sher Afzal; Ahmad, Farooq; Islam, Saeed; Abid, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Computer programming is the core of computer science curriculum. Several programming languages have been used to teach the first course in computer programming, and such languages are referred to as first programming language (FPL). The pool of programming languages has been evolving with the development of new languages, and from this pool different languages have been used as FPL at different times. Though the selection of an appropriate FPL is very important, yet it has been a controversial issue in the presence of many choices. Many efforts have been made for designing a good FPL, however, there is no ample way to evaluate and compare the existing languages so as to find the most suitable FPL. In this article, we have proposed a framework to evaluate the existing imperative, and object oriented languages for their suitability as an appropriate FPL. Furthermore, based on the proposed framework we have devised a customizable scoring function to compute a quantitative suitability score for a language, which reflects its conformance to the proposed framework. Lastly, we have also evaluated the conformance of the widely used FPLs to the proposed framework, and have also computed their suitability scores. PMID:24586449

  15. An Evaluation Framework and Comparative Analysis of the Widely Used First Programming Languages

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Muhammad Shoaib; Khan, Sher Afzal; Ahmad, Farooq; Islam, Saeed; Abid, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Computer programming is the core of computer science curriculum. Several programming languages have been used to teach the first course in computer programming, and such languages are referred to as first programming language (FPL). The pool of programming languages has been evolving with the development of new languages, and from this pool different languages have been used as FPL at different times. Though the selection of an appropriate FPL is very important, yet it has been a controversial issue in the presence of many choices. Many efforts have been made for designing a good FPL, however, there is no ample way to evaluate and compare the existing languages so as to find the most suitable FPL. In this article, we have proposed a framework to evaluate the existing imperative, and object oriented languages for their suitability as an appropriate FPL. Furthermore, based on the proposed framework we have devised a customizable scoring function to compute a quantitative suitability score for a language, which reflects its conformance to the proposed framework. Lastly, we have also evaluated the conformance of the widely used FPLs to the proposed framework, and have also computed their suitability scores. PMID:24586449

  16. Evaluation in Cross-Cultural Contexts: Proposing a Framework for International Education and Training Project Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    bin Yahya, Ismail; And Others

    This paper focuses on the need for increased sensitivity and responsiveness in international education and training project evaluations, particularly those in Third World countries. A conceptual-theoretical framework for designing and developing models appropriate for evaluating education and training projects in non-Western cultures is presented.…

  17. A Framework of Multi Objectives Negotiation for Dynamic Supply Chain Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Jia Yee; Sakaguchi, Tatsuhiko; Shirase, Keiichi

    Trends of globalization and advances in Information Technology (IT) have created opportunity in collaborative manufacturing across national borders. A dynamic supply chain utilizes these advances to enable more flexibility in business cooperation. This research proposes a concurrent decision making framework for a three echelons dynamic supply chain model. The dynamic supply chain is formed by autonomous negotiation among agents based on multi agents approach. Instead of generating negotiation aspects (such as amount, price and due date) arbitrary, this framework proposes to utilize the information available at operational level of an organization in order to generate realistic negotiation aspect. The effectiveness of the proposed model is demonstrated by various case studies.

  18. Towards a Framework for Evaluating and Comparing Diagnosis Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtoglu, Tolga; Narasimhan, Sriram; Poll, Scott; Garcia,David; Kuhn, Lukas; deKleer, Johan; vanGemund, Arjan; Feldman, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostic inference involves the detection of anomalous system behavior and the identification of its cause, possibly down to a failed unit or to a parameter of a failed unit. Traditional approaches to solving this problem include expert/rule-based, model-based, and data-driven methods. Each approach (and various techniques within each approach) use different representations of the knowledge required to perform the diagnosis. The sensor data is expected to be combined with these internal representations to produce the diagnosis result. In spite of the availability of various diagnosis technologies, there have been only minimal efforts to develop a standardized software framework to run, evaluate, and compare different diagnosis technologies on the same system. This paper presents a framework that defines a standardized representation of the system knowledge, the sensor data, and the form of the diagnosis results and provides a run-time architecture that can execute diagnosis algorithms, send sensor data to the algorithms at appropriate time steps from a variety of sources (including the actual physical system), and collect resulting diagnoses. We also define a set of metrics that can be used to evaluate and compare the performance of the algorithms, and provide software to calculate the metrics.

  19. Contrast matching techniques for digital subtraction radiography: an objective evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Likar, B.; Bernard, R.; Pernus, F.

    1996-01-01

    Digital subtraction radiography (DSR) enables the detection of subtle early detrimental effects of periodontal disease as well as the evaluation of the effects of therapy. However, the differences between two radiographs due to alignment and contrast errors must be kept at minimum. In the present in vitro study we test the efficacy of three basic contrast correction methods in the reduction of contrast mismatches which can adversely affect a subtracted image. The ODTF (Optical Density Thickness Function) method, which is based on a function relating grey level values of the aluminium wedge image and the corresponding thickness of the wedge, induced less contrast correction error than the CDF (Cumulative Density Function) and the LSQA (Least Square Quadratic Approximation) methods. Moreover, CDF, ODTF, and LSQA functions obtained from the reference structure density distribution may be applied for objective contrast enhancements and for standardisation of image quality, while the ODTF function allows also bone change volume estimations. PMID:8947675

  20. Objective evaluation of dextromethorphan and glaucine as antitussive agents.

    PubMed Central

    Rühle, K H; Criscuolo, D; Dieterich, H A; Köhler, D; Riedel, G

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-four inpatients affected by chronic cough completed a single-dose double-blind cross-over study of placebo, glaucine 30 mg and dextromethorphan 30 mg. The study was carried out using a balanced incomplete block design, each patient receiving two of the three experimental treatments. Objective evaluation of cough was ensured by means of a writing cough recorder. Coughs after dextromethorphan and glaucine were fewer than coughs after placebo: however only glaucine was significantly different from placebo in reducing coughs. Treatments were well tolerated: clinical results included a reduction in pulse rate after both dextromethorphan and glaucine , and a large number of patients reporting side effects after dextromethorphan administration. PMID:6375709

  1. Objective evaluation of dextromethorphan and glaucine as antitussive agents.

    PubMed

    Rühle, K H; Criscuolo, D; Dieterich, H A; Köhler, D; Riedel, G

    1984-05-01

    Twenty-four inpatients affected by chronic cough completed a single-dose double-blind cross-over study of placebo, glaucine 30 mg and dextromethorphan 30 mg. The study was carried out using a balanced incomplete block design, each patient receiving two of the three experimental treatments. Objective evaluation of cough was ensured by means of a writing cough recorder. Coughs after dextromethorphan and glaucine were fewer than coughs after placebo: however only glaucine was significantly different from placebo in reducing coughs. Treatments were well tolerated: clinical results included a reduction in pulse rate after both dextromethorphan and glaucine , and a large number of patients reporting side effects after dextromethorphan administration. PMID:6375709

  2. Objective evaluation of insert material for diabetic and athletic footwear.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, J W; Kourosh, S; Stills, M; Mooney, V

    1988-12-01

    Five of the most commonly used materials for shoe inserts (soft Plastazote, medium Pelite, PPT, Spenco, and Sorbothane) were objectively evaluated in the laboratory to characterize their behavior in the following three specific functions that correspond to clinical use: (1) the effect on the materials of repeated compression. (2) the effect of a combination of repetitive shear and compression. (3) the force-distribution (force-attenuation) properties of these materials, both when new and after repeated compression. The last function represents a model for relief of pressure beneath plantar bony prominences, a topic of special concern for the insensitive foot. All materials were effective in reducing transmitted force over the simulated bony prominence with a rank order of effectiveness. Other factors considered were: amount and rate of permanent deformation offset by considerations of enhanced moldability when comparing the neoprene and urethane materials with the polyethylene foams. The ideal insert represents a combination of material to achieve both durability and moldability. PMID:3229697

  3. OpenSMOKE++: An object-oriented framework for the numerical modeling of reactive systems with detailed kinetic mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuoci, A.; Frassoldati, A.; Faravelli, T.; Ranzi, E.

    2015-07-01

    OpenSMOKE++ is a general framework for numerical simulations of reacting systems with detailed kinetic mechanisms, including thousands of chemical species and reactions. The framework is entirely written in object-oriented C++ and can be easily extended and customized by the user for specific systems, without having to modify the core functionality of the program. The OpenSMOKE++ framework can handle simulations of ideal chemical reactors (plug-flow, batch, and jet stirred reactors), shock-tubes, rapid compression machines, and can be easily incorporated into multi-dimensional CFD codes for the modeling of reacting flows. OpenSMOKE++ provides useful numerical tools such as the sensitivity and rate of production analyses, needed to recognize the main chemical paths and to interpret the numerical results from a kinetic point of view. Since simulations involving large kinetic mechanisms are very time consuming, OpenSMOKE++ adopts advanced numerical techniques able to reduce the computational cost, without sacrificing the accuracy and the robustness of the calculations. In the present paper we give a detailed description of the framework features, the numerical models available, and the implementation of the code. The possibility of coupling the OpenSMOKE++ functionality with existing numerical codes is discussed. The computational performances of the framework are presented, and the capabilities of OpenSMOKE++ in terms of integration of stiff ODE systems are discussed and analyzed with special emphasis. Some examples demonstrating the ability of the OpenSMOKE++ framework to successfully manage large kinetic mechanisms are eventually presented.

  4. A Conceptual Framework for Evaluating Outpatient Electronic Prescribing Systems Based on Their Functional Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Douglas S.; Cretin, Shan; Marken, Richard S.; Landman, Adam B.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Electronic prescribing (e-prescribing) may substantially improve health care quality and efficiency, but the available systems are complex and their heterogeneity makes comparing and evaluating them a challenge. The authors aimed to develop a conceptual framework for anticipating the effects of alternative designs for outpatient e-prescribing systems. Design: Based on a literature review and on telephone interviews with e-prescribing vendors, the authors identified distinct e-prescribing functional capabilities and developed a conceptual framework for evaluating e-prescribing systems' potential effects based on their capabilities. Analyses of two commercial e-prescribing systems are presented as examples of applying the conceptual framework. Measurements: Major e-prescribing functional capabilities identified and the availability of evidence to support their specific effects. Results: The proposed framework for evaluating e-prescribing systems is organized using a process model of medication management. Fourteen e-prescribing functional capabilities are identified within the model. Evidence is identified to support eight specific effects for six of the functional capabilities. The evidence also shows that a functional capability with generally positive effects can be implemented in a way that creates unintended hazards. Applying the framework involves identifying an e-prescribing system's functional capabilities within the process model and then assessing the effects that could be expected from each capability in the proposed clinical environment. Conclusion: The proposed conceptual framework supports the integration of available evidence in considering the full range of effects from e-prescribing design alternatives. More research is needed into the effects of specific e-prescribing functional alternatives. Until more is known, e-prescribing initiatives should include provisions to monitor for unintended hazards. PMID:14527975

  5. Defining competency-based evaluation objectives in family medicine

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Tim; Brailovsky, Carlos; Rainsberry, Paul; Lawrence, Katherine; Crichton, Tom; Carpentier, Marie-Pierre; Visser, Shaun

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To develop a definition of competence in family medicine sufficient to guide a review of Certification examinations by the Board of Examiners of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. Design Delphi analysis of responses to a 4-question postal survey. Setting Canadian family practice. Participants A total of 302 family physicians who have served as examiners for the College of Family Physicians of Canada’s Certification examination. Methods A survey comprising 4 short-answer questions was mailed to the 302 participating family physicians asking them to list elements that define competence in family medicine among newly certified family physicians beginning independent practice. Two expert groups used a modified Delphi consensus process to analyze responses and generate 2 basic components of this definition of competence: first, the problems that a newly practising family physician should be competent to handle; second, the qualities, behaviour, and skills that characterize competence at the start of independent practice. Main findings Response rate was 54%; total number of elements among all responses was 5077, for an average 31 per respondent. Of the elements, 2676 were topics or clinical situations to be dealt with; the other 2401 were skills, behaviour patterns, or qualities, without reference to a specific clinical problem. The expert groups identified 6 essential skills, the phases of the clinical encounter, and 99 priority topics as the descriptors used by the respondents. More than 20% of respondents cited 30 of the topics. Conclusion Family physicians define the domain of competence in family medicine in terms of 6 essential skills, the phases of the clinical encounter, and priority topics. This survey represents the first level of definition of evaluation objectives in family medicine. Definition of the interactions among these elements will permit these objectives to become detailed enough to effectively guide assessment. PMID

  6. A scoping review about conference objectives and evaluative practices: how do we get more out of them?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Large multi-day conferences have often been criticized as ineffective ways to improve social outcomes and to influence policy or practice. Unfortunately, many conference evaluations have also been inadequate in determining the impact of a conference on its associated social sector, with little evidence gathered or analyzed to substantiate or refute these criticisms. The aim of this scoping review is to investigate and report stakeholders’ objectives for planning or participating in large multi-day conferences and how these objectives are being evaluated. We conducted a scoping review supplemented by a small number of key informant interviews. Eight bibliographic databases were systematically searched to identify papers describing conference objectives and/or evaluations. We developed a conference evaluation framework based on theoretical models and empirical findings, which structured the descriptive synthesis of the data. We identified 3,073 potential papers for review, of which 44 were included in this study. Our evaluation framework connects five key elements in planning a conference and its evaluation (number in brackets refers to number of themes identified): conference objectives (8), purpose of evaluation (7), evaluation methods (5), indicators of success (9) and theories/models (8). Further analysis of indicators of success identified three categories of indicators with differing scopes (i.e. immediate, prospective or follow-up) as well as empirical links between the purpose of evaluations and these indicators. Conference objectives and evaluations were largely correlated with the type of conference (i.e. academic, political/governmental or business) but diverse overall. While much can be done to improve the quality and usefulness of conference evaluations, there are innovative assessments that are currently being utilized by some conferences and warrant further investigation. This review provides conference evaluators and organizers a simple resource to

  7. Formulating a Curriculum Framework for Bible Study: Creating Course Objectives for Bible Curriculum in Jewish Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Eli; Goldstein, Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    Bible teachers worldwide lack a shared language with which to describe expectations of what pupils will learn at various stages of their schooling. This article attempts such a language. If defines a framework, formulated with the assistance of twenty-five Bible teachers in Jewish schools in the United Kingdom. It is hoped that this article will…

  8. Helping Students Identify Base Words in Indonesian--Linking Learning Objects in an ICLL Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colman, Ingrid; Davison, Janine

    2008-01-01

    For students of Indonesian, learning to identify base words is very important, but can often be quite tricky. This article describes how one of the authors used interactive digital content from The Le@rning Federation (TLF) together with an extensive range of offline activities within an intercultural language learning (ICLL) framework. It helps…

  9. A Proposed Framework for Global Leadership Education: Learning Objectives and Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, LeAnn M.; Whitaker, Brett L.; Brungardt, Curtis L.

    2012-01-01

    Many traditional leadership education paradigms are challenged by the transformational nature of globalization and are limited in application in diverse and complex contexts. In order to address these issues, a new framework must be adopted within higher education leadership programs to educate the next generation of global leaders. This paper…

  10. Prospective Secondary Teachers Repositioning by Designing, Implementing and Testing Mathematics Learning Objects: A Conceptual Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mgombelo, Joyce R.; Buteau, Chantal

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a conceptual framework developed to illuminate how prospective teachers' learning experiences are shaped by didactic-sensitive activities in departments of mathematics. We draw from the experiences of prospective teachers in the Department of Mathematics at our institution in designing, implementing (i.e. computer…

  11. An Object-Oriented Course Framework for Developing Adaptive Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tseng, Shian-Shyong; Su, Jun-Ming; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Hwang, Gwo-Haur; Tsai, Chin-Chung; Tsai, Chang-Jiun

    2008-01-01

    The popularity of web-based learning systems has encouraged researchers to pay attention to several new issues. One of the most important issues is the development of new techniques to provide personalized teaching materials. Although several frameworks or methods have been proposed, it remains a challenging issue to design an easy-to-realize…

  12. The WellingTONNE Challenge Toolkit: Using the RE-AIM Framework to Evaluate a Community Resource Promoting Healthy Lifestyle Behaviours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caperchione, Cristina; Coulson, Fiona

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The RE-AIM framework has been recognized as a tool to evaluate the adoption, delivery, and sustainability of an intervention, and estimate its potential public health impact. In this study four dimensions of the RE-AIM framework (adoption, implementation, effectiveness, and maintenance) were used to evaluate the WellingTONNE Challenge…

  13. Action semantics: A unifying conceptual framework for the selective use of multimodal and modality-specific object knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Elk, Michiel; van Schie, Hein; Bekkering, Harold

    2014-06-01

    Our capacity to use tools and objects is often considered one of the hallmarks of the human species. Many objects greatly extend our bodily capabilities to act in the physical world, such as when using a hammer or a saw. In addition, humans have the remarkable capability to use objects in a flexible fashion and to combine multiple objects in complex actions. We prepare coffee, cook dinner and drive our car. In this review we propose that humans have developed declarative and procedural knowledge, i.e. action semantics that enables us to use objects in a meaningful way. A state-of-the-art review of research on object use is provided, involving behavioral, developmental, neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies. We show that research in each of these domains is characterized by similar discussions regarding (1) the role of object affordances, (2) the relation between goals and means in object use and (3) the functional and neural organization of action semantics. We propose a novel conceptual framework of action semantics to address these issues and to integrate the previous findings. We argue that action semantics entails both multimodal object representations and modality-specific sub-systems, involving manipulation knowledge, functional knowledge and representations of the sensory and proprioceptive consequences of object use. Furthermore, we argue that action semantics are hierarchically organized and selectively activated and used depending on the action intention of the actor and the current task context. Our framework presents an integrative account of multiple findings and perspectives on object use that may guide future studies in this interdisciplinary domain.

  14. Action semantics: A unifying conceptual framework for the selective use of multimodal and modality-specific object knowledge.

    PubMed

    van Elk, Michiel; van Schie, Hein; Bekkering, Harold

    2014-06-01

    Our capacity to use tools and objects is often considered one of the hallmarks of the human species. Many objects greatly extend our bodily capabilities to act in the physical world, such as when using a hammer or a saw. In addition, humans have the remarkable capability to use objects in a flexible fashion and to combine multiple objects in complex actions. We prepare coffee, cook dinner and drive our car. In this review we propose that humans have developed declarative and procedural knowledge, i.e. action semantics that enables us to use objects in a meaningful way. A state-of-the-art review of research on object use is provided, involving behavioral, developmental, neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies. We show that research in each of these domains is characterized by similar discussions regarding (1) the role of object affordances, (2) the relation between goals and means in object use and (3) the functional and neural organization of action semantics. We propose a novel conceptual framework of action semantics to address these issues and to integrate the previous findings. We argue that action semantics entails both multimodal object representations and modality-specific sub-systems, involving manipulation knowledge, functional knowledge and representations of the sensory and proprioceptive consequences of object use. Furthermore, we argue that action semantics are hierarchically organized and selectively activated and used depending on the action intention of the actor and the current task context. Our framework presents an integrative account of multiple findings and perspectives on object use that may guide future studies in this interdisciplinary domain. PMID:24461373

  15. Expected frontiers: Incorporating weather uncertainty into a policy analysis using an integrated bi-level multi-objective optimization framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Weather is the main driver in both plant use of nutrients and fate and transport of nutrients in the environment. In previous work, we evaluated a green tax for control of agricultural nutrients in a bi-level optimization framework that linked deterministic models. In this study,...

  16. Evaluation of translucency of monolithic zirconia and framework zirconia materials

    PubMed Central

    Tuncel, İlkin; Üşümez, Aslıhan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The opacity of zirconia is an esthetic disadvantage that hinders achieving natural and shade-matched restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the translucency of non-colored and colored framework zirconia and monolithic zirconia. MATERIALS AND METHODS The three groups tested were: non-colored framework zirconia, colored framework zirconia with the A3 shade according to Vita Classic Scale, and monolithic zirconia (n=5). The specimens were fabricated in the dimensions of 15×12×0.5 mm. A spectrophotometer was used to measure the contrast ratio, which is indicative of translucency. Three measurements were made to obtain the contrast ratios of the materials over a white background (L*w) and a black background (L*b). The data were analyzed using the one-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests. One specimen from each group was chosen for scanning electron microscope analysis. The determined areas of the SEM images were divided by the number of grains in order to calculate the mean grain size. RESULTS Statistically significant differences were observed among all groups (P<.05). Non-colored zirconia had the highest translucency with a contrast ratio of 0.75, while monolithic zirconia had the lowest translucency with a contrast ratio of 0.8. The mean grain sizes of the non-colored, colored, and monolithic zirconia were 233, 256, and 361 nm, respectively. CONCLUSION The translucency of the zirconia was affected by the coloring procedure and the grain size. Although monolithic zirconia may not be the best esthetic material for the anterior region, it may serve as an alternative in the posterior region for the bilayered zirconia restorations. PMID:27350851

  17. Virtual Workshop Environment (VWE): A Taxonomy and Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) Framework for Modularized Virtual Learning Environments (VLE)--Applying the Learning Object Concept to the VLE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsson, Fredrik; Naeve, Ambjorn

    2006-01-01

    Based on existing Learning Object taxonomies, this article suggests an alternative Learning Object taxonomy, combined with a general Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) framework, aiming to transfer the modularized concept of Learning Objects to modularized Virtual Learning Environments. The taxonomy and SOA-framework exposes a need for a clearer…

  18. Nanoparticle risk management and cost evaluation: a general framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Dominique; Bomfim, João A. S.; Metz, Sébastien; Bouillard, Jacques X.; Brignon, Jean-Marc

    2011-07-01

    Industrial production of nano-objects has been growing fast during the last decade and a wide range of products containing nanoparticles (NPs) is proposed to the public in various markets (automotive, electronics, textiles...). The issues encountered in monitoring the presence of nano-objects in any media cause a major difficulty for controlling the risk associated to the production stage. It is therefore very difficult to assess the efficiency of prevention and mitigation solutions, which potentially leads to overestimate the level of the protection barriers that are recommended. The extra costs in adding nano-objects to the process, especially that of nanosafety, must be estimated and optimized to ensure the competitiveness of the future production lines and associated products. The risk management and cost evaluation methods presented herein have been designed for application in a pilot production line of injection-moulded nanocomposites.

  19. Framework and criteria for program evaluation in the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-30

    This study addresses the development of a framework and generic criteria for conducting program evaluation in the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy. The evaluation process is intended to provide the Assistant Secretary with comprehensive and consistent evaluation data for management decisions regarding policy and strategy, crosscutting energy impacts and resource allocation and justification. The study defines evaluation objectives, identifies basic information requirements (criteria), and identifies a process for collecting evaluation results at the basic program level, integrating the results, and summarizing information upward through the CE organization to the Assistant Secretary. Methods are described by which initial criteria were tested, analyzed, and refined for CE program applicability. General guidelines pertaining to evaluation and the Sunset Review requirements are examined and various types, designs, and models for evaluation are identified. Existing CE evaluation reports are reviewed and comments on their adequacy for meeting current needs are provided. An inventory and status survey of CE program evaluation activities is presented, as are issues, findings, and recommendations pertaining to CE evaluation and Sunset Review requirements. Also, sources of data for use in evaluation and the Sunset Review response are identified. An inventory of CE evaluation-related documents and reports is provided.

  20. A Framework for the Evaluation of Internet-based Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Background While still in its infancy, Internet-based diabetes management shows great promise for growth. However, the following aspects must be considered: what are the key metrics for the evaluation of a diabetes management site? how should these sites grow in the future and what services should they offer? Objectives To examine the needs of the patient and the health care professional in an Internet-based diabetes management solution and how these needs are translated into services offered. Methods An evaluation framework was constructed based on a literature review that identified the requirements for an Internet-based diabetes management solution. The requirements were grouped into 5 categories: Monitoring, Information, Personalization, Communication, and Technology. Two of the market leaders (myDiabetes and LifeMasters) were selected and were evaluated with the framework. The Web sites were evaluated independently by 5 raters using the evaluation framework. All evaluations were performed from November 1, 2001 through December 15, 2001. Results The agreement level between raters ranged from 60% to 100%. The multi-rater reliability (kappa) was 0.75 for myDiabetes and 0.65 for LifeMasters, indicating substantial agreement. The results of the evaluations indicate that LifeMasters is a more-complete solution than myDiabetes in all dimensions except Information, where both sites were equivalent. LifeMasters satisfied 32 evaluation criteria while myDiabetes satisfied 24 evaluation criteria, out of a possible 40 in the framework. Conclusions The framework is based on the recognition that the management of diabetes via the Internet is based on several integrated dimensions: Monitoring, Information, Personalization, Communication, and Technology. A successful diabetes management system should efficiently integrate all dimensions. The evaluation found that LifeMasters is successful in integrating the health care professional in the management of diabetes and that My

  1. Toward a multi-objective decision support framework to support regulations of unconventional oil and gas development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alongi, M.; Howard, C.; Kasprzyk, J. R.; Ryan, J. N.

    2015-12-01

    Unconventional oil and gas development (UOGD) using hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling has recently fostered an unprecedented acceleration in energy development. Regulations seek to protect environmental quality of areas surrounding UOGD, while maintaining economic benefits. One such regulation is a setback distance, which dictates the minimum proximity between an oil and gas well and an object such as a residential or commercial building, property line, or water source. In general, most setback regulations have been strongly politically motivated without a clear scientific basis for understanding the relationship between the setback distance and various performance outcomes. This presentation discusses a new decision support framework for setback regulations, as part of a large NSF-funded sustainability research network (SRN) on UOGD. The goal of the decision support framework is to integrate a wide array of scientific information from the SRN into a coherent framework that can help inform policy regarding UOGD. The decision support framework employs multiobjective evolutionary algorithm (MOEA) optimization coupled with simulation models of air quality and other performance-based outcomes on UOGD. The result of the MOEA optimization runs are quantitative tradeoff curves among different objectives. For example, one such curve could demonstrate air pollution concentrations versus estimates of energy development profits, for different levels of setback distance. Our results will also inform policy-relevant discussions surrounding UOGD such as comparing single- and multi-well pads, as well as regulations on the density of well development over a spatial area.

  2. Optimizing transformations of stencil operations for parallel object-oriented scientific frameworks on cache-based architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Bassetti, F.; Davis, K.; Quinlan, D.

    1998-12-31

    High-performance scientific computing relies increasingly on high-level large-scale object-oriented software frameworks to manage both algorithmic complexity and the complexities of parallelism: distributed data management, process management, inter-process communication, and load balancing. This encapsulation of data management, together with the prescribed semantics of a typical fundamental component of such object-oriented frameworks--a parallel or serial array-class library--provides an opportunity for increasingly sophisticated compile-time optimization techniques. This paper describes two optimizing transformations suitable for certain classes of numerical algorithms, one for reducing the cost of inter-processor communication, and one for improving cache utilization; demonstrates and analyzes the resulting performance gains; and indicates how these transformations are being automated.

  3. Temporal locality optimizations for stencil operations for parallel object-oriented scientific frameworks on cache-based architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Bassetti, F.; Davis, K.; Quinlan, D.

    1998-12-01

    High-performance scientific computing relies increasingly on high-level large-scale object-oriented software frameworks to manage both algorithmic complexity and the complexities of parallelism: distributed data management, process management, inter-process communication, and load balancing. This encapsulation of data management, together with the prescribed semantics of a typical fundamental component of such object-oriented frameworks--a parallel or serial array-class library--provides an opportunity for increasingly sophisticated compile-time optimization techniques. This paper describes a technique for introducing cache blocking suitable for certain classes of numerical algorithms, demonstrates and analyzes the resulting performance gains, and indicates how this optimization transformation is being automated.

  4. Collaborative evaluation within a framework of stakeholder-oriented evaluation approaches.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Rita G

    2012-11-01

    Collaborative Evaluation systematically invites and engages stakeholders in program evaluation planning and implementation. Unlike "distanced" evaluation approaches, which reject stakeholder participation as evaluation team members, Collaborative Evaluation assumes that active, on-going engagement between evaluators and program staff, result in stronger evaluation designs, enhanced data collection and analysis, and results that stakeholder understand and use. Among similar "participant-oriented" evaluation approaches (Fitzpatrick, Sanders, & Worthen, 2011), Collaborative Evaluation distinguishes itself in that it uses a sliding scale for levels of collaboration. This means that different program evaluations will experience different levels of collaborative activity. The sliding scale is applied as the evaluator considers each program's evaluation needs, readiness, and resources. While Collaborative Evaluation is a term widely used in evaluation, its meaning varies considerably. Often used interchangeably with participatory and/or empowerment evaluation, the terms can be used to mean different things, which can be confusing. The articles use a comparative Collaborative Evaluation Framework to highlight how from a theoretical perspective, Collaborative Evaluation distinguishes itself from the other participatory evaluation approaches. PMID:22364849

  5. a New Framework for Object-Based Image Analysis Based on Segmentation Scale Space and Random Forest Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadavand, A.; Saadatseresht, M.; Homayouni, S.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a new object-based framework is developed for automate scale selection in image segmentation. The quality of image objects have an important impact on further analyses. Due to the strong dependency of segmentation results to the scale parameter, choosing the best value for this parameter, for each class, becomes a main challenge in object-based image analysis. We propose a new framework which employs pixel-based land cover map to estimate the initial scale dedicated to each class. These scales are used to build segmentation scale space (SSS), a hierarchy of image objects. Optimization of SSS, respect to NDVI and DSM values in each super object is used to get the best scale in local regions of image scene. Optimized SSS segmentations are finally classified to produce the final land cover map. Very high resolution aerial image and digital surface model provided by ISPRS 2D semantic labelling dataset is used in our experiments. The result of our proposed method is comparable to those of ESP tool, a well-known method to estimate the scale of segmentation, and marginally improved the overall accuracy of classification from 79% to 80%.

  6. Polarization distance: a framework for modelling object detection by polarization vision systems

    PubMed Central

    How, Martin J.; Marshall, N. Justin

    2014-01-01

    The discrimination of polarized light is widespread in the natural world. Its use for specific, large-field tasks, such as navigation and the detection of water bodies, has been well documented. Some species of cephalopod and crustacean have polarization receptors distributed across the whole visual field and are thought to use polarized light cues for object detection. Both object-based polarization vision systems and large field detectors rely, at least initially, on an orthogonal, two-channel receptor organization. This may increase to three-directional analysis at subsequent interneuronal levels. In object-based and some of the large-field tasks, the dominant e-vector detection axes are often aligned (through eye, head and body stabilization mechanisms) horizontally and vertically relative to the outside world. We develop Bernard and Wehner's 1977 model of polarization receptor dynamics to apply it to the detection and discrimination of polarized objects against differently polarized backgrounds. We propose a measure of ‘polarization distance’ (roughly analogous to ‘colour distance’) for estimating the discriminability of objects in polarized light, and conclude that horizontal/vertical arrays are optimally designed for detecting differences in the degree, and not the e-vector axis, of polarized light under natural conditions. PMID:24352940

  7. Conceptual framework for standard economic evaluation of physical activity programs in primary prevention.

    PubMed

    Wolfenstetter, Silke B

    2011-12-01

    Economic evaluations of primary prevention physical activity programs have gained importance because of scarce resources in health-care-systems. A concept for economic evaluation should be based on the efficacy of physical activity, the standard methods of economic evaluation and the aims of public health. Previous publications have examined only parts of these components and have not developed a comprehensive conceptual framework; it is the objective of this article to develop such a framework. The derived method should aid decision makers and staff members of intervention programs in reviewing and conducting an economic evaluation. A literature search of articles was done using six electronic databases. Referenced works for standard methods and more comprehensive approaches for evaluation of preventive programs were studied. The newly developed conceptual framework for economic evaluation includes: (1) the type of physical activity program; (2) features of a selected study population; (3) the outcome dimension comprising exercise efficacy, reach, recruitment, response rate, maintenance, compliance and adverse health effects plus the social impact; and (4) the cost dimension consisting of program development costs, program implementation costs including the implementation, recruitment, program, participants' time costs and savings resulting from the health effects of the intervention. Cost-effectiveness also depends on the methodology, such as the chosen perspective, data collection, valuation methods and discounting. If an intervention is not considered cost-effective, it is necessary to check each dimension to find possible failures in order to learn for future interventions. A more detailed economic evaluation is of utmost importance for improved comparability and transferability. PMID:21773728

  8. The Effect of Instructional Objectives and General Objectives on Student Self-Evaluation of Psychomotor Performance in Power Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janeczko, Robert John

    The major purpose of this study was to ascertain the relative effects of student exposure to instructional objectives upon student self-evaluation of psychomotor activities in a college-level power mechanics course. A randomized posttest-only control group design was used with two different approaches to the statement of the objectives. Four…

  9. WV R-EMAP STUDY: MULTIPLE-OBJECTIVE SAMPLING DESIGN FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multi-objective sampling design has been implemented through Regional Monitoring and Assessment Program (R-EMAP) support of a cooperative agreement with the state of West Virginia. Goals of the project include: 1) development and testing of a temperature-adjusted fish IBI for t...

  10. Game Object Model Version II: A Theoretical Framework for Educational Game Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amory, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Complex computer and video games may provide a vehicle, based on appropriate theoretical concepts, to transform the educational landscape. Building on the original game object model (GOM) a new more detailed model is developed to support concepts that educational computer games should: be relevant, explorative, emotive, engaging, and include…

  11. iLOG: A Framework for Automatic Annotation of Learning Objects with Empirical Usage Metadata

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, L. D.; Soh, Leen-Kiat; Samal, Ashok; Nugent, Gwen

    2012-01-01

    Learning objects (LOs) are digital or non-digital entities used for learning, education or training commonly stored in repositories searchable by their associated metadata. Unfortunately, based on the current standards, such metadata is often missing or incorrectly entered making search difficult or impossible. In this paper, we investigate…

  12. Smart Objects, Dumb Archives: A User-Centric, Layered Digital Library Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maly, Kurt; Nelson, Michael L.; Zubair, Mohammad

    1999-01-01

    Discusses digital libraries, interoperability, and interfaces to access them, and proposes one universal protocol for communication for simple archives based on the hypertext transfer protocol (http). Describes the creation of a special class of digital objects called buckets, archives based on a NASA collection, and a set of digital library…

  13. A framework for evaluation of flood management strategies.

    PubMed

    Hansson, K; Danielson, M; Ekenberg, L

    2008-02-01

    The resulting impact of disasters on society depends on the affected country's economic strength prior to the disaster. The larger the disaster and the smaller the economy, the more significant is the impact. This is clearest seen in developing countries, where weak economies become even weaker afterwards. Deliberate strategies for the sharing of losses from hazardous events may aid a country or a community in efficiently using scarce prevention and mitigation resources, thus being better prepared for the effects of a disaster. Nevertheless, many governments lack an adequate institutional system for applying cost effective and reliable technologies for disaster prevention, early warnings, and mitigation. Modelling by event analyses and strategy models is one way of planning ahead, but these models have so far not been linked together. An approach to this problem was taken during a large study in Hungary, the Tisza case study, where a number of policy strategies for spreading of flood loss were formulated. In these strategies, a set of parameters of particular interest were extracted from interviews with stakeholders in the region. However, the study was focused on emerging economies, and, in particular, on insurance strategies. The scope is now extended to become a functional framework also for developing countries. In general, they have a higher degree of vulnerability. The paper takes northern Vietnam as an example of a developing region. We identify important parameters and discuss their importance for flood strategy formulations. Based on the policy strategies in the Tisza case, we extract data from the strategies and propose a framework for loss spread in developing and emerging economies. The parameter set can straightforwardly be included in a simulation and decision model for policy formulation and evaluation, taking multiple stakeholders into account. PMID:17292530

  14. Judgment under uncertainty; a probabilistic evaluation framework for decision-making about sanitation systems in low-income countries.

    PubMed

    Malekpour, Shirin; Langeveld, Jeroen; Letema, Sammy; Clemens, François; van Lier, Jules B

    2013-03-30

    This paper introduces the probabilistic evaluation framework, to enable transparent and objective decision-making in technology selection for sanitation solutions in low-income countries. The probabilistic framework recognizes the often poor quality of the available data for evaluations. Within this framework, the evaluations will be done based on the probabilities that the expected outcomes occur in practice, considering the uncertainties in evaluation parameters. Consequently, the outcome of evaluations will not be single point estimates; but there exists a range of possible outcomes. A first trial application of this framework for evaluation of sanitation options in the Nyalenda settlement in Kisumu, Kenya, showed how the range of values that an evaluation parameter may obtain in practice would influence the evaluation outcomes. In addition, as the probabilistic evaluation requires various site-specific data, sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the influence of each data set quality on the evaluation outcomes. Based on that, data collection activities could be (re)directed, in a trade-off between the required investments in those activities and the resolution of the decisions that are to be made. PMID:23416987

  15. A tiered assessment framework to evaluate human health risk of contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Ben K; Melwani, Aroon R; Bay, Steven M

    2015-07-01

    For sediment contaminated with bioaccumulative pollutants (e.g., PCBs and organochorine pesticides), human consumption of seafood that contain bioaccumulated sediment-derived contaminants is a well-established exposure pathway. Historically, regulation and management of this bioaccumulation pathway has focused on site-specific risk assessment. The state of California (United States) is supporting the development of a consistent and quantitative sediment assessment framework to aid in interpreting a narrative objective to protect human health. The conceptual basis of this framework focuses on 2 key questions: 1) do observed pollutant concentrations in seafood from a given site pose unacceptable health risks to human consumers? and 2) is sediment contamination at a site a significant contributor to seafood contamination? The first question is evaluated by interpreting seafood tissue concentrations at the site, based on health risk calculations. The second question is evaluated by interpreting site-specific sediment chemistry data using a food web bioaccumulation model. The assessment framework includes 3 tiers (screening assessment, site assessment, and refined site assessment), which enables the assessment to match variations in data availability, site complexity, and study objectives. The second and third tiers use a stochastic simulation approach, incorporating information on variability and uncertainty of key parameters, such as seafood contaminant concentration and consumption rate by humans. The framework incorporates site-specific values for sensitive parameters and statewide values for difficult to obtain or less sensitive parameters. The proposed approach advances risk assessment policy by incorporating local data into a consistent region-wide problem formulation, applying best available science in a streamlined fashion. PMID:25641876

  16. Development of a Dynamically Configurable,Object-Oriented Framework for Distributed, Multi-modal Computational Aerospace Systems Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afjeh, Abdollah A.; Reed, John A.

    2003-01-01

    This research is aimed at developing a neiv and advanced simulation framework that will significantly improve the overall efficiency of aerospace systems design and development. This objective will be accomplished through an innovative integration of object-oriented and Web-based technologies ivith both new and proven simulation methodologies. The basic approach involves Ihree major areas of research: Aerospace system and component representation using a hierarchical object-oriented component model which enables the use of multimodels and enforces component interoperability. Collaborative software environment that streamlines the process of developing, sharing and integrating aerospace design and analysis models. . Development of a distributed infrastructure which enables Web-based exchange of models to simplify the collaborative design process, and to support computationally intensive aerospace design and analysis processes. Research for the first year dealt with the design of the basic architecture and supporting infrastructure, an initial implementation of that design, and a demonstration of its application to an example aircraft engine system simulation.

  17. A framework for sustainable invasive species management: environmental, social and economic objectives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Diane L.; Phillips-Mao, Laura; Quiram, Gina; Sharpe, Leah; Stark, Rebecca; Sugita, Shinya; Weiler, Annie

    2011-01-01

    Applying the concept of sustainability to invasive species management (ISM) is challenging but necessary, given the increasing rates of invasion and the high costs of invasion impacts and control. To be sustainable, ISM must address environmental, social, and economic factors (or *pillars*) that influence the causes, impacts, and control of invasive species across multiple spatial and temporal scales. Although these pillars are generally acknowledged, their implementation is often limited by insufficient control options and significant economic and political constraints. In this paper, we outline specific objectives in each of these three *pillars* that, if incorporated into a management plan, will improve the plan's likelihood of sustainability. We then examine three case studies that illustrate how these objectives can be effectively implemented. Each pillar reinforces the others, such that the inclusion of even a few of the outlined objectives will lead to more effective management that achieves ecological goals, while generating social support and long-term funding to maintain projects to completion. We encourage agency directors and policy-makers to consider sustainability principles when developing funding schemes, management agendas, and policy.

  18. Incremental online object learning in a vehicular radar-vision fusion framework

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Zhengping; Weng, Juyang; Luciw, Matthew; Zeng, Shuqing

    2010-10-19

    In this paper, we propose an object learning system that incorporates sensory information from an automotive radar system and a video camera. The radar system provides a coarse attention for the focus of visual analysis on relatively small areas within the image plane. The attended visual areas are coded and learned by a 3-layer neural network utilizing what is called in-place learning, where every neuron is responsible for the learning of its own signal processing characteristics within its connected network environment, through inhibitory and excitatory connections with other neurons. The modeled bottom-up, lateral, and top-down connections in the network enable sensory sparse coding, unsupervised learning and supervised learning to occur concurrently. The presented work is applied to learn two types of encountered objects in multiple outdoor driving settings. Cross validation results show the overall recognition accuracy above 95% for the radar-attended window images. In comparison with the uncoded representation and purely unsupervised learning (without top-down connection), the proposed network improves the recognition rate by 15.93% and 6.35% respectively. The proposed system is also compared with other learning algorithms favorably. The result indicates that our learning system is the only one to fit all the challenging criteria for the development of an incremental and online object learning system.

  19. Object Creation and Human Factors Evaluation for Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Patricia F.

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of this project is to provide test objects for simulated environments utilized by the recently established Army/NASA Virtual Innovations Lab (ANVIL) at Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Al. The objective of the ANVIL lab is to provide virtual reality (VR) models and environments and to provide visualization and manipulation methods for the purpose of training and testing. Visualization equipment used in the ANVIL lab includes head-mounted and boom-mounted immersive virtual reality display devices. Objects in the environment are manipulated using data glove, hand controller, or mouse. These simulated objects are solid or surfaced three dimensional models. They may be viewed or manipulated from any location within the environment and may be viewed on-screen or via immersive VR. The objects are created using various CAD modeling packages and are converted into the virtual environment using dVise. This enables the object or environment to be viewed from any angle or distance for training or testing purposes.

  20. Comparative analysis of toxicological evaluations for dermal exposure performed under two different EU regulatory frameworks.

    PubMed

    Westerholm, Emma; Schenk, Linda

    2014-02-01

    Dermal exposure to chemicals is highly relevant in relation to the use of cosmetic products, both in consumers and in individuals exposed occupationally. Regulatory frameworks exist within the EU to limit the dermal exposure of the general population and workers to chemicals in general, as well as to limit the use of certain substances in cosmetic products. The objective of the study was to investigate and compare toxicological evaluations of dermal exposure performed under current regulatory frameworks. The publicly disseminated hazard information under the respective regulatory frameworks was compiled and compared for the five substances resorcinol, p-phenylenediamine, p-aminophenol, N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine, and diethylene glycol monoethyl ether. A low consistency between evaluations was observed in respect to data coverage and cited dose descriptors. No systematic differences over all five substances were identified from the viewpoint of dermal hazard assessment. The critical effect and corresponding systemic effect dose descriptor was identical for two substances, differed somewhat for two other (a factor of 2-2.5). For N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine a critical effect was only identified under REACH. PMID:24269627

  1. TRENCADIS - secure architecture to share and manage DICOM objects in a ontological framework based on OGSA.

    PubMed

    Blanquer, Ignacio; Hernandez, Vicente; Segrelles, Damià; Torres, Erik

    2007-01-01

    Today most European healthcare centers use the digital format for their databases of images. TRENCADIS is a software architecture comprising a set of services as a solution for interconnecting, managing and sharing selected parts of medical DICOM data for the development of training and decision support tools. The organization of the distributed information in virtual repositories is based on semantic criteria. Different groups of researchers could organize themselves to propose a Virtual Organization (VO). These VOs will be interested in specific target areas, and will share information concerning each area. Although the private part of the information to be shared will be removed, special considerations will be taken into account to avoid the access by non-authorized users. This paper describes the security model implemented as part of TRENCADIS. The paper is organized as follows. First introduces the problem and presents our motivations. Section 1 defines the objectives. Section 2 presents an overview of the existing proposals per objective. Section 3 outlines the overall architecture. Section 4 describes how TRENCADIS is architected to realize the security goals discussed in the previous sections. The different security services and components of the infrastructure are briefly explained, as well as the exposed interfaces. Finally, Section 5 concludes and gives some remarks on our future work. PMID:17476054

  2. Smart Objects, Dumb Archives: A User-Centric, Layered Digital Library Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maly, Kurt; Nelson, Michael L.; Zubair, Mohammad

    1999-01-01

    Currently, there exist a large number of superb digital libraries, all of which are, unfortunately, vertically integrated and all presenting a monolithic interface to their users. Ideally, a user would want to locate resources from a variety of digital libraries dealing only with one interface. A number of approaches exist to this interoperability issue exist including: defining a universal protocol for all libraries to adhere to; or developing mechanisms to translate between protocols. The approach we illustrate in this paper is to push down the level of universal protocols to one for digital object communication and for communication for simple archives. This approach creates the opportunity for digital library service providers to create digital libraries tailored to the needs of user communities drawing from available archives and individual publishers who adhere to this standard. We have created a reference implementation based on the hyper text transfer protocol (http) with the protocols being derived from the Dienst protocol. We have created a special class of digital objects called buckets and a number of archives based on a NASA collection and NSF funded projects. Starting from NCSTRL we have developed a set of digital library services called NCSTRL+ and have created digital libraries for researchers, educators and students that can each draw on all the archives and individually created buckets.

  3. European Healthy Cities evaluation: conceptual framework and methodology.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Evelyne; Green, Geoff; Dyakova, Mariana; Spanswick, Lucy; Palmer, Nicola

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the methodology, programme logic and conceptual framework that drove the evaluation of the Fifth Phase of the WHO European Healthy Cities Network. Towards the end of the phase, 99 cities were designated progressively through the life of the phase (2009-14). The paper establishes the values, systems and aspirations that these cities sign up for, as foundations for the selection of methodology. We assert that a realist synthesis methodology, driven by a wide range of qualitative and quantitative methods, is the most appropriate perspective to address the wide geopolitical, demographic, population and health diversities of these cities. The paper outlines the rationale for a structured multiple case study approach, the deployment of a comprehensive questionnaire, data mining through existing databases including Eurostat and analysis of management information generation tools used throughout the period. Response rates were considered extremely high for this type of research. Non-response analyses are described, which show that data are representative for cities across the spectrum of diversity. This paper provides a foundation for further analysis on specific areas of interest presented in this supplement. PMID:26069320

  4. Developing Evaluation Capacity in Extension 4-H Field Faculty: A Framework for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Mary E.

    2006-01-01

    Developing evaluation capacity in organizations is a complex and multifaceted task. This article outlines a framework for building evaluation capacity. The framework is based on four strategic methods for teaching evaluation: (a) using logic models for sound program planning, (b) providing one-on-one help, (c) facilitating small-team collaborative…

  5. A user-centred evaluation framework for the Sealife semantic web browsers

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Helen; Diallo, Gayo; de Quincey, Ed; Alexopoulou, Dimitra; Habermann, Bianca; Kostkova, Patty; Schroeder, Michael; Jupp, Simon; Khelif, Khaled; Stevens, Robert; Jawaheer, Gawesh; Madle, Gemma

    2009-01-01

    Background Semantically-enriched browsing has enhanced the browsing experience by providing contextualised dynamically generated Web content, and quicker access to searched-for information. However, adoption of Semantic Web technologies is limited and user perception from the non-IT domain sceptical. Furthermore, little attention has been given to evaluating semantic browsers with real users to demonstrate the enhancements and obtain valuable feedback. The Sealife project investigates semantic browsing and its application to the life science domain. Sealife's main objective is to develop the notion of context-based information integration by extending three existing Semantic Web browsers (SWBs) to link the existing Web to the eScience infrastructure. Methods This paper describes a user-centred evaluation framework that was developed to evaluate the Sealife SWBs that elicited feedback on users' perceptions on ease of use and information findability. Three sources of data: i) web server logs; ii) user questionnaires; and iii) semi-structured interviews were analysed and comparisons made between each browser and a control system. Results It was found that the evaluation framework used successfully elicited users' perceptions of the three distinct SWBs. The results indicate that the browser with the most mature and polished interface was rated higher for usability, and semantic links were used by the users of all three browsers. Conclusion Confirmation or contradiction of our original hypotheses with relation to SWBs is detailed along with observations of implementation issues. PMID:19796398

  6. A software framework for microarray and gene expression object model (MAGE-OM) array design annotation

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Matloob; Ivens, Alasdair

    2008-01-01

    Background The MIAME and MAGE-OM standards defined by the MGED society provide a specification and implementation of a software infrastructure to facilitate the submission and sharing of data from microarray studies via public repositories. However, although the MAGE object model is flexible enough to support different annotation strategies, the annotation of array descriptions can be complex. Results We have developed a graphical Java-based application (Adamant) to assist with submission of Microarray designs to public repositories. Output of the application is fully compliant with the standards prescribed by the various public data repositories. Conclusion Adamant will allow researchers to annotate and submit their own array designs to public repositories without requiring programming expertise, knowledge of the MAGE-OM or XML. The application has been used to submit a number of ArrayDesigns to the Array Express database. PMID:18366695

  7. Loop transformations for performance and message latency hiding in parallel object-oriented frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Bassetti, F.; Davis, K.; Quinlan, D.

    1998-09-01

    Application codes reliably achieve performance far less than the advertised capabilities of existing architectures, and this problem is worsening with increasingly-parallel machines. For large-scale numerical applications, stencil operations often impose the greater part of the computational cost, and the primary sources of inefficiency are the costs of message passing and poor cache utilization. This paper proposes and demonstrates optimizations for stencil and stencil-like computations for both serial and parallel environments that ameliorate these sources of inefficiency. Additionally, the authors argue that when stencil-like computations are encoded at a high level using object-oriented parallel array class libraries these optimizations, which are beyond the capability of compilers, may be automated.

  8. Object-based "dynamic cover types" - a new framework for monitoring landscape-level ecosystem change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dronova, I.; Wang, L.; Gong, P.; Zhong, L.

    2012-12-01

    Traditional analyses of ecosystem change with remote sensing data often focus on transitions between 'static' landscape cover types. However, in dynamic landscapes with frequent disturbance long-term surface trends may be obscured by intermediate shorter-term variation. Availability of high-quality remote sensing data is often inconsistent among change periods, which contributes to the uncertainty in change detection among 'static' classes. Alternatively, we propose Dynamic Cover Types (DCTs) to characterize highly variable areas based on their nested change regimes shaped by climate, phenology and disturbance. We define DCTs as sequences of surface transformations that have distinct temporal trajectories observable across landscapes within a given change period. To illustrate and test this concept, we combined multispectral and microwave satellite imagery to classify DCTs for a large complex seasonally inundated freshwater wetland in China in 2007-2008. Instead of using pixels, we mapped DCTs using object-based image analysis and supervised machine-learning algorithms to characterize common change types based on their spatial and temporal context. Spatial distributions of mapped DCTs simultaneously reflected several key drivers of wetland change, including broad-scale changes in submersion times, vegetation phenology and prevalence of plant cover and localized fine-scale disturbance. We further examined DCT response to a hypothetical scenario of a warmer wetter early spring by substituting spring 2008 images with 2007 ones. In this comparison, the strongest response was detected from DCTs that were closely associated with the water body and represented critical habitat for wintering migratory waterbirds in this area. Results indicate that object-based dynamic class boundaries may provide useful spatial units to highlight characteristic types of landscape change for environmental research, ecosystem monitoring and management considerations.

  9. Objective Situation Awareness Measurement Based on Performance Self-Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMaio, Joe

    1998-01-01

    The research was conducted in support of the NASA Safe All-Weather Flight Operations for Rotorcraft (SAFOR) program. The purpose of the work was to investigate the utility of two measurement tools developed by the British Defense Evaluation Research Agency. These tools were a subjective workload assessment scale, the DRA Workload Scale and a situation awareness measurement tool. The situation awareness tool uses a comparison of the crew's self-evaluation of performance against actual performance in order to determine what information the crew attended to during the performance. These two measurement tools were evaluated in the context of a test of innovative approach to alerting the crew by way of a helmet mounted display. The situation assessment data are reported here. The performance self-evaluation metric of situation awareness was found to be highly effective. It was used to evaluate situation awareness on a tank reconnaissance task, a tactical navigation task, and a stylized task used to evaluated handling qualities. Using the self-evaluation metric, it was possible to evaluate situation awareness, without exact knowledge the relevant information in some cases and to identify information to which the crew attended or failed to attend in others.

  10. Evaluation Manual for CIP Courses: Objectives and Implementation Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siri, Carmen

    This manual has been designed to guide courses on potato production sponsored by the International Potato Center (CIP) in Lima (Peru). It describes the CIP Course Evaluation System that is presently used and provides guidelines on how to use feedback more effectively for improving training. CIP evaluations are largely formative. The CIP focuses on…