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1

Whole genome amplification of the obligate intracellular pathogen Coxiella burnetii using multiple displacement amplification.  

PubMed

This study demonstrates that whole genome multiple displacement amplification (MDA) is a promising technique for downstream genomic analysis of fastidious obligate intracellular pathogens such as Coxiella burnetii. The MDA technology can help in obtaining sufficient genetic material from highly infectious agent and thus minimizing repeated culturing and associated biohazard. PMID:24455771

Kumar, Sanjay; Gangoliya, Shefali Raj; Berri, Mustapha; Rodolakis, Annie; Alam, Syed Imteyaz

2013-12-01

2

PI3K-? inhibitors in the therapeutic intervention of diseases caused by obligate intracellular pathogens  

PubMed Central

Our increased understanding of host pathogen interactions shows that pathogens could capitalize on host cell pathways to favor entry and disease establishment. One such pathway used by Leishmania mexicana to enter into neutrophils and macrophages is the PI3K? signaling pathway. We recently showed that the use of the PI3K? inhibitor AS-605240 for the treatment of experimental L. mexicana infection in mice resulted in significantly lower parasite burdens and lesion sizes than WT untreated mice. Further, AS-605240 was found to be as effective as Sodium Stibogluconate, the drug of choice for treatment of L. mexicana infection, in reducing parasite burdens in mice. Here, we provide potential mechanisms of PI3K? blockade in promoting resistance to L. mexicana infection in mice. As a proof of principle, we propose that targeting host cell signaling pathways used in the establishment of infection could be a possible therapeutic option in the management of obligate intracellular pathogens.

Oghumu, Steve; Satoskar, Abhay R.

2013-01-01

3

An Alternative Efficient Procedure for Purification of the Obligate Intracellular Fish Bacterial Pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis  

PubMed Central

Piscirickettsia salmonis is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen of salmonid fish and the etiological agent of the aggressive disease salmonid rickettsial syndrome. Today, this disease, also known as piscirickettsiosis, is the cause of high mortality in net pen-reared salmonids in southern Chile. Although the bacteria can be grown in tissue culture cells, genetic analysis of the organism has been hindered because of the difficulty in obtaining P. salmonis DNA free from contaminating host cell DNA. In this report, we describe a novel procedure to purify in vitro-grown bacteria with iodixanol as the substrate to run differential centrifugation gradients which, combined with DNase I digestion, yield enough pure bacteria to do DNA analysis. The efficiency of the purification procedure relies on two main issues: semiquantitative synchrony of the P. salmonis-infected Chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) tissue culture cells and low osmolarity of iodixanol to better resolve bacteria from the membranous structures of the host cell. This method resulted in the isolation of intact piscirickettsia organisms and removed salmon and mitochondrial DNA effectively, with only 1.0% contamination with the latter.

Henriquez, Vitalia; Rojas, Maria Veronica; Marshall, Sergio H.

2003-01-01

4

An alternative efficient procedure for purification of the obligate intracellular fish bacterial pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis.  

PubMed

Piscirickettsia salmonis is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen of salmonid fish and the etiological agent of the aggressive disease salmonid rickettsial syndrome. Today, this disease, also known as piscirickettsiosis, is the cause of high mortality in net pen-reared salmonids in southern Chile. Although the bacteria can be grown in tissue culture cells, genetic analysis of the organism has been hindered because of the difficulty in obtaining P. salmonis DNA free from contaminating host cell DNA. In this report, we describe a novel procedure to purify in vitro-grown bacteria with iodixanol as the substrate to run differential centrifugation gradients which, combined with DNase I digestion, yield enough pure bacteria to do DNA analysis. The efficiency of the purification procedure relies on two main issues: semiquantitative synchrony of the P. salmonis-infected Chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) tissue culture cells and low osmolarity of iodixanol to better resolve bacteria from the membranous structures of the host cell. This method resulted in the isolation of intact piscirickettsia organisms and removed salmon and mitochondrial DNA effectively, with only 1.0% contamination with the latter. PMID:14532090

Henríquez, Vitalia; Rojas, María Verónica; Marshall, Sergio H

2003-10-01

5

OspA, a lipoprotein antigen of the obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis.  

PubMed

No effective recombinant vaccines are currently available for any rickettsial diseases. In this regard the first non-ribosomal DNA sequences from the obligate intracellular pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis are presented. Genomic DNA isolated from Percoll density gradient purified P. salmonis, was used to construct an expression library in lambda ZAP II. In the absence of preexisting DNA sequence, rabbit polyclonal antiserum raised against P. salmonis, with a bias toward P. salmonis surface antigens, was used to identify immunoreactive clones. Catabolite repression of the lac promoter was required to obtain a stable clone of a 4,983 bp insert in Escherichia coli due to insert toxicity exerted by the accompanying radA open reading frame (ORF). DNA sequence analysis of the insert revealed 1 partial and 4 intact predicted ORF's. A 486 bp ORF, ospA, encoded a 17 kDa antigenic outer surface protein (OspA) with 62% amino acid sequence homology to the genus common 17 kDa outer membrane lipoprotein of Rickettsia prowazekii, previously thought confined to members of the genus Rickettsia. Palmitate incorporation demonstrated that OspA is posttranslationally lipidated in E. coli, albeit poorly expressed as a lipoprotein even after replacement of the signal sequence with the signal sequence from lpp (Braun lipoprotein) or the rickettsial 17 kDa homologue. To enhance expression, ospA was optimized for codon usage in E. coli by PCR synthesis. Expression of ospA was ultimately improved (approximately 13% of total protein) with a truncated variant lacking a signal sequence. High level expression (approximately 42% tot. prot.) was attained as an N-terminal fusion protein with the fusion product recovered as inclusion bodies in E. coli BL21. Expression of OspA in P. salmonis was confirmed by immunoblot analysis using polyclonal antibodies generated against a synthetic peptide of OspA (110-129) and a strong antibody response against OspA was detected in convalescent sera from coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). PMID:11200233

Kuzyk, M A; Burian, J; Thornton, J C; Kay, W W

2001-01-01

6

Transient Transfection and Expression in the Obligate Intracellular Parasite Toxoplasma gondii  

Microsoft Academic Search

Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan pathogen that produces severe disease in humans and animals. This obligate intracellular parasite provides an excellent model for the study of how such pathogens are able to invade, survive, and replicate intracellularly. DNA encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase was introduced into T. gondii and transiently expressed with the use of three vectors based on different Toxoplasma genes.

Dominique Soldati; John C. Boothroyd

1993-01-01

7

Obligate intracellular bacterial parasites of acanthamoebae related to Chlamydia spp.  

PubMed Central

The phylogeny of obligate intracellular coccoid parasites of acanthamoebae isolated from the nasal mucosa of humans was analyzed by the rRNA approach. The primary structures of the 16S and 23S rRNA molecules of one strain were determined in almost full length. In situ hybridization with a horseradish peroxidase-labeled oligonucleotide probe targeted to a unique signature site undoubtedly correlated the retrieved 16S rRNA sequence to the respective intracellular parasite. This probe also hybridized with the second strain, suggesting a close relationship between the two intracellular parasites. Comparative sequence analysis demonstrated a distinct relationship to the genus Chlamydia. With 16S rRNA similarities of 86 to 87% to the hitherto-sequenced Chlamydia species, the intracellular parasites are likely not new species of this genus but representatives of another genus in the family of the Chlamydiaceae. Consequently, it is proposed to provisionally classify the endoparasite of Acanthamoeba sp. strain Bn9 as "Candidatus Parachlamydia acanthamoebae." From an epidemiological perspective, the results suggest that small amoebae could be environmental reservoirs and vectors for a variety of potentially pathogenic bacteria including members of the Chlamydiaceae.

Amann, R; Springer, N; Schonhuber, W; Ludwig, W; Schmid, E N; Muller, K D; Michel, R

1997-01-01

8

Microsporidian genome analysis reveals evolutionary strategies for obligate intracellular growth  

PubMed Central

Microsporidia comprise a large phylum of obligate intracellular eukaryotes that are fungal-related parasites responsible for widespread disease, and here we address questions about microsporidia biology and evolution. We sequenced three microsporidian genomes from two species, Nematocida parisii and Nematocida sp1, which are natural pathogens of Caenorhabditis nematodes and provide model systems for studying microsporidian pathogenesis. We performed deep sequencing of transcripts from a time course of N. parisii infection. Examination of pathogen gene expression revealed compact transcripts and a dramatic takeover of host cells by Nematocida. We also performed phylogenomic analyses of Nematocida and other microsporidian genomes to refine microsporidian phylogeny and identify evolutionary events of gene loss, acquisition, and modification. In particular, we found that all microsporidia lost the tumor-suppressor gene retinoblastoma, which we speculate could accelerate the parasite cell cycle and increase the mutation rate. We also found that microsporidia acquired transporters that could import nucleosides to fuel rapid growth. In addition, microsporidian hexokinases gained secretion signal sequences, and in a functional assay these were sufficient to export proteins out of the cell; thus hexokinase may be targeted into the host cell to reprogram it toward biosynthesis. Similar molecular changes appear during formation of cancer cells and may be evolutionary strategies adopted independently by microsporidia to proliferate rapidly within host cells. Finally, analysis of genome polymorphisms revealed evidence for a sexual cycle that may provide genetic diversity to alleviate problems caused by clonal growth. Together these events may explain the emergence and success of these diverse intracellular parasites.

Cuomo, Christina A.; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Bakowski, Malina A.; Goldberg, Jonathan; Ma, Amy T.; Becnel, James J.; Didier, Elizabeth S.; Fan, Lin; Heiman, David I.; Levin, Joshua Z.; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Troemel, Emily R.

2012-01-01

9

Transient Transfection and Expression in the Obligate Intracellular Parasite Toxoplasma gondii  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan pathogen that produces severe disease in humans and animals. This obligate intracellular parasite provides an excellent model for the study of how such pathogens are able to invade, survive, and replicate intracellularly. DNA encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase was introduced into T. gondii and transiently expressed with the use of three vectors based on different Toxoplasma genes. The ability to introduce genes and have them efficiently and faithfully expressed is an essential tool for understanding the structure-function relation of genes and their products.

Soldati, Dominique; Boothroyd, John C.

1993-04-01

10

Rickettsia Phylogenomics: Unwinding the Intricacies of Obligate Intracellular Life  

PubMed Central

Background Completed genome sequences are rapidly increasing for Rickettsia, obligate intracellular ?-proteobacteria responsible for various human diseases, including epidemic typhus and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. In light of phylogeny, the establishment of orthologous groups (OGs) of open reading frames (ORFs) will distinguish the core rickettsial genes and other group specific genes (class 1 OGs or C1OGs) from those distributed indiscriminately throughout the rickettsial tree (class 2 OG or C2OGs). Methodology/Principal Findings We present 1823 representative (no gene duplications) and 259 non-representative (at least one gene duplication) rickettsial OGs. While the highly reductive (?1.2 MB) Rickettsia genomes range in predicted ORFs from 872 to 1512, a core of 752 OGs was identified, depicting the essential Rickettsia genes. Unsurprisingly, this core lacks many metabolic genes, reflecting the dependence on host resources for growth and survival. Additionally, we bolster our recent reclassification of Rickettsia by identifying OGs that define the AG (ancestral group), TG (typhus group), TRG (transitional group), and SFG (spotted fever group) rickettsiae. OGs for insect-associated species, tick-associated species and species that harbor plasmids were also predicted. Through superimposition of all OGs over robust phylogeny estimation, we discern between C1OGs and C2OGs, the latter depicting genes either decaying from the conserved C1OGs or acquired laterally. Finally, scrutiny of non-representative OGs revealed high levels of split genes versus gene duplications, with both phenomena confounding gene orthology assignment. Interestingly, non-representative OGs, as well as OGs comprised of several gene families typically involved in microbial pathogenicity and/or the acquisition of virulence factors, fall predominantly within C2OG distributions. Conclusion/Significance Collectively, we determined the relative conservation and distribution of 14354 predicted ORFs from 10 rickettsial genomes across robust phylogeny estimation. The data, available at PATRIC (PathoSystems Resource Integration Center), provide novel information for unwinding the intricacies associated with Rickettsia pathogenesis, expanding the range of potential diagnostic, vaccine and therapeutic targets.

Gillespie, Joseph J.; Williams, Kelly; Shukla, Maulik; Snyder, Eric E.; Nordberg, Eric K.; Ceraul, Shane M.; Dharmanolla, Chitti; Rainey, Daphne; Soneja, Jeetendra; Shallom, Joshua M.; Vishnubhat, Nataraj Dongre; Wattam, Rebecca; Purkayastha, Anjan; Czar, Michael; Crasta, Oswald; Setubal, Joao C.; Azad, Abdu F.; Sobral, Bruno S.

2008-01-01

11

The genome of obligately intracellular Ehrlichia canis revealsthemes of complex membrane structure and immune evasion strategies  

SciTech Connect

Ehrlichia canis, a small obligately intracellular, tick-transmitted, gram-negative, a-proteobacterium is the primary etiologic agent of globally distributed canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Complete genome sequencing revealed that the E. canis genome consists of a single circular chromosome of 1,315,030 bp predicted to encode 925 proteins, 40 stable RNA species, and 17 putative pseudogenes, and a substantial proportion of non-coding sequence (27 percent). Interesting genome features include a large set of proteins with transmembrane helices and/or signal sequences, and a unique serine-threonine bias associated with the potential for O-glycosylation that was prominent in proteins associated with pathogen-host interactions. Furthermore, two paralogous protein families associated with immune evasion were identified, one of which contains poly G:C tracts, suggesting that they may play a role in phase variation and facilitation of persistent infections. Proteins associated with pathogen-host interactions were identified including a small group of proteins (12) with tandem repeats and another with eukaryotic-like ankyrin domains (7).

Mavromatis, K.; Kuyler Doyle, C.; Lykidis, A.; Ivanova, N.; Francino, P.; Chain, P.; Shin, M.; Malfatti, S.; Larimer, F.; Copeland,A.; Detter, J.C.; Land, M.; Richardson, P.M.; Yu, X.J.; Walker, D.H.; McBride, J.W.; Kyrpides, N.C.

2005-09-01

12

A SYSTEMS BIOLOGICAL VIEW OF INTRACELLULAR PATHOGENS  

PubMed Central

Summary As biomedical research becomes increasingly data-intensive, it is increasingly essential to integrate genomic-scale datasets, so as to generate a more holistic picture of complex biological processes. The systems biology paradigm may differ in strategy from traditional reductionist scientific methods, but the goal remains the same: to generate tenable hypotheses driving the experimental elucidation of biological mechanisms. Intracellular pathogens provide an excellent opportunity for systems analysis, as many of these organisms are amenable to genetic manipulation, allowing their biology to be played off against that of the host. Moreover, many of the most fundamental biological properties of these microbes (host cell invasion, immune escape, intracellular replication, long-term persistence) are directly linked to pathogenesis and readily quantifiable using genomic-scale technologies. In this review, we summarize and discuss some of the available and foreseeable functional genomics datasets pertaining to host-pathogen interactions and suggest that the host-pathogen interface represents a promising, tractable challenge for systems biological analysis. Success will require developing and leveraging new technologies, expanding data acquisition, and increasing public access to comprehensive datasets, in order to assemble quantitative and testable models of the host-pathogen relationship.

Beiting, Daniel P.; Roos, David S.

2011-01-01

13

The Chlamydia psittaci Genome: A Comparative Analysis of Intracellular Pathogens  

PubMed Central

Background Chlamydiaceae are a family of obligate intracellular pathogens causing a wide range of diseases in animals and humans, and facing unique evolutionary constraints not encountered by free-living prokaryotes. To investigate genomic aspects of infection, virulence and host preference we have sequenced Chlamydia psittaci, the pathogenic agent of ornithosis. Results A comparison of the genome of the avian Chlamydia psittaci isolate 6BC with the genomes of other chlamydial species, C. trachomatis, C. muridarum, C. pneumoniae, C. abortus, C. felis and C. caviae, revealed a high level of sequence conservation and synteny across taxa, with the major exception of the human pathogen C. trachomatis. Important differences manifest in the polymorphic membrane protein family specific for the Chlamydiae and in the highly variable chlamydial plasticity zone. We identified a number of psittaci-specific polymorphic membrane proteins of the G family that may be related to differences in host-range and/or virulence as compared to closely related Chlamydiaceae. We calculated non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rate ratios for pairs of orthologous genes to identify putative targets of adaptive evolution and predicted type III secreted effector proteins. Conclusions This study is the first detailed analysis of the Chlamydia psittaci genome sequence. It provides insights in the genome architecture of C. psittaci and proposes a number of novel candidate genes mostly of yet unknown function that may be important for pathogen-host interactions.

Saluz, Hans Peter

2012-01-01

14

Transposon Mutagenesis of the Obligate Intracellular Pathogen Rickettsia prowazekii  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genetic analysis of Rickettsia prowazekii has been hindered by the lack of selectable markers and efficient mechanisms for generating rickettsial gene knockouts. We have addressed these problems by adapting a gene that codes for rifampin resistance for expression in R. prowazekii and by incorporating this selection into a transposon mutagenesis system suitable for generating rickettsial gene knockouts. The arr-2 gene

Aiping Qin; Aimee M. Tucker; Andria Hines; David O. Wood

2004-01-01

15

Caenorhabditis elegans as a model for intracellular pathogen infection.  

PubMed

The genetically tractable nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a convenient host for studies of pathogen infection. With the recent identification of two types of natural intracellular pathogens of C. elegans, this host now provides the opportunity to examine interactions and defence against intracellular pathogens in a whole-animal model for infection. C. elegans is the natural host for a genus of microsporidia, which comprise a phylum of fungal-related pathogens of widespread importance for agriculture and medicine. More recently, C. elegans has been shown to be a natural host for viruses related to the Nodaviridae family. Both microsporidian and viral pathogens infect the C. elegans intestine, which is composed of cells that share striking similarities to human intestinal epithelial cells. Because C. elegans nematodes are transparent, these infections provide a unique opportunity to visualize differentiated intestinal cells in vivo during the course of intracellular infection. Together, these two natural pathogens of C. elegans provide powerful systems in which to study microbial pathogenesis and host responses to intracellular infection. PMID:23617769

Balla, Keir M; Troemel, Emily R

2013-08-01

16

Caenorhabditis elegans as a model for intracellular pathogen infection  

PubMed Central

Summary The genetically tractable nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a convenient host for studies of pathogen infection. With the recent identification of two types of natural intracellular pathogens of C. elegans, this host now provides the opportunity to examine interactions and defence against intracellular pathogens in a whole-animal model for infection. C. elegans is the natural host for a genus of microsporidia, which comprise a phylum of fungal-related pathogens of widespread importance for agriculture and medicine. More recently, C. elegans has been shown to be a natural host for viruses related to the Nodaviridae family. Both microsporidian and viral pathogens infect the C. elegans intestine, which is composed of cells that share striking similarities to human intestinal epithelial cells. Because C. elegans nematodes are transparent, these infections provide a unique opportunity to visualize differentiated intestinal cells in vivo during the course of intracellular infection. Together, these two natural pathogens of C. elegans provide powerful systems in which to study microbial pathogenesis and host responses to intracellular infection.

Balla, Keir M.; Troemel, Emily R.

2014-01-01

17

Biological Properties and Cell Tropism of Chp2, a Bacteriophage of the Obligate Intracellular Bacterium Chlamydophila abortus  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of bacteriophages belonging to the Microviridae have been described infecting chlamydiae. Phy- logenetic studies divide the Chlamydiaceae into two distinct genera, Chlamydia and Chlamydophila, containing three and six different species, respectively. In this work we investigated the biological properties and host range of the recently described bacteriophage Chp2 that was originally discovered in Chlamydophila abortus. The obligate intracellular

J. S. Everson; S. A. Garner; B. Fane; B.-L. Liu; P. R. Lambden; I. N. Clarke

2002-01-01

18

Autophagic clearance of bacterial pathogens: molecular recognition of intracellular microorganisms.  

PubMed

Autophagy is involved in several physiological and pathological processes. One of the key roles of the autophagic pathway is to participate in the first line of defense against the invasion of pathogens, as part of the innate immune response. Targeting of intracellular bacteria by the autophagic machinery, either in the cytoplasm or within vacuolar compartments, helps to control bacterial proliferation in the host cell, controlling also the spreading of the infection. In this review we will describe the means used by diverse bacterial pathogens to survive intracellularly and how they are recognized by the autophagic molecular machinery, as well as the mechanisms used to avoid autophagic clearance. PMID:24137567

Pareja, Maria Eugenia Mansilla; Colombo, Maria I

2013-01-01

19

Autophagic clearance of bacterial pathogens: molecular recognition of intracellular microorganisms  

PubMed Central

Autophagy is involved in several physiological and pathological processes. One of the key roles of the autophagic pathway is to participate in the first line of defense against the invasion of pathogens, as part of the innate immune response. Targeting of intracellular bacteria by the autophagic machinery, either in the cytoplasm or within vacuolar compartments, helps to control bacterial proliferation in the host cell, controlling also the spreading of the infection. In this review we will describe the means used by diverse bacterial pathogens to survive intracellularly and how they are recognized by the autophagic molecular machinery, as well as the mechanisms used to avoid autophagic clearance.

Mansilla Pareja, Maria Eugenia; Colombo, Maria I.

2013-01-01

20

Bacterial Pathogens Commandeer Rab GTPases to Establish Intracellular Niches  

PubMed Central

Intracellular bacterial pathogens deploy virulence factors termed effectors to inhibit degradation by host cells and to establish intracellular niches where growth and differentiation take place. Here, we describe mechanisms by which human bacterial pathogens (including Chlamydiae; Coxiella burnetii; Helicobacter pylori; Legionella pneumophila; Listeria monocytogenes; Mycobacteria; Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica) modulate endocytic and exocytic Rab GTPases in order to thrive in host cells. Host cell Rab GTPases are critical for intracellular transport following pathogen phagocytosis or endocytosis. At the molecular level bacterial effectors hijack Rab protein function to: evade degradation, direct transport to particular intracellular locations, and monopolize host vesicles carrying molecules that are needed for a stable niche and/or bacterial growth and differentiation. Bacterial effectors may serve as specific receptors for Rab GTPases or as enzymes that post-translationally modify Rab proteins or endosomal membrane lipids required for Rab function. Emerging data indicate that bacterial effector expression is temporally and spatially regulated and multiple virulence factors may act concertedly to usurp Rab GTPase function, alter signaling and ensure niche establishment and intracellular bacterial growth, making this field an exciting area for further study.

Stein, Mary-Pat; Muller, Matthias P.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

2012-01-01

21

DNA vaccines: Future strategies and relevance to intracellular pathogens  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasing awareness of microbial threat has rekindled interest in the great potential of vaccines for controlling infectious diseases. The fact that diseases caused by intracellular pathogens cannot be overcome by chemotherapy alone has increased our interest in the generation of highly efficacious novel vaccines. Vaccines have proven their efficacy, as the immunoprotection they induce appears to be mediated by long-lived

AK Sharma; GK Khuller

2001-01-01

22

Isocitrate lyase of the facultative intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi  

Microsoft Academic Search

Isocitrate lyase is the first enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt which is required for the assimilation of fatty acids and acetate. The intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi contains high activities of this enzyme following growth on acetate and lactate, indicating that it plays an important role in the metabolism of these substrates. The gene encoding isocitrate lyase (aceA) was cloned and

Bridget G. Kelly; Daniel M. Wall; Clara A. Boland; Wim G. Meijer

2002-01-01

23

Intracellular lifestyle of Brucella spp. Common genes with other animal pathogens, plant pathogens, and endosymbionts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brucella spp. are intracellular pathogens that belong, like Agrobacterium, Rhizobium and Rickettsia, to the ?-2-subgroup of proteobacteria. The genome organization of most Brucella spp. is characterized by the presence of two chromosomes. The intracellular lifestyle of Brucella, as well as the possible genes involved in pathogenesis and host cell signaling, are discussed, including the presence of genes with high similarity

Rodolfo A. Ugalde

1999-01-01

24

Physical and Genetic Map of the Obligate Intracellular Bacterium Coxiella burnetii  

PubMed Central

Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and PCR techniques have been used to construct a NotI macrorestriction map of the obligate intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii Nine Mile. The size of the chromosome has been determined to be 2,103 kb comprising 29 NotI restriction fragments. The average resolution is 72.5 kb, or about 3.5% of the genome. Experimental data support the presence of a linear chromosome. Published genes were localized on the physical map by Southern hybridization. One gene, recognized as transposable element, was found to be present in at least nine sites evenly distributed over the whole chromosome. There is only one copy of a 16S rRNA gene. The putative oriC has been located on a 27.5-kb NotI fragment. Gene organization upstream the oriC is almost identical to that of Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis, whereas gene organization downstream the oriC seems to be unique among bacteria. The physical map will be helpful in investigations of the great heterogeneity in restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns of different isolates and the great variation in genome size. The genetic map will help to determine whether gene order in different isolates is conserved.

Willems, H.; Jager, Cornelie; Baljer, Georg

1998-01-01

25

Metabolic host responses to infection by intracellular bacterial pathogens  

PubMed Central

The interaction of bacterial pathogens with mammalian hosts leads to a variety of physiological responses of the interacting partners aimed at an adaptation to the new situation. These responses include multiple metabolic changes in the affected host cells which are most obvious when the pathogen replicates within host cells as in case of intracellular bacterial pathogens. While the pathogen tries to deprive nutrients from the host cell, the host cell in return takes various metabolic countermeasures against the nutrient theft. During this conflicting interaction, the pathogen triggers metabolic host cell responses by means of common cell envelope components and specific virulence-associated factors. These host reactions generally promote replication of the pathogen. There is growing evidence that pathogen-specific factors may interfere in different ways with the complex regulatory network that controls the carbon and nitrogen metabolism of mammalian cells. The host cell defense answers include general metabolic reactions, like the generation of oxygen- and/or nitrogen-reactive species, and more specific measures aimed to prevent access to essential nutrients for the respective pathogen. Accurate results on metabolic host cell responses are often hampered by the use of cancer cell lines that already exhibit various de-regulated reactions in the primary carbon metabolism. Hence, there is an urgent need for cellular models that more closely reflect the in vivo infection conditions. The exact knowledge of the metabolic host cell responses may provide new interesting concepts for antibacterial therapies.

Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Heesemann, Jurgen; Rudel, Thomas; Goebel, Werner

2013-01-01

26

Stable DNA transformation in the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii by complementation of tryptophan auxotrophy.  

PubMed Central

The protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii infects a wide range of vertebrate hosts and is an important opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised humans. Although Toxoplasma is amenable to both biochemical and cellular experimental approaches, the molecular basis of its success as an intracellular parasite is poorly understood. To provide a system for molecular genetic analyses, we have developed a stable DNA transformation system for Toxoplasma based on complementation of its naturally occurring tryptophan auxotrophy. Complementation was accomplished by expressing the Escherichia coli trpB gene, encoding the beta subunit of tryptophan synthase (EC 4.2.1.20), the enzyme that catalyzes the formation of tryptophan from indole plus serine. Transformants were obtained by electroporation of a plasmid, called SAG1/trpB, containing the trpB gene flanked by Toxoplasma surface antigen 1 (SAG1) gene sequences and selection for growth on indole. Transformants were obtained with circular forms of the SAG1/trpB plasmid with efficiencies of 10(-4) per cell. Transformation with either circular or linear SAG1/trpB resulted in integration into the genome at distinct, nonhomologous sites. Trp+ transformants typically contained tandemly repeated copies of the SAG1/trpB plasmid and were stable in the absence of continued selection. The Trp phenotype provides a dominant selectable marker that should allow expression of foreign or altered genes in Toxoplasma and facilitate molecular analyses of genes important for intracellular survival. Images

Sibley, L D; Messina, M; Niesman, I R

1994-01-01

27

Analysis of Fluorescent Protein Expression in Transformants of Rickettsia monacensis, an Obligate Intracellular Tick Symbiont  

PubMed Central

We developed and applied transposon-based transformation vectors for molecular manipulation and analysis of spotted fever group rickettsiae, which are obligate intracellular bacteria that infect ticks and, in some cases, mammals. Using the Epicentre EZ::TN transposon system, we designed transposons for simultaneous expression of a reporter gene and a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) resistance marker. Transposomes (transposon-transposase complexes) were electroporated into Rickettsia monacensis, a rickettsial symbiont isolated from the tick Ixodes ricinus. Each transposon contained an expression cassette consisting of the rickettsial ompA promoter and a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene (GFPuv) or the ompB promoter and a red fluorescent protein reporter gene (DsRed2), followed by the ompA transcription terminator and a second ompA promoter CAT gene cassette. Selection with chloramphenicol gave rise to rickettsial populations with chromosomally integrated single-copy transposons as determined by PCR, Southern blotting, and sequence analysis. Reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blots demonstrated transcription of all three genes. GFPuv transformant rickettsiae exhibited strong fluorescence in individual cells, but DsRed2 transformants did not. Western blots confirmed expression of GFPuv in R. monacensis and in Escherichia coli, but DsRed2 was expressed only in E. coli. The DsRed2 gene, but not the GFPuv gene, contains many GC-rich amino acid codons that are rare in the preferred codon suite of rickettsiae, possibly explaining the failure to express DsRed2 protein in R. monacensis. We demonstrated that our vectors provide a means to study rickettsia-host cell interactions by visualizing GFPuv-fluorescent R. monacensis associated with actin tails in tick host cells.

Baldridge, Gerald D.; Burkhardt, Nicole; Herron, Michael J.; Kurtti, Timothy J.; Munderloh, Ulrike G.

2005-01-01

28

Dual mechanisms of metabolite acquisition by the obligate intracytosolic pathogen Rickettsia prowazekii reveal novel aspects of triose phosphate transport.  

PubMed

Rickettsia prowazekii is an obligate intracytosolic pathogen and the causative agent of epidemic typhus fever in humans. As an evolutionary model of intracellular pathogenesis, rickettsiae are notorious for their use of transport systems that parasitize eukaryotic host cell biochemical pathways. Rickettsial transport systems for substrates found only in eukaryotic cell cytoplasm are uncommon among free-living microorganisms and often possess distinctive mechanisms. We previously reported that R. prowazekii acquires triose phosphates for phospholipid biosynthesis via the coordinated activities of a novel dihydroxyacetone phosphate transport system and an sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (K. M. Frohlich et al., J. Bacteriol. 192:4281-4288, 2010). In the present study, we have determined that R. prowazekii utilizes a second, independent triose phosphate acquisition pathway whereby sn-glycerol-3-phosphate is directly transported and incorporated into phospholipids. Herein we describe the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate transport systems in isolated R. prowazekii with respect to kinetics, energy coupling, transport mechanisms, and substrate specificity. These data suggest the existence of multiple rickettsial triose phosphate transport systems. Furthermore, the R. prowazekii dihydroxyacetone phosphate transport systems displayed unexpected mechanistic properties compared to well-characterized triose phosphate transport systems from plant plastids. Questions regarding possible roles for dual-substrate acquisition pathways as metabolic virulence factors in the context of a pathogen undergoing reductive evolution are discussed. PMID:23772074

Frohlich, Kyla M; Audia, Jonathon P

2013-08-01

29

Multi locus sequence typing of Chlamydiales: clonal groupings within the obligate intracellular bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis  

PubMed Central

Background The obligate intracellular growing bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis causes diseases like trachoma, urogenital infection and lymphogranuloma venereum with severe morbidity. Several serovars and genotypes have been identified, but these could not be linked to clinical disease or outcome. The related Chlamydophila pneumoniae, of which no subtypes are recognized, causes respiratory infections worldwide. We developed a multi locus sequence typing (MLST) scheme to understand the population genetic structure and diversity of these species and to evaluate the association between genotype and disease. Results A collection of 26 strains of C. trachomatis of different serovars and clinical presentation and 18 strains of C. pneumoniae were included in the study. For comparison, sequences of C. abortus, C. psittaci, C. caviae, C. felis, C. pecorum (Chlamydophila), C. muridarum (Chlamydia) and of Candidatus protochlamydia and Simkania negevensis were also included. Sequences of fragments (400 – 500 base pairs) from seven housekeeping genes (enoA, fumC, gatA, gidA, hemN, hlfX, oppA) were analysed. Analysis of allelic profiles by eBurst revealed three non-overlapping clonal complexes among the C. trachomatis strains, while the C. pneumoniae strains formed a single group. An UPGMA tree produced from the allelic profiles resulted in three groups of sequence types. The LGV strains grouped in a single cluster, while the urogenital strains were distributed over two separated groups, one consisted solely of strains with frequent occurring serovars (E, D and F). The distribution of the different serovars over the three groups was not consistent, suggesting exchange of serovar encoding ompA sequences. In one instance, exchange of fumC sequences between strains of different groups was observed. Cluster analyses of concatenated sequences of the Chlamydophila and Chlamydia species together with those of Candidatus Protochlamydia amoebophila and Simkania negevensis resulted in a tree identical to that obtained with 23S RNA gene sequences. Conclusion These data show that C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae are highly uniform. The difference in genetic diversity between C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae is in concordance with a later assimilation to the human host of the latter. Our data supports the taxonomy of the order of Chlamydiales.

Pannekoek, Yvonne; Morelli, Giovanna; Kusecek, Barica; Morre, Servaas A; Ossewaarde, Jacobus M; Langerak, Ankie A; van der Ende, Arie

2008-01-01

30

Nutrient salvaging and metabolism by the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila.  

PubMed

The Gram-negative bacterium Legionella pneumophila is ubiquitous in freshwater environments as a free-swimming organism, resident of biofilms, or parasite of protozoa. If the bacterium is aerosolized and inhaled by a susceptible human host, it can infect alveolar macrophages and cause a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. A sophisticated cell differentiation program equips L. pneumophila to persist in both extracellular and intracellular niches. During its life cycle, L. pneumophila alternates between at least two distinct forms: a transmissive form equipped to infect host cells and evade lysosomal degradation, and a replicative form that multiplies within a phagosomal compartment that it has retooled to its advantage. The efficient changeover between transmissive and replicative states is fundamental to L. pneumophila's fitness as an intracellular pathogen. The transmission and replication programs of L. pneumophila are governed by a number of metabolic cues that signal whether conditions are favorable for replication or instead trigger escape from a spent host. Several lines of experimental evidence gathered over the past decade establish strong links between metabolism, cellular differentiation, and virulence of L. pneumophila. Herein, we focus on current knowledge of the metabolic components employed by intracellular L. pneumophila for cell differentiation, nutrient salvaging and utilization of host factors. Specifically, we highlight the metabolic cues that are coupled to bacterial differentiation, nutrient acquisition systems, and the strategies utilized by L. pneumophila to exploit host metabolites for intracellular replication. PMID:24575391

Fonseca, Maris V; Swanson, Michele S

2014-01-01

31

HIGS: host-induced gene silencing in the obligate biotrophic fungal pathogen Blumeria graminis.  

PubMed

Powdery mildew fungi are obligate biotrophic pathogens that only grow on living hosts and cause damage in thousands of plant species. Despite their agronomical importance, little direct functional evidence for genes of pathogenicity and virulence is currently available because mutagenesis and transformation protocols are lacking. Here, we show that the accumulation in barley (Hordeum vulgare) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) of double-stranded or antisense RNA targeting fungal transcripts affects the development of the powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis. Proof of concept for host-induced gene silencing was obtained by silencing the effector gene Avra10, which resulted in reduced fungal development in the absence, but not in the presence, of the matching resistance gene Mla10. The fungus could be rescued from the silencing of Avra10 by the transient expression of a synthetic gene that was resistant to RNA interference (RNAi) due to silent point mutations. The results suggest traffic of RNA molecules from host plants into B. graminis and may lead to an RNAi-based crop protection strategy against fungal pathogens. PMID:20884801

Nowara, Daniela; Gay, Alexandra; Lacomme, Christophe; Shaw, Jane; Ridout, Christopher; Douchkov, Dimitar; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schweizer, Patrick

2010-09-01

32

Diverse intracellular pathogens activate type III interferon expression from peroxisomes.  

PubMed

Type I interferon responses are considered the primary means by which viral infections are controlled in mammals. Despite this view, several pathogens activate antiviral responses in the absence of type I interferons. The mechanisms controlling type I interferon-independent responses are undefined. We found that RIG-I like receptors (RLRs) induce type III interferon expression in a variety of human cell types, and identified factors that differentially regulate expression of type I and type III interferons. We identified peroxisomes as a primary site of initiation of type III interferon expression, and revealed that the process of intestinal epithelial cell differentiation upregulates peroxisome biogenesis and promotes robust type III interferon responses in human cells. These findings highlight the importance of different intracellular organelles in specific innate immune responses. PMID:24952503

Odendall, Charlotte; Dixit, Evelyn; Stavru, Fabrizia; Bierne, Helene; Franz, Kate M; Durbin, Ann Fiegen; Boulant, Steeve; Gehrke, Lee; Cossart, Pascale; Kagan, Jonathan C

2014-08-01

33

Thymic Independence of Adaptive Immunity to the Intracellular Pathogen Shigella flexneri Serotype 2a  

Microsoft Academic Search

Shigella flexneri is a facultative intracellular pathogen. While immunity to several intracellular pathogens is mediated by T lymphocytes, it is unknown whether cellular immune responses are important to adaptive immunity to S. flexneri. We show that vaccination with S. flexneri serotype 2a confers protection to mice that lack T lymphocytes or gamma interferon (IFN-g), specific depletion of T lymphocytes does

ALAIN C. BORCZUK; MARCIA B. GOLDBERG

1999-01-01

34

The genome sequence of the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella melitensis.  

PubMed

Brucella melitensis is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes abortion in goats and sheep and Malta fever in humans. The genome of B. melitensis strain 16M was sequenced and found to contain 3,294,935 bp distributed over two circular chromosomes of 2,117,144 bp and 1,177,787 bp encoding 3,197 ORFs. By using the bioinformatics suite ERGO, 2,487 (78%) ORFs were assigned functions. The origins of replication of the two chromosomes are similar to those of other alpha-proteobacteria. Housekeeping genes, including those involved in DNA replication, transcription, translation, core metabolism, and cell wall biosynthesis, are distributed on both chromosomes. Type I, II, and III secretion systems are absent, but genes encoding sec-dependent, sec-independent, and flagella-specific type III, type IV, and type V secretion systems as well as adhesins, invasins, and hemolysins were identified. Several features of the B. melitensis genome are similar to those of the symbiotic Sinorhizobium meliloti. PMID:11756688

DelVecchio, Vito G; Kapatral, Vinayak; Redkar, Rajendra J; Patra, Guy; Mujer, Cesar; Los, Tamara; Ivanova, Natalia; Anderson, Iain; Bhattacharyya, Anamitra; Lykidis, Athanasios; Reznik, Gary; Jablonski, Lynn; Larsen, Niels; D'Souza, Mark; Bernal, Axel; Mazur, Mikhail; Goltsman, Eugene; Selkov, Eugene; Elzer, Philip H; Hagius, Sue; O'Callaghan, David; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Haselkorn, Robert; Kyrpides, Nikos; Overbeek, Ross

2002-01-01

35

Actin-Based Motility of Intracellular Microbial Pathogens  

PubMed Central

A diverse group of intracellular microorganisms, including Listeria monocytogenes, Shigella spp., Rickettsia spp., and vaccinia virus, utilize actin-based motility to move within and spread between mammalian host cells. These organisms have in common a pathogenic life cycle that involves a stage within the cytoplasm of mammalian host cells. Within the cytoplasm of host cells, these organisms activate components of the cellular actin assembly machinery to induce the formation of actin tails on the microbial surface. The assembly of these actin tails provides force that propels the organisms through the cell cytoplasm to the cell periphery or into adjacent cells. Each of these organisms utilizes preexisting mammalian pathways of actin rearrangement to induce its own actin-based motility. Particularly remarkable is that while all of these microbes use the same or overlapping pathways, each intercepts the pathway at a different step. In addition, the microbial molecules involved are each distinctly different from the others. Taken together, these observations suggest that each of these microbes separately and convergently evolved a mechanism to utilize the cellular actin assembly machinery. The current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of microbial actin-based motility is the subject of this review.

Goldberg, Marcia B.

2001-01-01

36

Genetic diversity of the obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydophila pneumoniae by genome-wide analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms: evidence for highly clonal population structure  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Chlamydophila pneumoniae is an obligate intracellular bacterium that replicates in a biphasic life cycle within eukaryotic host cells. Four published genomes revealed an identity of > 99 %. This remarkable finding raised questions about the existence of distinguishable genotypes in correlation with geographical and anatomical origin. RESULTS: We studied the genetic diversity of C. pneumoniae by analysing synonymous single

Thomas Rattei; Stephan Ott; Michaela Gutacker; Jan Rupp; Matthias Maass; Stefan Schreiber; Werner Solbach; Thierry Wirth; Jens Gieffers

2007-01-01

37

Gene Gain and Loss during Evolution of Obligate Parasitism in the White Rust Pathogen of Arabidopsis thaliana  

PubMed Central

Biotrophic eukaryotic plant pathogens require a living host for their growth and form an intimate haustorial interface with parasitized cells. Evolution to biotrophy occurred independently in fungal rusts and powdery mildews, and in oomycete white rusts and downy mildews. Biotroph evolution and molecular mechanisms of biotrophy are poorly understood. It has been proposed, but not shown, that obligate biotrophy results from (i) reduced selection for maintenance of biosynthetic pathways and (ii) gain of mechanisms to evade host recognition or suppress host defence. Here we use Illumina sequencing to define the genome, transcriptome, and gene models for the obligate biotroph oomycete and Arabidopsis parasite, Albugo laibachii. A. laibachii is a member of the Chromalveolata, which incorporates Heterokonts (containing the oomycetes), Apicomplexa (which includes human parasites like Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii), and four other taxa. From comparisons with other oomycete plant pathogens and other chromalveolates, we reveal independent loss of molybdenum-cofactor-requiring enzymes in downy mildews, white rusts, and the malaria parasite P. falciparum. Biotrophy also requires “effectors” to suppress host defence; we reveal RXLR and Crinkler effectors shared with other oomycetes, and also discover and verify a novel class of effectors, the “CHXCs”, by showing effector delivery and effector functionality. Our findings suggest that evolution to progressively more intimate association between host and parasite results in reduced selection for retention of certain biosynthetic pathways, and particularly reduced selection for retention of molybdopterin-requiring biosynthetic pathways. These mechanisms are not only relevant to plant pathogenic oomycetes but also to human pathogens within the Chromalveolata.

Kemen, Eric; Gardiner, Anastasia; Schultz-Larsen, Torsten; Kemen, Ariane C.; Balmuth, Alexi L.; Robert-Seilaniantz, Alexandre; Bailey, Kate; Holub, Eric; Studholme, David J.; MacLean, Dan; Jones, Jonathan D. G.

2011-01-01

38

Human Female Genital Tract Infection by the Obligate Intracellular Bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis Elicits Robust Type 2 Immunity  

PubMed Central

While Chlamydia trachomatis infections are frequently asymptomatic, mechanisms that regulate host response to this intracellular Gram-negative bacterium remain undefined. This investigation thus used peripheral blood mononuclear cells and endometrial tissue from women with or without Chlamydia genital tract infection to better define this response. Initial genome-wide microarray analysis revealed highly elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinase 10 and other molecules characteristic of Type 2 immunity (e.g., fibrosis and wound repair) in Chlamydia-infected tissue. This result was corroborated in flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry studies that showed extant upper genital tract Chlamydia infection was associated with increased co-expression of CD200 receptor and CD206 (markers of alternative macrophage activation) by endometrial macrophages as well as increased expression of GATA-3 (the transcription factor regulating TH2 differentiation) by endometrial CD4+ T cells. Also among women with genital tract Chlamydia infection, peripheral CD3+ CD4+ and CD3+ CD4- cells that proliferated in response to ex vivo stimulation with inactivated chlamydial antigen secreted significantly more interleukin (IL)-4 than tumor necrosis factor, interferon-?, or IL-17; findings that repeated in T cells isolated from these same women 1 and 4 months after infection had been eradicated. Our results thus newly reveal that genital infection by an obligate intracellular bacterium induces polarization towards Type 2 immunity, including Chlamydia-specific TH2 development. Based on these findings, we now speculate that Type 2 immunity was selected by evolution as the host response to C. trachomatis in the human female genital tract to control infection and minimize immunopathological damage to vital reproductive structures.

Vicetti Miguel, Rodolfo D.; Harvey, Stephen A. K.; LaFramboise, William A.; Reighard, Seth D.; Matthews, Dean B.; Cherpes, Thomas L.

2013-01-01

39

Evolution to a Chronic Disease Niche Correlates with Increased Sensitivity to Tryptophan Availability for the Obligate Intracellular Bacterium Chlamydia pneumoniae.  

PubMed

The chlamydiae are obligate intracellular parasites that have evolved specific interactions with their various hosts and host cell types to ensure their successful survival and consequential pathogenesis. The species Chlamydia pneumoniae is ubiquitous, with serological studies showing that most humans are infected at some stage in their lifetime. While most human infections are asymptomatic, C. pneumoniae can cause more-severe respiratory disease and pneumonia and has been linked to chronic diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, and even Alzheimer's disease. The widely dispersed animal-adapted C. pneumoniae strains cause an equally wide range of diseases in their hosts. It is emerging that the ability of C. pneumoniae to survive inside its target cells, including evasion of the host's immune attack mechanisms, is linked to the acquisition of key metabolites. Tryptophan and arginine are key checkpoint compounds in this host-parasite battle. Interestingly, the animal strains of C. pneumoniae have a slightly larger genome, enabling them to cope better with metabolite restrictions. It therefore appears that as the evolutionarily more ancient animal strains have evolved to infect humans, they have selectively become more "susceptible" to the levels of key metabolites, such as tryptophan. While this might initially appear to be a weakness, it allows these human C. pneumoniae strains to exquisitely sense host immune attack and respond by rapidly reverting to a persistent phase. During persistence, they reduce their metabolic levels, halting progression of their developmental cycle, waiting until the hostile external conditions have passed before they reemerge. PMID:24682324

Huston, Wilhelmina M; Barker, Christopher J; Chacko, Anu; Timms, Peter

2014-06-01

40

Discovery of new intracellular pathogens by amoebal coculture and amoebal enrichment approaches.  

PubMed

Intracellular pathogens such as legionella, mycobacteria and Chlamydia-like organisms are difficult to isolate because they often grow poorly or not at all on selective media that are usually used to cultivate bacteria. For this reason, many of these pathogens were discovered only recently or following important outbreaks. These pathogens are often associated with amoebae, which serve as host-cell and allow the survival and growth of the bacteria. We intend here to provide a demonstration of two techniques that allow isolation and characterization of intracellular pathogens present in clinical or environmental samples: the amoebal coculture and the amoebal enrichment. Amoebal coculture allows recovery of intracellular bacteria by inoculating the investigated sample onto an amoebal lawn that can be infected and lysed by the intracellular bacteria present in the sample. Amoebal enrichment allows recovery of amoebae present in a clinical or environmental sample. This can lead to discovery of new amoebal species but also of new intracellular bacteria growing specifically in these amoebae. Together, these two techniques help to discover new intracellular bacteria able to grow in amoebae. Because of their ability to infect amoebae and resist phagocytosis, these intracellular bacteria might also escape phagocytosis by macrophages and thus, be pathogenic for higher eukaryotes. PMID:24192667

Jacquier, Nicolas; Aeby, Sébastien; Lienard, Julia; Greub, Gilbert

2013-01-01

41

Intracellular DNA replication and long-term survival of pathogenic mycoplasmas  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined intracellular survival and growth of pathogenic mycoplasmas (Mycoplasma penetrans,Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Mycoplasma genitalium) in cultured human cells. By using the eukaryotic nuclear DNA synthesis inhibitor, aphidicolin, we detected the selective synthesis of mycoplasma (My) and mitochondria (Mt) DNA, which could be further differentiated by restriction enzyme analyses. Also, intracellular M. pneumoniae and M. penetrans infectivity of human cells

S. F Dallo; J. B Baseman

2000-01-01

42

Manipulation of Costimulatory Molecules by Intracellular Pathogens: Veni, Vidi, Vici!!  

Microsoft Academic Search

Some of the most successful pathogens of human, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), HIV, and Leishmania donovani not only establish chronic infections but also remain a grave global threat. These pathogens have developed innovative strategies to evade immune responses such as antigenic shift and drift, interference with antigen processing\\/presentation, subversion of phagocytosis, induction of immune regulatory pathways, and manipulation of

Nargis Khan; Uthaman Gowthaman; Susanta Pahari; Javed N. Agrewala

2012-01-01

43

Characterization of an Obligate Intracellular Bacterium in the Midgut Epithelium of the Bulrush Bug Chilacis typhae (Heteroptera, Lygaeidae, Artheneinae)?  

PubMed Central

Many members of the suborder Heteroptera have symbiotic bacteria, which are usually found extracellularly in specific sacs or tubular outgrowths of the midgut or intracellularly in mycetomes. In this study, we describe the second molecular characterization of a symbiotic bacterium in a monophagous, seed-sucking stink bug of the family Lygaeidae (sensu stricto). Chilacis typhae possesses at the end of the first section of the midgut a structure which is composed of circularly arranged, strongly enlarged midgut epithelial cells. It is filled with an intracellular endosymbiont. This “mycetocytic belt” might represent an evolutionarily intermediate stage of the usual symbiotic structures found in stink bugs. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA and the groEL genes showed that the bacterium belongs to the Gammaproteobacteria, and it revealed a phylogenetic relationship with a secondary bacterial endosymbiont of Cimex lectularius and free-living plant pathogens such as Pectobacterium and Dickeya. The distribution and ultrastructure of the rod-shaped Chilacis endosymbiont were studied in adults and nymph stages using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and electron microscopy. The detection of symbionts at the anterior poles of developing eggs indicates that endosymbionts are transmitted vertically. A new genus and species name, “Candidatus Rohrkolberia cinguli,” is proposed for this newly characterized clade of symbiotic bacteria.

Kuechler, Stefan Martin; Dettner, Konrad; Kehl, Siegfried

2011-01-01

44

Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis determination of the genome size of obligate intracellular bacteria belonging to the genera Chlamydia, Rickettsiella, and Porochlamydia.  

PubMed Central

The chromosome length of obligate intracellular procaryotes was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of intact or NotI- and SfiI-restricted genomes. Sizes averaged 2,100, 1,720, 1,550, 2,650, and 1,450 kilobases for Rickettsiella grylli, Rickettsiella melolonthae, Porochlamydia buthi, Porochlamydia chironomi, and Chlamydia psittaci and Chlamydia trachomatis, respectively. An SfiI restriction map of the R. melolonthae genome was derived. Images

Frutos, R; Pages, M; Bellis, M; Roizes, G; Bergoin, M

1989-01-01

45

Extracellular and intracellular pathogen recognition by Drosophila PGRP-LE and PGRP-LC.  

PubMed

Despite lacking the adaptive immunity that is found in higher vertebrates, insects are able to defend themselves from a large battery of pathogens by multiple innate immune responses using molecular mechanisms that are strikingly similar to the innate immune responses of other multicellular organisms, including humans. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is therefore an excellent model organism for studying the basic principles of innate immunity using genetic and molecular biology techniques. In Drosophila, invading pathogens that pass through the epithelial barriers (a first line of self-defense) can encounter humoral and cellular responses that utilize pattern-recognition receptors to identify pathogen-associated molecular patterns in the hemolymph or on the immune cell surface. Some pathogens escape recognition and elimination in the hemolymph by invading the host cytoplasm. Some intracellular pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes are, nevertheless, eliminated by immune reactions such as autophagy through intracellular identification by pattern-recognition receptors. PMID:20089584

Kurata, Shoichiro

2010-03-01

46

Population and molecular genetics of susceptibility to intracellular pathogens  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the mouse, innate resistance to infection with certain species of Mycobacteria, Salmonella typhimurium and Leishmania donovani is controlled by the expression of a single dominant chromosome 1 gene, designated Bcg. The major effect of the Beg locus is the modulation of the growth rate of these pathogens in cells of the reticuloendothelial tissues during early infection. Using a positional

D. Malo; J. Hu; E. Skamene; E. Schurr

1994-01-01

47

Directed antigen delivery as a vaccine strategy for an intracellular bacterial pathogen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have developed a vaccine strategy for generating an attenuated strain of an intracellular bacterial pathogen that, after uptake by professional antigen-presenting cells, does not replicate intracellularly and is readily killed. However, after degradation of the vaccine strain within the phagolysosome, target antigens are released into the cytosol for endogenous processing and presentation for stimulation of CD8+ effector T cells. Applying this strategy to the model intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, we show that an intracellular replication-deficient vaccine strain is cleared rapidly in normal and immunocompromised animals, yet antigen-specific CD8+ effector T cells are stimulated after immunization. Furthermore, animals immunized with the intracellular replication-deficient vaccine strain are resistant to lethal challenge with a virulent WT strain of L. monocytogenes. These studies suggest a general strategy for developing safe and effective, attenuated intracellular replication-deficient vaccine strains for stimulation of protective immune responses against intracellular bacterial pathogens. CD8+ T cell | replication-deficient | Listeria monocytogenes

Bouwer, H. G. Archie; Alberti-Segui, Christine; Montfort, Megan J.; Berkowitz, Nathan D.; Higgins, Darren E.

2006-03-01

48

ISPsa2, the first mobile genetic element to be described and characterized in the bacterial facultative intracellular pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis.  

PubMed

Piscirickettsia salmonis is a novel, aggressive, facultative Gram-negative bacterium that drastically affects salmon production at different latitudes, with particular impact in southern Chile. Initially, P. salmonis was described as a Rickettsia-like, obligate, intracellular Alphaproteobacteria, but it was reclassified recently as a facultative intracellular Gammaproteobacteria. This designation has prompted the independent growth of the bacterium to a pure state for detailed study of its biology, genetics and epidemiology, properties that are still relatively poorly characterized. The preliminary sequence analysis of a 992-bp fragment of pure P. salmonis DNA allowed us to characterize a novel and complete 863-bp insertion sequence in the bacterial genome (named ISPsa2), which has a novel 16/16bp perfectly inverted terminal repeat flanking a 726-bp ORF that encodes a putative transposase (Tnp-Psa). The coding sequence of the enzyme shares similarities to that described in some Bacillus species and particularly to those of the IS6 family. ISPsa2 carries its own promoter with standard -10 and -35 sequences, suggesting an interesting potential for plasticity in this pathogenic bacterium. Additionally, the presence of ISPsa2 was confirmed from three isolates of P. salmonis collected from different epizootics in Chile in 2010. PMID:21073510

Marshall, Sergio H; Henríquez, Vitalia; Gómez, Fernando A; Cárdenas, Constanza

2011-01-01

49

HIGS: Host-Induced Gene Silencing in the Obligate Biotrophic Fungal Pathogen Blumeria graminis[W][OA  

PubMed Central

Powdery mildew fungi are obligate biotrophic pathogens that only grow on living hosts and cause damage in thousands of plant species. Despite their agronomical importance, little direct functional evidence for genes of pathogenicity and virulence is currently available because mutagenesis and transformation protocols are lacking. Here, we show that the accumulation in barley (Hordeum vulgare) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) of double-stranded or antisense RNA targeting fungal transcripts affects the development of the powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis. Proof of concept for host-induced gene silencing was obtained by silencing the effector gene Avra10, which resulted in reduced fungal development in the absence, but not in the presence, of the matching resistance gene Mla10. The fungus could be rescued from the silencing of Avra10 by the transient expression of a synthetic gene that was resistant to RNA interference (RNAi) due to silent point mutations. The results suggest traffic of RNA molecules from host plants into B. graminis and may lead to an RNAi-based crop protection strategy against fungal pathogens.

Nowara, Daniela; Gay, Alexandra; Lacomme, Christophe; Shaw, Jane; Ridout, Christopher; Douchkov, Dimitar; Hensel, Gotz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schweizer, Patrick

2010-01-01

50

Microsporidia: emerging pathogenic protists  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microsporidia are eukaryotic spore forming obligate intracellular protozoan parasites first recognized over 100 years ago. These organisms infect all of the major animal groups and are now recognized as opportunistic pathogens of humans. Microsporidian spores are common in the environment and microsporidia pathogenic to humans have been found in water supplies. The genera Nosema, Vittaforma, Brachiola, Pleistophora, Encephalitozoon, Enterocytozoon, Septata

Louis M. Weiss

2001-01-01

51

Comparative Genome Analysis of Wheat Blue Dwarf Phytoplasma, an Obligate Pathogen That Causes Wheat Blue Dwarf Disease in China  

PubMed Central

Wheat blue dwarf (WBD) disease is an important disease that has caused heavy losses in wheat production in northwestern China. This disease is caused by WBD phytoplasma, which is transmitted by Psammotettix striatus. Until now, no genome information about WBD phytoplasma has been published, seriously restricting research on this obligate pathogen. In this paper, we report a new sequencing and assembling strategy for phytoplasma genome projects. This strategy involves differential centrifugation, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, whole genome amplification, shotgun sequencing, de novo assembly, screening of contigs from phytoplasma and the connection of phytoplasma contigs. Using this scheme, the WBD phytoplasma draft genome was obtained. It was comprised of six contigs with a total size of 611,462 bp, covering ?94% of the chromosome. Five-hundred-twenty-five protein-coding genes, two operons for rRNA genes and 32 tRNA genes were identified. Comparative genome analyses between WBD phytoplasma and other phytoplasmas were subsequently carried out. The results showed that extensive arrangements and inversions existed among the WBD, OY-M and AY-WB phytoplasma genomes. Most protein-coding genes in WBD phytoplasma were found to be homologous to genes from other phytoplasmas; only 22 WBD-specific genes were identified. KEGG pathway analysis indicated that WBD phytoplasma had strongly reduced metabolic capabilities. However, 46 transporters were identified, which were involved with dipeptides/oligopeptides, spermidine/putrescine, cobalt and Mn/Zn transport, and so on. A total of 37 secreted proteins were encoded in the WBD phytoplasma chromosome and plasmids. Of these, three secreted proteins were similar to the reported phytoplasma virulence factors TENGU, SAP11 and SAP54. In addition, WBD phytoplasma possessed several proteins that were predicted to play a role in its adaptation to diverse environments. These results will provide clues for research on the pathogenic mechanisms of WBD phytoplasma and will also provide a perspective about the genome sequencing of other phytoplasmas and obligate organisms.

Chen, Wang; Li, Yan; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Nan; Wu, Yunfeng

2014-01-01

52

Chapter 6 The remarkably diverse pathogenicity effectors of the obligate oomycete Hyaloperonospora parasitica  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oomycete pathogens of plants, such as potato blight, cause massive yield losses every year but they are also proving to be important to our understanding of host defence mechanisms. Hyaloperonospora parasitica (Hpat) causes downy mildew disease of Arabidopsis and has been used in many studies that analyse the genes and signalling mechanisms of the host plant involved in disease resistance.

Jim Beynon

2008-01-01

53

Pathogenic intracellular and autoimmune mechanisms in urticaria and angioedema.  

PubMed

Urticaria and angioedema are common disorders. Chronic urticaria is defined as lasting longer than 6 weeks. Causes of chronic urticaria fall into the following categories: physical, allergic, hereditary, autoimmune, and idiopathic. Basophils and mast cells are the primary effector cells responsible for clinical symptoms and signs. These cells produce and secrete a variety of mediators including histamine, leukotrienes, prostaglandins, cytokines, chemokines, and other pro-inflammatory mediators. This leads to vasodilation, fluid exudation, increased vascular permeability, and accumulation of additional secondary inflammatory cells. Two mechanisms have been investigated as possibly contributing to the pathogenesis of chronic urticaria. One is the development of autoantibodies to Fc?RI or IgE on mast cells and basophils. This appears to be responsible for 30-50 % of cases. The other is dysregulation of intracellular signaling pathways involving Syk, SHIP-1, or SHIP-2 in basophils and mast cells. The primary treatment for chronic urticaria is to treat the underlying pathology, if any can be identified. Otherwise, in idiopathic cases, H1 antihistamines, H2 antihistamines, antileukotrienes, and corticosteroids constitute the main pharmacologic treatment modalities. In severe and recalcitrant cases of chronic and autoimmune urticaria, immunosuppressive drugs have been used, most commonly cyclosporin. More recent experimental studies have also suggested that omalizumab, an anti-IgE therapy, may be of benefit. Currently, inhibitors of Syk are also being developed and tested in the laboratory and in animal models. As our understanding of the pathogenesis of idiopathic urticaria increases, development of additional drugs targeting these pathways may provide relief for the significant physical and psychological morbidity experienced by patients with this disorder. PMID:22674016

Altman, Katherine; Chang, Christopher

2013-08-01

54

Role of the Pst System in Plaque Formation by the Intracellular Pathogen Shigella flexneri  

Microsoft Academic Search

In response to the host cell environment, the intracellular pathogen Shigella flexneri induces the expression of numerous genes, including those in the pst operon which is predicted to encode a high-affinity phosphate acquisition system that is expressed under reduced phosphate conditions. An S. flexneri pst mutant forms smaller plaques in Henle cell monolayers than does the parental strain. This mutant

L. J. Runyen-Janecky; A. M. Boyle; A. Kizzee; L. Liefer; S. M. Payne

2005-01-01

55

Delivery of host cell-directed therapeutics for intracellular pathogen clearance  

PubMed Central

Intracellular pathogens present a major health risk because of their innate ability to evade clearance. Their location within host cells and ability to react to the host environment by mutation or transcriptional changes often enables survival mechanisms to resist standard therapies. Host-directed drugs do not target the pathogen, minimizing the potential development of drug resistance; however, they can be difficult to deliver efficiently to intracellular sites. Vehicle delivery of host-mediated response drugs not only improves drug distribution and toxicity profiles, but can reduce the total amount of drug necessary to clear infection. In this article, we will review some host-directed drugs and current drug delivery techniques that can be used to efficiently clear intracellular infections.

Collier, Michael A.; Gallovic, Matthew D.; Peine, Kevin J.; Duong, Anthony D.; Bachelder, Eric M.; Gunn, John S.; Schlesinger, Larry S.; Ainslie, Kristy M.

2014-01-01

56

No Effect of Wolbachia on Resistance to Intracellular Infection by Pathogenic Bacteria in Drosophila melanogaster  

PubMed Central

Multiple studies have shown that infection with the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia pipientis confers Drosophila melanogaster and other insects with resistance to infection by RNA viruses. Studies investigating whether Wolbachia infection induces the immune system or confers protection against secondary bacterial infection have not shown any effect. These studies, however, have emphasized resistance against extracellular pathogens. Since Wolbachia lives inside the host cell, we hypothesized that Wolbachia might confer resistance to pathogens that establish infection by invading host cells. We therefore tested whether Wolbachia-infected D. melanogaster are protected against infection by the intracellular pathogenic bacteria Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella typhimurium, as well as the extracellular pathogenic bacterium Providencia rettgeri. We evaluated the ability of flies infected with Wolbachia to suppress secondary infection by pathogenic bacteria relative to genetically matched controls that had been cured of Wolbachia by treatment with tetracycline. We found no evidence that Wolbachia alters host ability to suppress proliferation of any of the three pathogenic bacteria. Our results indicate that Wolbachia-induced antiviral protection does not result from a generalized response to intracellular pathogens.

Rottschaefer, Susan M.; Lazzaro, Brian P.

2012-01-01

57

A new view to intracellular pathogens and host responses in the South of Spain  

PubMed Central

A workshop on ‘The Biology of Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens’ was held last October in a venue of the International University of Andalusia (UNIA) located in the World Historic Heritage town of Baeza, in the South of Spain. This Workshop gathered leading scientists from around the world to discuss their latest findings related to the mechanisms that intracellular pathogens use to subvert and manipulate host cell functions. The workshop focused on novel aspects that imprint current research in this discipline, including the heterogeneous behaviour of the pathogen at the population level, the host determinants that modulate susceptibility to the infection, the search for new drugs to combat these particular types of infections and also cutting edge technologies based on new imaging approaches and the use of microfluidics. Discussion on these topics provided new insights into the biology of these pathogens and enriched the field with new ideas for understanding why colonization of the intracellular niche of eukaryotic cells is a preferred strategy used by important human pathogens.

Portillo, Francisco Garcia-del; Cossart, Pascale

2012-01-01

58

Differential Modulation of Intracellular Survival of Cytosolic and Vacuolar Pathogens by Curcumin  

PubMed Central

Curcumin, a principal component of turmeric, acts as an immunomodulator regulating the host defenses in response to a diseased condition. The role of curcumin in controlling certain infectious diseases is highly controversial. It is known to alleviate symptoms of Helicobacter pylori infection and exacerbate that of Leishmania infection. We have evaluated the role of curcumin in modulating the fate of various intracellular bacterial pathogens. We show that pretreatment of macrophages with curcumin attenuates the infections caused by Shigella flexneri (clinical isolates) and Listeria monocytogenes and aggravates those caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi CT18 (a clinical isolate), Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, and Yersinia enterocolitica. Thus, the antimicrobial nature of curcumin is not a general phenomenon. It modulated the intracellular survival of cytosolic (S. flexneri and L. monocytogenes) and vacuolar (Salmonella spp., Y. enterocolitica, and S. aureus) bacteria in distinct ways. Through colocalization experiments, we demonstrated that curcumin prevented the active phagosomal escape of cytosolic pathogens and enhanced the active inhibition of lysosomal fusion by vacuolar pathogens. A chloroquine resistance assay confirmed that curcumin retarded the escape of the cytosolic pathogens, thus reducing their inter- and intracellular spread. We have demonstrated that the membrane-stabilizing activity of curcumin is crucial for its differential effect on the virulence of the bacteria.

Marathe, Sandhya A.; Sen, Minakshi; Dasgupta, Ishani

2012-01-01

59

NLRC5 regulates MHC class I antigen presentation in host defense against intracellular pathogens  

PubMed Central

NOD-like receptors (NLRs) are a family of intracellular proteins that play critical roles in innate immunity against microbial infection. NLRC5, the largest member of the NLR family, has recently attracted much attention. However, in vitro studies have reported inconsistent results about the roles of NLRC5 in host defense and in regulating immune signaling pathways. The in vivo function of NLRC5 remains unknown. Here, we report that NLRC5 is a critical regulator of host defense against intracellular pathogens in vivo. NLRC5 was specifically required for the expression of genes involved in MHC class I antigen presentation. NLRC5-deficient mice showed a profound defect in the expression of MHC class I genes and a concomitant failure to activate L. monocytogenes-specific CD8+ T cell responses, including activation, proliferation and cytotoxicity, and the mutant mice were more susceptible to the pathogen infection. NLRP3-mediated inflammasome activation was also partially impaired in NLRC5-deficient mice. However, NLRC5 was dispensable for pathogen-induced expression of NF-?B-dependent pro-inflammatory genes as well as type I interferon genes. Thus, NLRC5 critically regulates MHC class I antigen presentation to control intracellular pathogen infection.

Yao, Yikun; Wang, Yalong; Chen, Fuxiang; Huang, Yin; Zhu, Shu; Leng, Qibin; Wang, Hongyan; Shi, Yufang; Qian, Youcun

2012-01-01

60

The "domino theory" of gene death: gradual and mass gene extinction events in three lineages of obligate symbiotic bacterial pathogens.  

PubMed

During the adaptation of an organism to a parasitic lifestyle, various gene functions may be rendered superfluous due to the fact that the host may supply these needs. As a consequence, obligate symbiotic bacterial pathogens tend to undergo reductive genomic evolution through gene death (nonfunctionalization or pseudogenization) and deletion. Here, we examine the evolutionary sequence of gene-death events during the process of genome miniaturization in three bacterial species that have experienced extensive genome reduction: Mycobacterium leprae, Shigella flexneri, and Salmonella typhi. We infer that in all three lineages, the distribution of functional categories is similar in pseudogenes and genes but different from that of absent genes. Based on an analysis of evolutionary distances, we propose a two-step "domino effect" model for reductive genome evolution. The process starts with a gradual gene-by-gene-death sequence of events. Eventually, a crucial gene within a complex pathway or network is rendered nonfunctional triggering a "mass gene extinction" of the dependent genes. In contrast to published reports according to which genes belonging to certain functional categories are prone to nonfunctionalization more frequently and earlier than genes belonging to other functional categories, we could discern no characteristic regularity in the temporal order of function loss. PMID:16237210

Dagan, Tal; Blekhman, Ran; Graur, Dan

2006-02-01

61

Lipid acquisition by intracellular Chlamydiae.  

PubMed

Chlamydia species are obligate intracellular pathogens that are important causes of human genital tract, ocular and respiratory infections. The bacteria replicate within a specialized membrane-bound compartment termed the inclusion and require host-derived lipids for intracellular growth and development. Emerging evidence indicates that Chlamydia has evolved clever strategies to fulfil its lipid needs by interacting with multiple host cell compartments and redirecting trafficking pathways to its intracellular niche. In this review, we highlight recent findings that have significantly expanded our understanding of how Chlamydia exploit lipid trafficking pathways to ensure the survival of this important human pathogen. PMID:22452394

Elwell, Cherilyn A; Engel, Joanne N

2012-07-01

62

Blockade of CTLA-4 Enhances Host Resistance to the Intracellular Pathogen, Leishmania donovani1  

Microsoft Academic Search

CTLA-4 has recently been shown to act as a negative regulator of T cell activation. Here we provide evidence that blockade of CTLA-4 can result in enhanced host resistance to an intracellular pathogen. The administration of anti-CTLA-4 mAb 4F10 to BALB\\/c mice, 1 day following infection with Leishmania donovani, enhanced the frequency of IFN-g and IL-4 producing cells in both

Michaela L. Murphy; Sara E. J. Cotterell; Patricia M. A. Gorak; Christian R. Engwerda; Paul M. Kaye

63

Thioredoxin 80-Activated-Monocytes (TAMs) Inhibit the Replication of Intracellular Pathogens  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThioredoxin 80 (Trx80) is an 80 amino acid natural cleavage product of Trx, produced primarily by monocytes. Trx80 induces differentiation of human monocytes into a novel cell type, named Trx80-activated-monocytes (TAMs).Principal FindingsIn this investigation we present evidence for a role of TAMs in the control of intracellular bacterial infections. As model pathogens we have chosen Listeria monocytogenes and Brucella abortus

Ximena Cortes-Bratti; Eugénie Bassères; Fabiola Herrera-Rodriguez; Silvia Botero-Kleiven; Giuseppe Coppotelli; Jens B. Andersen; Maria G. Masucci; Arne Holmgren; Esteban Chaves-Olarte; Teresa Frisan; Javier Avila-Cariño

2011-01-01

64

Nitric Oxide-Mediated Intracellular Growth Restriction of Pathogenic Rhodococcus equi Can Be Prevented by Iron?  

PubMed Central

Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular pathogen which causes pneumonia in young horses and in immunocompromised humans. R. equi arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages at a prephagolysosome stage and grows inside a privileged compartment. Here, we show that, in murine macrophages activated with gamma interferon and lipopolysaccharide, R. equi does not multiply but stays viable for at least 24 h. Whereas infection control of other intracellular pathogens by activated macrophages is executed by enhanced phagosome acidification or phagolysosome formation, by autophagy or by the interferon-inducible GTPase Irgm1, none of these mechanisms seems to control R. equi infection. Growth control by macrophage activation is fully mimicked by treatment of resting macrophages with nitric oxide donors, and inhibition of bacterial multiplication by either activation or nitric oxide donors is annihilated by cotreatment of infected macrophages with ferrous sulfate. Transcriptional analysis of the R. equi iron-regulated gene iupT demonstrates that intracellular R. equi encounters iron stress in activated, but not in resting, macrophages and that this stress is relieved by extracellular addition of ferrous sulfate. Our results suggest that nitric oxide is central to the restriction of bacterial access to iron in activated macrophages.

von Bargen, Kristine; Wohlmann, Jens; Taylor, Gregory Alan; Utermohlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

2011-01-01

65

Expanded functions for a family of plant intracellular immune receptors beyond specific recognition of pathogen effectors.  

PubMed

Plants and animals deploy intracellular immune receptors that perceive specific pathogen effector proteins and microbial products delivered into the host cell. We demonstrate that the ADR1 family of Arabidopsis nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) receptors regulates accumulation of the defense hormone salicylic acid during three different types of immune response: (i) ADRs are required as "helper NB-LRRs" to transduce signals downstream of specific NB-LRR receptor activation during effector-triggered immunity; (ii) ADRs are required for basal defense against virulent pathogens; and (iii) ADRs regulate microbial-associated molecular pattern-dependent salicylic acid accumulation induced by infection with a disarmed pathogen. Remarkably, these functions do not require an intact P-loop motif for at least one ADR1 family member. Our results suggest that some NB-LRR proteins can serve additional functions beyond canonical, P-loop-dependent activation by specific virulence effectors, extending analogies between intracellular innate immune receptor function from plants and animals. PMID:21911370

Bonardi, Vera; Tang, Saijun; Stallmann, Anna; Roberts, Melinda; Cherkis, Karen; Dangl, Jeffery L

2011-09-27

66

Secondary Lymphoid Organ Homing Phenotype of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells Disrupted by an Intracellular Oral Pathogen  

PubMed Central

Several intracellular pathogens, including a key etiological agent of chronic periodontitis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, infect blood myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs). This infection results in pathogen dissemination to distant inflammatory sites (i.e., pathogen trafficking). The alteration in chemokine-chemokine receptor expression that contributes to this pathogen trafficking function, particularly toward sites of neovascularization in humans, is unclear. To investigate this, we utilized human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) and primary endothelial cells in vitro, combined with ex vivo-isolated blood mDCs and serum from chronic periodontitis subjects and healthy controls. Our results, using conditional fimbria mutants of P. gingivalis, show that P. gingivalis infection of MoDCs induces an angiogenic migratory profile. This profile is enhanced by expression of DC-SIGN on MoDCs and minor mfa-1 fimbriae on P. gingivalis and is evidenced by robust upregulation of CXCR4, but not secondary lymphoid organ (SLO)-homing CCR7. This disruption of SLO-homing capacity in response to respective chemokines closely matches surface expression of CXCR4 and CCR7 and is consistent with directed MoDC migration through an endothelial monolayer. Ex vivo-isolated mDCs from the blood of chronic periodontitis subjects, but not healthy controls, expressed a similar migratory profile; moreover, sera from chronic periodontitis subjects expressed elevated levels of CXCL12. Overall, we conclude that P. gingivalis actively “commandeers” DCs by reprogramming the chemokine receptor profile, thus disrupting SLO homing, while driving migration toward inflammatory vascular sites.

Miles, Brodie; Zakhary, Ibrahim; El-Awady, Ahmed; Scisci, Elizabeth; Carrion, Julio; O'Neill, John C.; Rawlings, Aaron; Stern, J. Kobi; Susin, Cristiano

2014-01-01

67

Secondary lymphoid organ homing phenotype of human myeloid dendritic cells disrupted by an intracellular oral pathogen.  

PubMed

Several intracellular pathogens, including a key etiological agent of chronic periodontitis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, infect blood myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs). This infection results in pathogen dissemination to distant inflammatory sites (i.e., pathogen trafficking). The alteration in chemokine-chemokine receptor expression that contributes to this pathogen trafficking function, particularly toward sites of neovascularization in humans, is unclear. To investigate this, we utilized human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) and primary endothelial cells in vitro, combined with ex vivo-isolated blood mDCs and serum from chronic periodontitis subjects and healthy controls. Our results, using conditional fimbria mutants of P. gingivalis, show that P. gingivalis infection of MoDCs induces an angiogenic migratory profile. This profile is enhanced by expression of DC-SIGN on MoDCs and minor mfa-1 fimbriae on P. gingivalis and is evidenced by robust upregulation of CXCR4, but not secondary lymphoid organ (SLO)-homing CCR7. This disruption of SLO-homing capacity in response to respective chemokines closely matches surface expression of CXCR4 and CCR7 and is consistent with directed MoDC migration through an endothelial monolayer. Ex vivo-isolated mDCs from the blood of chronic periodontitis subjects, but not healthy controls, expressed a similar migratory profile; moreover, sera from chronic periodontitis subjects expressed elevated levels of CXCL12. Overall, we conclude that P. gingivalis actively "commandeers" DCs by reprogramming the chemokine receptor profile, thus disrupting SLO homing, while driving migration toward inflammatory vascular sites. PMID:24126519

Miles, Brodie; Zakhary, Ibrahim; El-Awady, Ahmed; Scisci, Elizabeth; Carrion, Julio; O'Neill, John C; Rawlings, Aaron; Stern, J Kobi; Susin, Cristiano; Cutler, Christopher W

2014-01-01

68

(D)-amino acid chemical reporters reveal peptidoglycan dynamics of an intracellular pathogen.  

PubMed

Peptidoglycan (PG) is an essential component of the bacterial cell wall. Although experiments with organisms in vitro have yielded a wealth of information on PG synthesis and maturation, it is unclear how these studies translate to bacteria replicating within host cells. We report a chemical approach for probing PG in vivo via metabolic labeling and bioorthogonal chemistry. A wide variety of bacterial species incorporated azide and alkyne-functionalized d-alanine into their cell walls, which we visualized by covalent reaction with click chemistry probes. The d-alanine analogues were specifically incorporated into nascent PG of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes both in vitro and during macrophage infection. Metabolic incorporation of d-alanine derivatives and click chemistry detection constitute a facile, modular platform that facilitates unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution of PG dynamics in vivo. PMID:23240806

Siegrist, M Sloan; Whiteside, Sarah; Jewett, John C; Aditham, Arjun; Cava, Felipe; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

2013-03-15

69

d-Amino Acid Chemical Reporters Reveal Peptidoglycan Dynamics of an Intracellular Pathogen  

PubMed Central

Peptidoglycan (PG) is an essential component of the bacterial cell wall. Although experiments with organisms in vitro have yielded a wealth of information on PG synthesis and maturation, it is unclear how these studies translate to bacteria replicating within host cells. We report a chemical approach for probing PG in vivo via metabolic labeling and bioorthogonal chemistry. A wide variety of bacterial species incorporated azide and alkyne-functionalized d-alanine into their cell walls, which we visualized by covalent reaction with click chemistry probes. The d-alanine analogues were specifically incorporated into nascent PG of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes both in vitro and during macrophage infection. Metabolic incorporation of d-alanine derivatives and click chemistry detection constitute a facile, modular platform that facilitates unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution of PG dynamics in vivo.

2012-01-01

70

Piscirickettsia salmonis: a Gram-negative intracellular bacterial pathogen of fish.  

PubMed

Piscirickettsia salmonis is the first Gram-negative, intracellular bacterial pathogen isolated from fish and is a significant cause of mortality in salmonid fish. Recent reports of P. salmonis or P. salmonis-like organisms from new fish hosts and geographic regions have increased the interest in the bacterium. In this review, the important characteristics of the bacterium including recent taxonomic changes, features of the disease caused by the bacterium including transmission, hosts, reservoirs, diagnostic procedures, and current approaches for prevention and treatment have been discussed. The reader is also directed to other reviews concerning the bacterium and the disease it causes (Fryer & Lannan 1994, 1996; Almendras & Fuentealba 1997; Lannan, Bartholomew & Fryer 1999; House & Fryer 2002; Mauel & Miller 2002). PMID:12962234

Fryer, J L; Hedrick, R P

2003-05-01

71

Cloning to crystallization of dihydrodipicolinate synthase from the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila.  

PubMed

Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) catalyses the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of meso-diaminopimelate and lysine. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of DHDPS from the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila are described. Crystals grown in the presence of high-molecular-weight PEG precipitant and magnesium chloride were found to diffract beyond 1.65?Å resolution. The crystal lattice belonged to the hexagonal space group P6?22, with unit-cell parameters a=b=89.31, c=290.18?Å, and contained two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The crystal structure was determined by molecular replacement using a single chain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa DHDPS as the search model. PMID:24100576

Siddiqui, Tanzeela; Paxman, Jason J; Dogovski, Con; Panjikar, Santosh; Perugini, Matthew A

2013-10-01

72

The Interaction between IL-18 and IL-18R Limits the Magnitude of Protective Immunity and Enhances Pathogenic Responses Following Infection with Intracellular Bacteria  

PubMed Central

The binding of IL-18 to IL-18R? induces both pro-inflammatory and protective functions during infection, depending on the context in which it occurs. IL-18 is highly expressed in the liver of wild type (WT) C57BL/6 mice following lethal infection with highly virulent Ixodes Ovatus Ehrlichia (IOE), an obligate intracellular bacterium that causes acute fatal toxic shock-like syndrome. In this study, we found that IOE infection of IL-18R?-/- mice resulted in significantly less host cell apoptosis, decreased hepatic leukocyte recruitment, enhanced bacterial clearance and prolonged survival compared to infected WT mice, suggesting a pathogenic role of IL-18/IL-18R? in Ehrlichia-induced toxic shock. Although lack of IL-18R decreases the magnitude of IFN-? producing type-1 immune response, enhanced resistance of the IL-18R?-/- mice against Ehrlichia correlated with increased pro-inflammatory cytokines at sites of infection, decreased systemic IL-10 production, increased frequency of protective natural killer T (NKT) cells producing TNF-? and IFN-? and decreased frequency of pathogenic TNF-?-producing CD8+ T cells. Adoptive transfer of immune wild type CD8+ T cells increased bacterial burden in IL-18R?-/- mice following IOE infection. Furthermore, rIL-18 treatment of WT mice infected with mildly virulent Ehrlichia muris (EM) impaired bacterial clearance and enhanced liver injury. Finally, lack of IL-18R signal reduced dendritic cells (DCs) maturation and their TNF-? production, suggesting that IL-18 possibly promote the adaptive pathogenic immune responses against Ehrlichia via influencing T cell priming functions of DCs Together, these results suggest that the presence or absence of IL-18R signals governs the pathogenic versus protective immunity in a model of Ehrlichia-induced immunopathology.

Ghose, Purnima; Ali, Asim Q; Fang, Rong; Forbes, Digna; Ballard, Billy; Ismail, Nahed

2011-01-01

73

A role for IgG immune complexes during infection with the intracellular pathogen Leishmania.  

PubMed

We examined the role of immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies in mediating host defense to the intracellular parasite, Leishmania. We show that IgG not only fails to provide protection against this intracellular pathogen, but it actually contributes to disease progression. The J(H) strain of BALB/c mice, which lack IgG because they have a targeted deletion in the Ig heavy chain (J) locus, were more resistant to infection with Leishmania major than were normal BALB/c mice. However, the passive administration of anti-Leishmania IgG caused J(H) mice to develop large lesions containing high numbers of parasites. Antibody administration correlated with an increase in interleukin (IL) 10 production in lesions, and blocking the murine IL-10 receptor prevented antibody-mediated disease exacerbation. In human patients with active visceral leishmaniasis, high IgG levels are predictive of disease. Patients with ongoing disease had high IgG antibody titers and no delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses to Leishmania antigens. This pattern was reversed upon disease resolution after treatment, resulting in a decrease in total IgG, which was accompanied by a progressive increase in DTH responsiveness. We conclude that IgG can cause a novel form of immune enhancement due to its ability to induce IL-10 production from macrophages. PMID:15753208

Miles, Suzanne A; Conrad, Sean M; Alves, Renata G; Jeronimo, Selma M B; Mosser, David M

2005-03-01

74

Invasiveness and intracellular growth of multidrug-resistant salmonella and other pathogens in Caco-2 cells.  

PubMed

The increase of multidrug-resistant pathogens of human and animal origins is a major public health concern. For a better understanding of the health consequences of multidrug-resistant bacteria transmitted from animal products to humans, the host interaction of zoonotic Salmonella isolates along with other pathogenic and commensal bacteria was evaluated using a human intestinal Caco-2 cell system. Multidrug-resistant S. Agona, S. Heidelberg, and S. Typhimurium possessed plasmid-mediated class 1 integrons. The S. Typhimurium DT104 isolate from ground beef showed the well-known genotypic and phenotypic resistance characteristics of the species, and contained the chromosomally located class 1 integron. Among the multidrug-resistant Salmonella isolates, the S. Heidelberg 219 had the highest invasion number at 1.0 x 10(4) CFU/mL, followed by the S. Typhimurium DT104 isolate at 7.7 x 10(3) CFU/mL. Listeria monocytogenes was the best performer among the tested species in invading the Caco-2 cell. Multidrug-resistant opportunistic pathogens Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were also able to invade the cells. The invasion of S. Heidelberg 219, S. Typhimurium DT104, L. monocytogenes, K. pneumoniae, and P. aeruginosa into the Caco-2 cells was not affected even in the presence of commensal E. coli. During the intracellular growth of S. Heidelberg 219, S. Typhimurium DT104, and L. monocytogenes, the bacterial counts increased 2 log cycles in 9 h in the Caco-2 cells. Therefore, these strains could rapidly proliferate after their invasion into the cells. PMID:17995846

Kim, S-H; Wei, C-I

2007-03-01

75

Inducible Nitric Oxide Is Essential for Host Control of Persistent but Not Acute Infection with the Intracellular Pathogen Toxoplasma gondii  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The induction by IFN- g of reactive nitrogen intermediates has been postulated as a major mechanism of host resistance to intracellular pathogens. To formally test this hypothesis in vivo, the course of Toxoplasma gondii infection was assessed in nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) 2\\/2 mice. As expected, macrophages from these animals displayed defective microbicidal activity against the parasite in vitro.

Tanya M. Scharton-Kersten; George Yap; Jeanne Magram; Alan Sher

2010-01-01

76

A Rickettsia genome overrun by mobile genetic elements provides insight into the acquisition of genes characteristic of an obligate intracellular lifestyle.  

PubMed

We present the draft genome for the Rickettsia endosymbiont of Ixodes scapularis (REIS), a symbiont of the deer tick vector of Lyme disease in North America. Among Rickettsia species (Alphaproteobacteria: Rickettsiales), REIS has the largest genome sequenced to date (>2 Mb) and contains 2,309 genes across the chromosome and four plasmids (pREIS1 to pREIS4). The most remarkable finding within the REIS genome is the extraordinary proliferation of mobile genetic elements (MGEs), which contributes to a limited synteny with other Rickettsia genomes. In particular, an integrative conjugative element named RAGE (for Rickettsiales amplified genetic element), previously identified in scrub typhus rickettsiae (Orientia tsutsugamushi) genomes, is present on both the REIS chromosome and plasmids. Unlike the pseudogene-laden RAGEs of O. tsutsugamushi, REIS encodes nine conserved RAGEs that include F-like type IV secretion systems similar to that of the tra genes encoded in the Rickettsia bellii and R. massiliae genomes. An unparalleled abundance of encoded transposases (>650) relative to genome size, together with the RAGEs and other MGEs, comprise ~35% of the total genome, making REIS one of the most plastic and repetitive bacterial genomes sequenced to date. We present evidence that conserved rickettsial genes associated with an intracellular lifestyle were acquired via MGEs, especially the RAGE, through a continuum of genomic invasions. Robust phylogeny estimation suggests REIS is ancestral to the virulent spotted fever group of rickettsiae. As REIS is not known to invade vertebrate cells and has no known pathogenic effects on I. scapularis, its genome sequence provides insight on the origin of mechanisms of rickettsial pathogenicity. PMID:22056929

Gillespie, Joseph J; Joardar, Vinita; Williams, Kelly P; Driscoll, Timothy; Hostetler, Jessica B; Nordberg, Eric; Shukla, Maulik; Walenz, Brian; Hill, Catherine A; Nene, Vishvanath M; Azad, Abdu F; Sobral, Bruno W; Caler, Elisabet

2012-01-01

77

A Rickettsia Genome Overrun by Mobile Genetic Elements Provides Insight into the Acquisition of Genes Characteristic of an Obligate Intracellular Lifestyle  

PubMed Central

We present the draft genome for the Rickettsia endosymbiont of Ixodes scapularis (REIS), a symbiont of the deer tick vector of Lyme disease in North America. Among Rickettsia species (Alphaproteobacteria: Rickettsiales), REIS has the largest genome sequenced to date (>2 Mb) and contains 2,309 genes across the chromosome and four plasmids (pREIS1 to pREIS4). The most remarkable finding within the REIS genome is the extraordinary proliferation of mobile genetic elements (MGEs), which contributes to a limited synteny with other Rickettsia genomes. In particular, an integrative conjugative element named RAGE (for Rickettsiales amplified genetic element), previously identified in scrub typhus rickettsiae (Orientia tsutsugamushi) genomes, is present on both the REIS chromosome and plasmids. Unlike the pseudogene-laden RAGEs of O. tsutsugamushi, REIS encodes nine conserved RAGEs that include F-like type IV secretion systems similar to that of the tra genes encoded in the Rickettsia bellii and R. massiliae genomes. An unparalleled abundance of encoded transposases (>650) relative to genome size, together with the RAGEs and other MGEs, comprise ?35% of the total genome, making REIS one of the most plastic and repetitive bacterial genomes sequenced to date. We present evidence that conserved rickettsial genes associated with an intracellular lifestyle were acquired via MGEs, especially the RAGE, through a continuum of genomic invasions. Robust phylogeny estimation suggests REIS is ancestral to the virulent spotted fever group of rickettsiae. As REIS is not known to invade vertebrate cells and has no known pathogenic effects on I. scapularis, its genome sequence provides insight on the origin of mechanisms of rickettsial pathogenicity.

Joardar, Vinita; Williams, Kelly P.; Driscoll, Timothy; Hostetler, Jessica B.; Nordberg, Eric; Shukla, Maulik; Walenz, Brian; Hill, Catherine A.; Nene, Vishvanath M.; Azad, Abdu F.; Sobral, Bruno W.; Caler, Elisabet

2012-01-01

78

The complete genomic sequence of Mycoplasma penetrans, an intracellular bacterial pathogen in humans  

PubMed Central

The complete genomic sequence of an intracellular bacterial pathogen, Mycoplasma penetrans HF-2 strain, was determined. The HF-2 genome consists of a 1 358 633 bp single circular chromosome containing 1038 predicted coding sequences (CDSs), one set of rRNA genes and 30 tRNA genes. Among the 1038 CDSs, 264 predicted proteins are common to the Mycoplasmataceae sequenced thus far and 463 are M.penetrans specific. The genome contains the two-component system but lacks the essential cellular gene, uridine kinase. The relatively large genome of M.penetrans HF-2 among mycoplasma species may be accounted for by both its rich core proteome and the presence of a number of paralog families corresponding to 25.4% of all CDSs. The largest paralog family is the p35 family, which encodes surface lipoproteins including the major antigen, P35. A total of 44 genes for p35 and p35 homologs were identified and 30 of them form one large cluster in the chromosome. The genetic tree of p35 paralogs suggests the occurrence of dynamic chromosomal rearrangement in paralog formation during evolution. Thus, M.penetrans HF-2 may have acquired diverse repertoires of antigenic variation-related genes to allow its persistent infection in humans.

Sasaki, Yuko; Ishikawa, Jun; Yamashita, Atsushi; Oshima, Kenshiro; Kenri, Tsuyoshi; Furuya, Keiko; Yoshino, Chie; Horino, Atsuko; Shiba, Tadayoshi; Sasaki, Tsuguo; Hattori, Masahira

2002-01-01

79

Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of 'Rickettsiella agriotidis', an intracellular bacterial pathogen of Agriotes wireworms.  

PubMed

Wireworms, the polyphagous larvae of click beetles belonging to the genus Agriotes (Coleoptera: Elateridae) are severe and widespread agricultural pests that affect numerous crops globally. A new bacterial specimen identified in diseased wireworms had previously been shown by microscopy and 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene-based phylogenetic reconstruction to belong to the taxonomic genus Rickettsiella (Gammaproteobacteria) that comprises intracellular bacteria associated with and typically pathogenic for a wide range of arthropods. Going beyond these earlier results obtained from rRNA phylogenies, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) using a four marker scheme has been employed in the molecular taxonomic characterization of the new Rickettsiella pathotype, referred to as 'Rickettsiella agriotidis'. In combination with likelihood-based significance testing, the MLSA approach demonstrated the close phylogenetic relationship of 'R. agriotidis' to the pathotypes 'Rickettsiella melolonthae' and 'Rickettsiella tipulae', i.e., subjective synonyms of the nomenclatural type species, Rickettsiella popilliae. 'R. agriotidis' forms, therefore, part of a Rickettsiella pathotype complex that most likely represents the species R. popilliae. As there are currently no genetic data available from the R. popilliae type strain, the respective assignment cannot be corroborated directly. However, an alternative taxonomic assignment to the species Rickettsiella grylli has been positively ruled out by significance testing. MLSA has been shown to provide a more powerful tool for taxonomic delineation within the genus Rickettsiella as compared to 16S rRNA phylogenetics. However, the limitations of the present MLSA scheme for the sub-species level classification of 'R. agriotidis' and further R. popilliae synonyms has been critically evaluated. PMID:23007524

Schuster, Christina; Kleespies, Regina G; Ritter, Claudia; Feiertag, Simon; Leclerque, Andreas

2013-01-01

80

13C-Flux Spectral Analysis of Host-Pathogen Metabolism Reveals a Mixed Diet for Intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Summary Whereas intracellular carbon metabolism has emerged as an attractive drug target, the carbon sources of intracellularly replicating pathogens, such as the tuberculosis bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which causes long-term infections in one-third of the world’s population, remain mostly unknown. We used a systems-based approach—13C-flux spectral analysis (FSA) complemented with manual analysis—to measure the metabolic interaction between M. tuberculosis and its macrophage host cell. 13C-FSA analysis of experimental data showed that M. tuberculosis obtains a mixture of amino acids, C1 and C2 substrates from its host cell. We experimentally confirmed that the C1 substrate was derived from CO2. 13C labeling experiments performed on a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mutant revealed that intracellular M. tuberculosis has access to glycolytic C3 substrates. These findings provide constraints for developing novel chemotherapeutics.

Beste, Dany J.V.; Noh, Katharina; Niedenfuhr, Sebastian; Mendum, Tom A.; Hawkins, Nathaniel D.; Ward, Jane L.; Beale, Michael H.; Wiechert, Wolfgang; McFadden, Johnjoe

2013-01-01

81

Rickettsial Pathogens and Their Arthropod Vectors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rickettsial diseases, important causes of illness and death worldwide, exist primarily in endemic and enzootic foci that occasionally give rise to sporadic or seasonal outbreaks. Rickettsial pathogens are highly specialized for obligate intracellular survival in both the vertebrate host and the invertebrate vector. While studies often focus primarily on the vertebrate host, the arthropod vector is often more important in

Abdu F. Azad; Charles B. Beard

1998-01-01

82

Rapid and Sensitive Detection of an Intracellular Pathogen in Human Peripheral Leukocytes with Hybridizing Magnetic Relaxation Nanosensors  

PubMed Central

Bacterial infections are still a major global healthcare problem. The quick and sensitive detection of pathogens responsible for these infections would facilitate correct diagnosis of the disease and expedite treatment. Of major importance are intracellular slow-growing pathogens that reside within peripheral leukocytes, evading recognition by the immune system and detection by traditional culture methods. Herein, we report the use of hybridizing magnetic nanosensors (hMRS) for the detection of an intracellular pathogen, Mycobacterium avium spp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The hMRS are designed to bind to a unique genomic sequence found in the MAP genome, causing significant changes in the sample’s magnetic resonance signal. Clinically relevant samples, including tissue and blood, were screened with hMRS and results were compared with traditional PCR analysis. Within less than an hour, the hMRS identified MAP-positive samples in a library of laboratory cultures, clinical isolates, blood and homogenized tissues. Comparison of the hMRS with culture methods in terms of prediction of disease state revealed that the hMRS outperformed established culture methods, while being significantly faster (1 hour vs 12 weeks). Additionally, using a single instrument and one nanoparticle preparation we were able to detect the intracellular bacterial target in clinical samples at the genomic and epitope levels. Overall, since the nanoparticles are robust in diverse environmental settings and substantially more affordable than PCR enzymes, the potential clinical and field-based use of hMRS in the multiplexed identification of microbial pathogens and other disease-related biomarkers via a single, deployable instrument in clinical and complex environmental samples is foreseen.

Kaittanis, Charalambos; Boukhriss, Hamza; Santra, Santimukul; Naser, Saleh A.; Perez, J. Manuel

2012-01-01

83

Intracellular Growth of Legionella pneumophila in Dictyostelium discoideum, a System for Genetic Analysis of Host-Pathogen Interactions  

PubMed Central

Conditions were established in which Legionella pneumophila, an intracellular bacterial pathogen, could replicate within the unicellular organism Dictyostelium discoideum. By several criteria, L. pneumophila grew by the same mechanism within D. discoideum as it does in amoebae and macrophages. Bacteria grew within membrane-bound vesicles associated with rough endoplasmic reticulum, and L. pneumophila dot/icm mutants, blocked for growth in macrophages and amoebae, also did not grow in D. discoideum. Internalized L. pneumophila avoided degradation by D. discoideum and showed evidence of reduced fusion with endocytic compartments. The ability of L. pneumophila to grow within D. discoideum depended on the growth state of the cells. D. discoideum grown as adherent monolayers was susceptible to L. pneumophila infection and to contact-dependent cytotoxicity during high-multiplicity infections, whereas D. discoideum grown in suspension was relatively resistant to cytotoxicity and did not support intracellular growth. Some known D. discoideum mutants were examined for their effect on growth of L. pneumophila. The coronin mutant and the myoA/B double myosin I mutant were more permissive than wild-type strains for intracellular growth. Growth of L. pneumophila in a G? mutant was slightly reduced compared to the parent strain. This work demonstrates the usefulness of the L. pneumophila-D. discoideum system for genetic analysis of host-pathogen interactions.

Solomon, Jonathan M.; Rupper, Adam; Cardelli, James A.; Isberg, Ralph R.

2000-01-01

84

Interleukin-17 is required for T helper 1 cell immunity and host resistance to the intracellular pathogen Francisella tularensis.  

PubMed

The importance of T helper type 1 (Th1) cell immunity in host resistance to the intracellular bacterium Francisella tularensis is well established. However, the relative roles of interleukin (IL)-12-Th1 and IL-23-Th17 cell responses in immunity to F. tularensis have not been studied. The IL-23-Th17 cell pathway is critical for protective immunity against extracellular bacterial infections. In contrast, the IL-23-Th17 cell pathway is dispensable for protection against intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacteria. Here we show that the IL-23-Th17 pathway regulates the IL-12-Th1 cell pathway and was required for protective immunity against F.tularensis live vaccine strain. We show that IL-17A, but not IL-17F or IL-22, induced IL-12 production in dendritic cells and mediated Th1 responses. Furthermore, we show that IL-17A also induced IL-12 and interferon-gamma production in macrophages and mediated bacterial killing. Together, these findings illustrate a biological function for IL-17A in regulating IL-12-Th1 cell immunity and host responses to an intracellular pathogen. PMID:19853481

Lin, Yinyao; Ritchea, Shane; Logar, Alison; Slight, Samantha; Messmer, Michelle; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Guglani, Lokesh; Alcorn, John F; Strawbridge, Heather; Park, Sang Mi; Onishi, Reiko; Nyugen, Nikki; Walter, Michael J; Pociask, Derek; Randall, Troy D; Gaffen, Sarah L; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Kolls, Jay K; Khader, Shabaana A

2009-11-20

85

IL-17 is required for Th1 immunity and host resistance to the intracellular pathogen Francisella tularensis LVS  

PubMed Central

Summary The importance of T helper type 1(Th1) immunity in host resistance to the intracellular bacterium Francisella tularensis is well established. However, the relative roles of Interleukin (IL)-12/Th1 and IL-23/T helper type 17(Th17) responses in immunity to F.tularensis have not been studied. The IL-23/Th17 pathway is critical for protective immunity against extracellular bacterial infections. In contrast, the IL-23/Th17 pathway is dispensable for protection against intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacteria. Our data show that the IL-23/Th17 pathway regulates the IL-12/Th1 pathway and is required for protective immunity against F.tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS). We show that IL-17, but not IL-17F or IL-22 induces IL-12 production in dendritic cells and mediates Th1 responses. Furthermore, we show that IL-17 also induces IL-12 and IFN? production in macrophages and mediates bacterial killing. Together, these findings illustrate a novel biological function for IL-17 in regulating IL-12/Th1 immunity and host responses to an intracellular pathogen.

Lin, Yinyao; Ritchea, Shane; Logar, Alison; Slight, Samantha; Messmer, Michelle; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Guglani, Lokesh; Alcorn, John; Strawbridge, Heather; Park, Sang Mi; Onishi, Reiko; Nyugen, Nikki; Walters, Michael; Pociask, Derek; Randall, Troy D; Gaffen, Sarah L; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Kolls, Jay; Khader, Shabaana A

2009-01-01

86

TmpL, a Transmembrane Protein Required for Intracellular Redox Homeostasis and Virulence in a Plant and an Animal Fungal Pathogen  

Microsoft Academic Search

The regulation of intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is critical for developmental differentiation and virulence of many pathogenic fungi. In this report we demonstrate that a novel transmembrane protein, TmpL, is necessary for regulation of intracellular ROS levels and tolerance to external ROS, and is required for infection of plants by the necrotroph Alternaria brassicicola and for infection

Kwang-Hyung Kim; Sven D. Willger; Sang-Wook Park; Srisombat Puttikamonkul; Nora Grahl; Yangrae Cho; Biswarup Mukhopadhyay; Robert A. Cramer; Christopher B. Lawrence

2009-01-01

87

Coinfection of tick cell lines has variable effects on replication of intracellular bacterial and viral pathogens.  

PubMed

Ticks transmit various human and animal microbial pathogens and may harbour more than one pathogen simultaneously. Both viruses and bacteria can trigger, and may subsequently suppress, vertebrate host and arthropod vector anti-microbial responses. Microbial coinfection of ticks could lead to an advantage or disadvantage for one or more of the microorganisms. In this preliminary study, cell lines derived from the ticks Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes ricinus were infected sequentially with 2 arthropod-borne pathogens, Borrelia burgdorferi s.s., Ehrlichia ruminantium, or Semliki Forest virus (SFV), and the effect of coinfection on the replication of these pathogens was measured. Prior infection of tick cell cultures with the spirochaete B. burgdorferi enhanced subsequent replication of the rickettsial pathogen E. ruminantium whereas addition of spirochaetes to cells infected with E. ruminantium had no effect on growth of the latter. Both prior and subsequent presence of B. burgdorferi also had a positive effect on SFV replication. Presence of E. ruminantium or SFV had no measurable effect on B. burgdorferi growth. In tick cells infected first with E. ruminantium and then with SFV, virus replication was significantly higher across all time points measured (24, 48, 72h post infection), while presence of the virus had no detectable effect on bacterial growth. When cells were infected first with SFV and then with E. ruminantium, there was no effect on replication of either pathogen. The results of this preliminary study indicate that interplay does occur between different pathogens during infection of tick cells. Further study is needed to determine if this results from direct pathogen-pathogen interaction or from effects on host cell defences, and to determine if these observations also apply in vivo in ticks. If presence of one pathogen in the tick vector results in increased replication of another, this could have implications for disease transmission and incidence. PMID:24685441

Moniuszko, Anna; Rückert, Claudia; Alberdi, M Pilar; Barry, Gerald; Stevenson, Brian; Fazakerley, John K; Kohl, Alain; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley

2014-06-01

88

Coinfection of tick cell lines has variable effects on replication of intracellular bacterial and viral pathogens  

PubMed Central

Ticks transmit various human and animal microbial pathogens and may harbour more than one pathogen simultaneously. Both viruses and bacteria can trigger, and may subsequently suppress, vertebrate host and arthropod vector anti-microbial responses. Microbial coinfection of ticks could lead to an advantage or disadvantage for one or more of the microorganisms. In this preliminary study, cell lines derived from the ticks Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes ricinus were infected sequentially with 2 arthropod-borne pathogens, Borrelia burgdorferi s.s., Ehrlichia ruminantium, or Semliki Forest virus (SFV), and the effect of coinfection on the replication of these pathogens was measured. Prior infection of tick cell cultures with the spirochaete B. burgdorferi enhanced subsequent replication of the rickettsial pathogen E. ruminantium whereas addition of spirochaetes to cells infected with E. ruminantium had no effect on growth of the latter. Both prior and subsequent presence of B. burgdorferi also had a positive effect on SFV replication. Presence of E. ruminantium or SFV had no measurable effect on B. burgdorferi growth. In tick cells infected first with E. ruminantium and then with SFV, virus replication was significantly higher across all time points measured (24, 48, 72 h post infection), while presence of the virus had no detectable effect on bacterial growth. When cells were infected first with SFV and then with E. ruminantium, there was no effect on replication of either pathogen. The results of this preliminary study indicate that interplay does occur between different pathogens during infection of tick cells. Further study is needed to determine if this results from direct pathogen–pathogen interaction or from effects on host cell defences, and to determine if these observations also apply in vivo in ticks. If presence of one pathogen in the tick vector results in increased replication of another, this could have implications for disease transmission and incidence.

Moniuszko, Anna; Ruckert, Claudia; Alberdi, M. Pilar; Barry, Gerald; Stevenson, Brian; Fazakerley, John K.; Kohl, Alain; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley

2014-01-01

89

HIV-1 Vif Versus the APOBEC3 Cytidine Deaminases: An Intracellular Duel Between Pathogen and Host Restriction Factors  

PubMed Central

The Vif protein of HIV is essential for the effective propagation of this pathogenic retrovirus in vivo. Vif acts by preventing virion encapsidation of two potent antiviral factors, the APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F cytidine deaminases. Decreased encapsidation in part involves Vif-mediated recruitment of a ubiquitin E3 ligase complex that promotes polyubiquitylation and proteasome-mediated degradation of APOBEC3G/F. The resultant decline in intracellular levels of these enzymes leads to decreased encapsidation of APOBECG/F into budding virions. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of the dynamic interplay of Vif with the antiviral APOBEC3 enzymes.

Wissing, Silke; Galloway, Nicole L. K.; Greene, Warner C.

2010-01-01

90

Uptake of pathogenic intracellular bacteria into human and murine macrophages downregulates the eukaryotic 26S protease complex ATPase gene.  

PubMed Central

A differential PCR technique detected the transcriptional downregulation of the mss1 (mammalian suppressor of svg1) gene in murine J774A.1 macrophages following uptake of Salmonella typhimurium. This downregulation was also noted after entry of virulent strains of Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella flexneri, two other facultative intracellular bacterial species. In contrast, uptake of nonpathogenic Escherichia coli HB101, an aroA mutant of S. typhimurium, an invasion plasmid antigen B (ipaB) mutant of S. flexneri, hemolysin (hly) and positive-regulatory factor (prfA) mutants of L. monocytogenes, or latex beads produced mss1 expression levels similar to that of uninfected macrophages. Transcriptional downregulation of mss1 was also shown to occur in S. typhimurium-infected human U937 cells, albeit to an extent less than that in murine J774A.1 cells. In addition to a lower abundance of mss1 transcripts, we also demonstrate for the first time that less MSS1 protein was detected in intracellular-bacterium-infected cells (beginning about 1 h after entry of the pathogenic intracellular bacteria) than in noninfected cells. Some strains with specific mutations in characterized genes, such as an ipaB mutant strain of S. flexneri and an hly mutant strain of L. monocytogenes, did not elicit this lower level of expression of MSS1 protein. The decrease in MSS1 within infected macrophages resulted in an accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, substrates for MSS1. Since MSS1 comprises the ATPase part of the 26S protease that degrades ubiquitinated proteins, we hypothesize that downregulation of the mss1 gene by intracellular bacterial entry may help subvert the host cell's normal defensive response to internalized bacteria, allowing the intracellular bacteria to survive.

Schwan, W R; Kopecko, D J

1997-01-01

91

Two Phosphodiesterase Genes, PDEL and PDEH, Regulate Development and Pathogenicity by Modulating Intracellular Cyclic AMP Levels in Magnaporthe oryzae  

PubMed Central

Cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling plays an important role in regulating multiple cellular responses, such as growth, morphogenesis, and/or pathogenicity of eukaryotic organisms such as fungi. As a second messenger, cAMP is important in the activation of downstream effector molecules. The balance of intracellular cAMP levels depends on biosynthesis by adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and hydrolysis by cAMP phosphodiesterases (PDEases). The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae contains a high-affinity (PdeH/Pde2) and a low-affinity (PdeL/Pde1) PDEases, and a previous study showed that PdeH has a major role in asexual differentiation and pathogenicity. Here, we show that PdeL is required for asexual development and conidial morphology, and it also plays a minor role in regulating cAMP signaling. This is in contrast to PdeH whose mutation resulted in major defects in conidial morphology, cell wall integrity, and surface hydrophobicity, as well as a significant reduction in pathogenicity. Consistent with both PdeH and PdeL functioning in cAMP signaling, disruption of PDEH only partially rescued the mutant phenotype of ?magB and ?pka1. Further studies suggest that PdeH might function through a feedback mechanism to regulate the expression of pathogenicity factor Mpg1 during surface hydrophobicity and pathogenic development. Moreover, microarray data revealed new insights into the underlying cAMP regulatory mechanisms that may help to identify potential pathogenicity factors for the development of new disease management strategies.

Zhang, Haifeng; Liu, Kaiyue; Zhang, Xing; Tang, Wei; Wang, Jiansheng; Guo, Min; Zhao, Qian; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Zhengguang

2011-01-01

92

Molecular mechanisms of cell-cell spread of intracellular bacterial pathogens  

PubMed Central

Several bacterial pathogens, including Listeria monocytogenes, Shigella flexneri and Rickettsia spp., have evolved mechanisms to actively spread within human tissues. Spreading is initiated by the pathogen-induced recruitment of host filamentous (F)-actin. F-actin forms a tail behind the microbe, propelling it through the cytoplasm. The motile pathogen then encounters the host plasma membrane, forming a bacterium-containing protrusion that is engulfed by an adjacent cell. Over the past two decades, much progress has been made in elucidating mechanisms of F-actin tail formation. Listeria and Shigella produce tails of branched actin filaments by subverting the host Arp2/3 complex. By contrast, Rickettsia forms tails with linear actin filaments through a bacterial mimic of eukaryotic formins. Compared with F-actin tail formation, mechanisms controlling bacterial protrusions are less well understood. However, recent findings have highlighted the importance of pathogen manipulation of host cell–cell junctions in spread. Listeria produces a soluble protein that enhances bacterial protrusions by perturbing tight junctions. Shigella protrusions are engulfed through a clathrin-mediated pathway at ‘tricellular junctions’—specialized membrane regions at the intersection of three epithelial cells. This review summarizes key past findings in pathogen spread, and focuses on recent developments in actin-based motility and the formation and internalization of bacterial protrusions.

Ireton, Keith

2013-01-01

93

Dormant intracellular Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium discriminates among Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 effectors to persist inside fibroblasts.  

PubMed

Salmonella enterica uses effector proteins delivered by type III secretion systems (TTSS) to colonize eukaryotic cells. Recent in vivo studies have shown that intracellular bacteria activate the TTSS encoded by Salmonella pathogenicity island-2 (SPI-2) to restrain growth inside phagocytes. Growth attenuation is also observed in vivo in bacteria colonizing nonphagocytic stromal cells of the intestinal lamina propria and in cultured fibroblasts. SPI-2 is required for survival of nongrowing bacteria persisting inside fibroblasts, but its induction mode and the effectors involved remain unknown. Here, we show that nongrowing dormant intracellular bacteria use the two-component system OmpR-EnvZ to induce SPI-2 expression and the PhoP-PhoQ system to regulate the time at which induction takes place, 2 h postentry. Dormant bacteria were shown to discriminate the usage of SPI-2 effectors. Among the effectors tested, SseF, SseG, and SseJ were required for survival, while others, such as SifA and SifB, were not. SifA and SifB dispensability correlated with the inability of intracellular bacteria to secrete these effectors even when overexpressed. Conversely, SseJ overproduction resulted in augmented secretion and exacerbated bacterial growth. Dormant bacteria produced other effectors, such as PipB and PipB2, that, unlike what was reported for epithelial cells, did not to traffic outside the phagosomal compartment. Therefore, permissiveness for secreting only a subset of SPI-2 effectors may be instrumental for dormancy. We propose that the S. enterica serovar Typhimurium nonproliferative intracellular lifestyle is sustained by selection of SPI-2 effectors that are produced in tightly defined amounts and delivered to phagosome-confined locations. PMID:24144726

Núñez-Hernández, Cristina; Alonso, Ana; Pucciarelli, M Graciela; Casadesús, Josep; García-del Portillo, Francisco

2014-01-01

94

Dormant Intracellular Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Discriminates among Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 Effectors To Persist inside Fibroblasts  

PubMed Central

Salmonella enterica uses effector proteins delivered by type III secretion systems (TTSS) to colonize eukaryotic cells. Recent in vivo studies have shown that intracellular bacteria activate the TTSS encoded by Salmonella pathogenicity island-2 (SPI-2) to restrain growth inside phagocytes. Growth attenuation is also observed in vivo in bacteria colonizing nonphagocytic stromal cells of the intestinal lamina propria and in cultured fibroblasts. SPI-2 is required for survival of nongrowing bacteria persisting inside fibroblasts, but its induction mode and the effectors involved remain unknown. Here, we show that nongrowing dormant intracellular bacteria use the two-component system OmpR-EnvZ to induce SPI-2 expression and the PhoP-PhoQ system to regulate the time at which induction takes place, 2 h postentry. Dormant bacteria were shown to discriminate the usage of SPI-2 effectors. Among the effectors tested, SseF, SseG, and SseJ were required for survival, while others, such as SifA and SifB, were not. SifA and SifB dispensability correlated with the inability of intracellular bacteria to secrete these effectors even when overexpressed. Conversely, SseJ overproduction resulted in augmented secretion and exacerbated bacterial growth. Dormant bacteria produced other effectors, such as PipB and PipB2, that, unlike what was reported for epithelial cells, did not to traffic outside the phagosomal compartment. Therefore, permissiveness for secreting only a subset of SPI-2 effectors may be instrumental for dormancy. We propose that the S. enterica serovar Typhimurium nonproliferative intracellular lifestyle is sustained by selection of SPI-2 effectors that are produced in tightly defined amounts and delivered to phagosome-confined locations.

Nunez-Hernandez, Cristina; Alonso, Ana; Pucciarelli, M. Graciela; Casadesus, Josep

2014-01-01

95

Invasion and Persistent Intracellular Colonization of Erythrocytes: A Unique Parasitic Strategy of the Emerging Pathogen Bartonella  

Microsoft Academic Search

The expanding genus Bartonella includes zoonotic and human-specific pathogens that can cause a wide range of clinical manifestations. A productive infection allowing bacterial transmission by blood-sucking arthropods is marked by an intraerythrocytic bacteremia that occurs exclu- sively in specific human or animal reservoir hosts. Incidental human infection by animal- adapted bartonellae can cause disease without evidence for erythrocyte parasitism. A

Ralf Schülein; Anja Seubert; Christian Gille; Christa Lanz; Yves Hansmann; Yves Piémont; Christoph Dehio

96

Pathogen-derived oligosaccharides improve innate immune response to intracellular parasite infection.  

PubMed

Pathogen glycolipids, including Leishmania spp. lipophosphoglycan (LPG) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis mannosylated lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM), modulate essential interactions with host phagocytic cells. Polysaccharide and lipid components promote immunomodulation. Owing to the stereochemistry required to synthesize oligosaccharides, the roles for oligosaccharides in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases have remained largely unknown. Recent advances in carbohydrate chemistry allowed us to synthesize pathogen surface oligosaccharides to discern their immune response-altering activities. Trimannose cap carbohydrates from ManLAM and LPG altered the production of proinflammatory cytokines via a toll-like receptor (TLR2)-mediated mechanism in vitro and in vivo. In vivo treatment with trimannose led to increased Th1-polarizing, IL-12p40-producing cells from the draining lymph nodes of treated Leishmania major-infected mice compared with cells from untreated infected mice. Trimannose treatment increased the production of other Th1 proinflammatory cytokines (ie, interferon-?, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-?) critical for a productive immune response to either pathogen. This significant difference in cytokine production between trimannose cap sugar-treated and control groups was not observed in draining lymph node cells from TLR2(-/-) mice. Type of inflammation and rate of bead entry into macrophages and dendritic cells were different for trimannose-coated beads compared with control oligosaccharide-coated beads, indicating selective lectin receptor/oligosaccharide interactions mediating cell entry and cytokine production. These novel findings may prompt the development of targeted oligosaccharide adjuvants against chronic infections. PMID:21763266

Osanya, Alex; Song, Eun-Ho; Metz, Kyle; Shimak, Raeann M; Boggiatto, Paola Mercedes; Huffman, Elise; Johnson, Charles; Hostetter, Jesse M; Pohl, Nicola L B; Petersen, Christine A

2011-09-01

97

The Equine Antimicrobial Peptide eCATH1 Is Effective against the Facultative Intracellular Pathogen Rhodococcus equi in Mice  

PubMed Central

Rhodococcus equi, the causal agent of rhodococcosis, is a major pathogen of foals and is also responsible for severe infections in immunocompromised humans. Of great concern, strains resistant to currently used antibiotics have emerged. As the number of drugs that are efficient in vivo is limited because of the intracellular localization of the bacterium inside macrophages, new active but cell-permeant drugs will be needed in the near future. In the present study, we evaluated, by in vitro and ex vivo experiments, the ability of the alpha-helical equine antimicrobial peptide eCATH1 to kill intracellular bacterial cells. Moreover, the therapeutic potential of the peptide was assessed in experimental rhodococcosis induced in mice, while the in vivo toxicity was evaluated by behavioral and histopathological analysis. The study revealed that eCATH1 significantly reduced the number of bacteria inside macrophages. Furthermore, the bactericidal potential of the peptide was maintained in vivo at doses that appeared to have no visible deleterious effects for the mice even after 7 days of treatment. Indeed, daily subcutaneous injections of 1 mg/kg body weight of eCATH1 led to a significant reduction of the bacterial load in organs comparable to that obtained after treatment with 10 mg/kg body weight of rifampin. Interestingly, the combination of the peptide with rifampin showed a synergistic interaction in both ex vivo and in vivo experiments. These results emphasize the therapeutic potential that eCATH1 represents in the treatment of rhodococcosis.

Schlusselhuber, Margot; Torelli, Riccardo; Martini, Cecilia; Leippe, Matthias; Cattoir, Vincent; Leclercq, Roland; Laugier, Claire; Grotzinger, Joachim; Sanguinetti, Maurizio

2013-01-01

98

The Francisella pathogenicity island protein IglA localizes to the bacterial cytoplasm and is needed for intracellular growth  

PubMed Central

Background Francisella tularensis is a gram negative, facultative intracellular bacterium that is the etiological agent of tularemia. F. novicida is closely related to F. tularensis but has low virulence for humans while being highly virulent in mice. IglA is a 21 kDa protein encoded by a gene that is part of an iglABCD operon located on the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI). Results Bioinformatics analysis of the FPI suggests that IglA and IglB are components of a newly described type VI secretion system. In this study, we showed that IglA regulation is controlled by the global regulators MglA and MglB. During intracellular growth IglA production reaches a maximum at about 10 hours post infection. Biochemical fractionation showed that IglA is a soluble cytoplasmic protein and immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that it interacts with the downstream-encoded IglB. When the iglB gene was disrupted IglA could not be detected in cell extracts of F. novicida, although IglC could be detected. We further demonstrated that IglA is needed for intracellular growth of F. novicida. A non-polar iglA deletion mutant was defective for growth in mouse macrophage-like cells, and in cis complementation largely restored the wild type macrophage growth phenotype. Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate that IglA and IglB are interacting cytoplasmic proteins that are required for intramacrophage growth. The significance of the interaction may be to secrete effector molecules that affect host cell processes.

de Bruin, Olle M; Ludu, Jagjit S; Nano, Francis E

2007-01-01

99

Intracellular Persisting Staphylococcus aureus Is the Major Pathogen in Recurrent Tonsillitis  

PubMed Central

Background The two major indications for tonsillectomy are recurrent tonsillitis (RT) and peritonsillar abscess (PTA). Unlike PTAs, which are primarily treated surgically, RT is often cured by tonsillectomy only after a series of failed drug therapy attempts. Although the bacteriological background of RT has been studied, the reason for the lack of success of conservative therapeutic approaches is not well understood. Methods In a prospective study, tonsil specimens from 130 RT patients and 124 PTA patients were examined for the presence of extra- and intracellular bacteria using antibiotic protection assays. Staphylococcus aureus isolates from RT patients were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa-typing and MSCRAMM-gene-PCR. Their ability for biofilm formation was tested and their cell invasiveness was confirmed by a flow cytometric invasion assay (FACS), fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry. Findings S. aureus was the predominant species (57.7%) in RT patients, whereas Streptococcus pyogenes was most prevalent (20.2%) in PTA patients. Three different assays (FACS, FISH, antibiotic protection assay) showed that nearly all RT-associated S. aureus strains were located inside tonsillar cells. Correspondingly, the results of the MSCRAMM-gene-PCRs confirmed that 87% of these S. aureus isolates were invasive strains and not mere colonizers. Based upon PFGE analyses of genomic DNA and on spa-gene typing the vast majority of the S. aureus isolates belonged to different clonal lineages. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that intracellular residing S. aureus is the most common cause of RT and indicate that S. aureus uses this location to survive the effects of antibiotics and the host immune response. A German translation of the Abstract is provided as supplementary material (Abstract S1).

Zautner, Andreas E.; Krause, Merit; Stropahl, Gerhard; Holtfreter, Silva; Frickmann, Hagen; Maletzki, Claudia; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Pau, Hans Wilhelm; Podbielski, Andreas

2010-01-01

100

Transient transformation of the obligate biotrophic rust fungus Uromyces fabae using biolistics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Obligate biotrophic pathogens like the rust fungi are important plant pathogens causing enormous losses on food, forage and biomass crops. The analysis of the molecular details underlying obligate biotrophic host–parasite interactions is mainly hampered by the fact that no system for transformation is available for most obligate biotrophic organisms. Here we report the transient transformation of Uromyces fabae, an obligate

Alma Djulic; Annette Schmid; Heike Lenz; Pia Sharma; Christin Koch; Stefan G. R. Wirsel; Ralf T. Voegele

2011-01-01

101

The Iron-Regulated iupABC Operon Is Required for Saprophytic Growth of the Intracellular Pathogen Rhodococcus equi at Low Iron Concentrations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen which proliferates rapidly in both manure-enriched soil and alveolar macrophages. Although both environments are characterized by extremely low concentrations of free iron, very little is known regarding the strategies employed by R. equi to thrive under these conditions. This paper reports the characterization of an R. equi transposome mutant that fails to grow

Raul Miranda-CasoLuengo; Pamela S. Duffy; Enda P. O'Connell; Brian J. Graham; Michael W. Mangan; John F. Prescott; Wim G. Meijer

2005-01-01

102

Isocitrate Lyase Activity Is Required for Virulence of the Intracellular Pathogen Rhodococcus equi  

PubMed Central

Rhodococcus equi is an important pathogen of foals, causing severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia. Virulent R. equi strains grow within macrophages, a process which remains poorly characterized. A potential source of carbon for intramacrophage R. equi is membrane lipid-derived fatty acids, which following ? oxidation are assimilated via the glyoxylate bypass. To assess the importance of isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate bypass, in virulence of a foal isolate of R. equi, a mutant was constructed by a strategy of single homologous recombination using a suicide plasmid containing an internal fragment of the R. equi aceA gene encoding isocitrate lyase. Complementation of the resulting mutant with aceA showed that the mutant was specific for this gene. Assessment of virulence in a mouse macrophage cell line showed that the mutant was killed, in contrast to the parent strain. Studies in the liver of intravenously infected mice showed enhanced clearance of the mutant. When four 3-week-old foals were infected intrabronchially, the aceA mutant was completely attenuated, in contrast to the parent strain. In conclusion, the aceA gene was shown to be essential for virulence of R. equi, suggesting that membrane lipids may be an important source of carbon for phagocytosed R. equi.

Wall, Daniel M.; Duffy, Pamela S.; DuPont, Chris; Prescott, John F.; Meijer, Wim G.

2005-01-01

103

AmiA is a penicillin target enzyme with dual activity in the intracellular pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae.  

PubMed

Intracellular Chlamydiaceae do not need to resist osmotic challenges and a functional cell wall was not detected in these pathogens. Nevertheless, a recent study revealed evidence for circular peptidoglycan-like structures in Chlamydiaceae and penicillin inhibits cytokinesis, a phenomenon known as the chlamydial anomaly. Here, by characterizing a cell wall precursor-processing enzyme, we provide insights into the mechanisms underlying this mystery. We show that AmiA from Chlamydia pneumoniae separates daughter cells in an Escherichia coli amidase mutant. Contrary to homologues from free-living bacteria, chlamydial AmiA uses lipid II as a substrate and has dual activity, acting as an amidase and a carboxypeptidase. The latter function is penicillin sensitive and assigned to a penicillin-binding protein motif. Consistent with the lack of a regulatory domain in AmiA, chlamydial CPn0902, annotated as NlpD, is a carboxypeptidase, rather than an amidase activator, which is the case for E. coli NlpD. Functional conservation of AmiA implicates a role in cytokinesis and host response modulation. PMID:24953137

Klöckner, Anna; Otten, Christian; Derouaux, Adeline; Vollmer, Waldemar; Bühl, Henrike; De Benedetti, Stefania; Münch, Daniela; Josten, Michaele; Mölleken, Katja; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Henrichfreise, Beate

2014-01-01

104

AmiA is a penicillin target enzyme with dual activity in the intracellular pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae  

PubMed Central

Intracellular Chlamydiaceae do not need to resist osmotic challenges and a functional cell wall was not detected in these pathogens. Nevertheless, a recent study revealed evidence for circular peptidoglycan-like structures in Chlamydiaceae and penicillin inhibits cytokinesis, a phenomenon known as the chlamydial anomaly. Here, by characterizing a cell wall precursor-processing enzyme, we provide insights into the mechanisms underlying this mystery. We show that AmiA from Chlamydia pneumoniae separates daughter cells in an Escherichia coli amidase mutant. Contrary to homologues from free-living bacteria, chlamydial AmiA uses lipid II as a substrate and has dual activity, acting as an amidase and a carboxypeptidase. The latter function is penicillin sensitive and assigned to a penicillin-binding protein motif. Consistent with the lack of a regulatory domain in AmiA, chlamydial CPn0902, annotated as NlpD, is a carboxypeptidase, rather than an amidase activator, which is the case for E. coli NlpD. Functional conservation of AmiA implicates a role in cytokinesis and host response modulation.

Klockner, Anna; Otten, Christian; Derouaux, Adeline; Vollmer, Waldemar; Buhl, Henrike; De Benedetti, Stefania; Munch, Daniela; Josten, Michaele; Molleken, Katja; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Henrichfreise, Beate

2014-01-01

105

Characterization of two pathogenic mutations in cystathionine beta-synthase: different intracellular locations for wild-type and mutant proteins.  

PubMed

Cystathionine ?-synthase (CBS) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the condensation of homocysteine with serine to generate cystathionine. Homocystinuria is an autosomal recessive disorder commonly caused by a deficiency of CBS activity. Here, we characterized a novel CBS mutation (c.260C>A (p.T87N)) and a previously reported variant (c.700G>A (p.D234N)) found in Venezuelan homocystinuric patients, one nonresponsive and one responsive to vitamin B6. Both mutant proteins were expressed in vitro in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, finding lower soluble expression in HEK-293 cells (19% T87N and 23% D234N) compared to wild-type CBS. Residual activities obtained for the mutant proteins were 3.5% T87N and 43% D234N. Gel exclusion chromatography demonstrated a tendency of the T87N mutant to aggregate while the distribution of the D234N mutant was similar to wild-type enzyme. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, an unexpected difference in intracellular localization was observed between the wild-type and mutant proteins. While the T87N mutant exhibited a punctate appearance, the wild-type protein was homogeneously distributed inside the cell. Interestingly, the D234N protein showed both distributions. This study demonstrates that the pathogenic CBS mutations generate unstable proteins that are unable (T87N) or partially unable (D234N) to assemble into a functional enzyme, implying that these mutations might be responsible for the homocystinuria phenotype. PMID:23981774

Casique, L; Kabil, O; Banerjee, R; Martinez, J C; De Lucca, M

2013-11-15

106

Invasion of the Central Nervous System by Intracellular Bacteria  

PubMed Central

Infection of the central nervous system (CNS) is a severe and frequently fatal event during the course of many diseases caused by microbes with predominantly intracellular life cycles. Examples of these include the facultative intracellular bacteria Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Brucella and Salmonella spp. and obligate intracellular microbes of the Rickettsiaceae family and Tropheryma whipplei. Unfortunately, the mechanisms used by intracellular bacterial pathogens to enter the CNS are less well known than those used by bacterial pathogens with an extracellular life cycle. The goal of this review is to elaborate on the means by which intracellular bacterial pathogens establish infection within the CNS. This review encompasses the clinical and pathological findings that pertain to the CNS infection in humans and includes experimental data from animal models that illuminate how these microbes enter the CNS. Recent experimental data showing that L. monocytogenes can invade the CNS by more than one mechanism make it a useful model for discussing the various routes for neuroinvasion used by intracellular bacterial pathogens.

Drevets, Douglas A.; Leenen, Pieter J. M.; Greenfield, Ronald A.

2004-01-01

107

Gene Expression Profiles of Blumeria graminis Indicate Dynamic Changes to Primary Metabolism during Development of an Obligate Biotrophic PathogenW?  

PubMed Central

cDNA microarrays of Blumeria graminis f sp hordei transcript profiles during the asexual development cycle reveal the dynamics of global gene expression as the fungus germinates, penetrates, feeds on its host, and produces masses of conidia for dispersal. The expression profiles of genes encoding enzymes involved in primary metabolism show that there is a striking degree of coordinate regulation of some of the genes in the same pathway. In one example, genes encoding several glycolytic enzymes are significantly upregulated as mature appressoria form and also in infected epidermis, which contain fungal haustoria. In another example, mRNAs for lipid degrading enzymes are initially expressed at high levels in the conidia and the early germination stages and decrease significantly later. We discuss these results and draw inferences on the metabolic status of this obligate biotrophic fungus as it infects its host and completes its life cycle.

Both, Maike; Csukai, Michael; Stumpf, Michael P.H.; Spanu, Pietro D.

2005-01-01

108

The small GTPase RAB-11 directs polarized exocytosis of the intracellular pathogen N. parisii for fecal-oral transmission from C. elegans.  

PubMed

Pathogen exit is a key stage in the spread and propagation of infectious disease, with the fecal-oral route being a common mode of disease transmission. However, it is poorly understood which molecular pathways provide the major modes for intracellular pathogen exit and fecal-oral transmission in vivo. Here, we use the transparent nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate intestinal cell exit and fecal-oral transmission by the natural intracellular pathogen Nematocida parisii, which is a recently identified species of microsporidia. We show that N. parisii exits from polarized host intestinal cells by co-opting the host vesicle trafficking system and escaping into the lumen. Using a genetic screen, we identified components of the host endocytic recycling pathway that are required for N. parisii spore exit via exocytosis. In particular, we show that the small GTPase RAB-11 localizes to apical spores, is required for spore-containing compartments to fuse with the apical plasma membrane, and is required for spore exit. In addition, we find that RAB-11-deficient animals exhibit impaired contagiousness, supporting an in vivo role for this host trafficking factor in microsporidia disease transmission. Altogether, these findings provide an in vivo example of the major mode of exit used by a natural pathogen for disease spread via fecal-oral transmission. PMID:24843160

Szumowski, Suzannah C; Botts, Michael R; Popovich, John J; Smelkinson, Margery G; Troemel, Emily R

2014-06-01

109

Consent and Obligation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The main purpose of this study is to question the relation between consenting and being obligated. Topics covered include: An Idea of Consent and the Range of Obligation; Conditions of Consent -- Freedom, Information, Capacity, Conditions versus principle...

T. W. Stewart

1978-01-01

110

Parasite Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases as Drug Discovery Targets to Treat Human Protozoan Pathogens  

PubMed Central

Protozoan pathogens are a highly diverse group of unicellular organisms, several of which are significant human pathogens. One group of protozoan pathogens includes obligate intracellular parasites such as agents of malaria, leishmaniasis, babesiosis, and toxoplasmosis. The other group includes extracellular pathogens such as agents of giardiasis and amebiasis. An unfortunate unifying theme for most human protozoan pathogens is that highly effective treatments for them are generally lacking. We will review targeting protozoan mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) as a novel drug discovery approach towards developing better therapies, focusing on Plasmodia, Leishmania, and Toxoplasma, about which the most is known.

Brumlik, Michael J.; Pandeswara, Srilakshmi; Ludwig, Sara M.; Murthy, Kruthi; Curiel, Tyler J.

2011-01-01

111

Measuring Intergenerational Obligations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers have defined intergenerational obligations in diverse ways, and they have used many labels and ways of measuring intergenerational obligations. Using vignettes, we compared responses to questions about what family members should do when another family member needed assistance ("normative obligations") with responses to questions about…

Ganong, Lawrence; Coleman, Marilyn

2005-01-01

112

Cloning and characterization of a novel invertase from the obligate biotroph Uromyces fabae and analysis of expression patterns of host and pathogen invertases in the course of infection.  

PubMed

Invertases are key enzymes in carbon partitioning in higher plants. They gain additional importance in the distribution of carbohydrates in the event of wounding or pathogen attack. Although many researchers have found an increase in invertase activity upon infection, only a few studies were able to determine whether the source of this activity was host or parasite. This article analyzes the role of invertases involved in the biotrophic interaction of the rust fungus Uromyces fabae and its host plant, Vicia faba. We have identified a fungal gene, Uf-INV1, with homology to invertases and assessed its contribution to pathogenesis. Expression analysis indicated that transcription began upon penetration of the fungus into the leaf, with high expression levels in haustoria. Heterologous expression of Uf-INV1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris allowed a biochemical characterization of the enzymatic activity associated with the secreted gene product INV1p. Expression analysis of the known vacuolar and cell-wall-bound invertase isoforms of V. faba indicated a decrease in the expression of a vacuolar invertase, whereas one cell-wall-associated invertase exhibited increased expression. These changes were not confined to the infected tissue, and effects also were observed in remote plant organs, such as roots. These findings hint at systemic effects of pathogen infection. Our results support the hypothesis that pathogen infection establishes new sinks which compete with physiological sink organs. PMID:16776296

Voegele, Ralf T; Wirsel, Stefan; Möll, Ulla; Lechner, Melanie; Mendgen, Kurt

2006-06-01

113

Genome-Wide RNAi Screen in IFN-?-Treated Human Macrophages Identifies Genes Mediating Resistance to the Intracellular Pathogen Francisella tularensis  

PubMed Central

Interferon-gamma (IFN-?) inhibits intracellular replication of Francisella tularensis in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and in mice, but the mechanisms of this protective effect are poorly characterized. We used genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screening in the human macrophage cell line THP-1 to identify genes that mediate the beneficial effects of IFN-? on F. tularensis infection. A primary screen identified ?200 replicated candidate genes. These were prioritized according to mRNA expression in IFN-?-primed and F. tularensis-challenged macrophages. A panel of 20 top hits was further assessed by re-testing using individual shRNAs or siRNAs in THP-1 cells, HMDMs and primary human lung macrophages. Six of eight validated genes tested were also found to confer resistance to Listeria monocytogenes infection, suggesting a broadly shared host gene program for intracellular pathogens. The F. tularensis-validated hits included ‘druggable’ targets such as TNFRSF9, which encodes CD137. Treating HMDM with a blocking antibody to CD137 confirmed a beneficial role of CD137 in macrophage clearance of F. tularensis. These studies reveal a number of important mediators of IFN-? activated host defense against intracellular pathogens, and implicate CD137 as a potential therapeutic target and regulator of macrophage interactions with Francisella tularensis.

Zhou, Hongwei; DeLoid, Glen; Browning, Erica; Gregory, David J.; Tan, Fengxiao; Bedugnis, Alice S.; Imrich, Amy; Koziel, Henry; Kramnik, Igor; Lu, Quan; Kobzik, Lester

2012-01-01

114

Rickettsial pathogens and their arthropod vectors.  

PubMed Central

Rickettsial diseases, important causes of illness and death worldwide, exist primarily in endemic and enzootic foci that occasionally give rise to sporadic or seasonal outbreaks. Rickettsial pathogens are highly specialized for obligate intracellular survival in both the vertebrate host and the invertebrate vector. While studies often focus primarily on the vertebrate host, the arthropod vector is often more important in the natural maintenance of the pathogen. Consequently, coevolution of rickettsiae with arthropods is responsible for many features of the host-pathogen relationship that are unique among arthropod-borne diseases, including efficient pathogen replication, long-term maintenance of infection, and transstadial and transovarial transmission. This article examines the common features of the host-pathogen relationship and of the arthropod vectors of the typhus and spotted fever group rickettsiae.

Azad, A. F.; Beard, C. B.

1998-01-01

115

Application of Quantitative Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR in Assessing Drug Efficacy against the Intracellular Pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum In Vitro  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report here on a quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) assay for assessing drug efficacy against the intracellular pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum. The qRT-PCR assay detects 18S rRNA transcripts from both parasites, that is, the cycle threshold for 18S rRNA from parasites (CT(P18S)) and host cells (CT(H18S)), and evaluates the relative expression between parasite and host rRNA levels (i.e., CT CT(P18S)

Xiaomin Cai; Keith M. Woods; Steve J. Upton; Guan Zhu

2005-01-01

116

Classical Labeling of Bacterial Pathogens According to Their Lifestyle in the Host: Inconsistencies and Alternatives  

PubMed Central

An ample understanding of the complex interactions between host and pathogen will improve our ability to develop new prophylactic and therapeutic measures against infection. Precise classification of infectious agents in regards to their infective lifestyles in the host and corresponding pathogenic implications are required because clear concepts are essential to plan fruitful research. Classically, pathogenic bacteria are classified as extracellular, facultative intracellular, and obligate intracellular. In my opinion, this classification is inadequate because, as concluded from data here discussed, it is based on inconsistencies and hyper-valorizes the capacity of the infectious agent replicate in vitro in cell-free media. For a microbial pathogen, what matters is whether intra- or extracellularity is in the context of the in vivo life and in association with pathogenicity. When living as a pathogen in association with its host, what is relevant in microbiological terms is not the ability to grow in artificial cell-free bacteriological media or in environmental niches but whether the intracellular infectious agent, besides the phase of intracellular growth which is behind its label, also is able to live extracellularly in the natural settings of the extracellular territories of their hosts. To eliminate the inconsistencies associated with the classical labeling of bacterial pathogens, I propose that bacterial pathogens be labeled exclusive extracellular, dual intracellular/extracellular and exclusive intracellular based on their infective lifestyle in the host, not in the ability to grow in artificial bacteriological media.

Silva, Manuel T.

2012-01-01

117

A Resealed-Cell System for Analyzing Pathogenic Intracellular Events: Perturbation of Endocytic Pathways under Diabetic Conditions  

PubMed Central

Cell-based assay systems that can serve as cellular models of aberrant function in pathogenic organs would be novel and useful tools for screening drugs and clarifying the molecular mechanisms of various diseases. We constructed model cells that replicated the conditions in diabetic hepatocytes by using the cell resealing technique, which enables the exchange of cytosol. The plasma membrane of HeLa cells was permeabilized with the streptococcal toxin streptolysin O, and cytosol that had been prepared from wild-type or db/db diabetic mice was introduced into the resulting semi-intact cells. By resealing the plasma membrane by exposure to Ca2+, we created WT or Db model cells, in which the cytosolic conditions replicated those of healthy or diabetic liver. Interestingly, phosphorylation of p38 MAPK was promoted, whereas the level of endosomal phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate was decreased, in Db cells. We investigated several endocytic pathways in WT and Db cells, and found that retrograde endosome-to-Golgi transport was delayed in a p38 MAPK-dependent manner in Db cells. Furthermore, the degradation pathway of the EGF receptor from endosomes to lysosomes was enhanced in Db cells, and this did not depend on the activation of p38 MAPK. The disease model cell system should become a powerful tool for the detection of aberrant processes in cells under pathogenic conditions and for therapeutic applications.

Kano, Fumi; Nakatsu, Daiki; Noguchi, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Murata, Masayuki

2012-01-01

118

A resealed-cell system for analyzing pathogenic intracellular events: perturbation of endocytic pathways under diabetic conditions.  

PubMed

Cell-based assay systems that can serve as cellular models of aberrant function in pathogenic organs would be novel and useful tools for screening drugs and clarifying the molecular mechanisms of various diseases. We constructed model cells that replicated the conditions in diabetic hepatocytes by using the cell resealing technique, which enables the exchange of cytosol. The plasma membrane of HeLa cells was permeabilized with the streptococcal toxin streptolysin O, and cytosol that had been prepared from wild-type or db/db diabetic mice was introduced into the resulting semi-intact cells. By resealing the plasma membrane by exposure to Ca(2+), we created WT or Db model cells, in which the cytosolic conditions replicated those of healthy or diabetic liver. Interestingly, phosphorylation of p38 MAPK was promoted, whereas the level of endosomal phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate was decreased, in Db cells. We investigated several endocytic pathways in WT and Db cells, and found that retrograde endosome-to-Golgi transport was delayed in a p38 MAPK-dependent manner in Db cells. Furthermore, the degradation pathway of the EGF receptor from endosomes to lysosomes was enhanced in Db cells, and this did not depend on the activation of p38 MAPK. The disease model cell system should become a powerful tool for the detection of aberrant processes in cells under pathogenic conditions and for therapeutic applications. PMID:22952896

Kano, Fumi; Nakatsu, Daiki; Noguchi, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Murata, Masayuki

2012-01-01

119

Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Replication, Intracellular Trafficking, and Pathogenicity in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cell Monolayers  

PubMed Central

Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is one of the most important vector-borne viruses in Europe and Asia. Its transmission mainly occurs by the bite of an infected tick. However, consuming milk products from infected livestock animals caused TBEV cases. To better understand TBEV transmission via the alimentary route, we studied viral infection of human intestinal epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells were used to investigate pathological effects of TBEV infection. TBEV-infected Caco-2 monolayers showed morphological changes including cytoskeleton rearrangements and cytoplasmic vacuolization. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and further enlargement to TBEV containing caverns. Caco-2 monolayers maintained an intact epithelial barrier with stable transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) during early stage of infection. Concomitantly, viruses were detected in the basolateral medium, implying a transcytosis pathway. When Caco-2 cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of cellular pathways of endocytosis TBEV cell entry was efficiently blocked, suggesting that actin filaments (Cytochalasin) and microtubules (Nocodazole) are important for PI3K-dependent (LY294002) virus endocytosis. Moreover, experimental fluid uptake assay showed increased intracellular accumulation of FITC-dextran containing vesicles. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed co-localization of TBEV with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA1) as well as with sorting nexin-5 (SNX5), pointing to macropinocytosis as trafficking mechanism. In the late phase of infection, further evidence was found for translocation of virus via the paracellular pathway. Five days after infection TER was slightly decreased. Epithelial barrier integrity was impaired due to increased epithelial apoptosis, leading to passive viral translocation. These findings illuminate pathomechanisms in TBEV infection of human intestinal epithelial cells and viral transmission via the alimentary route.

Moller, Lars; Schulzke, Joerg D.; Niedrig, Matthias; Bucker, Roland

2014-01-01

120

On Obligations and Abilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we combine deontic logic with Alternating- time Temporal Logic (ATL) into a framework that makes it possible to model and reason about obligations and abilities of agents. The way both frameworks are combined is technically straightforward: we add deontic accessibility relations to ATL models (concurrent game structures), and deontic operators to the language of ATL (an additional

Wojciech Jamroga; Wiebe Van Der Hoek; Michael Wooldridge; A. Lomuscio; D. Nute

2004-01-01

121

On public obligation.  

PubMed

Poverty has a potent and provable impact on health, education, opportunity, safety, dignity, and overall quality of life for Americans. This article argues that our obligations to ameliorate poverty are not only private, religious, and charitable, they are public and governmental as well. PMID:23189436

Nichol, Gene R

2012-01-01

122

GRANDPARENTS' ENTITLEMENTS AND OBLIGATIONS  

PubMed Central

In this article, it is argued that grandparents' obligations originate from parental obligations (i.e from the relationship they have with their children, the parents of their grandchildren) and not from the role of grandparent per se, and any entitlements flow from the extent to which these obligations are met. The position defended is, therefore, that grandparents qua grandparents are not entitled to form or continue relationships with their grandchildren. A continuation of grandparent-grandchildren relationships may be in the interests of children, but the grandparental nature of the relationship is not decisive. What counts is the extent to which relationships children have with any adults who are not their parents are is significant to them. Sometimes, however, grandparents become parents or co-parents of their grandchildren. They then gain parental rights, and as such are as entitled, ceteris parius, as any parent to expect their relationship with the child to continue. The issue of grandparents' entitlements can come to the fore when parents separate, and grandparents are unhappy with the access they have to their grandchildren. Grandparents' obligations may become a particular issue when parents die, struggle, or fail to care for their children. This article focuses particularly on these kinds of circumstances.

Draper, Heather

2013-01-01

123

Acquisition of nutrients by Chlamydiae: unique challenges of living in an intracellular compartment  

PubMed Central

Summary The Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular pathogen that replicate within a membrane-bound vacuole, termed the “inclusion”. From this compartment, bacteria acquire essential nutrients by selectively redirecting transport vesicles and hijacking intracellular organelles. Re-routing is achieved by several mechanisms including proteolysis-mediated fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus, recruitment of Rab GTPases and SNAREs, and translocation of cytoplasmic organelles into the inclusion lumen. Given Chlamydiae’s extended co-evolution with eukaryotic cells, it is likely that co-option of multiple cellular pathways is a strategy to provide redundancy in the acquisition of essential nutrients from the host and has contributed to the success of these highly adapted pathogens.

Saka, Hector Alex; Valdivia, Raphael H.

2011-01-01

124

Up-regulation of intracellular signalling pathways may play a central pathogenic role in hypertension, atherogenesis, insulin resistance, and cancer program - the ‘PKC syndrome’  

Microsoft Academic Search

The modern diet is greatly different from that of our paleolithic forebears? in a number of respects. There is reason to believe that many of these dietary shifts can up-regulate intracellular signalling pathways mediated by free intracellular calcium and protein kinase C, particularly in vascular smooth muscle cells; this disorder of intracellular regulation is given the name ‘PKC syndrome#x02019;. PKC

M. F. McCarty

1996-01-01

125

SNARE Protein Mimicry by an Intracellular Bacterium  

PubMed Central

Many intracellular pathogens rely on host cell membrane compartments for their survival. The strategies they have developed to subvert intracellular trafficking are often unknown, and SNARE proteins, which are essential for membrane fusion, are possible targets. The obligate intracellular bacteria Chlamydia replicate within an intracellular vacuole, termed an inclusion. A large family of bacterial proteins is inserted in the inclusion membrane, and the role of these inclusion proteins is mostly unknown. Here we identify SNARE-like motifs in the inclusion protein IncA, which are conserved among most Chlamydia species. We show that IncA can bind directly to several host SNARE proteins. A subset of SNAREs is specifically recruited to the immediate vicinity of the inclusion membrane, and their accumulation is reduced around inclusions that lack IncA, demonstrating that IncA plays a predominant role in SNARE recruitment. However, interaction with the SNARE machinery is probably not restricted to IncA as at least another inclusion protein shows similarities with SNARE motifs and can interact with SNAREs. We modelled IncA's association with host SNAREs. The analysis of intermolecular contacts showed that the IncA SNARE-like motif can make specific interactions with host SNARE motifs similar to those found in a bona fide SNARE complex. Moreover, point mutations in the central layer of IncA SNARE-like motifs resulted in the loss of binding to host SNAREs. Altogether, our data demonstrate for the first time mimicry of the SNARE motif by a bacterium.

Delevoye, Cedric; Nilges, Michael; Dehoux, Pierre; Paumet, Fabienne; Perrinet, Stephanie; Dautry-Varsat, Alice; Subtil, Agathe

2008-01-01

126

Intracellular Parasite Invasion Strategies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Intracellular parasites use various strategies to invade cells and to subvert cellular signaling pathways and, thus, to gain a foothold against host defenses. Efficient cell entry, ability to exploit intracellular niches, and persistence make these parasites treacherous pathogens. Most intracellular parasites gain entry via host-mediated processes, but apicomplexans use a system of adhesion-based motility called ``gliding'' to actively penetrate host cells. Actin polymerization-dependent motility facilitates parasite migration across cellular barriers, enables dissemination within tissues, and powers invasion of host cells. Efficient invasion has brought widespread success to this group, which includes Toxoplasma, Plasmodium, and Cryptosporidium.

Sibley, L. D.

2004-04-01

127

Mechanisms of cellular invasion by intracellular parasites.  

PubMed

Numerous disease-causing parasites must invade host cells in order to prosper. Collectively, such pathogens are responsible for a staggering amount of human sickness and death throughout the world. Leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, toxoplasmosis, and malaria are neglected diseases and therefore are linked to socio-economical and geographical factors, affecting well-over half the world's population. Such obligate intracellular parasites have co-evolved with humans to establish a complexity of specific molecular parasite-host cell interactions, forming the basis of the parasite's cellular tropism. They make use of such interactions to invade host cells as a means to migrate through various tissues, to evade the host immune system, and to undergo intracellular replication. These cellular migration and invasion events are absolutely essential for the completion of the lifecycles of these parasites and lead to their for disease pathogenesis. This review is an overview of the molecular mechanisms of protozoan parasite invasion of host cells and discussion of therapeutic strategies, which could be developed by targeting these invasion pathways. Specifically, we focus on four species of protozoan parasites Leishmania, Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium, and Toxoplasma, which are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. PMID:24221133

Walker, Dawn M; Oghumu, Steve; Gupta, Gaurav; McGwire, Bradford S; Drew, Mark E; Satoskar, Abhay R

2014-04-01

128

Signatures of adaptation to obligate biotrophy in the Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis genome  

PubMed Central

Many oomycete and fungal plant pathogens are obligate biotrophs, which extract nutrients only from living plant tissue and cannot grow apart from their hosts. Although these pathogens cause significant crop losses, little is known about the molecular basis or evolution of obligate biotrophy. Here, we report the genome sequence of the oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa), an obligate biotroph and natural pathogen of Arabidopsis thaliana. In comparison to genomes of related, hemi-biotrophic Phytophthora species, the Hpa genome exhibits dramatic reductions in genes encoding: 1) RXLR effectors and other secreted pathogenicity proteins; 2) enzymes for assimilation of inorganic nitrogen and sulphur; 3) proteins associated with zoospore formation and motility. These attributes comprise a genomic signature of evolution towards obligate biotrophy.

Ishaque, Naveed; Boot, Nico; Cabral, Adriana; Kemen, Eric; Thines, Marco; Ah-Fong, Audrey; Anderson, Ryan; Badejoko, Wole; Bittner-Eddy, Peter; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Chibucos, Marcus C.; Coates, Mary; Dehal, Paramvir; Delehaunty, Kim; Dong, Suomeng; Downton, Polly; Dumas, Bernard; Fabro, Georgina; Fronick, Catrina; Fuerstenberg, Susan I.; Fulton, Lucinda; Gaulin, Elodie; Govers, Francine; Hughes, Linda; Humphray, Sean; Jiang, Rays H. Y.; Judelson, Howard; Kamoun, Sophien; Kyung, Kim; Meijer, Harold; Minx, Patrick; Morris, Paul; Nelson, Joanne; Phuntumart, Vipa; Qutob, Dinah; Rehmany, Anne; Rougon-Cardoso, Alejandra; Ryden, Peter; Torto-Alalibo, Trudy; Studholme, David; Wang, Yuanchao; Win, Joe; Wood, Jo; Clifton, Sandra W.; Rogers, Jane; Van den Ackerveken, Guido; Jones, Jonathan D. G.; McDowell, John M.; Beynon, Jim; Tyler, Brett M.

2014-01-01

129

IL8 released from human lung epithelial cells induced by cystic fibrosis pathogens Burkholderia cepacia complex affects the growth and intracellular survival of bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a group of Gram-negative pulmonary pathogens associated with life-threatening infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The airway epithelium plays a crucial role in the initiation and modulation of inflammatory responses to these pathogens. Interleukin (IL)-8 released from epithelial cells is a potent chemoattractant for neutrophils. The aims of this study were to compare the

Seshu K. Kaza; Siobhán McClean; Máire Callaghan

130

Genome degeneration affects both extracellular and intracellular bacterial endosymbionts  

PubMed Central

The obligate intracellular bacterial endosymbionts of insects are a paradigm for reductive genome evolution. A study published recently in BMC Biology demonstrates that similar evolutionary forces shaping genome structure may also apply to extracellular endosymbionts.

Feldhaar, Heike; Gross, Roy

2009-01-01

131

Disease Resistance in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar): Coinfection of the Intracellular Bacterial Pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis and the Sea Louse Caligus rogercresseyi  

PubMed Central

Background Naturally occurring coinfections of pathogens have been reported in salmonids, but their consequences on disease resistance are unclear. We hypothesized that 1) coinfection of Caligus rogercresseyi reduces the resistance of Atlantic salmon to Piscirickettsia salmonis; and 2) coinfection resistance is a heritable trait that does not correlate with resistance to a single infection. Methodology In total, 1,634 pedigreed Atlantic salmon were exposed to a single infection (SI) of P. salmonis (primary pathogen) or coinfection with C. rogercresseyi (secondary pathogen). Low and high level of coinfection were evaluated (LC?=?44 copepodites per fish; HC?=?88 copepodites per fish). Survival and quantitative genetic analyses were performed to determine the resistance to the single infection and coinfections. Main Findings C. rogercresseyi significantly increased the mortality in fish infected with P. salmonis (SI mortality?=?251/545; LC mortality?=?544/544 and HC mortality?=?545/545). Heritability estimates for resistance to P. salmonis were similar and of medium magnitude in all treatments (h2SI?=?0.23±0.07; h2LC?=?0.17±0.08; h2HC?=?0.24±0.07). A large and significant genetic correlation with regard to resistance was observed between coinfection treatments (rg LC-HC?=?0.99±0.01) but not between the single and coinfection treatments (rg SI-LC?=??0.14±0.33; rg SI-HC?=?0.32±0.34). Conclusions/Significance C. rogercresseyi, as a secondary pathogen, reduces the resistance of Atlantic salmon to the pathogen P. salmonis. Resistance to coinfection of Piscirickettsia salmonis and Caligus rogercresseyi in Atlantic salmon is a heritable trait. The absence of a genetic correlation between resistance to a single infection and resistance to coinfection indicates that different genes control these processes. Coinfection of different pathogens and resistance to coinfection needs to be considered in future research on salmon farming, selective breeding and conservation.

Lhorente, Jean Paul; Gallardo, Jose A.; Villanueva, Beatriz; Carabano, Maria J.; Neira, Roberto

2014-01-01

132

Up-regulation of intracellular signalling pathways may play a central pathogenic role in hypertension, atherogenesis, insulin resistance, and cancer promotion--the 'PKC syndrome'.  

PubMed

The modern diet is greatly different from that of our paleolithic forebears' in a number of respects. There is reason to believe that many of these dietary shifts can up-regulate intracellular signalling pathways mediated by free intracellular calcium and protein kinase C, particularly in vascular smooth muscle cells; this disorder of intracellular regulation is given the name 'PKC syndrome'. PKC syndrome may entail either a constitutive activation of these pathways, or a sensitization to activation by various agonists. The modern dietary perturbations which tend to induce PKC syndrome may include increased dietary fat and sodium, and decreased intakes of omega-3 fats, potassium, calcium, magnesium and chromium. Insulin resistance may be both a cause and effect of PKC syndrome, and weight reduction and aerobic training should act to combat this disorder. PKC syndrome sensitizes vascular smooth muscle cells to both vasoconstrictors and growth factors, and thus promotes both hypertension and atherogenesis. In platelets, it induces hyperaggregability, while in the microvasculature it may be a mediator of diabetic microangiopathy. In vascular endothelium, intimal macrophages, and hepatocytes, increased protein kinase C activity can be expected to increase cardiovascular risk. Up-regulation of protein kinase C in stem cells may also play a role in the promotion of 'Western' fat-related cancers. Practical guidelines for combatting PKC syndrome are suggested. PMID:8676754

McCarty, M F

1996-03-01

133

MgtC as a horizontally-acquired virulence factor of intracellular bacterial pathogens: evidence from molecular phylogeny and comparative genomics.  

PubMed

MgtC is a virulence factor required for intramacrophage survival and growth in low Mg2+ medium in two pathogens that are not phylogenetically related, Salmonella typhimurium and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In S. typhimurium, mgtC is carried by the SPI-3 pathogenicity island and hybridization studies have suggested that the distribution of mgtC among enterobacteria is limited. In the present study, we searched for the presence of mgtC-like sequences in eubacterial genomes. Analyses of MgtC-like proteins phylogeny and mgtC-like chromosomal context support the hypothesis that mgtC has been acquired by horizontal gene transfer repeatedly throughout bacterial evolution. In addition, the phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of a subgroup of proteins, that includes the S. typhimurium and M. tuberculosis MgtC proteins, as well as MgtC-related proteins from other pathogens that are able to survive in macrophages, B. melitensis and Y. pestis. We propose that MgtC has a similar function in all these distantly related pathogens, most likely providing the ability to grow in a low Mg2+ environment. PMID:14708580

Blanc-Potard, Anne-Béatrice; Lafay, Bénédicte

2003-10-01

134

Characterization of a multimeric, eukaryotic prolyl aminopeptidase: an inducible and highly specific intracellular peptidase from the non-pathogenic fungus Talaromyces emersonii  

PubMed Central

Fungi are capable of degrading proteins in their environment by secreting peptidases. However, the link between extracellular digestion and intracellular proteolysis has scarcely been investigated. Mycelial lysates of the filamentous fungus Talaromyces emersonii were screened for intracellular peptidase production. Five distinct proteolytic activities with specificity for the p-nitroanilide (pNA) peptides Suc-AAPF-pNA, Suc-AAA-pNA, K-pNA, F-pNA and P-pNA were identified. The native enzyme responsible for the removal of N-terminal proline residues was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by five successive chromatographic steps. The enzyme, termed Talaromyces emersonii prolyl aminopeptidase (TePAP), displayed a 50-fold specificity for cleaving N-terminal Pro–X (kcat/Km=2.1×106?M?1?s?1) compared with Ala–X or Val–X bonds. This intracellular aminopeptidase was optimally active at pH?7.4 and 50?°C. Peptide sequencing facilitated the design of degenerate oligonucleotides from homologous sequences encoding putative fungal proline aminopeptidases, enabling subsequent cloning of the gene. TePAP was shown to be relatively uninhibited by classical serine peptidase inhibitors and to be sensitive to selected cysteine- and histidine-modifying reagents, yet gene sequence analysis identified the protein as a serine peptidase with an ?/? hydrolase fold. Northern analysis indicated that Tepap mRNA levels were regulated by the composition of the growth medium. Highest Tepap transcript levels were observed when the fungus was grown in medium containing glucose and the protein hydrolysate casitone. Interestingly, both the induction profile and substrate preference of this enzyme suggest potential co-operativity between extracellular and intracellular proteolysis in this organism. Gel filtration chromatography suggested that the enzyme exists as a 270?kDa homo-hexamer, whereas most bacterial prolyl aminopeptidases (PAPs) are monomers. Phylogenetic analysis of known PAPs revealed two diverse subfamilies that are distinguishable on the basis of primary and secondary structure and appear to correlate with the subunit composition of the native enzymes. Sequence comparisons revealed that PAPs with key conserved topological features are widespread in bacterial and fungal kingdoms, and this study identified many putative PAP candidates within sequenced genomes. This work represents, to our knowledge, the first detailed biochemical and molecular analysis of an inducible PAP from a eukaryote and the first intracellular peptidase isolated from the thermophilic fungus T. emersonii.

Mahon, Cathal S.; O'Donoghue, Anthony J.; Goetz, David H.; Murray, Patrick G.; Craik, Charles S.; Tuohy, Maria G.

2009-01-01

135

The genome of the obligate endobacterium of an AM fungus reveals an interphylum network of nutritional interactions.  

PubMed

As obligate symbionts of most land plants, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have a crucial role in ecosystems, but to date, in the absence of genomic data, their adaptive biology remains elusive. In addition, endobacteria are found in their cytoplasm, the role of which is unknown. In order to investigate the function of the Gram-negative Candidatus Glomeribacter gigasporarum, an endobacterium of the AMF Gigaspora margarita, we sequenced its genome, leading to an ?1.72-Mb assembly. Phylogenetic analyses placed Ca. G. gigasporarum in the Burkholderiaceae whereas metabolic network analyses clustered it with insect endobacteria. This positioning of Ca. G. gigasporarum among different bacterial classes reveals that it has undergone convergent evolution to adapt itself to intracellular lifestyle. The genome annotation of this mycorrhizal-fungal endobacterium has revealed an unexpected genetic mosaic where typical determinants of symbiotic, pathogenic and free-living bacteria are integrated in a reduced genome. Ca. G. gigasporarum is an aerobic microbe that depends on its host for carbon, phosphorus and nitrogen supply; it also expresses type II and type III secretion systems and synthesizes vitamin B12, antibiotics- and toxin-resistance molecules, which may contribute to the fungal host's ecological fitness. Ca. G. gigasporarum has an extreme dependence on its host for nutrients and energy, whereas the fungal host is itself an obligate biotroph that relies on a photosynthetic plant. Our work represents the first step towards unraveling a complex network of interphylum interactions, which is expected to have a previously unrecognized ecological impact. PMID:21866182

Ghignone, Stefano; Salvioli, Alessandra; Anca, Iulia; Lumini, Erica; Ortu, Giuseppe; Petiti, Luca; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Bianciotto, Valeria; Piffanelli, Pietro; Lanfranco, Luisa; Bonfante, Paola

2012-01-01

136

Are Aviation Obligations Driving Students Away.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Evidence suggests that the quality of aviation accessions has been falling. Decision-makers question whether the decline is the result of the active duty service obligations (ADSOs) required of aviators. In away, these lengthy obligations compensate for t...

C. S. Moore

2000-01-01

137

Intracellular proteoglycans.  

PubMed Central

Proteoglycans (PGs) are proteins with glycosaminoglycan chains, are ubiquitously expressed and have a wide range of functions. PGs in the extracellular matrix and on the cell surface have been the subject of extensive structural and functional studies. Less attention has so far been given to PGs located in intracellular compartments, although several reports suggest that these have biological functions in storage granules, the nucleus and other intracellular organelles. The purpose of this review is, therefore, to present some of these studies and to discuss possible functions linked to PGs located in different intracellular compartments. Reference will be made to publications relevant for the topics we present. It is beyond the scope of this review to cover all publications on PGs in intracellular locations.

Kolset, Svein Olav; Prydz, Kristian; Pejler, Gunnar

2004-01-01

138

The small GTPase RacA mediates intracellular reactive oxygen species production, polarized growth, and virulence in the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.  

PubMed

Aspergillus fumigatus is the predominant mold pathogen in immunocompromised patients. In this study, we present the first characterization of the small GTPase RacA in A. fumigatus. To gain insight into the function of racA in the growth and pathogenesis of A. fumigatus, we constructed a strain that lacks a functional racA gene. The ?racA strain showed significant morphological defects, including a reduced growth rate and abnormal conidiogenesis on glucose minimal medium. In the ?racA strain, apical dominance in the leading hyphae is lost and, instead, multiple axes of polarity emerge. Intriguingly, superoxide production at the hyphal tips was reduced by 25% in the ?racA strain. Treatment of wild-type hyphae with diphenylene iodonium, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, resulted in phenotypes similar to that of the ?racA strain. These data suggest that ?racA strain phenotypes may be due to a reduction or alteration in the production of reactive oxygen species. Most surprisingly, despite these developmental and growth abnormalities, the ?racA strain retained at least wild-type virulence in both an insect model and two immunologically distinct murine models of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. These results demonstrate that in vitro growth phenotypes do not always correlate with in vivo virulence and raise intriguing questions about the role of RacA in Aspergillus virulence. PMID:21183690

Li, Haiyan; Barker, Bridget M; Grahl, Nora; Puttikamonkul, Srisombat; Bell, Jeremey D; Craven, Kelly D; Cramer, Robert A

2011-02-01

139

Intracellular locations of replication proteins and the origin of replication during chromosome duplication in the slowly growing human pathogen Helicobacter pylori.  

PubMed

We followed the position of the replication complex in the pathogenic bacterium Helicobacter pylori using antibodies raised against the single-stranded DNA binding protein (HpSSB) and the replicative helicase (HpDnaB). The position of the replication origin, oriC, was also localized in growing cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with fluorescence-labeled DNA sequences adjacent to the origin. The replisome assembled at oriC near one of the cell poles, and the two forks moved together toward the cell center as replication progressed in the growing cell. Termination and resolution of the forks occurred near midcell, on one side of the septal membrane. The duplicated copies of oriC did not separate until late in elongation, when the daughter chromosomes segregated into bilobed nucleoids, suggesting sister chromatid cohesion at or near the oriC region. Components of the replication machinery, viz., HpDnaB and HpDnaG (DNA primase), were found associated with the cell membrane. A model for the assembly and location of the H. pylori replication machinery during chromosomal duplication is presented. PMID:24363345

Sharma, Atul; Kamran, Mohammad; Verma, Vijay; Dasgupta, Santanu; Dhar, Suman Kumar

2014-03-01

140

12 CFR 966.2 - Issuance of consolidated obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-01-01 false Issuance of consolidated obligations. 966.2 Section 966.2 Banks...HOME LOAN BANK LIABILITIES CONSOLIDATED OBLIGATIONS § 966.2 Issuance of consolidated obligations. (a) Consolidated obligations...

2009-01-01

141

12 CFR 966.2 - Issuance of consolidated obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Issuance of consolidated obligations. 966.2 Section 966.2 Banks...HOME LOAN BANK LIABILITIES CONSOLIDATED OBLIGATIONS § 966.2 Issuance of consolidated obligations. (a) Consolidated obligations...

2010-01-01

142

Reduced nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) promoter activity in the Syrian hamster renders the animal functionally deficient in NOS2 activity and unable to control an intracellular pathogen.  

PubMed

Progressive disease in the hamster model of visceral leishmaniasis, caused by Leishmania donovani, in contrast to infection in mice, mimics the progressive disease observed in untreated humans. During progressive infection in hamsters, there was a vigorous type 1 cellular immune response, which is typically associated with control of infection, suggesting that there was ineffective IFN-gamma-mediated macrophage activation. Indeed, at the site of infection, hamsters did not express NO synthase 2 (NOS2), which is the primary mechanism for control of infection in mice. Furthermore, in striking contrast to mouse macrophages, IFN-gamma-activated hamster macrophages did not did not express NOS2 nor generate NO, and were unable to restrict the replication of intracellular L. donovani. The absent hamster NOS2 expression was not the result of NOS2 gene deletion and the NOS2 cDNA had an intact open reading frame. Furthermore, the impaired transcription of NOS2 mRNA was selective and not due to global impairment of IFN-gamma signaling (members of the IFN-gamma-signaling pathway were expressed and functional and IFN-gamma up-regulated several primary and secondary response genes). Strikingly, the proximal hamster NOS2 promoter, like the human ortholog, had >20-fold less basal and IFN-gamma/LPS-inducible activity than the corresponding mouse promoter. Thus, reduced basal and IFN-gamma-induced activity of the hamster NOS2 transcriptional unit, which is unique to this small animal and similar to the human counterpart, accompanies the inability of the animal to control an intracellular pathogen. PMID:16622021

Perez, Luis E; Chandrasekar, Bysani; Saldarriaga, Omar A; Zhao, Weiguo; Arteaga, Lourdes T; Travi, Bruno L; Melby, Peter C

2006-05-01

143

Chlamydial infections of fish: diverse pathogens and emerging causes of disease in aquaculture species.  

PubMed

Chlamydial infections of fish are emerging as an important cause of disease in new and established aquaculture industries. To date, epitheliocystis, a skin and gill disease associated with infection by these obligate intracellular pathogens, has been described in over 90 fish species, including hosts from marine and fresh water environments. Aided by advances in molecular detection and typing, recent years have seen an explosion in the description of these epitheliocystis-related chlamydial pathogens of fish, significantly broadening our knowledge of the genetic diversity of the order Chlamydiales. Remarkably, in most cases, it seems that each new piscine host studied has revealed the presence of a phylogenetically unique and novel chlamydial pathogen, providing researchers with a fascinating opportunity to understand the origin, evolution and adaptation of their traditional terrestrial chlamydial relatives. Despite the advances in this area, much still needs to be learnt about the epidemiology of chlamydial infections in fish if these pathogens are to be controlled in farmed environments. The lack of in vitro methods for culturing of chlamydial pathogens of fish is a major hindrance to this field. This review provides an update on our current knowledge of the taxonomy and diversity of chlamydial pathogens of fish, discusses the impact of these infections on the health, and highlights further areas of research required to understand the biology and epidemiology of this important emerging group of fish pathogens of aquaculture species. PMID:24932463

Stride, M C; Polkinghome, A; Nowak, B F

2014-06-25

144

Chlamydial infections of fish: diverse pathogens and emerging causes of disease in aquaculture species.  

PubMed

Chlamydial infections of fish are emerging as an important cause of disease in new and established aquaculture industries. To date, epitheliocystis, a skin and gill disease associated with infection by these obligate intracellular pathogens, has been described in over 90 fish species, including hosts from marine and fresh water environments. Aided by advances in molecular detection and typing, recent years have seen an explosion in the description of these epitheliocystis-related chlamydial pathogens of fish, significantly broadening our knowledge of the genetic diversity of the order Chlamydiales. Remarkably, in most cases, it seems that each new piscine host studied has revealed the presence of a phylogenetically unique and novel chlamydial pathogen, providing researchers with a fascinating opportunity to understand the origin, evolution and adaptation of their traditional terrestrial chlamydial relatives. Despite the advances in this area, much still needs to be learnt about the epidemiology of chlamydial infections in fish if these pathogens are to be controlled in farmed environments. The lack of in vitro methods for culturing of chlamydial pathogens of fish is a major hindrance to this field. This review provides an update on our current knowledge of the taxonomy and diversity of chlamydial pathogens of fish, discusses the impact of these infections on the health, and highlights further areas of research required to understand the biology and epidemiology of this important emerging group of fish pathogens of aquaculture species. PMID:24560593

Stride, M C; Polkinghorne, A; Nowak, B F

2014-05-14

145

Chemical induced intracellular hyperthermia  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

An invention relating to therapeutic pharmacological agents and methods to chemically induce intracellular hyperthermia and/or free radicals for the diagnosis and treatment of infections, malignancy and other medical conditions. The invention relates to a process and composition for the diagnosis or killing of cancer cells and inactivation of susceptible bacterial, parasitic, fungal, and viral pathogens by chemically generating heat, and/or free radicals and/or hyperthermia-inducible immunogenic determinants by using mitochondrial uncoupling agents, especially 2,4 dinitrophenol and, their conjugates, either alone or in combination with other drugs, hormones, cytokines and radiation.

2009-12-22

146

Specific Inhibition of Obligate Anaerobes  

Microsoft Academic Search

MANY drugs are known which optimally inhibit single groups of micro-organisms (bacteria, fungi, or protozoa), or which inhibit specific types within one of these groups (Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria, pathogenic or non-pathogenic fungi). For example, certain antibiotics only inhibit bacteria; the polyene antibiotics only inhibit fungi; fumagillin inhibits protozoa1. This list can be extended to include compounds other than antibiotics:

Herbert N. Prince

1960-01-01

147

Obligations and Liabilities of the Carrier  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The Rotterdam Rules follow the model of the Hague-Visby Rules by imposing specific obligations on the carrier, such as to\\u000a load, handle and stow the goods. However, the Rotterdam Rules impose two further obligations resulting from the extended scope\\u000a of the Rotterdam Rules: they are the obligations to receive and deliver the goods. Furthermore, under the Rotterdam Rules\\u000a the carrier

M. Fehmi Ülgener

148

47 CFR 27.1239 - Reimbursement obligation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...obligation. 27.1239 Section 27.1239 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband Radio Service and Educational Broadband...

2013-10-01

149

Visualization of pseudogenes in intracellular bacteria reveals the different tracks to gene destruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Pseudogenes reveal ancestral gene functions. Some obligate intracellular bacteria, such as Mycobacterium leprae and Rickettsia spp., carry substantial fractions of pseudogenes. Until recently, horizontal gene transfers were considered to be rare events in obligate host-associated bacteria. RESULTS: We present a visualization tool that displays the relationships and positions of degraded and partially overlapping gene sequences in multiple genomes. With

Hans-Henrik Fuxelius; Alistair C Darby; Nam-Huyk Cho; Siv GE Andersson

2008-01-01

150

Intracellular Neutralization of Virus by Immunoglobulin A Antibodies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

IgA is thought to neutralize viruses at the epithelial surface of mucous membranes by preventing their attachment. Since IgA, a polymeric immunoglobulin, is transported through the lining of epithelial cells by the polymeric-immunoglobulin receptor and since viruses are obligate intracellular parasites, we hypothesized that IgA antibodies may also interfere with viral replication by binding to newly synthesized viral proteins within infected cells. Polarized monolayers of Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells expressing the polymeric-immunoglobulin receptor were infected on the apical surface with Sendai virus. Anti-Sendai virus IgA monoclonal antibody delivered from the basolateral surface colocalized with viral protein within the cell, as documented by immunofluorescence. More importantly, anti-viral IgA reduced virus titers >1000-fold (P < 0.0001) in apical supernatants and >10-fold (P < 0.0001) in cell lysates from monolayers treated with anti-viral IgA compared with those treated with either anti-viral IgG or an irrelevant IgA monoclonal antibody. We believe that the differences in viral titers between cell layers treated with specific IgA, which enters the epithelial cell by binding to the polymeric-immunoglobulin receptor, and those treated with specific IgG, which does not enter the cells, or irrelevant IgA indicate that specific intracellular IgA antibodies can inhibit viral replication. Thus, in addition to the classical role of humoral antibodies in extracellular defense, IgA antibody may be able to neutralize microbial pathogens intracellularly, giving IgA a role in host defense that has traditionally been reserved for cell-mediated immunity.

Mazanec, Mary B.; Kaetzel, Charlotte S.; Lamm, Michael E.; Fletcher, David; Nedrud, John G.

1992-08-01

151

45 CFR 2400.65 - Teaching obligation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 false Teaching obligation. 2400.65 ...Conditions § 2400.65 Teaching obligation. Upon receiving...social studies, or political science on a full-time basis...is employed indicating the teaching activities of the Fellow...

2010-10-01

152

45 CFR 2400.65 - Teaching obligation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2009-10-01 false Teaching obligation. 2400.65 ...Conditions § 2400.65 Teaching obligation. Upon receiving...social studies, or political science on a full-time basis...is employed indicating the teaching activities of the Fellow...

2009-10-01

153

[The obligation of means and the obligation of results].  

PubMed

Several important decisions were made in 2000 concerning the proof of malpractice and the fundamental principles of medical responsibility. In order to guarantee indemnities for victims of medical accidents, the French courts have facilitated the implication of medical responsibility for medical accidents. The notion of a "virtual fault" was developed allowing the courts to retain the responsibility of the surgeon for instance for injury to the sublingual nerve during extraction of a wisdom tooth or for injury to the popliteal artery (March 23, 2000). These decisions not only facilitate the demonstration of malpractice but also modify the definition of responsibility, all physicians being required to use all available means. Likewise, although jurisprudence asserts that a safe result is mandatory in certain areas, the essential obligation is the absence of "fault" and not the result despite the disquieting arguments put forward by the Paris appeals court in its January 15, 1999 decree. The patient's right to a result was sustained only in well defined areas. PMID:11688200

Rougé-Maillart, C; Pessaux, P; Jousset, N; Hubert, N; Gosset, D; Penneau, M

2001-10-01

154

Intracellular bacteria and adverse pregnancy outcomes.  

PubMed

This review considers the role of intracellular bacteria in adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as miscarriage, stillbirths, and preterm labour. The cause of miscarriage, stillbirth and preterm labour often remains unexplained. Intracellular bacteria that grow either poorly or not at all on media used routinely to detect human pathogens could be the aetiological agents of these obstetric conditions. For example, Listeria monocytogenes and Coxiella burnetti are intracellular bacteria that have a predilection for the fetomaternal unit and may induce fatal disease in the mother and/or fetus. Both are important foodborne or zoonotic pathogens in pregnancy. Preventive measures, diagnostic tools and treatment will be reviewed. Moreover, we will also address the importance in adverse pregnancy outcomes of other intracellular bacteria, including Brucella abortus and various members of the order Chlamydiales. Indeed, there is growing evidence that Chlamydia trachomatis, Chlamydia abortus and Chlamydia pneumoniae infections may also result in adverse pregnancy outcomes in humans and/or animals. Moreover, newly discovered Chlamydia-like organisms have recently emerged as new pathogens of both animals and humans. For example, Waddlia chondrophila, a Chlamydia-related bacterium isolated from aborted bovine fetuses, has also been implicated in human miscarriages. Future research should help us to better understand the pathophysiology of adverse pregnancy outcomes caused by intracellular bacteria and to determine the precise mode of transmission of newly identified bacteria, such as Waddlia and Parachlamydia. These emerging pathogens may represent the tip of the iceberg of a large number of as yet unknown intracellular pathogenic agents. PMID:21884294

Baud, D; Greub, G

2011-09-01

155

11 CFR 9034.5 - Net outstanding campaign obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Net outstanding campaign obligations. 9034...MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.5 Net outstanding campaign obligations...the candidate shall submit a statement of net outstanding campaign obligations. The...

2012-01-01

156

11 CFR 9034.5 - Net outstanding campaign obligations.  

...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Net outstanding campaign obligations. 9034...MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.5 Net outstanding campaign obligations...the candidate shall submit a statement of net outstanding campaign obligations. The...

2014-01-01

157

11 CFR 9034.5 - Net outstanding campaign obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Net outstanding campaign obligations. 9034...MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.5 Net outstanding campaign obligations...the candidate shall submit a statement of net outstanding campaign obligations. The...

2011-01-01

158

11 CFR 9034.5 - Net outstanding campaign obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Net outstanding campaign obligations. 9034...MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.5 Net outstanding campaign obligations...the candidate shall submit a statement of net outstanding campaign obligations. The...

2013-01-01

159

11 CFR 9034.5 - Net outstanding campaign obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Net outstanding campaign obligations. 9034...MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.5 Net outstanding campaign obligations...the candidate shall submit a statement of net outstanding campaign obligations. The...

2010-01-01

160

31 CFR 225.5 - Pledge of definitive Government obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Pledge of definitive Government obligations. 225.5 Section 225.5...OF BONDS SECURED BY GOVERNMENT OBLIGATIONS IN LIEU OF BONDS WITH SURETIES...Pledge of definitive Government obligations. (a) Type and...

2010-07-01

161

31 CFR 225.5 - Pledge of definitive Government obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Pledge of definitive Government obligations. 225.5 Section 225.5...OF BONDS SECURED BY GOVERNMENT OBLIGATIONS IN LIEU OF BONDS WITH SURETIES...Pledge of definitive Government obligations. (a) Type and...

2009-07-01

162

12 CFR 1270.20 - Consolidated obligations are not obligations of the United States or guaranteed by the United...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 1270.20 Section 1270.20 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS LIABILITIES Book-Entry Procedure for Consolidated Obligations § 1270.20 Consolidated obligations are not obligations of the United...

2012-01-01

163

42 CFR 136.332 - Service obligation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Indian Health Care Improvement Act Programs Subdivision J-4-Indian...Scholarship Program § 136.332 Service obligation. The service...

2013-10-01

164

40 CFR 1043.30 - General obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF NOX, SOX, AND PM EMISSIONS FROM MARINE ENGINES AND VESSELS SUBJECT TO THE MARPOL PROTOCOL § 1043.30 General obligations....

2013-07-01

165

19 CFR 10.512 - Importer obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Import Requirements § 10.512 Importer obligations. (a) General. An...

2013-04-01

166

Federal Academic Science and Engineering Obligations Decreased  

NSF Publications Database

... Obligations Decreased Slightly in FY 1996 (April 27, 1998) This data brief highlights the major ... Fiscal Year 1996. A full set of Detailed Statistical Tables covering FY 1996 and prior years will be ...

167

Being Pathogenic, Plastic, and Sexual while Living with a Nearly Minimal Bacterial Genome  

PubMed Central

Mycoplasmas are commonly described as the simplest self-replicating organisms, whose evolution was mainly characterized by genome downsizing with a proposed evolutionary scenario similar to that of obligate intracellular bacteria such as insect endosymbionts. Thus far, analysis of mycoplasma genomes indicates a low level of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) implying that DNA acquisition is strongly limited in these minimal bacteria. In this study, the genome of the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma agalactiae was sequenced. Comparative genomic data and phylogenetic tree reconstruction revealed that ?18% of its small genome (877,438 bp) has undergone HGT with the phylogenetically distinct mycoides cluster, which is composed of significant ruminant pathogens. HGT involves genes often found as clusters, several of which encode lipoproteins that usually play an important role in mycoplasma–host interaction. A decayed form of a conjugative element also described in a member of the mycoides cluster was found in the M. agalactiae genome, suggesting that HGT may have occurred by mobilizing a related genetic element. The possibility of HGT events among other mycoplasmas was evaluated with the available sequenced genomes. Our data indicate marginal levels of HGT among Mycoplasma species except for those described above and, to a lesser extent, for those observed in between the two bird pathogens, M. gallisepticum and M. synoviae. This first description of large-scale HGT among mycoplasmas sharing the same ecological niche challenges the generally accepted evolutionary scenario in which gene loss is the main driving force of mycoplasma evolution. The latter clearly differs from that of other bacteria with small genomes, particularly obligate intracellular bacteria that are isolated within host cells. Consequently, mycoplasmas are not only able to subvert complex hosts but presumably have retained sexual competence, a trait that may prevent them from genome stasis and contribute to adaptation to new hosts.

Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Lartigue, Carole; Marenda, Marc; Jacob, Daniel; Barre, Aurelien; Barbe, Valerie; Schenowitz, Chantal; Mangenot, Sophie; Couloux, Arnaud; Segurens, Beatrice; de Daruvar, Antoine; Blanchard, Alain; Citti, Christine

2007-01-01

168

Obligate symbionts activate immune system development in the tsetse fly  

PubMed Central

Many insects rely on the presence of symbiotic bacteria for proper immune system function. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie this phenomenon are poorly understood. Adult tsetse flies (Glossina spp.) house 3 symbiotic bacteria that are vertically transmitted from mother to offspring during this insect's unique viviparous mode of reproduction. Larval tsetse that undergo intrauterine development in the absence of their obligate mutualist, Wigglesworthia, exhibit a compromised immune system during adulthood. In this study we characterize the immune phenotype of tsetse that develop in the absence of all of their endogenous symbiotic microbes. Aposymbiotic tsetse (GmmApo) present a severely compromised immune system that is characterized by the absence of phagocytic hemocytes and atypical expression of immunity-related genes. Correspondingly, these flies quickly succumb to infection with normally non-pathogenic E. coli. The susceptible phenotype exhibited by GmmApo adults can be reversed when they receive hemocytes transplanted from wild-type donor flies prior to infection. Furthermore, the process of immune system development can be restored in intrauterine GmmApo larvae when their moms are fed a diet supplemented with Wigglesworthia cell extracts. Our finding that molecular components of Wigglesworthia exhibit immunostimulatory activity within tsetse is representative of a novel evolutionary adaptation that steadfastly links an obligate symbiont with it's host.

Weiss, Brian L.; Maltz, Michele; Aksoy, Serap

2012-01-01

169

The Olive Fly Endosymbiont, "Candidatus Erwinia dacicola," Switches from an Intracellular Existence to an Extracellular Existence during Host Insect Development? †  

PubMed Central

As polyphagous, holometabolous insects, tephritid fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) provide a unique habitat for endosymbiotic bacteria, especially those microbes associated with the digestive system. Here we examine the endosymbiont of the olive fly [Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) (Diptera: Tephritidae)], a tephritid of great economic importance. “Candidatus Erwinia dacicola” was found in the digestive systems of all life stages of wild olive flies from the southwestern United States. PCR and microscopy demonstrated that “Ca. Erwinia dacicola” resided intracellularly in the gastric ceca of the larval midgut but extracellularly in the lumen of the foregut and ovipositor diverticulum of adult flies. “Ca. Erwinia dacicola” is one of the few nonpathogenic endosymbionts that transitions between intracellular and extracellular lifestyles during specific stages of the host's life cycle. Another unique feature of the olive fly endosymbiont is that unlike obligate endosymbionts of monophagous insects, “Ca. Erwinia dacicola” has a G+C nucleotide composition similar to those of closely related plant-pathogenic and free-living bacteria. These two characteristics of “Ca. Erwinia dacicola,” the ability to transition between intracellular and extracellular lifestyles and a G+C nucleotide composition similar to those of free-living relatives, may facilitate survival in a changing environment during the development of a polyphagous, holometabolous host. We propose that insect-bacterial symbioses should be classified based on the environment that the host provides to the endosymbiont (the endosymbiont environment).

Estes, Anne M.; Hearn, David J.; Bronstein, Judith L.; Pierson, Elizabeth A.

2009-01-01

170

The olive fly endosymbiont, "Candidatus Erwinia dacicola," switches from an intracellular existence to an extracellular existence during host insect development.  

PubMed

As polyphagous, holometabolous insects, tephritid fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) provide a unique habitat for endosymbiotic bacteria, especially those microbes associated with the digestive system. Here we examine the endosymbiont of the olive fly [Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) (Diptera: Tephritidae)], a tephritid of great economic importance. "Candidatus Erwinia dacicola" was found in the digestive systems of all life stages of wild olive flies from the southwestern United States. PCR and microscopy demonstrated that "Ca. Erwinia dacicola" resided intracellularly in the gastric ceca of the larval midgut but extracellularly in the lumen of the foregut and ovipositor diverticulum of adult flies. "Ca. Erwinia dacicola" is one of the few nonpathogenic endosymbionts that transitions between intracellular and extracellular lifestyles during specific stages of the host's life cycle. Another unique feature of the olive fly endosymbiont is that unlike obligate endosymbionts of monophagous insects, "Ca. Erwinia dacicola" has a G+C nucleotide composition similar to those of closely related plant-pathogenic and free-living bacteria. These two characteristics of "Ca. Erwinia dacicola," the ability to transition between intracellular and extracellular lifestyles and a G+C nucleotide composition similar to those of free-living relatives, may facilitate survival in a changing environment during the development of a polyphagous, holometabolous host. We propose that insect-bacterial symbioses should be classified based on the environment that the host provides to the endosymbiont (the endosymbiont environment). PMID:19767463

Estes, Anne M; Hearn, David J; Bronstein, Judith L; Pierson, Elizabeth A

2009-11-01

171

Autophagy vitalizes the pathogenicity of pathogenic fungi.  

PubMed

Plant pathogenic fungi utilize a series of complex infection structures, in particular the appressorium, to gain entry to and colonize plant tissue. As a consequence of the accumulation of huge quantities of glycerol in the cell the appressorium generates immense intracellular turgor pressure allowing the penetration peg of the appressorium to penetrate the leaf cuticle. Autophagic processes are ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells and facilitate the bulk degradation of macromolecules and organelles. The study of autophagic processes has been extended from the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to pathogenic fungi such as the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Significantly, null mutants for the expression of M. oryzae autophagy gene homologs lose their pathogenicity for infection of host plants. Clarification of the functions and network of interactions between the proteins expressed by M. oryzae autophagy genes will lead to a better understanding of the role of autophagy in fungal pathogenesis and help in the development of new strategies for disease control. PMID:22935638

Liu, Xiao-Hong; Gao, Hui-Min; Xu, Fei; Lu, Jian-Ping; Devenish, Rodney J; Lin, Fu-Cheng

2012-10-01

172

Host-cell interactions with pathogenic Rickettsia species  

PubMed Central

Pathogenic Rickettsia species are Gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacteria responsible for the spotted fever and typhus groups of diseases around the world. It is now well established that a majority of sequelae associated with human rickettsioses are the outcome of the pathogen's affinity for endothelium lining the blood vessels, the consequences of which are vascular inflammation, insult to vascular integrity and compromised vascular permeability, collectively termed ‘Rickettsial vasculitis’. Signaling mechanisms leading to transcriptional activation of target cells in response to Rickettsial adhesion and/or invasion, differential activation of host-cell signaling due to infection with spotted fever versus typhus subgroups of Rickettsiae, and their contributions to the host's immune responses and determination of cell fate are the major subtopics of this review. Also included is a succinct analysis of established in vivo models and their use for understanding Rickettsial interactions with host cells and pathogenesis of vasculotropic rickettsioses. Continued progress in these important but relatively under-explored areas of bacterial pathogenesis research should further highlight unique aspects of Rickettsial interactions with host cells, elucidate the biological basis of endothelial tropism and reveal novel chemotherapeutic and vaccination strategies for debilitating Rickettsial diseases.

Sahni, Sanjeev K; Rydkina, Elena

2009-01-01

173

Review of solar obligations in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solar energy utilization can not only decrease conventional energy consumption but also reduce environmental pollution. China has abundant solar energy resources and has the biggest solar water heater market in the world, so it is necessary for Chinese government to enact incentive policies and measures to enlarge the utilization scale of solar water heaters. According to international experience, solar obligation

Hui Xie; Chen Zhang; Bin Hao; Shan Liu; Kunkun Zou

174

Impaired stimulation of p38?-MAPK/Vps41-HOPS by LPS from pathogenic Coxiella burnetii prevents trafficking to microbicidal phagolysosomes.  

PubMed

Variations in lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a bacterial outer membrane component, determine virulence of the obligate intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We find that while avirulent C. burnetii LPS (avLPS) stimulates host p38?-MAPK signaling required for proper trafficking of bacteria containing compartments to lysosomes for destruction, pathogenic C. burnetii LPS (vLPS) does not. The defect in vLPS and pathogenic C. burnetii targeting to degradative compartments involves an antagonistic engagement of TLR4 by vLPS, lack of p38?-MAPK-driven phosphorylation, and block in recruitment of the homotypic fusion and protein-sorting complex component Vps41 to vLPS-containing vesicles. An upstream activator of p38?-MAPK or phosphomimetic mutant Vps41-S796E expression overrides the inhibition, allowing vLPS and pathogenic C. burnetii targeting to phagolysosomes. Thus, p38?-MAPK and its crosstalk with Vps41 play a central role in trafficking bacteria to phagolysosomes. Pathogenic C. burnetii has evolved LPS variations to evade this host response and thrive intracellularly. PMID:23245320

Barry, Abdoulaye Oury; Boucherit, Nicolas; Mottola, Giovanna; Vadovic, Pavol; Trouplin, Virginie; Soubeyran, Philippe; Capo, Christian; Bonatti, Stefano; Nebreda, Angel; Toman, Rudolf; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Mege, Jean-Louis; Ghigo, Eric

2012-12-13

175

Pathogen-pathogen interaction  

PubMed Central

There is growing awareness of the health implications of the fact that infectious agents often do not act independently; rather their disease potential is mediated in diverse and significant ways by their relationships with other pathogens. Pathogen-pathogen interaction (PPI), for example, impacts various virulence factors in human infection. Although still in its infancy, the study of PPI, a form of epidemiological synergism, is emerging as an important arena of new research and new understanding in health and clinical care. The aims of this paper are to: (1) draw attention to the role of PPI in human disease patterns; (2) present the syndemics model as a biosocial approach for examining the nature, pathways, contexts, and health implications of PPI and (3) suggest the utility of this approach to PPI. Toward these ends, this paper (a) reviews three case examples of alternative PPIs, (b) describes the development and key concepts and components of the syndemics model with specific reference to interacting infectious agents, (c) contextualizes this discussion with a brief review of broader syndemics disease processes (not necessarily involving infections disease) and (d) comments on the research, treatment and prevention implications of syndemic interaction among pathogens.

2010-01-01

176

The 'obligate diploid' Candida albicans forms mating-competent haploids.  

PubMed

Candida albicans, the most prevalent human fungal pathogen, is considered to be an obligate diploid that carries recessive lethal mutations throughout the genome. Here we demonstrate that C. albicans has a viable haploid state that can be derived from diploid cells under in vitro and in vivo conditions, and that seems to arise through a concerted chromosome loss mechanism. Haploids undergo morphogenetic changes like those of diploids, including the yeast-hyphal transition, chlamydospore formation and a white-opaque switch that facilitates mating. Haploid opaque cells of opposite mating type mate efficiently to regenerate the diploid form, restoring heterozygosity and fitness. Homozygous diploids arise spontaneously by auto-diploidization, and both haploids and auto-diploids show a similar reduction in fitness, in vitro and in vivo, relative to heterozygous diploids, indicating that homozygous cell types are transient in mixed populations. Finally, we constructed stable haploid strains with multiple auxotrophies that will facilitate molecular and genetic analyses of this important pathogen. PMID:23364695

Hickman, Meleah A; Zeng, Guisheng; Forche, Anja; Hirakawa, Matthew P; Abbey, Darren; Harrison, Benjamin D; Wang, Yan-Ming; Su, Ching-hua; Bennett, Richard J; Wang, Yue; Berman, Judith

2013-02-01

177

47 CFR 76.56 - Signal carriage obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signal carriage obligations. 76.56 Section 76.56...TELEVISION SERVICE Carriage of Television Broadcast Signals § 76.56 Signal carriage obligations. (a) Carriage of...

2010-10-01

178

47 CFR 76.56 - Signal carriage obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Telecommunication 4 2009-10-01 2009-10-01 false Signal carriage obligations. 76.56 Section 76.56...TELEVISION SERVICE Carriage of Television Broadcast Signals § 76.56 Signal carriage obligations. (a) Carriage of...

2009-10-01

179

38 CFR 17.608 - Deferment of obligated service.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...obligated service. (a) Request for deferment. A participant receiving a degree from a school of medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, optometry, or podiatry, may request deferment of obligated service to complete an approved program of advanced...

2013-07-01

180

48 CFR 333.213 - Obligation to continue performance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Obligation to continue performance. 333.213 Section 333.213 ...Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS... 333.213 Obligation to continue performance. (a) The Contracting Officer...

2013-10-01

181

47 CFR 22.878 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2009-10-01 false Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.878...Air-Ground Systems § 22.878 Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. This...877, shall be strictly accountable to abate the interference, with full...

2009-10-01

182

47 CFR 90.673 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2009-10-01 false Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 90.673...Interference § 90.673 Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. (a) Strict...chapter, shall be strictly accountable to abate the interference, with full...

2009-10-01

183

47 CFR 90.673 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 false Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 90.673...Interference § 90.673 Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. (a) Strict...chapter, shall be strictly accountable to abate the interference, with full...

2010-10-01

184

47 CFR 22.878 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 false Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.878...Air-Ground Systems § 22.878 Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. This...877, shall be strictly accountable to abate the interference, with full...

2010-10-01

185

47 CFR 22.971 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2009-10-01 false Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.971...Radiotelephone Service § 22.971 Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. (a) Strict...970, shall be strictly accountable to abate the interference, with full...

2009-10-01

186

47 CFR 22.971 - Obligation to abate unacceptable interference.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 false Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. 22.971...Radiotelephone Service § 22.971 Obligation to abate unacceptable interference. (a) Strict...970, shall be strictly accountable to abate the interference, with full...

2010-10-01

187

24 CFR 582.410 - Obligation and deobligation of funds.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SHELTER PLUS CARE Administration § 582.410 Obligation and deobligation of funds. (a) Obligation of funds....

2013-04-01

188

Hijacking of Host Cellular Functions by an Intracellular Parasite, the Microsporidian Anncaliia algerae  

PubMed Central

Intracellular pathogens including bacteria, viruses and protozoa hijack host cell functions to access nutrients and to bypass cellular defenses and immune responses. These strategies have been acquired through selective pressure and allowed pathogens to reach an appropriate cellular niche for their survival and growth. To get new insights on how parasites hijack host cellular functions, we developed a SILAC (Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell culture) quantitative proteomics workflow. Our study focused on deciphering the cross-talk in a host-parasite association, involving human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF) and the microsporidia Anncaliia algerae, a fungus related parasite with an obligate intracellular lifestyle and a strong host dependency. The host-parasite cross-talk was analyzed at five post-infection times 1, 6, 12 and 24 hours post-infection (hpi) and 8 days post-infection (dpi). A significant up-regulation of four interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats IFIT1, IFIT2, IFIT3 and MX1 was observed at 8 dpi suggesting a type 1 interferon (IFN) host response. Quantitative alteration of host proteins involved in biological functions such as signaling (STAT1, Ras) and reduction of the translation activity (EIF3) confirmed a host type 1 IFN response. Interestingly, the SILAC approach also allowed the detection of 148 A. algerae proteins during the kinetics of infection. Among these proteins many are involved in parasite proliferation, and an over-representation of putative secreted effectors proteins was observed. Finally our survey also suggests that A. algerae could use a transposable element as a lure strategy to escape the host innate immune system.

Panek, Johan; El Alaoui, Hicham; Mone, Anne; Urbach, Serge; Demettre, Edith; Texier, Catherine; Brun, Christine; Zanzoni, Andreas; Peyretaillade, Eric; Parisot, Nicolas; Lerat, Emmanuelle; Peyret, Pierre; Delbac, Frederic; Biron, David G.

2014-01-01

189

34 CFR 686.43 - Obligation to repay the grant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Obligation to repay the grant. 686.43 Section 686.43 Education...FOR COLLEGE AND HIGHER EDUCATION (TEACH) GRANT PROGRAM Service and Repayment Obligations § 686.43 Obligation to repay the grant. (a) The TEACH Grant amounts...

2013-07-01

190

An obligate osmophilic yeast from honey.  

PubMed

An obligate osmophilic yeast that requires high sugar concentrations (10 to 20% glucose) for growth was identified as Saccharomyces bisporus var. mellis. Optimum growth for this strain was at 60% glucose. Several non-assimilable compounds permitted growth at glucose concentrations below the minimum requirement and stimulated growth at glucose concentrations above the minimum. No correlation existed between growth stimulation and spheroplast stabilization capacities of the compounds examined. PMID:984813

Munitis, M T; Cabrera, E; Rodriguez-Navarro, A

1976-09-01

191

Intracellular antibodies for proteomics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The intracellular antibody technology has many applications for proteomics studies.The potential of intracellular antibodies for the systematic study of the proteome has been made possible by the development of new experimental strategies that allow the selection of antibodies under conditions of intracellular expression. The Intracellular Antibody Capture Technology (IACT) is an in vivo two-hybrid-based method originally developed for the selection

Michela Visintin; Giovanni Antonio Meli; Isabella Cannistraci; Antonino Cattaneo

2004-01-01

192

NLR functions beyond pathogen recognition  

Microsoft Academic Search

The last 10 years have witnessed the identification of a new class of intracellular pattern-recognition molecules—the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat–containing family (NLR). Members of this family garnered interest as pattern-recognition receptors able to trigger inflammatory responses against pathogens. Many studies support a pathogen-recognition function for human NLR proteins and shed light on their role in the broader control of

Thomas A Kufer; Philippe J Sansonetti

2011-01-01

193

MICROSPORIDIA: Biology and Evolution of Highly Reduced Intracellular Parasites  

Microsoft Academic Search

? Abstract Microsporidia are a large group,of microbial,eukaryotes,composed exclusively of obligate intracellular parasites of other eukaryotes. Almost 150 years of microsporidian,research has led to a basic understanding,of many,aspects of mi- crosporidian biology, especially their unique and highly specialized mode of infection, where,the parasite enters its host through,a projectile tube that is expelled,at high velocity. Molecular biology and genomic,studies on microsporidia,have

Patrick J. Keeling; Naomi M. Fast

2002-01-01

194

26 CFR 1.691(e)-1 - Installment obligations transmitted at death when prior law applied.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Installment obligations transmitted at death when prior law applied. 1.691(e... Installment obligations transmitted at death when prior law applied. (a) In general...transmission of installment obligations at the death of a holder of such obligations were...

2013-04-01

195

Reduction of ribonucleotides by the obligate intracytoplasmic bacterium Rickettsia prowazekii.  

PubMed Central

Rickettsia prowazekii, an obligate intracellular parasitic bacterium, was shown to have a ribonucleotide reductase that would allow the rickettsiae to obtain the deoxyribonucleotides needed for DNA synthesis from rickettsial ribonucleotides rather than from transport. In the presence of hydroxyurea, R. prowazekii failed to grow in mouse L929 cells or SC2 cells (a hydroxyurea-resistant cell line), which suggested that R. prowazekii contains a functional ribonucleotide reductase. This enzymatic activity was demonstrated by the conversion of ADP to dADP and CDP to dCDP, using (i) a crude extract of Renografin-purified R. prowazekii that had been harvested from infected yolk sacs and (ii) high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis. The rickettsial ribonucleotide reductase utilized ribonucleoside diphosphates as substrates, required magnesium and a reducing agent, and was inhibited by hydroxyurea. ADP reduction was stimulated by dGTP and inhibited by dATP. CDP reduction was stimulated by ATP and adenylylimido-diphosphate and inhibited by dATP and dGTP. These characteristics provided strong evidence that the rickettsial enzyme is a nonheme iron-containing enzyme similar to those found in mammalian cells and aerobic Escherichia coli.

Cai, J; Speed, R R; Winkler, H H

1991-01-01

196

Diversity and global distribution of the Coxiella intracellular bacterium in seabird ticks.  

PubMed

The obligate intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii is the etiological agent of Q fever, a widespread zoonotic disease whose most common animal reservoirs are domestic ruminants. Recently, a variety of Coxiella-like organisms have also been reported from non-mammalian hosts, including pathogenic forms in birds and forms without known effects in ticks, raising questions about the potential importance of non-mammalian hosts as reservoirs of Coxiella in the wild. In the present study, we examined the potential role of globally-distributed seabird ticks as reservoirs of these bacteria. To this aim, we tested for Coxiella infection 11 geographically distinct populations of two tick species frequently found in seabird breeding colonies, the hard tick Ixodes uriae (Ixodidae) and soft ticks of the Ornithodoros (Carios) capensis group (Argasidae). We found Coxiella-like organisms in all O. capensis sensu lato specimens, but only in a few I. uriae specimens of one population. The sequencing of 16S rDNA and GroEL gene sequences further revealed an unexpected Coxiella diversity, with seven genetically distinct Coxiella-like organisms present in seabird tick populations. Phylogenetic analyses show that these Coxiella-like organisms originate from three divergent subclades within the Coxiella genus and that none of the Coxiella strains found in seabird ticks are genetically identical to the forms known to be associated with pathogenicity in vertebrates, including C. burnetii. Using this data set, we discuss the potential epidemiological significance of the presence of Coxiella in seabird ticks. Notably, we suggest that these organisms may not be pathogenic forms, but rather behave as endosymbionts engaged in intricate interactions with their tick hosts. PMID:24915875

Duron, Olivier; Jourdain, Elsa; McCoy, Karen D

2014-09-01

197

Classification Revisions Reduce Reported Federal Development Obligations  

NSF Publications Database

Such was the case with recent survey revisions provided by NIH and NASA to the National Science Foundation's (NSF's) Survey of Federal Funds for Research and Development (Federal Funds for short). The NSF Federal Funds survey does not collect S&E field data for development or R&D plant funds. The data presented in this InfoBrief are obtained from an annual census of approximately 30 Federal agencies that report obligation data to the NSF Survey of Federal Funds for Research and Development.

198

Obligately barophilic bacterium from the Mariana trench.  

PubMed Central

An amphipod (Hirondellea gigas) was retrieved with decompression in an insulated trap from an ocean depth of 10,476 m. Bacterial isolates were obtained from the dead and cold animal by using silica gel medium incubated at 1000 bars (1 bar = 10(5) Pa) and 2 degrees C. The isolate designated MT41 was found to be obligately barophilic and did not grow at a pressure close to that of 380 bars found at average depths of the sea. The optimal generation time of about 25 hr was at 2 degrees C and 690 bars. The generation time at 2 degrees C and 1,035 bars, a pressure close to that at the depth of origin, was about 33 hr. Among the conclusions are: (i) pressure is an important determinant of zonation along the water column of the sea; (ii) some obligately barophilic bacteria survive decompressions; (iii) the pressure of optimal growth at 2 degrees C appears to be less than the pressure at the depth of origin and may be diagnostic for the depth of origin; (iv) rates of reproduction are slow yet significant and an order of magnitude greater than previously thought; and (v) much of deep-sea microbiology may have been done with spurious deep-sea organisms due to warming of samples. Images

Yayanos, A A; Dietz, A S; Van Boxtel, R

1981-01-01

199

Obligate Ordered Binding of Human Lactogenic Cytokines*  

PubMed Central

Class 1 cytokines bind two receptors to create an active heterotrimeric complex. It has been argued that ligand binding to their receptors is an ordered process, but a structural mechanism describing this process has not been determined. We have previously described an obligate ordered binding mechanism for the human prolactin/prolactin receptor heterotrimeric complex. In this work we expand this conceptual understanding of ordered binding to include three human lactogenic hormones: prolactin, growth hormone, and placental lactogen. We independently blocked either of the two receptor binding sites of each hormone and used surface plasmon resonance to measure human prolactin receptor binding kinetics and stoichiometries to the remaining binding surface. When site 1 of any of the three hormones was blocked, site 2 could not bind the receptor. But blocking site 2 did not affect receptor binding at site 1, indicating a requirement for receptor binding to site 1 before site 2 binding. In addition we noted variable responses to the presence of zinc in hormone-receptor interaction. Finally, we performed Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) analyses where receptor binding at subsaturating stoichiometries induced changes in FRET signaling, indicative of binding-induced changes in hormone conformation, whereas at receptor:hormone ratios in excess of 2:1 no additional changes in FRET signaling were observed. These results strongly support a conformationally mediated obligate-ordered receptor binding for each of the three lactogenic hormones.

Voorhees, Jeffery L.; Brooks, Charles L.

2010-01-01

200

On the nature of obligate intracellular symbiosis of rickettsiae — Rickettsia prowazekii cells import mitochondrial porin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mitochondrial porin was identified in Rickettsia prowazekii by Western blot analysis of whole cells and membrane fractions with monoclonal antibody against porin VDAC 1 of animal mitochondria.\\u000a Using the BLAST server, no protein sequences homologous to mitochondrial porin were found among the rickettsial genomes. Rickettsiae\\u000a also do not contain their own porin. The protein imported by rickettsiae is weakly extracted

V. V. Emelyanov; M. Yu. Vyssokikh

2006-01-01

201

Purifying selection in mitochondria, free-living and obligate intracellular proteobacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of elimination of slightly deleterious mutations depends mainly on drift and recombination frequency. Here we analyze the influence of these two factors on the strength of the purifying selection in mitochondrial and proteobacterial orthologous genes taking into account the differences in the organism lifestyles. RESULTS: (I) We found that the probability of fixation of nonsynonymous substitutions (Kn\\/Ks)

Leila Mamirova; Konstantin Popadin; Mikhail S Gelfand

2007-01-01

202

The Francisella tularensis migR, trmE, and cphA Genes Contribute to F. tularensis Pathogenicity Island Gene Regulation and Intracellular Growth by Modulation of the Stress Alarmone ppGpp  

PubMed Central

The Francisella tularensis pathogenicity island (FPI) encodes many proteins that are required for virulence. Expression of these genes depends upon the FevR (PigR) regulator and its interactions with the MglA/SspA and RNA polymerase transcriptional complex. Experiments to identify how transcription of the FPI genes is activated have led to identification of mutations within the migR, trmE, and cphA genes that decrease FPI expression. Recent data demonstrated that the small alarmone ppGpp, produced by RelA and SpoT, is important for stabilizing MglA/SspA and FevR (PigR) interactions in Francisella. Production of ppGpp is commonly known to be activated by cellular and nutritional stress in bacteria, which indicates that cellular and nutritional stresses act as important signals for FPI activation. In this work, we demonstrate that mutations in migR, trmE, or cphA significantly reduce ppGpp accumulation. The reduction in ppGpp levels was similar for each of the mutants and correlated with a corresponding reduction in iglA reporter expression. In addition, we observed that there were differences in the ability of each of these mutants to replicate within various mammalian cells, indicating that the migR, trmE, and cphA genes are likely parts of different cellular stress response pathways in Francisella. These results also indicate that different nutritional and cellular stresses exist in different mammalian cells. This work provides new information to help understand how Francisella regulates its virulence genes in response to host cell environments, and it contributes to our growing knowledge of this highly successful bacterial pathogen.

Faron, Matthew; Fletcher, Joshua R.; Rasmussen, Jed A.; Long, Matthew E.; Allen, Lee-Ann H.

2013-01-01

203

The Francisella tularensis migR, trmE, and cphA genes contribute to F. tularensis pathogenicity island gene regulation and intracellular growth by modulation of the stress alarmone ppGpp.  

PubMed

The Francisella tularensis pathogenicity island (FPI) encodes many proteins that are required for virulence. Expression of these genes depends upon the FevR (PigR) regulator and its interactions with the MglA/SspA and RNA polymerase transcriptional complex. Experiments to identify how transcription of the FPI genes is activated have led to identification of mutations within the migR, trmE, and cphA genes that decrease FPI expression. Recent data demonstrated that the small alarmone ppGpp, produced by RelA and SpoT, is important for stabilizing MglA/SspA and FevR (PigR) interactions in Francisella. Production of ppGpp is commonly known to be activated by cellular and nutritional stress in bacteria, which indicates that cellular and nutritional stresses act as important signals for FPI activation. In this work, we demonstrate that mutations in migR, trmE, or cphA significantly reduce ppGpp accumulation. The reduction in ppGpp levels was similar for each of the mutants and correlated with a corresponding reduction in iglA reporter expression. In addition, we observed that there were differences in the ability of each of these mutants to replicate within various mammalian cells, indicating that the migR, trmE, and cphA genes are likely parts of different cellular stress response pathways in Francisella. These results also indicate that different nutritional and cellular stresses exist in different mammalian cells. This work provides new information to help understand how Francisella regulates its virulence genes in response to host cell environments, and it contributes to our growing knowledge of this highly successful bacterial pathogen. PMID:23716606

Faron, Matthew; Fletcher, Joshua R; Rasmussen, Jed A; Long, Matthew E; Allen, Lee-Ann H; Jones, Bradley D

2013-08-01

204

Obligations of an academic and clinical oncologist: historical reflections.  

PubMed

Obligations are derived from one's core values-those fundamental, enduring, deeply held beliefs that guide one's everyday actions. Gandhi stated it more eloquently than I ever could: "Your beliefs become your thoughts, your thoughts become your words, your words become your actions, your actions become your habits, your habits become your values, your values become your destiny." So what are the obligations of the academic oncologist and clinician? I believe there are a few indubitable and fundamental obligations: professionalism, patient care, stewardship, maintenance of knowledge, productivity, and mentorship). I might add that I do not see these obligations as unique to the academician but rather applicable to all physicians. PMID:24857063

Johnson, David H

2014-01-01

205

cPLA2 Regulates the Expression of Type I Interferons and Intracellular Immunity to Chlamydia trachomatis*  

PubMed Central

Infection with the obligate bacterial intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis leads to the sustained activation of the small GTPase RAS and many of its downstream signaling components. In particular, the mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK and the calcium-dependent phospholipase cPLA2 are activated and are important for the onset of inflammatory responses. In this study we tested if activation of ERK and cPLA2 occurred as a result of RAS signaling during infection and determined the relative contribution of these signaling components to chlamydial replication and survival. We provide genetic and pharmacological evidence that during infection RAS, ERK, and, to a lesser extent, cPLA2 activation are uncoupled, suggesting that Chlamydia activates individual components of this signaling pathway in a non-canonical manner. In human cell lines, inhibition of ERK or cPLA2 signaling did not adversely impact C. trachomatis replication. In contrast, in murine cells, inhibition of ERK and cPLA2 played a significant protective role against C. trachomatis. We determined that cPLA2-deficient murine cells are permissive for C. trachomatis replication because of their impaired expression of ? interferon and the induction of immunity-related GTPases (IRG) important for the containment of intracellular pathogens. Furthermore, the MAPK p38 was primarily responsible for cPLA2 activation in Chlamydia-infected cells and IRG expression. Overall, these findings define a previously unrecognized role for cPLA2 in the induction of cell autonomous cellular immunity to Chlamydia and highlight the many non-canonical signaling pathways engaged during infection.

Vignola, Mark J.; Kashatus, David F.; Taylor, Gregory A.; Counter, Christopher M.; Valdivia, Raphael H.

2010-01-01

206

Identification of a family of effectors secreted by the type III secretion system that are conserved in pathogenic Chlamydiae.  

PubMed

Chlamydiae are Gram-negative, obligate intracellular pathogens that replicate within a membrane-bounded compartment termed an inclusion. Throughout their development, they actively modify the eukaryotic environment. The type III secretion (TTS) system is the main process by which the bacteria translocate effector proteins into the inclusion membrane and the host cell cytoplasm. Here we describe a family of type III secreted effectors that are present in all pathogenic chlamydiae and absent in the environment-related species. It is defined by a common domain of unknown function, DUF582, that is present in four or five proteins in each Chlamydiaceae species. We show that the amino-terminal extremity of DUF582 proteins functions as a TTS signal. DUF582 proteins from C. trachomatis CT620, CT621, and CT711 are expressed at the middle and late phases of the infectious cycle. Immunolocalization further revealed that CT620 and CT621 are secreted into the host cell cytoplasm, as well as within the lumen of the inclusion, where they do not associate with bacterial markers. Finally, we show that DUF582 proteins are present in nuclei of infected cells, suggesting that members of the DUF582 family of effector proteins may target nuclear cell functions. The expansion of this family of proteins in pathogenic chlamydiae and their conservation among the different species suggest that they play important roles in the infectious cycle. PMID:21078856

Muschiol, Sandra; Boncompain, Gaelle; Vromman, François; Dehoux, Pierre; Normark, Staffan; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Subtil, Agathe

2011-02-01

207

Global Analysis of Arabidopsis\\/Downy Mildew Interactions Reveals Prevalence of Incomplete Resistance and Rapid Evolution of Pathogen Recognition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interactions between Arabidopsis thaliana and its native obligate oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa) represent a model system to study evolution of natural variation in a host\\/pathogen interaction. Both Arabidopsis and Hpa genomes are sequenced and collections of different sub-species are available. We analyzed ?400 interactions between different Arabidopsis accessions and five strains of Hpa. We examined the pathogen's overall ability

Ksenia V. Krasileva; Connie Zheng; Lauriebeth Leonelli; Sandra Goritschnig; Douglas Dahlbeck; Brian J. Staskawicz

2011-01-01

208

Moral Obligations from Our Oath to the US Constitution.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Every officer in the military takes an oath of office upon entry into the service. Under that oath the officer has some moral obligations. This article examines these obligations in relation to the Constitution of the United States. The article looks back...

L. A. Helgeson

1987-01-01

209

The Role Obligations of Students and Lecturers in Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current discussion of consumerism in higher education focuses largely on what the providers are obliged to do for the consumers, against the background of rising tuition fees. This framework does not always sit comfortably with lecturers in the context of a learning and teaching relationship, as it appears to ignore the reciprocal obligations

Regan, Julie-Anne

2012-01-01

210

The Evolutionary Pathway to Obligate Scavenging in Gyps Vultures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The evolutionary pathway to obligate scavenging in Gyps vultures remains unclear. We propose that communal roosting plays a central role in setting up the information transfer network critical for obligate scavengers in ephemeral environments and that the formation of a flotilla-like foraging group is a likely strategy for foraging Gyps vultures. Using a spatial, individual-based, optimisation model we find that

Brian J. Dermody; Colby J. Tanner; Andrew L. Jackson

2011-01-01

211

In Defence of Associative Political Obligations: Part One  

Microsoft Academic Search

Part One of this article seeks to defend the idea of associative political obligations against a number of criticisms that have been advanced opposing it.The purpose of this defence is not to demonstrate that the associative account is therefore the best explanation of political obligations, but only that the principal reasons which have been given for rejecting it are much

John Horton

2007-01-01

212

Libertarianism, positive obligations and property abandonment: children's rights  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present paper is to test this premise of no positive obligations against a challenging critique that can be made of it. To wit, abandonment of babies. That is, does the mother who abandons her baby have the positive obligation to at least place it “on the church steps”, e.g. notify all other potential care givers of

Walter Block

2004-01-01

213

Child Support Obligations and Low-Income Fathers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using the 1994-1998 waves of the Current Population Survey--Child Support Supplement (N = 5,387), the aims of this study are to document child support obligation rates of nonresident fathers, to examine the effect of the obligation rate on child support compliance, and to calculate the trade-off between fathers' financial responsibility and…

Huang, Chien-Chung; Mincy, Ronald B.; Garfinkel, Irwin

2005-01-01

214

Cultural Generality of the Integration of Obligation and Other Motives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the present study is twofold. One is to assess the cultural generality of the information integration rule for moral obligation. The other is to examine how people integrate moral obligation and self-interest. Two studies were implemented following the functional measurement methodology with Chinese samples. Study 1 replicated the…

Yang, Jen-Shou

2012-01-01

215

Parental Beliefs about Nonresident Fathers' Obligations and Rights  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examine whether parents rely on principles of equity or equality in making judgments about nonresident fathers' obligations and rights. The data are taken from the first wave of the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. The analysis sample includes 4,304 new mothers and 3,414 new fathers. Results indicate that fathers perceive obligations

Lin, I-Fen; McLanahan, Sara S.

2007-01-01

216

What Is to Be Done? Children's Ascriptions of Conventional Obligations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is often not apparent what people ought to do. Three experiments explored cues that children and adults may use to identify conventional obligations. Experiment 1 addressed the hypothesis that young children identify obligations with expected outcomes. Although preschool-aged (4-5 years) children often expected consistency, they and school-aged…

Kalish, Charles W.; Cornelius, Rebecca

2007-01-01

217

Obligate Insect Endosymbionts Exhibit Increased Ortholog Length Variation and Loss of Large Accessory Proteins Concurrent with Genome Shrinkage  

PubMed Central

Extreme genome reduction has been observed in obligate intracellular insect mutualists and is an assumed consequence of fixed, long-term host isolation. Rapid accumulation of mutations and pseudogenization of genes no longer vital for an intracellular lifestyle, followed by deletion of many genes, are factors that lead to genome reduction. Size reductions in individual genes due to small-scale deletions have also been implicated in contributing to overall genome shrinkage. Conserved protein functional domains are expected to exhibit low tolerance for mutations and therefore remain relatively unchanged throughout protein length reduction while nondomain regions, presumably under less selective pressures, would shorten. This hypothesis was tested using orthologous protein sets from the Flavobacteriaceae (phylum: Bacteroidetes) and Enterobacteriaceae (subphylum: Gammaproteobacteria) families, each of which includes some of the smallest known genomes. Upon examination of protein, functional domain, and nondomain region lengths, we found that proteins were not uniformly shrinking with genome reduction, but instead increased length variability and variability was observed in both the functional domain and nondomain regions. Additionally, as complete gene loss also contributes to overall genome shrinkage, we found that the largest proteins in the proteomes of nonhost-restricted bacteroidetial and gammaproteobacterial species often were inferred to be involved in secondary metabolic processes, extracellular sensing, or of unknown function. These proteins were absent in the proteomes of obligate insect endosymbionts. Therefore, loss of genes encoding large proteins not required for host-restricted lifestyles in obligate endosymbiont proteomes likely contributes to extreme genome reduction to a greater degree than gene shrinkage.

Kenyon, Laura J.; Sabree, Zakee L.

2014-01-01

218

Pathogenic Rickettsia species acquire vitronectin from human serum to promote resistance to complement-mediated killing.  

PubMed

Bacteria of the genus Rickettsia are transmitted from arthropod vectors and primarily infect cells of the mammalian endothelial system. Throughout this infectious cycle, the bacteria are exposed to the deleterious effects of serum complement. Using Rickettsia conorii, the etiologic agent of Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF), as a model rickettsial species, we have previously demonstrated that this class of pathogen interacts with human factor H to mediate partial survival in human serum. Herein, we demonstrate that R.?conorii also interacts with the terminal complement complex inhibitor vitronectin (Vn). We further demonstrate that an evolutionarily conserved rickettsial antigen, Adr1/RC1281, interacts with human vitronectin and is sufficient to mediate resistance to serum killing when expressed at the outer-membrane of serum sensitive Escherichia coli. Adr1 is an integral outer-membrane protein whose structure is predicted to contain eight membrane-embedded ?-strands and four 'loop' regions that are exposed to extracellular milieu. Site-directed mutagenesis of Adr1 revealed that at least two predicted 'loop' regions are required to mediate resistance to complement-mediatedkilling and vitronectin acquisition. These results demonstrate that rickettsial species have evolved multiple mechanisms to evade complement deposition and that evasion of killing in serum is an evolutionarily conserved virulence attribute for this genus of obligate intracellular pathogens. PMID:24286496

Riley, Sean P; Patterson, Jennifer L; Nava, Samantha; Martinez, Juan J

2014-06-01

219

Involvement of TIP60 acetyltransferase in intracellular Salmonella replication  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Salmonella enterica is a facultative intracellular pathogen that replicates within a membrane-bound compartment termed Salmonella containing vacuole (SCV). The biogenesis of SCV requires Salmonella type III protein secretion\\/translocation system and their effector proteins which are translocated into host cells to exploit the vesicle trafficking pathways. SseF is one of these effectors required for SCV formation and Intracellular Salmonella replication

Xueqin Wang; Dongju Li; Di Qu; Daoguo Zhou

2010-01-01

220

Intracellular Ionized Calcium.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Measurement of intracellular ionized calcium concentration (Ca2+) in living cells is of considerable interest to investigators over a broad range of cell biology. Calcium has an important role in a number of cellular functions and, perhaps most interestin...

C. H. June P. S. Rabinovitch

1994-01-01

221

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

The main policy instruments currently used in the EU Member States to achieve the targets set for electricity produced from renewable energy sources are: (1) the quota obligation system; (2) the feed-in tariff system; and (3) the tendering system. The current study aims to review the experience gained with the quota obligation system. The report provides an overview of the regions where obligation systems have been implemented and contains a detailed evaluation of the performance of the obligation systems in the USA, the UK and in Sweden. The obligation systems in these countries have been evaluated based on the following criteria: Effectiveness; Market efficiency; Certainty for the renewable energy industry; Cost effectiveness; Stakeholder support for the obligation system; and Equity. The evaluation of international experiences with the obligation system gives rise to a mixed picture. Although an obligation in theory is effective and cost effective, it seems too early to conclude that the system delivers these promises in practice. On the one hand this is due to the limited period of implementation that makes it hard to distinguish between the direct effect of the system and some teething problems that will be solved in due time. On the other hand, the conclusion can be drawn that the obligation is a complex system, which will only function well if designed carefully. It does seem worthwhile, however, to continue monitoring the experiences with the obligation system abroad, because this will further reveal whether the system is indeed effective and cost effective in practice. In the longer term, e.g. beyond 2010, the introduction of an obligation system in the Netherlands could be considered. Finally, as the design of support schemes is being improved, it appears that the basic concepts of both the obligation system and the feed in system have been refined in such a way that the two systems are gradually converging. An important difference between the two systems however remains, namely that an obligation system relies more on market forces whereas the feed-in system is based on a greater involvement of the government.

Wiser, R.

2005-06-01

222

12 CFR 1270.18 - Additional requirements; notice of attachment for Book-entry consolidated obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...requirements; notice of attachment for Book-entry consolidated obligations. 1270...FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS LIABILITIES Book-Entry Procedure for Consolidated Obligations...requirements; notice of attachment for Book-entry consolidated obligations....

2013-01-01

223

12 CFR 960.4 - Obligation to Bank under all standby letters of credit.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Obligation to Bank under all standby letters of credit. 960.4 Section 960...OFF-BALANCE SHEET ITEMS STANDBY LETTERS OF CREDIT § 960.4 Obligation to Bank under all standby letters of credit. (a) Obligation to...

2009-01-01

224

12 CFR 960.4 - Obligation to Bank under all standby letters of credit.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Obligation to Bank under all standby letters of credit. 960.4 Section 960...OFF-BALANCE SHEET ITEMS STANDBY LETTERS OF CREDIT § 960.4 Obligation to Bank under all standby letters of credit. (a) Obligation to...

2010-01-01

225

Volatiles modulate the development of plant pathogenic rust fungi  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rust fungi are obligate biotrophic pathogens that differentiate a series of specialized cells to establish infection. One of these cells, the haustorium, which serves to absorb nutrients from living host cells, normally develops only in planta. Here, we show that the rust fungus Uromyces fabae (Pers.) Schroet. stimulates volatile emission of its host, broad bean (Vicia faba L.). Volatiles were

Kurt Mendgen; Stefan G. R. Wirsel; Andreas Jux; Jochen Hoffmann; Wilhelm Boland

2006-01-01

226

Intervention of Phytohormone Pathways by Pathogen Effectors[OPEN  

PubMed Central

The constant struggle between plants and microbes has driven the evolution of multiple defense strategies in the host as well as offense strategies in the pathogen. To defend themselves from pathogen attack, plants often rely on elaborate signaling networks regulated by phytohormones. In turn, pathogens have adopted innovative strategies to manipulate phytohormone-regulated defenses. Tactics frequently employed by plant pathogens involve hijacking, evading, or disrupting hormone signaling pathways and/or crosstalk. As reviewed here, this is achieved mechanistically via pathogen-derived molecules known as effectors, which target phytohormone receptors, transcriptional activators and repressors, and other components of phytohormone signaling in the host plant. Herbivores and sap-sucking insects employ obligate pathogens such as viruses, phytoplasma, or symbiotic bacteria to intervene with phytohormone-regulated defenses. Overall, an improved understanding of phytohormone intervention strategies employed by pests and pathogens during their interactions with plants will ultimately lead to the development of new crop protection strategies.

Kazan, Kemal; Lyons, Rebecca

2014-01-01

227

Physicians' strikes and the competing bases of physicians' moral obligations.  

PubMed

Many authors have addressed the morality of physicians' strikes on the assumption that medical practice is morally different from other kinds of occupations. This article analyzes three prominent theoretical accounts that attempt to ground such special moral obligations for physicians--practice-based accounts, utilitarian accounts, and social contract accounts--and assesses their applicability to the problem of the morality of strikes. After critiquing these views, it offers a fourth view grounding special moral obligations in voluntary commitments, and explains why this is a preferable basis for understanding physicians' moral obligations in general and especially as pertaining to strikes. PMID:24199524

MacDougall, D Robert

2013-09-01

228

Federal Academic Obligations for S&E Activities Increased More than 4% in FY 1997  

NSF Publications Database

Federal Academic Obligations for Science and Engineering Activities Increased More than 4 Percent in ... Institutions: Fiscal Year 1997 and focuses on academic science and engineering obligations. It ...

229

Sulfur Production by Obligately Chemolithoautotrophic Thiobacillus Species  

PubMed Central

Transient-state experiments with the obligately autotrophic Thiobacillus sp. strain W5 revealed that sulfide oxidation proceeds in two physiological phases, (i) the sulfate-producing phase and (ii) the sulfur- and sulfate-producing phase, after which sulfide toxicity occurs. Specific sulfur-producing characteristics were independent of the growth rate. Sulfur formation was shown to occur when the maximum oxidative capacity of the culture was approached. In order to be able to oxidize increasing amounts of sulfide, the organism has to convert part of the sulfide to sulfur (HS(sup-)(symbl)S(sup0) + H(sup+) + 2e(sup-)) instead of sulfate (HS(sup-) + 4H(inf2)O(symbl)SO(inf4)(sup2-) + 9 H(sup+) + 8e(sup-)), thereby keeping the electron flux constant. Measurements of the in vivo degree of reduction of the cytochrome pool as a function of increasing sulfide supply suggested a redox-related down-regulation of the sulfur oxidation rate. Comparison of the sulfur-producing properties of Thiobacillus sp. strain W5 and Thiobacillus neapolitanus showed that the former has twice the maximum specific sulfide-oxidizing capacity of the latter (3.6 versus 1.9 (mu)mol/mg of protein/min). Their maximum specific oxygen uptake rates were very similar. Significant mechanistic differences in sulfur production between the high-sulfur-producing Thiobacillus sp. strain W5 and the moderate-sulfur-producing species T. neapolitanus were not observed. The limited sulfide-oxidizing capacity of T. neapolitanus appears to be the reason that it can convert only 50% of the incoming sulfide to elemental sulfur.

Visser, J. M.; Robertson, L. A.; Van Verseveld, H. W.; Kuenen, J. G.

1997-01-01

230

Microsporidia Are Natural Intracellular Parasites of the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans  

PubMed Central

For decades the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been an important model system for biology, but little is known about its natural ecology. Recently, C. elegans has become the focus of studies of innate immunity and several pathogens have been shown to cause lethal intestinal infections in C. elegans. However none of these pathogens has been shown to invade nematode intestinal cells, and no pathogen has been isolated from wild-caught C. elegans. Here we describe an intracellular pathogen isolated from wild-caught C. elegans that we show is a new species of microsporidia. Microsporidia comprise a large class of eukaryotic intracellular parasites that are medically and agriculturally important, but poorly understood. We show that microsporidian infection of the C. elegans intestine proceeds through distinct stages and is transmitted horizontally. Disruption of a conserved cytoskeletal structure in the intestine called the terminal web correlates with the release of microsporidian spores from infected cells, and appears to be part of a novel mechanism by which intracellular pathogens exit from infected cells. Unlike in bacterial intestinal infections, the p38 MAPK and insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathways do not appear to play substantial roles in resistance to microsporidian infection in C. elegans. We found microsporidia in multiple wild-caught isolates of Caenorhabditis nematodes from diverse geographic locations. These results indicate that microsporidia are common parasites of C. elegans in the wild. In addition, the interaction between C. elegans and its natural microsporidian parasites provides a system in which to dissect intracellular intestinal infection in vivo and insight into the diversity of pathogenic mechanisms used by intracellular microbes.

Troemel, Emily R; Felix, Marie-Anne; Whiteman, Noah K; Barriere, Antoine; Ausubel, Frederick M

2008-01-01

231

A Lack of Parasitic Reduction in the Obligate Parasitic Green Alga Helicosporidium  

PubMed Central

The evolution of an obligate parasitic lifestyle is often associated with genomic reduction, in particular with the loss of functions associated with increasing host-dependence. This is evident in many parasites, but perhaps the most extreme transitions are from free-living autotrophic algae to obligate parasites. The best-known examples of this are the apicomplexans such as Plasmodium, which evolved from algae with red secondary plastids. However, an analogous transition also took place independently in the Helicosporidia, where an obligate parasite of animals with an intracellular infection mechanism evolved from algae with green primary plastids. We characterised the nuclear genome of Helicosporidium to compare its transition to parasitism with that of apicomplexans. The Helicosporidium genome is small and compact, even by comparison with the relatively small genomes of the closely related green algae Chlorella and Coccomyxa, but at the functional level we find almost no evidence for reduction. Nearly all ancestral metabolic functions are retained, with the single major exception of photosynthesis, and even here reduction is not complete. The great majority of genes for light-harvesting complexes, photosystems, and pigment biosynthesis have been lost, but those for other photosynthesis-related functions, such as Calvin cycle, are retained. Rather than loss of whole function categories, the predominant reductive force in the Helicosporidium genome is a contraction of gene family complexity, but even here most losses affect families associated with genome maintenance and expression, not functions associated with host-dependence. Other gene families appear to have expanded in response to parasitism, in particular chitinases, including those predicted to digest the chitinous barriers of the insect host or remodel the cell wall of Helicosporidium. Overall, the Helicosporidium genome presents a fascinating picture of the early stages of a transition from free-living autotroph to parasitic heterotroph where host-independence has been unexpectedly preserved.

Pombert, Jean-Francois; Blouin, Nicolas Achille; Lane, Chris; Boucias, Drion; Keeling, Patrick J.

2014-01-01

232

A lack of parasitic reduction in the obligate parasitic green alga Helicosporidium.  

PubMed

The evolution of an obligate parasitic lifestyle is often associated with genomic reduction, in particular with the loss of functions associated with increasing host-dependence. This is evident in many parasites, but perhaps the most extreme transitions are from free-living autotrophic algae to obligate parasites. The best-known examples of this are the apicomplexans such as Plasmodium, which evolved from algae with red secondary plastids. However, an analogous transition also took place independently in the Helicosporidia, where an obligate parasite of animals with an intracellular infection mechanism evolved from algae with green primary plastids. We characterised the nuclear genome of Helicosporidium to compare its transition to parasitism with that of apicomplexans. The Helicosporidium genome is small and compact, even by comparison with the relatively small genomes of the closely related green algae Chlorella and Coccomyxa, but at the functional level we find almost no evidence for reduction. Nearly all ancestral metabolic functions are retained, with the single major exception of photosynthesis, and even here reduction is not complete. The great majority of genes for light-harvesting complexes, photosystems, and pigment biosynthesis have been lost, but those for other photosynthesis-related functions, such as Calvin cycle, are retained. Rather than loss of whole function categories, the predominant reductive force in the Helicosporidium genome is a contraction of gene family complexity, but even here most losses affect families associated with genome maintenance and expression, not functions associated with host-dependence. Other gene families appear to have expanded in response to parasitism, in particular chitinases, including those predicted to digest the chitinous barriers of the insect host or remodel the cell wall of Helicosporidium. Overall, the Helicosporidium genome presents a fascinating picture of the early stages of a transition from free-living autotroph to parasitic heterotroph where host-independence has been unexpectedly preserved. PMID:24809511

Pombert, Jean-François; Blouin, Nicolas Achille; Lane, Chris; Boucias, Drion; Keeling, Patrick J

2014-05-01

233

47 CFR 25.701 - Public interest obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Public Interest Obligations... (1) Entities licensed to operate satellites in the 12.2 to 12.7 GHz DBS frequency... (2) Entities licensed to operate satellites in the Ku band...

2013-10-01

234

22 CFR 231.07 - Fiscal Agent obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Agent obligations. 231.07 Section 231.07 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ARAB REPUBLIC OF EGYPT LOAN GUARANTEES ISSUED UNDER THE EMERGENCY WARTIME SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS ACT OF 2003, PUBLIC LAW...

2013-04-01

235

24 CFR 291.565 - Continuing obligations after purchase.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...obligations after purchase. To remain in compliance with the GNND Sales Program, the law enforcement officer, teacher, or firefighter/emergency medical technician must, for the entire duration of the owner-occupancy term: (a) Continue to...

2013-04-01

236

24 CFR 576.203 - Obligation, expenditure, and payment requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES EMERGENCY SOLUTIONS GRANTS PROGRAM Award and Use of Funds § 576.203 Obligation, expenditure, and payment requirements. (a)...

2013-04-01

237

29 CFR 4043.20 - Post-Event filing obligation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Post-Event filing obligation. 4043.20 Section...CORPORATION PLAN TERMINATIONS REPORTABLE EVENTS AND CERTAIN OTHER NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS Post-Event Notice of Reportable Events §...

2010-07-01

238

29 CFR 4043.20 - Post-Event filing obligation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Post-Event filing obligation. 4043.20 Section...CORPORATION PLAN TERMINATIONS REPORTABLE EVENTS AND CERTAIN OTHER NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS Post-Event Notice of Reportable Events §...

2009-07-01

239

29 CFR 4043.20 - Post-Event filing obligation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Post-Event filing obligation. 4043.20 Section...CORPORATION PLAN TERMINATIONS REPORTABLE EVENTS AND CERTAIN OTHER NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS Post-Event Notice of Reportable Events §...

2013-07-01

240

47 CFR 27.1184 - Triggering a reimbursement obligation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...obligation. 27.1184 Section 27.1184 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1710-1755 MHz, 2110-2155 MHz, 2000-2020 MHz,...

2013-10-01

241

47 CFR 27.1168 - Triggering a Reimbursement Obligation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Obligation. 27.1168 Section 27.1168 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1710-1755 MHz, 2110-2155 MHz, 2000-2020 MHz,...

2013-10-01

242

32 CFR 220.9 - Rights and obligations of beneficiaries.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...PARTY PAYERS OF REASONABLE CHARGES FOR HEALTHCARE SERVICES § 220.9 Rights and obligations...be required. (b) Availability of healthcare services unaffected. The availability of healthcare services in any facility of the...

2013-07-01

243

22 CFR 232.07 - Fiscal agent obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Fiscal agent obligations. 232.07 Section 232.07 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT REPUBLIC OF TUNISIA LOAN GUARANTEES ISSUED UNDER THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE, FOREIGN OPERATIONS, AND RELATED PROGRAMS APPROPRIATIONS ACT,...

2013-04-01

244

6 CFR 25.5 - Obligations of seller.  

...ANTI-TERRORISM BY FOSTERING EFFECTIVE TECHNOLOGIES § 25.5 Obligations of seller...Terrorism when Qualified Anti-Terrorism Technologies have been deployed in defense against...Seller of a Qualified Anti-Terrorism Technology submit any information that...

2014-01-01

245

29 CFR 500.100 - Vehicle safety obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... REGULATIONS MIGRANT AND SEASONAL AGRICULTURAL WORKER PROTECTION Motor Vehicle...Transportation of Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Workers, Housing Safety and Health...obligations. Each farm labor contractor, agricultural employer and agricultural...

2013-07-01

246

45 CFR 303.6 - Enforcement of support obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Enforcement of support obligations. 303.6 Section... Public Welfare OFFICE OF CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN...

2013-10-01

247

Improving the Navy's Material Obligation Validation Response Rate.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This thesis sought to identify reasons for customer activity non-response to Material Obligation Validation (MOV) requests submitted by the Navy Inventory Control Points (ICP). If the non-response rate can be reduced, significant savings in procurement an...

M. A. Anderson

1985-01-01

248

Intracellular biology and virulence determinants of Francisella tularensis revealed by transcriptional profiling inside macrophages  

PubMed Central

Summary The highly infectious bacterium Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular pathogen, whose virulence requires proliferation inside host cells, including macrophages. Here we have performed a global transcriptional profiling of the highly virulent F. tularensis subsp. tularensis Schu S4 strain during its intracellular cycle within primary murine macrophages, to characterize its intracellular biology and identify pathogenic determinants based on their intracellular expression profiles. Phagocytosed bacteria rapidly responded to their intracellular environment and subsequently altered their transcriptional profile. Differential gene expression profiles were revealed that correlated with specific intracellular locale of the bacteria. Upregulation of general and oxidative stress response genes was a hallmark of the early phagosomal and late endosomal stages, while induction of transport and metabolic genes characterized the cytosolic replication stage. Expression of the Francisella Pathogenicity Island (FPI) genes, which are required for intracellular proliferation, increased during the intracellular cycle. Similarly, 27 chromosomal loci encoding putative hypothetical, secreted, outer membrane proteins or transcriptional regulators were identified as upregulated. Among these, deletion of FTT0383, FTT0369c or FTT1676 abolished the ability of Schu S4 to survive or proliferate intracellularly and cause lethality in mice, therefore identifying novel determinants of Francisella virulence from their intracellular expression profile.

Wehrly, Tara D.; Chong, Audrey; Virtaneva, Kimmo; Sturdevant, Dan E.; Child, Robert; Edwards, Jessica A.; Brouwer, Dedeke; Nair, Vinod; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Wicke, Luke; Curda, Alissa J.; Kupko, John J.; Martens, Craig; Crane, Deborah D.; Bosio, Catharine M.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Celli, Jean

2009-01-01

249

Complete structure of nuclear rDNA of the obligate plant parasite Plasmodiophora brassicae: intraspecific polymorphisms in the exon and group I intron of the large subunit rDNA.  

PubMed

Plasmodiophora brassicae is a soil-borne obligate intracellular parasite in the phylum Cercozoa of the Rhizaria that causes clubroot disease of crucifer crops. To control the disease, understanding the distribution and infection routes of the pathogen is essential, and thus development of reliable molecular markers to discriminate geographic populations is required. In this study, the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) repeat unit of P. brassicae was determined, with particular emphasis on the structure of large subunit (LSU) rDNA, in which polymorphic regions were expected to be present. The complete rDNA complex was 9513bp long, which included the small subunit, 5.8S and LSU rDNAs as well as the internal transcribed spacer and intergenic spacer regions. Among eight field populations collected from throughout Honshu Island, Japan, a 1.1 kbp region of the LSU rDNA, including the divergent 8 domain, exhibited intraspecific polymorphisms that reflected geographic isolation of the populations. Two new group I introns were found in this region in six out of the eight populations, and the sequences also reflected their geographic isolation. The polymorphic region found in this study may have potential for the development of molecular markers for discrimination of field populations/isolates of this organism. PMID:21497131

Niwa, Rieko; Kawahara, Ai; Murakami, Hiroharu; Tanaka, Shuhei; Ezawa, Tatsuhiro

2011-07-01

250

Pathogen intelligence.  

PubMed

Different species inhabit different sensory worlds and thus have evolved diverse means of processing information, learning and memory. In the escalated arms race with host defense, each pathogenic bacterium not only has evolved its individual cellular sensing and behavior, but also collective sensing, interbacterial communication, distributed information processing, joint decision making, dissociative behavior, and the phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity necessary for epidemiologic success. Moreover, pathogenic populations take advantage of dormancy strategies and rapid evolutionary speed, which allow them to save co-generated intelligent traits in a collective genomic memory. This review discusses how these mechanisms add further levels of complexity to bacterial pathogenicity and transmission, and how mining for these mechanisms could help to develop new anti-infective strategies. PMID:24551600

Steinert, Michael

2014-01-01

251

The intracellular bacteria Chlamydia hijack peroxisomes and utilize their enzymatic capacity to produce bacteria-specific phospholipids.  

PubMed

Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular pathogen responsible for loss of eyesight through trachoma and for millions of cases annually of sexually transmitted diseases. The bacteria develop within a membrane-bounded inclusion. They lack enzymes for several biosynthetic pathways, including those to make some phospholipids, and exploit their host to compensate. Three-dimensional fluorescence microscopy demonstrates that small organelles of the host, peroxisomes, are translocated into the Chlamydia inclusion and are found adjacent to the bacteria. In cells deficient for peroxisome biogenesis the bacteria are able to multiply and give rise to infectious progeny, demonstrating that peroxisomes are not essential for bacterial development in vitro. Mass spectrometry-based lipidomics reveal the presence in C. trachomatis of plasmalogens, ether phospholipids whose synthesis begins in peroxisomes and have never been described in aerobic bacteria before. Some of the bacterial plasmalogens are novel structures containing bacteria-specific odd-chain fatty acids; they are not made in uninfected cells nor in peroxisome-deficient cells. Their biosynthesis is thus accomplished by the metabolic collaboration of peroxisomes and bacteria. PMID:24465954

Boncompain, Gaelle; Müller, Constanze; Meas-Yedid, Vannary; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Lazarow, Paul B; Subtil, Agathe

2014-01-01

252

Proteomics of Plant Pathogenic Fungi  

PubMed Central

Plant pathogenic fungi cause important yield losses in crops. In order to develop efficient and environmental friendly crop protection strategies, molecular studies of the fungal biological cycle, virulence factors, and interaction with its host are necessary. For that reason, several approaches have been performed using both classical genetic, cell biology, and biochemistry and the modern, holistic, and high-throughput, omic techniques. This work briefly overviews the tools available for studying Plant Pathogenic Fungi and is amply focused on MS-based Proteomics analysis, based on original papers published up to December 2009. At a methodological level, different steps in a proteomic workflow experiment are discussed. Separate sections are devoted to fungal descriptive (intracellular, subcellular, extracellular) and differential expression proteomics and interactomics. From the work published we can conclude that Proteomics, in combination with other techniques, constitutes a powerful tool for providing important information about pathogenicity and virulence factors, thus opening up new possibilities for crop disease diagnosis and crop protection.

Gonzalez-Fernandez, Raquel; Prats, Elena; Jorrin-Novo, Jesus V.

2010-01-01

253

Intracellular antibody immunity.  

PubMed

Antibodies allow the immune system to target pathogens despite their tremendous diversity and rapid evolution. Once bound to a pathogen, antibodies induce a broad range of effector mechanisms, including phagocytosis and complement. However, these mechanisms are all initiated in the extracellular space, meaning that pathogens like viruses evade them upon infection of their target cells. Recently, it has been shown that, in addition to mediating extracellular immune responses, antibodies also activate immunity inside infected cells. Antibodies that are bound to the surface of non-enveloped viruses or bacteria are carried into the cell during pathogen entry. Once inside the cell, these pathogen-attached antibodies are recognised by a highly conserved, high affinity cytosolic antibody receptor called TRIM21. TRIM21 initiates both sensor and effector responses that reduce viral replication and induce an antiviral state. These responses are an important part of antiviral immunity and the removal of TRIM21 results in uncontrolled viraemia and death in a mouse model of infection. PMID:24722852

Watkinson, Ruth E; McEwan, William A; James, Leo C

2014-07-01

254

Employer obligations versus fulfillment and the effects on organizational citizenship and innovative work  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research investigated the relationship among discrepancies between the employers' obligations and the level of fulfillment of those obligations and the information technology (IT) professionals' citizenship and innovative work behaviors. The dimensional approach to the psychological contract was used to demonstrate the IT professional's perceptions of their employer's obligations and the level of fulfillment of those obligations. Survey data from

Sandra K. Newton; Linda I. Nowak

255

Molecular Mechanisms of Host-Pathogen Interactions and their Potential for the Discovery of New Drug Targets  

PubMed Central

Vaccines and chemotherapy have undeniably been the discoveries in the field of biomedical research that have exerted the biggest impact on the improvement of public health. Nevertheless, the development of bacterial resistance to antibiotics has co-evolved over time with the discovery of new drugs. This entails the necessity for continuous research on new anti-infectious agents.The current review highlights recent discoveries in the molecular mechanisms of specific host pathogen interactions and their potential for drug discovery. The focus is on facultative and obligate intracellular pathogens (Mycobacterium, Chlamydia and Legionella) and their manipulation of host cells in regard to inhibition of phagosome maturation and cell death. Furthermore, the composition and role of the SecA2 and the ESX-1 secretion pathways in bacterial virulence and manipulation of infected host cells is discussed. The central hypothesis proposed in this review is that the characterization of bacterial proteins and lipids involved in host cell manipulation (modulins) will provide an abundance of new drug targets. One advantage of targeting such bacterial modulins for drug development is that these anti-modulin drugs will not disrupt the beneficial host microflora and therefore have fewer side effects.

Briken, Volker

2008-01-01

256

Obligate biotrophy features unraveled by the genomic analysis of rust fungi  

PubMed Central

Rust fungi are some of the most devastating pathogens of crop plants. They are obligate biotrophs, which extract nutrients only from living plant tissues and cannot grow apart from their hosts. Their lifestyle has slowed the dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying host invasion and avoidance or suppression of plant innate immunity. We sequenced the 101-Mb genome of Melampsora larici-populina, the causal agent of poplar leaf rust, and the 89-Mb genome of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat and barley stem rust. We then compared the 16,399 predicted proteins of M. larici-populina with the 17,773 predicted proteins of P. graminis f. sp tritici. Genomic features related to their obligate biotrophic lifestyle include expanded lineage-specific gene families, a large repertoire of effector-like small secreted proteins, impaired nitrogen and sulfur assimilation pathways, and expanded families of amino acid and oligopeptide membrane transporters. The dramatic up-regulation of transcripts coding for small secreted proteins, secreted hydrolytic enzymes, and transporters in planta suggests that they play a role in host infection and nutrient acquisition. Some of these genomic hallmarks are mirrored in the genomes of other microbial eukaryotes that have independently evolved to infect plants, indicating convergent adaptation to a biotrophic existence inside plant cells.

Duplessis, Sebastien; Cuomo, Christina A.; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Aerts, Andrea; Tisserant, Emilie; Veneault-Fourrey, Claire; Joly, David L.; Hacquard, Stephane; Amselem, Joelle; Cantarel, Brandi L.; Chiu, Readman; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Feau, Nicolas; Field, Matthew; Frey, Pascal; Gelhaye, Eric; Goldberg, Jonathan; Grabherr, Manfred G.; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Kohler, Annegret; Kues, Ursula; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan M.; Mago, Rohit; Mauceli, Evan; Morin, Emmanuelle; Murat, Claude; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Park, Robert; Pearson, Matthew; Quesneville, Hadi; Rouhier, Nicolas; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Salamov, Asaf A.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Selles, Benjamin; Shapiro, Harris; Tanguay, Philippe; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Henrissat, Bernard; Van de Peer, Yves; Rouze, Pierre; Ellis, Jeffrey G.; Dodds, Peter N.; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Zhong, Shaobin; Hamelin, Richard C.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Szabo, Les J.; Martin, Francis

2011-01-01

257

A New Role of the Complement System: C3 Provides Protection in a Mouse Model of Lung Infection with Intracellular Chlamydia psittaci  

PubMed Central

The complement system modulates the intensity of innate and specific immunity. While it protects against infections by extracellular bacteria its role in infection with obligate intracellular bacteria, such as the avian and human pathogen Chlamydia (C.) psittaci, is still unknown. In the present study, knockout mice lacking C3 and thus all main complement effector functions were intranasally infected with C. psittaci strain DC15. Clinical parameters, lung histology, and cytokine levels were determined. A subset of infections was additionally performed with mice lacking C5 or C5a receptors. Complement activation occurred before symptoms of pneumonia appeared. Mice lacking C3 were ?100 times more susceptible to the intracellular bacteria compared to wild-type mice, with all C3?/? mice succumbing to infection after day 9. At a low infective dose, C3?/? mice became severely ill after an even longer delay, the kinetics suggesting a so far unknown link of complement to the adaptive, protective immune response against chlamydiae. The lethal phenotype of C3?/? mice is not based on differences in the anti-chlamydial IgG response (which is slightly delayed) as demonstrated by serum transfer experiments. In addition, during the first week of infection, the absence of C3 was associated with partial protection characterized by reduced weight loss, better clinical score and lower bacterial burden, which might be explained by a different mechanism. Lack of complement functions downstream of C5 had little effect. This study demonstrates for the first time a strong and complex influence of complement effector functions, downstream of C3 and upstream of C5, on the outcome of an infection with intracellular bacteria, such as C. psittaci.

Bode, Jenny; Dutow, Pavel; Sommer, Kirsten; Janik, Katrin; Glage, Silke; Tummler, Burkhard; Munder, Antje; Laudeley, Robert; Sachse, Konrad W.; Klos, Andreas

2012-01-01

258

LOW PATHOGENIC POTENTIAL IN HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA FROM POTABLE WATER  

EPA Science Inventory

Forty-five isolates of HPC bacteria, most of which express virulence-related characteristics are being tested for pathogenicity in immunocompromised mice. All forty-five were negative for facultative intracellular pathogenicity. All twenty-three isolates tested thus far were a...

259

Subversion of inflammasome activation and pyroptosis by pathogenic bacteria  

PubMed Central

Activation of the inflammasome occurs in response to a notably high number of pathogenic microbes and is a broad innate immune response that effectively contributes to restriction of pathogen replication and generation of adaptive immunity. Activation of these platforms leads to caspase-1- and/or caspase-11-dependent secretion of proteins, including cytokines, and induction of a specific form of cell death called pyroptosis, which directly or indirectly contribute for restriction of pathogen replication. Not surprisingly, bona fide intracellular pathogens developed strategies for manipulation of cell death to guarantee intracellular replication. In this sense, the remarkable advances in the knowledge of the inflammasome field have been accompanied by several reports characterizing the inhibition of this platform by several pathogenic bacteria. Herein, we review some processes used by pathogenic bacteria, including Yersinia spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Chlamydia trachomatis, Francisella tularensis, Shigella flexneri, Legionella pneumophila, and Coxiella burnetii to evade the activation of the inflammasome and the induction of pyroptosis.

Cunha, Larissa D.; Zamboni, Dario S.

2013-01-01

260

Non-Lytic, Actin-Based Exit of Intracellular Parasites from C. elegans Intestinal Cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

The intestine is a common site for invasion by intracellular pathogens, but little is known about how pathogens restructure and exit intestinal cells in vivo. The natural microsporidian parasite N. parisii invades intestinal cells of the nematode C. elegans, progresses through its life cycle, and then exits cells in a transmissible spore form. Here we show that N. parisii causes

Kathleen A. Estes; Suzannah C. Szumowski; Emily R. Troemel

2011-01-01

261

Invasion and Intracellular Survival by Protozoan Parasites  

PubMed Central

Summary Intracellular parasitism has arisen only a few times during the long ancestry of protozoan parasites including in diverse groups such as microsporidians, kinetoplastids, and apicomplexans. Strategies used to gain entry differ widely from injection (e.g. microsporidians), active penetration of the host cell (e.g. Toxoplasma), recruitment of lysosomes to a plasma membrane wound (e.g. Trypanosoma cruzi), to host cell-mediated phagocytosis (e.g. Leishmania). The resulting range of intracellular niches is equally diverse ranging from cytosolic (e.g. T. cruzi) to residing within a nonfusigenic vacuole (e.g. Toxoplasma, Encephalitizoon) or a modified phagolysosome (e.g. Leishmania). These lifestyle choices influence access to nutrients, interaction with host cell signaling pathways, and detection by pathogen recognition systems. As such, intracellular life requires a repertoire of adaptations to assure entry-exit from the cell, as well as to thwart innate immune mechanisms and prevent clearance. Elucidating these pathways at the cellular and molecular level may identify key steps that can be targeted to reduce parasite survival or augment immunological responses and thereby prevent disease.

Sibley, L. David

2013-01-01

262

[Using of antibodies against Microsporia Hsp70 family proteins for analysis of secretome of intracellular parasites].  

PubMed

Microsporidia is a large group of fungi-related unicellular parasites with obligate intracellular lifestyle. Unlike other protozoan intracellular parasites (Kinetoplastida and Apicomplexa), most microsporidian species develop in direct contact with the host cell cytoplasm. This fact, acquisition of unique transporters to exploit host metabolic system (alongside the strong minimization of own machinery) and predicted repertoire of microsporidia secretome altogether suggest an active role of parasite proteins in the control of infected cell. Lack of information about secretome of microsporidia intracellular stages is largely due to the methodological difficulties of working with the obligate intracellular parasites. An important problem of such study is the contamination of preparations of host cell cytoplasm by inner (nonsecreted) parasite proteins. Even the homogenization of infected tissue in mild conditions and removal of parasite cells by low-speed centrifugation may result in their partial disruption. We expressed the fragments of three Hsp70 family chaperones from the microsporidium Paranosema (Antonospora) locustae in bacteria Escherichia coli. Immunoblotting with proteins of microsporidia intracellular stages and infected host tissue (locust fat bodies) demonstrated that antibodies against recombinant polypeptides may be used to monitor the integrity of parasite cells during homogenization of infected host tissue and subsequent removal of parasites by centrifugation. PMID:23458023

Dolgikh, V V; Senderski?, I V; Pavlova, O A; Timofeev, S A; Naumov, A M

2012-01-01

263

Functional characterization of a putative aquaporin from Encephalitozoon cuniculi, a microsporidia pathogenic to humans.  

PubMed

The microsporidia are a group of obligate intracellular parasitic protists that have been implicated as both human and veterinary pathogens. The infectious process of these organisms is believed to be dependent upon the rapid influx of water into spores, presumably via aquaporins (AQPs), transmembrane channels that facilitate osmosis. An AQP-like sequence of the microsporidium Encephalitozoon cuniculi (EcAQP), when cloned and expressed in oocytes of Xenopus laevis, rendered these oocytes highly permeable to water. No permeability to the solutes glycerol or urea was observed. Pre-treatment of EcAQP-expressing oocytes with HgCl(2) failed to inhibit their osmotic permeability, as predicted from EcAQP's lack of mercury-sensitive cysteine residues near the NPA motifs which line the AQP aqueous pore. EcAQP exhibits sequence identity to AQP A of Dictyostelium discoideum (26%) and human AQP 2 (24%). Further study of AQPs in microsporidia and their potential inhibitors may yield novel therapeutic agents for microsporidian infections. PMID:16197948

Ghosh, Kaya; Cappiello, Clint D; McBride, Sean M; Occi, James L; Cali, Ann; Takvorian, Peter M; McDonald, Thomas V; Weiss, Louis M

2006-01-01

264

Intracellular Trafficking of Porphyrins  

PubMed Central

Hemes are porphyrins that play a critical role in diverse biological processes. Heme synthesis culminates in the mitochondrial matrix, but the eight-step biosynthetic pathway is spatially shared between the mitochondria and cytoplasm. A recent paper describes the nature of the transporter which translocates the heme precursor coproporphyrinogen III into the mitochondria for heme synthesis. The identification of ABCB6 and future studies aimed at precisely delineating the mechanism and the physiological nature of its ligand(s) will further enhance our current understanding of the intracellular movement of tetrapyrroles in eukaryotes.

Hamza, Iqbal

2014-01-01

265

Bacterial pathogens.  

PubMed

Bacterial infections are frequent complications among patients treated for cancer. The type, severity, and treatment of bacterial infections vary and depend upon the specific malignancy, associated chemotherapies, and transplantation. This chapter discusses commonly encountered bacterial pathogens as well as Nocardia and mycobacteria in patients with cancer and addresses the clinical syndromes and management. Drug-resistant bacteria are becoming an increasingly recognized problem in patients with cancer. Antimicrobial resistance in select gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria are discussed along with the mechanisms of resistance and recommended therapies. PMID:24706222

Wilson, John W

2014-01-01

266

Intracellular trafficking of integrins in cancer cells.  

PubMed

Integrins are heterodimeric cell surface receptors, which principally mediate the interaction between cells and their extracellular microenvironments. Because of their pivotal roles in cancer proliferation, survival, invasion and metastasis, integrins have been recognized as promising targets for cancer treatment. As is the case with other receptors, the localization of integrins on the cell surface has provided opportunities to block their functions by various inhibitory monoclonal antibodies. A number of small molecule agents blocking integrin-ligand binding have also been established, and some such agents are currently on the market or in clinical trials for some diseases including cancer. This review exclusively focuses on another strategy for cancer therapy, which comes from the obligate localization of integrins on the cell surface; targeting the intracellular trafficking of integrins. A number of studies have shown the essential roles of integrin trafficking in hallmarks of cancer, such as activation of oncogenic signaling pathways as well as acquisition of invasiveness. Recent findings have shown that increased integrin recycling activity is associated with some types of gain-of-function mutations of p53, a common feature of diverse types of cancers, which also indicates that targeting integrin recycling could be widely applicable and effective against many cancers. We also discuss possible therapeutic contexts where integrin trafficking can be effectively targeted, and what molecular interfaces may hopefully be druggable. PMID:23711790

Onodera, Yasuhito; Nam, Jin-Min; Sabe, Hisataka

2013-10-01

267

12 CFR 1270.4 - Issuance of consolidated obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...paragraphs (b)(1) through (b)(6) of this section free from any lien or pledge, in an amount at least equal to...consolidated obligations shall be treated as if they were assets free from any lien or pledge for purposes of compliance with...

2012-01-01

268

The BOID architecture: conflicts between beliefs, obligations, intentions and desires  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we introduce the so-called Beliefs-Obligations-Intentions-Desires or BOID architecture. It contains feedback loops to consider all effects of actions before committing to them, and mechanisms to resolve conflicts between the outputs of its four components. Agent types such as realistic or social agents correspond to specific types of conflict resolution embedded in the BOID archecture.

Jan Broersen; Mehdi Dastani; Joris Hulstijn; Zhisheng Huang; Leendert W. N. van der Torre

2001-01-01

269

Family Obligations in Micronesian Cultures: Implications for Educators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Micronesian people, a new group of immigrants to the USA, have a strong system of responsibilities to family members that guides their priorities and actions. When family obligations clash with school priorities, conflicts can occur. I interviewed 26 adults to learn about the relationships and responsibilities of family members to each other in…

Ratliffe, Katherine T.

2010-01-01

270

The obligations and common ground structure of practical dialogues  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper a theory of dialogue structure of tas k oriented conversations and its associated tagging scheme are presented. The theory introduces two linguistic str uctures supporting the dialogue that, following tra ditional terminology, we call the obligations and common ground. The theory is illustrated with the detailed an alysis of a transaction. We also describe the empirical work

Luis Alberto Pineda; Varinia M. Estrada; Sergio Rafael Coria Olguin; James F. Allen

2007-01-01

271

European air transport public service obligations: a periodic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ‘Third Package’ of European Union air transport liberalisation measures came into effect on 1 January 1993 and has substantially reduced the restrictions on interstate flight operations. The package of measures also includes provision for the member states to impose ‘public service obligations’ on low-density routes which were deemed necessary for the purposes of regional development. In this paper, it

Aisling Reynolds-Feighan

1995-01-01

272

Clinical review: Influenza pandemic – physicians and their obligations  

Microsoft Academic Search

An influenza pandemic threatens to be the most lethal public health crisis to confront the world. Physicians will have critical roles in diagnosis, containment and treatment of influenza, and their commitment to treat despite increased personal risks is essential for a successful public health response. The obligations of the medical profession stem from the unique skills of its practitioners, who

Devanand Anantham; Wendy McHugh; Stephen O'Neill; Lachlan Forrow

2008-01-01

273

26 CFR 1.454-1 - Obligations issued at discount.  

...increases in the amount of 50 cents on each such date, the amount accruing in that year would be $1 ($0.50 on February 1 and $0.50 on August 1). If the taxpayer owns a non-interest-bearing obligation of the character...

2014-04-01

274

Who can be morally obligated to be a vegetarian?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Kathryn Paxton George has recently argued that vegetarianism cannot be a moral obligation for most human beings, even if Tom Regan is correct in arguing that humans and certain nonhuman animals are equally inherently valuable. She holds that Regan's liberty principle permits humans to kill and eat innocent others who have a right to life, provided that doing so prevents

Evelyn Pluhar

1992-01-01

275

The Legal Obligation to Prosecute 'Rendition to Tor ture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The United States of America and Italy are currentl y in violation of binding legal obligations under the United Nations Convention against Torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment to investigate allegations of torture resulting from extraordinary rendition and to prose cute those individuals responsible. This article describes cases that aim to establish that (i) torture has

Elena Landriscina

276

Classification Revisions Reduce Reported Federal Development Obligations. InfoBrief.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document reports on federal Research and Development (R&D) funding trends for the last 10 years and explains the sources of Federal R&D revisions. The data are obtained from an annual census of approximately 30 federal agencies that report obligation data to the National Science Foundation Survey of Federal Funds for R&D. (YDS)

Jankowski, John E.

277

Obama states obligation to act on climate change  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Obama states obligation to act on climate change Noting increased global temperatures, Arctic ice melt, and severe weather events, President Barack Obama said that climate change is real and called for a conversation across the country to determine what can be done about it.

Showstack, Randy

2012-11-01

278

Family Obligation and the Transition to Young Adulthood.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined changes in sense of family obligation (FO) among an ethnically diverse group of 745 Americans in transition from secondary school into young adulthood. Found that FO increased for all young adults, with slight variations according to ethnic and financial backgrounds. Implications of FO for employment and educational persistence depended…

Fuligni, Andrew J.; Pedersen, Sara

2002-01-01

279

Comparative Phylogeography in a Specific and Obligate Pollination Antagonism  

Microsoft Academic Search

In specific and obligate interactions the nature and abundance of a given species can have important effects on the survival and population dynamics of associated organisms. In a phylogeographic framework, we therefore expect that the fates of organisms interacting specifically are also tightly interrelated. Here we investigate such a scenario by analyzing the genetic structures of species interacting in an

Anahí Espíndola; Nadir Alvarez

2011-01-01

280

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The main policy instruments currently used in the EU Member States to achieve the targets set for electricity produced from renewable energy sources are: (1) the quota obligation system; (2) the feed-in tariff system; and (3) the tendering system. The cur...

N. H. van der Linden M. A. Uyterlinde C. Vrolijk L. J. Nilsson J. Khan

2005-01-01

281

Experimental evolution of nodule intracellular infection in legume symbionts  

PubMed Central

Soil bacteria known as rhizobia are able to establish an endosymbiosis with legumes that takes place in neoformed nodules in which intracellularly hosted bacteria fix nitrogen. Intracellular accommodation that facilitates nutrient exchange between the two partners and protects bacteria from plant defense reactions has been a major evolutionary step towards mutualism. Yet the forces that drove the selection of the late event of intracellular infection during rhizobium evolution are unknown. To address this question, we took advantage of the previous conversion of the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum into a legume-nodulating bacterium that infected nodules only extracellularly. We experimentally evolved this draft rhizobium into intracellular endosymbionts using serial cycles of legume-bacterium cocultures. The three derived lineages rapidly gained intracellular infection capacity, revealing that the legume is a highly selective environment for the evolution of this trait. From genome resequencing, we identified in each lineage a mutation responsible for the extracellular–intracellular transition. All three mutations target virulence regulators, strongly suggesting that several virulence-associated functions interfere with intracellular infection. We provide evidence that the adaptive mutations were selected for their positive effect on nodulation. Moreover, we showed that inactivation of the type three secretion system of R. solanacearum that initially allowed the ancestral draft rhizobium to nodulate, was also required to permit intracellular infection, suggesting a similar checkpoint for bacterial invasion at the early nodulation/root infection and late nodule cell entry levels. We discuss our findings with respect to the spread and maintenance of intracellular infection in rhizobial lineages during evolutionary times.

Guan, Su Hua; Gris, Carine; Cruveiller, Stephane; Pouzet, Cecile; Tasse, Lena; Leru, Aurelie; Maillard, Aline; Medigue, Claudine; Batut, Jacques; Masson-Boivin, Catherine; Capela, Delphine

2013-01-01

282

Intracellular protein topogenesis  

PubMed Central

Concurrently with or shortly after their synthesis on ribosomes, numerous specific proteins are unidirectionally translocated across or asymmetrically integrated into distinct cellular membranes. Thereafter, subpopulations of these proteins need to be sorted from each other and routed for export or targeted to other intracellular membranes or compartments. It is hypothesized here that the information for these processes, termed “protein topogenesis,” is encoded in discrete “topogenic” sequences that constitute a permanent or transient part of the polypeptide chain. The repertoire of distinct topogenic sequences is predicted to be relatively small because many different proteins would be topologically equivalent—i.e., targeted to the same intracellular address. The information content of topogenic sequences would be decoded and processed by distinct effectors. Four types of topogenic sequences could be distinguished: signal sequences, stop-transfer sequences, sorting sequences, and insertion sequences. Signal sequences initiate translocation of proteins across specific membranes. They would be decoded and processed by protein translocators that, by virtue of their signal sequence-specific domain and their unique location in distinct cellular membranes, effect unidirectional translocation of proteins across specific cellular membranes. Stop-transfer sequences interrupt the translocation process that was previously initiated by a signal sequence and, by excluding a distinct segment of the polypeptide chain from translocation, yield asymmetric integration of proteins into translocation-competent membranes. Sorting sequences would act as determinants for posttranslocational traffic of subpopulations of proteins, originating in translocation-competent donor membranes (and compartments) and going to translocation-incompetent receiver membranes (and compartments). Finally, insertion sequences initiate unilateral integration of proteins into the lipid bilayer without the mediation of a distinct protein effector. Examples are given for topogenic sequences, either alone or in combination, to provide the information for the location of proteins in any of the intracellular compartments or for the asymmetric orientation of proteins and their location in any of the cellular membranes. Proposals are made concerning the evolution of topogenic sequences and the relationship of protein topogenesis to the precellular evolution of membranes and compartments.

Blobel, Gunter

1980-01-01

283

Water near intracellular surfaces  

PubMed Central

In this paper we make the following points: Water is perturbed within several angstroms of the surfaces of soluble molecules. Removal of this water can require significant amounts of work, seen as an exponentially varying "hydration force" with respect to molecular separation. The favorable and specific attractions that occur in molecular assembly or in ligand binding imply that the specific association between the molecular surfaces is stronger than the association of those surfaces with water. The specificity of biochemical association is not simply a matter of protein-protein interaction but also of competing protein-water interactions. Small structural changes in molecular surfaces can evoke large changes in the contact energy of hydrated surfaces; surface hydration and the energetics of water displacement are a likely mechanism for the contact specificity of intracellular associations integrating the cell matrix.

Parsegian, V. A.; Rau, D. C.

1984-01-01

284

Genetic control of resistance to Mycobacterium intracellulare infection in mice.  

PubMed Central

The susceptibilities of various strains of mice to a highly pathogenic strain of Mycobacterium intracellulare, the Mino strain, were determined by intravenous injection of 5 X 10(6) bacteria. CFU were counted on days 1 and 21 of infection. Among 10 strains of mice, C57BL/6, C57BL/10, BALB/c, B10.BR, B10.A, and B10.D2 were susceptible, whereas DBA/2, A/J, CBA, and C3H/He were resistant. In the susceptible mouse strains, the number of bacteria increased during 21 days of infection, whereas no bacterial growth was observed in the resistant strains. Susceptible mice showed weak but positive delayed-type hypersensitivity to M. intracellulare purified protein derivative 20 days after injection of bacteria. Resistant mice developed no delayed-type hypersensitivity. Histological examination showed severe granulomatous lesions in livers or spleens of the susceptible mice after M. intracellulare injection. Analysis of F1 hybrids of susceptible and resistant strains and of F2 and backcross mice showed that the resistance to M. intracellulare seems to be controlled genetically by a single dominant gene. The pattern of distribution of resistance to M. intracellulare among the mouse strains was consistent with that of natural resistance to Mycobacterium bovis to BCG. Thus, resistance to M. intracellulare infection may be regulated by a gene linked to the Bcg gene on chromosome 1.

Goto, Y; Nakamura, R M; Takahashi, H; Tokunaga, T

1984-01-01

285

Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37 Is Effective against both Extra- and Intracellular Staphylococcus aureus  

PubMed Central

The increasing resistance of bacteria to conventional antibiotics and the challenges posed by intracellular bacteria, which may be responsible for chronic and recurrent infections, have driven the need for advanced antimicrobial drugs for effective elimination of both extra- and intracellular pathogens. The purpose of this study was to determine the killing efficacy of cationic antimicrobial peptide LL-37 compared to conventional antibiotics against extra- and intracellular Staphylococcus aureus. Bacterial killing assays and an infection model of osteoblasts and S. aureus were studied to determine the bacterial killing efficacy of LL-37 and conventional antibiotics against extra- and intracellular S. aureus. We found that LL-37 was effective in killing extracellular S. aureus at nanomolar concentrations, while lactoferricin B was effective at micromolar concentrations and doxycycline and cefazolin at millimolar concentrations. LL-37 was surprisingly more effective in killing the clinical strain than in killing an ATCC strain of S. aureus. Moreover, LL-37 was superior to conventional antibiotics in eliminating intracellular S. aureus. The kinetic studies further revealed that LL-37 was fast in eliminating both extra- and intracellular S. aureus. Therefore, LL-37 was shown to be very potent and prompt in eliminating both extra- and intracellular S. aureus and was more effective in killing extra- and intracellular S. aureus than commonly used conventional antibiotics. LL-37 could potentially be used to treat chronic and recurrent infections due to its effectiveness in eliminating not only extracellular but also intracellular pathogens.

Noore, Jabeen; Noore, Adly

2013-01-01

286

Antimicrobial activity of four root canal sealers against endodontic pathogens  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antibacterial effects of various types of widely used endodontic sealers have not been compared systematically on facultative or obligate anaerobic endodontic pathogens. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of four commonly used endodontic sealers: two epoxy-resin-based sealers (AH26, AH plus), one zinc-oxide eugenol-based sealer (N2), and one calcium hydroxide-based sealer (Sealapex). The testing microbes

Chung-Chih Lai; Fu-Mei Huang; Hui-Wen Yang; You Chan; Min-Sheng Huang; Ming-Yung Chou; Yu-Chao Chang

2001-01-01

287

78 FR 52308 - Harmonization of Compliance Obligations for Registered Investment Companies Required To Register...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Part 4 RIN 3038-AD75 Harmonization of Compliance Obligations for Registered Investment...regulations with respect to certain compliance obligations for commodity pool operators...are effective September 23, 2013. Compliance dates: Registered CPOs seeking...

2013-08-22

288

42 CFR 137.309 - How are NEPA and NHPA obligations typically enforced?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How are NEPA and NHPA obligations typically enforced? 137...SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Nepa Process § 137.309 How are NEPA and NHPA obligations typically...

2012-10-01

289

42 CFR 137.309 - How are NEPA and NHPA obligations typically enforced?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How are NEPA and NHPA obligations typically enforced? 137...SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Nepa Process § 137.309 How are NEPA and NHPA obligations typically...

2010-10-01

290

42 CFR 137.309 - How are NEPA and NHPA obligations typically enforced?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-10-01 2009-10-01 false How are NEPA and NHPA obligations typically enforced? 137...SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Nepa Process § 137.309 How are NEPA and NHPA obligations typically...

2009-10-01

291

42 CFR 137.309 - How are NEPA and NHPA obligations typically enforced?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How are NEPA and NHPA obligations typically enforced? 137...SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Nepa Process § 137.309 How are NEPA and NHPA obligations typically...

2013-10-01

292

21 CFR 821.30 - Tracking obligations of persons other than device manufacturers: distributor requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracking obligations of persons other than...MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE TRACKING REQUIREMENTS Additional Requirements...Responsibilities § 821.30 Tracking obligations of persons other...

2010-04-01

293

21 CFR 821.30 - Tracking obligations of persons other than device manufacturers: distributor requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-04-01 2009-04-01 false Tracking obligations of persons other than...MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE TRACKING REQUIREMENTS Additional Requirements...Responsibilities § 821.30 Tracking obligations of persons other...

2009-04-01

294

43 CFR 3137.41 - What continuing development obligations must I define in a unit agreement?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false What continuing development obligations must I define in a unit agreement...Agreements-National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Development § 3137.41 What continuing development obligations must I define in a unit...

2013-10-01

295

43 CFR 3137.76 - What happens if I do not meet a continuing development obligation?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...happens if I do not meet a continuing development obligation? 3137.76 Section...Agreements-National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Development Requirements § 3137.76 ...happens if I do not meet a continuing development obligation? (a) After...

2013-10-01

296

43 CFR 3137.70 - What must I do to meet initial development obligations?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... What must I do to meet initial development obligations? 3137.70 Section...Agreements-National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Development Requirements § 3137.70 What must I do to meet initial development obligations? (a) To meet...

2013-10-01

297

32 CFR 220.2 - Statutory obligation of third party payer to pay.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...COLLECTION FROM THIRD PARTY PAYERS OF REASONABLE CHARGES FOR HEALTHCARE SERVICES § 220.2 Statutory obligation of third party...obligation to pay the United States the reasonable charges for healthcare services provided in or through any facility of...

2013-07-01

298

26 CFR 1.662(a)-4 - Amounts used in discharge of a legal obligation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Amounts used in discharge of a legal obligation. 1...662(a)-4 Amounts used in discharge of a legal obligation. Any...instrument, is used in full or partial discharge or satisfaction of a...

2010-04-01

299

26 CFR 1.662(a)-4 - Amounts used in discharge of a legal obligation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-04-01 false Amounts used in discharge of a legal obligation. 1...662(a)-4 Amounts used in discharge of a legal obligation. Any...instrument, is used in full or partial discharge or satisfaction of a...

2009-04-01

300

43 CFR 3137.40 - What initial development obligations must I define in a unit agreement?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...What initial development obligations must I define in a unit agreement? 3137.40 Section...What initial development obligations must I define in a unit agreement? Your unit agreement must defineâ (a) The number of wells you...

2010-10-01

301

43 CFR 3137.71 - What must I do to meet continuing development obligations?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...What must I do to meet continuing development obligations? 3137.71 Section...Agreements-National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Development Requirements § 3137.71 What must I do to meet continuing development obligations? (a) Once you...

2013-10-01

302

Federal Agencies' AcademicS&E Obligations Continued to Climb in FY 1995  

NSF Publications Database

Federal Agencies' Academic S&E Obligations Continued to Climb in FY 1995 (May 16, 1997) This Data ... analytic summary of Federal academic science and engineering obligations collected through the ...

303

29 CFR 37.27 - What are the obligations of small recipients regarding Equal Opportunity Officers?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Secretary of Labor IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NONDISCRIMINATION AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROVISIONS OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) Recordkeeping and Other Affirmative Obligations of Recipients § 37.27 What are the obligations of small...

2010-07-01

304

18 CFR 292.309 - Termination of obligation to purchase from qualifying facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...obligation to purchase from qualifying facilities. 292.309 Section 292.309 ...Cogeneration and Small Power Production Facilities Under Section 210 of the Public Utility...obligation to purchase from qualifying facilities. (a) After August 8,...

2009-04-01

305

78 FR 40953 - Loan Participations; Purchase, Sale and Pledge of Eligible Obligations; Purchase of Assets and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Loan Participations; Purchase, Sale and Pledge of Eligible Obligations; Purchase of Assets and Assumption of Liabilities; Extension...Loan Participations; Purchase, Sale and Pledge of Eligible Obligations; Purchase of Assets and Assumption of Liabilities,...

2013-07-09

306

26 CFR 46.4701-1 - Tax on issuer of registration-required obligation not in registered form.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Tax on issuer of registration-required obligation not in registered form. 46.4701-1...POLICIES ISSUED BY FOREIGN INSURERS AND OBLIGATIONS NOT IN REGISTERED FORM Excise Tax on Obligations Not in Registered Form §...

2009-04-01

307

26 CFR 46.4701-1 - Tax on issuer of registration-required obligation not in registered form.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Tax on issuer of registration-required obligation not in registered form. 46.4701-1...POLICIES ISSUED BY FOREIGN INSURERS AND OBLIGATIONS NOT IN REGISTERED FORM Excise Tax on Obligations Not in Registered Form §...

2010-04-01

308

31 CFR 225.4 - Pledge of book-entry Government obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pledge of book-entry Government obligations. 225...BONDS WITH SURETIES § 225.4 Pledge of book-entry Government obligations. (a...and approval of the bond official, of book-entry Government obligations....

2013-07-01

309

Nutrient availability induces contrasting allocation and starch formation in resprouting and obligate seeding shrubs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary 1. Woody plant responses to crown removal in fire-prone vegetation are of two types: resprouting (resprouters) or killed (obligate seeders). Obligate seeders maximize their fitness by ensuring they are reproductively mature before the next fire; resprouters invest in structures that increase their chance of surviving the next fire. 2. We tested whether seven congeneric pairs of resprouter and obligate

K. J. E. KNOX; P. J. CLARKE

2005-01-01

310

24 CFR 905.120 - Penalties for slow obligation or expenditure of CFP assistance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2009-04-01 false Penalties for slow obligation or expenditure of CFP assistance...FUND PROGRAM § 905.120 Penalties for slow obligation or expenditure of CFP assistance...sanctions available to HUD, the penalties for slow obligation or expenditure of CFP...

2009-04-01

311

24 CFR 905.120 - Penalties for slow obligation or expenditure of Capital Fund program assistance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-04-01 false Penalties for slow obligation or expenditure of Capital Fund...Capital Fund § 905.120 Penalties for slow obligation or expenditure of Capital Fund...sanctions available to HUD, the penalties for slow obligation or expenditure of CFP...

2013-04-01

312

24 CFR 905.120 - Penalties for slow obligation or expenditure of CFP assistance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-04-01 false Penalties for slow obligation or expenditure of CFP assistance...FUND PROGRAM § 905.120 Penalties for slow obligation or expenditure of CFP assistance...sanctions available to HUD, the penalties for slow obligation or expenditure of CFP...

2010-04-01

313

Discharge against medical advice: ethical considerations and professional obligations.  

PubMed

Discharges against medical advice (AMA) account for approximately 1% of discharges for general medical patients. Patients discharged AMA have longer eventual hospital stays and worse health outcomes. These patients are also less likely to have an established relationship with a physician, tend to have poorer social supports, and are more likely to abuse alcohol and other substances. These discharges are also distressing for physicians and other health professionals. How should physicians manage their conflicted obligations to respect patients' choices and to prevent harms from befalling their patients? What are physicians' obligations to their patients who leave accepting only partial or inadequate treatment plans or no treatment at all? When should physicians question the decision-making capacity of patients who make dangerous judgments to leave the hospital? This article examines the ethical and professional implications of discharge AMA. PMID:18951403

Berger, Jeffrey T

2008-09-01

314

Duty of care is underpinned by a range of obligations.  

PubMed

The courts have long established that nurses are in a duty situation and owe a duty of care to their patients (Kent v Griffiths [2001]). Traditionally, the profession set the standard of care and nurses were required to act in accordance with a practice accepted by a responsible body of their peers (Bolam v Friern HMC [1957]).The introduction of the Human Rights Act 1998 gave rise to a positive obligation on government to ensure that laws, policies and procedures are in place to protect violations of human rights. Nurses must now inform their practice with relevant statute law, common law and professional standards in order to properly discharge their duty of care. Richard Griffith considers the law that now underpins a nurse's duty of care and uses a recent report from the Health Service Ombudsman for England to illustrate the obligations that underpin the nurse-patient relationship. PMID:24809155

Griffith, Richard

315

Molecular basis of host specificity in human pathogenic bacteria  

PubMed Central

Pathogenic bacteria display various levels of host specificity or tropism. While many bacteria can infect a wide range of hosts, certain bacteria have strict host selectivity for humans as obligate human pathogens. Understanding the genetic and molecular basis of host specificity in pathogenic bacteria is important for understanding pathogenic mechanisms, developing better animal models and designing new strategies and therapeutics for the control of microbial diseases. The molecular mechanisms of bacterial host specificity are much less understood than those of viral pathogens, in part due to the complexity of the molecular composition and cellular structure of bacterial cells. However, important progress has been made in identifying and characterizing molecular determinants of bacterial host specificity in the last two decades. It is now clear that the host specificity of bacterial pathogens is determined by multiple molecular interactions between the pathogens and their hosts. Furthermore, certain basic principles regarding the host specificity of bacterial pathogens have emerged from the existing literature. This review focuses on selected human pathogenic bacteria and our current understanding of their host specificity.

Pan, Xiaolei; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Jing-Ren

2014-01-01

316

US arms control obligations under the Non-Proliferation Treaty  

SciTech Connect

Article VI of the 1968 Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) obligates the nuclear weapon states parties to the Treaty ''to pursue negotiations in good faith on effective measures relating to cessation of the nuclear arms race, ... to nuclear disarmament, and on a treaty on general and complete disarmament under strict and effective international control.'' The preamble to the NPT recalls the 1963 Limited Test Ban Treaty ''determination ... to achieve the discontinuance of ... explosions.'' These provisions are interpreted by a majority of the non-nuclear weapon states parties to the Treaty as an obligation of the nuclear weapon states parties to the Treaty to pursue a comprehensive test ban (CTB). However, a review of the history of the NPT negotiations and US ratification proceedings makes clear that the NPT imposes no legal obligation on the US to pursue a CTB. The US did not make a one-to-one correspondence between Article VI and any specific arms control measure; to the contrary, the US argued successfully that such a connection (to any specific measure) would be pernicious to the attempt to achieve agreement on the NPT. This interpretation, which was sustained through the negotiations and the ratification proceedings, still reflects the limits of the legal obligations the US has accepted. But, in the absence of progress on other arms control measures, which would relieve the pressure for a CTB, the majority interpretation creates political difficulties for the US and could threaten the NPT regime in the future. These problems highlight the need for the US to better defend its compliance with Article VI and to develop a long-term strategy that will permit necessary testing while assuring the survival of the NPT regime in effective form.

Not Available

1986-06-27

317

Product Individual Sorting and Identification Systems to organize WEEE obligations  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the implementation of the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment directive (WEEE) manufacturers of electrical equipment\\u000a are obliged to take responsibility for their appliances. At the moment different configuration of recycling systems are discussed\\u000a in Germany which have in common that the recycling costs are distributed among the manufacturers by their respective market\\u000a share. The developed concept allows an automated

Christian Butz

318

The relationship between family obligation and religiosity on caregiving.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between family obligation and religiosity on the positive appraisal of caregiving among African-American, Hispanic and non-Hispanic Caucasian family caregivers of older adults. Roy's adaptation model guided formulation of the aims and study design. A cross-sectional, correlational study design was employed to examine the relationship amongst variables for the family caregiver participants. Study participants (N = 69) completed a demographic tool and four instruments the: (1) Katz index, (2) obligation scale, (3) Duke University religion index, and (4) positive appraisal of care scale. There was a significant correlation between family obligation and positive appraisal of caregiving. However, there was no relationship between the family caregiver's religiosity and positive appraisal of caregiving overall. Demographic variables were also examined to show a higher marginal mean for Hispanic primary caregivers in relation to the positive appraisal of caregiving. Future studies should consider replicating these findings in a larger sample to provide health care professionals with substantial evidence to incorporate culturally sensitive interventions aimed at promoting positive outcomes and healthy family behaviors. PMID:24314743

Epps, Fayron

2014-01-01

319

"Alternative" Endocytic Mechanisms Exploited by Pathogens  

PubMed Central

Some pathogens utilize unique routes to enter cells that may evade the intracellular barriers encountered by the typical clathrin-mediated endocytic pathway. Retrograde transport and caveolar uptake are among the better characterized pathways, as alternatives to clathrin-mediated endocytosis, that are known to facilitate entry of pathogens and potential delivery agents. Recent characterization of the trafficking mechanisms of prion proteins and certain bacteria may present new paradigms for strategizing improvements in therapeutic spread and retention of therapy. This review will provide an overview of such endocytic pathways, and discuss current and future possibilities in using these routes as a means to improve therapeutic delivery.

Medina-Kauwe, Lali K.

2007-01-01

320

Expressed sequence tag analysis of the soybean rust pathogen Phakopsora pachyrhizi  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soybean rust is caused by the obligate fungal pathogen Phakopsora pachyrhizi Sydow. A unidirectional cDNA library was constructed using mRNA isolated from germinating P. pachyrhizi urediniospores to identify genes expressed at this physiological stage. Single pass sequence analysis of 908 clones revealed 488 unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs, unigenes) of which 107 appeared as multiple copies. BLASTX analysis identified 189

Martha Lucia Posada-Buitrago; Reid D. Frederick

2005-01-01

321

StCDPK5 confers resistance to late blight pathogen but increases susceptibility to early blight pathogen in potato via reactive oxygen species burst.  

PubMed

• Potato (Solanum tuberosum) calcium-dependent protein kinase (StCDPK5) has been shown to phosphorylate the N-terminal region of plasma membrane RBOH (respiratory burst oxidase homolog) proteins, and participate in StRBOHB-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst. The constitutively active form, StCDPK5VK, provides a useful tool for gain-of-function analysis of RBOH in defense responses. • StCDPK5- and StCDPK5VK-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins were predominantly targeted to the plasma membrane, and conditional expression of StCDPK5VK activated StRBOHA-D. The interaction was confirmed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay. We generated transgenic potato plants containing StCDPK5VK under the control of a pathogen-inducible promoter to investigate the role of ROS burst on defense responses to blight pathogens. • Virulent isolates of the late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans and the early blight pathogen Alternaria solani induced hypersensitive response-like cell death accompanied by ROS production at the infection sites of transgenic plants. Transgenic plants showed resistance to the near-obligate hemibiotrophic pathogen P. infestans and, by contrast, increased susceptibility to the necrotrophic pathogen A. solani. • These results indicate that RBOH-dependent ROS contribute to basal defense against near-obligate pathogens, but have a negative role in resistance or have a positive role in expansion of disease lesions caused by necrotrophic pathogens. PMID:22783903

Kobayashi, Michie; Yoshioka, Miki; Asai, Shuta; Nomura, Hironari; Kuchimura, Kazuo; Mori, Hitoshi; Doke, Noriyuki; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

2012-10-01

322

Plant NBS-LRR proteins in pathogen sensing and host defense  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plant proteins belonging to the nucleotide-binding site–leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) family are used for pathogen detection. Like the mammalian Nod-LRR protein 'sensors' that detect intracellular conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns, plant NBS-LRR proteins detect pathogen-associated proteins, most often the effector molecules of pathogens responsible for virulence. Many virulence proteins are detected indirectly by plant NBS-LRR proteins from modifications the virulence proteins inflict

Brody J DeYoung; Roger W Innes

2006-01-01

323

The role of autophagy in the intracellular survival of Campylobacter concisus  

PubMed Central

Campylobacter concisus is an emerging pathogen that has been associated with gastrointestinal diseases. Given the importance of autophagy for the elimination of intracellular bacteria and the subversion of this process by pathogenic bacteria, we investigated the role of autophagy in C. concisus intracellular survival. Gentamicin protection assays were employed to assess intracellular levels of C. concisus within Caco-2 cells, following autophagy induction and inhibition. To assess the interaction between C. concisus and autophagosomes, confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were employed. Expression levels of 84 genes involved in the autophagy process were measured using qPCR. Autophagy inhibition resulted in two- to four-fold increases in intracellular levels of C. concisus within Caco-2 cells, while autophagy induction resulted in a significant reduction in intracellular levels or bacterial clearance. C. concisus strains with low intracellular survival levels showed a dramatic increase in these levels upon autophagy inhibition. Confocal microscopy showed co-localization of the bacterium with autophagosomes, while transmission electron microscopy identified intracellular bacteria persisting within autophagic vesicles. Further, qPCR showed that following infection, 13 genes involved in the autophagy process were significantly regulated, and a further five showed borderline results, with an overall indication towards a dampening effect exerted by the bacterium on this process. Our data collectively indicates that while autophagy is important for the clearance of C. concisus, some strains may manipulate this process to benefit their intracellular survival.

Burgos-Portugal, Jose A.; Mitchell, Hazel M.; Castano-Rodriguez, Natalia; Kaakoush, Nadeem O.

2014-01-01

324

The role of autophagy in the intracellular survival of Campylobacter concisus.  

PubMed

Campylobacter concisus is an emerging pathogen that has been associated with gastrointestinal diseases. Given the importance of autophagy for the elimination of intracellular bacteria and the subversion of this process by pathogenic bacteria, we investigated the role of autophagy in C. concisus intracellular survival. Gentamicin protection assays were employed to assess intracellular levels of C. concisus within Caco-2 cells, following autophagy induction and inhibition. To assess the interaction between C. concisus and autophagosomes, confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were employed. Expression levels of 84 genes involved in the autophagy process were measured using qPCR. Autophagy inhibition resulted in two- to four-fold increases in intracellular levels of C. concisus within Caco-2 cells, while autophagy induction resulted in a significant reduction in intracellular levels or bacterial clearance. C. concisus strains with low intracellular survival levels showed a dramatic increase in these levels upon autophagy inhibition. Confocal microscopy showed co-localization of the bacterium with autophagosomes, while transmission electron microscopy identified intracellular bacteria persisting within autophagic vesicles. Further, qPCR showed that following infection, 13 genes involved in the autophagy process were significantly regulated, and a further five showed borderline results, with an overall indication towards a dampening effect exerted by the bacterium on this process. Our data collectively indicates that while autophagy is important for the clearance of C. concisus, some strains may manipulate this process to benefit their intracellular survival. PMID:24918042

Burgos-Portugal, Jose A; Mitchell, Hazel M; Castaño-Rodríguez, Natalia; Kaakoush, Nadeem O

2014-01-01

325

Prison Break: Pathogens' Strategies To Egress from Host Cells  

PubMed Central

Summary: A wide spectrum of pathogenic bacteria and protozoa has adapted to an intracellular life-style, which presents several advantages, including accessibility to host cell metabolites and protection from the host immune system. Intracellular pathogens have developed strategies to enter and exit their host cells while optimizing survival and replication, progression through the life cycle, and transmission. Over the last decades, research has focused primarily on entry, while the exit process has suffered from neglect. However, pathogen exit is of fundamental importance because of its intimate association with dissemination, transmission, and inflammation. Hence, to fully understand virulence mechanisms of intracellular pathogens at cellular and systemic levels, it is essential to consider exit mechanisms to be a key step in infection. Exit from the host cell was initially viewed as a passive process, driven mainly by physical stress as a consequence of the explosive replication of the pathogen. It is now recognized as a complex, strategic process termed “egress,” which is just as well orchestrated and temporally defined as entry into the host and relies on a dynamic interplay between host and pathogen factors. This review compares egress strategies of bacteria, pathogenic yeast, and kinetoplastid and apicomplexan parasites. Emphasis is given to recent advances in the biology of egress in mycobacteria and apicomplexans.

Friedrich, Nikolas; Hagedorn, Monica; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

2012-01-01

326

Intracellular Helicobacter pylori in gastric epithelial progenitors  

PubMed Central

Helicobacter pylori is generally viewed as an extracellular pathogen. We have analyzed the tropism of H. pylori clinical isolates in a gnotobiotic transgenic mouse model of human chronic atrophic gastritis, a preneoplastic condition. These mice lack acid-producing parietal cells and have an amplified population of dividing gastric epithelial progenitors (GEPs) that express NeuAc?2,3Gal?1,4-glycans recognized by H. pylori adhesins. Scanning confocal and transmission electron microscopic studies of stomachs that had been colonized for 1 month or 1 year revealed intracellular bacterial collections (IBCs) in a small subset of multi- and oligopotential epithelial progenitors. Transmission electron microscopic and multilabel immunohistochemical analyses disclosed bacteria with several morphotypes, including spiral-shaped, in the cytoplasm and endosomes. Several stages in IBC evolution were documented, from a few solitary bacteria to consolidated populations in dividing and nondividing GEPs, to microorganisms traversing breaches in the GEP plasma cell membrane. IBC formation was not a unique feature of H. pylori strains isolated from patients with chronic atrophic gastritis. The notion that adult mammalian epithelial progenitors can function as a repository for H. pylori broadens the view of host habitats available to this and perhaps other pathogens.

Oh, Jung D.; Karam, Sherif M.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

2005-01-01

327

Role of extracellular nucleotides in the immune response against intracellular bacteria and protozoan parasites  

PubMed Central

Extracellular nucleotides are danger signals involved in recognition and control of intracellular pathogens. They are an important component of the innate immune response against intracellular pathogens, inducing the recruitment of inflammatory cells, stimulating secretion of cytokines, and producing inflammatory mediators such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). In the case of extracellular ATP, some of the immune responses are mediated through activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and secretion of the cytokine, interleukin-1? (IL-1?), through a mechanism dependent on ligation of the P2X7 receptor. Here we review the role of extracellular nucleotides as sensors of intracellular bacteria and protozoan parasites, and discuss how these pathogens manipulate purinergic signaling to diminish the immune response against infection.

Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Ojcius, David M.

2014-01-01

328

Phenotypic analysis of Arabidopsis mutants: oomycete pathogens.  

PubMed

Various fungal pathogens are used in Arabidopsis pathogen studies, including Fusarium oxysporum, Alternaria brassicicola, Botrytis cinerea, and others. The oomycete pathogen Peronospora parasitica has been used by several groups and is described in this protocol. Working with Peronospora is complicated by the fact that it is an obligate biotroph, and consequently cultures must be maintained on living plants. There is no central repository for Peronospora stocks, but most investigators who work with them are willing to provide samples of infected tissue. These can be used to initiate new stock cultures, or they can be maintained as live cultures on seedlings. One of the most important factors in maintaining Peronospora is the humidity of the growth chamber, which must be kept at a minimum of 80%. Various Peronospora isolates are available. These vary with respect to which Arabidopsis ecotypes they can infect, because some combinations trigger gene-for-gene resistance. Thus, it is important that the appropriate ecotype is inoculated with the appropriate strain of pathogen. The extent of infections can be rated or quantitatively measured as the number of spores produced per plant, and frozen tissue stocks can be prepared from heavily infected tissue. PMID:20147042

Clarke, Joseph D

2009-10-01

329

Decreased Intracellular Survival of anfkpAMutant of Salmonella typhimuriumCopenhagen  

Microsoft Academic Search

ThefkpAgene ofSalmonella typhimuriumencodes a protein similar to the macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) proteins ofLegionella pneumophilaandChlamydia trachomatis. Because Mip proteins enhance the ability of these intracellular pathogens to survive within macrophages and epithelial cells, we tested whether the product of the fkpA gene would have the same effect on the intracellular growth of a virulent strain of S. typhimurium. By a

SHELLEY M. HORNE; THEODORE J. KOTTOM; LISA K. NOLAN; D. YOUNG

1997-01-01

330

Intracellular Antibody Neutralizes Listeria Growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

We previously reported that treatment of mice with a neutralizing mAb against listeriolysin O (LLO), the pore-forming toxin of Listeria monocytogenes, provided resistance to this intracellular bacterium. We evaluated whether anti-LLO mAb would affect Listeria handling by macrophages, essential cells in Listeria resistance. Macrophages infected in the presence of anti-LLO mAb showed a marked reduction in intracellular Listeria growth, with

Brian T Edelson; Emil R Unanue

2001-01-01

331

Role of the Clp System in Stress Tolerance, Biofilm Formation, and Intracellular Invasion in Porphyromonas gingivalis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clp proteases and chaperones are ubiquitous among prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and in many pathogenic bacteria the Clp stress response system is also involved in regulation of virulence properties. In this study, the roles of ClpB, ClpC, and ClpXP in stress resistance, homotypic and heterotypic biofilm formation, and intracellular invasion in the oral opportunistic pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis were investigated. Absence of

Cindy A. Capestany; Gena D. Tribble; Kazuhiko Maeda; Donald R Demuth; Richard J. Lamont

2008-01-01

332

The Evolutionary Pathway to Obligate Scavenging in Gyps Vultures  

PubMed Central

The evolutionary pathway to obligate scavenging in Gyps vultures remains unclear. We propose that communal roosting plays a central role in setting up the information transfer network critical for obligate scavengers in ephemeral environments and that the formation of a flotilla-like foraging group is a likely strategy for foraging Gyps vultures. Using a spatial, individual-based, optimisation model we find that the communal roost is critical for establishing the information network that enables information transfer owing to the spatial-concentration of foragers close to the roost. There is also strong selection pressure for grouping behaviour owing to the importance of maintaining network integrity and hence information transfer during foraging. We present a simple mechanism for grouping, common in many animal species, which has the added implication that it negates the requirement for roost-centric information transfer. The formation of a flotilla-like foraging group also improves foraging efficiency through the reduction of overlapping search paths. Finally, we highlight the importance of consideration of information transfer mechanisms in order to maximise the success of vulture reintroduction programmes.

Dermody, Brian J.; Tanner, Colby J.; Jackson, Andrew L.

2011-01-01

333

Acquisition of an animal gene by microsporidian intracellular parasites  

PubMed Central

Parasites have adapted to their specialised way of life by a number of means, including the acquisition of genes by horizontal gene transfer. These newly acquired genes seem to come from a variety of sources, but seldom from the host, even in the most intimate associations between obligate intracellular parasite and host [1]. Microsporidian intracellular parasites have acquired a handful of genes, mostly from bacteria, that help them take energy from their hosts or protect them from the environment [2,3]. To date, however, no animal genes have been documented in any microsporidian genome. Here, we have surveyed the genome of the microsporidian Encephalitozoon romaleae, which parasitises arthropods for evidence of animal genes. We found one protein-encoding gene that is absent from publicly available sequence data from other microsporidia. The gene encodes a component of the purine salvage pathway, and has been independently acquired by other parasites through horizontal gene transfer from other donors. In this case, however, the gene shows a very strong phylogenetic signal for arthropod origin.

Selman, Mohammed; Pombert, Jean-Francois; Solter, Leellen; Farinelli, Laurent; Weiss, Louis M.; Keeling, Patrick; Corradi, Nicolas

2013-01-01

334

Comparative analysis of Chlamydia psittaci genomes reveals the recent emergence of a pathogenic lineage with a broad host range.  

PubMed

Chlamydia psittaci is an obligate intracellular bacterium. Interest in Chlamydia stems from its high degree of virulence as an intestinal and pulmonary pathogen across a broad range of animals, including humans. C. psittaci human pulmonary infections, referred to as psittacosis, can be life-threatening, which is why the organism was developed as a bioweapon in the 20th century and is listed as a CDC biothreat agent. One remarkable recent result from comparative genomics is the finding of frequent homologous recombination across the genome of the sexually transmitted and trachoma pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis. We sought to determine if similar evolutionary dynamics occurred in C. psittaci. We analyzed 20 C. psittaci genomes from diverse strains representing the nine known serotypes of the organism as well as infections in a range of birds and mammals, including humans. Genome annotation revealed a core genome in all strains of 911 genes. Our analyses showed that C. psittaci has a history of frequently switching hosts and undergoing recombination more often than C. trachomatis. Evolutionary history reconstructions showed genome-wide homologous recombination and evidence of whole-plasmid exchange. Tracking the origins of recombinant segments revealed that some strains have imported DNA from as-yet-unsampled or -unsequenced C. psittaci lineages or other Chlamydiaceae species. Three ancestral populations of C. psittaci were predicted, explaining the current population structure. Molecular clock analysis found that certain strains are part of a clonal epidemic expansion likely introduced into North America by South American bird traders, suggesting that psittacosis is a recently emerged disease originating in New World parrots. PMID:23532978

Read, Timothy D; Joseph, Sandeep J; Didelot, Xavier; Liang, Brooke; Patel, Lisa; Dean, Deborah

2013-01-01

335

Functional Transfer of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 to Salmonella bongori and Escherichia coli  

Microsoft Academic Search

The type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded by the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2) has a central role in systemic infections by Salmonella enterica and for the intracellular phenotype. Intracellular S. enterica uses the SPI2-encoded T3SS to translocate a set of effector proteins into the host cell, which modify host cell functions, enabling intracellular survival and replication of the bacteria.

Imke Hansen-Wester; Dipshikha Chakravortty; Michael Hensel

2004-01-01

336

Iron in intracellular infection: to provide or to deprive?  

PubMed Central

Due to their chemical versatility, transition metals were incorporated as cofactors for several basic metabolic pathways in living organisms. This same characteristic makes them potentially harmful, since they can be engaged in deleterious reactions like Fenton chemistry. As such, organisms have evolved highly specialized mechanisms to supply their own metal needs while keeping their toxic potential in check. This dual character comes into play in host-pathogen interactions, given that the host can either deprive the pathogen of these key nutrients or exploit them to induce toxicity toward the invading agent. Iron stands as the prototypic example of how a metal can be used to limit the growth of pathogens by nutrient deprivation, a mechanism widely studied in Mycobacterium infections. However, the host can also take advantage of iron-induced toxicity to control pathogen proliferation, as observed in infections caused by Leishmania. Whether we may harness either of the two pathways for therapeutical purposes is still ill-defined. In this review, we discuss how modulation of the host iron availability impacts the course of infections, focusing on those caused by two relevant intracellular pathogens, Mycobacterium and Leishmania.

Silva-Gomes, Sandro; Vale-Costa, Silvia; Appelberg, Rui; Gomes, Maria S.

2013-01-01

337

PATHOGENS: VIEWS OF EPA'S PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE  

EPA Science Inventory

This presentation reviews the pathogenic microorganisms that may be found in municipal sewage sludge and the commonly employed Class A and B processes for controlling pathogens. It notes how extensively they are used and discusses issues and concerns with their application. Pre...

338

Metallochaperones regulate intracellular copper levels.  

PubMed

Copper (Cu) is an important enzyme co-factor that is also extremely toxic at high intracellular concentrations, making active efflux mechanisms essential for preventing Cu accumulation. Here, we have investigated the mechanistic role of metallochaperones in regulating Cu efflux. We have constructed a computational model of Cu trafficking and efflux based on systems analysis of the Cu stress response of Halobacterium salinarum. We have validated several model predictions via assays of transcriptional dynamics and intracellular Cu levels, discovering a completely novel function for metallochaperones. We demonstrate that in addition to trafficking Cu ions, metallochaperones also function as buffers to modulate the transcriptional responsiveness and efficacy of Cu efflux. This buffering function of metallochaperones ultimately sets the upper limit for intracellular Cu levels and provides a mechanistic explanation for previously observed Cu metallochaperone mutation phenotypes. PMID:23349626

Pang, W Lee; Kaur, Amardeep; Ratushny, Alexander V; Cvetkovic, Aleksandar; Kumar, Sunil; Pan, Min; Arkin, Adam P; Aitchison, John D; Adams, Michael W W; Baliga, Nitin S

2013-01-01

339

Metallochaperones Regulate Intracellular Copper Levels  

PubMed Central

Copper (Cu) is an important enzyme co-factor that is also extremely toxic at high intracellular concentrations, making active efflux mechanisms essential for preventing Cu accumulation. Here, we have investigated the mechanistic role of metallochaperones in regulating Cu efflux. We have constructed a computational model of Cu trafficking and efflux based on systems analysis of the Cu stress response of Halobacterium salinarum. We have validated several model predictions via assays of transcriptional dynamics and intracellular Cu levels, discovering a completely novel function for metallochaperones. We demonstrate that in addition to trafficking Cu ions, metallochaperones also function as buffers to modulate the transcriptional responsiveness and efficacy of Cu efflux. This buffering function of metallochaperones ultimately sets the upper limit for intracellular Cu levels and provides a mechanistic explanation for previously observed Cu metallochaperone mutation phenotypes.

Pang, W. Lee; Kaur, Amardeep; Ratushny, Alexander V.; Cvetkovic, Aleksandar; Kumar, Sunil; Pan, Min; Arkin, Adam P.; Aitchison, John D.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Baliga, Nitin S.

2013-01-01

340

25 CFR 163.42 - Obligated service and breach of contract.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forestry Education, Education Assistance, Recruitment...Obligated service. (1) Individuals completing forestry education programs with an...

2011-04-01

341

Intracellular recording in behaving animals  

PubMed Central

Electrophysiological recordings from behaving animals provide an unparalleled view into the functional role of individual neurons. Intracellular approaches can be especially revealing as they provide information about a neuron’s inputs and intrinsic cellular properties, which together determine its spiking output. Recent technical developments have made intracellular recording possible during an ever-increasing range of behaviors in both head-fixed and freely moving animals. These recordings have yielded fundamental insights into the cellular and circuit mechanisms underlying neural activity during natural behaviors in such areas as sensory perception, motor sequence generation, and spatial navigation, forging a direct link between cellular and systems neuroscience.

Long, Michael A.; Lee, Albert K.

2011-01-01

342

Ultraviolet-irradiated monocytes efficiently inhibit the intracellular replication of Mycobacterium avium intracellulare.  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the antimicrobial activities of monocytes for the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium avium intracellulare (MAI). UV radiation augmented monocyte antimicrobial activity for MAI in a dose-dependent fashion. UVB doses of greater than or equal to 25 J/m2 resulted in a 50-100-fold reduction in MAI growth 7 d after initiation of culture. The increased monocyte antibacterial effect could be blocked by a plate glass filter, indicating that wavelengths within the UVB were responsible for the effect. UV radiation did not stimulate monocyte phagocytosis, and enhanced inhibition of MAI growth was observed in populations of adherent mononuclear cells that were devoid of T cells. This suggested that UV radiation acted directly to augment intrinsic monocyte antimicrobial activities. The administration of 8-methoxypsoralen plus UVA radiation to monocytes also augmented their antimicrobial activities against MAI. UV radiation thus may serve as a unique agent by which to evaluate the mechanisms by which mononuclear phagocytes control the growth of MAI. Images

Mirando, W S; Shiratsuchi, H; Tubesing, K; Toba, H; Ellner, J J; Elmets, C A

1992-01-01

343

Female-biased obligate strategies in a partially migratory population.  

PubMed

Partial migration occurs when a breeding population consists of seasonal migrants and year-round residents. Although it is common among birds, the basis of individual movement decisions within partially migratory populations is still unresolved. Over 4 years, we used state of the art tracking techniques, a combination of geolocators and radio transmitters, to follow individual European blackbirds Turdus merula year round from a partially migratory population to determine individual strategies and departure and arrival dates. The individual-based tracking combined with measures of energetic and hormonal (corticosterone) state enabled us to distinguish between obligate and facultative migration and to test several classical hypotheses of partial migration: the 'Arrival Time'-, 'Dominance'- and 'Thermal Tolerance'-hypotheses. Two distinct periods of departures from the breeding grounds were observed during the study; one in early autumn, and another during the midst of winter. Although blackbirds that migrated in autumn were never observed overwintering within 300 km of the study site, four individuals that departed in the winter were observed within 40 km. Females were significantly more likely to migrate in autumn than males but there was no difference in the age or body size of migrants and non migrants in autumn. Just prior to autumn migration, migrants had higher fat scores than non migrants and tended to have higher concentrations of baseline corticosterone, but similar concentrations of triglycerides. Unlike autumn migrants, we found no difference between the tendencies of males versus females to depart in winter, nor did we find any difference in body size or age of individuals that departed in the winter. Autumn migration was sex biased and resembled obligate migration. Our results provide strong support for the 'Arrival Time' hypothesis for partial migration in the autumn. We found no clear support for the 'Dominance' or 'Thermal Tolerance' hypotheses. By tracking individuals year round, we were able to identify a second period of departures. Overall, these results suggest the co-occurrence of obligate autumn migrants, winter movements and sedentary individuals within a single population. PMID:23363245

Fudickar, Adam M; Schmidt, Andreas; Hau, Michaela; Quetting, Michael; Partecke, Jesko

2013-07-01

344

Deciphering the Intracellular Fate of Propionibacterium acnes in Macrophages  

PubMed Central

Propionibacterium acnes is a Gram-positive bacterium that colonizes various niches of the human body, particularly the sebaceous follicles of the skin. Over the last years a role of this common skin bacterium as an opportunistic pathogen has been explored. Persistence of P. acnes in host tissue has been associated with chronic inflammation and disease development, for example, in prostate pathologies. This study investigated the intracellular fate of P. acnes in macrophages after phagocytosis. In a mouse model of P. acnes-induced chronic prostatic inflammation, the bacterium could be detected in prostate-infiltrating macrophages at 2 weeks postinfection. Further studies performed in the human macrophage cell line THP-1 revealed intracellular survival and persistence of P. acnes but no intracellular replication or escape from the host cell. Confocal analyses of phagosome acidification and maturation were performed. Acidification of P. acnes-containing phagosomes was observed at 6 h postinfection but then lost again, indicative of cytosolic escape of P. acnes or intraphagosomal pH neutralization. No colocalization with the lysosomal markers LAMP1 and cathepsin D was observed, implying that the P. acnes-containing phagosome does not fuse with lysosomes. Our findings give first insights into the intracellular fate of P. acnes; its persistency is likely to be important for the development of P. acnes-associated inflammatory diseases.

Fischer, Natalie; Mak, Tim N.; Shinohara, Debika Biswal; Sfanos, Karen S.; Meyer, Thomas F.

2013-01-01

345

Deciphering the intracellular fate of Propionibacterium acnes in macrophages.  

PubMed

Propionibacterium acnes is a Gram-positive bacterium that colonizes various niches of the human body, particularly the sebaceous follicles of the skin. Over the last years a role of this common skin bacterium as an opportunistic pathogen has been explored. Persistence of P. acnes in host tissue has been associated with chronic inflammation and disease development, for example, in prostate pathologies. This study investigated the intracellular fate of P. acnes in macrophages after phagocytosis. In a mouse model of P. acnes-induced chronic prostatic inflammation, the bacterium could be detected in prostate-infiltrating macrophages at 2 weeks postinfection. Further studies performed in the human macrophage cell line THP-1 revealed intracellular survival and persistence of P. acnes but no intracellular replication or escape from the host cell. Confocal analyses of phagosome acidification and maturation were performed. Acidification of P. acnes-containing phagosomes was observed at 6 h postinfection but then lost again, indicative of cytosolic escape of P. acnes or intraphagosomal pH neutralization. No colocalization with the lysosomal markers LAMP1 and cathepsin D was observed, implying that the P. acnes-containing phagosome does not fuse with lysosomes. Our findings give first insights into the intracellular fate of P. acnes; its persistency is likely to be important for the development of P. acnes-associated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23862148

Fischer, Natalie; Mak, Tim N; Shinohara, Debika Biswal; Sfanos, Karen S; Meyer, Thomas F; Brüggemann, Holger

2013-01-01

346

Draft Genome Sequence of the Fish Pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis.  

PubMed

Piscirickettsia salmonis is a Gram-negative intracellular fish pathogen that has a significant impact on the salmon industry. Here, we report the genome sequence of P. salmonis strain LF-89. This is the first draft genome sequence of P. salmonis, and it reveals interesting attributes, including flagellar genes, despite this bacterium being considered nonmotile. PMID:24201203

Eppinger, Mark; McNair, Katelyn; Zogaj, Xhavit; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Edwards, Robert A; Klose, Karl E

2013-01-01

347

Emerging Escherichia Pathogen  

PubMed Central

Escherichia hermannii was first identified as a new species in 1982. It has rarely been reported as a human pathogen. We report the first case of E. hermannii as the sole pathogen in a catheter-related bloodstream infection.

Permpalung, Nitipong; Sentochnik, Deborah E.

2013-01-01

348

Determinants of Microbial Pathogenicity.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The terms of pathogenicity and virulence are synonymous; they mean the capacity to produce disease. To be pathogenic a microorganism must be able to: (1) Infect the mucous surfaces of the respiratory, alimentary or urogenital tracts. Some microbes are int...

H. Smith

1984-01-01

349

The Role of the Cytoskeleton in the Life Cycle of Viruses and Intracellular Bacteria: Tracks, Motors, and Polymerization Machines  

PubMed Central

Recent advances in microbiology implicate the cytoskeleton in the life cycle of some pathogens, such as intracellular bacteria, Rickettsia and viruses. The cellular cytoskeleton provides the basis for intracellular movements such as those that transport the pathogen to and from the cell surface to the nuclear region, or those that produce cortical protrusions that project the pathogen outwards from the cell surface towards an adjacent cell. Transport in both directions within the neuron is required for pathogens such as the herpesviruses to travel to and from the nucleus and perinuclear region where replication takes place. This trafficking is likely to depend on cellular motors moving on a combination of microtubule and actin filament tracks. Recently, Bearer et al. reconstituted retrograde transport of herpes simplex virus (HSV) in the giant axon of the squid. These studies identified the tegument proteins as the viral proteins most likely to recruit retrograde motors for the transport of HSV to the neuronal nucleus. Similar microtubule-based intracellular movements are part of the biological behavior of vaccinia, a poxvirus, and of adenovirus. Pathogen-induced surface projections and motility within the cortical cytoplasm also play a role in the life cycle of intracellular pathogens. Such motility is driven by pathogen-mediated actin polymerization. Virulence depends on this actin-based motility, since virulence is reduced in Listeria ActA mutants that lack the ability to recruit Arp2/3 and polymerize actin and in vaccinia virus mutants that cannot stimulate actin polymerization. Inhibition of intracellular movements provides a potential strategy to limit pathogenicity. The host cell motors and tracks, as well as the pathogen factors that interact with them, are potential targets for novel antimicrobial therapy.

Bearer, E.L.; Satpute-Krishnan, P.

2013-01-01

350

Carbon Metabolism of Enterobacterial Human Pathogens Growing in Epithelial Colorectal Adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) Cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis of the genome sequences of the major human bacterial pathogens has provided a large amount of information concerning their metabolic potential. However, our knowledge of the actual metabolic pathways and metabolite fluxes occurring in these pathogens under infection conditions is still limited. In this study, we analysed the intracellular carbon metabolism of enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC HN280 and EIEC

Andreas Götz; Eva Eylert; Wolfgang Eisenreich; Werner Goebel; Holger Bruggemann

2010-01-01

351

Comparative Phylogeography in a Specific and Obligate Pollination Antagonism  

PubMed Central

In specific and obligate interactions the nature and abundance of a given species can have important effects on the survival and population dynamics of associated organisms. In a phylogeographic framework, we therefore expect that the fates of organisms interacting specifically are also tightly interrelated. Here we investigate such a scenario by analyzing the genetic structures of species interacting in an obligate plant-insect pollination lure-and-trap antagonism, involving Arum maculatum (Araceae) and its specific psychodid (Diptera) visitors Psychoda phalaenoides and Psycha grisescens. Because the interaction is asymmetric (i.e., only the plant depends on the insect), we expect the genetic structure of the plant to be related with the historical pollinator availability, yielding incongruent phylogeographic patterns between the interacting organisms. Using insect mtDNA sequences and plant AFLP genome fingerprinting, we inferred the large-scale phylogeographies of each species and the distribution of genetic diversities throughout the sampled range, and evaluated the congruence in their respective genetic structures using hierarchical analyses of molecular variances (AMOVA). Because the composition of pollinator species varies in Europe, we also examined its association with the spatial genetic structure of the plant. Our findings indicate that while the plant presents a spatially well-defined genetic structure, this is not the case in the insects. Patterns of genetic diversities also show dissimilar distributions among the three interacting species. Phylogeographic histories of the plant and its pollinating insects are thus not congruent, a result that would indicate that plant and insect lineages do not share the same glacial and postglacial histories. However, the genetic structure of the plant can, at least partially, be explained by the type of pollinators available at a regional scale. Differences in life-history traits of available pollinators might therefore have influenced the genetic structure of the plant, the dependent organism, in this antagonistic interaction.

Espindola, Anahi; Alvarez, Nadir

2011-01-01

352

Palladium-mediated intracellular chemistry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many important intracellular biochemical reactions are modulated by transition metals, typically in the form of metalloproteins. The ability to carry out selective transformations inside a cell would allow researchers to manipulate or interrogate innumerable biological processes. Here, we show that palladium nanoparticles trapped within polystyrene microspheres can enter cells and mediate a variety of Pd0-catalysed reactions, such as allylcarbamate cleavage

Rahimi M. Yusop; Asier Unciti-Broceta; Emma M. V. Johansson; Rosario M. Sánchez-Martín; Mark Bradley

2011-01-01

353

Intracellular survival of Vibrio anguillarum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The intracellular survival of a Vibrio anguillarum strain, ingested by head kidney phagocytes and peripheral leukocytes of grouper, Epinephelus awoara, was assessed in vitro by comparing with that of V. parahaemolyticus and Staphylococcus albus. There was an increase in numbers of V. alginolyticus in macrophages from head kidney and peripheral leukocytes during the first 30min after infection, followed by a

Wenbo Chen; Yingxue Qin; Qingpi Yan

2010-01-01

354

T-Cell-Independent Humoral Immunity Is Sufficient for Protection against Fatal Intracellular Ehrlichia Infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although humoral immunity has been shown to contribute to host defense during intracellular bacterial infections, its role has generally been ancillary. Instead, CD4 T cells are often considered to play the dominant role in protective immunity via their production of type I cytokines. Our studies of highly pathogenic Ehrlichia bacteria isolated from Ixodes ovatus (IOE) reveal, however, that this paradigm

Constantine Bitsaktsis; Bisweswar Nandi; Rachael Racine; Katherine C. MacNamara; Gary Winslow

2007-01-01

355

Analysis of Ten Brucella Genomes Reveals Evidence for Horizontal Gene Transfer Despite a Preferred Intracellular Lifestyle  

Microsoft Academic Search

The facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen Brucella infects a wide range of warm-blooded land and marine vertebrates and causes brucellosis. Currently, there are nine recognized Brucella species based on host preferences and phenotypic differences. The availability of 10 different genomes consisting of two chromosomes and representing six of the species allowed for a detailed comparison among themselves and relatives in the

Alice R. Wattam; Kelly P. Williams; Eric E. Snyder; Nalvo F. Almeida; Maulik Shukla; A. W. Dickerman; O. R. Crasta; R. Kenyon; J. Lu; J. M. Shallom; H. Yoo; T. A. Ficht; R. M. Tsolis; C. Munk; R. Tapia; C. S. Han; J. C. Detter; D. Bruce; T. S. Brettin; Bruno W. Sobral; Stephen M. Boyle; Joao C. Setubal

2009-01-01

356

Signaling to Life and Death: Influenza Viruses and Intracellular Signal Transduction Cascades  

Microsoft Academic Search

Influenza viruses successfully replicate in birds and mammals. To support their replication these pathogens extensively manipulate host-cell functions [reviewed in 1]. At the same time the infected cell activates defense mechanisms to fight the invader. These processes are mostly mediated by different intracellular signaling cascades that regulate a variety of events in the infected cell including expression of cellular antiviral

S. Ludwig; O. Planz; S. Pleschka; T. Wolff

2008-01-01

357

Multiple Genetic Elements Carry the Tetracycline Resistance Gene tet(W) in the Animal Pathogen Arcanobacterium pyogenes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tet(W) gene is associated with tetracycline resistance in a wide range of bacterial species, including obligately anaerobic rumen bacteria and isolates from the human gut and oral mucosa. However, little is known about how this gene is disseminated and the types of genetic elements it is carried on. We examined tetracycline-resistant isolates of the animal commensal and opportunistic pathogen

Stephen J. Billington; B. Helen Jost

2006-01-01

358

Quantitative Proteomics of Intracellular Campylobacter jejuni Reveals Metabolic Reprogramming.  

PubMed

Campylobacter jejuni is the major cause of bacterial food-borne illness in the USA and Europe. An important virulence attribute of this bacterial pathogen is its ability to enter and survive within host cells. Here we show through a quantitative proteomic analysis that upon entry into host cells, C. jejuni undergoes a significant metabolic downshift. Furthermore, our results indicate that intracellular C. jejuni reprograms its respiration, favoring the respiration of fumarate. These results explain the poor ability of C. jejuni obtained from infected cells to grow under standard laboratory conditions and provide the bases for the development of novel anti microbial strategies that would target relevant metabolic pathways. PMID:22412372

Liu, Xiaoyun; Gao, Beile; Novik, Veronica; Galán, Jorge E

2012-01-01

359

Fly immunity: recognition of pathogens and induction of immune responses.  

PubMed

Despite the lack of adaptive immunity based on gene rearrangement such as that in higher vertebrates, flies are able to defend themselves from a wide array of pathogens using multiple innate immune responses whose molecular mechanisms are strikingly similar to those of the innate immune responses of other multicellular organisms, including humans. Invading pathogens passing through the epithelial barriers, the first line of self-defense, are detected by pattern recognition receptors that identify pathogen-associated molecular patterns in the hemolymph or on the immune cell surface and are eliminated by humoral and cellular responses. Some pathogens escape recognition and elimination in the hemolymphby invading the host cell cytoplasm. Some of these intracellular pathogens, however, such as Listeria monocytogenes, are identified by pattern recognition receptors in the cytoplasm and are eliminated by intracellular responses, including autophagy, an intracellular degradation system. Although some of these pattern recognition receptors are encoded in the germ-line as protein families, another type of receptor in the immunoglobulin-superfamily is extensively diversified by alternative splicing in somatic immune cells in Drosophila. PMID:21528700

Kurata, Shoichiro

2010-01-01

360

Intracellularly Induced Cyclophilins Play an Important Role in Stress Adaptation and Virulence of Brucella abortus  

PubMed Central

Brucella is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes the worldwide zoonotic disease brucellosis. Brucella virulence relies on its ability to transition to an intracellular lifestyle within host cells. Thus, this pathogen must sense its intracellular localization and then reprogram gene expression for survival within the host cell. A comparative proteomic investigation was performed to identify differentially expressed proteins potentially relevant for Brucella intracellular adaptation. Two proteins identified as cyclophilins (CypA and CypB) were overexpressed in the intracellular environment of the host cell in comparison to laboratory-grown Brucella. To define the potential role of cyclophilins in Brucella virulence, a double-deletion mutant was constructed and its resulting phenotype was characterized. The Brucella abortus ?cypAB mutant displayed increased sensitivity to environmental stressors, such as oxidative stress, pH, and detergents. In addition, the B. abortus ?cypAB mutant strain had a reduced growth rate at lower temperature, a phenotype associated with defective expression of cyclophilins in other microorganisms. The B. abortus ?cypAB mutant also displays reduced virulence in BALB/c mice and defective intracellular survival in HeLa cells. These findings suggest that cyclophilins are important for Brucella virulence and survival in the host cells.

Garcia Fernandez, Lucia; DelVecchio, Vito G.; Briones, Gabriel

2013-01-01

361

Linking the Transcriptional Profiles and the Physiological States of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during an Extended Intracellular Infection  

PubMed Central

Intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis have evolved strategies for coping with the pressures encountered inside host cells. The ability to coordinate global gene expression in response to environmental and internal cues is one key to their success. Prolonged survival and replication within macrophages, a key virulence trait of M. tuberculosis, requires dynamic adaptation to diverse and changing conditions within its phagosomal niche. However, the physiological adaptations during the different phases of this infection process remain poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, we have developed a multi-tiered approach to define the temporal patterns of gene expression in M. tuberculosis in a macrophage infection model that extends from infection, through intracellular adaptation, to the establishment of a productive infection. Using a clock plasmid to measure intracellular replication and death rates over a 14-day infection and electron microscopy to define bacterial integrity, we observed an initial period of rapid replication coupled with a high death rate. This was followed by period of slowed growth and enhanced intracellular survival, leading finally to an extended period of net growth. The transcriptional profiles of M. tuberculosis reflect these physiological transitions as the bacterium adapts to conditions within its host cell. Finally, analysis with a Transcriptional Regulatory Network model revealed linked genetic networks whereby M. tuberculosis coordinates global gene expression during intracellular survival. The integration of molecular and cellular biology together with transcriptional profiling and systems analysis offers unique insights into the host-driven responses of intracellular pathogens such as M. tuberculosis.

Rohde, Kyle H.; Veiga, Diogo F. T.; Caldwell, Shannon; Balazsi, Gabor; Russell, David G.

2012-01-01

362

Contractual obligations and the sharing of confidential health information in sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

As an employee, a sports doctor has obligations to their employer, but also professional and widely accepted obligations of a doctor to the patient (in this case the individual team member). The conflict is evident when sports doctors are asked by an athlete to keep personal health information confidential from the coach and team management, and yet both doctor and

L Anderson

2008-01-01

363

Limiting the Scope of Moral Obligations to Help: A Cross-Cultural Investigation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Surveyed U.S. and Indian college students regarding the moral obligation to save someone's life by donating bone marrow. Indians were more likely to consider donation morally required. Both groups limited obligation to help out-group members. Indians regarded donating more highly when it arose from duty. Americans regarded donating more highly…

Baron, Jonathan; Miller, Joan G.

2000-01-01

364

Newcomer Psychological Contracts and Employee Socialization Activities: Does Perceived Balance in Obligations Matter?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We sought to determine the extent to which one's beliefs about the relationship between an employee and an organization at the start of employment influence subsequent socialization activities. The balance of employee exchange relationships, employee perceptions of both their own obligations and the employers' obligations, were collected from 120…

Payne, Stephanie C.; Culbertson, Satoris S.; Boswell, Wendy R.; Barger, Eric J.

2008-01-01

365

Extending XACML authorisation model to support policy obligations handling in distributed application  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper summarises the recent developments and discussions in the Grid and networking security community to build interoperable and scalable authorisation infrastructure for distributed applications. The paper provides a short overview of the XACML policy format and policy obligations definition in the XACML specification. The paper analyses the basic use cases for obligations in computer Grids and on-demand network resource

Yuri Demchenko; Oscar Koeroo; Cees De Laat; Hakon Sagehaug

2008-01-01

366

The Role of Family Obligations and School Adjustment in Explaining the Immigrant Paradox  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the role of family obligations and school adjustment in explaining immigrant adolescents' adaptation. Despite a relatively low socio-economic status, immigrant adolescents have been found to have a pattern of adaptation superior to that of national adolescents. Immigrant adolescents' strong sense of family obligations and…

van Geel, Mitch; Vedder, Paul

2011-01-01

367

Mass public health programmes and the obligations of sponsoring and participating organisations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The obligations of organisations associated with policy formation and implementation of international mass public health programmes are explored. Lines of responsibility are considered to become unclear because of the large number of agencies associated with such programmes. A separation of the relevant obligations among the bodies responsible for the formulation (usually an international non-governmental organisation) and those responsible for the

A Dawson; Y Paul

2006-01-01

368

26 CFR 1.103-16 - Obligations of certain volunteer fire departments.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...equipment not to be used in providing fire fighting services, interest on the obligation...obligation for funds to purchase a new fire truck, a new ambulance, and rescue equipment not to be used for fighting fires. Funds to be used for the...

2013-04-01

369

42 CFR 52b.7 - How is the grantee obligated to use the facility?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How is the grantee obligated to use the facility? 52b.7...CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.7 How is the grantee obligated to use the facility? (a) The grantee shall use the facility (or that...

2012-10-01

370

42 CFR 52b.7 - How is the grantee obligated to use the facility?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How is the grantee obligated to use the facility? 52b.7...CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.7 How is the grantee obligated to use the facility? (a) The grantee shall use the facility (or that...

2013-10-01

371

The Lived Experience of How Adult Nursing Students Blend Lifestyle Obligations with Nursing School Expectations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many adult nursing students have lifestyle obligations that require integration with nursing school programs in order to graduate and fulfill their dreams of becoming a nurse. Fourteen participants shared their stories of how they were able to blend their lifestyles commitments with nursing school. Student interaction between lifestyle obligations

Coutrier, Karen A.

2011-01-01

372

31 CFR 203.6 - Obligations of TT&L depositaries.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Obligations of TT&L depositaries. 203.6 Section 203.6 Money and...General Information § 203.6 Obligations of TT&L depositaries. A TT&L depositary must: (a) Administer a TIP main...

2013-07-01

373

14 CFR 240.2 - Obligation of air carriers, foreign air carriers, and ticket agents.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Obligation of air carriers, foreign air carriers, and ticket agents. 240.2 Section 240...OF ACCOUNTS AND PROPERTY § 240.2 Obligation of air carriers, foreign air carriers, and ticket...

2014-01-01

374

Health professionals' enactment of their accountability obligations: Doing the best they can  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the current context of health care, health professionals' accountability obligations may be more extensive than the degree of autonomy that they are permitted to exercise. To date, how professionals fulfil their obligations with regard to this potential for dissonance has not been investigated. The purpose of this Grounded Theory study was to examine how one professional group, occupational therapists,

Andrew R. Freeman; Carol L. McWilliam; Joyce R. MacKinnon; Sandra DeLuca; Susan G. Rappolt

2009-01-01

375

42 CFR 62.11 - When can a scholarship program payment obligation be discharged in bankruptcy?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

In accordance with section 754(d)(3) of the Act, any payment obligation incurred under § 62.10 may not be discharged in bankruptcy under title XI of the United States Code until 5 years after the date on which the payment obligation is...

2012-10-01

376

Conceptualising Hy-Bivalent Subjectivities to Facilitate an Examination of Australian Government Mutual Obligations Policies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper illustrates how the work of feminist theorists Valerie Walkerdine, Helen Lucey and June Melody, Beverly Skeggs, and Nancy Fraser were used together to examine the lived effects of Australian government Mutual Obligations policies. As "active" welfare policies, Mutual Obligations construct particular relations between themselves and…

Edwards, Jan

2006-01-01

377

Cognitive Representations of Obligation and Prohibition Signs when They Provide the Same Amount of Semantic Information  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this research was to test whether there is an inherent difficulty in understanding prohibition signs rather than obligation signs. In the experiment conducted, participants decided whether simple car movements presented on a computer screen were allowed or not according to either obligation or prohibition traffic signs. The information…

Castro, C.; Moreno-Rios, S.; Tornay, F. J.

2012-01-01

378

Pathogen Phytosensing: Plants to Report Plant Pathogens  

PubMed Central

Real-time systems that provide evidence of pathogen contamination in crops can be an important new line of early defense in agricultural centers. Plants possess defense mechanisms to protect against pathogen attack. Inducible plant defense is controlled by signal transduction pathways, inducible promoters and cis-regulatory elements corresponding to key genes involved in defense, and pathogen-specific responses. Identified inducible promoters and cis-acting elements could be utilized in plant sentinels, or ‘phytosensors’, by fusing these to reporter genes to produce plants with altered phenotypes in response to the presence of pathogens. Here, we have employed cis-acting elements from promoter regions of pathogen inducible genes as well as those responsive to the plant defense signal molecules salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and ethylene. Synthetic promoters were constructed by combining various regulatory elements supplemented with the enhancer elements from the Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter to increase basal level of the GUS expression. The inducibility of each synthetic promoter was first assessed in transient expression assays using Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts and then examined for efficacy in stably transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. Histochemical and fluorometric GUS expression analyses showed that both transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants responded to elicitor and phytohormone treatments with increased GUS expression when compared to untreated plants. Pathogen-inducible phytosensor studies were initiated by analyzing the sensitivity of the synthetic promoters against virus infection. Transgenic tobacco plants infected with Alfalfa mosaic virus showed an increase in GUS expression when compared to mock-inoculated control plants, whereas Tobacco mosaic virus infection caused no changes in GUS expression. Further research, using these transgenic plants against a range of different pathogens with the regulation of detectable reporter gene could provide biological evidence to define the functional differences between pathogens, and provide new technology and applications for transgenic plants as phytosensors.

Mazarei, Mitra; Teplova, Irina; Hajimorad, M. Reza; Stewart, C. Neal

2008-01-01

379

Murine Salmonellosis Studied by Confocal Microscopy: Salmonella typhimurium Resides Intracellularly Inside Macrophages and Exerts a Cytotoxic Effect on Phagocytes In Vivo  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Salmonella typhimurium is considered a facultative intracellular pathogen, but its intracellular lo- cation in vivo has not been demonstrated conclusively. Here we describe the development of a new method to study the course of the histopathological processes associated with murine sal- monellosis using confocal laser scanning microscopy of immunostained sections of mouse liver. Confocal microscopy of 30- m m-thick

Agneta Richter-Dahlfors; Alison M. J. Buchan; B. Brett Finlay

380

An Extended Role-Based Access Control Model for Delegating Obligations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main aim of access control models is to provide means to simplify the management of the security policy, which is a fastidious and error-prone task. Supporting delegation is considered as an important mean to decentralize the administration and therefore to allow security policy to be more flexible and easier to manipulate. Our main contribution is the proposition of a unified model to the administration and delegation of obligations. Managing such delegations implies more requirements than managing traditional privileges delegation. In fact, delegating obligations may include two interpretations: the delegation of the obligation and the delegation of the responsibility related to this obligation. Therefore, it is important to deal with these two notions separately. Moreover, since delegating an obligation involves the delegation of sanctions, then the consent of the user who receives this delegation may be required in some cases. We address in this paper these requirements and we propose a formalism to deal with them.

Ben-Ghorbel-Talbi, Meriam; Cuppens, Frédéric; Cuppens-Boulahia, Nora; Bouhoula, Adel

381

Observer perceptions of moral obligations in groups with a history of victimization.  

PubMed

The authors investigated when observers assign contemporary group members moral obligations based on their group's victimization history. In Experiment 1, Americans perceived Israelis as obligated to help Sudanese genocide victims and as guiltworthy for not helping if reminded of the Holocaust and its descendants were linked to this history. In Experiment 2, participants perceived Israelis as more obligated to help and guiltworthy for not helping when the Holocaust was presented as a unique victimization event compared with when genocide was presented as pervasive. Experiments 3 and 4 replicated the effects of Experiment 1 with Cambodians as the victimized group. Experiment 5 demonstrated that participants perceived Cambodians as having more obligations under high just world threat compared with low just world threat. Perceiving victimized groups as incurring obligations is one just world restoration method of providing meaning to collective injustice. PMID:22427385

Warner, Ruth H; Branscombe, Nyla R

2012-07-01

382

Stress adaptation in a pathogenic fungus  

PubMed Central

Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen of humans. This yeast is carried by many individuals as a harmless commensal, but when immune defences are perturbed it causes mucosal infections (thrush). Additionally, when the immune system becomes severely compromised, C. albicans often causes life-threatening systemic infections. A battery of virulence factors and fitness attributes promote the pathogenicity of C. albicans. Fitness attributes include robust responses to local environmental stresses, the inactivation of which attenuates virulence. Stress signalling pathways in C. albicans include evolutionarily conserved modules. However, there has been rewiring of some stress regulatory circuitry such that the roles of a number of regulators in C. albicans have diverged relative to the benign model yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This reflects the specific evolution of C. albicans as an opportunistic pathogen obligately associated with warm-blooded animals, compared with other yeasts that are found across diverse environmental niches. Our understanding of C. albicans stress signalling is based primarily on the in vitro responses of glucose-grown cells to individual stresses. However, in vivo this pathogen occupies complex and dynamic host niches characterised by alternative carbon sources and simultaneous exposure to combinations of stresses (rather than individual stresses). It has become apparent that changes in carbon source strongly influence stress resistance, and that some combinatorial stresses exert non-additive effects upon C. albicans. These effects, which are relevant to fungus–host interactions during disease progression, are mediated by multiple mechanisms that include signalling and chemical crosstalk, stress pathway interference and a biological transistor.

Brown, Alistair J. P.; Budge, Susan; Kaloriti, Despoina; Tillmann, Anna; Jacobsen, Mette D.; Yin, Zhikang; Ene, Iuliana V.; Bohovych, Iryna; Sandai, Doblin; Kastora, Stavroula; Potrykus, Joanna; Ballou, Elizabeth R.; Childers, Delma S.; Shahana, Shahida; Leach, Michelle D.

2014-01-01

383

Settling Down: The Genome of Serratia symbiotica from the Aphid Cinara tujafilina Zooms in on the Process of Accommodation to a Cooperative Intracellular Life.  

PubMed

Particularly interesting cases of mutualistic endosymbioses come from the establishment of co-obligate associations of more than one species of endosymbiotic bacteria. Throughout symbiotic accommodation from a free-living bacterium, passing through a facultative stage and ending as an obligate intracellular one, the symbiont experiences massive genomic losses and phenotypic adjustments. Here, we scrutinized the changes in the coevolution of Serratia symbiotica and Buchnera aphidicola endosymbionts in aphids, paying particular attention to the transformations undergone by S. symbiotica to become an obligate endosymbiont. Although it is already known that S. symbiotica is facultative in Acyrthosiphon pisum, in Cinara cedri it has established a co-obligate endosymbiotic consortium along with B. aphidicola to fulfill the aphid's nutritional requirements. The state of this association in C. tujafilina, an aphid belonging to the same subfamily (Lachninae) that C. cedri, remained unknown. Here, we report the genome of S. symbiotica strain SCt-VLC from the aphid C. tujafilina. While being phylogenetically and genomically very closely related to the facultative endosymbiont S. symbiotica from the aphid A. pisum, it shows a variety of metabolic, genetic, and architectural features, which point toward this endosymbiont being one step closer to an obligate intracellular one. We also describe in depth the process of genome rearrangements suffered by S. symbiotica and the role mobile elements play in gene inactivations. Finally, we postulate the supply to the host of the essential riboflavin (vitamin B2) as key to the establishment of S. symbiotica as a co-obligate endosymbiont in the aphids belonging to the subfamily Lachninane. PMID:24951564

Manzano-Marín, Alejandro; Latorre, Amparo

2014-01-01

384

Stochastic models of intracellular transport  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures.

Bressloff, Paul C.; Newby, Jay M.

2013-01-01

385

DNA topology and adaptation of Salmonella typhimurium to an intracellular environment.  

PubMed Central

The expression of genes coding for determinants of DNA topology in the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella typhimurium was studied during adaptation by the bacteria to the intracellular environment of J774A.1 macrophage-like cells. A reporter plasmid was used to monitor changes in DNA supercoiling during intracellular growth. Induction of the dps and spv genes, previously shown to be induced in the macrophage, was detected, as was expression of genes coding for DNA gyrase, integration host factor and the nucleoid-associated protein H-NS. The topA gene, coding for the DNA relaxing enzyme topoisomerase I, was not induced. Reporter plasmid data showed that bacterial DNA became relaxed following uptake of S. typhimurium cells by the macrophage. These data indicate that DNA topology in S. typhimurium undergoes significant changes during adaptation to the intracellular environment. A model describing how this process may operate is discussed.

Marshall, D G; Bowe, F; Hale, C; Dougan, G; Dorman, C J

2000-01-01

386

Nanocarriers for antibiotics: a promising solution to treat intracellular bacterial infections.  

PubMed

In the field of antibiotherapy, intracellular infections remain difficult to eradicate mainly due to the poor intracellular penetration of most of the commonly used antibiotics. Bacteria have quickly understood that their intracellular localisation allows them to be protected from the host immune system, but also from the action of antimicrobial agents. In addition, in most cases pathogens nestle in professional phagocytic cells, and can even use them as a 'Trojan horse' to induce a secondary site of infection thereby causing persistent or recurrent infections. Thus, new strategies had to be considered in order to counteract these problems. Amongst them, nanocarriers loaded with antibiotics represent a promising approach. Nowadays, it is possible to encapsulate, incorporate or even conjugate biologically active molecules into different families of nanocarriers such as liposomes or nanoparticles in order to deliver antibiotics intracellularly and hence to treat infections. This review gives an overview of the variety of nanocarriers developed to deliver antibiotics directly into infected cells. PMID:24721232

Abed, Nadia; Couvreur, Patrick

2014-06-01

387

29 CFR 37.16 - What is this part's effect on a recipient's obligations under other laws, and what limitations...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...effect on a recipient's obligations under other laws, and what limitations...effect on a recipient's obligations under other laws, and what limitations...or her race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, political...

2013-07-01

388

Obligation of Funds for Ship Maintenance and Repair at the U.S. Pacific Fleet Maintenance Activities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Our overall audit objective was to evaluate whether the Department of the Navy correctly obligated funds for ship maintenance and repair. Specifically, we determined whether the Department of the Navy obligated funds for ship maintenance and repair in acc...

2008-01-01

389

43 CFR 3137.74 - What must I do after BLM approves my continuing development obligations plan?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...after BLM approves my continuing development obligations plan? 3137.74...Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Development Requirements § 3137.74 ...after BLM approves my continuing development obligations plan? No...

2013-10-01

390

26 CFR 1.6049-6 - Statements to recipients of interest payments and holders of obligations for attributed original...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...obligations for attributed original issue discount. 1.6049-6 Section 1.6049-6...obligations for attributed original issue discount. (a) Requirement of furnishing statement...interest (other than original issue discount) to any person during a calendar...

2013-04-01

391

45 CFR 2553.83 - What financial obligation does the Corporation incur for non-Corporation funded projects?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Welfare 4 2009-10-01 2009-10-01 false What financial obligation does the Corporation incur for non-Corporation... Non-Corporation Funded Projects § 2553.83 What financial obligation does the Corporation incur for...

2009-10-01

392

45 CFR 2552.113 - What financial obligation does the Corporation incur for non-Corporation funded projects?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Welfare 4 2009-10-01 2009-10-01 false What financial obligation does the Corporation incur for non-Corporation...Foster Grandparent Program Projects § 2552.113 What financial obligation does the Corporation incur for...

2009-10-01

393

45 CFR 2553.83 - What financial obligation does the Corporation incur for non-Corporation funded projects?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What financial obligation does the Corporation incur for non-Corporation... Non-Corporation Funded Projects § 2553.83 What financial obligation does the Corporation incur for...

2010-10-01

394

45 CFR 2552.113 - What financial obligation does the Corporation incur for non-Corporation funded projects?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What financial obligation does the Corporation incur for non-Corporation...Foster Grandparent Program Projects § 2552.113 What financial obligation does the Corporation incur for...

2010-10-01

395

26 CFR 5f.103-1 - Obligations issued after December 31, 1982, required to be in registered form.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Obligations issued after December 31, 1982, required to be in registered form. ...TAX EQUITY AND FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY ACT OF 1982 § 5f.103-1 Obligations issued after December 31, 1982, required to be in registered form....

2009-04-01

396

26 CFR 5f.103-1 - Obligations issued after December 31, 1982, required to be in registered form.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Obligations issued after December 31, 1982, required to be in registered form. ...TAX EQUITY AND FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY ACT OF 1982 § 5f.103-1 Obligations issued after December 31, 1982, required to be in registered form....

2010-04-01

397

31 CFR 1060.300 - Reporting obligations on foreign bank relationships with Iranian-linked financial institutions...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Reporting obligations on foreign bank relationships with Iranian-linked financial...300 Reporting obligations on foreign bank relationships with Iranian-linked financial...receiving a written request from FinCEN, a bank (as defined in 31 CFR...

2013-07-01

398

31 CFR 354.2 - Law governing rights and obligations of Federal Reserve Banks, and Sallie Mae; rights of any...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...rights and obligations of Federal Reserve Banks, and Sallie Mae; rights of any Person against Federal Reserve Banks and Sallie Mae. 354.2 Section 354...rights and obligations of Federal Reserve Banks, and Sallie Mae; rights of any...

2013-07-01

399

24 CFR 81.92 - Law governing rights and obligations of United States, Federal Reserve Banks, and GSEs; rights of...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...obligations of United States, Federal Reserve Banks, and GSEs; rights of any Person against United States, Federal Reserve Banks, and GSEs; Law governing other interests...obligations of United States, Federal Reserve Banks, and GSEs; rights of any Person...

2013-04-01

400

Forest-obligate Sabethes mosquitoes suggest palaeoecological perturbations.  

PubMed

The origin of tropical forest diversity has been hotly debated for decades. Although specific mechanisms vary, many such explanations propose some vicariance in the distribution of species during glacial cycles and several have been supported by genetic evidence in Neotropical taxa. However, no consensus exists with regard to the extent or time frame of the vicariance events. Here, we analyse the cytochrome oxidase II mitochondrial gene of 250 Sabethes albiprivus B mosquitoes sampled from western Sao Paulo in Brazil. There was very low population structuring among collection sites (Phi(ST)=0.03, P=0.04). Historic demographic analyses and the contemporary geographic distribution of genetic diversity suggest that the populations sampled are not at demographic equilibrium. Three distinct mitochondrial clades were observed in the samples, one of which differed significantly in its geographic distribution relative to the other two within a small sampling area (approximately 70 x 35 km). This fact, supported by the inability of maximum likelihood analyses to achieve adequate fits to simple models for the population demography of the species, suggests a more complex history, possibly involving disjunct forest refugia. This hypothesis is supported by a genetic signal of recent population growth, which is expected if population sizes of this forest-obligate insect increased during the forest expansions that followed glacial periods. Although a time frame cannot be reliably inferred for the vicariance event leading to the three genetic clades, molecular clock estimates place this at approximately 1 Myr before present. PMID:18506202

Pedro, P M; Sallum, M A; Butlin, R K

2008-08-01

401

Health facilities' obligations when a patient refuses treatment.  

PubMed

Recent cases involving the decisions of Elizabeth Bouvia and G. Ross Henninger to starve themselves to death highlight the ethical obligations of patients, health care facilities, and the courts. When a patient seeks the hospital's cooperation in his or her attempt to commit suicide, society's responsibility is not merely to restrain the patient from suicide but to offer physical care, financial aid, and personal support. The hospital's duty is to intervene, and the court's responsibility is to allow such intervention. The most compassionate way in which the hospital can help is to force-feed the patient. If a patient is mentally competent, the refusal to eat is morally wrong. The patient is morally not permitted to commit suicide, though the avoidance of treatment may be justified in cases when force-feeding would be considered an extraordinary means, because of the patient's age or physical condition, for example. If a patient is incompetent, the refusal to eat is not a fully rational act; for the hospital to refrain from force-feeding would not be considered cooperation in suicide, since the incompetent patient cannot commit suicide. To avoid court rulings that order compliance with a patient's wishes, health care facilities in the future may have to require patients or their families to agree in writing to treatment by ordinary means. PMID:10268324

Gallagher, J

1984-09-01

402

Managing Incidental Genomic Findings: Legal Obligations of Clinicians  

PubMed Central

Purpose Clinical whole exome and whole genome sequencing will result in a broad range of incidental findings (IFs), but clinicians’ obligations to identify and disclose such findings are a matter of debate. We sought legal cases that could offer insights into clinicians’ legal liability. Methods We searched for cases in which IFs were related to the cause of action, using the search engines WestLaw, WestLaw Next, Lexis, and Lexis Advance. Results We found no case law related to IFs from genetic testing, but identified eight cases involving IFs in medical imaging. These cases suggest that clinicians may face liability for failing to disclose IFs that would have offered an opportunity for interventions to improve health outcome, if (1) under the applicable standard of care, they fail to identify or appreciate the significance of the IF; or 2) they negligently fail to notify other clinicians and/or the patient of the identified IF. Other cases support liability for failure to refer appropriately to a clinician with greater expertise. Conclusions Clinicians may face liability if they fail to disclose incidental information that could inform interventions to improve health outcome; information lacking clinical actionability is likely to have less import.

Clayton, Ellen Wright; Haga, Susanne; Kuszler, Patricia; Bane, Emily; Shutske, Krysta; Burke, Wylie

2013-01-01

403

The effects of macrophage source on the mechanism of phagocytosis and intracellular survival of Leishmania  

PubMed Central

Leishmania spp. protozoa are obligate intracellular parasites that replicate in macrophages during mammalian infection. Efficient phagocytosis and survival in macrophages are important determinants of parasite virulence. Macrophage lines differ dramatically in their ability to sustain intracellular Leishmania infantum chagasi (Lic). We report that the U937 monocytic cell line supported the intracellular replication and cell-to-cell spread of Lic during 72 hours after parasite addition, whereas primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) did not. Electron microscopy and live cell imaging illustrated that Lic promastigotes anchored to MDMs via their anterior ends and were engulfed through symmetrical pseudopods. In contrast, U937 cells bound Lic in diverse orientations, and extended membrane lamellae to reorient and internalize parasites through coiling phagocytosis. Lic associated tightly with the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) membrane in both cell types. PVs fused with LAMP-1-expressing compartments 24 hours after phagocytosis by MDMs, whereas U937 cell PVs remained LAMP-1 negative. The expression of one phagocytic receptor (CR3) was higher in MDMs than U937 cells, leading us to speculate that parasite uptake proceeds through dissimilar pathways between these cells. We hypothesize that the mechanism of phagocytosis differs between primary versus immortalized human macrophage cells, with corresponding differences in the subsequent intracellular fate of the parasite.

Hsiao, Chia-Hung Christine; Ueno, Norikiyo; Shao, Jian Q.; Schroeder, Kristin R.; Moore, Kenneth C.; Donelson, John E.; Wilson, Mary E.

2011-01-01

404

Cell-specific Activation of Nuclear Factor-k Bb y the Parasite Trypanosoma cruzi Promotes Resistance to Intracellular Infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The transcription factor nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) is central to the innate and acquired immune response to microbial pathogens, coordinating cellular responses to the presence of infection. Here we demonstrate a direct role for NF-kB activation in controlling intracellular infection in nonim- mune cells. Trypanosoma cruzi is an intracellular parasite of mammalian cells with a marked preference for infection of myocytes.

Belinda S. Hall; Winnie Tam; Ranjan Sen; Miercio E. A. Pereira

2000-01-01

405

Pathogenic Microorganisms in Water  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Pathogenic Microorganisms in Water: Traditionally, groundwater has been used without treatment because the soil acts as a filter, removing pathogenic microorganisms. Some potential sources of pathogens (or disease causing organisms) in groundwater include septic tanks, leaking sewer lines, sewage sludge, intentional groundwater recharge with sewage, irrigation with sewage, direct injection of sewage, domestic solid waste disposal (landfills) and sewage oxidation ponds. The objective of the session is to introduce hydrogeologist to the types of microorganisms, sources of pathogens, and a simple exercise that can be incorporated into a hydrogeology class.

Lenczewski, Melissa

406

INsPECT, an open-source and versatile software for automated quantification of (Leishmania) intracellular parasites.  

PubMed

Intracellular protozoan parasites are causative agents of infectious diseases that constitute major health problems for developing countries. Leishmania sp., Trypanosoma cruzi or Toxoplasma gondii are all obligate intracellular protozoan parasites that reside and multiply within the host cells of mammals, including humans. Following up intracellular parasite proliferation is therefore an essential and a quotidian task for many laboratories working on primary screening of new natural and synthetic drugs, analyzing drug susceptibility or comparing virulence properties of natural and genetically modified strains. Nevertheless, laborious manual microscopic counting of intracellular parasites is still the most commonly used approach. Here, we present INsPECT (Intracellular ParasitE CounTer), an open-source and platform independent software dedicated to automate infection level measurement based on fluorescent DNA staining. It offers the possibility to choose between different types of analyses (fluorescent DNA acquisitions only or in combination with phase contrast image set to further separate intra- from extracellular parasites), and software running modes (automatic or custom). A proof-of-concept study with intracellular Leishmania infantum parasites stained with DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) confirms a good correspondence between digital results and the "gold standard" microscopic counting method with Giemsa. Interestingly, this software is versatile enough to accurately detect intracellular T. gondii parasites on images acquired with High Content Screening (HCS) systems. In conclusion, INsPECT software is proposed as a new fast and simple alternative to the classical intracellular Leishmania quantification methods and can be adapted for mid to large-scale drug screening against different intracellular parasites. PMID:24831235

Yazdanparast, Ehsan; Dos Anjos, Antonio; Garcia, Deborah; Loeuillet, Corinne; Shahbazkia, Hamid Reza; Vergnes, Baptiste

2014-05-01

407

INsPECT, an Open-Source and Versatile Software for Automated Quantification of (Leishmania) Intracellular Parasites  

PubMed Central

Intracellular protozoan parasites are causative agents of infectious diseases that constitute major health problems for developing countries. Leishmania sp., Trypanosoma cruzi or Toxoplasma gondii are all obligate intracellular protozoan parasites that reside and multiply within the host cells of mammals, including humans. Following up intracellular parasite proliferation is therefore an essential and a quotidian task for many laboratories working on primary screening of new natural and synthetic drugs, analyzing drug susceptibility or comparing virulence properties of natural and genetically modified strains. Nevertheless, laborious manual microscopic counting of intracellular parasites is still the most commonly used approach. Here, we present INsPECT (Intracellular ParasitE CounTer), an open-source and platform independent software dedicated to automate infection level measurement based on fluorescent DNA staining. It offers the possibility to choose between different types of analyses (fluorescent DNA acquisitions only or in combination with phase contrast image set to further separate intra- from extracellular parasites), and software running modes (automatic or custom). A proof-of-concept study with intracellular Leishmania infantum parasites stained with DAPI (4?,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) confirms a good correspondence between digital results and the “gold standard” microscopic counting method with Giemsa. Interestingly, this software is versatile enough to accurately detect intracellular T. gondii parasites on images acquired with High Content Screening (HCS) systems. In conclusion, INsPECT software is proposed as a new fast and simple alternative to the classical intracellular Leishmania quantification methods and can be adapted for mid to large-scale drug screening against different intracellular parasites.

Yazdanparast, Ehsan; Dos Anjos, Antonio; Garcia, Deborah; Loeuillet, Corinne; Shahbazkia, Hamid Reza; Vergnes, Baptiste

2014-01-01

408

Quantitative proteomics reveals metabolic and pathogenic properties of Chlamydia trachomatis developmental forms.  

PubMed

Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular pathogen responsible for ocular and genital infections of significant public health importance. C. trachomatis undergoes a biphasic developmental cycle alternating between two distinct forms: the infectious elementary body (EB), and the replicative but non-infectious reticulate body (RB). The molecular basis for these developmental transitions and the metabolic properties of the EB and RB forms are poorly understood as these bacteria have traditionally been difficult to manipulate through classical genetic approaches. Using two-dimensional liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC/LC-MS/MS) we performed a large-scale, label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of C. trachomatis LGV-L2 EB and RB forms. Additionally, we carried out LC-MS/MS to analyse the membranes of the pathogen-containing vacuole ('inclusion'). We developed a label-free quantification approaches to measure protein abundance in a mixed-proteome background which we applied for EB and RB quantitative analysis. In this manner, we catalogued the relative distribution of > 54% of the predicted proteins in the C. trachomatis LGV-L2 proteome. Proteins required for central metabolism and glucose catabolism were predominant in the EB, whereas proteins associated with protein synthesis, ATP generation and nutrient transport were more abundant in the RB. These findings suggest that the EB is primed for a burst in metabolic activity upon entry, whereas the RB form is geared towards nutrient utilization, a rapid increase in cellular mass, and securing the resources for an impending transition back to the EB form. The most revealing difference between the two forms was the relative deficiency of cytoplasmic factors required for efficient type III secretion (T3S) in the RB stage at 18 h post infection, suggesting a reduced T3S capacity or a low frequency of active T3S apparatus assembled on a 'per organism' basis. Our results show that EB and RB proteomes are streamlined to fulfil their predicted biological functions: maximum infectivity for EBs and replicative capacity for RBs. PMID:22014092

Saka, Hector A; Thompson, J Will; Chen, Yi-Shan; Kumar, Yadunanda; Dubois, Laura G; Moseley, M Arthur; Valdivia, Raphael H

2011-12-01

409

31 CFR 225.3 - Pledge of Government obligations in lieu of a bond with surety or sureties.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Pledge of Government obligations in lieu of a bond with surety or...ACCEPTANCE OF BONDS SECURED BY GOVERNMENT OBLIGATIONS IN LIEU OF BONDS WITH SURETIES § 225.3 Pledge of Government obligations in lieu of a bond with surety...

2010-07-01

410

31 CFR 225.3 - Pledge of Government obligations in lieu of a bond with surety or sureties.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 false Pledge of Government obligations in lieu of a bond with surety or...ACCEPTANCE OF BONDS SECURED BY GOVERNMENT OBLIGATIONS IN LIEU OF BONDS WITH SURETIES § 225.3 Pledge of Government obligations in lieu of a bond with surety...

2009-07-01

411

Detection of Intracellular Bacterial Communities in Human Urinary Tract Infection  

PubMed Central

Background Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections and are predominantly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). While UTIs are typically considered extracellular infections, it has been recently demonstrated that UPEC bind to, invade, and replicate within the murine bladder urothelium to form intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs). These IBCs dissociate and bacteria flux out of bladder facet cells, some with filamentous morphology, and ultimately establish quiescent intracellular reservoirs that can seed recurrent infection. This IBC pathogenic cycle has not yet been investigated in humans. In this study we sought to determine whether evidence of an IBC pathway could be found in urine specimens from women with acute UTI. Methods and Findings We collected midstream, clean-catch urine specimens from 80 young healthy women with acute uncomplicated cystitis and 20 asymptomatic women with a history of UTI. Investigators were blinded to culture results and clinical history. Samples were analyzed by light microscopy, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy for evidence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria. Evidence of IBCs was found in 14 of 80 (18%) urines from women with UTI. Filamentous bacteria were found in 33 of 80 (41%) urines from women with UTI. None of the 20 urines from the asymptomatic comparative group showed evidence of IBCs or filaments. Filamentous bacteria were present in all 14 of the urines with IBCs compared to 19 (29%) of 66 samples with no evidence of IBCs (p < 0.001). Of 65 urines from patients with E. coli infections, 14 (22%) had evidence of IBCs and 29 (45%) had filamentous bacteria, while none of the gram-positive infections had IBCs or filamentous bacteria. Conclusions The presence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria in the urines of women with acute cystitis suggests that the IBC pathogenic pathway characterized in the murine model may occur in humans. The findings support the occurrence of an intracellular bacterial niche in some women with cystitis that may have important implications for UTI recurrence and treatment.

Rosen, David A; Hooton, Thomas M; Stamm, Walter E; Humphrey, Peter A; Hultgren, Scott J

2007-01-01

412

Protein intrinsic disorder in the acetylome of intracellular and extracellular Toxoplasma gondii.  

PubMed

Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa, which includes a number of species of medical and veterinary importance. Inhibitors of lysine deacetylases (KDACs) exhibit potent antiparasitic activity, suggesting that interference with lysine acetylation pathways holds promise for future drug targeting. Using high resolution LC-MS/MS to identify parasite peptides enriched by immunopurification with acetyl-lysine antibody, we recently produced an acetylome of the proliferative intracellular stage of Toxoplasma. In this study, we used similar approaches to greatly expand the Toxoplasma acetylome by identifying acetylated proteins in non-replicating extracellular tachyzoites. The functional breakdown of acetylated proteins in extracellular parasites is similar to intracellular parasites, with an enrichment of proteins involved in metabolism, translation, and chromatin biology. Altogether, we have now detected over 700 acetylation sites on a wide variety of parasite proteins of diverse function in multiple subcellular compartments. We found 96 proteins uniquely acetylated in intracellular parasites, 216 uniquely acetylated in extracellular parasites, and 177 proteins acetylated in both states. Our findings suggest that dramatic changes occur at the proteomic level as tachyzoites transition from the intracellular to the extracellular environment, similar to reports documenting significant changes in gene expression during this transition. The expanded dataset also allowed a thorough analysis of the degree of protein intrinsic disorder surrounding lysine residues targeted for this post-translational modification. These analyses indicate that acetylated lysines in proteins from extracellular and intracellular tachyzoites are largely located within similar local environments, and that lysine acetylation preferentially occurs in intrinsically disordered or flexible regions. PMID:23403842

Xue, Bin; Jeffers, Victoria; Sullivan, William J; Uversky, Vladimir N

2013-04-01

413

Protein intrinsic disorder in the acetylome of intracellular and extracellular Toxoplasma gondii  

PubMed Central

Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa, which includes a number of species of medical and veterinary importance. Inhibitors of lysine deacetylases (KDACs) exhibit potent antiparasitic activity, suggesting that interference with lysine acetylation pathways hold promise for future drug targeting. Using high resolution LC-MS/MS to identify parasite peptides enriched by immunopurification with acetyl-lysine antibody, we recently produced an acetylome of the proliferative intracellular stage of Toxoplasma. In this study, we used similar approaches to greatly expand the Toxoplasma acetylome by identifying acetylated proteins in non-replicating extracellular tachyzoites. The functional breakdown of acetylated proteins in extracellular parasites is similar to intracellular parasites, with an enrichment of proteins involved in metabolism, translation, and chromatin biology. Altogether, we have now detected over 700 acetylation sites on a wide variety of parasite proteins of diverse function in multiple subcellular compartments. We found 96 proteins uniquely acetylated in intracellular parasites, 216 uniquely acetylated in extracellular parasites, and 177 proteins acetylated in both states. Our findings suggest that dramatic changes occur at the proteomic level as tachyzoites transition from the intracellular to extracellular environment, similar to reports documenting significant changes in gene expression during this transition. The expanded dataset also allowed a thorough analysis of the degree of protein intrinsic disorder surrounding lysine residues targeted for this post-translational modification. These analyses indicate that acetylated lysines in proteins from extracellular and intracellular tachyzoites are largely located within similar local environments, and that lysine acetylation preferentially occurs in intrinsically disordered or flexible regions.

Xue, Bin; Jeffers, Victoria; Sullivan, William J.; Uversky, Vladimir N.

2013-01-01

414

Intracellular ion channels and cancer  

PubMed Central

Several types of channels play a role in the maintenance of ion homeostasis in subcellular organelles including endoplasmatic reticulum, nucleus, lysosome, endosome, and mitochondria. Here we give a brief overview of the contribution of various mitochondrial and other organellar channels to cancer cell proliferation or death. Much attention is focused on channels involved in intracellular calcium signaling and on ion fluxes in the ATP-producing organelle mitochondria. Mitochondrial K+ channels (Ca2+-dependent BKCa and IKCa, ATP-dependent KATP, Kv1.3, two-pore TWIK-related Acid-Sensitive K+ channel-3 (TASK-3)), Ca2+ uniporter MCU, Mg2+-permeable Mrs2, anion channels (voltage-dependent chloride channel VDAC, intracellular chloride channel CLIC) and the Permeability Transition Pore (MPTP) contribute importantly to the regulation of function in this organelle. Since mitochondria play a central role in apoptosis, modulation of their ion channels by pharmacological means may lead to death of cancer cells. The nuclear potassium channel Kv10.1 and the nuclear chloride channel CLIC4 as well as the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER)-located inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor, the ER-located Ca2+ depletion sensor STIM1 (stromal interaction molecule 1), a component of the store-operated Ca2+ channel and the ER-resident TRPM8 are also mentioned. Furthermore, pharmacological tools affecting organellar channels and modulating cancer cell survival are discussed. The channels described in this review are summarized on Figure 1. Overall, the view is emerging that intracellular ion channels may represent a promising target for cancer treatment.

Leanza, Luigi; Biasutto, Lucia; Manago, Antonella; Gulbins, Erich; Zoratti, Mario; Szabo, Ildiko

2013-01-01

415

Modelling intracellular H(+) ion diffusion.  

PubMed

Intracellular pH, an important modulator of cell function, is regulated by plasmalemmal proteins that transport H(+), or its equivalent, into or out of the cell. The pH(i) is also stabilised by high-capacity, intrinsic buffering on cytoplasmic proteins, oligopeptides and other solutes, and by the extrinsic CO(2)/HCO(3)(-) (carbonic) buffer. As mobility of these buffers is lower than for the H(+) ion, they restrict proton diffusion. In this paper we use computational approaches, based on the finite difference and finite element methods (FDM and FEM, respectively), for analysing the spatio-temporal behaviour of [H(+)] when it is locally perturbed. We analyse experimental data obtained for various cell-types (cardiac myocytes, duodenal enterocytes, molluscan neurons) where pH(i) has been imaged confocally using intracellular pH-sensitive dyes. We design mathematical algorithms to generate solutions for two-dimensional diffusion that fit data in terms of an apparent intracellular H(+) diffusion coefficient, D(H)(app). The models are used to explore how the spatial distribution of [H(+)](i) is affected by membrane H(+)-equivalent transport and by cell geometry. We then develop a mechanistic model, describing spatio-temporal changes of [H(+)](i) in a cardiac ventricular myocyte in terms of H(+)-shuttling on mobile buffers and H(+)-anchoring on fixed buffers. We also discuss how modelling may include the effects of extrinsic carbonic-buffering. Overall, our computational approach provides a framework for future analyses of the physiological consequences of pH(i) non-uniformity. PMID:12865074

Swietach, Pawel; Zaniboni, Massimiliano; Stewart, Andrew K; Rossini, Alessandra; Spitzer, Kenneth W; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D

2003-10-01

416

Pharmacology of intracellular signalling pathways  

PubMed Central

This article provides a brief and somewhat personalized review of the dramatic developments that have occurred over the last 45 years in our understanding of intracellular signalling pathways associated with G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Signalling via cyclic AMP, the phosphoinositides and Ca2+ is emphasized and these systems have already been revealed as new pharmacological targets. The therapeutic benefits of most of such targets are, however, yet to be realized, but it is certain that the discipline of pharmacology needs to widen its boundaries to meet these challenges in the future.

Nahorski, Stefan R

2006-01-01

417

Barcoding Hedgehog for Intracellular Transport  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Hedgehog, an essential protein for the development of many vertebrate and invertebrate organs, signals at both short and long distances to control growth and patterning. The mechanism by which it moves between source and target cells is not known, but characterization of the covalent modification of its N terminus with palmitate and of its C terminus with cholesterol has led to the suggestion that the lipophilic properties of the modified protein serve to regulate movement after its secretion into the extracellular space. Another interpretation and model is that the C-terminal cholesterol acts to target Hedgehog to an intracellular trafficking pathway that prepares Hedgehog for release in an encapsulated form.

Thomas B. Kornberg (San Francisco;University of California REV)

2011-11-22

418

Direct measurement of intracellular pressure.  

PubMed

A method to directly measure the intracellular pressure of adherent, migrating cells is described in this unit. This approach is based on the servo-null method where a microelectrode is introduced into the cell to directly measure the physical pressure of the cytoplasm. We also describe the initial calibration of the microelectrode, as well as the application of the method to cells migrating inside three-dimensional (3-D) extracellular matrix (ECM). Curr. Protoc. Cell Biol. 63:12.9.1-12.9.9. © 2014 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:24894836

Petrie, Ryan J; Koo, Hyun

2014-01-01

419

Regulation of toxin production in the pathogenic clostridia.  

PubMed

The genus Clostridium comprises a large, heterogeneous group of obligate anaerobic, Gram-positive spore forming bacilli. Members of this genus are ubiquitous in the environment and although most species are considered saprophytic, several are pathogenic to both humans and animals. These bacteria cause a variety of diseases including neuroparalysis, gas gangrene, necrotic enteritis, food poisoning, toxic shock syndrome and pseudomembraneous colitis, which in most cases arise as a consequence of the production of potent exotoxins. Treatment options are often limited, underscoring the need for new treatment strategies and novel therapeutics. Understanding the fundamental mechanisms and signals that control toxin production in the pathogenic clostridia may lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets that can be exploited in the development of new antimicrobial agents. PMID:24563915

Carter, Glen P; Cheung, Jackie K; Larcombe, Sarah; Lyras, Dena

2014-01-01

420

Federal Funds for Research and Development: Federal Obligations for Research by Agency and Detailed Field of S&E: Fiscal Years 1970-2000  

NSF Publications Database

... Format Federal Funds for Research and Development: Federal Obligations for Research by Agency and ... pdf) Federal Funds for Research and Development: Federal Obligations for Research by Agency and ...

421

Federal Funds for Research and Development: Federal Obligations for Research to Universities and Colleges by Agency and Detailed Field of S&E: Fiscal Years 1973-2000  

NSF Publications Database

... Format Federal Funds for Research and Development: Federal Obligations for Research to Universities ... pdf) Federal Funds for Research and Development: Federal Obligations for Research to Universities ...

422

Federal Funds for Research and Development: Federal Obligations for Research to Universities and Colleges by Agency and Detailed Field of Science and Engineering: Fiscal Years 1973-2001  

NSF Publications Database

... Format Federal Funds for Research and Development: Federal Obligations for Research to Universities ... pdf) Federal Funds for Research and Development: Federal Obligations for Research to Universities ...

423

Francisella tularensis Harvests Nutrients Derived via ATG5-Independent Autophagy to Support Intracellular Growth  

PubMed Central

Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent intracellular pathogen that invades and replicates within numerous host cell types including macrophages, hepatocytes and pneumocytes. By 24 hours post invasion, F. tularensis replicates up to 1000-fold in the cytoplasm of infected cells. To achieve such rapid intracellular proliferation, F. tularensis must scavenge large quantities of essential carbon and energy sources from the host cell while evading anti-microbial immune responses. We found that macroautophagy, a eukaryotic cell process that primarily degrades host cell proteins and organelles as well as intracellular pathogens, was induced in F. tularensis infected cells. F. tularensis not only survived macroautophagy, but optimal intracellular bacterial growth was found to require macroautophagy. Intracellular growth upon macroautophagy inhibition was rescued by supplying excess nonessential amino acids or pyruvate, demonstrating that autophagy derived nutrients provide carbon and energy sources that support F. tularensis proliferation. Furthermore, F. tularensis did not require canonical, ATG5-dependent autophagy pathway induction but instead induced an ATG5-independent autophagy pathway. ATG5-independent autophagy induction caused the degradation of cellular constituents resulting in the release of nutrients that the bacteria harvested to support bacterial replication. Canonical macroautophagy limits the growth of several different bacterial species. However, our data demonstrate that ATG5-independent macroautophagy may be beneficial to some cytoplasmic bacteria by supplying nutrients to support bacterial growth.

Ziehr, Benjamin; Taft-Benz, Sharon; Moorman, Nathaniel; Kawula, Thomas

2013-01-01

424

Emerging foodborne pathogens  

Microsoft Academic Search

The broad spectrum of foodborne infections has changed dramatically over time, as well-established pathogens have been controlled or eliminated, and new ones have emerged. The burden of foodborne disease remains substantial: one in four Americans is estimated to have a significant foodborne illness each year. The majority of these illnesses are not accounted for by known pathogens, so more must

Robert V. Tauxe

2002-01-01

425

BACTERIAL WATERBORNE PATHOGENS  

EPA Science Inventory

Bacterial pathogens are examples of classical etiological agents of waterborne disease. While these agents no longer serve as major threats to U.S. water supplies, they are still important pathogens in areas with substandard sanitation and poor water treatment facilities. In th...

426

Plant pathogen resistance  

DOEpatents

Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

Greenberg, Jean T; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

2012-11-27

427

Plant pathogenic Pseudomonas species  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the current taxonomy, plant pathogenic Pseudomonas species are restricted to rRNA group I organisms belonging to the Gamma subclass of Proteobacteria. Currently, about 21 validly described plant pathogenic Pseudomonas species are known. The most important species is P. syringae with more than 50 described pathovars. The pathovar concept is confusing and the taxonomy of P. syringae needs revision. P.

Monica Höfte; PAUL DE VOS

428

Pulmonary abnormalities in obligate heterozygotes for cystic fibrosis.  

PubMed Central

Parents of children with cystic fibrosis have been reported to have a high prevalence of increased airway reactivity, but these studies were done in a select young, healthy, symptomless population. In the present study respiratory symptoms were examined in 315 unselected parents of children with cystic fibrosis and 162 parents of children with congenital heart disease (controls). The cardinal symptom of airway reactivity, wheezing, was somewhat more prevalent in cystic fibrosis parents than in controls, but for most subgroups this increased prevalence did not reach statistical significance. Among those who had never smoked, 38% of obligate heterozygotes for cystic fibrosis but only 25% of the controls reported wheezing (p less than 0.05). The cystic fibrosis parents who had never smoked but reported wheezing had lower FEV1 and FEF25-75, expressed as a percentage of the predicted value, than control parents; and an appreciable portion of the variance in pulmonary function was contributed by the interaction of heterozygosity for cystic fibrosis with wheezing. For cystic fibrosis parents, but not controls, the complaint of wheezing significantly contributed to the prediction of pulmonary function (FEV1 and FEF25-75). In addition, parents of children with cystic fibrosis reported having lung disease before the age of 16 more than twice as frequently as control parents. Other respiratory complaints, including dyspnoea, cough, bronchitis, and hay fever, were as common in controls as in cystic fibrosis heterozygotes. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that heterozygosity for cystic fibrosis is associated with increased airway reactivity and its symptoms, and that the cystic fibrosis heterozygotes who manifest airway reactivity and its symptoms may be at risk for poor pulmonary function.

Davis, P B; Vargo, K

1987-01-01

429

Pathogen inactivation techniques.  

PubMed

The desire to rid the blood supply of pathogens of all types has led to the development of many technologies aimed at the same goal--eradication of the pathogen(s) without harming the blood cells or generating toxic chemical agents. This is a very ambitious goal, and one that has yet to be achieved. One approach is to shun the 'one size fits all' concept and to target pathogen-reduction agents at the Individual component types. This permits the development of technologies that might be compatible with, for example, plasma products but that would be cytocidal and thus incompatible with platelet concentrates or red blood cell units. The technologies to be discussed include solvent detergent and methylene blue treatments--designed to inactivate plasma components and derivatives; psoralens (S-59--amotosalen) designed to pathogen-reduce units of platelets; and two products aimed at red blood cells, S-303 (a Frale--frangible anchor-linker effector compound) and Inactine (a binary ethyleneimine). A final pathogen-reduction material that might actually allow one material to inactivate all three blood components--riboflavin (vitamin B2)--is also under development. The sites of action of the amotosalen (S-59), the S-303 Frale, Inactine, and riboflavin are all localized in the nucleic acid part of the pathogen. Solvent detergent materials act by dissolving the plasma envelope, thus compromising the integrity of the pathogen membrane and rendering it non-infectious. By disrupting the pathogen's ability to replicate or survive, its infectivity is removed. The degree to which bacteria and viruses are affected by a particular pathogen-reducing technology relates to its Gram-positive or Gram-negative status, to the sporulation characteristics for bacteria, and the presence of lipid or protein envelopes for viruses. Concerns related to photoproducts and other breakdown products of these technologies remain, and the toxicology of pathogen-reduction treatments is a major ongoing area of investigation. Clearly, regulatory agencies have a major role to play in the evaluation of these new technologies. This chapter will cover the several types of pathogen-reduction systems, mechanisms of action, the inactivation efficacy for specific types of pathogens, toxicology of the various systems and the published research and clinical trial data supporting their potential usefulness. Due to the nature of the field, pathogen reduction is a work in progress and this review should be considered as a snapshot in time rather than a clear picture of what the future will bring. PMID:16377551

Pelletier, J P R; Transue, S; Snyder, E L

2006-01-01

430

Pathogenic adaptations to host-derived antibacterial copper  

PubMed Central

Recent findings suggest that both host and pathogen manipulate copper content in infected host niches during infections. In this review, we summarize recent developments that implicate copper resistance as an important determinant of bacterial fitness at the host-pathogen interface. An essential mammalian nutrient, copper cycles between copper (I) (Cu+) in its reduced form and copper (II) (Cu2+) in its oxidized form under physiologic conditions. Cu+ is significantly more bactericidal than Cu2+ due to its ability to freely penetrate bacterial membranes and inactivate intracellular iron-sulfur clusters. Copper ions can also catalyze reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which may further contribute to their toxicity. Transporters, chaperones, redox proteins, receptors and transcription factors and even siderophores affect copper accumulation and distribution in both pathogenic microbes and their human hosts. This review will briefly cover evidence for copper as a mammalian antibacterial effector, the possible reasons for this toxicity, and pathogenic resistance mechanisms directed against it.

Chaturvedi, Kaveri S.; Henderson, Jeffrey P.

2014-01-01

431

Processes for managing pathogens.  

PubMed

Wastewater contains human, animal, and plant pathogens capable of causing viral, bacterial, or parasitic infections. There are several routes whereby sewage pathogens may affect human health, including direct contact, contamination of food crops, zoonoses, and vectors. The range and numbers of pathogens in municipal wastewater vary with the level of endemic disease in the community, discharges from commercial activities, and seasonal factors. Regulations to control pathogen risk in the United States and Europe arising from land application of biosolids are based on the concept of multiple barriers to the prevention of transmission. The barriers are (i) treatment to reduce pathogen content and vector attraction, (ii) restrictions on crops grown on land to which biosolids have been applied, and (iii) minimum intervals following application and grazing or harvesting. Wastewater treatment reduces number of pathogens in the wastewater by concentrating them with the solids in the sludge. Although some treatment processes are designed specifically to inactivate pathogens, many are not, and the actual mechanisms of microbial inactivation are not fully understood for all processes. Vector attraction is reduced by stabilization (reduction of readily biodegradable material) and/or incorporation immediately following application. Concerns about health risks have renewed interest in the effects of treatment (on pathogens) and advanced treatment methods, and work performed in the United States suggests that Class A pathogen reduction can be achieved less expensively than previously thought. Effective pathogen risk management requires control to the complete chain of sludge treatment, biosolids handling and application, and post-application activities. This may be achieved by adherence to quality management systems based on hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) principles. PMID:15647539

Godfree, Alan; Farrell, Joseph

2005-01-01

432

16 CFR 240.11 - Wholesaler or third party performance of seller's obligations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR ADVERTISING ALLOWANCES AND OTHER MERCHANDISING PAYMENTS AND SERVICES § 240.11 Wholesaler or third party performance of seller's obligations. A seller may...

2010-01-01

433

31 CFR 547.407 - Payments from blocked accounts to satisfy obligations prohibited.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO SANCTIONS REGULATIONS Interpretations § 547.407 Payments from blocked accounts to satisfy obligations...

2010-07-01

434

Federal Academic Science and Engineering Obligations Up More Than 6 Percent in FY 1998  

NSF Publications Database

... This Data Brief presents Federal academic science and engineering obligations data from 19 agencies ... Nonprofit Institutions. In this annual survey, data are collected on Federal S&E support by funding ...

435

77 FR 11345 - Harmonization of Compliance Obligations for Registered Investment Companies Required To Register...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...COMMISSION 17 CFR Part 4 Harmonization of Compliance Obligations for Registered Investment...proposing certain provisions to facilitate compliance by registered investment companies with...Proposed Changes to Registration and Compliance Regime for Commodity Pool...

2012-02-24

436

76 FR 56271 - Notice of Release From Federal Grant Assurance Obligations for Livermore Municipal Airport...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Assurance Obligations for Livermore Municipal Airport, Livermore, CA AGENCY: Federal Aviation...ACTION: Notice of request to release airport land...release of approximately 4.5 acres of airport property at the Livermore Municipal...

2011-09-12

437

75 FR 70081 - Notice of Release From Federal Grant Assurance Obligations for Tucson International Airport...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Assurance Obligations for Tucson International Airport, Tucson, AZ AGENCY: Federal Aviation...ACTION: Notice of request to release airport land...of approximately 2,000 square feet of airport property at Tucson International...

2010-11-16

438

77 FR 12906 - Notice of Release From Federal Grant Assurance Obligations at Fresno Yosemite International...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Obligations at Fresno Yosemite International Airport, Fresno, CA AGENCY: Federal Aviation...ACTION: Notice of request to release airport land...release of approximately 16.02 acres of airport property at the Fresno Yosemite...

2012-03-02

439

78 FR 8220 - Notice of Release From Quitclaim Deed and Federal Grant Assurance Obligations for Delano...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Assurance Obligations for Delano Municipal Airport, Delano, CA AGENCY: Federal Aviation...ACTION: Notice of Request to Release Airport Land...release of approximately 9.89 acres of airport property at Delano Municipal...

2013-02-05

440

76 FR 36482 - Affirmative Action and Nondiscrimination Obligations of Contractors and Subcontractors Regarding...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...and 60-300 RIN 1250-AA00 Affirmative Action and Nondiscrimination Obligations...regulations implementing the affirmative action provisions of the Vietnam Era...proposed rule entitled ``Affirmative Action and Nondiscrimination...

2011-06-22

441

77 FR 7108 - Affirmative Action and Nondiscrimination Obligations of Contractors and Subcontractors Regarding...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Part 60-741 RIN 1250-AA02 Affirmative Action and Nondiscrimination Obligations...implementing the nondiscrimination and affirmative action regulations of section 503...proposed rule entitled, ``Affirmative Action and Nondiscrimination...

2012-02-10

442

45 CFR 660.5 - What is the Director's obligation with respect to Federal interagency coordination?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 660.5 What is the Director's obligation...

2013-10-01

443

43 CFR 3287.2 - When may BLM grant a suspension of unit obligations?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...suspension of initial drilling obligations due to a unit operator's inability to obtain an electrical sales contract, or when poor economics affect the electrical generation market, limiting the opportunity to obtain a viable sales contract. BLM may grant a...

2013-10-01

444

76 FR 74721 - Reexamination of Roaming Obligations of Commercial Mobile Radio Service Providers and Other...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Reexamination of Roaming Obligations of Commercial Mobile Radio Service Providers and Other Providers of Mobile Data Services AGENCY: Federal Communications...facilities-based providers of commercial mobile data services to offer data roaming...

2011-12-01