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Sample records for obscure-overt gastrointestinal bleeding

  1. Utility of double-balloon enteroscopy in patients with left ventricular assist devices and obscure overt gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Adam L; Mönkemüller, Klaus; Pamboukian, Salpy V; George, James F; Wilcox, C M; Peter, Shajan

    2014-11-01

    Obscure overt gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) is a challenge in patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). We evaluated the utility and safety of double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) in patients with LVADs in an observational consecutive-patient cohort from a single tertiary referral center. Ten patients with LVADs underwent thirteen DBEs for obscure OGIB. The first OGIB event necessitating DBE occurred after a mean of 512 ± 363 days of LVAD support. All patients underwent DBE, eleven anterograde and two retrograde, with a mean insertion depth 176 ± 85 cm. Diagnostic yield was 69 % with the primary bleeding lesion most frequently found in the mid-bowel. The most common lesions were arteriovenous malformations. Therapeutic yield with argon plasma coagulation (APC), epinephrine injection, and/or hemoclip placement was 89 %. There were no procedure-related complications. DBE in patients with LVADs has good diagnostic yield and high therapeutic yield for obscure OGIB and is safe and well tolerated. PMID:25290096

  2. Multiple Polypoid Angiodysplasia with Obscure Overt Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jooyoung; Hwang, Sung Wook; Kim, Jihye; Kang, Jinwoo; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Park, Kyu Joo; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Angiodysplasia (AD) is increasingly being recognized as a major cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. Morphologically flat lesions are common types of AD, whereas the polypoid types are rare. We report a case of multiple polypoid AD in the small bowel causing severe anemia and requiring surgical treatment. A 60-year-old male patient visited our hospital with dyspnea and hematochezia. He had a history of myocardial infarction and was taking both aspirin and clopidogrel. Capsule endoscopy, enteroscopy, computed tomography, and angiography revealed multifocal vascular lesions with a polypoid shape in the jejunum. Surgical resection was performed because endoscopic treatment was considered impossible with the number and the location of lesions. The risk of recurrent bleeding related to the use of antiplatelet agents also contributed to the decision to perform surgery. AD was histologically diagnosed from the surgical specimen. He resumed taking both aspirin and clopidogrel after surgery. He fully recovered and has been doing well during the several months of follow-up. PMID:26855931

  3. Obscure Overt Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due To Isolated Small Bowel Angiomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Melissa; Chiorean, Michael V.; Cote, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Isolated small bowel angiomatosis is a rare entity with a distinctive endoscopic appearance. A multidisciplinary approach is often required to diagnose and treat these complex lesions. We present 2 cases of isolated small bowel angiomatosis, and illustrate the endoscopic findings that may guide similar diagnoses. PMID:27144197

  4. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes. PMID:26520197

  5. Gastrointestinal bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... on a lab test such as the fecal occult blood test. Other signs of GI bleeding include: ... ray Volvulus - x-ray GI bleeding - series Fecal occult blood test References Jensen DM. GI hemorrhage and ...

  6. Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... stool Dark blood mixed with stool Signs of bleeding in the lower digestive tract include Black or tarry stool Dark blood mixed with stool Stool mixed or coated with bright red blood GI bleeding is not a disease, but a symptom of ...

  7. Severe gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, K L

    1994-02-01

    Severe gastrointestinal bleeding is a common cause of admission of the elderly to intensive care units. Differentiation between upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding is made on the basis of history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests. Therapy is based in part on the severity of the bleeding episode and on the cause of the hemorrhage. Therapeutic intervention may involve medical therapy, endoscopic therapy, angiographic therapy, and surgery. Patient outcome is often related to other underlying disease states. PMID:8168017

  8. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  9. [Acute gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Baumbach, Robert; Faiss, Siegbert; Cordruwisch, Wolfgang; Schrader, Carsten

    2016-04-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common major emergency (Internal medical or gastroenterological or medical), approximately 85 % of which occur in the upper GI tract. It is estimated that about a half of upper GI bleeds are caused by peptic ulcers. Upper GI bleeds are associated with more severe bleeding and poorer outcomes when compared to middle or lower GI bleeds. Prognostic determinants include bleeding intensity, patient age, comorbid conditions and the concomitant use of anticoagulants. A focused medical history can offer insight into the bleeding intensity, location and potential cause (along with early risk stratification). Initial measures should focus on rapid assessment and resuscitation of unstable patients. The oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) is the gold standard method for localizing the source of bleeding and for interventional therapy. Bleeding as a result of peptic ulcers is treated endoscopically with mechanical and / or thermal techniques in combination with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. When variceal bleeding is suspected, pre-interventional use of vasopressin analogues and antibiotic therapies are recommended. Endoscopically, the first line treatment of esophageal varices is endoscopic ligature therapy, whereas that for gastric varices is the use of Histoacryl injection sclerotherapy. When persistent and continued massive hemorrhage occurs in a patient with known or suspected aortic disease the possibility of an aorto-enteric fistula must be considered. PMID:27078246

  10. Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Syed Irfan-Ur; Saeian, Kia

    2016-04-01

    In the intensive care unit, vigilance is needed to manage nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A focused history and physical examination must be completed to identify inciting factors and the need for hemodynamic stabilization. Although not universally used, risk stratification tools such as the Blatchford and Rockall scores can facilitate triage and management. Urgent evaluation for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeds requires prompt respiratory assessment, and identification of hemodynamic instability with fluid resuscitation and blood transfusions if necessary. Future studies are needed to evaluate the indication, safety, and efficacy of emerging endoscopic techniques. PMID:27016164

  11. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Matthew; Lobo, Alan J

    2015-10-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is a frequently encountered medical emergency with an incidence of 84-160/100000 and associated with mortality of approximately 10%. Guidelines from the National Institute for Care and Care Excellence outline key features in the management of AUGIB. Patients require prompt resuscitation and risk assessment using validated tools. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy provides accurate diagnosis, aids in estimating prognosis and allows therapeutic intervention. Endoscopy should be undertaken immediately after resuscitation in unstable patients and within 24 hours in all other patients. Interventional radiology may be required for bleeding unresponsive to endoscopic intervention. Drug therapy depends on the cause of bleeding. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors should be used in patients with high-risk ulcers. Terlipressin and broad-spectrum antibiotics should be used following variceal haemorrhage. Hospitals admitting patients with AUGIB need to provide well organised services and ensure access to relevant services for all patients, and particularly to out of hours endoscopy. PMID:26430191

  12. Diagnostic yield and impact of capsule endoscopy on management of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding of obscure origin.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Cerezo, Eduardo; Pérez-Vigara, Gracia; Pérez-Sola, Angel; Gómez-Ruiz, Carmen J; Chicano, Miriam Viñuelas; Sánchez-Manjavacas, Natividad; Morillas, Julia; Pérez-García, José I; García-Cano, Jesús

    2007-05-01

    This study assessed diagnostic yield and impact of capsule endoscopy on patient management. Seventy-five patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding were included. Clinical and followup information was collected by review of patient records and with personal contact with the referring physicians. All previous clinical information and interventions after capsule endoscopy and clinical outcome were noted. The indication was obscure-overt gastrointestinal bleeding in 36 patients (48%) and obscure-occult gastrointestinal bleeding in 39 patients (52%). Overall diagnostic yield was 66.7% considering relevant lesions. Followup was available in 31 patients. Capsule endoscopy changed clinical management in 61.4%. Multivariate analysis showed that patients with another potential source of bleeding and patients whose onset was hematochezia were not good candidates for capsule endoscopy. Capsule endoscopy has a high diagnostic yield and a positive influence on clinical management in a high proportion of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:17356913

  13. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Silber, G

    1990-09-01

    The differential diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in children can be reduced markedly simply by taking into account the age of the child. The clinical condition of the patient can further help narrow the diagnostic possibilities. Newborns and infants who are clinically unstable are more likely to have diseases such as necrotizing enterocolitis, volvulus, Hirschprung disease, intussusception, or Meckel diverticulum. A baby who appears healthy should be examined for swallowed blood, allergic colitis, anal fissures, or lymphonodular hyperplasia. An older child of healthy appearance with bleeding is likely to have a juvenile polyp or infectious colitis, but a child who appears sick may have hemolytic uremic syndrome, Henoch-Schoenlein purpura, or inflammatory bowel disease. This information, along with that gleaned from the physical examination, can lead the pediatrician to determine the need for specific tests, such as abdominal radiographs, stool cultures, and an endoscopic evaluation. We have come a long way in our ability to diagnose the causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. With the availability of newer radiographic and nuclear medicine modalities and the ability to visualize the colon endoscopically, the need for exploratory laparotomy for diagnosis is rarer. While surgery may still be the therapy of choice, new diagnostic modalities give the surgeon much more preoperative information. PMID:2235771

  14. [Gastrointestinal bleeding in cardiological patients].

    PubMed

    Braun, G; Messmann, H

    2013-11-01

    Oral anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy are risk factors for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. GI bleeding-especially lower GI bleeding-seems to be associated with a poorer outcome. With the introduction of dabigatrane and rivaroxaban, difficulties in the management of bleeding complications arose. Thus, the goal of the authors was to establish a standard operating procedure (SOP) for the treatment of severe GI bleeding associated with rivaroxaban, dabigatrane, and antiplatelet therapy. Bleeding complications during phenprocoumon treatment should be treated with prothrombin complex concentrates and vitamin K1. Dabigatrane elimination is highly dependent to the renal function. The measurement of drug concentrations of dabigatrane and rivaroxaban is useful to indicate an increased risk of bleeding complications. Severe bleeding associated with dabigatrane or rivaroxaban therapy should trigger prothrombin complex therapy, whereby in cases with severe bleeding associated with antiplatelet therapy platelet transfusion should be initiated. Low-dose aspirin should be continued after 24 h. PMID:24150711

  15. [Gastrointestinal bleeding in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Vartic, M; Chilie, A; Beuran, M

    2006-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) is a frequent finding in intensive care unit (ICU) and has considerable morbidity particularly for the elderly. The most common etiology for upper digestive bleeding is the stress ulcer and for the lower bleeding the diverticular disease of the colon. The predictive risk factors for GIB are age, organ failure, mechanical ventilation and length of stay in ICU. Even though a 4.5 times increase in mortality is seen in these patients it cannot be directly correlated to the bleeding. Routine use of H2 inhibitors is effective only in high risk patients, opposing enteral nutrition which is valuable in all patients. Prophylactic measures resulted in a 50% decrease in incidence of GIB in ICU and also of the mortality. Most of the patients are now treated non-operatively. PMID:17059147

  16. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Calciphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nancy; Haq, Khwaja F; Mahajan, Sugandhi; Nagpal, Prashant; Doshi, Bijal

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Calciphylaxis is associated with a high mortality that approaches 80%. The diagnosis is usually made when obvious skin lesions (painful violaceous mottling of the skin) are present. However, visceral involvement is rare. We present a case of calciphylaxis leading to lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and rectal ulceration of the GI mucosa. CASE REPORT A 66-year-old woman with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), recently diagnosed ovarian cancer, and on hemodialysis (HD) presented with painful black necrotic eschar on both legs. The radiograph of the legs demonstrated extensive calcification of the lower extremity arteries. The hospital course was complicated with lower GI bleeding. A CT scan of the abdomen revealed severe circumferential calcification of the abdominal aorta, celiac artery, and superior and inferior mesenteric arteries and their branches. Colonoscopy revealed severe rectal necrosis. She was deemed to be a poor surgical candidate due to comorbidities and presence of extensive vascular calcifications. Recurrent episodes of profuse GI bleeding were managed conservatively with blood transfusion as needed. Following her diagnosis of calciphylaxis, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium containing phosphate binders was stopped. She was started on daily hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate bath as well as intravenous sodium thiosulphate. The clinical condition of the patient deteriorated. The patient died secondary to multiorgan failure. CONCLUSIONS Calciphylaxis leading to intestinal ischemia/perforation should be considered in the differential diagnosis in ESRD on HD presenting with abdominal pain or GI bleeding. PMID:26572938

  17. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Calciphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nancy; Haq, Khwaja F.; Mahajan, Sugandhi; Nagpal, Prashant; Doshi, Bijal

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 66 Final Diagnosis: Calciphylaxis Symptoms: Gastrointesinal haemorrhage Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Hemodialysis • blood transfusions Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Calciphylaxis is associated with a high mortality that approaches 80%. The diagnosis is usually made when obvious skin lesions (painful violaceous mottling of the skin) are present. However, visceral involvement is rare. We present a case of calciphylaxis leading to lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and rectal ulceration of the GI mucosa. Case Report: A 66-year-old woman with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), recently diagnosed ovarian cancer, and on hemodialysis (HD) presented with painful black necrotic eschar on both legs. The radiograph of the legs demonstrated extensive calcification of the lower extremity arteries. The hospital course was complicated with lower GI bleeding. A CT scan of the abdomen revealed severe circumferential calcification of the abdominal aorta, celiac artery, and superior and inferior mesenteric arteries and their branches. Colonoscopy revealed severe rectal necrosis. She was deemed to be a poor surgical candidate due to comorbidities and presence of extensive vascular calcifications. Recurrent episodes of profuse GI bleeding were managed conservatively with blood transfusion as needed. Following her diagnosis of calciphylaxis, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium containing phosphate binders was stopped. She was started on daily hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate bath as well as intravenous sodium thiosulphate. The clinical condition of the patient deteriorated. The patient died secondary to multiorgan failure. Conclusions: Calciphylaxis leading to intestinal ischemia/perforation should be considered in the differential diagnosis in ESRD on HD presenting with abdominal pain or GI bleeding. PMID:26572938

  18. The role of capsule endoscopy in etiological diagnosis and management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, Meghraj; Pandav, Nilesh; Parikh, Pathik; Patel, Jignesh; Phadke, Aniruddha; Sawant, Prabha

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To investigate the various etiologies, yields, and effects of capsule endoscopy (CE) on management and complications, along with follow up of patients with obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Methods The study group of patients included those having obscure, overt, or occult GI bleeding. The findings were categorized as (A) obvious/definitive, (B) equivocal, or (C) negative. Any significant alteration in patient management post CE in the form of drug or surgical intervention was noted. Results Total patients included in the study were 68 (48 males and 20 females). The ratio of male:female was 2.4:1. The age ranged between 16 years to 77 years. Mean age for males was 62±14 years, for females 58±16 years. The total yield of CE with definitive lesions was in 44/68 (65.0%) of patients. In descending order (A) angiodysplasia 16/68 (23.53%), (B) Crohn's disease 10/68 (14.70%), (C) non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug enteropathy 8/68 (11.76%), (D) small bowel ulcers 4/68 (5.88%), (E) jejunal and ileal polyps 2/68 (2.94%), (F) intestinal lymphangiectasis 2/68 (2.94%), and (G) ileal hemangiomas 2/68 (2.94%) were followed. Equivocal findings 12/68 (17.65%) and negative study 12/68 (17.65%) was found. Complications in the form of capsule retention in the distal ileum were noted in 2/68 (2.94%) subjects. Statistically, there was a higher probability of finding the etiology if the CE was done during an episode of bleeding. Conclusions CE plays an important role in diagnosing etiologies of obscure GI bleeding. Its role in influencing the management outcome is vital. PMID:26884737

  19. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: an approach to management.

    PubMed

    Marshall, J K; Lesi, O A; Hunt, R H

    2000-02-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding provides an uncommon but frustrating and resource-intensive challenge for clinicians. Such patients hemorrhage recurrently from sites within the gastrointestinal tract that are not detected by routine endoscopy or radiography, and require a special diagnostic approach to localize or exclude less common bleeding sources such as small bowel angioectasia or neoplasia. The differential diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal hemorrhage is discussed, and the performance of available endoscopic, radiological and surgical diagnostic tools including enteroscopy are examined critically. A stepwise management algorithm that progresses from the history and physical examination to surgical exploration is offered to facilitate early and efficient diagnosis. PMID:10694283

  20. [Update on non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes the main studies in the field of non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding reported in the last American Congress of Gastroenterology (Digestive Disease Week) in 2013. Some of these studies have provided new knowledge and expertise in areas of uncertainty. In this context and among other findings, it has been reported that the administration of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) prior to endoscopy or the early performance of endoscopy-within 6 hours of admission in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) (or colonoscopy within 24 hours in patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding)-does not improve the prognosis of the event. It has also been reported that oral administration of a PPI after endoscopic hemostasis may produce a similar outcome to that of intravenously administered PPI in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). In the field of endoscopic therapy, the use of radiofrequency ablation for antral vascular ectasia is of interest. Regarding UGIB and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), new data confirm the risk of cardiovascular events by stopping treatment with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) after an episode of UGIB, the increased risk of UGIB when associating gastrotoxic drugs, and the need to identify both the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risks of each NSAID and coxib when prescribing these agents. Finally, there is evidence that both environmental and genetic factors are involved in individual susceptibility to gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:24160953

  1. [New therapeutical options for heavy gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Braun, Georg; Messmann, Helmut

    2015-06-01

    The number of patients taking new oral anticoagulants is rising, so is the number of serious bleeding events. In severe bleeding, the decision to start a procoagulant therapy is difficult to take. With Idarucizumab and Andexanet Alfa, specific antidotes have been developed against both, direct thrombin inhibitors as well as direct Factor Xa inhibitors. In the endoscopic treatment of severe gastrointestinal bleeding, alternative treatment options are available with Hemospray™, Endoclot™ and new hemostasis clips. Especially in the recurrent ulcer bleeding, the newly developed clips can achieve hemostasis and prevent an operational procedure. PMID:26069913

  2. An Unsusual Case of Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Guru, Pramod Kumar; Iyer, Vivek N.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 81 Final Diagnosis: Gastrointestinal amyloidosis Symptoms: Gastrointesinal haemorrhage • hypotension Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Endoscopy Specialty: Criitcal Care Medicine Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Amyloidosis is a multisystem disease, and can present with multitude of nonspecific symptoms. Gastrointestinal amyloidosis is common, and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in these patients has a wide differential diagnosis. The present case features the distinctive endoscopic finding of submucosal hematoma as a clue to immunoglobin light chain (AL) amyloid involvement of the gastrointestinal tract. Case Report: An 81-year-old woman with AL amyloidosis was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) for evaluation of GI bleeding. Prior to the bleeding episode, the patient had undergone paracentesis for management of her ascites related to restrictive cardiomyopathy. Initial evaluation was negative for any intra-abdominal catastrophe related to her recent paracentesis. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was negative for any source of bleeding. However, colonoscopy showed a ruptured submucosal hematoma, which is a rare but classical finding in patients with amyloidosis. The patient was managed conservatively and did not have any further episodes of bleeding in the hospital. She unfortunately died due to her primary illness 6 weeks after discharge from the hospital. Conclusions: The finding of submucosal hematoma on endoscopy is a rare but sentinel sign for amyloidosis involvement in the GI tract. PMID:26979633

  3. MedlinePlus: Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... looks like coffee grounds Black or tarry stool Dark blood mixed with stool Signs of bleeding in ... lower digestive tract include Black or tarry stool Dark blood mixed with stool Stool mixed or coated ...

  4. AN UNUSUAL CAUSE OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING.

    PubMed

    Ali, Kishwar; Zarin, Muhammad; Latif, Humera

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal haemorrhage (GI) is a serious condition that presents both diagnostic as well as therapeutic challenges. Resuscitation of the patient is the first and most important step in its management followed by measures to localize and treat the exact source and site of bleeding. These modalities are upper and lower GI endoscopies, radionuclide imaging and angiography. Surgery is the last resort to handle the situation, if the patient does not respond to resuscitative measures and the various interventional procedures fail to locate and stop the bleeding. We present a case of upper GI bleeding which presented with massive per rectal bleeding and the patient was not responding to resuscitation with multiple blood transfusions. Ultimately an exploratory laparotomy was done which revealed an extra-intestinal source of bleeding into the lumen of duodenum, presenting as upper GI bleeding. PMID:26721047

  5. Bayesian network modelling of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisha, Nazziwa; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Adam, Mohd Bakri

    2013-09-01

    Bayesian networks are graphical probabilistic models that represent causal and other relationships between domain variables. In the context of medical decision making, these models have been explored to help in medical diagnosis and prognosis. In this paper, we discuss the Bayesian network formalism in building medical support systems and we learn a tree augmented naive Bayes Network (TAN) from gastrointestinal bleeding data. The accuracy of the TAN in classifying the source of gastrointestinal bleeding into upper or lower source is obtained. The TAN achieves a high classification accuracy of 86% and an area under curve of 92%. A sensitivity analysis of the model shows relatively high levels of entropy reduction for color of the stool, history of gastrointestinal bleeding, consistency and the ratio of blood urea nitrogen to creatinine. The TAN facilitates the identification of the source of GIB and requires further validation.

  6. Gastrointestinal Bleeding - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... List of All Topics All Gastrointestinal Bleeding - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) French ( ...

  7. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding: etiology and management.

    PubMed

    Arora, N K; Ganguly, S; Mathur, P; Ahuja, A; Patwari, A

    2002-02-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a potentially fatal condition at times due to loss of large volumes of blood. Common sources of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in children include mucosal lesions and variceal hemorrhage (most commonly extra hepatic portal venous obstruction) and, in intensive care settings infections and drugs are other etiological factors associated with bleeding. Massive upper GI bleeding is life threatening and requires immediate resuscitation measures in the form of protection of the airways, oxygen administration, immediate volume replacement with ringer lactate or normal saline, transfusion of whole blood or packed cells and also monitoring the adequacy of volume replacement by central venous lines and urine output. Upper GI endoscopy is an effective initial diagnostic modality to localize the site and cause of bleeding in almost 85-90% of patients. Antacids supplemented by H2- receptor antagonists, proton pump inhibitors and sucralfate are the mainstay in the treatment of bleeding from mucosal lesion. For variceal bleeds, emergency endoscopy is the treatment of choice after initial haemodynamic stabilization of patient. If facilities for endoscopic sclerotherapy (EST) are not available, pharmacotherapy which decreases the portal pressure is almost equally effective and should be resorted to. Shunt surgery is reserved for patients who do not respond to the above therapy. Beta blockers combined with sclerotherapy have been shown to be the most effective therapy in significantly reducing the risk of recurrent rebleeding from varices as well as the death rates, as compared to any other modality of treatment. Based on studies among adult patients, presence of shock, co-morbidities, underlying diagnosis, presence of stigmata of recent hemorrhage on endoscopy and rebleeding are independent risk factors for mortality due to upper GI bleeding. Rebleeding is more likely to occur if the patient has hematemesis, liver disease, coagulopathy

  8. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong Sik Matthew; Li, Bob T; Engel, Alexander; Samra, Jaswinder S; Clarke, Stephen; Norton, Ian D; Li, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not apparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians. PMID:25400991

  9. The Approach to Occult Gastrointestinal Bleed.

    PubMed

    Naut, Edgar R

    2016-09-01

    Occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not visible and may present with a positive fecal occult blood test or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure bleeding can be overt or occult, with no source identified despite an appropriate diagnostic workup. A stepwise approach to this evaluation after negative upper and lower endoscopy has been shown to be cost effective. This includes repeat endoscopies if warranted, followed by video capsule endoscopy (VCE) if no obstruction is present. If the VCE is positive then specific endoscopic intervention may be possible. If negative, patients may undergo either repeat testing or watchful waiting with iron supplements. PMID:27542424

  10. Diagnosis and management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Tarin, D; Allison, D J; Modlin, I M; Neale, G

    1978-01-01

    Twelve consecutive patients presenting with unexplained recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding were investigated by selective visceral angiography. A cause for the bleeding was shown in all 12 cases, and in eight the lesion responsible was diagnosed radiologically as an area of angiodysplasia. Abnormal areas were pinpointed by fluoroscopy and examination of the resected bowel with a dissecting microscope after injecting the vessels with barium. Histologically these areas had various microvascular abnormalities. Angiodysplasia is a useful descriptive radiological term, but does not seem to represent a single pathological entity. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 FIG 5 PMID:308828

  11. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Chait, Maxwell M

    2010-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is an important worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The incidence of LGIB increases with age and corresponds to the increased incidence of specific gastrointestinal diseases that have worldwide regional variation, co-morbid diseases and polypharmacy. The evaluation and treatment of patients is adjusted to the rate and severity of hemorrhage and the clinical status of the patient and may be complicated by the presence of visual, auditory and cognitive impairment due to age and co-morbid disease. Bleeding may be chronic and mild or severe and life threatening, requiring endoscopic, radiologic or surgical intervention. Colonoscopy provides the best method for evaluation and treatment of patients with LGIB. There will be a successful outcome of LGIB in the majority of elderly patients with appropriate evaluation and management. PMID:21160742

  12. Gastrointestinal Amyloidosis Presenting with Multiple Episodes of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang Hyeon Kang, Eun Ju; Park, Jee Won; Jo, Jung Hyun; Kim, Soo Jin; Cho, Jin Han; Kang, Myong Jin; Park, Byeong Ho

    2009-05-15

    Amyloidosis is characterized by the extracellular deposition of amyloid protein in various organs. Gastrointestinal involvement in amyloidosis is common, but a diagnosis of amyloidosis is often delayed. Severe gastrointestinal hemorrhage in amyloidosis is rare but can be fatal in some cases. We experienced a case of a 49-year-old man who presented with recurrent massive hematochezia. Although embolization was performed eight times for bleeding from different sites of the small intestine, hematochezia did not cease. We report the case, with a review of the literature.

  13. Endoscopy for Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Bae; Youn, Sei Jin

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopy for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding plays an important role in primary diagnosis and management, particularly with respect to identification of high-risk stigmata lesions and to providing endoscopic hemostasis to reduce the risk of rebleeding and mortality. Early endoscopy, defined as endoscopy within the first 24 hours after presentation, improves patient outcome and reduces the length of hospitalization when compared with delayed endoscopy. Various endoscopic hemostatic methods are available, including injection therapy, mechanical therapy, and thermal coagulation. Either single treatment with mechanical or thermal therapy or a treatment that combines more than one type of therapy are effective and safe for peptic ulcer bleeding. Newly developed methods, such as Hemospray powder and over-the-scope clips, may provide additional options. Appropriate decisions and specific treatment are needed depending upon the conditions. PMID:25133117

  14. Endoscopy for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Bae; Yoon, Soon Man; Youn, Sei Jin

    2014-07-01

    Endoscopy for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding plays an important role in primary diagnosis and management, particularly with respect to identification of high-risk stigmata lesions and to providing endoscopic hemostasis to reduce the risk of rebleeding and mortality. Early endoscopy, defined as endoscopy within the first 24 hours after presentation, improves patient outcome and reduces the length of hospitalization when compared with delayed endoscopy. Various endoscopic hemostatic methods are available, including injection therapy, mechanical therapy, and thermal coagulation. Either single treatment with mechanical or thermal therapy or a treatment that combines more than one type of therapy are effective and safe for peptic ulcer bleeding. Newly developed methods, such as Hemospray powder and over-the-scope clips, may provide additional options. Appropriate decisions and specific treatment are needed depending upon the conditions. PMID:25133117

  15. An Unusual Case of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Fiorino, Kristin N.; Lestini, Brian; Nichols, Kim E.; Anupindi, Sudha A.; Maqbool, Asim

    2011-01-01

    A 10-year-old boy presented with a 3-day history of worsening abdominal pain, fever, emesis and melena. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a right upper quadrant mass that was confirmed by computed tomography angiogram (CTA), which showed an 8 cm well-defined retroperitoneal vascular mass. 123Iodine metaiodobenzylguanidine (123MIBG) scan indicated uptake only in the abdominal mass. Subsequent biopsy revealed a paraganglioma that was treated with chemotherapy. This case represents an unusual presentation of a paraganglioma associated with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and highlights the utility of CTA and 123MIBG in evaluation and treatment. PMID:22606522

  16. Microcoil Embolization for Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    D'Othee, Bertrand Janne Surapaneni, Padmaja; Rabkin, Dmitry; Nasser, Imad; Clouse, Melvin

    2006-02-15

    Purpose. To assess outcomes after microcoil embolization for active lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Methods. We retrospectively studied all consecutive patients in whom microcoil embolization was attempted to treat acute lower GI bleeding over 88 months. Baseline, procedural, and outcome parameters were recorded following current Society of Interventional Radiology guidelines. Outcomes included technical success, clinical success (rebleeding within 30 days), delayed rebleeding (>30 days), and major and minor complication rates. Follow-up consisted of clinical, endoscopic, and pathologic data. Results. Nineteen patients (13 men, 6 women; mean age {+-} 95% confidence interval = 70 {+-} 6 years) requiring blood transfusion (10 {+-} 3 units) had angiography-proven bleeding distal to the marginal artery. Main comorbidities were malignancy (42%), coagulopathy (28%), and renal failure (26%). Bleeding was located in the small bowel (n = 5), colon (n 13) or rectum (n = 1). Technical success was obtained in 17 patients (89%); 2 patients could not be embolized due to vessel tortuosity and stenoses. Clinical follow-up length was 145 {+-} 75 days. Clinical success was complete in 13 (68%), partial in 3 (16%), and failed in 2 patients (11%). Delayed rebleeding (3 patients, 27%) was always due to a different lesion in another bowel segment (0 late rebleeding in embolized area). Two patients experienced colonic ischemia (11%) and underwent uneventful colectomy. Two minor complications were noted. Conclusion. Microcoil embolization for active lower GI bleeding is safe and effective in most patients, with high technical and clinical success rates, no procedure-related mortality, and a low risk of bowel ischemia and late rebleeding.

  17. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding And Risk of Gastrointestinal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Viborg, Søren; Søgaard, Kirstine Kobberøe; Farkas, Dóra Körmendiné; Nørrelund, Helene; Pedersen, Lars; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a well-known symptom of colorectal cancer (CRC). Whether incident GI bleeding is also a marker of other GI cancers remains unclear. METHODS: This nationwide cohort study examined the risk of various GI cancer types in patients with lower GI bleeding. We used Danish medical registries to identify all patients with a first-time hospital diagnosis of lower GI bleeding during 1995–2011 and followed them for 10 years to identify subsequent GI cancer diagnoses. We computed absolute risks of cancer, treating death as a competing risk, and calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) by comparing observed cancer cases with expected cancer incidence rates in the general population. RESULTS: Among 58,593 patients with lower GI bleeding, we observed 2,806 GI cancers during complete 10-year follow-up. During the first year of follow-up, the absolute GI cancer risk was 3.6%, and the SIR of any GI cancer was 16.3 (95% confidence interval (CI): 15.6–17.0). Colorectal cancers accounted for the majority of diagnoses, but risks of all GI cancers were increased. During 1–5 years of follow-up, the SIR of any GI cancer declined to 1.36 (95% CI: 1.25–1.49), but risks remained increased for several GI cancers. Beyond 5 years of follow-up, the overall GI cancer risk was close to unity, with reduced risk of rectal cancer and increased risk of liver and pancreatic cancers. CONCLUSIONS: A hospital-based diagnosis of lower GI bleeding is a strong clinical marker of prevalent GI cancer, particularly CRC. It also predicts an increased risk of any GI cancer beyond 1 year of follow-up. PMID:27054580

  18. Guideline for Capsule Endoscopy: Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Ki-Nam; Moon, Jeong Seop; Chang, Dong Kyung; Do, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Ji Hyun; Min, Byung Hoon; Jeon, Seong Ran; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) is considered as a noninvasive and reliable diagnostic tool of examining the entire small bowel. CE has been performed frequently at many medical centers in South Korea; however, there is no evidence-based CE guideline for adequate diagnostic approaches. To provide accurate information and suggest correct testing approaches for small bowel disease, the guideline on CE was developed by the Korean Gut Image Study Group, a part of the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Operation teams for developing the guideline were organized into four areas: obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, small bowel preparation, Crohn's disease, and small bowel tumor. A total of 20 key questions were selected. In preparing this guideline, MEDLINE, Cochrane library, KMbase, KISS, and KoreaMed literature searches were performed. After writing a draft of the guideline, opinions from various experts were reflected before approving the final document. The guideline should be regarded as recommendations only to gastroenterologists in providing care to their patients. These are not absolute rules and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care. Although further revision may be necessary as new data appear, this guideline is expected to play a role for adequate diagnostic approaches of various small bowel diseases. PMID:23423225

  19. Seven cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding after cold biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Alneaimi, Khaled; Abdelmoula, Ali; Vincent, Magalie; Savale, Camille; Baye, Birane; Lesur, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Routine biopsy of the upper gastrointestinal tract is performed with increasing frequency. It is generally considered to be safe without significant complication. However, gastrointestinal bleeding as a result of cold biopsy is a known complication. We report seven cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding after cold biopsy and discuss clinical data, risks factors, severity and management of this event. We suggest that physicians must be more cautious with this rare but potentially severe complication.

  20. Porcine survival model to simulate acute upper gastrointestinal bleedings.

    PubMed

    Prosst, Ruediger L; Schurr, Marc O; Schostek, Sebastian; Krautwald, Martina; Gottwald, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The existing animal models used for the simulation of acute gastrointestinal bleedings are usually non-survival models. We developed and evaluated a new porcine model (domestic pig, German Landrace) in which the animal remains alive and survives the artificial bleeding without any cardiovascular impairment. This consists of a bleeding catheter which is implanted into the stomach, then subcutaneously tunnelled from the abdomen to the neck where it is exteriorized and fixed with sutures. Using the injection of porcine blood, controllable and reproducible acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding can be simulated while maintaining normal gastrointestinal motility and physiology. Depending on the volume of blood applied through the gastric catheter, the bleeding intensity can be varied from traces of blood to a massive haemorrhage. This porcine model could be valuable, e.g. for testing the efficacy of new bleeding diagnostics in large animals before human use. PMID:26306615

  1. Emergency diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding by fiberoptic endoscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Villar, H V; Roberts Fender, H; Watson, L C; Thompson, J C

    1977-01-01

    Emergency esophagogastroduodenoscopy has been performed in 192 consecutive patients admitted with massive gastrointestinal bleeding. Accurate endoscopic diagnosis was made in 184 or 96%; 58 patients underwent emergency operations to control bleeding with an overall operative mortality of 26%. Excluding 16 patients who underwent emergency portacaval shunting, the operative mortality was 7%. In 6 patients, the bleeding was controlled by endoscopic electrocoagulation. There were no complications. Emergency endoscopy should be done routinely as the primary diagnostic approach in the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:300236

  2. Wireless capsule endoscopy: perspectives beyond gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Cerezo, Eduardo; Sánchez-Capilla, Antonio Damián; De La Torre-Rubio, Paloma; De Teresa, Javier

    2014-11-14

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (CE) is a technology developed for the endoscopic exploration of the small bowel. The first capsule model was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2001, and its first and essential indication was occult gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Over subsequent years, this technology has been refined to provide superior resolution, increased battery life, and capabilities to view different parts of the GI tract. Indeed, cases for which CE proved useful have increased significantly over the last few years, with new indications for the small bowel and technical improvements that have expanded its use to other parts of the GI tract, including the esophagus and colon. The main challenges in the development of CE are new devices with the ability to provide therapy, air inflation for a better vision of the small bowel, biopsy sampling systems attached to the capsule and the possibility to guide and move the capsule with an external motion control. In this article we review the current and new indications of CE, and the evolving technological changes shaping this technology, which has a promising potential in the coming future of gastroenterology. PMID:25400450

  3. New insights to occult gastrointestinal bleeding: From pathophysiology to therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Capilla, Antonio Damián; De La Torre-Rubio, Paloma; Redondo-Cerezo, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is still a clinical challenge for gastroenterologists. The recent development of novel technologies for the diagnosis and treatment of different bleeding causes has allowed a better management of patients, but it also determines the need of a deeper comprehension of pathophysiology and the analysis of local expertise in order to develop a rational management algorithm. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding can be divided in occult, when a positive occult blood fecal test is the main manifestation, and overt, when external sings of bleeding are visible. In this paper we are going to focus on overt gastrointestinal bleeding, describing the physiopathology of the most usual causes, analyzing the diagnostic procedures available, from the most classical to the novel ones, and establishing a standard algorithm which can be adapted depending on the local expertise or availability. Finally, we will review the main therapeutic options for this complex and not so uncommon clinical problem. PMID:25133028

  4. Serendipity in scintigraphic gastrointestinal bleeding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Goergen, T.G.

    1983-09-01

    A retrospective review of 80 scintigraphic bleeding studies performed with Tc-99m sulfur colloid or Tc-99m labeled red blood cells showed five cases where there were abnormal findings not related to bleeding. In some cases, the abnormalities were initially confused with bleeding or could obscure an area of bleeding, while in other cases, the abnormalities represented additional clinical information. These included bone marrow replacement related to tumor and radiation therapy, hyperemia related to a uterine leiomyoma and a diverticular abscess, and a dilated abdominal aorta (aneurysm). Recognition of such abnormalities should prevent an erroneous diagnosis and the additional information may be of clinical value.

  5. Hemostatic powder spray: a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Changela, Kinesh; Papafragkakis, Haris; Ofori, Emmanuel; Ona, Mel A; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury

    2015-05-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The management of gastrointestinal bleeding is often challenging, depending on its location and severity. To date, widely accepted hemostatic treatment options include injection of epinephrine and tissue adhesives such as cyanoacrylate, ablative therapy with contact modalities such as thermal coagulation with heater probe and bipolar hemostatic forceps, noncontact modalities such as photodynamic therapy and argon plasma coagulation, and mechanical hemostasis with band ligation, endoscopic hemoclips, and over-the-scope clips. These approaches, albeit effective in achieving hemostasis, are associated with a 5-10% rebleeding risk. New simple, effective, universal, and safe methods are needed to address some of the challenges posed by the current endoscopic hemostatic techniques. The use of a novel hemostatic powder spray appears to be effective and safe in controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Although initial reports of hemostatic powder spray as an innovative approach to manage gastrointestinal bleeding are promising, further studies are needed to support and confirm its efficacy and safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility, clinical efficacy, and safety of hemostatic powder spray (Hemospray, Cook Medical, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA) as a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review article, we performed an extensive literature search summarizing case reports and case series of Hemospray for the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. Indications, features, technique, deployment, success rate, complications, and limitations are discussed. The combined technical and clinical success rate of Hemospray was 88.5% (207/234) among the human subjects and 81.8% (9/11) among the porcine models studied. Rebleeding occurred within 72 hours post-treatment in 38 patients (38/234; 16.2%) and in three porcine

  6. Hemostatic powder spray: a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Papafragkakis, Haris; Ofori, Emmanuel; Ona, Mel A.; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The management of gastrointestinal bleeding is often challenging, depending on its location and severity. To date, widely accepted hemostatic treatment options include injection of epinephrine and tissue adhesives such as cyanoacrylate, ablative therapy with contact modalities such as thermal coagulation with heater probe and bipolar hemostatic forceps, noncontact modalities such as photodynamic therapy and argon plasma coagulation, and mechanical hemostasis with band ligation, endoscopic hemoclips, and over-the-scope clips. These approaches, albeit effective in achieving hemostasis, are associated with a 5–10% rebleeding risk. New simple, effective, universal, and safe methods are needed to address some of the challenges posed by the current endoscopic hemostatic techniques. The use of a novel hemostatic powder spray appears to be effective and safe in controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Although initial reports of hemostatic powder spray as an innovative approach to manage gastrointestinal bleeding are promising, further studies are needed to support and confirm its efficacy and safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility, clinical efficacy, and safety of hemostatic powder spray (Hemospray, Cook Medical, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA) as a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review article, we performed an extensive literature search summarizing case reports and case series of Hemospray for the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. Indications, features, technique, deployment, success rate, complications, and limitations are discussed. The combined technical and clinical success rate of Hemospray was 88.5% (207/234) among the human subjects and 81.8% (9/11) among the porcine models studied. Rebleeding occurred within 72 hours post-treatment in 38 patients (38/234; 16.2%) and in three porcine

  7. Hemostatic Powders in Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-07-01

    Topical hemostatic agents and powders are an emerging modality in the endoscopic management of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. This systematic review demonstrates the effectiveness and safety of these agents with special emphasis on TC-325 and Ankaferd Blood Stopper. The unique noncontact/nontraumatic application, ability to cover large areas of bleed, and ease of use make these hemostatic agents an attractive option in certain clinical situations, such as massive bleeding with poor visualization, salvage therapy, and diffuse bleeding from luminal malignancies. PMID:26142037

  8. The Clinical Outcomes of Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding Are Not Better than Those of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Min Seob; Cha, Jae Myung; Han, Yong Jae; Yoon, Jin Young; Jeon, Jung Won; Shin, Hyun Phil; Joo, Kwang Ro; Lee, Joung Il

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is increasing; however, predictors of outcomes for patients with LGIB are not as well defined as those for patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). The aim of this study was to identify the clinical outcomes and the predictors of poor outcomes for patients with LGIB, compared to outcomes for patients with UGIB. We identified patients with LGIB or UGIB who underwent endoscopic procedures between July 2006 and February 2013. Propensity score matching was used to improve comparability between LGIB and UGIB groups. The clinical outcomes and predictors of 30-day rebleeding and mortality rate were analyzed between the two groups. In total, 601 patients with UGIB (n = 500) or LGIB (n = 101) were included in the study, and 202 patients with UGIB and 101 patients with LGIB were analyzed after 2:1 propensity score matching. The 30-day rebleeding and mortality rates were 9.9% and 4.5% for the UGIB group, and 16.8% and 5.0% for LGIB group, respectively. After logistic regression analysis, the Rockall score (P = 0.013) and C-reactive protein (CRP; P = 0.047) levels were significant predictors of 30-day mortality in patients with LGIB; however, we could not identify any predictors of rebleeding in patients with LGIB. The clinical outcomes for patients with LGIB are not better than clinical outcomes for patients with UGIB. The clinical Rockall score and serum CRP levels may be used to predict 30-day mortality in patients with LGIB. PMID:27550490

  9. [Gastrointestinal bleeding associated with NSAIDs, antiplatelet therapy and anticoagulant agent].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Angel

    2012-09-01

    Following the trends observed for the last 2-3 years, the most significant and recent advances in the area of gastrointestinal lesions associated with anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have focused on adverse effects in the distal intestine and on issues related to the toxicity associated with antiplatelet therapy. New data reinforce evidence that NSAIDs and antiplatelet therapy are associated with an increased risk of serious complications in both the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract, opening up several lines of research in prevention and therapy based on probiotics, antibiotics and mucosal protectants. The interaction between Helicobacter pylori infection and NSAIDs or aspirin remains controversial but a positive interaction between this bacterium and NSAIDs seems to be reinforced. Several systematic reviews confirm that the combination of gastrotoxic drugs significantly increases the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, which should reinforce existing prevention strategies, and that new anticoagulant agents do not appear to reduce the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. Once gastrointestinal hemorrhage has occurred, several studies have indicated the need to implement simpler prognostic scales than those used today. Notable innovations are the development of a disposable endoscope for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding events and a promising new hemostatic technique, hemospray, applied locally over the bleeding lesion. PMID:23018006

  10. Improving the management of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael J; Hayes, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains a major cause of mortality in patients with cirrhosis. The most common source of bleeding is from gastroesophageal varices but non-variceal bleeding from peptic ulcer disease also carries a significant risk in patients with liver disease. The prognosis is related to the severity of the underlying liver disease, and deaths often occur due to liver failure, infection or renal failure. Optimal management should therefore not only achieve haemostasis but address these complications as well. The management of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis includes a range of medical, endoscopic and radiological interventions. This article updates the recent developments in this area and highlights topics where further research is still required. PMID:26581713

  11. Hemospray treatment is effective for lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Holster, I Lisanne; Brullet, Enric; Kuipers, Ernst J; Campo, Rafel; Fernández-Atutxa, Alberto; Tjwa, Eric T T L

    2014-01-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is diverse in origin and can be substantial, requiring urgent hemostasis. Hemospray is a promising novel hemostatic agent for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). It has been claimed in a small series that the use of Hemospray is also feasible in LGIB. We aimed to expand our knowledge of the application of Hemospray for the treatment of LGIB in a wider range of conditions to further define the optimal patient population for this new therapeutic modality. We analyzed the outcomes of nine unselected consecutive patients with active LGIB treated with Hemospray in two major hospitals in Europe. Initial hemostasis was achieved after Hemospray application in all patients. Rebleeding occurred in two patients (22%) who were on acetyl salicylic acid and presented with spurting bleeds. These preliminary data show that Hemospray can be effective in the management of LGIB, but suggest cautious use for patients on antithrombotic therapy and spurting bleeds. PMID:24218304

  12. Jejunal Amyloidoma - a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of localized amyloid tumor of the jejunum which presented with abdominal pain and gastrointestinal bleeding. We reviewed the pathophysiologic process that precipitates bleeding in this rare tumor. We also examined the documented radiologic and endoscopic features of amyloidosis of the small bowel in the light of our reported case. All with a view to add to the growing evidence on this rare tumor which will facilitate accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:20062677

  13. [Jejunal GIST with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Nelly Manrique, María; Frisancho, Oscar; Rivas Wong, Luz; Palomino, Américo

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a woman of 84 years with a history of cardiac arrhythmia and hemorrhoids. She had multiple hospitalizations and transfusions for symptomatic iron deficiency anemia, endoscopic studies showed only small diverticula and colon polyps. He was later hospitalized with bloody stools red wines, upper endoscopy and colonoscopy showed gastritis, small colonic ulcers, colonic polyp and multiple diverticula. Readmitted with bleeding of obscure origin, on that occasion showed gastritis, antral erosions, small ulcers, colon polyps and colon ulcers in the process of healing, capsule endoscopy showed angiodysplasia in jejunum, anterograde enteroscopy detected some erythematous lesions in proximal jejunum without evidence of bleeding. Again hospitalized for melena and abdominal. PMID:22086325

  14. Novel capsules for potential theranostics of obscure gastrointestinal bleedings.

    PubMed

    Çolak, Bayram; Şakalak, Hüseyin; Çavuşoğlu, Halit; Yavuz, Mustafa Selman

    2016-09-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is identified as persistent or repeated bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract which could not be defined by conventional gastrointestinal endoscopy and radiological examinations. These GI bleedings are assessed through invasive diagnostic and treatment methods including enteroscopy, angiography and endoscopy. In addition, video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is a non-invasive method used to determine the location of the bleeding, however, this does not provide any treatment. Despite of these successful but invasive methods, an effective non-invasive treatment is desperately needed. Herein, we prepare non-invasive theranostic capsules to cure obscure GI bleeding. An effective theranostic capsule containing endothelin as the targeting agent, thrombin-fibrinogen or fibrin as the treating agent, and fluorescein dye as the diagnostic tool is suggested. These theranostic capsules can be administered orally in a simple and non-invasive manner without a risk of complication. By using these novel capsules, one can diagnose obscure GI bleeding with having a possibility of curing. PMID:27515212

  15. Scintigraphic demonstration of gastrointestinal bleeding due to mesenteric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.E.; Coleman, R.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Mesenteric varices can appear as massive, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The small bowel or colon may be involved, varices usually developing at sites of previous surgery or inflammation in patients with portal hypertension. Two patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and protal hypertension presented with rectal bleeding. Tc-99m RBC studies demonstrated varices and extravasation into the adjacent bowel. The varices were documented by mesenteric angiography. Characteristic features of Tc-99m labeled RBC studies can identify mesenteric varices as the cause of intestinal bleeding and localize the abnormal vessels.

  16. The role of capsule endoscopy in acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Nadler, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common cause of hospitalization, resulting in about 400,000 hospital admissions annually, with a mortality rate of 5–10%. It is estimated that 5% of acute GI bleedings are of obscure origin with a normal esophagogastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy. Capsule endoscopy is the state-of-the-art procedure for inspection of the entire small bowel with a high sensitivity for the detection of causes of bleeding. In recent years, many studies have addressed the sensitivity and outcome of capsule-endoscopy procedures in patients with acute GI bleeding. This review looks at the role of capsule endoscopy in the evaluation of patients with acute GI bleeding from either the upper GI tract or small bowel. PMID:24587821

  17. Low hemoglobin levels are associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Hasegawa, Rumiko; Shirai, Yoshinori; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding can be fatal. Blood test variables were reviewed in search of threshold values to detect the presence of occult upper GI bleeding. The records of 1,023 patients who underwent endoscopy at the National Hospital Organization Shimoshizu Hospital from October 2014, to September 2015, were retrospectively reviewed. Of those, 95 had upper GI bleeding. One-way analysis of variance was applied to blood test variables comparing patients with and without upper GI bleeding. Logistic regression analysis was applied to detect the association of blood test parameters with upper GI bleeding, and receiver-operator characteristics were applied to establish threshold values. White blood cell count (WBC), platelet (Plt) count, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels were higher, and hemoglobin (Hb) and albumin (Alb) levels were lower in patients with upper GI bleeding. Logistic regression analysis showed that low Hb was significantly associated with upper GI bleeding and a Hb value of 10.8 g/dl was established as the threshold for the diagnosis. In patients with upper GI bleeding, WBC, Plt count, and BUN levels were higher and Hb and Alb levels were reduced. Hb at 10.8 g/dl was established as a threshold value to detect upper GI bleeding. PMID:27588176

  18. Effective treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding with thalidomide - Chances and limitations.

    PubMed

    Bauditz, Juergen

    2016-03-21

    For more than 50 years bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias has been treated by hormonal therapy with estrogens and progesterons. After a randomized study finally demonstrated that hormones have no effect on bleeding events and transfusion requirements, therapy has switched to endoscopic coagulation. However, angiodysplasias tend to recur over months to years and endoscopy often has to be repeated for long time periods. Thalidomide, which caused severe deformities in newborn children in the 1960s, is now increasingly used after it was shown to suppress tumor necrosis factor alpha, inhibit angiogenesis and to be also effective for treatment of multiple myeloma. In 2011 thalidomide was proven to be highly effective for treatment of bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias in a randomized study. Further evidence by uncontrolled studies exists that thalidomide is also useful for treatment of bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. In spite of this data, endoscopic therapy remains the treatment of choice in many hospitals, as thalidomide is still notorious for its teratogenicity. However, patients with gastrointestinal bleeding related to angiodysplasias are generally at an age in which women have no child-bearing potential. Teratogenicity is therefore no issue for these elderly patients. Other side-effects of thalidomide like neurotoxicity may limit treatment options but can be monitored safely. PMID:27003992

  19. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding*

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; Cardia, Patricia Prando; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26811556

  20. Effective treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding with thalidomide - Chances and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Bauditz, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    For more than 50 years bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias has been treated by hormonal therapy with estrogens and progesterons. After a randomized study finally demonstrated that hormones have no effect on bleeding events and transfusion requirements, therapy has switched to endoscopic coagulation. However, angiodysplasias tend to recur over months to years and endoscopy often has to be repeated for long time periods. Thalidomide, which caused severe deformities in newborn children in the 1960s, is now increasingly used after it was shown to suppress tumor necrosis factor alpha, inhibit angiogenesis and to be also effective for treatment of multiple myeloma. In 2011 thalidomide was proven to be highly effective for treatment of bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias in a randomized study. Further evidence by uncontrolled studies exists that thalidomide is also useful for treatment of bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. In spite of this data, endoscopic therapy remains the treatment of choice in many hospitals, as thalidomide is still notorious for its teratogenicity. However, patients with gastrointestinal bleeding related to angiodysplasias are generally at an age in which women have no child-bearing potential. Teratogenicity is therefore no issue for these elderly patients. Other side-effects of thalidomide like neurotoxicity may limit treatment options but can be monitored safely. PMID:27003992

  1. Swallowable fluorometric capsule for wireless triage of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Nemiroski, A; Ryou, M; Thompson, C C; Westervelt, R M

    2015-12-01

    Real-time detection of gastrointestinal bleeding remains a major challenge because there does not yet exist a minimally invasive technology that can both i) monitor for blood from an active hemorrhage and ii) uniquely distinguish it from blood left over from an inactive hemorrhage. Such a device would be an important tool for clinical triage. One promising solution, which we have proposed previously, is to inject a fluorescent dye into the blood stream and to use it as a distinctive marker of active bleeding by monitoring leakage into the gastrointestinal tract with a wireless fluorometer. This paper reports, for the first time to our knowledge, the development of a swallowable, wireless capsule with a built-in fluorometer capable of detecting fluorescein in blood, and intended for monitoring gastrointestinal bleeding in the stomach. The embedded, compact fluorometer uses pinholes to define a microliter sensing volume and to eliminate bulky optical components. The proof-of-concept capsule integrates optics, low-noise analog sensing electronics, a microcontroller, battery, and low power Zigbee radio, all into a cylindrical package measuring 11 mm × 27 mm and weighing 10 g. Bench-top experiments demonstrate wireless fluorometry with a limit-of-detection of 20 nM aqueous fluorescein. This device represents a major step towards a technology that would enable simple, rapid detection of active gastrointestinal bleeding, a capability that would save precious time and resources and, ultimately, reduce complications in patients. PMID:26490455

  2. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Cirrhotic Patients with Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Biecker, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding related to portal hypertension is a serious complication in patients with liver cirrhosis. Most patients bleed from esophageal or gastric varices, but bleeding from ectopic varices or portal hypertensive gastropathy is also possible. The management of acute bleeding has changed over the last years. Patients are managed with a combination of endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment. The endoscopic treatment of choice for esophageal variceal bleeding is variceal band ligation. Bleeding from gastric varices is treated by injection with cyanoacrylate. Treatment with vasoactive drugs as well as antibiotic treatment is started before or at the time point of endoscopy. The first-line treatment for primary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding is nonselective beta blockers. Pharmacologic therapy is recommended for most patients; band ligation is an alternative in patients with contraindications for or intolerability of beta blockers. Treatment options for secondary prophylaxis include variceal band ligation, beta blockers, a combination of nitrates and beta blockers, and combination of band ligation and pharmacologic treatment. A clear superiority of one treatment over the other has not been shown. Bleeding from portal hypertensive gastropathy or ectopic varices is less common. Treatment options include beta blocker therapy, injection therapy, and interventional radiology. PMID:27335828

  3. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Is Urgent Colonoscopy Necessary for All Hematochezia?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is defined as acute or chronic abnormal blood loss distal to the ligament of Treitz. The incidence of LGIB is only one fifth of that of the upper gastrointestinal tract and is estimated to be 21 to 27 cases per 100,000 adults per year. Acute bleeding is arbitrarily defined as bleeding of <3 days' duration resulting in instability of vital signs, anemia, and/or need for blood transfusion. Chronic bleeding is defined as slow blood loss over a period of several days or longer presenting with symptoms of occult fecal blood, intermittent melena, or scant hematochezia. Bleeding means that the amounts of blood in the feces are too small to be seen but detectable by chemical tests. LGIB is usually chronic and stops spontaneously. Bleeding stop (80%), but male gender and older patients suffer from more severe LGIB. The optimal timing of colonoscopic intervention for LGIB remains uncertain. Urgent colonoscopy may serve to decrease hospital stay. However, urgent colonoscopy is difficult to control, and showed no evidence of improving clinical outcomes or lowering costs as compared with routine elective colonoscopy. PMID:24143306

  4. Endovascular treatment of nonvariceal acute arterial upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Duvnjak, Stevo

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter arterial embolization as treatment of upper nonvariceal gastrointestinal bleeding is increasingly being used after failed primary endoscopic treatment. The results after embolization have become better and surgery still has a high mortality. Embolization is a safe and effective procedure, but its use is has been limited because of relatively high rates of rebleeding and high mortality, both of which are associated with gastrointestinal bleeding and non-gastrointestinal related mortality causes. Transcatheter arterial embolization is a valuable minimal invasive method in the treatment of early rebleeding and does not involve a high risk of treatment associated complications. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary in the treatment of these patients and should comprise gastroenterologists, interventional radiologists, anaesthesiologists, and surgeons to achieve the best possible results. PMID:21160665

  5. Massive extra-enteric gastrointestinal bleeding: angiographic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Koehler, P R; Nelson, J A; Berenson, M M

    1976-04-01

    Two patients with massive gastrointestinal bleeding are reported. One bled from an aneurysm of a branch of the left hepatic artery, the blood reaching the bowel through communication with the biliary tree. The second had an aneurysm of a branch of the splenic artery which communicated with the pancreatic duct. This type of bleeding is intermittent and, consequently, actual extravasation of contrast media is not always seen. Therefore, if one sees an aneurysm of a visceral artery, even if it does not directly supply the enteric tract, one should consider the possibility that it is the origin of the hemorrhage. Pathogenesis, diagnostic modalities, and therapeutic implications are discussed. PMID:1083037

  6. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis and Gastrointestinal Bleeding: What a Surgeon Should Know

    PubMed Central

    Popeskou, S.; Gavillet, M.; Demartines, N.; Christoforidis, D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents to the surgical community an unusual and often ignored cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemophagocytic syndrome or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare medical entity characterized by phagocytosis of red blood cells, leucocytes, platelets, and their precursors in the bone marrow by activated macrophages. When intestinal bleeding is present, the management is very challenging with extremely high mortality rates. Early diagnosis and treatment seem to be the most important factors for a successful outcome. We present two cases and review another 18 from the literature. PMID:26199785

  7. Visceral Kaposi's Sarcoma Presenting as Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Naomi; McKenzie, Devon; Fonseca, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Since the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the incidence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome- (AIDS-) related Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) has decreased dramatically. While cutaneous KS is the most common and well-known manifestation, knowledge of alternative sites such as the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is important. GI-KS is particularly dangerous because of its potential for serious complications including perforation, obstruction, or bleeding. We report a rare case of GI-KS presenting as upper GI bleeding in a human immunodeficiency virus- (HIV-) infected transgendered individual. Prompt diagnosis and early initiation of therapy are the cornerstones for management of this potentially severe disease. PMID:26064706

  8. Gastrointestinal and urinary tract bleeding in methanol toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mostafazadeh, Babak; Talaie, Haleh; Mahdavinejad, Arezou; Mesri, Mehdi; Emanhadi, Mohammadali

    2008-01-01

    Methanol is a clear, colourless liquid with a smell and taste similar to ethanol. Intoxications with methanol are still frequent in large parts of the developing world. Haemodialysis should be done in cases of severe toxicity to eliminate toxic metabolites. In this case report, we describe a 37-year-old chronic alcohol abuser with methanol poisoning, who developed haematuria and upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding after haemodialysis. The upper GI endoscopic findings showed only low grade oesophageal ulceration. Haematuria and upper GI bleeding in our patient might also have cause by the effect of heparinisation during haemodialysis. PMID:21716826

  9. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding from a jejunal Dieulafoy lesion

    PubMed Central

    Kozan, Ramazan; Gülen, Merter; Yılmaz, Tonguç Utku; Leventoğlu, Sezai; Yılmaz, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Dieulafoy lesion should be considered in massive gastrointestinal bleeding that may be difficult to localize. If the endoscopic and angiographic approaches fail, surgery must be considered according to the patient’s clinical condition within an appropriate time. Although mostly seen in the stomach of old male patients with co-morbidities, here we presented a Dieulafoy lesion in the jejunum of a 21-year-old female patient without any significant comorbidity. After endoscopic and angiographic attempts, surgical resection with the help of intraoperative endoscopy was performed. It was shown that perioperative endoscopy may reveal the localization of jejunal bleedings and may guide the definitive treatment. PMID:25931935

  10. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding from a jejunal Dieulafoy lesion.

    PubMed

    Kozan, Ramazan; Gülen, Merter; Yılmaz, Tonguç Utku; Leventoğlu, Sezai; Yılmaz, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Dieulafoy lesion should be considered in massive gastrointestinal bleeding that may be difficult to localize. If the endoscopic and angiographic approaches fail, surgery must be considered according to the patient's clinical condition within an appropriate time. Although mostly seen in the stomach of old male patients with co-morbidities, here we presented a Dieulafoy lesion in the jejunum of a 21-year-old female patient without any significant comorbidity. After endoscopic and angiographic attempts, surgical resection with the help of intraoperative endoscopy was performed. It was shown that perioperative endoscopy may reveal the localization of jejunal bleedings and may guide the definitive treatment. PMID:25931935

  11. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-11-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  12. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  13. Trends on gastrointestinal bleeding and mortality: Where are we standing?

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    Bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract and its management are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The predisposing factors that led to the occurrence of these hemorrhagic instances are largely linked to the life style of the affected persons. Designing a new strategy aimed at educating the publics and improving their awareness of the problem could effectively help in eradicating this problem with no associated risks and in bringing the mortality rates down to almost zero. PMID:22468077

  14. Obscure and occult gastrointestinal bleeding: comparison of different imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Filippone, Antonella; Cianci, Roberta; Milano, Angelo; Pace, Erika; Neri, Matteo; Cotroneo, Antonio Raffaele

    2012-02-01

    Patients with persistent, recurrent, or intermittent bleeding from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract for which no definite cause has been identified by initial esophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy, or conventional radiologic evaluation are considered to have an obscure GI bleeding (OGIB). The diagnosis and management of patients with OGIB is challenging, often requiring extensive and expensive workups. The main objective is the identification of the etiology and site of bleeding, which should be as rapidly accomplished as possible, in order to establish the most appropriate therapy. The introduction of capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy and the recent improvements in CT and MRI techniques have revolutionized the approach to patients with OGIB, allowing the visualization of the entire GI tract, particularly the small bowel, until now considered as the "dark continent" . In this article we review and compare the radiologic and endoscopic examinations currently used in occult and OGIB, focusing on diagnostic patterns, pitfalls, strengths, weaknesses, and value in patients' management. PMID:21912990

  15. [Diagnostic performance of colonoscopy in lower gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Moranta, Francisco; Berrozpe, Ana; Guardiola, Jordi

    2011-10-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency that usually has a favorable prognosis. However, these events generate high resource use. The procedure of choice is colonoscopy with prior colonic preparation due to its high diagnostic performance and safety and the possibility of endoscopic therapy. Emergency colonoscopy has advantages over elective colonoscopy, showing higher diagnostic yield and superior detection of stigmata of recent bleeding, increasing the probability of endoscopic treatment. Predictive models of bleeding severity and recurrence have been published, allowing resource use to be rationalized, mainly by reducing hospital stay in low-risk patients. Nevertheless, the optimal timing of emergency colonoscopy has not been established and the impact of endoscopic treatment on prognosis is controversial. PMID:21885162

  16. Re-bleeding events in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding after negative capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães-Costa, Pedro; Bispo, Miguel; Santos, Sofia; Couto, Gilberto; Matos, Leopoldo; Chagas, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate long-term re-bleeding events after a negative capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) and the risk factors associated with the procedure. METHODS: Patients referred to Hospital Egas Moniz (Lisboa, Portugal) between January 2006 and October 2012 with OGIB and a negative capsule endoscopy were retrospectively analyzed. The following study variables were included: demographic data, comorbidities, bleeding-related drug use, hemoglobin level, indication for capsule endoscopy, post procedure details, work-up and follow-up. Re-bleeding rates and associated factors were assessed using a Cox proportional hazard analysis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the cumulative incidence of re-bleeding at 1, 3 and 5 years, and the differences between factors were evaluated. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 640 patients referred for OGIB investigation. Wireless capsule endoscopy was deemed negative in 113 patients (17.7%). A total of 64.6% of the population was female, and the median age was 69 years. The median follow-up was forty-eight months (interquartile range 24-60). Re-bleeding occurred in 27.4% of the cases. The median time to re-bleeding was fifteen months (interquartile range 2-33). In 22.6% (n = 7) of the population, small-bowel angiodysplasia was identified as the culprit lesion. A univariate analysis showed that age > 65 years old, chronic kidney disease, aortic stenosis, anticoagulant use and overt OGIB were risk factors for re-bleeding; however, on a multivariate analysis, there were no risk factors for re-bleeding. The cumulative risk of re-bleeding at 1, 3 and 5 years of follow-up was 12.9%, 25.6% and 31.5%, respectively. Patients who presented with overt OGIB tended to re-bleed sooner (median time for re-bleeding: 8.5 mo vs 22 mo). CONCLUSION: Patients with OGIB despite a negative capsule endoscopy have a significant re-bleeding risk; therefore, these patients require an extended follow

  17. Rare case of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Xie, Xiang-Jun; Geng, Chang-Xin; Zhan, Shu-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is a prototypic esophageal motility disorder with complications including aspiration-pneumonia, esophagitis, esophageal-tracheal fistula, spontaneous rupture of the esophagus, and squamous cell carcinoma. However, achalasia is rarely associated with esophageal stones and ulcer formation that lead to upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Here, we report the case of a 61-year-old woman who was admitted to our department after vomiting blood for six hours. Physical examination revealed that the patient had severe anemia and mild palpitation in the upper abdomen. CT revealed lower esophageal dilatation and esophageal wall thickening, and an emergency upper endoscopy showed that the esophagus was substantially expanded by a dark round stone, with multiple ulcers on the esophageal wall and a slit in the cardiac mucosa with a large clot attached. The patient’s history included ingestion of 1 kg hawthorn three days prior. The acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding was caused by Mallory-Weiss syndrome associated with achalasia and an esophageal stone. For patients with achalasia, preventing excessive ingestion of tannins is crucial to avoid complications such as bleeding and rupture. PMID:25789307

  18. Endoscopic Evaluation of Upper and Lower Gastro-Intestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ray-Offor, Emeka; Elenwo, Solomon N

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A myriad of pathologies lead to gastro-intestinal bleeding (GIB). The common clinical presentations are hematemesis, melena, and hematochezia. Endoscopy aids localization and treatment of these lesions. Aims: The aim was to study the differential diagnosis of GIB emphasizing the role of endoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of GIB. Patients and Methods: A prospective study of patients with GIB referred to the Endoscopy unit of two health facilities in Port Harcourt Nigeria from February 2012 to August 2014. The variables studied included: Demographics, clinical presentation, risk score, endoscopic findings, therapeutic procedure, and outcome. Data were collated and analyzed using SPSS version 20 software. Results: A total of 159 upper and lower gastro-intestinal (GI) endoscopies were performed during the study period with 59 cases of GI bleeding. There were 50 males and 9 females with an age range of 13–86 years (mean age 52.4 ± 20.6 years). The primary presentations were hematochezia, hematemesis, and melena in 44 (75%), 9 (15%), and 6 (10%) cases, respectively. Hemorrhoids were the leading cause of lower GIB seen in 15 cases (41%). The majority of pathologies in upper GIB were seen in the stomach (39%): Gastritis and benign gastric ulcer. Injection sclerotherapy was successfully performed in the hemorrhoids and a case of gastric varices. The mortality recorded was 0%. Conclusion: Endoscopy is vital in the diagnosis and treatment of GIB. Gastritis and Haemorrhoid are the most common causes of upper and lower GI bleeding respectively, in our environment PMID:26425062

  19. Gastrointestinal bleeding and obstructive jaundice: Think of hepatic artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Vultaggio, Fabrice; Morère, Pierre-Henri; Constantin, Christophe; Christodoulou, Michel; Roulin, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Hemobilia is an uncommon and potential life-threatening condition mainly due to hepato-biliary tree traumatic or iatrogenic injuries. Spontaneously ruptured aneurysm of the hepatic artery is seldom described. We report the case of an 89-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain, jaundice and gastrointestinal bleeding, whose ultrasound and computed tomography revealed a non-traumatic, spontaneous aneurysm of the right hepatic artery. The oeso-gastro-duodenoscopy and colonoscopy did not reveal any bleeding at the ampulla of Vater, nor anywhere else. Selective angiography confirmed the diagnosis of hepatic artery aneurysm and revealed a full hepatic artery originating from the superior mesenteric artery. The patient was successfully treated by selective embolization of microcoils. We discuss the etiologies of hemobilia and its treatment with selective embolization, which remains favored over surgical treatment. Although aneurysm of the hepatic artery is rare, especially without trauma, a high index of suspicion is needed in order to ensure appropriate treatment. PMID:27358680

  20. Gastrointestinal bleeding and obstructive jaundice: Think of hepatic artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Vultaggio, Fabrice; Morère, Pierre-Henri; Constantin, Christophe; Christodoulou, Michel; Roulin, Didier

    2016-06-27

    Hemobilia is an uncommon and potential life-threatening condition mainly due to hepato-biliary tree traumatic or iatrogenic injuries. Spontaneously ruptured aneurysm of the hepatic artery is seldom described. We report the case of an 89-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain, jaundice and gastrointestinal bleeding, whose ultrasound and computed tomography revealed a non-traumatic, spontaneous aneurysm of the right hepatic artery. The oeso-gastro-duodenoscopy and colonoscopy did not reveal any bleeding at the ampulla of Vater, nor anywhere else. Selective angiography confirmed the diagnosis of hepatic artery aneurysm and revealed a full hepatic artery originating from the superior mesenteric artery. The patient was successfully treated by selective embolization of microcoils. We discuss the etiologies of hemobilia and its treatment with selective embolization, which remains favored over surgical treatment. Although aneurysm of the hepatic artery is rare, especially without trauma, a high index of suspicion is needed in order to ensure appropriate treatment. PMID:27358680

  1. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding: gallstone-induced auto-sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kalipershad, Sujala; Chung, Kin Tong; Jehangir, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    A 67-year-old gentleman with no significant medical history of note presented with sudden onset of epigastric pain, coffee ground vomiting and passing black tarry stool. A series of investigations including blood tests, ultrasound scan, CT abdomen and pelvis with contrast and endoscopy failed to reveal any site of active bleeding. The mystery remained and the patient continued to have upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A second CT abdomen and pelvis with contrast was carried out and showed evidence of contrast extravasation into the duodenum (figure 3). An exploratory laparotomy showed no obvious site of haemorrhage and a loop jejunostomy was performed. The diagnosis of gallstone-induced auto-sphincterotomy was only made, using gastroscope via jejunostomy, when a big gallstone was found in the third part of the duodenum and the papilla was ruptured (figure 5). PMID:22914239

  2. Role of Medical Therapy for Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Fortinsky, Kyle J; Bardou, Marc; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-07-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Mortality from UGIB has remained 5-10% over the past decade. This article presents current evidence-based recommendations for the medical management of UGIB. Preendoscopic management includes initial resuscitation, risk stratification, appropriate use of blood products, and consideration of nasogastric tube insertion, erythromycin, and proton pump inhibitor therapy. The use of postendoscopic intravenous proton pump inhibitors is strongly recommended for certain patient populations. Postendoscopic management also includes the diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori, appropriate use of proton pump inhibitors and iron replacement therapy. PMID:26142032

  3. Three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by severe gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yoshiki; Miura, Hiroki; Mori, Yuji; Sugata, Ken; Nakajima, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Yasuto; Morooka, Masashi; Tsuge, Ikuya; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Taniguchi, Koki; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide in children. We report three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by various severity of gastrointestinal bleeding. Two patients (cases 1 and 2) recovered completely without any specific treatments. One patient (case 3) died despite extensive treatments including a red blood cell transfusion and endoscopic hemostatic therapy. Rotavirus genotypes G1P[8] and G9P[8] were detected in cases 2 and 3, respectively. Rotavirus antigenemia levels were not high at the onset of melena, suggesting that systemic rotaviral infection does not play an important role in causing melena. PMID:26100228

  4. Endoscopic management of nonvariceal, nonulcer upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Tjwa, Eric T T L; Holster, I Lisanne; Kuipers, Ernst J

    2014-12-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is the most common emergency condition in gastroenterology. Although peptic ulcer and esophagogastric varices are the predominant causes, other conditions account for up to 50% of UGIBs. These conditions, among others, include angiodysplasia, Dieulafoy and Mallory-Weiss lesions, gastric antral vascular ectasia, and Cameron lesions. Upper GI cancer as well as lesions of the biliary tract and pancreas may also result in severe UGIB. This article provides an overview of the endoscopic management of these lesions, including the role of novel therapeutic modalities such as hemostatic powder and over-the-scope-clips. PMID:25440920

  5. Highlighted Steps of the Management Algorithm in Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding - Case Reports and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Andrei, Gabriel Nicolae; Popa, Bogdan; Gulie, Laurentiu; Diaconescu, Bogdan Ionut; Martian, Bogdan Valeriu; Bejenaru, Mircea; Beuran, Mircea

    2016-01-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a major problem worldwide, being a rare and life threatening condition, with a mortality rate situated between 2 and 4%. Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding is solvent for 1 - 2% of the entire hospital emergencies, 15% presenting as massive bleeding and up to 5% requiring surgery. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding can be classified depending on their location in the small or large intestine. The small bowel is the rarest site of lower gastrointestinal bleeding, at the same time being the commonest cause of obscure bleeding. 5% of total lower GI bleeding appears in the small bowel. When endoscopic therapy associated with medical treatment are insufficient, endovascular intervention can be lifesaving. Unfortunately in some rare cases of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding with hemo-dynamic instability and the angiography performed being unable to locate the source of bleeding, the last therapeutic resource remains surgery. In the following we exemplify two cases of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding which were resolved in different ways, followed by a thorough description of the different types of available treatment and finally, in the conclusions, we systematize the most important stages of the management algorithm in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26988545

  6. Acid-base Balance in Acute Gastrointestinal Bleeding*

    PubMed Central

    Northfield, T. C.; Kirby, B. J.; Tattersfield, Anne E.

    1971-01-01

    Acid-base balance has been studied in 21 patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A low plasma bicarbonate concentration was found in nine patients, accompanied in each case by a base deficit of more than 3 mEq/litre, indicating a metabolic acidosis. Three patients had a low blood pH. Hyperlactataemia appeared to be a major cause of the acidosis. This was not accompanied by a raised blood pyruvate concentration. The hyperlactataemia could not be accounted for on the basis of hyperventilation, intravenous infusion of dextrose, or arterial hypoxaemia. Before blood transfusion it was most pronounced in patients who were clinically shocked, suggesting that it may have resulted from poor tissue perfusion and anaerobic glycolysis. Blood transfusion resulted in a rise in lactate concentration in seven patients who were not clinically shocked, and failed to reverse a severe uncompensated acidosis in a patient who was clinically shocked. These effects of blood transfusion are probably due to the fact that red blood cells in stored bank blood, with added acid-citrate-dextrose solution, metabolize the dextrose anaerobically to lactic acid. Monitoring of acid-base balance is recommended in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding who are clinically shocked. A metabolic acidosis can then be corrected with intravenous sodium bicarbonate. PMID:5313902

  7. Gastrointestinal angiodysplasia is associated with significant gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with continuous left ventricular assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Justin; Jackson, Christian; Schlepp, Greg; Strong, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Patients with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) have a 65 % incidence of bleeding events within the first year. The majority of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) is from gastrointestinal angiodyplasia (GIAD). The primary aim of the study was to determine whether GIAD was associated with a higher rate of significant bleeding, an increased number of bleeding events per year, and a higher rate of transfusion compared to non-GIAD sources. Patients and methods: This retrospective cohort study included 118 individuals who received a LVAD at a tertiary medical center from 2006 through 2014. Patients were subdivided into GIB and non-GIB for comparison of patient demographics, comorbid conditions, and laboratory data. GIB was further divided into sources of GIB, GIAD, obscure, or non-GIAD to establish severity of bleeding, rate of re-bleeding, and transfusion rate. Results: GIAD is associated with an increased number of bleeding events compared to non-GIAD sources of GIB (2.07 vs 1.23, P = 0.01) and a higher number of bleeding events per year (0.806 vs. 0.455 P = 0.001). GIAD compared to non-GIAD sources of GIB was associated with an increased incidence of major bleeding (100 % vs 60 %, P = 0.006) and increased rates of transfusion (8.8 vs 2.95 units, P = 0.0004). Cox Regression analysis between non-GIB and GIAD demonstrated increased risk with age (P = 0.001), history of chronic kidney disease (P = 0.005), and length of stay after LVAD implantation of more than 45 days (P = 0.04). History of hypertension (P = 0.045), diabetes mellitus (P = 0.016), and male gender was associated with decreased risk (P = 0.04). Conclusion: Patients with a continuous-flow LVAD who develop a GIB secondary to GIAD have a higher rate of major bleeding, multiple bleeding events, and require more transfusions to achieve stabilization compared to patients who do not have GIAD. PMID

  8. Critical gastrointestinal bleed due to secondary aortoenteric fistula

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Mohammad U.; Ucbilek, Enver; Sherwal, Amanpreet S.

    2015-01-01

    Secondary aortoenteric fistula (SAEF) is a rare yet lethal cause of gastrointestinal bleeding and occurs as a complication of an abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Clinical presentation may vary from herald bleeding to overt sepsis and requires high index of suspicion and clinical judgment to establish diagnosis. Initial diagnostic tests may include computerized tomography scan and esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Each test has variable sensitivity and specificity. Maintaining the hemodynamic status, control of bleeding, removal of the infected graft, and infection control may improve clinical outcomes. This review entails the updated literature on diagnosis and management of SAEF. A literature search was conducted for articles published in English, on PubMed and Scopus using the following search terms: secondary, aortoenteric, aorto-enteric, aortoduodenal, aorto-duodenal, aortoesophageal, and aorto-esophageal. A combination of MeSH terms and Boolean operators were used to device search strategy. In addition, a bibliography of clinically relevant articles was searched to find additional articles (Appendix A). The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive update on the diagnosis, management, and prognosis of SAEF. PMID:26653698

  9. Critical gastrointestinal bleed due to secondary aortoenteric fistula.

    PubMed

    Malik, Mohammad U; Ucbilek, Enver; Sherwal, Amanpreet S

    2015-01-01

    Secondary aortoenteric fistula (SAEF) is a rare yet lethal cause of gastrointestinal bleeding and occurs as a complication of an abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Clinical presentation may vary from herald bleeding to overt sepsis and requires high index of suspicion and clinical judgment to establish diagnosis. Initial diagnostic tests may include computerized tomography scan and esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Each test has variable sensitivity and specificity. Maintaining the hemodynamic status, control of bleeding, removal of the infected graft, and infection control may improve clinical outcomes. This review entails the updated literature on diagnosis and management of SAEF. A literature search was conducted for articles published in English, on PubMed and Scopus using the following search terms: secondary, aortoenteric, aorto-enteric, aortoduodenal, aorto-duodenal, aortoesophageal, and aorto-esophageal. A combination of MeSH terms and Boolean operators were used to device search strategy. In addition, a bibliography of clinically relevant articles was searched to find additional articles (Appendix A). The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive update on the diagnosis, management, and prognosis of SAEF. PMID:26653698

  10. Heparin as a pharmacologic intervention to induce positive scintiscan in occult gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, T.K.; Brantly, M.

    1984-04-01

    The value of using heparin as a pharmacologic intervention to induce a positive scintiscan was studied in a patient with chronic occult gastrointestinal bleeding. When all standard diagnostic tests (upper and lower gastrointestinal series, upper and lower endoscopy, and conventional noninterventional Tc-99m RBC imaging) fail to detect and localize gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient who has definite clinical evidence (guaiac positive stool and dropping hemoglobin, hematocrit) of chronic occult gastrointestinal oozing, heparin may be used (with proper precaution) as a last resort to aid in the scintigraphic detection and localization of chronic occult gastrointestinal bleeding.

  11. The BUN/creatinine ratio in localizing gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Felber, S; Rosenthal, P; Henton, D

    1988-01-01

    Localizing the bleeding site in pediatric patients with gastrointestinal hemorrhage may require invasive and costly diagnostic procedures. A simple index to discriminate upper and lower bleeding sources would be invaluable. We evaluated the reliability of the calculated blood urea nitrogen/creatinine (BUN/Cr) ratio in segregating upper from lower gastrointestinal bleeding sites in 40 children. For upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, the calculated BUN/Cr ratios (mg/mg) ranged from 10 to 140, with a mean value of 34. For lower gastrointestinal bleeders, the BUN/Cr ratios ranged from 3.3 to 30, with a mean value of 16. All BUN/Cr ratios greater than 30 corresponded to patients with documented upper gastrointestinal bleeding sources. Calculation of the BUN/Cr ratio in the initial evaluation of gastrointestinal bleeding may prove useful in guiding the sequence of diagnostic procedures and examinations. PMID:3263488

  12. Gastrointestinal Bleeding as a Complication of Serial Transverse Enteroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jeremy G.; Stamm, Danielle A.; Modi, Biren P.; Duggan, Christopher; Jaksic, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Serial transverse enteroplasty (STEP) lengthens and tapers bowel in patients with intestinal failure and has a generally low complication profile. Evaluation and treatment of serious gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) in three STEP patients is described. Methods Records of patients participating in an interdisciplinary intestinal rehabilitation program were reviewed to identify those who underwent STEP and had GIB necessitating red blood cell transfusion. Results Of 296 patients, 23 underwent STEP and 3 (13%) had subsequent GIB requiring transfusion. Underlying diagnoses were multiple atresias/intrauterine volvulus, gastroschisis, and gastroschisis with volvulus. STEP was performed at ages ranging from 3–5 months, using 3–8 stapler firings with an increase in mean bowel length from 23 to 45 cm. GIB was noted at 10–33 months post-op and resulted in 2–7 transfusions per patient over a period of 3–16 months. Gastrointestinal endoscopic evaluation demonstrated ulcers adjacent to the staple lines in two patients. Both had improvement of GIB with enteral antibiotics, sulfasalazine, topical enteral steroids and, ultimately, a period of bowel rest. The third patient had histological evidence of eosinophilic enteritis and was treated sequentially with antibiotics, sulfasalazine, enteral steroids, and an elemental diet. In all three, hemoglobin levels improved despite persistent occult bleeding. Conclusions Significant GIB is a potential late complication of STEP. Endoscopy identified the underlying source of GIB in all three patients. A combination of enteral antibiotics, anti-inflammatory medications, and bowel rest was effective in the treatment of post-STEP GIB, without the need for additional bowel resection. PMID:24851761

  13. Distribution of bleeding gastrointestinal angioectasias in a Western population

    PubMed Central

    Bollinger, Elizabeth; Raines, Daniel; Saitta, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To define which segments of the gastrointestinal tract are most likely to yield angioectasias for ablative therapy. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed for patients treated in the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Gastroenterology clinics between the dates of July 1, 2007 and October 1, 2010. The selection of cases for review was initiated by use of our electronic medical record to identify all patients with a diagnosis of angioectasia, angiodysplasia, or arteriovenous malformation. Of these cases, chart reviews identified patients who had a complete evaluation of their gastrointestinal tract as defined by at least one upper endoscopy, colonoscopy and small bowel capsule endoscopy within the past three years. Patients without evidence of overt gastrointestinal bleeding or iron deficiency anemia associated with intestinal angioectasias were classified as asymptomatic and excluded from this analysis. Thirty-five patients with confirmed, bleeding intestinal angioectasias who had undergone complete endoscopic evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract were included in the final analysis. RESULTS: A total of 127 cases were reviewed. Sixty-six were excluded during subsequent screening due to lack of complete small bowel evaluation and/or lack of documentation of overt bleeding or iron deficiency anemia. The 61 remaining cases were carefully examined with independent review of endoscopic images as well as complete capsule endoscopy videos. This analysis excluded 26 additional cases due to insufficient records/images for review, incomplete capsule examination, poor capsule visualization or lack of confirmation of typical angioectasias by the principal investigator on independent review. Thirty-five cases met criteria for final analysis. All study patients were age 50 years or older and 13 patients (37.1%) had chronic kidney disease stage 3 or higher. Twenty of 35 patients were taking aspirin (81 mg or 325 mg), clopidogrel, and/or warfarin

  14. Modern management of acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hegade, Vinod S; Sood, Ruchit; Mohammed, Noor; Moreea, Sulleman

    2013-10-01

    An acute upper gastrointestinal bleed (AUGIB) often represents a life-threatening event and is recognised universally as a common cause of emergency hospitalisation. Large observational studies have improved our understanding of the disease characteristics and its impact on mortality but despite significant advancement in endoscopic management, mortality remains high, particularly in elderly patients and those with multiple comorbidities. Skilled assessment, risk stratification and prompt resuscitation are essential parts of patient care, with endoscopy playing a key role in the definitive management. A successful outcome partly relies on the clinician's familiarity with current guidelines and recommendations, including the National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines published in 2012. Validated risk stratification scores, such as the Blatchford and Rockall score, facilitate early discharge of low-risk patients as well as help in identifying those needing early endoscopic intervention. Major advances in therapeutic endoscopy, including more recently, the development of non-toxic proprietary powders (Hemospray and EndoClot), have resulted in the development of effective treatments of bleeding lesions, reduction in rebleeding rates and the need for emergency surgery. The role of proton-pump inhibitor therapy prior to endoscopy and the level of optimum red cell transfusion in the setting of AUGIB remain fields that require further research. PMID:23924686

  15. Predictors of poor outcome in gastrointestinal bleeding in emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Ender; Karaca, Mehmet Ali; Aldemir, Deniz; Ozmen, M Mahir

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prognostic risk factors of gastrointestinal bleeding in emergency department cases. METHODS: The trial was a retrospective single-center study involving 600 patients over 18-years-old and carried out with approval by the Institutional Ethics Committee. Patient data included demographic characteristics, symptoms at admission, past medical history, vital signs, laboratory results, endoscopy and colonoscopy results, length of hospital stay, need of intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and mortality. Mortality rate was the principal endpoint of the study, while duration of hospital stay, required interventional treatment, and admission to the ICU were secondary endpoints. RESULTS: The mean age of patients was 61.92-years-old. Among the 600 total patients, 363 (60.5%) underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and the most frequent diagnoses were duodenal ulcer (19.2%) and gastric ulcer (12.8%). One-hundred-and-fifteen (19.2%) patients required endoscopic treatment, 20 (3.3%) required surgical treatment, and 5 (0.8%) required angiographic embolization. The mean length of hospital stay was 5.21 ± 5.85 d. The mortality rate was 6.3%. The ICU admission rate was 5.3%. Patients with syncope, higher blood glucose levels, and coronary artery disease had significantly higher ICU admission rates (P = 0.029, P = 0.043, and P = 0.002, respectively). Patients with low thrombocyte levels, high creatinine, high international normalized ratio, and high serum transaminase levels had significantly longer hospital stay (P = 0.02, P = 0.001, P = 0.019, and P = 0.005, respectively). Patients who died had significantly higher serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels (P = 0.016 and P = 0.038), and significantly lower mean blood pressure and oxygen saturation (P = 0.004 and P = 0.049). Malignancy and low Glasgow coma scale (GCS) were independent predictive factors of mortality. CONCLUSION: Prognostic factors for gastrointestinal bleeding in emergency room cases

  16. Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding - review the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis methods

    PubMed Central

    Szura, Mirosław; Pasternak, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is a condition that requires immediate medical intervention and has a high associated mortality rate (exceeding 10%). The vast majority of upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases are due to peptic ulcers. Helicobacter pylori infection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. Endoscopic therapy has generally been recommended as the first-line treatment for upper gastrointestinal bleeding as it has been shown to reduce recurrent bleeding, the need for surgery and mortality. Early endoscopy (within 24 h of hospital admission) has a greater impact than delayed endoscopy on the length of hospital stay and requirement for blood transfusion. This paper aims to review and compare the efficacy of the types of endoscopic hemostasis most commonly used to control non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding by pooling data from the literature. PMID:26421105

  17. Application of cyanoacrylate in difficult-to-arrest acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Baniukiewicz, Andrzej; Świdnicka-Siergiejko, Agnieszka; Dąbrowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency. Although endoscopic treatment is effective in controlling non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, in cases of persistent bleeding radiological or surgical interventions are required. Application of cyanoacrylate for treatment of difficult-to-arrest non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is poorly investigated. We describe patients in whom cyanoacrylate for acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding was used to stop the bleeding after failure of conventional endoscopic treatment. Five patients were treated with cyanoacrylate application (injection and/or spraying) for persistent bleeding (duodenal ulcer in 3, gastric ulcer in 1 and gastric Dieulafoy's lesion in 1) despite conventional endoscopic therapies. Hemostasis was achieved in all patients (100%). One patient (20%) developed recurrent bleeding 4 days after initial treatment. No complications or adverse events attributed to the cyanoacrylate application during the follow-up period of 57 days were observed. Application of cyanoacrylate is a safe and effective method to achieve immediate hemostasis when conventional endoscopic treatment is unsuccessful. This technique is easy to perform and should be considered in cases of patients with difficult-to-arrest acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25337181

  18. [New methods for endoscopic hemostasis: focus on non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Albert, J G; Peiffer, K H

    2016-03-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a frequent emergency in daily clinical practice of a gastroenterologist. While incidence and mortality of gastrointestinal bleeding are decreasing in many countries, numbers of endoscopic procedures are increasing. Endoscopic therapy of non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is still mainly based on "classical" procedures like injection of vasoactive drugs (i. e. epinephrine) or blood derivates, application of through-the-scope hemoclips (TTSC), Argon plasma coagulation and bipolar coagulation. However, in the last years new endoscopic techniques especially for non-variceal gastrointestinal bleedings have become available and enriched our endoscopic equipment. For example, over-the-scope clips (OTSCs) surpass the size of TTSCs and have been successfully established for treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding and leak closure of fistulas and perforations. In addition, hemostatic powders were shown to achieve primary hemostasis in several cases of gastrointestinal bleeding. Besides a brief overview of "classical" endoscopic procedures for hemostasis of non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding, this review focuses on new epidemiological data and uprising methods for endoscopic hemostasis. PMID:26894683

  19. Comorbidities Affect Risk of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Crooks, Colin John; West, Joe; Card, Timothy Richard

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims The incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) has not been reduced despite the decreasing incidence of peptic ulcers, strategies to eradicate Helicobacter pylori infection, and prophylaxis against ulceration from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Other factors might therefore be involved in the pathogenesis of GIB. Patients with GIB have increasing nongastrointestinal comorbidity, so we investigated whether comorbidity itself increased the risk of GIB. Methods We conducted a matched case-control study using linked primary and secondary care data collected in England from April 1, 1997 through August 31, 2010. Patients older than 15 years with nonvariceal GIB (n = 16,355) were matched to 5 controls by age, sex, year, and practice (n = 81,636). All available risk factors for GIB were extracted and modeled using conditional logistic regression. Adjusted associations with nongastrointestinal comorbidity, defined using the Charlson Index, were then tested and sequential population attributable fractions calculated. Results Comorbidity had a strong graded association with GIB; the adjusted odds ratio for a single comorbidity was 1.43 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.35–1.52) and for multiple or severe comorbidity was 2.26 (95% CI: 2.14%–2.38%). The additional population attributable fraction for comorbidity (19.8%; 95% CI: 18.4%–21.2%) was considerably larger than that for any other measured risk factor, including aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use (3.0% and 3.1%, respectively). Conclusions Nongastrointestinal comorbidity is an independent risk factor for GIB, and contributes to a greater proportion of patients with bleeding in the population than other recognized risk factors. These findings could help in the assessment of potential causes of GIB, and also explain why the incidence of GIB remains high in an aging population. PMID:23470619

  20. Recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding and hepatic infarction after liver biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Bishehsari, Faraz; Ting, Peng-Sheng; Green, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysms (HAP) are rare events, particularly after liver biopsy, but can be associated with serious complications. Therefore a high suspicion is necessary for timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment. We report on a case of HAP that potentially formed after a liver biopsy in a patient with sarcoidosis. The HAP in our case was virtually undetectable initially by angiography but resulted in several complications including recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, hemorrhagic cholecystitis and finally hepatic infarction with abscess formation until it became detectable at a size of 5-mm. The patient remains asymptomatic over a year after endovascular embolization of the HAP. In this report, we demonstrate that a small HAP can avoid detection by angiography at an early stage while being symptomatic for a prolonged course. A high clinical suspicion with a close clinical/radiological follow-up is needed in symptomatic patients with history of liver biopsy despite initial negative work up. Once diagnosed, HAP can be safely and effectively treated by endovascular embolization. PMID:24587666

  1. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk scores: Who, when and why?

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Sara; Gonçalves, Tiago Cúrdia; Magalhães, Joana; Cotter, José

    2016-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) remains a significant cause of hospital admission. In order to stratify patients according to the risk of the complications, such as rebleeding or death, and to predict the need of clinical intervention, several risk scores have been proposed and their use consistently recommended by international guidelines. The use of risk scoring systems in early assessment of patients suffering from UGIB may be useful to distinguish high-risks patients, who may need clinical intervention and hospitalization, from low risk patients with a lower chance of developing complications, in which management as outpatients can be considered. Although several scores have been published and validated for predicting different outcomes, the most frequently cited ones are the Rockall score and the Glasgow Blatchford score (GBS). While Rockall score, which incorporates clinical and endoscopic variables, has been validated to predict mortality, the GBS, which is based on clinical and laboratorial parameters, has been studied to predict the need of clinical intervention. Despite the advantages previously reported, their use in clinical decisions is still limited. This review describes the different risk scores used in the UGIB setting, highlights the most important research, explains why and when their use may be helpful, reflects on the problems that remain unresolved and guides future research with practical impact. PMID:26909231

  2. Metastatic Periampullary Tumor from Hepatocellular Carcinoma Presenting as Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Nicholas N.; Guindi, Maha; Jamil, Laith H.

    2015-01-01

    Periampullary tumors constitute a number of diverse neoplastic lesions located within 2 cm of the major duodenal papilla; among these, metastatic lesions account for only a small proportion of the periampullary tumors. To our knowledge, a metastatic periampullary tumor from hepatocellular carcinoma has never been reported. A 62-year-old male reported to our institute for fatigue and low hemoglobin. His medical history was remarkable for multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with selective transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was performed which revealed a periampullary mass. Histopathology was consistent with metastatic moderately differentiated HCC. Two endoloops were deployed around the base of the mass one month apart. The mass eventually sloughed off and patient's hemoglobin level stabilized. We postulated that periampullary metastasis in this patient was the result of tumor fragments migration through the biliary tracts and that TACE which increases tumor fragments burden might have played a contributory role. Metastasis of HCC to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract should be considered as a cause of GI bleeding. PMID:26064707

  3. ACG Clinical Guideline: Management of Patients With Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Strate, Lisa L; Gralnek, Ian M

    2016-04-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the management of patients with acute overt lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemodynamic status should be initially assessed with intravascular volume resuscitation started as needed. Risk stratification based on clinical parameters should be performed to help distinguish patients at high- and low-risk of adverse outcomes. Hematochezia associated with hemodynamic instability may be indicative of an upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding source and thus warrants an upper endoscopy. In the majority of patients, colonoscopy should be the initial diagnostic procedure and should be performed within 24 h of patient presentation after adequate colon preparation. Endoscopic hemostasis therapy should be provided to patients with high-risk endoscopic stigmata of bleeding including active bleeding, non-bleeding visible vessel, or adherent clot. The endoscopic hemostasis modality used (mechanical, thermal, injection, or combination) is most often guided by the etiology of bleeding, access to the bleeding site, and endoscopist experience with the various hemostasis modalities. Repeat colonoscopy, with endoscopic hemostasis performed if indicated, should be considered for patients with evidence of recurrent bleeding. Radiographic interventions (tagged red blood cell scintigraphy, computed tomographic angiography, and angiography) should be considered in high-risk patients with ongoing bleeding who do not respond adequately to resuscitation and who are unlikely to tolerate bowel preparation and colonoscopy. Strategies to prevent recurrent bleeding should be considered. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use should be avoided in patients with a history of acute lower GI bleeding, particularly if secondary to diverticulosis or angioectasia. Patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin (secondary prophylaxis) should generally resume aspirin as soon as possible after bleeding ceases and at least within 7 days. The

  4. Protein C deficiency related obscure gastrointestinal bleeding treated by enteroscopy and anticoagulant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Fan; Tsang, Yuk-Ming; Teng, Chung-Jen; Chung, Chen-Shuan

    2015-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is an uncommonly encountered and difficult-to-treat clinical problem in gastroenterology, but advancements in endoscopic and radiologic imaging modalities allow for greater accuracy in diagnosing obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Ectopic varices account for less than 5% of all variceal bleeding cases, and jejunal variceal bleeding due to extrahepatic portal hypertension is rare. We present a 47-year-old man suffering from obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed multiple vascular tufts around the proximal jejunum but no evidence of cirrhosis, and a visible hypodense filling defect suggestive of thrombus was visible in the superior mesenteric vein. Enteroscopy revealed several serpiginous varices in the proximal jejunum. Serologic data disclosed protein C deficiency (33.6%). The patient was successfully treated by therapeutic balloon-assisted enteroscopy and long-term anticoagulant therapy, which is normally contraindicated in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Diagnostic modalities for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, such as capsule endoscopy, computed tomography enterography, magnetic resonance enterography, and enteroscopy, were also reviewed in this article. PMID:25624741

  5. Rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding owing to hepatic cancer invasion: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Ding; Wu, Jia; Yang, Hong-Guo; Chen, Yuan; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Zhao, Da-Jian; Hu, Zhi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding refers to bleeding that arises from the gastrointestinal tract proximal to the ligament of Treitz. The primary reason for gastrointestinal bleeding associated with hepatocellular carcinoma is rupture of a varicose vein owing to pericardial hypotension. We report a rare case of gastrointestinal bleeding with hepatocellular carcinoma in a patient who presented with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding. The initial diagnosis was gastric cancer with metastasis to the multiple lymph nodes of the lesser curvature. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy, which identified two lesions in the gastric wall. Total gastrectomy and hepatic local excision was then performed. Pathological results indicated that the hepatocellular carcinoma had invaded the stomach directly, which was confirmed immunohistochemically. The patient is alive with a disease-free survival of 1 year since the surgery. Hepatocellular carcinoma with gastric invasion should be considered as a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in hepatocellular carcinoma patients, especially with lesions located in the left lateral hepatic lobe. Surgery is the best solution. PMID:25253981

  6. Chronic portomesenteic venous thrombosis complicated by a high flow arteriovenous malformation presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Plotnik, Adam N; Hebroni, Frank; McWilliams, Justin

    2016-02-01

    Portomesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare but potentially life-threatening condition. The presenting symptoms of chronic portomesenteric venous thrombosis are often non-specific but may present with variceal bleeding. We present the first reported case of chronic portomesenteric venous thrombosis causing a high flow arteriovenous malformation that resulted in extensive gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25871943

  7. Early lactate clearance for predicting active bleeding in critically ill patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Wada, Tomoki; Hagiwara, Akiyoshi; Uemura, Tatsuki; Yahagi, Naoki; Kimura, Akio

    2016-08-01

    Not all patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) require emergency endoscopy. Lactate clearance has been suggested as a parameter for predicting patient outcomes in various critical care settings. This study investigates whether lactate clearance can predict active bleeding in critically ill patients with UGIB. This single-center, retrospective, observational study included critically ill patients with UGIB who met all of the following criteria: admission to the emergency department (ED) from April 2011 to August 2014; had blood samples for lactate evaluation at least twice during the ED stay; and had emergency endoscopy within 6 h of ED presentation. The main outcome was active bleeding detected with emergency endoscopy. Classification and regression tree (CART) analyses were performed using variables associated with active bleeding to derive a prediction rule for active bleeding in critically ill UGIB patients. A total of 154 patients with UGIB were analyzed, and 31.2 % (48/154) had active bleeding. In the univariate analysis, lactate clearance was significantly lower in patients with active bleeding than in those without active bleeding (13 vs. 29 %, P < 0.001). Using the CART analysis, a prediction rule for active bleeding is derived, and includes three variables: lactate clearance; platelet count; and systolic blood pressure at ED presentation. The rule has 97.9 % (95 % CI 90.2-99.6 %) sensitivity with 32.1 % (28.6-32.9 %) specificity. Lactate clearance may be associated with active bleeding in critically ill patients with UGIB, and may be clinically useful as a component of a prediction rule for active bleeding. PMID:26837207

  8. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients on long-term dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Juliana; Szabo, Aniko

    2016-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has not been adequately characterized. Using United States Renal Data System data we investigated the epidemiology of GIB in hospitalized patients receiving long-term dialysis. Methods Medicare ESRD patients who began dialysis between 1996 and 2005 were followed from 90 days after starting dialysis to death, transplant, loss of Medicare, or December 31, 2006. GIB events were identified using claims data. Predictors of GIB incidence were analyzed using over-dispersed Poisson regression and Cox regression was used to evaluate the effect on survival. Repeat episodes were modeled using a partially conditional Cox regression model. Results 406,836 patients were followed for 832,131 person-years, during which 133,967 events were identified. The incidence of GIB was stable through year 2000 but steadily increased thereafter. Chronic gastric ulcer and colonic diverticulosis were the commonest defined causes of upper and lower GIB respectively. Age >49 years, female gender, hypertension as the cause of ESRD, and initiation on hemodialysis was associated with a greater risk of GIB. An episode of GIB conferred a increased hazard of death (hazard ratio 1.9, 95 % CI 1.86–1.93). A previous episode of GIB was associated with greater hazard of another episode (hazard ratio 3.93, 95 % CI 3.82–4.05). Conclusions In ESRD patients incident to long-term dialysis the incidence of hospital-associated GIB is increasing, is associated with a greater hazard of death, and carries a great hazard of repeat episodes. PMID:25185727

  9. Uterine doughnut in early proliferating phase: potential pitfall in gastrointestinal bleeding studies.

    PubMed

    Karacalioglu, Ozgur; Ilgan, Seyfettin; Arslan, Nuri; Ozguven, Mehmet

    2003-12-01

    A 41-year-old woman with rectal bleeding was referred to our department for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding study. She was in early post-menstrual period and had stable vital signs. A GI bleeding study with Tc-99m SC revealed uterine blush in the pelvis. The shape of activity and quick fading excluded a GI bleeding. To rule out an intermittent bleeding, patient underwent a second bleeding study with Tc-99m RBC. Serial images showed uterine "doughnut" in the pelvis. The activity neither changed in shape nor showed distal movement with time excluding a GI hemorrhage. Uterus in early proliferating phase could be a potential pitfall in GI bleeding studies. PMID:14971611

  10. Efficacy of ankaferd blood stopper application on non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Gungor, Gokhan; Goktepe, M Hakan; Biyik, Murat; Polat, Ilker; Tuna, Tuncer; Ataseven, Huseyin; Demir, Ali

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively assess the hemostatic efficacy of the endoscopic topical use of ankaferd blood stopper (ABS) in active non-variceal upper gastrointestinal system (GIS) bleeding. METHODS: Endoscopy was performed on 220 patients under suspiciency of GIS bleeding. Patients with active non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) with a spurting or oozing type were included. Firstly, 8-10 cc of isotonic saline was sprayed to bleeding lesions. Then, 8 cc of ABS was applied on lesions in which bleeding continued after isotonic saline application. The other endoscopic therapeutic methods were applied on the lesions in which the bleeding did not stop after ABS. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients had an active NVUGIB with a spurting or oozing type and 193 patients were excluded from the study since they did not have non-variceal active bleeding. 8 cc of ABS was sprayed on to the lesions of 26 patients whose bleeding continued after isotonic saline and in 19 of them, bleeding stopped after ABS. Other endoscopic treatment methods were applied to the remaining patients and the bleeding was stopped with these interventions in 6 of 7 patients. CONCLUSION: ABS is an effective method on NVUGIB, particularly on young patients with no coagulopathy. ABS may be considered as part of a combination treatment with other endoscopic methods. PMID:23293725

  11. Predictors of In-hospital Mortality Among Patients Presenting with Variceal Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amith S.; Sibia, Raminderpal S.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim: The recent years have witnessed an increase in number of people harboring chronic liver diseases. Gastroesophageal variceal bleeding occurs in 30% of patients with cirrhosis, and accounts for 80%-90% of bleeding episodes. We aimed to assess the in-hospital mortality rate among subjects presenting with variceal gastrointestinal bleeding and (2) to investigate the predictors of mortality rate among subjects presenting with variceal gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted from treatment records of 317 subjects who presented with variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding to Government Medical College, Patiala, between June 1, 2010, and May 30, 2014. The data thus obtained was compiled using a preset proforma, and the details analyzed using SPSSv20. Results: Cirrhosis accounted for 308 (97.16%) subjects with bleeding varices, with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction 9 (2.84%) completing the tally. Sixty-three (19.87%) subjects succumbed to death during hospital stay. Linear logistic regression revealed independent predictors for in-hospital mortality, including higher age (P = 0.000), Child-Pugh Class (P = 0.002), altered sensorium (P = 0.037), rebleeding within 24 h of admission (P = 0.000), low hemoglobin level (P = 0.023), and serum bilirubin (P = 0.002). Conclusion: Higher age, low hemoglobin, higher Child-Pugh Class, rebleeding within 24 h of admission, higher serum bilirubin, and lower systolic blood pressure are the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality among subjects presenting with variceal gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25672238

  12. Value of early capsular endoscopy for severe gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Clinton L.

    2004-01-01

    This case illustrates the importance of early capsule endoscopy in cases of severe rectal bleeding when initial diagnostic tests do not document the site of bleeding. Although this case occurred in a community hospital capable of performing capsule endoscopy, I practice at a city hospital that serves the poor and underserved and currently does not have capsule endoscopy capability. Over the years, we have seen several cases of severe rectal bleeding where the site of bleeding was never identified, despite multiple diagnostic procedures short of capsule endoscopy. Often times, the bleeding stops spontaneously or ends in emergency surgery where morbidity or mortality is increased. Physicians like myself need to be made aware of this relatively new diagnostic tool that provides added value to standard diagnostic tests for evaluating severe rectal bleeding of unknown etiology. Early identification of the site of rectal bleeding may curtail the need for multiple transfusions, resolve economical burden, and reduce morbidity and mortality associated with severe rectal bleeding. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:15622697

  13. Portal hypertension and gastrointestinal bleeding: Diagnosis, prevention and management

    PubMed Central

    Biecker, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Bleeding from esophageal varices is a life threatening complication of portal hypertension. Primary prevention of bleeding in patients at risk for a first bleeding episode is therefore a major goal. Medical prophylaxis consists of non-selective beta-blockers like propranolol or carvedilol. Variceal endoscopic band ligation is equally effective but procedure related morbidity is a drawback of the method. Therapy of acute bleeding is based on three strategies: vasopressor drugs like terlipressin, antibiotics and endoscopic therapy. In refractory bleeding, self-expandable stents offer an option for bridging to definite treatments like transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). Treatment of bleeding from gastric varices depends on vasopressor drugs and on injection of varices with cyanoacrylate. Strategies for primary or secondary prevention are based on non-selective beta-blockers but data from large clinical trials is lacking. Therapy of refractory bleeding relies on shunt-procedures like TIPS. Bleeding from ectopic varices, portal hypertensive gastropathy and gastric antral vascular ectasia-syndrome is less common. Possible medical and endoscopic treatment options are discussed. PMID:23964137

  14. Guidelines for endoscopic management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Kakushima, Naomi; Kato, Motohiko; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Hoteya, Shu; Kataoka, Mikinori; Shimaoka, Shunji; Yahagi, Naohisa; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2016-05-01

    Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society (JGES) has compiled a set of guidelines for endoscopic management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding using evidence-based methods. The major cause of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is peptic gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding. As a result, these guidelines mainly focus on peptic gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding, although bleeding from other causes is also overviewed. From the epidemiological aspect, in recent years in Japan, bleeding from drug-related ulcers has become predominant in comparison with bleeding from Helicobacter pylori (HP)-related ulcers, owing to an increase in the aging population and coverage of HP eradication therapy by national health insurance. As for treatment, endoscopic hemostasis, in which there are a variety of methods, is considered to be the first-line treatment for bleeding from almost all causes. It is very important to precisely evaluate the severity of the patient's condition and stabilize the patient's vital signs with intensive care for successful endoscopic hemostasis. Additionally, use of antisecretory agents is recommended to prevent rebleeding after endoscopic hemostasis, especially for gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding. Eighteen statements with evidence and recommendation levels have been made by the JGES committee of these guidelines according to evidence obtained from clinical research studies. However, some of the statements that are supported by a low level of evidence must be confirmed by further clinical research. PMID:26900095

  15. Elevated C-reactive protein level predicts lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding

    PubMed Central

    TOMIZAWA, MINORU; SHINOZAKI, FUMINOBU; HASEGAWA, RUMIKO; SHIRAI, YOSHINORI; MOTOYOSHI, YASUFUMI; SUGIYAMA, TAKAO; YAMAMOTO, SHIGENORI; ISHIGE, NAOKI

    2016-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding can be caused by colorectal polyps or cancer. The aim of the present study was to identify blood test variables and medications that can predict lower GI bleeding, which would allow for appropriate colonoscopy. The medical records of patients who underwent colonoscopy from September 2014 to September 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The selected patients included 278 men (mean age, 67.0±11.5 years) and 249 women (mean age, 69.6±12.0 years). The diagnosis, medications, and blood test variables were compared between patients with and without bleeding. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the factors associated with lower GI bleeding. The presence of colorectal polyp and cancer was associated with lower GI bleeding (P=0.0044) with an odds ratio of 6.71 (P=0.0148). No lower GI bleeding was observed in patients taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, or anticoagulants. The C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were significantly higher in patients with lower GI bleeding (P=0.0227). The Hb levels were lower in patients with lower GI bleeding, however this finding was not statistically significant (P>0.05). No blood test variable was associated with lower GI bleeding. Elevated CRP was associated with lower GI bleeding, while there was no association between the medications and lower GI bleeding. PMID:27284411

  16. Technetium-99m labeled RBC imaging in gastrointestinal bleeding from gastric leiomyoma

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, U.A.; Jhingran, S.G.

    1988-01-01

    Tc-99m labeled RBC imaging is becoming increasingly useful in detecting gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding sites. A patient is presented who had massive GI bleeding from an unsuspected gastric leiomyoma in whom a Tc-99m sulfur colloid GI bleed image was negative. The Tc-99m labeled RBC imaging done on the day after sulfur colloid imaging revealed increased gastric activity due to active bleeding from an intragastric leiomyoma. Tc-99m labeled RBC imaging helped in early detection of the bleeding site resulting in its successful treatment. This experience also reinforces the assertion that Tc-99m labeled RBC imaging may be more helpful than Tc-99m sulfur colloid imaging in patients with upper GI or intermittent bleeding.

  17. Telemetric real-time sensor for the detection of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Schostek, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Melanie; Keller, Jan; Fode, Mario; Melbert, Michael; Schurr, Marc O; Gottwald, Thomas; Prosst, Ruediger L

    2016-04-15

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleedings from ulcers or esophago-gastric varices are life threatening medical conditions which require immediate endoscopic therapy. Despite successful endoscopic hemostasis, there is a significant risk of rebleeding often requiring close surveillance of these patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Any time delay to recognize bleeding may lead to a high blood loss and increases the risk of death. A novel telemetric real-time bleeding sensor can help indicate blood in the stomach: the sensor is swallowed to detect active bleeding or is anchored endoscopically on the gastrointestinal wall close to the potential bleeding source. By telemetric communication with an extra-corporeal receiver, information about the bleeding status is displayed. In this study the novel sensor, which measures characteristic optical properties of blood, has been evaluated in an ex-vivo setting to assess its clinical applicability and usability. Human venous blood of different concentrations, various fluids, and liquid food were tested. The LED-based sensor was able to reliably distinguish between concentrated blood and other liquids, especially red-colored fluids. In addition, the spectrometric quality of the small sensor (size: 6.5mm in diameter, 25.5mm in length) was comparable to a much larger and technically more complex laboratory spectrophotometer. The experimental data confirm the capability of a miniaturized sensor to identify concentrated blood, which could help in the very near future the detection of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and to survey high-risk patients for rebleeding. PMID:26667093

  18. Amphetamine-related ischemic colitis causing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Panikkath, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with acute lower intestinal bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Multiple initial investigations did not reveal the cause of the bleeding. Colonoscopy performed 2 days later showed features suggestive of ischemic colitis. On detailed history, the patient admitted to using amphetamines, and her urine drug screen was positive for them. She was managed conservatively and advised not to use amphetamines again. She did not have any recurrence on 2-year follow-up. PMID:27365888

  19. Diffuse gastrointestinal bleeding and BK polyomavirus replication in a pediatric allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Koskenvuo, M; Lautenschlager, I; Kardas, P; Auvinen, E; Mannonen, L; Huttunen, P; Taskinen, M; Vettenranta, K; Hirsch, H H

    2015-01-01

    Patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are at high risk of severe gastrointestinal bleeding caused by infections, graft versus host disease, and disturbances in haemostasis. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) is known to cause hemorrhagic cystitis, but there is also evidence of BKV shedding in stool and its association with gastrointestinal disease. We report putative association of BKPyV replication with high plasma viral loads in a pediatric HSCT patient developing hemorrhagic cystitis and severe gastrointestinal bleeding necessitating intensive care. The observation was based on chart review and analysis of BKPyV DNA loads in plasma and urine as well as retrospective BKPyV-specific IgM and IgG measurements in weekly samples until three months post-transplant. The gastrointestinal bleeding was observed after a >100-fold increase in the plasma BKPyV loads and the start of hemorrhagic cystitis. The BKPyV-specific antibody response indicated past infection prior to transplantation, but increasing IgG titers were seen following BKPyV replication. The gastrointestinal biopsies were taken at a late stage of the episode and were no longer informative of BK polyomavirus involvement. In conclusion, gastrointestinal complications with bleeding are a significant problem after allogeneic HSCT to which viral infections including BKPyV may contribute. PMID:25542476

  20. Evaluation of technetium-99m DTPA for localization of site of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Mahajan, K.K.; Ericsson, S.; Nawaz, K.; Owunwanne, A.; Kouris, K.; Higazy, E.; Awdeh, M.

    1986-11-01

    Intravenous Tc-99m DTPA was evaluated in 34 patients with active upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Active bleeding was detected in 25 patients: nine in the stomach, 12 in the duodenum, and four from esophageal varices. No active bleeding was seen in nine patients (two gastric ulcers and seven duodenal ulcers). Results were correlated with endoscopic and/or surgical findings. All completely correlated except: 1) one case of esophageal varices in which there was disagreement on the site, 2) three cases of duodenal ulcers that were not bleeding on endoscopy but showed mild oozing on delayed images and 3) one case of gastric ulcer, in which no bleeding was detected in the Tc-99m DTPA study, but was found to be bleeding at surgery 24 hours later. The Tc-99m DTPA study is a reliable method for localization of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with an agreement ratio of 85%. This method also can be used safely for follow-up of patients with intermittent bleeding. It is less invasive than endoscopy, is easily repeatable, and has the same accuracy.

  1. Risk of Gastrointestinal Bleeding with Rivaroxaban: A Comparative Study with Warfarin

    PubMed Central

    Tupper, Ruth; Spurr, Charles; Sifuentes, Humberto; Sridhar, Subbaramiah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The risk of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with rivaroxaban has not been studied extensively. The aim of our study was to assess this risk in comparison to warfarin. Methods. We examined the medical records for patients who were started on rivaroxaban or warfarin from April 2011 to April 2013. Results. We identified 300 patients (147 on rivaroxaban versus 153 on warfarin). GI bleeding occurred in 4.8% patients with rivaroxaban when compared to 9.8% patients in warfarin group (p = 0.094). GI bleeding occurred in 8% with therapeutic doses of rivaroxaban (>10 mg/d) compared to 9.8% with warfarin (p = 0.65). Multivariate analysis showed that patients who were on rivaroxaban for ≤40 days had a higher incidence of GI bleeding than those who were on it for >40 days (OR = 2.8, p = 0.023). Concomitant use of dual antiplatelet agents was associated with increased risk of GI bleeding in the rivaroxaban group (OR = 7.4, p = 0.0378). Prior GI bleeding was also a risk factor for GI bleeding in rivaroxaban group (OR = 15.5). Conclusion. The incidence of GI bleeding was similar between rivaroxaban and warfarin. The risk factors for GI bleeding with rivaroxaban were the first 40 days of taking the drug, concomitant dual antiplatelet agents, and prior GI bleeding. PMID:26880901

  2. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding - a new approach to clinical and endoscopic management.

    PubMed

    Rey, Johannes W; Fischbach, Andreas; Teubner, Daniel; Dieroff, Marc; Heuberger, Dominik; Nguyen-Tat, Marc; Manner, Hendrik; Kiesslich, Ralf; Hoffman, Arthur

    2015-05-01

    Overt or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is a frequently observed condition in routine gastroenterological practice. Occult gastrointestinal bleeding is usually a purely incidental finding, based on the discovery of iron deficiency anemia in the laboratory or blood in stool (a positive Hemoccult test). However, overt bleeding accompanied by the clinical features of tarry stool, hematemesis, or hematochezia may be a life-threatening condition, calling for immediate emergency management. In contrast to traumatology, algorithms of emergency and intensive medicine are not sufficiently validated yet for acute life-threatening bleeding. The purpose of this review was to present all established and new endoscopic hemostasis techniques and to evaluate their efficacy, as well as to provide the treating endoscopist with practical advice on how he/she could incorporate these procedures into acute medical management. The recommendations are based on inspection of the study results in the recent published literature, as well as emergency medicine algorithms in traumatology. PMID:25822855

  3. Management of Antiplatelet Agents and Anticoagulants in Patients with Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Neena S

    2015-07-01

    Antithrombotic drugs (anticoagulants, aspirin, and other antiplatelet agents) are used to treat cardiovascular disease and to prevent secondary thromboembolic events. These drugs are independently associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB), and, when prescribed in combination, further increase the risk of adverse bleeding events. Clinical evidence to inform the choice of endoscopic hemostatic procedure, safe temporary drug cessation, and use of reversal agents is reviewed to optimize management following clinically significant GIB. PMID:26142031

  4. Comparison of a novel bedside portable endoscopy device with nasogastric aspiration for identifying upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong Hwan; Choi, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Yoo Jin; Lee, Hyung Ki; Choi, Wang Yong; Kim, Eun Soo; Park, Kyung Sik; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare outcomes using the novel portable endoscopy with that of nasogastric (NG) aspiration in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: Patients who underwent NG aspiration for the evaluation of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding were eligible for the study. After NG aspiration, we performed the portable endoscopy to identify bleeding evidence in the UGI tract. Then, all patients underwent conventional esophagogastroduodenoscopy as the gold-standard test. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the portable endoscopy for confirming UGI bleeding were compared with those of NG aspiration. RESULTS: In total, 129 patients who had GI bleeding signs or symptoms were included in the study (age 64.46 ± 13.79, 91 males). The UGI tract (esophagus, stomach, and duodenum) was the most common site of bleeding (81, 62.8%) and the cause of bleeding was not identified in 12 patients (9.3%). Specificity for identifying UGI bleeding was higher with the portable endoscopy than NG aspiration (85.4% vs 68.8%, P = 0.008) while accuracy was comparable. The accuracy of the portable endoscopy was significantly higher than that of NG in the subgroup analysis of patients with esophageal bleeding (88.2% vs 75%, P = 0.004). Food material could be detected more readily by the portable endoscopy than NG tube aspiration (20.9% vs 9.3%, P = 0.014). No serious adverse effect was observed during the portable endoscopy. CONCLUSION: The portable endoscopy was not superior to NG aspiration for confirming UGI bleeding site. However, this novel portable endoscopy device might provide a benefit over NG aspiration in patients with esophageal bleeding. PMID:25009396

  5. A Prospective Study of Aspirin Use and the Risk of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Men

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Edward S.; Strate, Lisa L.; Ho, Wendy W.; Lee, Salina S.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Data regarding the influence of dose and duration of aspirin use on risk of gastrointestinal bleeding are conflicting. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of 32,989 men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) in 1994 who provided biennial aspirin data. We estimated relative risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding requiring hospitalization or a blood transfusion. Results During 14 years of follow-up, 707 men reported an episode of major gastrointestinal bleeding over 377,231 person-years. After adjusting for risk factors, regular aspirin use (≥2 times/week) had a multivariate relative risk (RR) of gastrointestinal bleeding of 1.32 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12–1.55) compared to non-regular use. The association was particularly evident for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (multivariate RR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.16–1.92). Compared to men who denied any aspirin use, multivariate RRs of upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 1.05 (95% CI 0.71–1.52) for men who used 0.5–1.5 standard tablets/week, 1.31 (95% CI 0.88–1.95) for 2–5 aspirin/week, 1.63 (95% CI, 1.15–2.32) for 6–14 aspirin/week and 2.40 (95% CI, 1.10–5.22) for >14 aspirin/week (Ptrend<0.001). The relative risk also appeared to be dose-dependent among short-term users <5 years; Ptrend<.001) and long-term users (≥5 years; Ptrend = 0.015). In contrast, after controlling for dose, increasing duration of use did not appear to be associated with risk (Ptrend = 0.749). Conclusions Regular aspirin use increases the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, especially from the upper tract. However, risk of bleeding appears to be more strongly related to dose than to duration of use. Risk of bleeding should be minimized by using the lowest effective dose among short-term and long-term aspirin users. PMID:21209949

  6. Successful endoscopic hemoclipping of massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding from paratyphoid A fever.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Dong, Xiao-Lin; Yu, Xiao-Ming; Chung, Kyu Sung; Gao, Jian-Peng

    2015-01-21

    Paratyphoid fever can be complicated by massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding with ileocolonic ulcerations, which are commonly localized using colonoscopy. The most common manifestations include multiple, variable-sized, round or oval-shaped, punched-out ulcers. Occasionally, massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding can occur from erosion of blood vessels. We present a rare case of severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding due to paratyphoid A fever that was successfully controlled with hemoclippings. A 30-year-old man experienced high fever and hematochezia whose blood culture showed Salmonella paratyphi A. A complete colonoscopy was successfully performed up to the level of the terminal ileum, which showed multiple, shallow, ulcerated lesions over the entire terminal ileum. A bleeding vessel was seen in one of the ulcers, with overlaying blood clots. Endoscopic hemostasis was successfully performed with four pieces of endoclip and without immediate complication. This report highlights the use of colonoscopy and endoscopic therapy with endoclips for lower gastrointestinal bleeding, which should be considered before surgery. PMID:25624745

  7. [Non-small bowel lesions detected with capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Juanmartiñena Fernández, J F; Fernández-Urién, I; Saldaña Dueñas, C; Elosua González, A; Borda Martín, A; Vila Costas, J J

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding accounts for approximately 5-10% of patients presenting with gastrointestinal haemorrhage. The majority of lesions responsible were found to be located in the small bowel. Currently, capsule en-doscopy is the first-line tool to investigate the small bowel as it is a non-invasive, feasible and simple procedure. Howe-ver, capsule endoscopy sometimes identifies the source of bleeding outside the small bowel and within the reach of conventional endoscopy. We present the case of a 46 year-old man with few prior negative endoscopic procedures and iron-deficiency anaemia due to gastric GIST. PMID:27599960

  8. ACUTE UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING SECONDARY TO KAPOSI SARCOMA AS INITIAL PRESENTATION OF HIV INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Sara A.; Stawicki, Stanislaw P.A.; Forbes, Rachel C.; Papadimos, Thomas J.; Lindsey, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Despite our decades of experience with Kaposi Sarcoma its true nature remains elusive. This angioproliferative disease of the vascular endothelium has a propensity to involve visceral organs in the immunocompromised population. There are four variants of the disease and each has its own pathogenesis and evolution. While the common sources of upper gastrointestinal bleeding are familiar to surgeons and critical care physicians, here we present the exceedingly rare report of upper gastrointestinal bleeding attributable to this malady, explore its successful management, and review the various forms of Kaposi Sarcoma including the strategies in regard to their management. PMID:24369327

  9. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by a "hypophrenic" diverticulum of the distal esophagus.

    PubMed

    Sam, Albert D; Chaer, Rabih A; Cintron, Jose; Teresi, Miguel; Massad, Malek G

    2005-04-01

    Distal esophageal diverticula are uncommon acquired anomalies of the distal thoracic esophagus. We report a case of an elderly man presenting with a history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to a distal esophageal diverticulum arising from the intra-abdominal portion of the esophagus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a subdiaphragmatic esophageal diverticulum. We propose the term "hypophrenic diverticulum of the esophagus" for this disease entity, and we would like to bring it to the attention of readers of The American Surgeon. PMID:15943409

  10. Arteriovenous malformation of the mandible presented as massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding: report of one case.

    PubMed

    Su, Kuan-Wen; Peng, Yen-Shih; Wu, Yu-Nian; Tsai, Ya-Huei; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2006-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformation is an uncommon cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in children. It should be taken into consideration when a child has upper gastrointestinal bleeding because without proper management, it might be fatal. We report a 10-year-old boy whose initial presentation was massive hematemesis and impending shock. After angiography, arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the mandible was found and treated with embolization. This 10-year-old boy also had chicken pox during admission. Case reports regarding AVM of dental arches in literature are reviewed and the proposed managements are summarized. Embolization combined with surgical excision might be the optimal way to manage AVM of dental arches. PMID:17180789

  11. Crohn's disease and massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding: angiographic appearance and two case reports

    SciTech Connect

    McGarrity, T.J.; Manasse, J.S.; Koch, K.L.; Weidner, W.A.

    1987-10-01

    Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding is described in two patients with Crohn's disease. In case 1, extravasation of contrast material from the ileal branch of the ileocolic artery was seen during selective angiography. In case 2, results of an in vitro labeled /sup 99/Tc pyrophosphate red blood cell scan localized bleeding to the ileum. In both cases, medical management was unsuccessful, and surgical resection of the affected bowel was required to stop the bleeding. Angiographic appearance of Crohn's disease is discussed, and a review of the literature of this unusual feature of Crohn's disease is presented. 16 references.

  12. Small Intestinal and Mesenteric Multiple Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Causing Occult Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Dinc, Tolga; Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Erdogan, Ahmet; Cetinkaya, Erdinc; Akgul, Ozgur; Coskun, Faruk

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the meseancymal neoplasms which may involve any part of gastrointestinal tract. C-Kit and platelet derived factor receptor alpha polypeptide are believed to be responsible for the genetic basis. This case presentation aimed to discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic modality of multiple small intestinal, omental, and mesenteric GISTs with different sizes which caused occult bleeding in a 43-year-old male patient. PMID:26989528

  13. Gadofosveset trisodium-enhanced MR angiography for detection of lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Robert F; Browne, William F; Khanna, Lauren G; Prince, Martin R; Hecht, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to determine if Gadofosveset trisodium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) could be used for detection and localization of acute lower gastrointestinal (LGI) bleed. Four patients underwent MRA (4 females, mean age of 65 years) for suspected LGI bleeding. MRA detected an active rectal bleed in one patient. All other patients did not demonstrate active bleeding and these true negatives were confirmed by computed tomography angiography, endoscopy, and tagged-red blood cell scan or digital subtraction angiography. Preliminary results suggest that MRA may serve as an alternative technique for detecting acute LGI bleeding when nuclear scintigraphy is unavailable or in the younger radiosensitive population but further investigation in a larger cohort is required. PMID:26355018

  14. Outcome of patients who have undergone total enteroscopy for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Shishido, Takayoshi; Oka, Shiro; Tanaka, Shinji; Imagawa, Hiroki; Takemura, Yoshito; Yoshida, Shigeto; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic success and outcome among patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding who underwent total enteroscopy with double-balloon endoscopy. METHODS: Total enteroscopy was attempted in 156 patients between August 2003 and June 2008 at Hiroshima University Hospital and achieved in 75 (48.1%). It is assessed whether sources of bleeding were identified, treatment methods, complications, and 1-year outcomes (including re-bleeding) after treatment, and we compared re-bleeding rates among patients. RESULTS: The source of small bowel bleeding was identified in 36 (48.0%) of the 75 total enteroscopy patients; the source was outside the small bowel in 11 patients (14.7%) and not identified in 28 patients (37.3%). Sixty-one of the 75 patients were followed up for more than 1 year (27.2 ± 13.3 mo). Four (6.6%) of these patients showed signs of re-bleeding during the first year, but bleeding did not recur after treatment. Although statistical significance was not reached, a marked difference was found in the re-bleeding rate between patients in whom total enteroscopy findings were positive (8.6%, 3/35) and negative (3.8%, 1/26) (3/35 vs 1/26, P = 0.63). CONCLUSION: A good outcome can be expected for patients who undergo total enteroscopy and receive proper treatment for the source of bleeding in the small bowel. PMID:22363138

  15. Prediction of Outcome in Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding Using Gradient Boosting

    PubMed Central

    Ayaru, Lakshmana; Ypsilantis, Petros-Pavlos; Nanapragasam, Abigail; Choi, Ryan Chang-Ho; Thillanathan, Anish; Min-Ho, Lee; Montana, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Background There are no widely used models in clinical care to predict outcome in acute lower gastro-intestinal bleeding (ALGIB). If available these could help triage patients at presentation to appropriate levels of care/intervention and improve medical resource utilisation. We aimed to apply a state-of-the-art machine learning classifier, gradient boosting (GB), to predict outcome in ALGIB using non-endoscopic measurements as predictors. Methods Non-endoscopic variables from patients with ALGIB attending the emergency departments of two teaching hospitals were analysed retrospectively for training/internal validation (n=170) and external validation (n=130) of the GB model. The performance of the GB algorithm in predicting recurrent bleeding, clinical intervention and severe bleeding was compared to a multiple logic regression (MLR) model and two published MLR-based prediction algorithms (BLEED and Strate prediction rule). Results The GB algorithm had the best negative predictive values for the chosen outcomes (>88%). On internal validation the accuracy of the GB algorithm for predicting recurrent bleeding, therapeutic intervention and severe bleeding were (88%, 88% and 78% respectively) and superior to the BLEED classification (64%, 68% and 63%), Strate prediction rule (78%, 78%, 67%) and conventional MLR (74%, 74% 62%). On external validation the accuracy was similar to conventional MLR for recurrent bleeding (88% vs. 83%) and therapeutic intervention (91% vs. 87%) but superior for severe bleeding (83% vs. 71%). Conclusion The gradient boosting algorithm accurately predicts outcome in patients with acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding and outperforms multiple logistic regression based models. These may be useful for risk stratification of patients on presentation to the emergency department. PMID:26172121

  16. Discharge hemoglobin and outcome in patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Eun Sun; Chun, Hoon Jai; Hwang, Young-Jae; Lee, Jae Hyung; Kang, Seung Hun; Yoo, In Kyung; Kim, Seung Han; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Keum, Bora; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Many patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding present with anemia and frequently require red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. A restrictive transfusion strategy and a low hemoglobin (Hb) threshold for transfusion had been shown to produce acceptable outcomes in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, most patients are discharged with mild anemia owing to the restricted volume of packed RBCs (pRBCs). We investigated whether discharge Hb influences the outcome in patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding who had received pRBCs during hospitalization between January 2012 and January 2014. Patients with variceal bleeding, malignant lesion, stroke, or cardiovascular disease were excluded. We divided the patients into 2 groups, low (8 g/dL ≤ Hb < 10 g/dL) and high (Hb ≥ 10 [g/dL]) discharge Hb, and compared the clinical course and Hb changes between these groups. Results: A total of 102 patients met the inclusion criteria. Fifty patients were discharged with Hb levels < 10 g/dL, whereas 52 were discharged with Hb levels > 10 g/dL. Patients in the low Hb group had a lower consumption of pRBCs and shorter hospital stay than did those in the high Hb group. The Hb levels were not fully recovered at outpatient follow-up until 7 days after discharge; however, most patients showed Hb recovery at 45 days after discharge. The rate of rebleeding after discharge was not significantly different between the 2 groups. Conclusions: In patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding, a discharge Hb between 8 and 10 g/dL was linked to favorable outcomes on outpatient follow-up. Most patients recovered from anemia without any critical complication within 45 days after discharge. PMID:27540574

  17. Over-the-scope clip placement is effective rescue therapy for severe acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Matthew; Gutierrez, Juan P.; Neumann, Helmut; Wilcox, C. Mel; Burski, Chad; Mönkemüller, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background and study aim: The novel over-the-scope clip (OTSC) allows for excellent apposition of tissue, potentially permitting hemostasis to be achieved in various types of gastrointestinal lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness and safety of OTSCs for endoscopic hemostasis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in whom traditional endoscopic methods had failed. Patients and methods: A retrospective case series of all patients who underwent placement of an OTSC for severe recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding over a 14-month period was studied. Outcome data for the procedure included achievement of primary hemostasis, episodes of recurrent bleeding, and complications. Results: Twelve consecutive patients (67 % men; mean age 59, range 29 – 86) with ongoing upper gastrointestinal bleeding despite previous endoscopic management were included. They had a mean ASA score of 3 (range 2 – 4), a mean hemoglobin of 7.2 g/dL (range 5.2 – 9.1), and shock was present in 75 % of patients. They had all received packed red blood cells (mean 5.1 units, range 2 – 12). The etiology of bleeding was: duodenal ulcer (n = 6), gastric ulcer (n = 2) Dieulafoy lesion (n = 2), anastomotic ulceration (n = 1), Mallory – Weiss tear (n = 1). Hemostasis was achieved in all patients. Rebleeding occurred in two patients 1 day and 7 days after OTSC placement. There were no complications associated with OTSC application. Conclusions: OTSC use represents an effective, easily performed, and safe endoscopic therapy for various causes of severe acute gastrointestinal bleeding when conventional endoscopic techniques have failed. This therapy should be added to the armamentarium of therapeutic endoscopists. PMID:26134611

  18. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding in the elderly: a rare aetiology masquerading as a diverticular bleed.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Nikita R; Boland, Michael R; Abdelraheem, Omar; Merrigan, Anne B

    2016-01-01

    Bleeding per rectum is a relatively common acute surgical presentation. Common causes include diverticular disease, colitis, haemorrhoids, polyps, etc. An 83-year-old man with a history of recurrent rectosigmoid diverticulitis and bilateral internal iliac artery aneurysms for 2 years presented with rectal bleeding. He was suspected to have a diverticular bleed based on history and examination. A CT scan revealed a large haematoma adjacent to the right isolated internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIIAA) almost indistinguishable from the adjacent rectosigmoid, consistent with a ruptured IIIAA and an ileorectal fistula. The fistula was of a primary vascular enteric type and was accentuated by the inflammation arising from the diverticulitis. Hence, presence of more common or apparently obvious causes should not deter clinicians from thoroughly investigating the case. Rare causes should be kept in mind while dealing with common acute presentations, especially in elderly patients with multiple comorbidities. PMID:27033287

  19. Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection: an unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Rios, Juliana Trazzi; Franco, Matheus Cavalcante; Martins, Bruno da Costa; Baba, Elisa Ryoka; Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana Vaz; Sakai, Paulo; Retes, Felipe Alves; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2015-08-01

    Strongyloidiasis is a parasitic disease that may progress to a disseminated form, called hyperinfection syndrome, in patients with immunosuppression. The hyperinfection syndrome is caused by the wide multiplication and migration of infective larvae, with characteristic gastrointestinal and/or pulmonary involvement. This disease may pose a diagnostic challenge, as it presents with nonspecific findings on endoscopy. PMID:26466210

  20. Gallbladder visualization during technetium-99m-labeled red cell scintigraphy for gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, D.R.

    1985-12-01

    Localization of radionuclide activity in the gallbladder was seen on delayed views following injection of 99mTc-labeled red blood cells for gastrointestinal bleeding in five patients. The mechanism for this unusual finding probably relates to labeling of heme, the biochemical precursor of bilirubin. All patients had had prior transfusions. All but one had severe renal impairment, probably an important predisposing factor.

  1. Proton pump inhibition prevents gastrointestinal bleeding in ultramarathon runners: a randomised, double blinded, placebo controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Thalmann, M; Sodeck, G H; Kavouras, S; Matalas, A; Skenderi, K; Yannikouris, N; Domanovits, H

    2006-01-01

    Background Ultra‐endurance running is emerging as a popular sport in Western industrialised countries. Gastrointestinal bleeding has been reported to be an adverse effect in these runners. Objective To see if the oral administration of a proton pump inhibitor would reduce the incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding in an ultramarathon. Methods In a randomised, double blinded, placebo controlled study, a prophylactic regimen of three days of an oral proton pump inhibitor (pantoprazole 20 mg) was tested in healthy athletes participating in the Spartathlon ultramarathon. The incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding was assessed by a stool guaiac test. Results Results were obtained for 70 healthy volunteers. The data for 20 of 35 runners in the intervention group and 17 of 35 runners in the placebo group were entered into the final analysis. At the end of the ultramarathon, two subjects in the intervention group and 12 in the placebo group had positive stool guaiac tests (risk difference 0.86; 95% confidence interval 0.45 to 0.96; p  =  0.001). Conclusion A short prophylactic regimen of oral proton pump inhibition can successfully decrease the incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding in participants in an ultramarathon. PMID:16556794

  2. Fibrate/Statin Initiation in Warfarin Users and Gastrointestinal Bleeding Risk

    PubMed Central

    Schelleman, Hedi; Bilker, Warren B.; Brensinger, Colleen M.; Wan, Fei; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Hennessy, Sean

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether initiation of a fibrate or statin increases the risk of hospitalization for gastrointestinal bleeding in warfarin users. Methods We used Medicaid claims data (1999-2003) to perform an observational case-control study nested within person-time exposed to warfarin in those ≥18 years (n=353,489). Gastrointestinal bleeding cases were matched to 50 controls based on index date and state. Results Chronic warfarin users had an increased odds ratio of gastrointestinal bleeding upon initiation of gemfibrozil (1.88 [95% CI, 1.00-3.54] for the first prescription; 1.75 [95% CI, 0.77-3.95] for the second prescription); simvastatin (1.46 [95% CI, 1.03-2.07] for the first prescription; 1.60 [95% CI, 1.07-2.39] for the second prescription); or atorvastatin (1.39; [95% CI, 1.07-1.81] for the first prescription; 1.05 [95% CI, 0.73-1.52] for the second prescription). In contrast, no increased risk was found with pravastatin initiation (0.75; [95% CI, 0.39-1.46] for the first prescription; 0.90 [95% CI, 0.43-1.91] for the second prescription). Conclusions Initiation of a fibrate or statin that inhibits CYP3A4 enzymes, including atorvastatin, was associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for gastrointestinal bleeding. Initiation of pravastatin, which is mainly excreted unchanged, was not associated with an increased risk. PMID:20103024

  3. The natural history of occult or angiodysplastic gastrointestinal bleeding in von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Makris, M; Federici, A B; Mannucci, P M; Bolton-Maggs, P H B; Yee, T T; Abshire, T; Berntorp, E

    2015-05-01

    Recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding is one of the most challenging complications encountered in the management of patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD). The commonest cause is angiodysplasia, but often no cause is identified due to the difficulty in making the diagnosis. The optimal treatment to prevent recurrences remains unknown. We performed a retrospective study of VWD patients with occult or angiodysplastic bleeding within the setting of the von Willebrand Disease Prophylaxis Network (VWD PN) to describe diagnostic and treatment strategies. Centres participating in the VWD PN recruited subjects under their care with a history of congenital VWD and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding due to angiodysplasia, or cases in which the cause was not identified despite investigation. Patients with acquired von Willebrand syndrome or those for whom the GI bleeding was due to another cause were excluded. Forty-eight patients from 18 centres in 10 countries were recruited. Seven individuals had a family history of GI bleeding and all VWD types except 2N were represented. Angiodysplasia was confirmed in 38%, with video capsule endoscopy and GI tract endoscopies being the most common methods of making the diagnosis. Recurrent GI bleeding in VWD is associated with significant morbidity and required hospital admission on up to 30 occasions. Patients were treated with multiple pharmacological agents with prophylactic von Willebrand factor concentrate being the most efficient in preventing recurrence of the GI bleeding. The diagnosis and treatment of recurrent GI bleeding in congenital VWD remains challenging and is associated with significant morbidity. Prophylactic treatment with von Willebrand factor concentrate was the most effective method of preventing recurrent bleeding but its efficacy remains to be confirmed in a prospective study. PMID:25381842

  4. Roles of Capsule Endoscopy and Single-Balloon Enteroscopy in Diagnosing Unexplained Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ooka, Shohei; Kobayashi, Kiyonori; Kawagishi, Kana; Kodo, Masaru; Yokoyama, Kaoru; Sada, Miwa; Tanabe, Satoshi; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The diagnostic algorithms used for selecting patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) for capsule endoscopy (CE) or balloon-assisted enteroscopy (BE) vary among facilities. We aimed to demonstrate the appropriate selection criteria of CE and single balloon-assisted enteroscopy (SBE) for patients with OGIB according to their conditions, by retrospectively comparing the diagnostic performances of CE and BE for detecting the source of the OGIB. Methods: We investigated 194 patients who underwent CE and/or BE. The rate of positive findings, details of the findings, accidental symptoms, and hemostasis methods were examined and analyzed. Results: CE and SBE were performed in 103 and 91 patients, respectively, and 26 patients underwent both examinations. The rate of positive findings was significantly higher with SBE (73.6%) than with CE (47.5%, p<0.01). The rate of positive findings was higher in overt bleeding cases than in occult bleeding cases for both BE and SBE. Among the overt bleeding cases, the rate was significantly higher in ongoing bleeding cases than in previous bleeding cases. Conclusions: Both CE and SBE are useful to diagnose OGIB. For overt bleeding cases and ongoing bleeding cases, SBE may be more appropriate than CE because endoscopic diagnosis and treatment can be completed simultaneously. PMID:26855925

  5. Gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with a continuous-flow biventricular assist device

    PubMed Central

    Mirasol, Raymond V; Tholany, Jason J; Reddy, Hasini; Fyfe-Kirschner, Billie S; Cheng, Christina L; Moubarak, Issam F; Nosher, John L

    2016-01-01

    The association between continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from angiodysplasia is well recognized. However, the association between continuous-flow biventricular assist devices (CF-BIVADs) and bleeding angiodysplasia is less understood. We report a case of GI bleeding from a patient with a CF-BIVAD. The location of GI bleeding was identified by nuclear red blood cell bleeding scan. The vascular malformation leading to the bleed was identified and localized on angiography and then by pathology. The intensity of bleeding, reflected by number of units of packed red blood cells needed for normalization of hemoglobin, as well as the time to onset of bleeding after transplantation, are similar to that seen in the literature for CF-LVADs and pulsatile BIVADs. While angiography only detected a dilated late draining vein, pathology demonstrated the presence of both arterial and venous dilation in the submucosa, vascular abnormalities characteristic of a late arteriovenous malformation. PMID:27158430

  6. Gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with a continuous-flow biventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Mirasol, Raymond V; Tholany, Jason J; Reddy, Hasini; Fyfe-Kirschner, Billie S; Cheng, Christina L; Moubarak, Issam F; Nosher, John L

    2016-04-28

    The association between continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from angiodysplasia is well recognized. However, the association between continuous-flow biventricular assist devices (CF-BIVADs) and bleeding angiodysplasia is less understood. We report a case of GI bleeding from a patient with a CF-BIVAD. The location of GI bleeding was identified by nuclear red blood cell bleeding scan. The vascular malformation leading to the bleed was identified and localized on angiography and then by pathology. The intensity of bleeding, reflected by number of units of packed red blood cells needed for normalization of hemoglobin, as well as the time to onset of bleeding after transplantation, are similar to that seen in the literature for CF-LVADs and pulsatile BIVADs. While angiography only detected a dilated late draining vein, pathology demonstrated the presence of both arterial and venous dilation in the submucosa, vascular abnormalities characteristic of a late arteriovenous malformation. PMID:27158430

  7. Should Capsule Endoscopy Be the First Test for Every Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding?

    PubMed Central

    Tae, Chung Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) refers to gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding of unclear origin that persists or recurs after negative findings on esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy. OGIB accounts for approximately 5% of all types of GI bleeding. More than 80% of OGIB cases originate in the small bowel. The ability to detect OGIB in the small bowel has significantly advanced and been revolutionized since the introduction of the capsule endoscopy and double-balloon enteroscopy techniques in 2000 and 2001, respectively. With these new methods for small-bowel evaluation, new guidelines have been proposed for the diagnosis and management of OGIB. However, some issues remain unsolved. The purpose of this article is to review the various modalities used for evaluating OGIB, including capsule endoscopy and double-balloon enteroscopy, and to help guide clinicians in their decisions on which modality will be the most effective. PMID:25324999

  8. Comparative risk of gastrointestinal bleeding with dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and warfarin: population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sonal; Alexander, G Caleb; Heien, Herbert; Haas, Lindsey R; Crown, William; Shah, Nilay D

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the real world risk of gastrointestinal bleeding associated with the use of the novel oral anticoagulants dabigatran and rivaroxaban compared with warfarin. Design Retrospective, propensity matched cohort study. Setting: Optum Labs Data Warehouse, a large database including administrative claims data on privately insured and Medicare Advantage enrollees. Participants New users of dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and warfarin from 1 November 2010 to 30 September 2013. Main outcome measures Incidence rates (events/100 patient years) and propensity score matched Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate rates of total gastrointestinal bleeds, upper gastrointestinal bleeds, and lower gastrointestinal bleeds for the novel oral anticoagulants compared with warfarin in patients with and without atrial fibrillation. Heterogeneity of treatment effect related to age was examined using a marginal effects model. Results The incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding associated with dabigatran was 2.29 (95% confidence interval 1.88 to 2.79) per 100 patient years and that associated with warfarin was 2.87 (2.41 to 3.41) per 100 patient years in patients with atrial fibrillation. In non-atrial fibrillation patients, the incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding was 4.10 (2.47 to 6.80) per 100 patient years with dabigatran and 3.71 (2.16 to 6.40) per 100 patient years with warfarin. With rivaroxaban, 2.84 (2.30 to 3.52) gastrointestinal bleeding events per 100 patient years occurred in atrial fibrillation patients (warfarin 3.06 (2.49 to 3.77)/100 patient years) and 1.66 (1.23 to 2.24) per 100 patient years in non-atrial fibrillation patients (warfarin 1.57 (1.25 to 1.99)/100 patient years). In propensity score matched models, the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding with novel oral anticoagulants was similar to that with warfarin in atrial fibrillation patients (dabigatran v warfarin, hazard ratio 0.79 (0.61 to 1.03); rivaroxaban v warfarin, 0.93 (0.69 to 1

  9. Role of hemostatic powders in the endoscopic management of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Bustamante-Balén, Marco; Plumé, Gema

    2014-08-15

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding (AGIB) is a prevalent condition with significant influence on healthcare costs. Endoscopy is essential for the management of AGIB with a pivotal role in diagnosis, risk stratification and management. Recently, hemostatic powders have been added to our endoscopic armamentarium to treat gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. These substances are intended to control active bleeding by delivering a powdered product over the bleeding site that forms a solid matrix with a tamponade function. Local activation of platelet aggregation and coagulation cascade may be also boosted. There are currently three powders commercially available: hemostatic agent TC-325 (Hemospray(®)), EndoClot™ polysaccharide hemostatic system, and Ankaferd Bloodstopper(®). Although the available evidence is based on short series of cases and there is no randomized controlled trial yet, these powders seem to be effective in controlling GI bleeding from a variety of origins with a very favorable side effects profile. They can be used either as a primary therapy or a second-line treatment, and they seem to be especially indicated in cases of cancer-related bleeding and lesions with difficult access. In this review, we will comment on the mechanism of action, efficacy, safety and technical challenges of the use of powders in several clinical scenarios and we will try to define the main current indications of use and propose new lines of research in this area. PMID:25133029

  10. Role of hemostatic powders in the endoscopic management of gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante-Balén, Marco; Plumé, Gema

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding (AGIB) is a prevalent condition with significant influence on healthcare costs. Endoscopy is essential for the management of AGIB with a pivotal role in diagnosis, risk stratification and management. Recently, hemostatic powders have been added to our endoscopic armamentarium to treat gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. These substances are intended to control active bleeding by delivering a powdered product over the bleeding site that forms a solid matrix with a tamponade function. Local activation of platelet aggregation and coagulation cascade may be also boosted. There are currently three powders commercially available: hemostatic agent TC-325 (Hemospray®), EndoClot™ polysaccharide hemostatic system, and Ankaferd Bloodstopper®. Although the available evidence is based on short series of cases and there is no randomized controlled trial yet, these powders seem to be effective in controlling GI bleeding from a variety of origins with a very favorable side effects profile. They can be used either as a primary therapy or a second-line treatment, and they seem to be especially indicated in cases of cancer-related bleeding and lesions with difficult access. In this review, we will comment on the mechanism of action, efficacy, safety and technical challenges of the use of powders in several clinical scenarios and we will try to define the main current indications of use and propose new lines of research in this area. PMID:25133029

  11. An obscure cause of gastrointestinal bleeding: Renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the small bowel.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Robyn L; Jalil, Salah Abdel; Razick, Manver; Jalil, Ala' Abdel

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the small intestine is a rare condition. It usually results in gastrointestinal bleeding and it could happen many years after the diagnosis with renal cell cancer. Treatment includes surgery as well as targeted agents such as tyrosine kinases. We report here the case of an 82-year-old man with a past medical history of high-grade renal cell carcinoma and right nephrectomy 6 years earlier, who presented with recurrent episodes of syncope and black stools. He underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and colonoscopy without evident source of bleeding. Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) showed three bleeding lesions in the jejunum and ileum. Push enteroscopy revealed a proximal jejunum bleeding mass that was suspicious for malignancy. Histopathology demonstrated poorly differentiated carcinoma. Given the patient's history of high-grade renal cell carcinoma, and similarity of histologic changes to the old renal cell cancer specimen, metastatic renal cell carcinoma was felt to be the responsible etiology. PMID:26348395

  12. Strongyloidiasis in immunosuppressed hosts. Presentation as massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Powell, R W; Moss, J P; Nagar, D; Melo, J C; Boram, L H; Anderson, W H; Cheng, S H

    1980-08-01

    Two cases of massive lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in immunosuppressed patients were due to complicated infestation with Strongyloides stercoralis. The very high mortality of disseminated strongyloidiasis may in part be attributed to delays in diagnosis and treatment resulting from the complex life cycle of this nematode. Successful therapy in the cases presented consisted of reduction of corticosteroid dosage, use of thiabendazole in excess of that recommended for uncomplicated infestation, parenterally administered nutrition, multiple transfusion of blood products, and vigorous supportive management. Emphasis is given to proper categorization of patients and measures designed to prevent, detect, and treat hyperinfection in patients in whom immunosuppression is anticipated. PMID:6967302

  13. A Therapeutic Dose of Ketoprofen Causes Acute Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Erosions, and Ulcers in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shientag, Lisa J; Wheeler, Suzanne M; Garlick, David S; Maranda, Louise S

    2012-01-01

    Perioperative treatment of several rats in our facility with ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) resulted in blood loss, peritonitis, and death within a day to a little more than a week after surgery that was not related to the gastrointestinal tract. Published reports have established the 5-mg/kg dose as safe and effective for rats. Because ketoprofen is a nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug that can damage the gastrointestinal tract, the putative diagnosis for these morbidities and mortalities was gastrointestinal toxicity caused by ketoprofen (5 mg/kg). We conducted a prospective study evaluating the effect of this therapeutic dose of ketoprofen on the rat gastrointestinal tract within 24 h. Ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) was administered to one group of rats that then received gas anesthesia for 30 min and to another group without subsequent anesthesia. A third group was injected with saline followed by 30 min of gas anesthesia. Our primary hypothesis was that noteworthy gastrointestinal bleeding and lesions would occur in both groups treated with ketoprofen but not in rats that received saline and anesthesia. Our results showed marked gastrointestinal bleeding, erosions, and small intestinal ulcers in the ketoprofen-treated rats and minimal damages in the saline-treated group. The combination of ketoprofen and anesthesia resulted in worse clinical signs than did ketoprofen alone. We conclude that a single 5-mg/kg dose of ketoprofen causes acute mucosal damage to the rat small intestine. PMID:23294892

  14. Management of variceal and nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Suzane

    2014-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage remains the most common medical emergency managed by gastroenterologists. Causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in patients with liver cirrhosis can be grouped into two categories: the first includes lesions that arise by virtue of portal hypertension, namely gastroesophageal varices and portal hypertensive gastropathy; and the second includes lesions seen in the general population (peptic ulcer, erosive gastritis, reflux esophagitis, Mallory–Weiss syndrome, tumors, etc.). Emergency upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the standard procedure recommended for both diagnosis and treatment of UGIB. The endoscopic treatment of choice for esophageal variceal bleeding is band ligation of varices. Bleeding from gastric varices is treated by injection with cyanoacrylate. Treatment with vasoactive drugs as well as antibiotic treatment is started before or at the same time as endoscopy. Bleeding from portal hypertensive gastropathy is less frequent, usually chronic and treatment options include β-blocker therapy, injection therapy and interventional radiology. The standard of care of UGIB in patients with cirrhosis includes careful resuscitation, preferably in an intensive care setting, medical and endoscopic therapy, early consideration for placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and, sometimes, surgical therapy or hepatic transplant. PMID:25177367

  15. Italian survey on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and gastrointestinal bleeding in children

    PubMed Central

    Cardile, Sabrina; Martinelli, Massimo; Barabino, Arrigo; Gandullia, Paolo; Oliva, Salvatore; Di Nardo, Giovanni; Dall'Oglio, Luigi; Rea, Francesca; de' Angelis, Gian Luigi; Bizzarri, Barbara; Guariso, Graziella; Masci, Enzo; Staiano, Annamaria; Miele, Erasmo; Romano, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate gastrointestinal complications associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) use in children. METHODS: A retrospective, multicenter study was conducted between January 2005 and January 2013, with the participation of 8 Italian pediatric gastroenterology centers. We collected all the cases of patients who refer to emergency room for suspected gastrointestinal bleeding following NSAIDs consumption, and underwent endoscopic evaluation. Previous medical history, associated risk factors, symptoms and signs at presentation, diagnostic procedures, severity of bleeding and management of gastrointestinal bleeding were collected. In addition, data regarding type of drug used, indication, dose, duration of treatment and prescriber (physician or self-medication) were examined. RESULTS: Fifty-one patients, including 34 males, were enrolled (median age: 7.8 years). Ibuprofen was the most used NSAID [35/51 patients (68.6%)]. Pain was the most frequent indication for NSAIDs use [29/51 patients (56.9%)]. Seven patients had positive family history of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection or peptic ulcer, and 12 had associated comorbidities. Twenty-four (47%) out of 51 patients used medication inappropriately. Hematemesis was the most frequent symptom (33.3%). Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastric lesions in 32/51 (62%) patients, duodenal lesions in 17 (33%) and esophageal lesions in 8 (15%). In 10/51 (19.6%) patients, a diagnosis of H. pylori gastritis was made. Forty-eight (94%) patients underwent medical therapy, with spontaneous bleeding resolution, while in 3/51 (6%) patients, an endoscopic hemostasis was needed. CONCLUSION: The data collected in this study confirms that adverse events with the involvement of the gastrointestinal tract secondary to NSAID use are also common in children PMID:26855547

  16. Endoscopic Management of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Shinji; Kimura, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is one of the most common reasons for hospitalization and a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recently developed endoscopic devices and supporting apparatuses can achieve endoscopic hemostasis with greater safety and efficiency. With these advancements in technology and technique, gastroenterologists should have no concerns regarding the management of acute upper GI bleeding, provided that they are well prepared and trained. However, when endoscopic hemostasis fails, endoscopy should not be continued. Rather, endoscopists should refer patients to radiologists and surgeons without any delay for evaluation regarding the appropriateness of emergency interventional radiology or surgery. PMID:25844335

  17. [Endoscopic treatment in critically ill patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Kheladze, Z S; Dzhaiani, S V; Tsutskiridze, B N; Kheladze, Zv Z; Chakhunashvili, G K; Chakhunashvili, D K

    2010-03-01

    The goal of the current research was to ascertain the optimal methods of an endoscopic haemostasis in critical care patients with GDB. The research was conducted on critically ill patients. The different endoscopic methods of treatment: injectional hemostasis, irrigation with local hemostatics, thermo coagulation, and combined method were used. Treatment with injectional hemostasis resulted in hemostasis in 75% of patients. Irrigation with local hemostatics was conducted using the local hemostatic agent caprofer and (or) 10% solution of epsylonaminocapronal acid. The final hemostasis was achieved in the 90% of the cases; bleeding was stopped in 85% of the cases when the hemorrhages occurred from chronic ulcers. The effect of thermo coagulation method was 80-85%. Combined method of treatment (combination of the irrigation with caprofer and thermo coagulation) helped to achieve 95% of the final hemostasis in critically ill patients. The achieved results certify that the combined use of caprofer and method of electro coagulation in critical care patients with GDB is very perspective. Simultaneously with this, it is also recommended to use anti-segregation therapy with blockers of proton pomp and boosting the defense of the mucous tissue with high doses of mucogen. PMID:20413810

  18. Combination therapies for the endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hiele, M; Rutgeerts, P

    2000-06-01

    This review discusses the background and analysis of data in the literature regarding the effect of a combination of endoscopic therapies on the treatment of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Although these techniques are commonly used, convincing data to support combinations of injection therapies are scarce, and various studies give somewhat conflicting results. In one study, a combination of the injection of adrenaline and a high dose of thrombin was superior to using adrenaline alone. The combination of injection therapy with a thermal method tends to give better results than injection therapy alone in several studies, but the difference is only statistically significant in one study (which uses the gold probe). The data regarding a combination of injection therapy with haemostatic clips are somewhat discordant regarding the effect of the haemoclip itself, but none of the studies found an advantage of combining the two modalities. Some studies suggest that subgroups may exist, such as ulcers with spurting haemorrhage, in which combined treatment might be more useful. PMID:10952808

  19. Gastrointestinal bleeding from Dieulafoy’s lesion: Clinical presentation, endoscopic findings, and endoscopic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nojkov, Borko; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2015-01-01

    Although relatively uncommon, Dieulafoy’s lesion is an important cause of acute gastrointestinal bleeding due to the frequent difficulty in its diagnosis; its tendency to cause severe, life-threatening, recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding; and its amenability to life-saving endoscopic therapy. Unlike normal vessels of the gastrointestinal tract which become progressively smaller in caliber peripherally, Dieulafoy’s lesions maintain a large caliber despite their peripheral, submucosal, location within gastrointestinal wall. Dieulafoy’s lesions typically present with severe, active, gastrointestinal bleeding, without prior symptoms; often cause hemodynamic instability and often require transfusion of multiple units of packed erythrocytes. About 75% of lesions are located in the stomach, with a marked proclivity of lesions within 6 cm of the gastroesophageal junction along the gastric lesser curve, but lesions can also occur in the duodenum and esophagus. Lesions in the jejunoileum or colorectum have been increasingly reported. Endoscopy is the first diagnostic test, but has only a 70% diagnostic yield because the lesions are frequently small and inconspicuous. Lesions typically appear at endoscopy as pigmented protuberances from exposed vessel stumps, with minimal surrounding erosion and no ulceration (visible vessel sans ulcer). Endoscopic therapy, including clips, sclerotherapy, argon plasma coagulation, thermocoagulation, or electrocoagulation, is the recommended initial therapy, with primary hemostasis achieved in nearly 90% of cases. Dual endoscopic therapy of epinephrine injection followed by ablative or mechanical therapy appears to be effective. Although banding is reportedly highly successful, it entails a small risk of gastrointestinal perforation from banding deep mural tissue. Therapeutic alternatives after failed endoscopic therapy include repeat endoscopic therapy, angiography, or surgical wedge resection. The mortality has declined from about 30

  20. Unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleed, when OGD could be fatal.

    PubMed

    Khehra, Raman; Agrawal, Satyanisth; Aoun, Elie; Midian, Robin

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old man presented with chest pain, dyspnoea and coffee grounds emesis. He was haemodynamically stable without significant drop in haemoglobin. He suddenly developed cardiac arrest with wide complex tachycardia and became comatose. CT scan of the head revealed pneumocephalus and multiple infarcts. Given the recent history of radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation, atrio-oesophageal fistula (AOF) was suspected. CT angiography of the thorax showed a 5 mm diverticulum on the posterior wall of the left atrium, also raising suspicion for AOF. The patient was taken to the operating room. An AOF was found and repaired. He did not have any further gastrointestinal bleeding. There was no neurological recovery at day 11 and life support was withdrawn per his family's request. This case highlights the importance of obtaining history of recent cardiac procedures in patients presenting with an upper gastrointestinal bleed. An oesophagogastroduodenoscopy in this patient could have been instantaneously deadly. PMID:26438675

  1. Continuing challenges in the diagnosis and management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, Veronica; Marya, Neil; Singh, Anupam; Rupawala, Abbas; Gondal, Bilal; Cave, David

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis and management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) have changed dramatically since the introduction of video capsule endoscopy (VCE) followed by deep enteroscopy and other imaging technologies in the last decade. Significant advances have been made, yet there remains room for improvement in our diagnostic yield and treatment capabilities for recurrent OGIB. In this review, we will summarize the latest technologies for the diagnosis of OGIB, limitations of VCE, technological enhancement in VCE, and different management options for OGIB. PMID:25400996

  2. Continuing challenges in the diagnosis and management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Veronica; Marya, Neil; Singh, Anupam; Rupawala, Abbas; Gondal, Bilal; Cave, David

    2014-11-15

    The diagnosis and management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) have changed dramatically since the introduction of video capsule endoscopy (VCE) followed by deep enteroscopy and other imaging technologies in the last decade. Significant advances have been made, yet there remains room for improvement in our diagnostic yield and treatment capabilities for recurrent OGIB. In this review, we will summarize the latest technologies for the diagnosis of OGIB, limitations of VCE, technological enhancement in VCE, and different management options for OGIB. PMID:25400996

  3. Duodenal Lipomatosis as a Curious Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleed: A Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Majid; Tiwari, Priyanka; Ramaswamy, Palaniswamy Kalipatti; Kumar, Reddy Prasanna

    2016-01-01

    Lipomas of the gastrointestinal tract are rare. Duodenal lipomas are incidental and mostly asymptomatic. Tumours may produce symptoms of abdominal pain and discomfort or cause bleeding due to ulceration or intestinal obstruction due to intussusception. We describe a 45-year-old man presenting in emergency with 3 days history of melena with normal gastroduodenoscopy and contrast enhanced computed tomography revealing multiple polypoid lesion in duodenum and proximal jejunum suggestive of lipoma. Due to ongoing bleed, he underwent laparotomy with duodenectomy and uneventful postoperative recovery. Our review of cases published in last 67 years indicate that duodenal lipomas are rare to occur but commonly found in second part, they may be seen in third and fourth part of duodenum which may be missed on endoscopy. They can be multiple and may present as severe UGI bleeding which could be managed surgically. Though CT is diagnostic, histopathology confirms the diagnosis which shows lipomatous lesion composed of mature adipose arranged in lobules. PMID:27437304

  4. Jejunal angiodysplasia causing recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding presenting as severe anaemia and melena.

    PubMed

    Tiwary, Satyendra K; Hakim, Md Zeeshan; Kumar, Puneet; Khanna, Ajay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Angiodysplasia of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract consists of ectasia of the submucosal vessels of the bowel. The evaluation of such patients needs proctoscopy, colonoscopy, small bowel enema, enteroscopy, capsule enteroscopy and angiography. Capsule enteroscopy has come up as an alternative to GI enteroscopy and colonoscopy in patients with occult GI bleeding; up to 52% cases of small bowel angiodysplasia in patients with occult GI bleed with negative upper GI and colonoscopy have been reported. The use of capsule enteroscopy potentially limits the hazard of radiation exposure from angiography and is less invasive than double balloon endoscopy. The treatment options for angiodysplasias include intra-arterial vasopressin injection, selective gel foam embolisation, endoscopic electrocoagulation and injection of sclerosants, with each of these being technically demanding, and requiring centres with good access to enteroscopy technology and trained gastroenterologists. Operative intervention has been indicated for refractory bleeding or lesions in sites not accessible to endoscopic interventions. PMID:26567241

  5. Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Diffuse Skin Thickening as Kaposi Sarcoma Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Querido, Sara; Sousa, Henrique Silva; Pereira, Tiago Assis; Birne, Rita; Matias, Patrícia; Jorge, Cristina; Weigert, André; Adragão, Teresa; Bruges, Margarida; Machado, Domingos

    2015-01-01

    A 56-year-old African patient received a kidney from a deceased donor with 4 HLA mismatches in April 2013. He received immunosuppression with basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. Immediate diuresis and a good allograft function were soon observed. Six months later, the serum creatinine level increased to 2.6 mg/dL. A renal allograft biopsy revealed interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy grade II. Toxicity of calcineurin inhibitor was assumed and, after a switch for everolimus, renal function improved. However, since March 2014, renal function progressively deteriorated. A second allograft biopsy showed no new lesions. Two months later, the patient was admitted due to anuria, haematochezia with anaemia, requiring 5 units of packed red blood cells, and diffuse skin thickening. Colonoscopy showed haemorrhagic patches in the colon and the rectum; histology diagnosis was Kaposi sarcoma (KS). A skin biopsy revealed cutaneous involvement of KS. Rapid clinical deterioration culminated in death in June 2014. This case is unusual as less than 20 cases of KS with gross gastrointestinal bleeding have been reported and only 6 cases had the referred bleeding originating in the lower gastrointestinal tract. So, KS should be considered in differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding in some kidney transplant patients. PMID:26783491

  6. Availability of Blood Urea Nitrogen/Creatinine Ratio in Gastrointestinal Bleeding with Melena in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyu Seon; Kang, Chan Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aims of our study were to evaluate the blood urea nitrogen to creatinine ratio (BUN/Cr ratio) for distinguishing between an upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB), and differentiating between the two most common causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) presenting with melena in children. Methods Retrospective data of patients with GIB presenting with melena were analyzed. The data from 60 cases were reviewed including demographics, laboratory findings, diagnostic modalities and results, treatments, and transfusions. Results Among the 60 cases, UGIB and lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) were found in 35 cases (58.3%) and 14 cases (23.3%), respectively. The two common causes of UGIB were varices (37.1%), and peptic ulcer diseases (PUD) (31.4%). The BUN/Cr ratio of 30 or greater was higher in UGIB than LGIB (odds ratio [OR], 6.9; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.3-37.2). In UGIB, the BUN/Cr ratio of the varices group was higher than that of the PUD group (p=0.015). The OR for the BUN/Cr ratio appeared as 1.2 per unit increase in the varices group than the PUD group (95% CI, 1.03-1.3). There was no difference between the PUD group and Meckel's diverticulum group. Conclusion The BUN/Cr ratio was not uneven in differentiating UGIB from LGIB of children with melena in our study. This suggests that BUN/Cr ratio should be interpreted carefully. PMID:25866731

  7. Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Diffuse Skin Thickening as Kaposi Sarcoma Clinical Presentation.

    PubMed

    Querido, Sara; Sousa, Henrique Silva; Pereira, Tiago Assis; Birne, Rita; Matias, Patrícia; Jorge, Cristina; Weigert, André; Adragão, Teresa; Bruges, Margarida; Machado, Domingos

    2015-01-01

    A 56-year-old African patient received a kidney from a deceased donor with 4 HLA mismatches in April 2013. He received immunosuppression with basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. Immediate diuresis and a good allograft function were soon observed. Six months later, the serum creatinine level increased to 2.6 mg/dL. A renal allograft biopsy revealed interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy grade II. Toxicity of calcineurin inhibitor was assumed and, after a switch for everolimus, renal function improved. However, since March 2014, renal function progressively deteriorated. A second allograft biopsy showed no new lesions. Two months later, the patient was admitted due to anuria, haematochezia with anaemia, requiring 5 units of packed red blood cells, and diffuse skin thickening. Colonoscopy showed haemorrhagic patches in the colon and the rectum; histology diagnosis was Kaposi sarcoma (KS). A skin biopsy revealed cutaneous involvement of KS. Rapid clinical deterioration culminated in death in June 2014. This case is unusual as less than 20 cases of KS with gross gastrointestinal bleeding have been reported and only 6 cases had the referred bleeding originating in the lower gastrointestinal tract. So, KS should be considered in differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding in some kidney transplant patients. PMID:26783491

  8. Video capsule endoscopy in left ventricular assist device recipients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Amornsawadwattana, Surachai; Nassif, Michael; Raymer, David; LaRue, Shane; Chen, Chien-Huan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether video capsule endoscopy (VCE) affects the outcomes of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) recipients with gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of LVAD recipients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) who underwent VCE at a tertiary medical center between 2005 and 2013. All patients were admitted and monitored with telemetry and all VCE and subsequent endoscopic procedures were performed as inpatients. A VCE study was considered positive only when P2 lesions were found and was regarded as negative if P1 or P0 were identified. All patients were followed until heart transplant, death, or the end of the study. RESULTS: Between 2005 and 2013, 30 patients with LVAD underwent VCE. Completion rate of VCE was 93.3% and there was no capsule retention. No interference of VCE recording or the function of LVAD was found. VCE was positive in 40% of patients (n = 12). The most common finding was active small intestinal bleeding (50%) and small intestinal angiodysplasia (33.3%). There was no difference in the rate of recurrent bleeding between patients with positive and negative VCE study (50.0% vs 55.6%, P = 1.00) during an average of 11.6 ± 9.6 mo follow up. Among patients with positive VCE, the recurrent bleeding rate did not differ whether subsequent endoscopy was performed (50% vs 50%, P = 1.00). CONCLUSION: VCE can be safely performed in LVAD recipients with a diagnostic yield of 40%. VCE does not affect recurrent bleeding in LVAD patients regardless of findings. PMID:27182165

  9. Delayed positive gastrointestinal bleeding studies with technetium-99m-red blood cells: Utility of a second injection

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, A.F. )

    1991-02-01

    Two patients studied with technetium-99m-labeled red blood cells (RBCs) for gastrointestinal bleeding had positive findings only on 24-hr delayed images, at which time the site of bleeding could not be ascertained. In each instance, when additional delayed images suggested that active bleeding was occurring, a second aliquot of RBCs was labeled and injected. Sites of active hemorrhage were identified following further imaging in both patients. When delayed GI bleeding images are positive, further views should be obtained to ascertain if the pattern of intraluminal activity changes. If renewed active hemorrhage is suspected, reinjection with a second dose of labeled RBCs may identify the bleeding site.

  10. Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... emergency help. Calm and reassure the person. The sight of blood can be very frightening. If the ... is best for external bleeding, except for an eye injury. Maintain pressure until the bleeding stops. When ...

  11. Analysis of risk factor and clinical characteristics of angiodysplasia presenting as upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Bum; Chung, Woo Chul; Lee, Seok Jong; Sung, Hea Jung; Woo, Seokyung; Kim, Hyo Suk; Jeong, Yeon Oh; Lee, Hyewon; Kim, Yeon-Ji

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Angiodysplasia is important in the differential diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), but the clinical features and outcomes associated with UGIB from angiodysplasia have not been characterized. We aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics and outcomes of angiodysplasia presented as UGIB. Methods: Between January 2004 and December 2013, a consecutive series of patients admitted with UGIB were retrospectively analyzed. Thirty-five patients with bleeding from angiodysplasia were enrolled. We compared them with an asymptomatic control group (incidental finding of angiodysplasia in health screening, n = 58) and bleeding control group (simultaneous finding of angiodysplasia and peptic ulcer bleeding, n = 28). Results: When patients with UGIB from angiodysplasia were compared with the asymptomatic control group, more frequent rates of nonantral location and large sized lesion (≥ 1 cm) were evident in multivariate analysis. When these patients were compared with the bleeding control group, they were older (mean age: 67.94 ± 9.16 years vs.55.07 ± 13.29 years, p = 0.03) and received less transfusions (p = 0.03). They also had more frequent rate of recurrence (40.0% vs. 20.7%, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Non-antral location and large lesions (≥ 1 cm) could be risk factors of UGIB of angiodysplasia. UGIB due to angiodysplasia was more common in older patients. Transfusion requirement would be less and a tendency of clinical recurrence might be apparent. PMID:26828247

  12. Gastrointestinal bleeding: an accessory spleen causing a false-positive Tc-99m-sulfur colloid study

    SciTech Connect

    Heyman, S.; Sunaryo, F.P.; Ziegler, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    A Tc-99m-sulfur colloid abdominal scan was performed on a 12-year-old girl to localize the site of gastrointestinal bleeding. The study was normal. When bleeding recurred two weeks later, a repeat study revealed a focal abnormality in the upper abdomen. This was thought to be compatible with a small bleed. However, at surgery an accessory spleen was found, accounting for the abnormal scan.

  13. Octreotide for the Management of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Patient with a HeartWare Left Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Geetanjali; Grayburn, Ryan; Lamb, Geoffrey; Umpierrez De Reguero, Adrian; Gaglianello, Nunzio

    2014-01-01

    HeartWare is a third generation left ventricular assist device (LVAD), widely used for the management of advanced heart failure patients. These devices are frequently associated with a significant risk of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. The data for the management of patients with LVAD presenting with GI bleeding is limited. We describe a 56-year-old lady, recipient of a HeartWare device, who experienced recurrent GI bleeding and was successfully managed with subcutaneous (SC) formulations of octreotide. PMID:25587457

  14. Utility of the Shock Index and Other Risk-Scoring Tools in Patients with Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Ratra, Atul; Rassameehiran, Supannee; Parupudi, Sreeram; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-03-01

    Patients with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding frequently require hospitalization and have a mortality rate that ranges from 6% to 14%. These patients need rapid clinical assessment to determine the urgency of endoscopy and the need for endoscopic treatment. Risk-scoring tools, such as the Rockall score and the Glasgow-Blatchford score, are commonly used in this assessment. These tools clearly help identify high-risk patients but do not necessarily have good predictive value in identifying important outcomes. Their diagnostic accuracy in identifying rebleeding and mortality ranges from poor to fair. The shock index (heart rate divided by systolic blood pressure) provides an integrated assessment of the cardiovascular status. It can be easily calculated during the initial evaluation of patients and monitoring after treatment. The shock index has been used in a few studies in patients with acute GI bleeding, including studies to determine which patients need emergency endoscopy, to predict complications after corrosive ingestions, to identify delayed hemorrhage following pancreatic surgery, and to evaluate the utility of angiograms to identify sites of GI bleeding. Not all studies have found the shock index to be useful in patients with GI bleeding, however. This may reflect the unpredictable natural history of various etiologies of GI bleeding, comorbidity that may influence blood pressure and/or heart rate, and inadequate data acquisition. The shock index needs more formal study in patients with GI bleeding admitted to medical intensive care units. Important considerations include the initial response to resuscitation, persistent bleeding following initial treatment, and rebleeding following a period of stabilization. In addition, it needs correlation with other risk-scoring tools. PMID:26954657

  15. Randomized controlled trial comparing outcomes of video capsule endoscopy with push enteroscopy in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Segarajasingam, Dev S; Hanley, Stephen C; Barkun, Alan N; Waschke, Kevin A; Burtin, Pascal; Parent, Josée; Mayrand, Serge; Fallone, Carlo A; Jobin, Gilles; Seidman, Ernest G; Martel, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Optimal management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate diagnostic yields and downstream clinical outcomes comparing video capsule endoscopy (VCE) with push enteroscopy (PE). METHODS: Patients with OGIB and negative esophagogastroduodenoscopies and colonoscopies were randomly assigned to VCE or PE and followed for 12 months. End points included diagnostic yield, acute or chronic bleeding, health resource utilization and crossovers. RESULTS: Data from 79 patients were analyzed (VCE n=40; PE n=39; 82.3% overt OGIB). VCE had greater diagnostic yield (72.5% versus 48.7%; P<0.05), especially in the distal small bowel (58% versus 13%; P<0.01). More VCE-identified lesions were rated possible or certain causes of bleeding (79.3% versus 35.0%; P<0.05). During follow-up, there were no differences in the rates of ongoing bleeding (acute [40.0% versus 38.5%; P not significant], chronic [32.5% versus 45.6%; P not significant]), nor in health resource utilization. Fewer VCE-first patients crossed over due to ongoing bleeding (22.5% versus 48.7%; P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: A VCE-first approach had a significant diagnostic advantage over PE-first in patients with OGIB, especially with regard to detecting small bowel lesions, affecting clinical certainty and subsequent further small bowel investigations, with no subsequent differences in bleeding or resource utilization outcomes in follow-up. These findings question the clinical relevance of many of the discovered endoscopic lesions or the ability to treat most of these effectively over time. Improved prognostication of both patient characteristics and endoscopic lesion appearance with regard to bleeding behaviour, coupled with the impact of therapeutic deep enteroscopy, is now required using adapted, high-quality study methodologies. PMID:25803018

  16. Etiology, endoscopic management and mortality of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Bruno da Costa; de Lima, Marcelo Simas; Leonardo, Daniel Valdivia; Retes, Felipe Alves; Kawaguti, Fábio Shiguehissa; Sato, Cezar Fabiano Manabu; Hondo, Fábio Yuji; Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana Vaz; Ribeiro, Ulysses

    2013-01-01

    Background The source and outcomes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in oncologic patients are poorly investigated. Objective The study aimed to investigate these issues in a tertiary academic referral center specialized in cancer treatment. Methods This was a retrospective study including all patients with cancer referred to endoscopy due to UGIB in 2010. Results UGIB was confirmed in 147 (of 324 patients) referred to endoscopy for a suspected episode of GI bleeding. Tumor was the most common cause of bleeding (N = 35, 23.8%), followed by varices (N = 30, 19.7%), peptic ulcer (N = 29, 16.3%) and gastroduodenal erosions (N = 16, 10.9%). Among the 32 patients with cancer of the upper GI tract, the main causes of bleeding were cancer (N = 27, 84.4%) and peptic ulcer (N = 5, 6.3%). Forty-one patients (27.9%) presented with bleeding from the primary tumor or from a metastatic lesion, and seven received endoscopic therapy, with successful initial hemostasis in six (85.7%). Rebleeding and mortality rates were not different between endoscopically treated (N = 7) and non-treated (N = 34) patients (28.6% vs. 14.7%, p = 0.342; 43.9% vs. 44.1%, p = 0.677). Median survival was 20 days, and the overall 30-day mortality rate was 44.9%. There was no predictive factor of mortality or rebleeding. Conclusion Tumor bleeding is the most common cause of UGIB in cancer patients. UGIB in cancer patients correlates with a high mortality rate regardless of the bleeding source. Current endoscopic treatments may not be effective in preventing rebleeding or improving survival. PMID:24917941

  17. Thrombin in combination with intensive nursing in treating upper gastrointestinal bleeding in children.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Xiang, M L; Liu, Y M

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric upper gastrointestinal bleeding, a commonly seen pediatric emergency, needs timely symptomatic treatment to avoid a worse outcome. To discuss the clinical effect of thrombin treatment in combination with intensive nursing on pediatric upper gastrointestinal bleeding, this study analyzed 128 children who were treated in the second ward of the Children’s Internal Medical Department in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University between February 2012 and December 2014. The patients were divided into two groups, an experimental group and a control group. Besides thrombin, the experimental group was given intensive nursing, consisting of regular nursing and targeted nursing, while the control group was given regular nursing only. Clinical indexes of the two groups, such as effective rate, nursing satisfaction and side effect rate, were compared. Relevant clinical indexes such as duration of hospital stay, time to stopping of bleeding and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) score, as well as overall satisfaction level of the observation group were all better than those of the control group and differences between the two groups had statistical significance (P less than 0.05). Furthermore, difference of overall effective rate between the experimental group (90.63%) and the control group (68.75%) was significant. Difference of incidence of side effects between the two groups was statistically significant. Thus thrombin treatment in combination with intensive nursing proved to have a remarkable clinical effect and high safety level in treating pediatric upper gastrointestinal bleeding and, moreover, it shortens treatment time and enhances the patients’ quality of life. PMID:27358137

  18. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the jejunum presenting as obscure gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with a history of gliosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso Puentes, Nidia; Jimenez-Alfaro Larrazabal, Carmen; García Higuera, Maria Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Small bowel malignant tumors are rare and sarcomatoid carcinomas have rarely been reported at this site. We report a 56-year-old woman, with history of an excised gliosarcoma, who presented with recurrent obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. She underwent endoscopy and colonoscopy, which failed to identify the cause of the bleeding. The abdominal computed tomography scan located a tumor in the small bowel. Pathology revealed a jejunal sarcomatoid carcinoma. She developed tumor recurrence and multiple liver metastases shortly after surgery. Immunohistochemistry is required for accurate diagnosis. Sarcomatoid carcinoma is a rare cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, which is associated with a poor prognosis. PMID:24759341

  19. Cyanoacrylate spray as treatment in difficult-to-manage gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Toapanta-Yanchapaxi, Liz; Chavez-Tapia, Norberto; Téllez-Ávila, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding can be a life-treating event that is managed with standard endoscopic therapy in the majority of cases. However, up to 5%-10% of patients may have persistent bleeding that does not respond to conventional measures. Several endoscopic treatment techniques have been proposed as strategies to control such cases, such as epinephrine injection, hemoclips or argon plasma coagulation, but there are certain clinical scenarios where it is difficult to achieve hemostasis even though adequate use of the available resources is made. Reasons for these failures can be associated with the lesion features, such as extent or location. The use of long-standing techniques in non-traditional scenarios, such as with cyanoacrylate for gastric varices sclerosis, has been reported with favorable results. Although new products such as TC-325 or Ankaferd Blood Stopper hemosprays may be useful, their formulations are not available worldwide. Here we present two clinical cases with very different scenarios of gastrointestinal bleeding, where the use of cyanoacrylate in spray had favorable results in uncommon indications. Cyanoacrylate used as a spray is a technique that can be used as an alternative method in emergent settings. PMID:25228947

  20. Cyanoacrylate spray as treatment in difficult-to-manage gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Toapanta-Yanchapaxi, Liz; Chavez-Tapia, Norberto; Téllez-Ávila, Félix

    2014-09-16

    Gastrointestinal bleeding can be a life-treating event that is managed with standard endoscopic therapy in the majority of cases. However, up to 5%-10% of patients may have persistent bleeding that does not respond to conventional measures. Several endoscopic treatment techniques have been proposed as strategies to control such cases, such as epinephrine injection, hemoclips or argon plasma coagulation, but there are certain clinical scenarios where it is difficult to achieve hemostasis even though adequate use of the available resources is made. Reasons for these failures can be associated with the lesion features, such as extent or location. The use of long-standing techniques in non-traditional scenarios, such as with cyanoacrylate for gastric varices sclerosis, has been reported with favorable results. Although new products such as TC-325 or Ankaferd Blood Stopper hemosprays may be useful, their formulations are not available worldwide. Here we present two clinical cases with very different scenarios of gastrointestinal bleeding, where the use of cyanoacrylate in spray had favorable results in uncommon indications. Cyanoacrylate used as a spray is a technique that can be used as an alternative method in emergent settings. PMID:25228947

  1. Recent advances on the management of patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Sheasgreen, Christopher; Leontiadis, Grigorios I.

    2013-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common emergency associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The mainstays of therapy include prompt resuscitation, early risk stratification, and appropriate access to endoscopy. Patients with high-risk endoscopic findings should receive endoscopic hemostasis with a modality of established efficacy. The pillar of post-endoscopic therapy is acid-suppression via proton pump inhibitors (PPI), although the optimal dose and route of administration are still unclear. Post-discharge management of patients with peptic ulcers includes standard oral PPI treatment and eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection. The risk of recurrent bleeding should be carefully considered and appropriate gastroprotection should be offered when non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-platelet agents, and/or anticoagulation need to be used. This review seeks to survey new evidence in the management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding that has emerged in the past 3 years and put it into context with recommendations from recent practice guidelines. PMID:24714301

  2. Risk of Hospitalized Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Persons Randomized to Diuretic, ACE-Inhibitor, or Calcium-Channel Blocker in ALLHAT

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, William; Piller, Linda B.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Whittle, Jeffrey; Jafri, Syed Z.A.; Ford, Charles E.; Einhorn, Paula T.; Oparil, Suzanne; Furberg, Curt D.; Grimm, Richard H.; Alderman, Michael H.; Davis, Barry R.; Probstfield, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium channel-blockers (CCB) are an important class of medication useful in the treatment of hypertension. Several observational studies have suggested an association between CCB therapy and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Using administrative databases, we re-examined in a post-hoc analysis whether the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) participants randomized to the calcium-channel blocker amlodipine had a greater risk of hospitalized gastrointestinal bleeding (a pre-specified outcome) compared to those randomized to the diuretic chlorthalidone or the ACE-inhibitor lisinopril. Participants randomized to chlorthalidone did not have a reduced risk for gastrointestinal bleeding hospitalizations compared to participants randomized to amlodipine (HR, 1.09, 95% CI 0.92-1.28). Those randomized to lisinopril were at increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding compared those randomized to chlorthalidone (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.00-1.36). In a post-hoc comparison, participants assigned lisinopril therapy had a higher risk of hospitalized gastrointestinal hemorrhage (HR,1.27, 95% CI 1.06-1.51) versus those assigned to amlodipine. In-study use of atenolol prior to first gastrointestinal hemorrhage was related to a lower incidence of GI bleeding (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.57-0.83). In conclusion, hypertensive patients on amlodipine do not have an increased risk of GI bleeding hospitalizations compared to those on either chlorthalidone or lisinopril. PMID:24283598

  3. Gastrointestinal bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer of the small intestine Cancer of the stomach Intestinal polyps (a pre-cancerous condition) Other causes of ... is passed through your mouth into your esophagus, stomach, and small intestine A tube is placed through your mouth into ...

  4. Dieulafoy's lesion-like bleeding: an underrecognized cause of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage in patients with advanced liver disease.

    PubMed

    Akhras, Jamil; Patel, Pragnesh; Tobi, Martin

    2007-03-01

    Dieulafoy's lesion is a gastrointestinal submucosal artery that ruptures into the lumen causing massive hemorrhage. Until recently, failure to diagnose and treat patients endoscopically may have necessitated blind gastrectomy. Because arteriolar spider nevi abound in patients with liver disease and bleeding from such lesions has been described in the upper gastrointestinal tract, we reviewed our experience to determine whether a diagnosis of advanced liver disease could facilitate recognition and treatment of this type of arterial bleeding. Endoscopy records from 1991 to 1996 for all cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding at our institution were reviewed. Dieulafoy's lesion-like bleeding was defined as arterial-type bleeding with no evidence of mucosal ulceration or erosions. Advanced liver disease was defined as signs of portal hypertension and/or cirrhosis or infiltrative liver disease. Dieulafoy's lesion-like bleeding was the cause in 6 of 4569 cases (0.13%). Five patients with Dieulafoy's lesion-like gastrointestinal hemorrhage had advanced liver disease compared with 954 of 4569 of all patients endoscoped for gastrointestinal hemorrhage for the period evaluated (OR = 19.04; 95% CI 2.1-900.8; p < 0.002 by Fisher's exact test). Dieulafoy's lesion-like bleeding was treated successfully with epinephrine injection and endoscopic cauterization in 5 of 6 patients with 1 patient requiring surgery. No other clinical associations were evident. Dieulafoy's lesion-like bleeding occurs more commonly in patients with advanced liver disease and should be included as a potential cause for bleeding in advanced liver disease and aggressively sought. PMID:17237996

  5. Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Anticoagulant or Antiplatelet Drugs: Systematic Search for Clinical Practice Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Gutermann, Irit Kaye; Niggemeier, Verena; Zimmerli, Lukas U.; Holzer, Barbara M.; Battegay, Edouard; Scharl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a frequently encountered and very serious problem in emergency room patients who are currently being treated with anticoagulant or antiplatelet medications. There is, however, a lack of clinical practice guidelines about how to respond to these situations. The goal of this study was to find published articles that contain specific information about how to safely adjust anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy when GI bleeding occurs. The investigators initiated a global search on the PubMed and Google websites for published information about GI bleeding in the presence of anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy. After eliminating duplicate entries, the medical articles that remained were screened to narrow the sets of articles to those that met specific criteria. Articles that most closely matched study criteria were analyzed in detail and compared to determine how many actual guidelines exist and are useful. We could provide only minimal information about appropriate therapeutic strategies because no articles provided sufficient specific advice about how to respond to situations involving acute GI bleeding and concurrent use of anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs. Only 4 articles provided enough detail to be of any use in an emergency situation. Clinical practice guidelines and also clinical trials for GI hemorrhaging should be expanded to state in which situations the use of anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs should be suspended and the medications should later be resumed, and they should state the level of risk for any particular action. PMID:25569664

  6. Role of interventional radiology in the management of acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Raja S; Choi, Hyung Won; Mouser, Hans C; Narsinh, Kazim H; McCammack, Kevin C; Treesit, Tharintorn; Kinney, Thomas B

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) can lead to significant morbidity and mortality without appropriate treatment. There are numerous causes of acute GIB including but not limited to infection, vascular anomalies, inflammatory diseases, trauma, and malignancy. The diagnostic and therapeutic approach of GIB depends on its location, severity, and etiology. The role of interventional radiology becomes vital in patients whose GIB remains resistant to medical and endoscopic treatment. Radiology offers diagnostic imaging studies and endovascular therapeutic interventions that can be performed promptly and effectively with successful outcomes. Computed tomography angiography and nuclear scintigraphy can localize the source of bleeding and provide essential information for the interventional radiologist to guide therapeutic management with endovascular angiography and transcatheter embolization. This review article provides insight into the essential role of Interventional Radiology in the management of acute GIB. PMID:24778770

  7. A long-Segmental Vascular Malformation in the Small Bowel Presenting With Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Preschool-Aged Child

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeoun Joo; Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Cho, Yong Hoon; Kim, Yong-Woo; Kim, Tae Un; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in pediatric patients has several causes. Vascular malformation of the small bowel is a rare disease leading to pediatric GI bleeding. To our knowledge, few reports describe ultrasound and computed tomography findings of venous malformations involving the small bowel. We present a case of long-segmental and circumferential vascular malformation that led to GI bleeding in a pre-school aged child, focusing on the radiologic findings. Although vascular malformation including of the GI tract is rare in children, it should be considered when GI bleeding occurs in pediatric patients. PMID:27110342

  8. Georges Brohee Prize. Oestrogen-progesterone, a new therapy of bleeding gastrointestinal vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Van Cutsem, E

    1993-01-01

    Gastrointestinal vascular malformations can cause haemorrhage requiring multiple transfusions. Surgical or endoscopic therapy are ineffective when the vascular malformations are spread diffusely over the gastrointestinal tract, when lesions escape identification or are not accessible for treatment. Several reports suggest that oestrogen-progesterone therapy is effective in the treatment of epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. The aim of our studies is to test the hypothesis that oestrogen-progesterone is an effective treatment for bleeding gastrointestinal vascular malformations in patients with a very high transfusion need and in whom surgical or endoscopic treatment failed or could not be performed. The mean transfusion requirement prior to entering the studies amounted to 35.4 units packed per patient. In an uncontrolled trial oestrogen-progesterone therapy diminished significantly transfusion requirements from 3.4 units packed cells per patient per month to 0.1 units packed cells (p = 0.02). Haemorrhage ceased totally in 3 of 7 patients. A double-blind randomized placebo-controlled, cross-over trial shows that therapy with 0.050 mg ethinyloestradiol and 1 mg norethisterone is very effective in reducing transfusion requirements: 2.8 versus 11.2 units packed cells over a 6 month treatment period (p = 0.002). Only 3 of 13 patients treated with ethinyloestradiol and norethisterone required transfusions for persistent bleeding, while 12 of 13 patients in the placebo group had transfusion requirements (p = 0.001). After stopping hormonal therapy, no transfusions were needed for a mean of 10 months. This indicates a long-lasting effect of ethinyloestradiol and norethisterone on bleeding and transfusion requirements.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8342398

  9. Role of Interventional Radiology in the Emergent Management of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Navuluri, Rakesh; Patel, Jay; Kang, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100,000 cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) require inpatient admission annually in the United States. When medical management and endoscopic therapy are inadequate, endovascular intervention can be lifesaving. These emergent situations highlight the importance of immediate competence of the interventional radiologist in the preangiographic evaluation as well as the endovascular treatment of UGIB. We describe a case of UGIB managed with endovascular embolization and detail the angiographic techniques used. The case description is followed by a detailed discussion of the treatment approach to UGIB, with attention to both nonvariceal and variceal algorithms. PMID:23997408

  10. Transjugular Endovascular Recanalization of Splenic Vein in Patients with Regional Portal Hypertension Complicated by Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Xuefeng; Nie, Ling; Wang, Zhu; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Tang, Chengwei; Li, Xiao

    2013-05-02

    PurposeRegional portal hypertension (RPH) is an uncommon clinical syndrome resulting from splenic vein stenosis/occlusion, which may cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from the esophagogastric varices. The present study evaluated the safety and efficacy of transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein in patients with GI bleeding secondary to RPH.MethodsFrom December 2008 to May 2011, 11 patients who were diagnosed with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and had undergone transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein were reviewed retrospectively. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed splenic vein stenosis in six cases and splenic vein occlusion in five. Etiology of RPH was chronic pancreatitis (n = 7), acute pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst (n = 2), pancreatic injury (n = 1), and isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (n = 1).ResultsTechnical success was achieved in 8 of 11 patients via the transjugular approach, including six patients with splenic vein stenosis and two patients with splenic vein occlusion. Two patients underwent splenic vein venoplasty only, whereas four patients underwent bare stents deployment and two covered stents. Splenic vein pressure gradient (SPG) was reduced from 21.5 ± 7.3 to 2.9 ± 1.4 mmHg after the procedure (P < 0.01). For the remaining three patients who had technical failures, splenic artery embolization and subsequent splenectomy was performed. During a median follow-up time of 17.5 (range, 3–34) months, no recurrence of GI bleeding was observed.ConclusionsTransjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein is a safe and effective therapeutic option in patients with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and is not associated with an increased risk of procedure-related complications.

  11. Aspirin use for primary prophylaxis: Adverse outcomes in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Souk, Karina M; Tamim, Hani M; Abu Daya, Hussein A; Rockey, Don C; Barada, Kassem A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare outcomes of patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) taking aspirin for primary prophylaxis to those not taking it. METHODS: Patients not known to have any vascular disease (coronary artery or cerebrovascular disease) who were admitted to the American University of Beirut Medical Center between 1993 and 2010 with NVUGIB were included. The frequencies of in-hospital mortality, re-bleeding, severe bleeding, need for surgery or embolization, and of a composite outcome defined as the occurrence of any of the 4 bleeding related adverse outcomes were compared between patients receiving aspirin and those on no antithrombotics. We also compared frequency of in hospital complications and length of hospital stay between the two groups. RESULTS: Of 357 eligible patients, 94 were on aspirin and 263 patients were on no antithrombotics (control group). Patients in the aspirin group were older, the mean age was 58 years in controls and 67 years in the aspirin group (P < 0.001). Patients in the aspirin group had significantly more co-morbidities, including diabetes mellitus and hypertension [25 (27%) vs 31 (112%) and 44 (47%) vs 74 (28%) respectively, (P = 0.001)], as well as dyslipidemia [21 (22%) vs 16 (6%), P < 0.0001). Smoking was more frequent in the aspirin group [34 (41%) vs 60 (27%), P = 0.02)]. The frequencies of endoscopic therapy and surgery were similar in both groups. Patients who were on aspirin had lower in-hospital mortality rates (2.1% vs 13.7%, P = 0.002), shorter hospital stay (4.9 d vs 7 d, P = 0.01), and fewer composite outcomes (10.6% vs 24%, P = 0.01). The frequencies of in-hospital complications and re-bleeding were similar in the two groups. CONCLUSION: Patients who present with NVUGIB while receiving aspirin for primary prophylaxis had fewer adverse outcomes. Thus aspirin may have a protective effect beyond its cardiovascular benefits. PMID:27462392

  12. Gallbladder bleeding-related severe gastrointestinal bleeding and shock in a case with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jun-Li; Tsai, Shang-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gallbladder (GB) bleeding is very rare and it is caused by cystic artery aneurysm and rupture, or GB wall rupture. For GB rupture, the typical findings are positive Murphy's sign and jaundice. GB bleeding mostly presented as hemobilia. This is the first case presented with severe GI bleeding because of GB rupture-related GB bleeding. After comparing computed tomography, one gallstone spillage was noticed. In addition to gallstones, uremic coagulopathy also worsens the bleeding condition. This is also the first case that patients with GB spillage-related rupture and bleeding were successfully treated by nonsurgical management. Clinicians should bear in mind the rare causes of GI bleeding. Embolization of the bleeding artery should be attempted as soon as possible. PMID:27281100

  13. Predictive factors of mortality within 30 days in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Min, Bo Ram; Kim, Eun Soo; Park, Kyung Sik; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok; Jeon, Seong Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) is a common medical emergency that can be life threatening. This study evaluated predictive factors of 30-day mortality in patients with this condition. Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted at a single hospital between April 2010 and November 2012, and 336 patients with symptoms and signs of gastrointestinal bleeding were consecutively enrolled. Clinical characteristics and endoscopic findings were reviewed to identify potential factors associated with 30-day mortality. Results: Overall, 184 patients were included in the study (men, 79.3%; mean age, 59.81 years), and 16 patients died within 30 days (8.7%). Multivariate analyses revealed that comorbidity of diabetes mellitus (DM) or metastatic malignancy, age ≥ 65 years, and hypotension (systolic pressure < 90 mmHg) during hospitalization were significant predictive factors of 30-day mortality. Conclusions: Comorbidity of DM or metastatic malignancy, age ≥ 65 years, and hemodynamic instability during hospitalization were predictors of 30-day mortality in patients with NVUGIB. These results will help guide the management of patients with this condition. PMID:26767858

  14. Acute Upper Gastro-Intestinal Bleeding in Morocco: What Have Changed?

    PubMed Central

    Timraz, A.; Khannoussi, W.; Ajana, F. Z.; Essamri, W.; Benelbarhdadi, I.; Afifi, R.; Benazzouz, M.; Essaid, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. In the present study, we aimed to investigate epidemiological, clinical, and etiological characteristics of acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2003 and December 2008. It concerned all cases of acute upper gastroduodenal bleeding benefited from an urgent gastro-intestinal endoscopy in our department in Morocco. Characteristics of patients were evaluated in terms of age, gender, medical history, presenting symptoms, results of rectal and clinical examinations, and endoscopy findings. Results. 1389 cases were registered. As 66% of the patients were male, 34% were female. Mean age was 49. 12% of patients had a history of previous hemorrhage, and 26% had a history of NSAID and aspirin use. Endoscopy was performed in 96%. The gastroduodenal ulcer was the main etiology in 38%, followed by gastritis and duodenitis in 32.5%. Conclusion. AUGIB is still a frequent pathology, threatening patients' life. NSAID and aspirin are still the major risk factors. Their impact due to peptic ulcer remains stable in our country. PMID:21991509

  15. Utility of urgent colonoscopy in acute lower gastro-intestinal bleeding: a single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Albeldawi, Mazen; Ha, Duc; Mehta, Paresh; Lopez, Rocio; Jang, Sunguk; Sanaka, Madhusudhan R.; Vargo, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The role of urgent colonoscopy in lower gastro-intestinal bleeding (LGIB) remains controversial. Over the last two decades, a number of studies have indicated that urgent colonoscopy may facilitate the identification and treatment of bleeding lesions; however, studies comparing this approach to elective colonoscopy for LGIB are limited. Aims. To determine the utility and assess the outcome of urgent colonoscopy as the initial test for patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with acute LGIB. Methods. Consecutive patients who underwent colonoscopy at our institution for the initial evaluation of acute LGIB between January 2011 and January 2012 were analysed retrospectively. Patients were grouped into urgent vs. elective colonoscopy, depending on the timing of colonoscopy after admission to the ICU. Urgent colonoscopy was defined as being performed within 24 hours of admission and those performed later than 24 hours were considered elective. Outcomes included length of hospital stay, early re-bleeding rates, and the need for additional diagnostic or therapeutic interventions. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with increased transfusion requirements. Results. Fifty-seven patients underwent colonoscopy for the evaluation of suspected LGIB, 24 of which were urgent. There was no significant difference in patient demographics, co-morbidities, or medications between the two groups. Patients who underwent urgent colonoscopy were more likely to present with hemodynamic instability (P = 0.019) and require blood transfusions (P = 0.003). No significant differences in length of hospital stay, re-bleeding rates, or the need for additional diagnostic or therapeutic interventions were found. Patients requiring blood transfusions (n = 27) were more likely to be female (P = 0.016) and diabetics (P = 0.015). Fourteen patients re-bled at a median of 2 days after index colonoscopy. Those with hemodynamic

  16. Safety and efficacy of Hemospray® in upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Alan Hoi Lun; Ou, George; Galorport, Cherry; Amar, Jack; Bressler, Brian; Donnellan, Fergal; Ko, Hin Hin; Lam, Eric; Enns, Robert Allan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hemospray (Cook Medical, USA) has recently been approved in Canada for the management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestional bleeding (UGIB). OBJECTIVE: To review the authors’ experience with the safety and efficacy of Hemospray for treating UGIB. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed on patients who required endoscopic evaluation for suspected UGIB and were treated with Hemospray. RESULTS: From February 2012 to July 2013, 19 patients (mean age 67.6 years) with UGIB were treated with Hemospray. A bleeding lesion was identified in the esophagus in one (5.3%) patient, the stomach in five (26.3%) and duodenum in 13 (68.4%). Bleeding was secondary to peptic ulcers in 12 (63.2%) patients, Dieulafoy lesions in two (10.5%), mucosal erosion in one (5.3%), angiodysplastic lesions in one (5.3%), ampullectomy in one (5.3%), polypectomy in one (5.3%) and an unidentified lesion in one (5.3%). The lesions showed spurting hemorrhage in four (21.1%) patients, oozing hemorrhage in 11 (57.9%) and no active bleeding in four (21.1%). Hemospray was administered as monotherapy in two (10.5%) patients, first-line modality in one (5.3%) and rescue modality in 16 (84.2%). Hemospray was applied prophylactically to nonbleeding lesions in four (21.1%) patients and therapeutically to bleeding lesions in 15 (78.9%). Acute hemostasis was achieved in 14 of 15 (93.3%) patients. Rebleeding within seven days occurred in seven of 18 (38.9%) patients. Potential adverse events occurred in two (10.5%) patients and included visceral perforation and splenic infarct. Mortality occurred in five (26.3%) patients but the cause of death was unrelated to gastrointestinal bleeding with the exception of one patient who developed hemoperitoneum. CONCLUSIONS: The high rates of both acute hemostasis and recurrent bleeding suggest that Hemospray may be used in high-risk cases as a temporary measure or a bridge toward more definitive therapy. PMID:24501723

  17. Clinical outcome of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding after hours: the role of urgent endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Dong-Won; Park, Young Soo; Lee, Sang Hyub; Shin, Cheol Min; Hwang, Jin-Hyeok; Kim, Jin-Wook; Jeong, Sook-Hyang; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study was performed to investigate the clinical role of urgent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (ANVUGIB) performed by experienced endoscopists after hours. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed for consecutively collected data of patients with ANVUGIB between January 2009 and December 2010. Results: A total of 158 patients visited the emergency unit for ANVUGIB after hours. Among them, 60 underwent urgent EGD (within 8 hours) and 98 underwent early EGD (8 to 24 hours) by experienced endoscopists. The frequencies of hemodynamic instability, fresh blood aspirate on the nasogastric tube, and high-risk endoscopic findings were significantly higher in the urgent EGD group. Primary hemostasis was achieved in all except two patients. There were nine cases of recurrent bleeding, and 30-day mortality occurred in three patients. There were no significant differences between the two groups in primary hemostasis, recurrent bleeding, and 30-day mortality. In a multiple linear regression analysis, urgent EGD significantly reduced the hospital stay compared with early EGD. In patients with a high clinical Rockall score (more than 3), urgent EGD tended to decrease the hospital stay, although this was not statistically significant (7.7 days vs. 12.0 days, p > 0.05). Conclusions: Urgent EGD after hours by experienced endoscopists had an excellent endoscopic success rate. However, clinical outcomes were not significantly different between the urgent and early EGD groups. PMID:27048253

  18. Gastrointestinal bleeding due to angiodysplasia in patients on hemodialysis: A single-center study.

    PubMed

    Zajjari, Yassir; Tamzaourte, Mouna; Montasser, Dina; Hassani, Kawtar; Aatif, Taoufiq; El Kabbaj, Driss; Benyahia, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding due to angiodysplastic lesions is a common problem among patients receiving hemodialysis (HD). We studied 22 HD patients (5 females and 17 males) who had GI bleeding due to angiodysplasia; the mean age of whom was 54 ± 10 years. All patients had upper and lower GI endoscopy. The most common site for the lesion was the right colon in seven cases (31.8%), followed by stomach in 4 cases (18.1%). In eight (36.3%) patients, there were multiple lesions located in the stomach, duodenum, and the right colon. All patients were treated with coagulation; with argon plasma in 14 (63.6%) patients, bipolar coagulation in five (22.7%) patients, and hot clip in three (13.6%) patients. One patient who presented with persistent bleeding despite endoscopic therapy was well-benefited of a complementary treatment, thalidomide. Hemostasis was obtained in all patients after an average of 6.8 sessions of endoscopic coagulation procedure. We conclude that angiodysplasia is a frequent cause of hemorrhage in chronic renal failure that can be managed in most patients by argon plasma and bipolar coagulation. PMID:27424692

  19. Interventional digital subtraction angiography for small bowel gastrointestinal stromal tumors with bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao-Ting; Sun, Hong-Liang; Luo, Jiang-Hong; Ni, Jia-Yan; Chen, Dong; Jiang, Xiong-Ying; Zhou, Jing-Xing; Xu, Lin-Feng

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of interventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for bleeding small bowel gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). METHODS: Between January 2006 and December 2013, small bowel tumors in 25 consecutive patients undergoing emergency interventional DSA were histopathologically confirmed as GIST after surgical resection. The medical records of these patients and the effects of interventional DSA and the presentation and management of the condition were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Of the 25 patients with an age range from 34- to 70-year-old (mean: 54 ± 12 years), 8 were male and 17 were female. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, including tarry or bloody stool and intermittent melena, was observed in all cases, and one case also involved hematemesis. Nineteen patients required acute blood transfusion. There were a total of 28 small bowel tumors detected by DSA. Among these, 20 were located in the jejunum and 8 were located in the ileum. The DSA characteristics of the GISTs included a hypervascular mass of well-defined, homogeneous enhancement and early developed draining veins. One case involved a complication of intussusception of the small intestine that was discovered during surgery. No pseudoaneurysms, arteriovenous malformations or fistulae, or arterial rupture were observed. The completely excised size was approximately 1.20 to 5.50 cm (mean: 3.05 ± 1.25 cm) in maximum diameter based on measurements after the resection. There were ulcerations (n = 8), erosions (n = 10), hyperemia and edema (n = 10) on the intra-luminal side of the tumors. Eight tumors in patients with a large amount of blood loss were treated with transcatheter arterial embolization with gelfoam particles during interventional DSA. CONCLUSION: Emergency interventional DSA is a useful imaging option for locating and diagnosing small bowel GISTs in patients with bleeding, and is an effective treatment modality. PMID:25548494

  20. Prediction of esophageal varices and variceal hemorrhage in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Rockey, Don C; Elliott, Alan; Lyles, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    In patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), identifying those with esophageal variceal hemorrhage prior to endoscopy would be clinically useful. This retrospective study of a large cohort of patients with UGIB used logistic regression analyses to evaluate the platelet count, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) to platelet ratio index (APRI), AST to alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio (AAR) and Lok index (all non-invasive blood markers) as predictors of variceal bleeding in (1) all patients with UGIB and (2) patients with cirrhosis and UGIB. 2233 patients admitted for UGIB were identified; 1034 patients had cirrhosis (46%) and of these, 555 patients (54%) had acute UGIB due to esophageal varices. In all patients with UGIB, the platelet count (cut-off 122,000/mm(3)), APRI (cut-off 5.1), AAR (cut-off 2.8) and Lok index (cut-off 0.9) had area under the curve (AUC)s of 0.80 0.82, 0.64, and 0.80, respectively, for predicting the presence of varices prior to endoscopy. To predict varices as the culprit of bleeding, the platelet count (cut-off 69,000), APRI (cut-off 2.6), AAR (cut-off 2.5) and Lok Index (0.90) had AUCs of 0.76, 0.77, 0.57 and 0.73, respectively. Finally, in patients with cirrhosis and UGIB, logistic regression was unable to identify optimal cut-off values useful for predicting varices as the culprit bleeding lesion for any of the non-invasive markers studied. For all patients with UGIB, non-invasive markers appear to differentiate patients with varices from those without varices and to identify those with a variceal culprit lesion. However, these markers could not distinguish between a variceal culprit and other lesions in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:26912006

  1. Defining upper gastrointestinal bleeding from linked primary and secondary care data and the effect on occurrence and 28 day mortality

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary care records from the UK have frequently been used to identify episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in studies of drug toxicity because of their comprehensive population coverage and longitudinal recording of prescriptions and diagnoses. Recent linkage within England of primary and secondary care data has augmented this data but the timing and coding of concurrent events, and how the definition of events in linked data effects occurrence and 28 day mortality is not known. Methods We used the recently linked English Hospital Episodes Statistics and General Practice Research Database, 1997–2010, to define events by; a specific upper gastrointestinal bleed code in either dataset, a specific bleed code in both datasets, or a less specific but plausible code from the linked dataset. Results This approach resulted in 81% of secondary care defined bleeds having a corresponding plausible code within 2 months in primary care. However only 62% of primary care defined bleeds had a corresponding plausible HES admission within 2 months. The more restrictive and specific case definitions excluded severe events and almost halved the 28 day case fatality when compared to broader and more sensitive definitions. Conclusions Restrictive definitions of gastrointestinal bleeding in linked datasets fail to capture the full heterogeneity in coding possible following complex clinical events. Conversely too broad a definition in primary care introduces events not severe enough to warrant hospital admission. Ignoring these issues may unwittingly introduce selection bias into a study’s results. PMID:23148590

  2. [Intestinal venous vascular malformation: Unusual etiology of gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatrics. Case report].

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Inés S; Steimberg, Clarisa; Udaquiola, Julia; González, Lucio; Liberto, Daniel; Cieri, Patricio; Peralta, Oscar; Orsi, Marina

    2016-06-01

    Intestinal vascular malformations, especially those in the right colon, are a frequent cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in adults, but they are a very rare condition in children. Symptoms include acute hemorrhage, intestinal obstruction, or chronic anemia of uncertain etiology, which is the most frequent form of presentation but the most difficult to diagnose and thus properly treat. We report the case of an 11 year old boy admitted to the Emergency Room with abdominal pain, vomits, hemodynamic decompensation, who required expansion and blood transfusion. With history ofrecurrent bloody stools since infancy with repeated normal endoscopies and Tc99 scintigraphy with chronic anemia and no improvement despite adequate treatment. In the last admission, the videocolonoscopy detected a venous vascular malformation in the ileocecal region. The angiography and the entero multislice computer tomography scanner were valuable tools to confirm the diagnosis and to select the appropriate surgical procedure for this rare condition. PMID:27164348

  3. An unusual and fatal case of upper gastrointestinal perforation and bleeding secondary to foreign body ingestion.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Rosario; Tacchella, Tiziana; Lo Pinto, Sara; Bonsignore, Alessandro; Ventura, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    We report a fatal case of gastrointestinal perforation and hemorrhage secondary to the ingestion of a foreign body. While engaged in an amateur futsal competition, an apparently healthy young man suddenly collapsed and his respiration ceased. Autopsy revealed a 3-mm circular perforation on the gastric wall fundus with a significant amount of clotted blood within the gastric lumen. On inspection, a foreign body consisting of a bristle-like hair, later identified via electron microscopy to be a cat vibrissa, i.e. a whisker, was found along the perforation margin. Thus, the inadvertent ingestion of fine, sharp objects (even a cat whisker) can lead to gastric perforation and bleeding, which might prove fatal under given circumstances. PMID:27183326

  4. Latent vitellointestinal duct sinus presenting with massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ramnik V; Evans, Kathryn; Sau, Indranil; Huddart, Simon

    2014-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy with a history, at birth, of a weeping pink fleshy lesion after his umbilical cord detached, requiring repeated chemical cauterisation, presented with massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding and required resuscitation and blood transfusion. Augmented Tc99m nuclear medicine scan confirmed ectopic gastric mucosa. The lateral view suggested its attachment behind the umbilicus. At exploration, a latent vitellointestinal duct sinus with ectopic gastric mucosal mass was found. Segmental resection of the sinus and mass excision with primary anastomosis and incidental appendicectomy was curative. Pink fleshy mass discharging coloured fluid at the umbilicus following detachment of umbilical cord should be considered a remnant of vitellointestinal duct unless proved otherwise. A pink lesion with yellowish discharge resistant to chemical cauterisation should raise the suspicion of embryonic structures. Latent vitellointestinal sinus is a new lesion in the spectrum of umbilical anomalies. Lateral view of the nuclear medicine scan is helpful in locating the site. PMID:25228678

  5. A jejunal GIST presenting with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and small bowel obstruction secondary to intussusception.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Peter; Lanzon-Miller, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old man with episodes of overt obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding was investigated with multiple upper and lower GI endoscopies, CT enterography and capsule endoscopy, but no cause was found. He then presented acutely with small bowel obstruction. A laparotomy revealed complete small bowel obstruction secondary to jejunal intussusception over a 4 cm intraluminal polyp. Following resection and primary anastomosis, histology revealed that the polyp was a GI stromal tumour (GIST). This is an exceptionally uncommon presentation of a rare tumour. It is surprising that this tumour was not detected by CT enterography and not seen on capsule endoscopy. Immunohistochemistry and mutation analysis of the GIST suggested that it had a low risk of metastatic disease, but a high risk of recurrence. Staging CT scans did not reveal evidence of distal spread. The patient is currently receiving 3 years of chemotherapy with imatinib. PMID:26527610

  6. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with Sjögren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Margarida; Fernandes, Samuel; Teixeira, Vitor; Freitas, Luis Carlos

    2016-09-01

    A 68-year-old female patient with Sjögren syndrome was admitted with asthenia, anorexia and weight loss. On the third day of admission, she developed severe hematemesis. Urgent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE) showed multiple gastric and duodenal ulcers, some with active bleeding requiring endoscopic therapy. The anatomopathologic examination was compatible with gastric and duodenal infiltration by a diffuse CD20+ large B cell lymphoma with germinal center B cell-like morphology. And the patient was referred for chemotherapy with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone. Although seldom observed, the risk of lymphoma in Sjögren syndrome is up to 44 times higher than the general population and rises 7 years after diagnosis. We present a brief case report with interesting iconography. PMID:27615015

  7. Study protocol: first nationwide comparative audit of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Oakland, Kathryn; Guy, Richard; Uberoi, Raman; Seeney, Frances; Collins, Gary; Grant-Casey, John; Mortensen, Neil; Murphy, Mike; Jairath, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is a common indication for emergency hospitalisation worldwide. In contrast to upper GIB, patient characteristics, modes of investigation, transfusion, treatment and outcomes are poorly described. There are minimal clinical guidelines to inform care pathways and the use of endoscopy, including (diagnostic and therapeutic yields), interventional radiology and surgery are poorly defined. As a result, there is potential for wide variation in practice and clinical outcomes. Methods and analysis The UK Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding Audit is a large nationwide audit of adult patients acutely admitted with LGIB or those who develop LGIB while hospitalised for another reason. Consecutive, unselected presentations with LGIB will be enrolled prospectively over a 2-month period at the end of 2015 and detailed data will be collected on patient characteristics, comorbidities, use of anticoagulants, transfusion, timing and modalities of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, clinical outcome, length of stay and mortality. These will be audited against predefined minimum standards of care for LGIB. It is anticipated that over 80% of all acute hospitals in England and some hospitals in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will participate. Data will be collected on the availability and organisation of care, provision of diagnostic and therapeutic GI endoscopy, interventional radiology, surgery and transfusion protocols. Ethics and dissemination This audit will be conducted as part of the national comparative audit programme of blood transfusion through collaboration with specialists in gastroenterology, surgery and interventional radiology. Individual reports will be provided to each participant site as well as an overall report and disseminated through specialist societies. Results will also be published in peer-reviewed journals. The study has been funded by National Health Services (NHS) Blood and Transplant and the

  8. Use of SSRI, But Not SNRI, Increased Upper and Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuan-Lung; Hu, Hsiao-Yun; Lin, Xi-Hsuan; Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Peng, Yen-Ling; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Fa-Yauh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Selective serotonin receptor inhibitor (SSRI) and serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) users have been reported to have an increased risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), but their association with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is less studied. This study aimed to analyze the incidence of UGIB and LGIB among SSRI users, SNRI users, and controls. Using the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan, 9753 subjects who were taking serotonin reuptake inhibitors (8809 with SSRIs, and 944 with SNRIs), and 39,012 age, sex, and enrollment time-matched controls were enrolled at a 1:4 ratio. The log-rank test was used to analyze differences in the cumulative hazard of UGIB and LGIB between groups. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was used to evaluate the independent risk factors for UGIB and LGIB. During the 10-year follow-up period from 2000 to 2010, SSRI users, but not SNRI users, had significantly higher incidences of UGIB and LGIB than the controls (P < 0.001; log-rank test). The use of SSRIs, but not SNRIs, was independently associated with an increased risk of UGIB (hazard ratio [HR]:1.97; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.67–2.31) and LGIB (HR: 2.96, 95% CI: 2.46–3.57) after adjusting for age, sex, underlying comorbidities, and medications. The long-term use of SSRIs significantly increased the risk of UGIB and LGIB, and caused more LGIB than UGIB in the general population after adjusting for possible confounding factors, but the association between SNRIs and GIB is insignificant. Further prospective studies are needed to clarify this important issue. PMID:26579809

  9. Routine use of Hemospray for gastrointestinal bleeding: prospective two-center experience in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Sulz, Michael C; Frei, Remus; Meyenberger, Christa; Bauerfeind, Peter; Semadeni, Gian-Marco; Gubler, Christoph

    2014-07-01

    Hemospray (Cook Medical, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA) is a hemostatic agent recently introduced for the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). To date, there is little experience with this fairly new hemostatic tool. The aim of this case series was to reflect the use and effectiveness of Hemospray as a treatment option in GIB in everyday clinical practice at two tertiary referral centers. Consecutive patients (n = 16) with active GIB of various origins were treated with Hemospray. The rate of successful initial hemostasis was 93.75 % (15 /16; salvage therapy 92.85 % [13/14]; monotherapy 100 % [2 /2]). The rebleeding rate within 7 days was 12.5 % (2/16). One patient, in whom interventional radiology also failed, had to undergo surgery as salvage therapy. The effectiveness of Hemospray in the management of GIB in various clinical situations is promising. Future multicenter randomized prospective trials for clearly defined bleeding situations are needed for greater generalizability of case series findings. PMID:24770964

  10. Simple risk factors to predict urgent endoscopy in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding pre-endoscopically

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianzong; Hu, Duanming; Tang, Wen; Hu, Chuanyin; Lu, Qin; Li, Juan; Zhu, Jianhong; Xu, Liming; Sui, Zhenyu; Qian, Mingjie; Wang, Shaofeng; Yin, Guojian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The goal of this study is to evaluate how to predict high-risk nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) pre-endoscopically. A total of 569 NVUGIB patients between Match 2011 and January 2015 were retrospectively studied. The clinical characteristics and laboratory data were statistically analyzed. The severity of NVUGIB was based on high-risk NVUGIB (Forrest I–IIb), and low-risk NVUGIB (Forrest IIc and III). By logistic regression and receiver-operating characteristic curve, simple risk score systems were derived which predicted patients’ risks of potentially needing endoscopic intervention to control bleeding. Risk score systems combined of patients’ serum hemoglobin (Hb) ≤75 g/L, red hematemesis, red stool, shock, and blood urine nitrogen ≥8.5 mmol/L within 24 hours after admission were derived. As for each one of these clinical signs, the relatively high specificity was 97.9% for shock, 96.4% for red stool, 85.5% for red hematemesis, 76.7% for Hb ≤75 g/L, and the sensitivity was 50.8% for red hematemesis, 47.5% for Hb ≤75 g/L, 14.2% for red stool, and 10.9% for shock. When these 5 clinical signs were presented as a risk score system, the highest area of receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.746, with sensitivity 0.675 and specificity 0.733, which discriminated well with high-risk NVUGIB. These simple risk factors identified patients with high-risk NVUGIB of needing treatment to manage their bleeding pre-endoscopically. Further validation in the clinic was required. PMID:27367977

  11. Direct Versus Video Laryngoscopy for Intubating Adult Patients with Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Jestin N.; Crofts, Jason; Walls, Ron M.; Brown, Calvin A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Video laryngoscopy (VL) has been advocated for several aspects of emergency airway management; however, there are still concerns over its use in select patient populations such as those with large volume hematemesis secondary to gastrointestinal (GI) bleeds. Given the relatively infrequent nature of this disease process, we sought to compare intubation outcomes between VL and traditional direct laryngoscopy (DL) in patients intubated with GI bleeding, using the third iteration of the National Emergency Airway Registry (NEARIII). Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected national database (NEARIII) of intubations performed in United States emergency departments (EDs) from July 1, 2002, through December 31, 2012. All cases where the indication for intubation was “GI bleed” were analyzed. We included patient, provider and intubation characteristics. We compared data between intubation attempts initiated as DL and VL using parametric and non-parametric tests when appropriate. Results We identified 325 intubations, 295 DL and 30 VL. DL and VL cases were similar in terms of age, sex, weight, difficult airway predictors, operator specialty (emergency medicine, anesthesia or other) and level of operator training (post-graduate year 1, 2, etc). Proportion of successful first attempts (DL 261/295 (88.5%) vs. VL 28/30 (93.3%) p=0.58) and Cormack-Lehane grade views (p=0.89) were similar between devices. The need for device change was similar between DL [2/295 (0.7%) and VL 1/30 (3.3%); p=0.15]. Conclusion In this national registry of intubations performed in the ED for patients with GI bleeds, both DL and VL had similar rates of success, glottic views and need to change devices. PMID:26759653

  12. Simple risk factors to predict urgent endoscopy in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding pre-endoscopically.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianzong; Hu, Duanming; Tang, Wen; Hu, Chuanyin; Lu, Qin; Li, Juan; Zhu, Jianhong; Xu, Liming; Sui, Zhenyu; Qian, Mingjie; Wang, Shaofeng; Yin, Guojian

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate how to predict high-risk nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) pre-endoscopically. A total of 569 NVUGIB patients between Match 2011 and January 2015 were retrospectively studied. The clinical characteristics and laboratory data were statistically analyzed. The severity of NVUGIB was based on high-risk NVUGIB (Forrest I-IIb), and low-risk NVUGIB (Forrest IIc and III). By logistic regression and receiver-operating characteristic curve, simple risk score systems were derived which predicted patients' risks of potentially needing endoscopic intervention to control bleeding. Risk score systems combined of patients' serum hemoglobin (Hb) ≤75 g/L, red hematemesis, red stool, shock, and blood urine nitrogen ≥8.5 mmol/L within 24 hours after admission were derived. As for each one of these clinical signs, the relatively high specificity was 97.9% for shock, 96.4% for red stool, 85.5% for red hematemesis, 76.7% for Hb ≤75 g/L, and the sensitivity was 50.8% for red hematemesis, 47.5% for Hb ≤75 g/L, 14.2% for red stool, and 10.9% for shock. When these 5 clinical signs were presented as a risk score system, the highest area of receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.746, with sensitivity 0.675 and specificity 0.733, which discriminated well with high-risk NVUGIB. These simple risk factors identified patients with high-risk NVUGIB of needing treatment to manage their bleeding pre-endoscopically. Further validation in the clinic was required. PMID:27367977

  13. Update on the transfusion in gastrointestinal bleeding (TRIGGER) trial: statistical analysis plan for a cluster-randomised feasibility trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous research has suggested an association between more liberal red blood cell (RBC) transfusion and greater risk of further bleeding and mortality following acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB). Methods and design The Transfusion in Gastrointestinal Bleeding (TRIGGER) trial is a pragmatic cluster-randomised feasibility trial which aims to evaluate the feasibility of implementing a restrictive vs. liberal RBC transfusion policy for adult patients admitted to hospital with AUGIB in the UK. This trial will help to inform the design and methodology of a phase III trial. The protocol for TRIGGER has been published in Transfusion Medicine Reviews. Recruitment began in September 2012 and was completed in March 2013. This update presents the statistical analysis plan, detailing how analysis of the TRIGGER trial will be performed. It is hoped that prospective publication of the full statistical analysis plan will increase transparency and give readers a clear overview of how TRIGGER will be analysed. Trial registration ISRCTN85757829 PMID:23837630

  14. Hemosuccus pancreaticus caused by rupture of a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm complicating chronic alcoholic pancreatitis: an uncommon cause of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hiltrop, Nick; Vanhauwaert, Anke; Palmers, Pieter-Jan Liesbeth Herman; Cool, Mike; Deboever, Guido; Lambrecht, Guy

    2015-12-01

    We present a case of a 52-year old female patient with intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding and iron deficiency anaemia. Repeated endoscopic investigation revealed no diagnosis, but contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a splenic artery pseudo-aneurysm secondary to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. A distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy was performed. Hemosuccus pancreaticus is an uncommon cause of gastrointestinal bleeding, most frequently associated with chronic pancreatitis. Erosion of a peripancreatic artery by a pseudocyst can cause a pseudoaneurysm and rupture occurs in up to 10% of the cases. Bleeding from a pseudocyst wall or rupture of an atherosclerotic or traumatic aneurysm is rare. Angiography, contrast-enhanced computed tomography and endoscopic findings can be diagnostic in the majority of cases. Angiographic embolization or surgery are both therapeutic options depending on underlying nonvascular pancreas related indications requiring surgery. We discuss diagnostic pitfalls and current therapeutic strategies in the management of this disease. PMID:26712055

  15. Importance of Heparin Provocation and SPECT/CT in Detecting Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding on 99mTc-RBC Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Haghighatafshar, Mahdi; Gheisari, Farshid; Ghaedian, Tahereh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We presented a pediatric case with a history of intermittent melena for 3 years because of angiodyplasia of small intestine. The results of frequent upper gastrointestinal endoscopies and colonoscopies as well as both 99mTc-red blood cell (RBC) and Meckel's scintigraphies for several times were negative in detection of bleeding site. However, 99mTc-RBC scintigraphy with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) after heparin augmentation detected a site of bleeding in the distal ileum which later was confirmed during surgery with final diagnosis of angiodysplasia. It could be stated that heparin provocation of bleeding before 99mTc-RBC scintigraphy accompanied by fused SPECT/CT images should be kept in mind for management of intestinal bleeding especially in difficult cases. PMID:26313771

  16. Patients with Gastric Antral Vascular Ectasia (GAVE) Are at a Higher Risk of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in the Absence of Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jennifer; Stine, Jonathan G.; Cornella, Scott L.; Argo, Curtis K.; Cohn, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) is commonly found in patients with cirrhosis, but it is also associated with other diseases in the absence of cirrhosis. Whether GAVE confers a different severity of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding between patients with and without cirrhosis remains unknown. We aim to examine whether there is a difference in clinically significant GI bleeding due to GAVE in patients with or without cirrhosis. Methods: This is a retrospective case-control study of patients who were diagnosed with GAVE between January 2000 and June 2014. Patients were categorized into cirrhosis and noncirrhosis groups, and those with an additional GI bleeding source were excluded. Univariate comparisons and multivariable models were constructed using logistic regression. Results: In total, 110 patients diagnosed with GAVE on esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) were included in our analysis; 84 patients had cirrhosis (76.4%) and 26 (23.6%) did not. Active GI bleeding was more prevalent in patients without cirrhosis (63.4% vs. 32.1%, p=0.003) despite similar indications for EGD, and endoscopic treatment with argon plasma coagulation (APC) was required more often in this group, approaching statistical significance (27% vs. 10.7%, p=0.056). There was no difference in bleeding severity, as evidenced by similar re-bleeding rates, surgery, or death attributed to uncontrolled bleeding. The strongest independent risk factor for GI bleeding was the absence of cirrhosis (odds ratio (OR): 5.151 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08-24.48, p=0.039). Conclusions: Patients with GAVE in the absence of cirrhosis are at higher risk for active GI bleeding and require more frequent endoscopic treatment than similar patients with cirrhosis. It may be worthwhile to treat GAVE in this population even in the absence of active bleeding. PMID:26807380

  17. Pancreatitis-associated pseudoaneurysm of the splenic artery presenting as lower gastrointestinal bleeding: treatment with transcatheter embolisation

    PubMed Central

    Taslakian, Bedros; Khalife, Mohammad; Faraj, Walid; Mukherji, Deborah; Haydar, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatitis is a known cause of pseudoaneurysms of the peripancreatic arteries, which can rarely rupture into various adjacent structures and become a source of life-threatening bleeding. The management is challenging and requires an individualised approach and multidisciplinary care. Herein, we present the case of a 24-year-old man in whom a splenic pseudoaneurysm ruptured into the adjacent infected pseudocyst, communicating with the colon by a fistulous tract, causing massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding. This was successfully managed by transcatheter arterial embolisation (TAE). PMID:23208811

  18. A Novel Easy-to-Use Prediction Scheme for Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Vera; Neubauer, Henrik; Heinzler, Julia; Smarczyk, Anna; Hellmich, Martin; Bowe, Andrea; Kuetting, Fabian; Demir, Muenevver; Pelc, Agnes; Schulte, Sigrid; Toex, Ullrich; Nierhoff, Dirk; Steffen, Hans-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is the leading indication for emergency endoscopy. Scoring schemes have been developed for immediate risk stratification. However, most of these scores include endoscopic findings and are based on data from patients with nonvariceal bleeding. The aim of our study was to design a pre-endoscopic score for acute UGIB—including variceal bleeding—in order to identify high-risk patients requiring urgent clinical management. The scoring system was developed using a data set consisting of 586 patients with acute UGIB. These patients were identified from the emergency department as well as all inpatient services at the University Hospital of Cologne within a 2-year period (01/2007–12/2008). Further data from a cohort of 322 patients who presented to our endoscopy unit with acute UGIB in 2009 served for external/temporal validation. Clinical, laboratory, and endoscopic parameters, as well as further data on medical history and medication were retrospectively collected from the electronic clinical documentation system. A multivariable logistic regression was fitted to the development set to obtain a risk score using recurrent bleeding, need for intervention (angiography, surgery), or death within 30 days as a composite endpoint. Finally, the obtained risk score was evaluated on the validation set. Only C-reactive protein, white blood cells, alanine-aminotransferase, thrombocytes, creatinine, and hemoglobin were identified as significant predictors for the composite endpoint. Based on the regression coefficients of these variables, an easy-to-use point scoring scheme (C-WATCH) was derived to estimate the risk of complications from 3% to 86% with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.723 in the development set and 0.704 in the validation set. In the validation set, no patient in the identified low-risk group (0–1 points), but 38.7% of patients in the high-risk group (≥ 2 points) reached the composite endpoint. Our

  19. Impact of fecal occult blood on obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: Observational study

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Watabe, Hirotsugu; Yamada, Atsuo; Suzuki, Hirobumi; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Yamaji, Yutaka; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the association between small bowel diseases (SBDs) and positive fecal occult blood test (FOBT) in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). METHODS: Between February 2008 and August 2013, 202 patients with OGIB who performed both capsule endoscopy (CE) and FOBT were enrolled (mean age; 63.6 ± 14.0 years, 118 males, 96 previous overt bleeding, 106 with occult bleeding). All patients underwent immunochemical FOBTs twice prior to CE. Three experienced endoscopists independently reviewed CE videos. All reviews and consensus meeting were conducted without any information on FOBT results. The prevalence of SBDs was compared between patients with positive and negative FOBT. RESULTS: CE revealed SBDs in 72 patients (36%). FOBT was positive in 100 patients (50%) and negative in 102 (50%). The prevalence of SBDs was significantly higher in patients with positive FOBT than those with negative FOBT (46% vs 25%, P = 0.002). In particular, among patients with occult OGIB, the prevalence of SBDs was higher in positive FOBT group than negative FOBT group (45% vs 18%, P = 0.002). On the other hand, among patients with previous overt OGIB, there was no significant difference in the prevalence of SBDs between positive and negative FOBT group (47% vs 33%, P = 0.18). In disease specific analysis among patients with occult OGIB, the prevalence of ulcer and tumor were higher in positive FOBT group than negative FOBT group. In multivariate analysis, only positive FOBT was a predictive factors of SBDs in patients with OGIB (OR = 2.5, 95%CI: 1.4-4.6, P = 0.003). Furthermore, the trend was evident among patients with occult OGIB who underwent FOBT on the same day or a day before CE. The prevalence of SBDs in positive vs negative FOBT group were 54% vs 13% in patients with occult OGIB who underwent FOBT on the same day or the day before CE (P = 0.001), while there was no significant difference between positive and negative FOBT group in those who underwent

  20. Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma with Synchronous Tumor Growth in Azygoesophageal Recess and Duodenum: A Rare Cause of Anemia and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Vootla, Vamshidhar R.; Kashif, Muhammad; Niazi, Masooma; Nayudu, Suresh K.

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has potential to present with distant metastasis several years after complete resection. The common sites of metastases include the lungs, bones, liver, renal fossa, and brain. RCCs metastasize rarely to the duodenum, and duodenal metastasis presenting with acute gastrointestinal bleed is infrequently reported in literature. We present a case of synchronous presentation of duodenal and azygoesophageal metastasis manifesting as acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding, four years after undergoing nephrectomy for RCC. The patient underwent further workup and was treated with radiation. The synchronous presentation is rare and stresses the importance of searching for recurrence of RCC in patients presenting with acute gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26640732

  1. Yield, etiologies and outcomes of capsule endoscopy in Thai patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Pongprasobchai, Supot; Chitsaeng, Songla; Tanwandee, Tawesak; Manatsathit, Sathaporn; Kachintorn, Udom

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the yield, etiologies and impact of capsule endoscopy (CE) in Thai patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). METHODS: The present study is a retrospective cohort study. All patients with OGIB who underwent CE in Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand during 2005-2009 were included in the study. All the patients’ medical records and results of the CE videos were reviewed. CE findings were classified as significant, suspicious/equivocal and negative. Sites of the lesions were located to duodenum, jejunum, jejunoileum, ileum and diffuse lesions by the localization device of the CE. Impact of CE on the patients’ management was defined by any investigation or treatment given to the patients that was more than an iron supplement or blood transfusion. Patients’ outcomes (rebleeding, persistent bleeding, anemia or requirement of blood transfusion) were collected from chart reviews and direct phone interviews with the patients. RESULTS: Overall, there were 103 patients with OGIB included in the study. Mean age of the patients was 64 ± 16 years (range 9-88 years) and 57 patients (55%) were male. Types of OGIB were overt in 80 (78%) and occult in 23 patients (22%). The median time interval of CE after onset of OGIB was 10 d (range 1-180 d). The median time of follow-up was 19 mo (range 1-54 mo). Capsules reached caecum in 77 patients (74%) and capsule retention was found in 1 patient (1%). The diagnostic yield of CE revealed significant lesions in 37 patients (36%), suspicious/equivocal lesions in 15 patients (15%) and 51 patients (49%) had negative CE result. Among the significant lesions, the bleeding etiologies were small bowel ulcers in 44%, angiodysplasia in 27%, small bowel tumor in 13%, miscellaneous in 8% and active bleeding without identifiable causes in 8%. Patients with small bowel ulcers were significantly associated with the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (48%, P = 0.034), while patients with small bowel tumors

  2. Incidence of serious upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shigenao; Inaba, Tomoki; Mizuno, Motowo; Okada, Hiroyuki; Kuwaki, Kenji; Kuzume, Toshiaki; Yokota, Hitomi; Fukuda, Yasuyo; Takeda, Kou; Nagano, Hiroshi; Wato, Masaki; Kawai, Kozo

    2008-02-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a major adverse event of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and co-administration of proton pump inhibitors and H2 receptor antagonists has been established as a means of preventing such an effect. However, the incidence of bleeding associated with NSAID-induced ulcers under conditions where such strong anti-acid agents are used for prevention has yet to be clarified. We aimed to determine the annual incidence of serious upper gastrointestinal ulcer bleeding among Japanese patients in whom NSAIDs were used in our hospital. Before commencing the study, we recommended to all the physicians in our hospital the best method for caring for NSAID users, focusing on the concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors or H2 receptor antagonists. We conducted a cohort study involving 17,270 patients for whom NSAIDs had been newly prescribed. Bleeding from gastric ulcers was observed in 8 of the 17,270 patients using NSAIDs (0.05%). The pooled incidence rate for bleeding was calculated as 2.65 (95% confidence interval, 2.56-2.74) and 1.29 (1.27-1.31) per 1,000 patient years for low-dose aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID users, respectively. None of the bleeding ulcer patients required blood transfusion or were in serious condition. In conclusion, gastric ulcer bleeding occurred in low-dose aspirin or non-aspirin NSAID users, but its incidence was low and outcomes were not serious when adequate preventive measures were taken. PMID:18323869

  3. Efficacy of computed image modification of capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Tomoaki; Arai, Makoto; Sato, Toru; Nakagawa, Tomoo; Maruoka, Daisuke; Tsuboi, Masaru; Hata, Sachio; Arai, Eiji; Katsuno, Tatsuro; Imazeki, Fumio; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether flexible spectral color enhancement (FICE) improves diagnostic yields of capsule endoscopy (CE) for obscure gastro-intestinal bleeding (OGIB). METHODS: The study subjects consisted of 81 patients. Using FICE, there were three different sets with different wavelengths. Using randomly selected sets of FICE, images of CE were evaluated again by two individuals who were not shown the conventional CE reports and findings. The difference between FICE and conventional imaging was examined. RESULTS: The overall diagnostic yields in FICE sets 1, 2, 3 and conventional imaging (48.1%) were 51.9%, 40.7%, 51.9% and 48.1%, respectively, which showed no statistical difference compared to conventional imaging. The total numbers of detected lesions per examination in FICE imaging and conventional imaging were 2.5 ± 2.1 and 1.8 ± 1.7, respectively, which showed a significant difference (P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: The diagnostic yield for OGIB is not improved by FICE. However, FICE can detect significantly more small bowel lesions compared to conventional imaging. PMID:23125901

  4. Regional differences in outcomes of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Saskatchewan

    PubMed Central

    O’Byrne, Michael; Smith-Windsor, Erin L; Kenyon, Chris R; Bhasin, Sanchit; Jones, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) is associated with significant mortality. OBJECTIVE: To examine several factors that may impact the mortality and 30-day rebleed rates of patients presenting with NVUGIB. METHODS: A retrospective study of the charts of patients admitted to hospital in either the Saskatoon Health Region (SHR) or Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region (RQHR) (Saskatchewan) in 2008 and 2009 was performed. Mortality and 30-day rebleed end points were stratified according to age, sex, day of admission, patient status, health region, specialty of the endoscopist and time to endoscopy. Logistic regression modelling was performed, controlling for the Charlson comorbidity index, age and sex as covariates. RESULTS: The overall mortality rate observed was 12.2% (n=44), while the overall 30-day rebleed rate was 20.3% (n=80). Inpatient status at the time of the rebleeding event was associated with a significantly increased risk of both mortality and rebleed, while having endoscopy performed in the RQHR versus SHR was associated with a significantly decreased risk of rebleed. A larger proportion of endoscopies were performed both within 24 h and by a gastroenterologist in the RQHR. CONCLUSION: Saskatchewan has relatively high rates of mortality and 30-day rebleeding among patients with NVUGIB compared with published rates. The improved outcomes observed in the RQHR, when compared with the SHR, may be related to the employ of a formal call-back endoscopy team for the treatment of NVUGIB. PMID:24619634

  5. Applying Classification Trees to Hospital Administrative Data to Identify Patients with Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Juned; Ruhnke, Gregory W.; Flores, Andrea; Prochaska, Micah T.; Paesch, Elizabeth; Meltzer, David O.; Whelan, Chad T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is a common cause of acute hospitalization. Currently, there is no accepted standard for identifying patients with LGIB in hospital administrative data. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a set of classification algorithms that use hospital administrative data to identify LGIB. Methods Our sample consists of patients admitted between July 1, 2001 and June 30, 2003 (derivation cohort) and July 1, 2003 and June 30, 2005 (validation cohort) to the general medicine inpatient service of the University of Chicago Hospital, a large urban academic medical center. Confirmed cases of LGIB in both cohorts were determined by reviewing the charts of those patients who had at least 1 of 36 principal or secondary International Classification of Diseases, Ninth revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) diagnosis codes associated with LGIB. Classification trees were used on the data of the derivation cohort to develop a set of decision rules for identifying patients with LGIB. These rules were then applied to the validation cohort to assess their performance. Results Three classification algorithms were identified and validated: a high specificity rule with 80.1% sensitivity and 95.8% specificity, a rule that balances sensitivity and specificity (87.8% sensitivity, 90.9% specificity), and a high sensitivity rule with 100% sensitivity and 91.0% specificity. Conclusion These classification algorithms can be used in future studies to evaluate resource utilization and assess outcomes associated with LGIB without the use of chart review. PMID:26406318

  6. Endoscopic management of acute gastrointestinal bleeding in children: Time for a radical rethink.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Mike; Belsha, Dalia

    2016-02-01

    Currently we are no nearer than 10 or 20years ago providing a safe, adequate, and effective round-the-clock endoscopic services for acute life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding in children. Preventable deaths are occurring still, and it is a tragedy. This is owing to a number of factors which require urgent attention. Skill-mix and the ability of available endoscopists in the UK are woeful. Manpower is spread too thinly and not concentrated in centers of excellence, which is necessary given the relative rarity of the presentation. Adult gastroenterologists are increasingly reticent regarding their help in increasingly litigious times. Recent work on identification of those children likely to require urgent endoscopic intervention has mirrored scoring systems that have been present in adult circles for many years and may allow appropriate and timely intervention. Recent technical developments such as that of Hemospray® may lower the threshold of competency in dealing with this problem endoscopically, thus allowing lives to be saved. Educational courses, mannequin and animal model training are important but so will be appropriate credentialing of individuals for this skill-set. Assessment of competency will become the norm and guidelines on a national level in each country mandatory if we are to move this problem from the "too difficult" to the "achieved". It is an urgent problem and is one of the last emergencies in pediatrics that is conducted poorly. This cannot and should not be allowed to continue unchallenged. PMID:26703435

  7. A Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Post-Traumatic Splenosis: “Wait and See” Represents a Feasible Attitude

    PubMed Central

    Famà, Fausto; Giacobbe, Giuseppa; Cintolo, Marcello; Gioffré-Florio, Maria; Pallio, Socrate; Consolo, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Splenosis represents a benign condition due to an ectopic localization of splenic tissue caused by pathologic or traumatic spleen rupture. Generally, it is asymptomatic and incidentally diagnosed during imaging performed for other reasons. Occult gastrointestinal bleeding due to an extraperitoneal localization is a rare occurrence. Differential diagnosis may be very hard and includes benign and malignant neoplasms. We describe the case of a 68-year-old Caucasian man that was admitted for an increasing lower gastrointestinal bleeding associated to a vague abdominal pain. He was assessed by means of laboratory tests, as well as by endoscopic and radiological examinations, and successfully treated with an exclusive medical approach. The patient was discharged on the ninth day and currently he is doing well. This case shows that wait and see could prove a feasible attitude for the management of clinically stable patients. PMID:27124065

  8. A Case of an Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Ruptured Dissection of a Right Aortic Arch

    SciTech Connect

    Born, Christine; Forster, Andreas; Rock, Clemens; Pfeifer, Klaus-Juergen; Rieger, Johannes; Reiser, Maximilian

    2003-09-15

    We report a case of severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a rare underlying cause. The patient was unconscious when he was admitted to the hospital. No chest radiogram was performed. Routine diagnostic measures, including endoscopy, failed to reveal the origin of the bleeding, which was believed to originate from the esophagus secondary to a peptic ulcer or varices. Exploratory laparotomy added no further information, but contrast-enhanced multislice computed tomography (MSCT) of the chest showed dextroposition of the widened aortic arch with a ruptured type-B dissection and a consecutive aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF). The patient died on the day of admission. Noninvasive MSCT angiography gives rapid diagnostic information on patients with occult upper gastrointestinal bleeding and should be considered before more invasive conventional angiography or surgery.

  9. Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome: a rare presentation of late-onset anemia and lower gastrointestinal bleeding without cutaneous manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Goud, Aditya; Abdelqader, Abdelhai; Walters, Jamie; Selinger, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome (BRBNS) is a congenital disorder with characteristic venous anomalies that can present with varying degree of blood loss. The most clinically significant symptoms in adults include gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and iron deficiency anemia. Severe complications can include intestinal torsion, intussusception, and even perforation, with each leading to significant morbidity and mortality. This report serves to give a brief understanding of this rare disease along with current diagnostic and therapeutic options. PMID:26908380

  10. Culprit for recurrent acute gastrointestinal massive bleeding: "Small bowel Dieulafoy's lesions" - a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sathyamurthy, Anjana; Winn, Jessica N; Ibdah, Jamal A; Tahan, Veysel

    2016-08-15

    A Dieulafoy's lesion is a dilated, aberrant, submucosal vessel that erodes the overlying epithelium without evidence of a primary ulcer or erosion. It can be located anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract. We describe a case of massive gastrointestinal bleeding from Dieulafoy's lesions in the duodenum. Etiology and precipitating events of a Dieulafoy's lesion are not well known. Bleeding can range from being self-limited to massive life- threatening. Endoscopic hemostasis can be achieved with a combination of therapeutic modalities. The endoscopic management includes sclerosant injection, heater probe, laser therapy, electrocautery, cyanoacrylate glue, banding, and clipping. Endoscopic tattooing can be helpful to locate the lesion for further endoscopic re-treatment or intraoperative wedge resection. Therapeutic options for re-bleeding lesions comprise of repeated endoscopic hemostasis, angiographic embolization or surgical wedge resection of the lesions. We present a 63-year-old Caucasian male with active bleeding from the two small bowel Dieulafoy's lesions, which was successfully controlled with epinephrine injection and clip applications. PMID:27574568

  11. One hundred and one over-the-scope-clip applications for severe gastrointestinal bleeding, leaks and fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Wedi, Edris; Gonzalez, Susana; Menke, Detlev; Kruse, Elena; Matthes, Kai; Hochberger, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy and clinical outcome of patients treated with an over-the-scope-clip (OTSC) system for severe gastrointestinal hemorrhage, perforations and fistulas. METHODS: From 02-2009 to 10-2012, 84 patients were treated with 101 OTSC clips. 41 patients (48.8%) presented with severe upper-gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, 3 (3.6%) patients with lower-GI bleeding, 7 patients (8.3%) underwent perforation closure, 18 patients (21.4%) had prevention of secondary perforation, 12 patients (14.3%) had control of secondary bleeding after endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and 3 patients (3.6%) had an intervention on a chronic fistula. RESULTS: In 78/84 patients (92.8%), primary treatment with the OTSC was technically successful. Clinical primary success was achieved in 75/84 patients (89.28%). The overall mortality in the study patients was 11/84 (13.1%) and was seen in patients with life threatning upper GI hemorrhage. There was no mortality in any other treatment group. In detail OTSC application lead to a clinical success in 35/41 (85.36%) patients with upper GI bleeding and in 3/3 patients with lower GI bleeding. Technical success of perforation closure was 100% while clinical success was seen in 4/7 cases (57.14%) due to attendant circumstances unrelated to the OTSC. Technical and clinic success was achieved in 18/18 (100%) patients for the prevention of bleeding or perforation after endoscopic mucosal resection and ESD and in 3/3 cases of fistula closure. Two application-related complications were seen (2%). CONCLUSION: This largest single center experience published so far confirms the value of the OTSC for GI emergencies and complications. Further clinical experience will help to identify optimal indications for its targeted and prophylactic use. PMID:26855543

  12. Using an ‘action set’ for the management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Charles; Hamilton, Mark; Epstein, Owen; Negus, Rupert; Peachey, Tim; Kaul, Arvind; O’Beirne, James

    2013-01-01

    Background: We studied the management of patients with acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding (AUGIB) at the Royal Free Hospital. The aim was to compare our performance with the national standard and determine ways of improving the delivery of care in accordance with the recently published ‘Scope for improvement’ report. Methods: We randomly selected patients who presented with haematemesis, melaena, or both, and had an oesophageogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) between April and October 2009. We developed local guidelines and presented our findings in various forums. We collaborated with the British Medical Journal’s Evidence Centre and Cerner Millennium electronic patient record system to create an electronic ‘Action Set’ for the management of patients presenting with AUGIB. We re-audited using the same standard and target. Results: With the action set, documentation of pre-OGD Rockall scores increased significantly (p ≤ 0.0001). The differences in the calculation and documentation of post-OGD full Rockall scores were also significant between the two audit loops (p = 0.007). Patients who inappropriately received proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) before endoscopy were reduced from 73.8% to 33% (p = 0.02). Patients receiving PPIs after OGD were also reduced from 66% to 50% (p = 0.01). Discharges of patients whose full Rockall score was less than or equal to two increased from 40% to 100% (p = 0.43). Conclusion: The use of the Action Set improved calculation and documentation of risk scores and facilitated earlier hospital discharge for low-risk patients. Significant improvements were also seen in inappropriate use of PPIs. Actions sets can improve guideline adherence and can potentially promote cost-cutting and improve health economics. PMID:24179478

  13. Risk Factors and Outcomes of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Left Ventricular Assist Device Recipients.

    PubMed

    Joy, Parijat Saurav; Kumar, Gagan; Guddati, Achuta Kumar; Bhama, Jay Kumar; Cadaret, Linda Marie

    2016-01-15

    Increasing use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) has been accompanied by rising incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). Objectives of this study were to determine the yearly incidence of GIB in LVAD recipients, compare outcomes of continuous-flow (CF) and pulsatile-flow LVAD eras, and investigate for risk factors. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project-Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2005 to 2010 was analyzed. Primary outcome of interest was incidence of GIB in LVAD recipients. Multivariate logistic regression model was used to examine independent associations of GIB with risk factors and outcomes. An estimated 8,879 LVAD index admissions and 8,722 readmissions in LVAD recipients over 6 years were analyzed. The yearly incidence of GIB after LVAD implantation increased from 5% in 2005 to 10% in 2010. On multivariate regression analysis, the odds of GIB was 3.24 times greater (95% confidence interval 1.53 to 6.89) in the era of CF LVADs than in the era of pulsatile-flow LVADs. Compared to their younger counterparts, in LVAD recipients aged >65 years, the adjusted odds of GIB was 20.5 times greater (95% confidence interval 2.24 to 188). GIB did not significantly increase the inhospital mortality but increased the inpatient length of stay. In conclusion, the incidence of GIB in LVAD recipients has increased since the use of CF LVADs has increased, leading to greater inpatient lengths of stay and hospital charges. Older recipients of CF LVADs appear to be at a greater risk of GIB. PMID:26651456

  14. Comparison of the Risk of Gastrointestinal Bleeding among Different Statin Exposures with Concomitant Administration of Warfarin: Electronic Health Record-Based Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sun Gyo; Hong, Ji Man; Park, Rae Woong; Lee, Jin Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Patients who should be treated with both warfarin and a statin are frequently seen in vascular clinics. The risk for bleeding and potential drug interactions should be considered when prescribing both medications together. This study aimed to compare the risk for gastrointestinal bleeding among different statin exposures with concomitant administration of warfarin. Materials and Methods This is a single-hospital retrospective cohort study. We included patients who were concomitantly exposed to one of four statins (pravastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin, and rosuvastatin) and warfarin for up to 2 years (730 days). The observation period ended when a gastrointestinal bleeding event occurred or the observation was censored. Within-class comparisons were used, and 1:1 matching using a propensity score was performed for comparisons between each statin and all of the other statins. Kaplan-Meier analyses with log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were conducted to determine associations with the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. Results Data were analyzed for 1,686 patients who were concomitantly administered a statin and warfarin. Log-rank tests for the gastrointestinal bleeding-free survival rate showed that the risk for gastrointestinal bleeding was significantly lower in the pravastatin group (p = 0.0499) and higher in the rosuvastatin group (p = 0.009). In the Cox proportional hazard regression analysis, the hazard ratio of 5.394 for gastrointestinal bleeding based on statin exposure in the rosuvastatin group was significant (95% confidence interval, 1.168–24.916). Conclusions There was a relatively high risk of gastrointestinal bleeding with rosuvastatin when administered concomitantly with warfarin. PMID:27386858

  15. Management of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients anticoagulated with dabigatran compared with warfarin: a retrospective, comparative case review

    PubMed Central

    Al-hamid, Hussein; Leelasinjaroen, Pornchai; Hashmi, Usman; McCullough, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dabigatran etexilate, was found to be effective for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Given its predictable pharmacodynamics, laboratory monitoring is not required. Moreover, the risks of overall bleeding, intracranial bleeding, and life-threatening hemorrhage from dabigatran were found to be lower than warfarin. However, a higher risk of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding caused by dabigatran from the randomized evaluation of long-term anticoagulant therapy (RE-LY) trial has raised the concern regarding clinical outcomes of patients with GI bleeding caused by dabigatran compared with warfarin. Methods We retrospectively studied patients who were hospitalized for GI bleeding from dabigatran compared with warfarin with therapeutic anticoagulation monitoring during 2009 to 2012. Initial laboratory findings at presentation, number of transfused packed red blood cells (PRBCs), acute kidney injury, clinical outcomes (e.g., hypotension, tachycardia), length of stay, and death were compared. Results Thirteen patients taking dabigatran and 26 patients who were on warfarin with therapeutic international normalized ratio (INR) were hospitalized during the study period. Demographic data and baseline parameters between the two groups were not significantly different except for concurrent aspirin use (84.6% vs. 50%, P=0.036). Fifty-four percent of patients taking dabigatran did not have activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) level performed at presentation (7/13). The patients with GI bleeding from warfarin received significantly more PRBC transfusions compared with the dabigatran group (1.92±2.2 vs. 0.69±1.1 units, P=0.024). After controlling for initial hemoglobin and history of chronic kidney disease by using multivariate analysis, the patients in the warfarin group were likely to receive more PRBC. Hypotension at presentation was more common in GI bleeding caused by warfarin than dabigatran but the P value was insignificant

  16. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding from the Internal Iliac Artery: Angiographic Demonstration of an Iliac Arteriocolic Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Gittleman, Adam M.; Glanz, Sidney; Hon, Man; Ortiz, A. Orlando; Katz, Douglas S.

    2004-09-15

    A rare source of potentially massive lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in women is advanced gynecologic malignancy. Such patients can develop gastrointestinal hemorrhage with or without prior pelvic irradiation, due to arteriocolic fistulas. Angiography permits the correct diagnosis and subsequent embolotherapy.

  17. Recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding diagnosed by delayed scintigraphy with Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Nwakanma, Lois; Meyerrose, Gary; Kennedy, Shalyn; Rakvit, Ariwan; Bohannon, Todd; Silva, Micheal

    2003-08-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented with bright-red blood from the rectum. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed mild gastritis. Colonoscopy demonstrated diverticulosis without active bleeding, and in vitro tagged red blood cell scintigraphy was unremarkable. There was no further evidence of bleeding and the patient was discharged home. The patient returned with recurrent bright-red blood from the rectum. Although delayed scintigraphic images seldom demonstrate the site of bleeding, delayed images at 12 hours demonstrated active bleeding near the hepatic flexure in this patient. This was confirmed with selective mesenteric angiography, and was treated with coil embolization of the tertiary branches of the right middle colic artery. PMID:12897664

  18. Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma as the Cause of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Celiac Disease: A Rare Malignancy in a Common Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fallah, Jaleh; Afari, Maxwell Eyram; Cordova, Alfredo C.; Olszewski, Adam J.; Minami, Taro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Celiac disease is associated with an increased risk of small bowel malignancies, particularly lymphoma. Its association with small bowel carcinoma is less known. Case Description. We report a case of an 89-year-old woman with celiac disease who experienced recurrent episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding and was ultimately found to have adenocarcinoma of the small intestine. Discussion and Evaluation. Diagnosis of small bowel adenocarcinoma is often delayed because of the need for specialized modalities, which are often deferred in the inpatient setting. Although resection is the modality of choice for small bowel tumors, a majority is either locally advanced or metastatic at diagnosis, and even localized cancers have worse prognosis than stage-matched colorectal tumors. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy is uncertain, but it is often offered extrapolating data from other gastrointestinal cancers. Small bowel carcinomas occurring in the context of celiac disease appear to be associated with higher rates of microsatellite instability than sporadic tumors, although other specific genomic abnormalities and mechanisms of carcinogenesis in celiac disease remain unknown. Conclusion. Recurrent episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with celiac disease should prompt an early evaluation of the small bowel to assure timely diagnosis of carcinoma at an early curable stage. PMID:26290763

  19. Acute Middle Gastrointestinal Bleeding Risk Associated with NSAIDs, Antithrombotic Drugs, and PPIs: A Multicenter Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Naoyoshi; Niikura, Ryota; Yamada, Atsuo; Sakurai, Toshiyuki; Shimbo, Takuro; Kobayashi, Yuka; Okamoto, Makoto; Mitsuno, Yuzo; Ogura, Keiji; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Akiyama, Junichi; Uemura, Naomi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Middle gastrointestinal bleeding (MGIB) risk has not been fully investigated due to its extremely rare occurrence and the need for multiple endoscopies to exclude upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. This study investigated whether MGIB is associated with the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), low-dose aspirin (LDA), thienopyridines, anticoagulants, and proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), and whether PPI use affects the interactions between MGIB and antithrombotic drugs. Methods In this multicenter, hospital-based, case-control study, 400 patients underwent upper and lower endoscopy, 80 had acute overt MGIB and 320 had no bleeding and were matched for age and sex as controls (1:4). MGIB was additionally evaluated by capsule and/or double-balloon endoscopy, after excluding upper and lower GI bleeding. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) for MGIB risk were calculated using conditional logistic regression. To estimate the propensity score, we employed a logistic regression model for PPI use. Results In patients with MGIB, mean hemoglobin level was 9.4 g/dL, and 28 patients (35%) received blood transfusions. Factors significantly associated with MGIB were chronic kidney disease (p<0.001), liver cirrhosis (p = 0.034), NSAIDs (p<0.001), thienopyridines (p<0.001), anticoagulants (p = 0.002), and PPIs (p<0.001). After adjusting for these factors, NSAIDs (AOR, 2.5; p = 0.018), thienopyridines (AOR, 3.2; p = 0.015), anticoagulants (AOR, 4.3; p = 0.028), and PPIs (AOR; 2.0; p = 0.021) were independently associated with MGIB. After adjusting for propensity score, the use of PPIs remained an independent risk factors for MGIB (AOR, 1.94; p = 0.034). No significant interactions were observed between PPIs and NSAIDs (AOR, 0.7; p = 0.637), LDA (AOR, 0.3; p = 0.112), thienopyridine (AOR, 0.7, p = 0.671), or anticoagulants (AOR, 0.5; p = 0.545). Conclusions One-third of patients with acute small intestinal bleeding required blood transfusion. NSAIDs

  20. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Crohn Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guanwei; Ren, Jianan; Wang, Gefei; Wu, Qin; Gu, Guosheng; Ren, Huajian; Liu, Song; Hong, Zhiwu; Li, Ranran; Li, Yuan; Guo, Kun; Wu, Xiuwen; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (ALGIB) is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of Crohn disease (CD). Thus far, few studies of ALGIB in the context of CD have been published, most of which were case reports with limited value. We aimed to explore the prevalence of ALGIB in CD patients, evaluate risk factors for hemorrhagic CD and its recurrence, and analyze clinical data of the death cases. A total of 1374 CD patients registered from January 2007 to June 2013 were examined. Medical records of 73 patients with ALGIB and 146 matched as controls were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively. Logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed to identify risk factors for ALGIB and the cumulative probability of rebleeding. Kaplan–Meier curves with log-rank tests were used to demonstrate the cumulative survival rates of rebleeding. The prevalence of ALGIB was 5.31% (73/1374) in this study. In the univariate analysis, possible risk factors for ALGIB were duration of CD (odds ratio [OR] 0.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.33–1.09, P = 0.095), perianal disease (OR 1.96, 95% CI 0.92–4.20, P = 0.082), left colon involvement (OR 2.16, 95% CI 1.10–4.24, P = 0.025), azathioprine use ≥1 year (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.23–0.90, P = 0.023), and previous hemorrhage history (OR 11.86, 95% CI 5.38–26.12, P < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, left colon involvement (OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.04–4.91, P = 0.039), azathioprine use ≥1 year (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.20–0.99, P = 0.044), and previous hemorrhage history (OR 13.04, 95% CI 5.66–30.04, P < 0.0001) remained independent influencing factors. Older age (HR 0.23, 95% CI 0.07–0.77, P = 0.018), surgical treatment (HR 0.17, 95% CI 0.06–0.50, P < 0.001), and having bleeding episodes >3 months ago (HR 0.24, 95% CI 0.07–0.82, P = 0.022) resulted to be predictors associated with rebleeding after discharge. Patients who died often

  1. Use of recombinant factor VIIa in uncontrolled gastrointestinal bleeding after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation among patients with thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yaqiong; Wu, Qian; Wu, Xiaojin; Qiu, Huiying; Sun, Aining; Ruan, Changgeng; Wu, Depei; Han, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Recombinant-activated factor VII (rVIIa) is a vitamin K-dependent glycoprotein that is an analog of the naturally occurring protease. It has an off-label use to control life-threatening bleeding that is refractory to other measures and was shown to decrease transfusion requirements. Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a severe complication following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in patients with thrombocytopenia, while hemostatic measures based on antifibrinolytic or transfusion therapy may not always be successful. The present study investigated the treatment with rFVIIa in severe GI bleeding among thrombocytopenia patients undergoing HSCT. Methods: rFVIIa was given as a single dose of 60μg/kg in patients with GI bleeding following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Results: Among all patients enrolled, 12 (75%) of 16 patients obtained a response, of which 5 achieved a complete response and 7 achieved a partial response. The 4 remiaing patients (25%) had no response. Nine patients (56.3%) died in a follow-up of 90 days. No thromboembolic events wereassociated with the drug administration occurred. Conclusions: Our study showed that rFVIIa may represent an additional therapeutic option in such cases. PMID:26870102

  2. How Can We Maximize Skills for Non-Variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Injection, Clipping, Burning, or Others?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopy has its role in the primary diagnosis and management of acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Main roles of endoscopy are identifying high risk stigmata lesion, and performing endoscopic hemostasis to lower the rebleeding and mortality risks. Early endoscopy within the first 24 hours enables risk classification according to clinical and endoscopic criteria, which guide safe and prompt discharge of low risk patients, and improve outcomes of high risk patients. Techniques including injection therapy, ablative therapy and mechanical therapy have been studied over the recent decades. Combined treatment is more effective than injection treatment, and single treatment with mechanical or thermal method is safe and effective in peptic ulcer bleeding. Specific treatment and correct decisions are needed in various situations depending on the site, location, specific characteristics of lesion and patient's clinical conditions. PMID:22977808

  3. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Scotland 2000-2010: Improved outcomes but a significant weekend effect

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Asma; Armstrong, Matthew; Robertson, Ishbel; Morris, Allan John; Blatchford, Oliver; Stanley, Adrian J

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess numbers and case fatality of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), effects of deprivation and whether weekend presentation affected outcomes. METHODS: Data was obtained from Information Services Division (ISD) Scotland and National Records of Scotland (NRS) death records for a ten year period between 2000-2001 and 2009-2010. We obtained data from the ISD Scottish Morbidity Records (SMR01) database which holds data on inpatient and day-case hospital discharges from non-obstetric and non-psychiatric hospitals in Scotland. The mortality data was obtained from NRS and linked with the ISD SMR01 database to obtain 30-d case fatality. We used 23 ICD-10 (International Classification of diseases) codes which identify UGIB to interrogate database. We analysed these data for trends in number of hospital admissions with UGIB, 30-d mortality over time and assessed effects of social deprivation. We compared weekend and weekday admissions for differences in 30-d mortality and length of hospital stay. We determined comorbidities for each admission to establish if comorbidities contributed to patient outcome. RESULTS: A total of 60643 Scottish residents were admitted with UGIH during January, 2000 and October, 2009. There was no significant change in annual number of admissions over time, but there was a statistically significant reduction in 30-d case fatality from 10.3% to 8.8% (P < 0.001) over these 10 years. Number of admissions with UGIB was higher for the patients from most deprived category (P < 0.05), although case fatality was higher for the patients from the least deprived category (P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant change in this trend between 2000/01-2009/10. Patients admitted with UGIB at weekends had higher 30-d case fatality compared with those admitted on weekdays (P < 0.001). Thirty day mortality remained significantly higher for patients admitted with UGIB at weekends after adjusting for comorbidities. Length of

  4. Restrictive vs Liberal Blood Transfusion for Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Rationale and Protocol for a Cluster Randomized Feasibility Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jairath, Vipul; Kahan, Brennan C.; Gray, Alasdair; Doré, Caroline J.; Mora, Ana; Dyer, Claire; Stokes, Elizabeth A.; Llewelyn, Charlotte; Bailey, Adam A.; Dallal, Helen; Everett, Simon M.; James, Martin W.; Stanley, Adrian J.; Church, Nicholas; Darwent, Melanie; Greenaway, John; Le Jeune, Ivan; Reckless, Ian; Campbell, Helen E.; Meredith, Sarah; Palmer, Kelvin R.; Logan, Richard F.A.; Travis, Simon P.L.; Walsh, Timothy S.; Murphy, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is the commonest reason for hospitalization with hemorrhage in the UK and the leading indication for transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs). Observational studies suggest an association between more liberal RBC transfusion and adverse patient outcomes, and a recent randomised trial reported increased further bleeding and mortality with a liberal transfusion policy. TRIGGER (Transfusion in Gastrointestinal Bleeding) is a pragmatic, cluster randomized trial which aims to evaluate the feasibility and safety of implementing a restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion policy in adult patients admitted with AUGIB. The trial will take place in 6 UK hospitals, and each centre will be randomly allocated to a transfusion policy. Clinicians throughout each hospital will manage all eligible patients according to the transfusion policy for the 6-month trial recruitment period. In the restrictive centers, patients become eligible for RBC transfusion when their hemoglobin is < 8 g/dL. In the liberal centers patients become eligible for transfusion once their hemoglobin is < 10 g/dL. All clinicians will have the discretion to transfuse outside of the policy but will be asked to document the reasons for doing so. Feasibility outcome measures include protocol adherence, recruitment rate, and evidence of selection bias. Clinical outcome measures include further bleeding, mortality, thromboembolic events, and infections. Quality of life will be measured using the EuroQol EQ-5D at day 28, and the costs associated with hospitalization for AUGIB in the UK will be estimated. Consent will be sought from participants or their representatives according to patient capacity for use of routine hospital data and day 28 follow up. The study has ethical approval for conduct in England and Scotland. Results will be analysed according to a pre-defined statistical analysis plan and disseminated in peer reviewed publications to relevant stakeholders. The

  5. Urgent double balloon endoscopy provides higher yields than non-urgent double balloon endoscopy in overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Aniwan, Satimai; Viriyautsahakul, Vichai; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Angsuwatcharakon, Phonthep; Kongkam, Pradermchai; Treeprasertsuk, Sombat; Kullavanijaya, Pinit

    2014-01-01

    Background and study aims: In overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OV), double balloon endoscopy (DBE) is recommended as one of the most important investigations as it can provide both diagnosis and treatment. However, there is no set standard on the timing of DBE in OV. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic and therapeutic yields between urgent and non-urgent DBE in patients with OV. Patients and methods: Between January 2006 and February 2013, 120 patients with OV who underwent DBE were retrospectively reviewed. An urgent DBE was defined as DBE performed within 72 h from the last visible gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 74) whereas a non-urgent DBE was defined as DBE performed after 72 h (n = 46). Diagnostic yields, therapeutic impact and clinical outcomes were evaluated. Results: Diagnostic yield in urgent DBE was significantly higher than that in non-urgent DBE (70 % versus 30 %; P < 0.05). Urgent DBE offered significantly more therapies including endoscopic, angiographic embolization, and surgery than non-urgent DBE (54 % versus 15 %; P < 0.001). Endoscopic therapy was performed in 43 % of urgent-DBE patients whereas only 13 % of patients in the other group received endoscopic therapy (P < 0.01). In patients with identified bleeding sources, the rebleeding rate was lower in patients who underwent urgent DBE than in those who underwent non-urgent DBE (10 % versus 29 %, NS). Conclusions: Regarding diagnostic and therapeutic impacts in OV, our retrospective study showed that urgent DBE is better than non-urgent DBE. The recurrent bleeding rate in patients undergoing urgent DBE tended to be lower. PMID:26135267

  6. TIPS treatment in a patient with severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding with a misdiagnosis of cirrhotic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Laborda, Alicia; Guirola, José Andrés; Medrano, Joaquín; Simón, Miguel Ángel; Ioakeim, Ignatios; de-Gregorio, Miguel Ángel

    2015-12-01

    Abernethy malformation is a rare abnormal embryological development of splanchnic venous system characterised by the presence of a congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt. We present a rare case of an adult male patient that was admitted with severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding, requiring multiple blood transfusions. The patient's medical history and the laboratory tests performed led to the misdiagnosis of a congenital Abernethy malformation. We present a rare case, discussing the reasons for the misdiagnosis and we conclude that management of clinical data and imaging are highly important to discard these types of congenital malformations that can mimic a portal hypertension condition. PMID:26671592

  7. Strongyloides stercoralis Hyperinfection Syndrome Presenting as Severe, Recurrent Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Leading to a Diagnosis of Cushing Disease.

    PubMed

    Yee, Brittany; Chi, Nai-Wen; Hansen, Lawrence A; Lee, Roland R; U, Hoi-Sang; Savides, Thomas J; Vinetz, Joseph M

    2015-10-01

    A 50-year-old male immigrant from Ethiopia presented for consultation after 3 years of hematochezia/melena requiring > 25 units of blood transfusions. Physical examination revealed severe proximal muscle wasting and weakness, central obesity, proptosis, and abdominal striae, accompanied by eosinophilia, elevated hemoglobin A1c, elevated 24-hour urinary cortisol, lack of suppression of 8 am cortisol levels by 1 mg dexamethasone, and inappropriately elevated random adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level. Histopathological examination of gastrointestinal biopsies showed large numbers of Strongyloides stercoralis, indicating Strongyloides hyperinfection. Treatment with 2 days of ivermectin led to resolution of gastrointestinal bleeding. This syndrome was due to chronic immunosuppression from a pituitary ACTH (corticotroph) microadenoma, of which resection led to gradual normalization of urine cortisol, improved glycemic control, resolution of eosinophilia, and no recurrence of infection. PMID:26195463

  8. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt for acute variceal gastrointestinal bleeding: Indications, techniques and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Loffroy, R; Favelier, S; Pottecher, P; Estivalet, L; Genson, P Y; Gehin, S; Krausé, D; Cercueil, J-P

    2015-01-01

    Acute variceal bleeding is a life-threatening condition that requires a multidisciplinary approach for effective therapy. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure is a minimally invasive image-guided intervention used for secondary prevention of bleeding and as salvage therapy in acute bleeding. Emergency TIPS should be considered early in patients with refractory variceal bleeding once medical treatment and endoscopic sclerotherapy fail, before the clinical condition worsens. Furthermore, admission to specialized centers is mandatory in such a setting and regional protocols are essential to be organized effectively. This procedure involves establishment of a direct pathway between the hepatic veins and the portal veins to decompress the portal venous hypertension that is the source of the patient's bleeding. The procedure is technically challenging, especially in critically ill patients, and has a mortality of 30%-50% in the emergency setting, but has an effectiveness greater than 90% in controlling bleeding from gastro-esophageal varices. This review focuses on the role of TIPS in the setting of variceal bleeding, with emphasis on current indications and techniques for TIPS creation, TIPS clinical outcomes, and the role of adjuvant embolization of varices. PMID:26094039

  9. Recurrent Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Ileal GIST Diagnosed by Video Capsule Endoscopy—A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lamsen, Marie; Coron, Roger; Deliana, Danila; Rangraj, Madhu; Jesmajian, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the ileum is an extremely rare cause of recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). Case Report. An 89-year-old man was admitted with melana. He had extensive PMH of CAD post-CABG/AICD, AAA repair, chronic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, lung cancer after resection, and recurrent GIB. Prior EGDs, colonoscopies, and upper device-assisted enteroscopy showed duodenal ulcer, A-V malformation s/p cauterization, and angioectasia. On admission, Hb was 6.0 g/dL. An endoscopic capsule study showed an ulcerated tumor in the ileum. CT showed no distant metastasis. The lesion was resected successfully and confirmed as a high-grade GIST. The patient was discharged with no further bleeding. Discussion. Early diagnosis for patients with ileal GIST is often challenging. Video capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy could be useful diagnostic tools. Surgical removal is the first line for a resectable GIST. Imatinib has become the standard therapy. Conclusion. This is a unique case of an ileal GIST in a patient with recurrent GIB which was diagnosed by video capsule. Complicated medical comorbidities often lead to a significant delay in diagnosis. Therefore, we recommend that if GIB does not resolve after appropriate treatments for known causes, the alternative diagnosis for occult GIB must be considered, including malignancy such as GIST. PMID:24027646

  10. Recurrent Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Ileal GIST Diagnosed by Video Capsule Endoscopy-A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jie; Lamsen, Marie; Coron, Roger; Deliana, Danila; Siddiqui, Sabah; Rangraj, Madhu; Jesmajian, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the ileum is an extremely rare cause of recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). Case Report. An 89-year-old man was admitted with melana. He had extensive PMH of CAD post-CABG/AICD, AAA repair, chronic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, lung cancer after resection, and recurrent GIB. Prior EGDs, colonoscopies, and upper device-assisted enteroscopy showed duodenal ulcer, A-V malformation s/p cauterization, and angioectasia. On admission, Hb was 6.0 g/dL. An endoscopic capsule study showed an ulcerated tumor in the ileum. CT showed no distant metastasis. The lesion was resected successfully and confirmed as a high-grade GIST. The patient was discharged with no further bleeding. Discussion. Early diagnosis for patients with ileal GIST is often challenging. Video capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy could be useful diagnostic tools. Surgical removal is the first line for a resectable GIST. Imatinib has become the standard therapy. Conclusion. This is a unique case of an ileal GIST in a patient with recurrent GIB which was diagnosed by video capsule. Complicated medical comorbidities often lead to a significant delay in diagnosis. Therefore, we recommend that if GIB does not resolve after appropriate treatments for known causes, the alternative diagnosis for occult GIB must be considered, including malignancy such as GIST. PMID:24027646

  11. Durable survival after chemotherapy in a HIV patient with Burkitt's lymphoma presenting with massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Law, Man F; Chan, Hay N; Pang, Chun Y; Lai, Ho K; Ha, Chung Y; Ng, Celia; Ho, Rita; Wong, Cheuk K; Yeung, Yiu M; Yip, Sze F

    2016-07-01

    Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding is an uncommon presentation of Burkitt's lymphoma in a patient with HIV/AIDS, and is seldom reported in the literature. A 39-year-old man who has sex with men presented with abdominal pain and massive haematemesis and a rapid drop in haemoglobin level to 4.8 g/dL. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a large blood clot in the stomach, and an emergency laparotomy was performed because of unstable haemodynamics. This showed active bleeding from multiple tumours in the fundus and body of the stomach. The patient underwent gastrectomy and gastric biopsy confirmed Burkitt's lymphoma. Further tests showed lymphoma involvement in bone marrow and central nervous system. The patient tested positive for HIV, and had a CD4 count of 212 cells/mm(3) and viral load of 18,000 copies/mL at diagnosis. He was commenced on a chemotherapy regimen of CODOX-M/IVAC, and highly active antiretroviral therapy consisting of indinavir, stavudine and lamivudine. The major side effect was peripheral neuropathy. Infective complications during chemotherapy were controlled by broad-spectrum antibiotics and anti-fungal agents. Complete remission of the lymphoma was achieved after the chemotherapy and remission was maintained for more than 14 years. PMID:26185043

  12. Can the vicious cycle of obscure or intractable gastrointestinal bleeding be broken in patients with atrial fibrillation subject to anticoagulant therapy?

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, Diego; Martín-Yuste, Victoria; Feu, Faust; Brugaletta, Salvatore; Freixa, Xavier; Regueiro, Ander; Sabaté, Manel

    2014-05-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding of obscure origin or with an intractable cause is particularly common in patients with atrial fibrillation subject to oral anticoagulant therapy. This condition is highly recurrent and therefore gives rise to high morbidity and mortality rates, thus entailing a vicious cycle that is difficult to solve.Percutaneous left atrial appendage closure has become a therapeutic alternative for patients with atrial fibrillation and a contraindication for oral anticoagulation. This technique would allow the discontinuation of oral anticoagulants, thus helping to reduce the risk for gastrointestinal bleeding, and would also be protective against embolic events in this group of patients, thereby eventually breaking this vicious cycle.We report our experience with percutaneous left atrial appendage closure in the management of patients with atrial fibrillation who are subject to oral anticoagulation therapy and suffer from obscure or intractable gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25287239

  13. Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Children: The Role of Helicobacter pylori Infection and Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Usta, M; Urganci, N

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To study the role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and Helicobacter pylori infection in the aetiology of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in children. Subjects and Methods: One hundred and eighty-eight patients (82 girls, 106 boys; mean age 8.43 ± 5.24 years), admitted to the paediatric gastroenterology unit because of UGIB and who underwent endoscopic examination, were studied from their medical records, retrospectively. Results: Upper gastrointestinal bleeding was observed in 188 (8.29%) of 2266 patients. The mucosal causes related to the oesophagus, stomach and duodenum were found at the rate of 37%, 58% and 24.5%, respectively with endoscopic examination. The location of bleeding could not be determined in 14.4% of the patients. History of drug intake before admitting to hospital was present in 40 patients (21.3%). When we examined these forty patients, 35% were on acetylsalicylic acid, 47.5% were on ibuprofen and 17.5% were on NSAIDs. Ibuprofen versus acetylsalicylic acid usage was found to be highly significant (p < 0.05) for UGIB. Helicobacter pylori was found in 20.7% of the patients. The relationship between H pylori and UGIB was not found statistically significant (p > 0.05). The relationship between drug intake and presence of H pylori infection was not found significant in our patients (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Ibuprofen and acetylsalicyclic acid intake were found significant in the aetiology of UGIB in children. There was no significant connection with Helicobacter pylori infection in children with UGIB. We did not find a significant relationship with drug intake and H pylori infection. PMID:26360683

  14. CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND OUTCOME OF PATIENTS WITH UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING AT THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT OF A TERTIARY HOSPITAL IN NIGERIA

    PubMed Central

    Rukewe, A.; Otegbayo, J.A.; Fatiregun, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a potentially life threatening condition with multiple causes. There is scarcity of health data depicting the clinical characteristics of the condition in African countries. This study was designed to describe the demographic, clinical characteristics and outcome of the patients who presented to our Emergency Department. Method: The records of cohort of all patients admitted with upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding from 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed from admission to discharge or death. Results: There were 169 patients with median age of 44.0 years (range 13-89); 25 (15.0%) of them were known peptic ulcer disease patients. Most (69.2%) of the patients were males. The most common presenting symptom was haematemesis (34.9%) followed by melaena (16.6%). There was a history of NSAIDs use in 16.8% and alcohol ingestion in 12%. Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy was performed in 6.8% cases. Twenty-three (13.6%) patients died. There was association between mortality and diastolic blood pressure; more deaths (1/7; 14.3%) occurred in those with diastolic blood pressure > 90mmHg compared with ≤90mmHg (5/70; 7.1%) (P = 0.002). There were more deaths among patients who did not receive blood transfusion (4/40; 10.0%) compared with those who had blood transfusion (2/37; 5.4%) (P=0.008). Conclusion: The common presentations were haematemesis and melaena, mainly in middle aged men with mortality in one out of seven patients. The high mortality may be due to co-morbidities and poor support services. PMID:27162520

  15. Is Occult Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding a Definite Indication for Capsule Endoscopy? A Retrospective Analysis of Diagnostic Yield in Patients with Occult versus Overt Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shinji; Nakano, Makoto; Aoyama, Taiki; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim. Usefulness of capsule endoscopy (CE) for diagnosing small-bowel lesions in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) has been reported. Most reports have addressed the clinical features of overt OGIB, with few addressing occult OGIB. We aimed to clarify whether occult OGIB is a definite indication for CE. Methods. We retrospectively compared the cases of 102 patients with occult OGIB and 325 patients with overt OGIB, all having undergone CE. The diagnostic yield of CE and identification of various lesion types were determined in cases of occult OGIB versus overt OGIB. Results. There was no significant difference in diagnostic yield between occult and overt OGIB. The small-bowel lesions in cases of occult OGIB were diagnosed as ulcer/erosive lesions (n = 18, 18%), vascular lesions (n = 11, 11%), and tumors (n = 4, 3%), and those in cases of overt OGIB were diagnosed as ulcer/erosive lesions (n = 51, 16%), vascular lesions (n = 31, 10%), and tumors (n = 20, 6%). Conclusion. CE detection rates and CE identification of various small-bowel diseases do not differ between patients with occult versus overt OGIB. CE should be actively performed for patients with either occult or overt OGIB. PMID:24324488

  16. Severe Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Patient With Subvalvular Aortic Stenosis Treated With Thalidomide and Octreotide: Bridging to Transcoronary Ablation of Septal Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hvid-Jensen, Helene S.; Poulsen, Steen H.; Agnholt, Jorgen S.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding (GB) due to angiodysplasias can cause severe, recurrent bleeding, especially in elderly patients. Angiodysplastic bleedings in the gastrointestinal tract have been associated with aortic stenosis and, more recently, hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, caused by an acquired coagulopathy known as Heyde’s syndrome. Multiple factors are involved in the pathogenesis of angiodysplastic bleeding including genetic factors and increased levels of vascular intestinal growth factor at tissue levels. Endoscopic coagulation therapy is the primary treatment but often fails to resolve bleeding, especially in patients with large numbers of angiodysplasias. In patients with aortic stenosis and GB, the main treatment is aortic valve replacement but the patients may be unfit to undergo surgery due to the complicating anemia. In this case story, we present a patient with severe, GB due to hypertrophic subvalvular obstructive cardiomyopathy. Endoscopic procedures with argon beaming were performed without effect on bleeding. The patient was treated with a combination of both thalidomide and octreotide. Within 3 months, the patient recovered from the anemia and was able to undergo transcoronary ethanol ablation. No further bleeding episodes occurred, and thalidomide and octreotide were arrested. To our knowledge, this case report is the first to describe how this new drug combination therapy is an effective treatment of GB from angiodysplasias and can be used to bridge to surgical or endovascular treatment. PMID:26491506

  17. Peptic ulcers accompanied with gastrointestinal bleeding, pylorus obstruction and cholangitis secondary to choledochoduodenal fistula: A case report

    PubMed Central

    XI, BIN; JIA, JUN-JUN; LIN, BING-YI; GENG, LEI; ZHENG, SHU-SEN

    2016-01-01

    Peptic ulcers are an extremely common condition, usually occurring in the stomach and proximal duodenum. However, cases of peptic ulcers accompanied with multiple complications are extremely rare and hard to treat. The present case reinforces the requirement for the early recognition and correct treatment of peptic ulcers accompanied with multiple complications. A 67-year-old man presented with recurrent abdominal pain, fever and melena. The laboratory results showed anemia (hemoglobin 62 g/l) and hypoproteinemia (23 g/l). Abdominal imaging examinations revealed stones in the gallbladder and right liver, with air in the dilated intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography failed due to a deformed pylorus. The patient was finally diagnosed with peptic ulcers accompanied with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, pylorus obstruction and cholangitis secondary to a choledochoduodenal fistula during an emergency pancreatoduodenectomy, which was performed due to a massive hemorrhage of the GI tract. The patient recovered well after the surgery. PMID:26870237

  18. Adherence to guidelines: A national audit of the management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The REASON registry

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yidan; Barkun, Alan N; Martel, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess process of care in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) using a national cohort, and to identify predictors of adherence to ‘best practice’ standards. METHODS: Consecutive charts of patients hospitalized for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding across 21 Canadian hospitals were reviewed. Data regarding initial presentation, endoscopic management and outcomes were collected. Results were compared with ‘best practice’ using established guidelines on NVUGIB. Adherence was quantified and independent predictors were evaluated using multivariable analysis. RESULTS: Overall, 2020 patients (89.4% NVUGIB, variceal in 10.6%) were included (mean [± SD] age 66.3±16.4 years; 38.4% female). Endoscopy was performed in 1612 patients: 1533 with NVUGIB had endoscopic lesions (63.1% ulcers; high-risk stigmata in 47.8%). Early endoscopy was performed in 65.6% and an assistant was present in 83.5%. Only 64.5% of patients with high-risk stigmata received endoscopic hemostasis; 9.8% of patients exhibiting low-risk stigmata also did. Intravenous proton pump inhibitor was administered after endoscopic hemostasis in 95.7%. Rebleeding and mortality rates were 10.5% and 9.4%, respectively. Multivariable analysis revealed that low American Society of Anesthesiologists score patients had fewer assistants present during endoscopy (OR 0.63 [95% CI 0.48 to 0.83), a hemoglobin level <70 g/L predicted inappropriate high-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor use in patients with low-risk stigmata, and endoscopies performed during regular hours were associated with longer delays from presentation (OR 0.33 [95% CI 0.24 to 0.47]). CONCLUSION: There was variability between the process of care and ‘best practice’ in NVUGIB. Certain patient and situational characteristics may influence guideline adherence. Dissemination initiatives must identify and focus on such considerations to improve quality of care. PMID:25314356

  19. Gastrointestinal bleeding after high intake of omega-3 fatty acids, cortisone and antibiotic therapy: a case study.

    PubMed

    Detopoulou, Paraskevi; Papamikos, Vasilios

    2014-06-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids exert a plethora of physiological actions including triglycerides lowering, reduction of inflammatory indices, immunomodulation, anti- thrombotic effects and possibly promotion of exercise performance. Their use is widespread and for commonly ingested doses their side- effects are minimal. We report a case of a 60 y amateur athlete who consumed about 20 g omega-3 fatty acids daily from supplements and natural sources for a year. After the intake of cortisone and antibiotics he presented duodenum ulcer and bleeding although he had no previous history of gastrointestinal problems. Although several animal data support gastro-protective effects of omega-3 fatty acids in the present case they were not able to prevent ulcer generation. The present observation may be explained by (i) the high dose of omega-3 fatty acids and their effect on bleeding, (ii) the fact that cortisone increases their oxidation and may render them proinflammatory, (iii) other antithrombotic microconstituents included in the consumed cod-oil and/or the diet of the subject and (iv) the differences in the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems of well- trained subjects. Further studies are needed to substantiate any possible interaction of cortisone and omega-3 fatty acids in wide ranges of intake. PMID:24281788

  20. Embolization of Acute Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Resistant to Endoscopic Treatment: Results and Predictors of Recurrent Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Loffroy, Romaric Rao, Pramod; Ota, Shinichi; Lin Mingde; Kwak, Byung-Kook; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2010-12-15

    Acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage is a frequent complication associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The most common cause of UGI bleeding is peptic ulcer disease, but the differential diagnosis is diverse and includes tumors; ischemia; gastritis; arteriovenous malformations, such as Dieulafoy lesions; Mallory-Weiss tears; trauma; and iatrogenic causes. Aggressive treatment with early endoscopic hemostasis is essential for a favorable outcome. However, severe bleeding despite conservative medical treatment or endoscopic intervention occurs in 5-10% of patients, requiring surgery or transcatheter arterial embolization. Surgical intervention is usually an expeditious and gratifying endeavor, but it can be associated with high operative mortality rates. Endovascular management using superselective catheterization of the culprit vessel, < sandwich> occlusion, or blind embolization has emerged as an alternative to emergent operative intervention for high-risk patients and is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding refractory to endoscopic treatment. Indeed, many published studies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and its high technical and clinical success rates, which range from 69 to 100% and from 63 to 97%, respectively, even if the choice of the best embolic agent among coils, cyanaocrylate glue, gelatin sponge, or calibrated particles remains a matter of debate. However, factors influencing clinical outcome, especially predictors of early rebleeding, are poorly understood, and few studies have addressed this issue. This review of the literature will attempt to define the role of embolotherapy for acute nonvariceal UGI hemorrhage that fails to respond to endoscopic hemostasis and to summarize data on factors predicting angiographic and embolization failure.

  1. Decreased plasma and tissue isoleucine levels after simulated gastrointestinal bleeding by blood gavages in chronic portacaval shunted rats.

    PubMed Central

    Olde Damink, S W; Dejong, C H; Deutz, N E; Soeters, P B

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previously, arterial concentrations of the essential branched chain amino acid isoleucine (Ile) were found to have decreased by more than 50% after gastrointestinal haemorrhage in patients and after intragastric blood administration in healthy humans and pigs. Hypothetically, this induced hypoisoleucinaemia could deplete tissue Ile pools. AIMS: To study the effect of repeated blood gavages on arterial and tissue Ile levels during normal and impaired liver function. SUBJECTS: Male Wistar rats. METHODS: 14 days after portacaval shunting or sham surgery, rats received 3 ml bovine erythrocytes or saline at 0, 1, 2, and 3 hours via a gastrostomy catheter in the duodenum. At 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours arterial blood and at 8 hours intestine, liver, muscle, and cerebral cortex were sampled for determination of ammonia and amino acid concentrations. RESULTS: In both groups repeated blood administration resulted in a marked decrease in plasma Ile (40-60%). This was accompanied by decreased tissue Ile concentrations in liver (50%), muscle (40-60%), and cerebral cortex (40-50%), but unaltered intestinal Ile levels. In contrast, the arterial and tissue concentrations of ammonia, urea, and of most amino acids increased, most strikingly of the other two branched chain amino acids, valine and leucine. CONCLUSIONS: Simulated gastrointestinal bleeding by blood gavages in rats with and without impaired liver function leads to hypoisoleucinaemia and decreased tissue Ile pools. PMID:9135535

  2. Are altered pharmacokinetics of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) a risk factor for gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed Central

    Wynne, H A; Long, A; Nicholson, E; Ward, A; Keir, D

    1998-01-01

    Aims We hypothesised that pharmacokinetic factors might go some way to explaining the risk of major gastrointestinal haemorrhage with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), with bleeders exhibiting a reduced clearance of NSAIDs compared with non-bleeders and set out to investigate this. Methods Fifty patients presenting to hospital with acute gastrointestinal bleeding while taking piroxicam, indomethacin, diclofenac or naproxen and age, sex, musculoskeletal disease and drug matched community dwelling controls, up to two for each index case, who had not bled were recruited. Clinical details including duration of therapy were recorded. Bleeders discontinued the implicated NSAID at presentation, controls at least five half-lives before the study. Bleeders were contacted by letter 1 month after discharge and invited to take part and were studied after a median delay of 5 months. Subjects received an oral dose of their respective NSAID and venous blood was sampled, over a period determined by the half-life of the NSAID. Plasma concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Results The median length of treatment for the index patients was 1 year (range 2 weeks—28 years) and for the control patients 2 years (1 month—25 years), P<0.0005. There were no significant differences in peak plasma concentration, time to peak plasma concentration or area under the plasma concentration-time curve between bleeders or controls for any of the NSAIDs studied, apart from piroxicam Cmax being lower in bleeders at 2.07 mg l−1 than in controls at 3.21 mg l−1, mean difference (95% CI) −1.14 (−1.83–−0.48), P<0.005. Conclusions The data failed to support the hypothesis that reduced clearance of NSAIDs, which results in higher plasma concentrations, is a risk factor for acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage. PMID:9578191

  3. Prognostic Value of AIMS65 Score in Cirrhotic Patients with Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Gaduputi, Vinaya; Abdulsamad, Molham; Tariq, Hassan; Rafeeq, Ahmed; Abbas, Naeem; Kumbum, Kavitha; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Unlike Rockall scoring system, AIMS65 is based only on clinical and laboratory features. In this study we investigated the correlation between the AIMS65 score and Endoscopic Rockall score, in cirrhotic and noncirrhotic patients. Methods. This is a retrospective study of patients admitted with overt UGIB and undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). AIMS65 and Rockall scores were calculated at the time of admission. We investigated the correlation between both scores along with stigmata of bleed seen on endoscopy. Results. A total of 1255 patients were studied. 152 patients were cirrhotic while 1103 patients were noncirrhotic. There was significant correlation between AIMS65 and Total Rockall scores in patients of both groups. There was significant correlation between AIMS65 score and Endoscopic Rockall score in noncirrhotics but not cirrhotics. AIMS65 scores in both cirrhotic and noncirrhotic groups were significantly higher in patients who died from UGIB than in patients who did not. Conclusion. We observed statistically significant correlation between AIMS65 score and length of hospitalization and mortality in noncirrhotic patients. We found that AIMS65 score paralleled the endoscopic grading of lesion causing UGIB in noncirrhotics. AIMS65 score correlated only with mortality but not the length of hospitalization or endoscopic stigmata of bleed in cirrhotics. PMID:25587269

  4. An unusual cause of overt gastrointestinal bleeding in a malnourished child.

    PubMed

    Zanwar, Vinay G; Pawar, Sunil V; Jain, Samit S; Rathi, Surabhi P; Contractor, Qais Q; Rathi, Pravin M

    2016-04-01

    Trichuris trichiura (T. Trichiura) is a known parasite infestation among tropical children. Humans acquire Trichuriasis infection after ingestion of embryonated eggs via contaminated food or water. Most of them are asymptomatic. A severe form of trichuris infestation is known as Trichuris dysentery syndrome (TDS). It manifests as mucous diarrhoea, bleeding, malnutrition and stunting, or even life-threatening anaemia. We are reporting an interesting case of a 7-year-old girl who presented with bloody diarrhoea for 2 years. Her growth was stunted as she was not gaining weight. Severe inflammatory bowel disease was suspected clinically. Physical examination revealed marked pallor, pedal oedema and koilonychia along with sparse and hypopigmented hair. On evaluationT. Trichiurahelminths were seen on stool examination and massive worm load was visualised directly on colonoscopy. A diagnosis of TDS was made. She was successfully treated with oral Albendazole (400 mg) and blood transfusion. PMID:26264463

  5. Argon plasma coagulation for the endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal tumor bleeding: A retrospective comparison with a non-treated historical cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wodak, Stephanie; Gusmon, Carla C; Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana Vaz; Kawaguti, Fabio Shiguehissa; Baba, Elisa Ryoka; Pennacchi, Caterina MP; Lima, Marcelo Simas; Ribeiro, Ulysses; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2015-01-01

    Background The endoscopic use of argon plasma coagulation (APC) to achieve hemostasis for upper gastrointestinal tumor bleeding (UGITB) has not been adequately evaluated in controlled trials. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of APC for the treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from malignant lesions. Methods Between January and September 2011, all patients with UGITB underwent high-potency APC therapy (up to 70 Watts). This group was compared with a historical cohort of patients admitted between January and December 2010, when the endoscopic treatment of bleeding malignancies was not routinely performed. Patients were stratified into two categories, grouping the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status scale: Category I (ECOG 0–2) patients with a good clinical status and Category II (ECOG 3–4) patients with a poor clinical status. Results Our study had 25 patients with UGITB whom underwent APC treatment and 28 patients whom received no endoscopic therapy. The clinical characteristics of the groups were similar, except for endoscopic active bleeding, which was more frequently detected in APC group. We had 15 patients in the APC group whom had active bleeding, and initial hemostasis was obtained in 11 of them (73.3%). In the control group, four patients had active bleeding. There were no differences in 30-day re-bleeding (33.3% in the APC group versus 14.3% in the control group; p = 0.104) and 30-day mortality rates (20.8% in the APC group, versus 42.9% in the control group; p = 0.091). When patients were categorized according to their ECOG status, we found that APC therapy had no impact in re-bleeding and mortality rates (Group I: APC versus no endoscopic treatment: re-bleeding p = 0.412, mortality p = 0.669; Group II: APC versus no endoscopic treatment: re-bleeding p = 0.505, mortality p = 0.580). Hematemesis and site of bleeding located at the esophagus or duodenum were associated with a higher 30-day

  6. Management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from portal hypertension: Elective or emergency operation?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical outcome of emergency and elective operation of splenectomy with periesophagogastric devascularization in treating upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage resulted from portal hypertension. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 219 patients of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage resulted from portal hypertension treated using emergency or elective operation between Jul 2002 and Aug 2010. The clinical data were collected and analyzed. Results: In the group of elective operation, four patients with grade B and three with grade C died, and in the group of emergency operation, two patients with Grade B and four with Grade C died. The Grade C patients treated using emergency operation presented with a higher mortality than those treated using elective operation, but no significant difference was found (p>0.05). In the two groups, no patients with Grade A died. 17 cases (11.1%) suffered from complications in the group of elective operation and 11 cases (16.7 %) in emergency operation (p>0.05). The complication rate in patients with Grade C is significantly higher than that in patients with Grade A or B in each group (p<0.05). The hospital stay and cost in group of elective operation are significantly higher than those in group of emergency operation (p<0.05). Conclusion: The patients with Grade A or B treated using emergency operation have similar clinical outcomes as those treated using elective operation, but emergency operation may result in higher rate of death and complication in patients with Grade C. PMID:24948982

  7. The AIMS65 Score Is a Useful Predictor of Mortality in Patients with Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Urgent Endoscopy in Patients with High AIMS65 Scores

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Wook; Song, Young Wook; Tak, Dae Hyun; Ahn, Byung Moo; Kang, Sun Hyung; Moon, Hee Seok; Sung, Jae Kyu; Jeong, Hyun Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: To validate the AIMS65 score for predicting mortality of patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding and to evaluate the effectiveness of urgent (<8 hours) endoscopic procedures in patients with high AIMS65 scores. Methods: This was a 5-year single-center, retrospective study. Nonvariceal, upper gastrointestinal bleeding was assessed by using the AIM65 and Rockall scores. Scores for mortality were assessed by calculating the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROC). Patients with high AIMS65 scores (≥2) were allocated to either the urgent or non-urgent endoscopic procedure group. In-hospital mortality, success of endoscopic procedure, recurrence of bleeding, admission period, and dose of transfusion were compared between groups. Results: A total of 634 patients were analyzed. The AIMS65 score successfully predicted mortality (AUROC=0.943; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.876 to 0.99) and was superior to the Rockall score (AUROC=0.856; 95% CI, 0.743 to 0.969) in predicting mortality. The group with high AIMS65 score included 200 patients. The urgent endoscopic procedure group had reduced hospitalization periods (p<0.05) Conclusions: AIMS65 score may be useful in predicting mortality in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Urgent endoscopic procedures in patients with high scores may be related to reduced hospitalization periods. PMID:26668799

  8. Outcome of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Matched Case–control Study

    PubMed Central

    Thanapirom, Kessarin; Ridtitid, Wiriyaporn; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Thungsuk, Rattikorn; Noophun, Phadet; Wongjitrat, Chatchawan; Luangjaru, Somchai; Vedkijkul, Padet; Lertkupinit, Comson; Poonsab, Swangphong; Ratanachu-ek, Thawee; Hansomburana, Piyathida; Pornthisarn, Bubpha; Thongbai, Thirada; Mahachai, Varocha; Treeprasertsuk, Sombat

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: The risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) increases in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) due to the frequent use of antiplatelets. There is some data reporting on treatment outcomes in CAD patients presenting with UGIB. We aim to determine the clinical characteristics and outcomes of UGIB in patients with CAD, compared with non-CAD patients. Patients and Methods: We conducted a prospective multi-center cohort study (THAI UGIB-2010) that enrolled 981 consecutive hospitalized patients with acute UGIB. A matched case–control analysis using this database, which was collected from 11 tertiary referral hospitals in Thailand between January 2010 and September 2011, was performed. Result: Of 981 hospitalized patients with UGIB, there were 61 CAD patients and 244 gender-matched non-CAD patients (ratio 1:4). UGIB patients with CAD were significantly older, and had more frequently used antiplatelets and warfarin than in non-CAD patients. Compared with non-CAD, the CAD patients had significantly higher Glasgow–Blatchford score, full and pre-endoscopic Rockall score and full. Peptic ulcer in CAD patients was identified more often than in non-CAD patients. UGIB patients with CAD and non-CAD had similar outcomes with regard to mortality rate, re-bleeding, surgery, embolization, and packed erythrocyte transfusion. However, CAD patients had longer duration of hospital stays than non-CAD patients. Two CAD patients died from cardiac arrest after endoscopy, whereas three non-CAD patients died from pneumonia and acute renal failure during their hospitalization. Conclusion: In Thailand, patients presenting with UGIB, concomitant CAD did not affect clinical outcome of treatment, compared with non-CAD patients, except for longer hospital stay. PMID:27184638

  9. High-altitude gastrointestinal bleeding: An observation in Qinghai-Tibetan railroad construction workers on Mountain Tanggula

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tian-Yi; Ding, Shou-Quan; Liu, Jin-Liang; Jia, Jian-Hou; Dai, Rui-Chen; Zhu, Dong-Chun; Liang, Bao-Zhu; Qi, De-Tang; Sun, Yong-Fu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) in people from lowland to high altitude and in workers on Mountain Tanggula and its causes as well as treatment and prophylaxis. METHODS: From 2001 to October 2003, we studied GIB in 13 502 workers constructing the railroad on Mountain Tanggula which is 4905 m above the sea level. The incidence of GIB in workers at different altitudes was recorded. Endoscopy was performed when the workers evacuated to Golmud (2808 m) and Xining (2261 m). The available data on altitude GIB were analyzed. RESULTS: The overall incidence of GIB was 0.49% in 13 502 workers. The incidence increased with increasing altitude. The onset of symptoms in most patients was within three weeks after arrival at high altitude. Bleeding manifested as hematemesis, melaena or hematochezia, and might be occult. Endoscopic examination showed that the causes of altitude GIB included hemorrhage gastritis, gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, and gastric erosion. Experimental studies suggested that acute gastric mucosal lesion (AGML) could be induced by hypoxic and cold stress, which might be the pathogenesis of altitude GIB. Those who consumed large amount of alcohol, aspirin or dexamethasone were at a higher risk of developing GIB. Persons who previously suffered from peptic ulcer or high-altitude polycythemia were also at risk of developing GIB. Early diagnosis, evacuation, and treatment led to early recovery. CONCLUSION: GIB is a potentially life threatening disease, if it is not treated promptly and effectively. Early diagnosis, treatment and evacuation lead to an early recovery. Death due to altitude GIB can be avoided if early symptoms and signs are recognized. PMID:17278202

  10. [Emergency admission with suspected anemia-causing bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Schulthess, G; Schleiffenbaum, B

    1996-10-29

    The 33-year-old woman was violently beaten and suffered from concussion of the upper abdomen. Because of pain she took mefenamic acid for two days. Then she reported hematemesis, melena and vertigo. The value for hemoglobin was determined as 5.8 g/dl. Acute blood loss was suspected, but neither intraabdominal nor upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage could be detected. Further investigations revealed a Coombs-negative hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia, and microangiopathic hemolysis was suggested by the detection of fragmentocytes in a peripheral blood smear. The diagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) was made, though the patient did not suffer from manifestations of impaired microcirculation like neurological symptoms or renal failure. The TTP was found to be associated with HIV infection. The hematological disease responded well to the treatment with fresh-frozen plasma. PMID:8966448

  11. Complimentary Imaging Modalities for Investigating Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Capsule Endoscopy, Double-Balloon Enteroscopy, and Computed Tomographic Enterography.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ye; Wu, Sheng; Qian, Yuting; Wang, Qi; Li, Juanjuan; Tang, Yanping; Bai, Tingting; Wang, Lifu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The complimentary value of computed tomographic enterography (CTE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) combined with capsule endoscopy (CE) was evaluated in the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). Methods. Patients who received CE examinations at Ruijin Hospital between July 2007 and July 2014 with the indication of OGIB were identified, and those who also underwent DBE and/or CTE were included. Their clinical information was retrieved, and results from each test were compared with findings from the other two examinations. Results. The overall diagnostic yield of CE was comparable with DBE (73.9% versus 60.9%) but was significantly higher than the yield of CTE (87% versus 25%, p < 0.001). The diagnostic yield of angiodysplasia at CE was significantly higher than CTE (73% versus 8%, p < 0.001) and DBE (39.1% versus 17.4%, p = 0.013), while no significant difference was found between the three approaches for small bowel tumors. DBE and CTE identified small bowel diseases undetected or undetermined by CE. Conversely, CE improved diagnosis in the cases with negative CTE and DBE, and findings at initial CE directed further diagnosis made by DBE. Conclusions. Combination of the three diagnostic platforms provides complementary value in the diagnosis of OGIB. PMID:26858753

  12. Complimentary Imaging Modalities for Investigating Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Capsule Endoscopy, Double-Balloon Enteroscopy, and Computed Tomographic Enterography

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ye; Wu, Sheng; Qian, Yuting; Wang, Qi; Li, Juanjuan; Tang, Yanping; Bai, Tingting; Wang, Lifu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The complimentary value of computed tomographic enterography (CTE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) combined with capsule endoscopy (CE) was evaluated in the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). Methods. Patients who received CE examinations at Ruijin Hospital between July 2007 and July 2014 with the indication of OGIB were identified, and those who also underwent DBE and/or CTE were included. Their clinical information was retrieved, and results from each test were compared with findings from the other two examinations. Results. The overall diagnostic yield of CE was comparable with DBE (73.9% versus 60.9%) but was significantly higher than the yield of CTE (87% versus 25%, p < 0.001). The diagnostic yield of angiodysplasia at CE was significantly higher than CTE (73% versus 8%, p < 0.001) and DBE (39.1% versus 17.4%, p = 0.013), while no significant difference was found between the three approaches for small bowel tumors. DBE and CTE identified small bowel diseases undetected or undetermined by CE. Conversely, CE improved diagnosis in the cases with negative CTE and DBE, and findings at initial CE directed further diagnosis made by DBE. Conclusions. Combination of the three diagnostic platforms provides complementary value in the diagnosis of OGIB. PMID:26858753

  13. Comparison of AIMS65 Score and Other Scoring Systems for Predicting Clinical Outcomes in Koreans with Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Min; Yeum, Seok Cheon; Kim, Byung-Wook; Kim, Joon Sung; Kim, Ji Hee; Sim, Eun Hui; Ji, Jeong-Seon; Choi, Hwang

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The AIMS65 score has not been sufficiently validated in Korea. The objective of this study was to compare the AIMS65 and other scoring systems for the prediction of various clinical outcomes in Korean patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB). Methods The AIMS65 score, clinical and full Rockall scores (cRS and fRS) and Glasgow-Blatchford (GBS) score were calculated in patients with NVUGIB in a single center retrospectively. The performance of these scores for predicting mortality, rebleeding, transfusion requirement, and endoscopic intervention was assessed by calculating the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve. Results Of the 523 patients, 3.4% died within 30 days, 2.5% experienced rebleeding, 40.0% required endoscopic intervention, and 75.7% needed transfusion. The AIMS65 score was useful for predicting the 30-day mortality, the need for endoscopic intervention and for transfusion. The fRS was superior to the AIMS65, GBS, and cRS for predicting endoscopic intervention and the GBS was superior to the AIMS65, fRS, and cRS for predicting the transfusion requirement. Conclusions The AIMS65 score was useful for predicting the 30-day mortality, transfusion requirement, and endoscopic intervention in Korean patients with acute NVUGIB. However, it was inferior to the GBS and fRS for predicting the transfusion requirement and endoscopic intervention, respectively. PMID:27377742

  14. Comparison of three dimensional magnetic resonance imaging in conjunction with a blood pool contrast agent and nuclear scintigraphy for the detection of experimentally induced gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hilfiker, P; Weishaupt, D; Kacl, G; Hetzer, F; Griff, M; Ruehm, S; Debatin, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—To compare the performance of 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in conjunction with an intravascular contrast agent with that of scintigraphy, with respect to detection and localisation of gastrointestinal haemorrhage in vivo in pigs.
METHODS—Intraluminal bleeding sites were surgically created in the small bowel and colon of six pigs. The animals underwent scintigraphy with 99mTc labelled red blood cells and 3D MRI following administration of an intravascular contrast agent (NC100150) at five minute intervals over 30 minutes. For analysis, the intestinal tract was divided into six segments. Based on the two evaluated methods, each segment was characterised on a five point scale regarding the presence of a bleed. At autopsy, the surgically manipulated bowel segments were inspected for the presence of haemorrhage.
RESULTS—Bleeding was confirmed at autopsy in 18/36 segments. Contrast extravasation with subsequent movement through the bowel could be documented on MRI data sets. All segments were correctly characterised, resulting in 100% sensitivity and specificity for MRI. Based on scintigraphy, interpretation of seven segments (19%) was false (sensitivity/specificity of 78%/72%). Differences in diagnostic performance were evident in the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis, with an area under the MRI curve of 0.99 and under the scintigraphy curve of 0.85.
CONCLUSION—In conjunction with an intravascular contrast agent, 3D MRI permits accurate detection and localisation of gastrointestinal bleeding. The extent and evolution of intestinal bleeding can be determined with repeated data acquisition.


Keywords: gastrointestinal tract; haemorrhage; scintigraphy; magnetic resonance; contrast agent PMID:10486369

  15. Non-Helicobacter pylori, non-NSAIDs peptic ulcers: a descriptive study on patients referred to Taleghani hospital with upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Rajabalinia, Hasan; Ghobakhlou, Mehdi; Nikpour, Shahriar; Dabiri, Reza; Bahriny, Rasoul; Sherafat, Somayeh Jahani; Moghaddam, Pardis Ketabi

    2012-01-01

    Aim The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the number and proportion of various causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and actual numbers of non-NSAID, non-Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) peptic ulcers seen in endoscopy of these patients. Background The number and the proportion of patients with non- H.pylori, non-NSAIDs peptic ulcer disease leading to upper gastrointestinal bleeding is believed to be increasing after eradication therapy for H.pylori. Patients and methods Medical records of patients referred to the emergency room of Taleghani hospital from 2010 with a clinical diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (hematemesis, coffee ground vomiting and melena) were included in this study. Patients with hematochezia with evidence of a source of bleeding from upper gastrointestinal tract in endoscopy were also included in this study. Results In this study, peptic ulcer disease (all kinds of ulcers) was seen in 61 patients which were about 44.85% of abnormalities seen on endoscopy of patients. Among these 61 ulcers, 44 were duodenal ulcer, 22 gastric ulcer (5 patients had the both duodenal and gastric ulcers). Multiple biopsies were taken and be sent to laboratory for Rapid Urease Test and pathological examination. About 65.53% of patients had ulcers associated with H.pylori, 9.83% had peptic ulcer disease associated with NSAIDs and 11.47% of patients had ulcers associated with both H.pylori and consumption of NSAIDs. 13.11% of patients had non-NSAIDs non- H.pylori peptic ulcer disease. Conclusion The results of this study supports the results of other studies that suggest the incidence of H.pylori infection related with duodenal ulcer is common, and that non-H pylori and non-NSAIDs duodenal ulcer is also common. PMID:24834225

  16. Successful treatment of bleeding large duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumour in a patient under dual antiplatelet therapy after recent drug-eluting coronary stent implantation

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Keita; Fujikawa, Takahisa; Kuramitsu, Shoichi; Tanaka, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 69-year-old man who started dual antiplatelet therapy (APT) with aspirin and clopidogrel after recent implantation of drug-eluting coronary stent and developed massive bleeding due to large duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST). Following endoscopic haemostasis and discontinuation of dual APT, neoadjuvant chemotherapy with imatinib was started under continuation of ‘single’ APT with aspirin. A good chemotherapeutic response was achieved without recurrence of bleeding, and subsequent less invasive surgical resection of the tumour was performed, while preoperative single APT was continued for prevention of stent thrombosis. The patient recovered well without any thromboembolic or bleeding events. Neoadjuvant imatinib therapy and subsequent less invasive surgery under continuation of APT is one of the preferred approaches for patients with duodenal GIST with severe thromboembolic comorbidities, as in the current case. PMID:24777088

  17. Chronic Kidney Disease, Hemodynamic Instability, and Endoscopic High-Risk Appearance Are Associated with 30-Day Rebleeding in Patients with Non-Variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Hah, Yu Jin; Park, Kyung Sik; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok

    2013-01-01

    The results of studies that evaluated predictive factors for rebleeding in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate predictive factors for 30-day rebleeding in these patients. A consecutive 312 patients presenting symptoms and signs of gastrointestinal bleeding were enrolled in this prospective, observational study. Clinical and demographic characteristics and endoscopic findings were evaluated for potential factors associated with 30-day rebleeding using logistic regression analysis. Overall, 176 patients were included (male, 80.1%; mean age, 59.7±16.0 yr). Rebleeding within 7 and 30 days occurred in 21 (11.9%) and 27 (15.3%) patients, respectively. We found that chronic kidney disease (CKD) (OR, 10.29; 95% CI, 2.84-37.33; P<0.001), tachycardia (pulse>100 beats/min) during the admission (OR, 3.79; 95% CI, 1.25-11.49; P=0.019), and Forrest classes I, IIa, and IIb (OR, 6.14; 95% CI, 1.36-27.66; P=0.018) were significant independent predictive factors for 30-day rebleeding. However, neither Rockall nor Blatchford scores showed statistically significant relationships with 30-day rebleeding in a multivariate analysis. CKD, hemodynamic instability during hospitalization, and an endoscopic high-risk appearance are significantly independent predictors of 30-day rebleeding in patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. These factors may be useful for clinical management of such patients. PMID:24133356

  18. Culprit for recurrent acute gastrointestinal massive bleeding: “Small bowel Dieulafoy’s lesions” - a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Sathyamurthy, Anjana; Winn, Jessica N; Ibdah, Jamal A; Tahan, Veysel

    2016-01-01

    A Dieulafoy's lesion is a dilated, aberrant, submucosal vessel that erodes the overlying epithelium without evidence of a primary ulcer or erosion. It can be located anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract. We describe a case of massive gastrointestinal bleeding from Dieulafoy’s lesions in the duodenum. Etiology and precipitating events of a Dieulafoy’s lesion are not well known. Bleeding can range from being self-limited to massive life- threatening. Endoscopic hemostasis can be achieved with a combination of therapeutic modalities. The endoscopic management includes sclerosant injection, heater probe, laser therapy, electrocautery, cyanoacrylate glue, banding, and clipping. Endoscopic tattooing can be helpful to locate the lesion for further endoscopic re-treatment or intraoperative wedge resection. Therapeutic options for re-bleeding lesions comprise of repeated endoscopic hemostasis, angiographic embolization or surgical wedge resection of the lesions. We present a 63-year-old Caucasian male with active bleeding from the two small bowel Dieulafoy’s lesions, which was successfully controlled with epinephrine injection and clip applications. PMID:27574568

  19. Risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation associated with low-dose aspirin as plain and enteric-coated formulations

    PubMed Central

    de Abajo, Francisco J; García Rodríguez, Luis A

    2001-01-01

    Background The use of low-dose aspirin has been reported to be associated with an increased risk of upper gastrointestinal complications (UGIC). The coating of aspirin has been proposed as an approach to reduce such a risk. To test this hypothesis, we carried out a population based case-control study. Methods We identified incident cases of UGIC (bleeding or perforation) aged 40 to 79 years between April 1993 to October 1998 registered in the General Practice Research Database. Controls were selected randomly from the source population. Adjusted estimates of relative risk (RR) associated with current use of aspirin as compared to non use were computed using unconditional logistic regression. Results We identified 2,105 cases of UGIC and selected 11,500 controls. Among them, 287 (13.6%) cases and 837 (7.3%) controls were exposed to aspirin, resulting in an adjusted RR of 2.0 (1.7-2.3). No clear dose-effect was found within the range of 75-300 mg. The RR associated with enteric-coated formulations (2.3, 1.6-3.2) was similar to the one of plain aspirin (1.9, 1.6-2.3), and no difference was observed depending on the site. The first two months of treatment was the period of greater risk (RR= 4.5, 2.9-7.1). The concomitant use of aspirin with high-dose NSAIDs greatly increased the risk of UGIC (13.3, 8.5-20.9) while no interaction was apparent with low-medium doses (2.2, 1.0-4.6). Conclusions Low-dose aspirin increases by twofold the risk of UGIC in the general population and its coating does not modify the effect. Concomitant use of low-dose aspirin and NSAIDs at high doses put patients at a specially high risk of UGIC. PMID:11228592

  20. Pre-endoscopic erythromycin administration in upper gastrointestinal bleeding: an updated meta-analysis and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Rubayat; Nguyen, Douglas L.; Sohail, Umair; Almashhrawi, Ashraf A.; Ashraf, Imran; Puli, Srinivas R.; Bechtold, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    Background In patients suffering from upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), adequate visualization is essential during endoscopy. Prior to endoscopy, erythromycin administration has been shown to enhance visualization in these patients; however, guidelines have not fully adopted this practice. Thus, we performed a comprehensive, up-to-date meta-analysis on the issue of erythromycin administration in this patient population. Methods After searching multiple databases (November 2015), randomized controlled trials on adult subjects comparing administration of erythromycin before endoscopy in UGIB patients to no erythromycin or placebo were included. Pooled estimates of adequacy of gastric mucosa visualized, need for second endoscopy, duration of procedure, length of hospital stay, units of blood transfused, and need for emergent surgery using odds ratio (OR) or mean difference (MD) were calculated. Heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed. Results Eight studies (n=598) were found to meet the inclusion criteria. Erythromycin administration showed statistically significant improvement in adequate gastric mucosa visualization (OR 4.14; 95% CI: 2.01-8.53, P<0.01) while reduced the need for a second-look endoscopy (OR 0.51; 95% CI: 0.34-0.77, P<0.01) and length of hospital stay (MD -1.75; 95% CI: -2.43 to -1.06, P<0.01). Duration of procedure (P=0.2), units of blood transfused (P=0.08), and need for emergent surgery (P=0.88) showed no significant differences. Conclusion Pre-endoscopic erythromycin administration in UGIB patients significantly improves gastric mucosa visualization while reducing length of hospital stay and the need for second-look endoscopy. PMID:27366031

  1. Early clinical experience of the safety and efficacy of EndoClot in the management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Beg, Sabina; Al-Bakir, Ibrahim; Bhuva, Meha; Patel, Jay; Fullard, Mark; Leahy, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: EndoClot is a novel topical hemostatic powder approved for use in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. This study examines its impact as rescue therapy in the management of gastrointestinal bleeding for which standard endoscopic therapy failed to achieve hemostasis. Methods: This observational study covered a 24-month period. Data were collated from patients treated with EndoClot for comparison with a cohort of patients managed with standard endoscopic therapy. End points of this study included immediate hemostasis, 30-day rebleed rate, 30-day mortality rate, and adverse events. Results: Between April 1, 2012, and March 31, 2014, gastroscopic procedures were performed in 1009 patients, of whom 173 required endoscopic therapy. EndoClot was used in 21 patients, with immediate hemostasis achieved in all cases, a 30-day rebleed rate of 4.8 % (95 % confidence interval [95 %CI] – 4.34 % to 3.94 %), and a 30-day mortality rate of 19.0 % (95 %CI 2.29 % – 35.91 %). Despite higher risk bleeds in this cohort of patients, Fisher's exact test demonstrated no significant difference between their 30-day mortality rate (P = 0.51) and rebleed rate (P = 0.31) and those of the patients treated with standard endoscopic hemostatic techniques. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that EndoClot can be used both safely and effectively in the management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26716120

  2. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and admission to hospital for upper gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation: a record linkage case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, J. M.; McMahon, A. D.; McGilchrist, M. M.; White, G.; Murray, F. E.; McDevitt, D. G.; MacDonald, T. M.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the relation between topically applied non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and upper gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation. DESIGN--A case-control study with 1103 patients admitted to hospital for upper gastrointestinal bleeding or perforation between January 1990 and December 1992 (cases). Two different control groups were used, with six community controls and with two hospital controls for each case. Previous exposure to topical and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and ulcer healing drugs was assessed. STUDY POPULATION--The population of 319,465 people who were resident in Tayside and were registered with a Tayside general practitioner between January 1989 and October 1994. A record linkage database containing all data on hospital events and dispensed drugs between 1989 and 1992 was used for this population. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios of exposure in those admitted to hospital compared with controls. RESULTS--Significant unadjusted associations were detected between all three classes of drug and upper gastrointestinal complications. The significant association detected for topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was no longer evident in analyses which adjusted for the confounding effect of concomitant exposure to oral anti-inflammatories and ulcer healing drugs (odds ratio = 1.45; 95% confidence interval 0.84 to 2.50 with community controls; 1.06; 0.60 to 1.88 with hospital controls). CONCLUSION--In this study topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were not significantly associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation after adjustment for the confounding effects of concomitant use of oral anti-inflammatories and ulcer healing drugs. PMID:7613317

  3. Analysis of Dosimetric Parameters Associated With Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Treated With Gemcitabine-Based Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Akira; Shibuya, Keiko; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To identify the dosimetric parameters associated with gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The data from 40 patients were analyzed retrospectively. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of conventional fractionated three-dimensional radiotherapy and weekly gemcitabine. Treatment-related acute GI toxicity and upper GI bleeding (UGB) were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 4.0. The dosimetric parameters (mean dose, maximal absolute dose which covers 2 cm{sup 3} of the organ, and absolute volume receiving 10-50 Gy [V{sub 10-50}]) of the stomach, duodenum, small intestine, and a composite structure of the stomach and duodenum (StoDuo) were obtained. The planning target volume was also obtained. Univariate analyses were performed to identify the predictive factors for the risk of grade 2 or greater acute GI toxicity and grade 3 or greater UGB, respectively. Results: The median follow-up period was 15.7 months (range, 4-37). The actual incidence of acute GI toxicity was 33%. The estimated incidence of UGB at 1 year was 20%. Regarding acute GI toxicity, a V{sub 50} of {>=}16 cm{sup 3} of the stomach was the best predictor, and the actual incidence in patients with V{sub 50} <16 cm{sup 3} of the stomach vs. those with V{sub 50} of {>=}16 cm{sup 3} was 9% vs. 61%, respectively (p = 0.001). Regarding UGB, V{sub 50} of {>=}33 cm{sup 3} of the StoDuo was the best predictor, and the estimated incidence at 1 year in patients with V{sub 50} <33 cm{sup 3} of the StoDuo vs. those with V{sub 50} {>=}33 cm{sup 3} was 0% vs. 44%, respectively (p = 0.002). The dosimetric parameters correlated highly with one another. Conclusion: The irradiated absolute volume of the stomach and duodenum are important for the risk of acute GI toxicity and UGB. These results could be helpful in escalating the radiation doses using novel

  4. A Fibreoptic endoscopic study of upper gastrointestinal bleeding at Bugando Medical Centre in northwestern Tanzania: A retrospective review of 240 cases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is recognized as a common and potentially life-threatening abdominal emergency that needs a prompt assessment and aggressive emergency treatment. A retrospective study was undertaken at Bugando Medical Centre in northwestern Tanzania between March 2010 and September 2011 to describe our own experiences with fibreoptic upper GI endoscopy in the management of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in our setting and compare our results with those from other centers in the world. Findings A total of 240 patients representing 18.7% of all patients (i.e. 1292) who had fibreoptic upper GI endoscopy during the study period were studied. Males outnumbered female by a ratio of 2.1:1. Their median age was 37 years and most of patients (60.0%) were aged 40 years and below. The vast majority of the patients (80.4%) presented with haematemesis alone followed by malaena alone in 9.2% of cases. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, alcohol and smoking prior to the onset of bleeding was recorded in 7.9%, 51.7% and 38.3% of cases respectively. Previous history of peptic ulcer disease was reported in 22(9.2%) patients. Nine (3.8%) patients were HIV positive. The source of bleeding was accurately identified in 97.7% of patients. Diagnostic accuracy was greater within the first 24 h of the bleeding onset, and in the presence of haematemesis. Oesophageal varices were the most frequent cause of upper GI bleeding (51.3%) followed by peptic ulcers in 25.0% of cases. The majority of patients (60.8%) were treated conservatively. Endoscopic and surgical treatments were performed in 30.8% and 5.8% of cases respectively. 140 (58.3%) patients received blood transfusion. The median length of hospitalization was 8 days and it was significantly longer in patients who underwent surgical treatment and those with higher Rockall scores (P < 0.001). Rebleeding was reported in 3.3% of the patients. The overall mortality rate of

  5. Evaluation of Superselective Transcatheter Arterial Embolization with n-Butyl Cyanoacrylate in Treating Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Retrospective Study on Seven Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Li, Gang; Yu, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate the safety and efficacy of superselective transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) in treating lower gastrointestinal bleeding caused by angiodysplasia. Methods. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the clinical data of the patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding caused by angiodysplasia. The patients were treated with superselective TAE with NBCA between September 2013 and March 2015. Angiography was performed after the embolization. The clinical signs including melena, anemia, and blood transfusion treatment were evaluated. The complications including abdominal pain and intestinal ischemia necrosis were recorded. The patients were followed up to evaluate the efficacy in the long run. Results. Seven cases (2 males, 5 females; age of 69.55 ± 2.25) were evaluated in the study. The embolization was successfully performed in all cases. About 0.2–0.8 mL (mean 0.48 ± 0.19 mL) NCBA was used. Immediate angiography after the embolization operation showed that the abnormal symptoms disappeared. The patients were followed up for a range of 2–19 months and six patients did not reoccur. No serious complications, such as femoral artery puncture point anomaly, vascular injury, and intestinal necrosis perforation were observed. Conclusion. For the patients with refractory and repeated lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to angiodysplasia, superselective TAE with NBCA seem to be a safe and effective alternative therapy when endoscopy examination and treatment do not work. PMID:27528867

  6. Gastrointestinal (GI) Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

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  7. Alcohol and gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    MacMath, T L

    1990-11-01

    Ethanol has experimentally been shown to be "ulcerogenic," independent of gastric intraluminal pH. Ethanol remains ulcerogenic despite antisecretory doses of H2-receptor antagonists. Low-dose alcohol stimulates acid secretion in man, an effect possibly mediated by histamine or gastrin. High-dose alcohol reduces intraluminal acid by damaging mucosa, thereby enhancing back diffusion of hydrogen ion, and also by direct damage to oxyntic (parietal) cells. Ethanol is capable of increasing gastric mucosal permeability as evidenced by the increase in back diffusion (increases intraluminal pH) and by the characteristic fall in transmucosal potential difference which reflects surface cell layer exfoliation. This exfoliation may offer an explanation for the potentiating effect of alcohol on gastric mucosal injury when it is ingested simultaneously with other gastric irritants. Ethanol of greater than 20% concentration can rapidly destroy the gastric mucus-bicarbonate layer, which may be a defense layer for both the inhibition of back diffusion and bicarbonate neutralization of existing acid. Ethanol depletes sulfhydryl compounds in gastric mucosa. These sulfhydryls may be necessary for stabilization of cell membranes as well as for binding free radicals. Ethanol is damaging to the mucosal microcirculation. The rapidity of ethanol-induced damage makes it unlikely that the process is purely ischemic. The cytoprotective phenomenon, as this brief literature review suggests, is a multifactorial, dynamic process. The complex interplay of mucosal defense factors, endogenous and exogenous stimuli, induction of humoral responses, and ultimately the success or failure of cellular repair, is unlikely to be solely mediated by endogenous prostaglandins. Although prostaglandins are unquestionably significant to cytoprotection, the supporting and, perhaps, major roles of leukotrienes, sulfhydryls, histamines, and like substances cannot be ignored. Several innovative therapeutic agents directly derived from these research efforts have already entered the clinician's formulary. The significance of the concept of cytoprotection is only now being realized in clinical applications. Alcoholic hemorrhagic gastritis, although a significant clinical entity, remains a rather elusive diagnosis for the emergency physician. As a diagnosis of suspicion, therapeutic trials of antacids, sucralfate, or perhaps synthetic prostaglandin analogues are acceptable, pending endoscopic verification or short-term resolution of symptoms. All patients presenting with true hemorrhage or with persistent symptoms should undergo gastroenterologic referral and endoscopic evaluation. The Mallory-Weiss syndrome has long been associated with acute and chronic alcohol abuse.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2226291

  8. A case of upper gastrointestinal acute bleeding as a complication of renal carcinoma metastases to the papilla Vateri

    PubMed Central

    Piskorz, Łukasz; Wawrzycki, Marcin; Jabłoński, Sławomir; Brocki, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Acute bleeding from metastatic tumour of the papilla Vateri is an extremely rare case. In this report the case of a woman who suffered from complications after a metastatic tumour of the papilla is described. Seventeen years following resection of the kidney due to clear cell carcinoma the patient was admitted to the clinic because of massive bleeding (Forrest IB) to the upper digestive tract in the form of sanguineous vomiting. The conducted diagnostics revealed a bleeding tumour of the papilla Vateri. Endoscopic treatment could not effectively stop the bleeding. A surgical procedure was performed by Whipple's method. A histopathological examination showed a metastatic clear cell tumour of the kidney. The patient was discharged from hospital on the 8th day following her admission and was also referred for further oncological treatment. The discussion is based on other cases of rare bleeding from the digestive tract within tumours of the bile duct and papilla Vateri. PMID:24596540

  9. CYP2C9 variants as a risk modifier of NSAID-related gastrointestinal bleeding: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Estany-Gestal, Ana; Aguirre, Carmelo; Ruiz, Borja; Vidal, Xavier; Carvajal, Alfonso; Salado, Inés; Salgado-Barreira, Angel; Rodella, Luca; Moretti, Ugo; Ibáñez, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess whether the CYP2C9*2 and/or *3 variants might modify the risk for NSAID-related upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in NSAID users. Patients and methods We conducted a multicenter, case–control study in which cases were patients aged more than 18 years with a diagnosis of UGIB, and controls were matched (1 : 3) by sex, age, date of admission, and hospital. Exposure was defined as the mean number of defined daily doses (DDDs) of NSAIDs metabolized by CYP2C9 in the week preceding the index date. Three DDD categories were defined (0, ≤0.5, and >0.5). Exposure was constructed taking both NSAID use and CYP2C9 polymorphisms into account. Patients of non-European origin were excluded from the analysis. Results A total of 577 cases and 1343 controls were finally included in the analysis: 103 cases and 89 controls consumed NSAIDs metabolized by CYP2C9, and 88 cases and 177 controls were CYP2C9*3 carriers. The adjusted odds ratios (aORs) of UGIB associated with the CYP2C9*2 and wild-type alleles proved to be similar [OR=8.79 (4.50–17.17) and 10.15 (2.92–35.35), respectively] and lower than those of the CYP2C9*3 allele [aOR=18.07 (6.34–51.53)] for consumers taking more than 0.5 DDDs of NSAIDs metabolized by CYP2C9. Grouping genotypes into carriers and noncarriers of the CYP2C9*3 variant resulted in aORs of 16.92 (4.96–57.59) for carriers and 9.72 (4.55–20.76) for noncarriers, where DDDs were greater than 0.5. Conclusion The presence of the CYP2C9*3 variant increases the risk for UGIB associated with NSAID for DDDs greater than 0.5. The presence of the CYP2C9*2 allele shows no such effect. PMID:26544900

  10. The association between non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and gastrointestinal bleeding: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    He, Ying; Wong, Ian C K; Li, Xue; Anand, Shweta; Leung, Wai K; Siu, Chung Wah; Chan, Esther W

    2016-07-01

    Particular concerns have been raised regarding the association between non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB); however, current findings are still inconclusive. We conducted a systematic review with a meta-analysis to examine the association between NOACs and GIB in real-life settings. We performed a systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE and CINAHL Plus up to September 2015. Observational studies that evaluated exposure to NOACs reporting GIB outcomes were included. The inverse variance method using the random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled estimates. Eight cohort studies were included in the primary meta-analysis, enrolling 1442 GIB cases among 106 626 dabigatran users (49 486 patient-years), and 184 GIB cases among 10 713 rivaroxaban users (4046 patient-years). The pooled incidence rates of GIB were 4.50 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.17, 5.84] and 7.18 (95% CI 2.42, 12.0) per 100 patient-years among dabigatran and rivaroxaban users, respectively. The summary risk ratio (RR) was 1.21 (95% CI 1.05, 1.39) for dabigatran compared with warfarin, and 1.09 (95% CI 0.92, 1.30) for rivaroxaban. Subgroup analyses showed a dose-related effect of dabigatran, with a significantly higher risk of GIB for 150 mg b.i.d. (RR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.34, 1.70) but not for 75 mg b.i.d. or 110 mg b.i.d.. In addition, the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs)/histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs) influenced the association in dabigatran users, whereas this effect was modest among rivaroxaban users. In conclusion, our meta-analysis suggested a slightly higher risk of GIB with dabigatran use compared with warfarin, whereas no significant difference was found between rivaroxaban and warfarin for GIB risk. PMID:26889922

  11. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding associated with diclofenac topical patch in a patient with colonic mass and on antiplatelet therapy for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jacob; Burke, David T

    2014-11-01

    Topical formulations of diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug commonly prescribed to treat musculoskeletal complaints such as osteoarthritis, low back pain, and myofascial pain, are available in the form of a solution, gel, and patch. The topical application of diclofenac results in substantially lower systemic exposure to diclofenac compared with oral diclofenac, resulting in a more favorable side effect profile. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case report of a lower gastrointestinal bleed associated with diclofenac topical patch use in a 77 yr-old-woman with a history of colonic mass and atrial fibrillation on antiplatelet therapy. PMID:25122100

  12. Severe Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Patient with Crohn's Disease: a Case Report and the Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Paragomi, Pedram; Moradi, Kamran; Khosravi, Pejman; Ansari, Reza

    2015-11-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is rarely presented with lower GI bleeding (LGIB) which eludes the clinician. A 25-year-old lady with severe rectorrhagia was presented with no history of constipation, diarrhea or abdominal pain. Colonoscopy revealed ulcers in the rectum, sigmoid colon, and terminal ileum. Crohn's pathologic features were detected in the terminal ileum. The bleeding was controlled via supportive care and IV corticosteroid. Recurrent LGIB was managed by prednisolone and azathioprine. The patient had an uneventful recovery. The clinicians should consider CD as a possible diagnosis in severe LGIB. Prednisolone and azathioprine efficiently control acute bleeding episodes and prevent the recurrence. PMID:26786996

  13. Incidence and Risk Factor Analysis for Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Pump Thrombosis in Left Ventricular Assist Device Recipients.

    PubMed

    Lopilato, Alex C; Doligalski, Christina Teeter; Caldeira, Christiano

    2015-11-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are associated with hemostatic complications. We describe the incidence and risk factors for gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) and pump thrombosis (PT) to optimize patient selection/management. An IRB-approved retrospective review of first LVAD implants between October 1, 2011 and September 30, 2013 at a single center was conducted. Endpoints included epidemiological and risk factor analyses for GIB and PT. Descriptive statistics, chi-squared, and t-tests were used. Sixty-four patients received continuous-flow LVADs. The 12-month incidence of GIB and PT was 23.4% and 12.5%. Time to first GIB was 72.6 days (9-160). The 1-, 3-, and 6-month rate of PT was 1.6%, 6.25%, and 12.5%, respectively. All PT required pump exchange. Females (50% vs. 16%, P = 0.026) and patients without antiplatelet therapy (12.5% vs. 50%, P = 0.046) were at increased risk of PT. No pre-implant comorbidities were associated with PT. Infection was not identified as a risk factor in our cohort (25% vs. 51.8%, P = 0.156). Mean INR preceding event was not different from nonevent patients (2.1 vs. 2.24, P = 0.24). Regarding biomarkers preceding event, elevated plasma free hemoglobin (pfHg) did not reach significance (75% vs. 58%, P = 0.383) while lactate dehydrogenase was elevated significantly (744 vs. 298, P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis demonstrated that an LDH of >500 was highly sensitive and specific for PT. No pre-implant factors were associated with GIB. Post-implant risk factors for GIB included infection (80% vs. 38.8%, P = 0.005) and infrequent elevations in pfHg (13.3% vs. 63.3%, P < 0.001). Increased pump speed as a GIB risk factor was confirmed (HeartMate II 9560 rpm vs. 9490 rpm, P < 0.001; HeartWare 2949 rpm vs. 2710 rpm, P < 0.001). Anticoagulation/antiplatelet therapy did not affect GIB: mean INR preceding event was not different from nonevent patients (2.21 vs. 2.27, P

  14. Hookworm infestation is not an uncommon cause of obscure occult and overt gastrointestinal bleeding in an endemic area: A study using capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Uday C; Venkitaramanan, Arvind; Verma, Abhai; Misra, Asha; Saraswat, Vivek A

    2015-11-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB), particularly occult, has been reported to be caused by hookworm infestation rarely from tropical countries, particularly India. Hence, we undertook a retrospective study evaluating frequency, clinical spectrum, and outcome of patients with OGIB associated with worm infestation. Data of consecutive patients with OGIB undergoing capsule endoscopy in a multilevel university hospital in northern India were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-one out of 163 (13 %) patients with OGIB had hookworm infestation detected on capsule endoscopy. Of 21 patients (median age 65 years [range 19-82], 17 [81 %] male), 16 had overt and 5 had occult OGIB. Another lesion that could explain OGIB was present in 8/21 patients, 3/5 with OGIB occult, and 5/16 overt (p = ns). All the patients received treatment with albendazole and appropriate measures for the associated lesion, if any. Patients with hookworm infestation with another lesion experienced recurrent bleeding more often than those with worm infestation only. Hookworm infestation is an important cause of occult as well as overt OGIB and may be present even in association with another lesion. Those with additional lesion had recurrent bleeding more often than those with worm infestation alone. PMID:26631236

  15. Safety and efficacy of nasogastric intubation for gastrointestinal bleeding after myocardial infarction: an analysis of 125 patients at two tertiary cardiac referral hospitals.

    PubMed

    Cappell, Mitchell S

    2005-11-01

    Our purpose was to analyze risks versus benefits of nasogastric (NG) intubation for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding performed soon after myocardial infarction (MI). While NG intubation and aspiration is relatively safe, clinically beneficial, and routinely performed in the general population for recent GI bleeding, its safety after MI is unstudied and unknown. In addition to the usual complications of NG tubes, patients status post-MI may be particularly susceptible to myocardial ischemia or cardiac arrhythmias from anxiety or discomfort during intubation. We studied NG intubation within 30 days of MI in 125 patients at two hospitals from 1986 through 2001. Indications for NG intubation included melena in 55 patients; fecal occult blood with an acute hematocrit decline, severe anemia, or sudden hypotension in 37; hematemesis in 18; bright red blood per rectum in 8; and dark red blood per rectum in 7. The intubation was performed on average 5.3 +/- 7.2 (SD) days after MI. NG aspiration revealed bright red blood in 38 patients, "coffee grounds"-appearing blood in 45, and clear (or bilious) fluid in 42. Among 114 of the patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), EGD revealed the cause of bleeding in 79 (95%) of 83 patients with a grossly bloody NG aspirate versus 12 (39%) of 31 patients with a clear aspirate (P < 0.0001, OR = 31.3, OR CI = 9.4-103.1). Among 85 patients undergoing EGD within 16 hr of NG intubation, stigmata of recent hemorrhage were present in 28 (42%) of 66 with a bloody NG aspirate versus 3 (16%) of 19 with a clear aspirate (P = 0.06, OR = 3.93). Among 35 patients undergoing lower GI endoscopy, lower endoscopy revealed the cause of bleeding in 14 (56%) of 25 patients with a clear NG aspirate versus 1 (10%) of 10 patients with a grossly bloody aspirate (P < 0.04, OR = 11.46, OR CI = 1.55-78.3). The two NG tube complications (epistaxis during intubation and gastric erosions from NG suctioning) were neither cardiac nor major (requiring blood

  16. Outcomes of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in relation to timing of endoscopy and the experience of endoscopist: a tertiary center experience

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Noor; Rehman, Amer; Swinscoe, Mark Thomas; Mundre, Pradeep; Rembacken, Bjorn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patients with gastrointestinal bleeding admitted out of hours or at the weekends may have an excess mortality rate. The literature reports around this are conflicting. Aims and methods: We aimed to analyze the outcomes of emergency endoscopies performed out of hours and over the weekends in our center. We retrospectively analyzed data from April 2008 to June 2012. Results: A total of 507 ‘high risk’ emergency gastroscopies were carried out over the study period for various indications. Patients who died within 30 days of the index procedure [22 % (114 /510)] had a significantly higher Rockall score (7.6 vs. 6.0, P < 0.0001), a higher American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) status (3.5 vs. 2.7, P < 0.001), and a lower systolic blood pressure (BP) at the time of the examination (94.8 vs 103, P = 0.025). These patients were significantly older (77.7 vs. 67.5 years, P = 0.006), and required more blood transfusion (5.9 versus 3.8 units). Emergency out-of-hours endoscopy was not associated with an increased risk of death [relative risk (RR) 1.09, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.12 – 1.95]. Whether the examination was carried out by a senior specialist registrar (senior trainee) or a consultant made no difference to the survival of the patient (RR 0.98, CI 0.77 – 1.32). Conclusion: Higher pre-endoscopy Rockall score and ASA status contributed significantly to the 30-day mortality following upper gastrointestinal bleeding, whereas lower BP tended towards significance. Outcomes did not vary with the time of the endoscopy nor was there any difference between a consultant and a senior specialist registrar led service. PMID:27004244

  17. Bleeding time

    MedlinePlus

    Bleeding time is a medical test that measures how fast small blood vessels in the skin stop bleeding. ... until the bleeding stops. The provider records the time it takes for the cuts to stop bleeding.

  18. The Performance of a Modified Glasgow Blatchford Score in Predicting Clinical Interventions in Patients with Acute Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Vietnamese Prospective Multicenter Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Quach, Duc Trong; Dao, Ngoi Huu; Dinh, Minh Cao; Nguyen, Chung Huu; Ho, Linh Xuan; Nguyen, Nha-Doan Thi; Le, Quang Dinh; Vo, Cong Minh Hong; Le, Sang Kim; Hiyama, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To compare the performance of a modified Glasgow Blatchford score (mGBS) to the Glasgow Blatchford score (GBS) and the pre-endoscopic Rockall score (RS) in predicting clinical interventions in Vietnamese patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AN-VUGIB). Methods A prospective multicenter cohort study was conducted in five tertiary hospitals from May 2013 to February 2014. The mGBS, GBS, and pre-endoscopic RS scores were prospectively calculated for all patients. The accuracy of mGBS was compared with that of GBS and pre-endoscopic RS using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Clinical interventions were defined as blood transfusions, endoscopic or radiological intervention, or surgery. Results There were 395 patients including 128 (32.4%) needing endoscopic treatment, 117 (29.6%) requiring blood transfusion and two (0.5%) needing surgery. In predicting the need for clinical intervention, the mGBS (AUC, 0.707) performed as well as the GBS (AUC, 0.708; p=0.87) and outperformed the pre-endoscopic RS (AUC, 0.594; p<0.001). However, none of these scores effectively excluded the need for endoscopic intervention at a threshold of 0. Conclusions mGBS performed as well as GBS and better than pre-endoscopic RS for predicting clinical interventions in Vietnamese patients with ANVUGIB. PMID:26601829

  19. Child-Pugh versus MELD score for predicting the in-hospital mortality of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying; Qi, Xingshun; Dai, Junna; Li, Hongyu; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to compare the performance of Child-Pugh and Model for End-Stage Liver Diseases (MELD) scores for predicting the in-hospital mortality of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in patients with liver cirrhosis. A total of 145 patients with a diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and acute UGIB between July 2013 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed (male/female: 94/51; mean age: 56.77±11.33 years; Child-Pugh class A/B/C: 46/64/35; mean Child-Pugh score: 7.88±2.17; mean MELD score: 7.86±7.22). The in-hospital mortality was 8% (11/145). Areas under receiving-operator characteristics curve (AUROC) for predicting the in-hospital mortality were compared between MELD and Child-Pugh scores. AUROCs for predicting the in-hospital mortality for Child-Pugh and MELD scores were 0.796 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.721-0.858) and 0.810 (95% CI: 0.736-0.870), respectively. The discriminative ability was not significant different between the two scoring systems (P=0.7241). In conclusion, Child-Pugh and MELD scores were similar for predicting the in-hospital mortality of acute UGIB in cirrhotic patients. PMID:25785053

  20. Red Blood Cell Transfusions and Iron Therapy for Patients Presenting with Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Survey of Canadian Gastroenterologists and Hepatologists

    PubMed Central

    Fortinsky, Kyle J.; Razik, Roshan; Spiegle, Gillian; Gallinger, Zane R.; Grover, Samir C.; Pavenski, Katerina; Weizman, Adam V.; Kwapisz, Lukasz; Mehta, Sangeeta; Gray, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. There is limited data evaluating physician transfusion practices in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). Methods. A web-based survey was sent to 500 gastroenterologists and hepatologists across Canada. The survey included clinical vignettes where physicians were asked to choose transfusion thresholds. Results. The response rate was 41% (N = 203). The reported hemoglobin (Hgb) transfusion trigger differed by up to 50 g/L. Transfusions were more liberal in hemodynamically unstable patients compared to stable patients (mean Hgb of 86.7 g/L versus 71.0 g/L; p < 0.001). Many clinicians (24%) reported transfusing a hemodynamically unstable patient at a Hgb threshold of 100 g/L and the majority (57%) are transfusing two units of RBCs as initial management. Patients with coronary artery disease (mean Hgb of 84.0 g/L versus 71.0 g/L; p < 0.01) or cirrhosis (mean Hgb of 74.4 g/L versus 71.0 g/L; p < 0.01) were transfused more liberally than healthy patients. Fewer than 15% would prescribe iron to patients with UGIB who are anemic upon discharge. Conclusions. The transfusion practices of gastroenterologists in the management of UGIB vary widely and more high-quality evidence is needed to help assess the efficacy and safety of selected transfusion thresholds in varying patients presenting with UGIB. PMID:27446847

  1. Test-positive rate at CT colonography is increased by rectal bleeding and/or unexplained weight loss, unlike other common gastrointestinal symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hock, D.; Materne, R.; Ouhadi, R.; Mancini, I.; Aouachria, S.A.; Nchimi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the rate of significant colonic and extra-colonic abnormalities at computed tomography colonography (CTC), according to symptoms and age. Materials and methods We retrospectively evaluated 7361 consecutive average-risk subjects (3073 males, average age: 60.3 ± 13.9; range 18–96 years) for colorectal cancer (CRC) who underwent CTC. They were divided into three groups according to clinical symptoms: 1343 asymptomatic individuals (group A), 899 patients with at least one “alarm” symptom for CRC, including rectal bleeding and unexplained weight loss (group C), and 5119 subjects with other gastrointestinal symptoms (group B). Diagnostic and test-positive rates of CTC were established using optical colonoscopy (OC) and/or surgery as reference standard. In addition, clinically significant extra-colonic findings were noted. Results 903 out of 7361 (12%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.11–0.13) subjects had at least one clinically significant colonic finding at CTC. CTC true positive fraction and false positive fraction were respectively 637/642 (99.2%, 95%CI 0.98–0.99) and 55/692 (7.95%, 95%CI 0.05–0.09). The pooled test-positive rate in group C (138/689, 20.0%, 95%CI 0.17–0.23) was significantly higher than in both groups A (79/1343, 5.9%, 95%CI 0.04–0.07) and B (420/5329, 7.5%, 95%CI 0.07–0.08) (p < 0.001). Aging and male gender were associated to a higher test positive rate. The rate of clinically significant extra-colonic findings was significantly higher in group C (44/689, 6.4%, 95%CI 0.04–0.08) versus groups A (26/1343, 1.9%, 95%CI 0.01–0.02) and B (64/5329, 1.2%, 95%CI 0.01–0.02) (p < 0.001). Conclusion Both test-positive and significant extra-colonic finding rates at CTC are significantly increased in the presence of “alarm” gastrointestinal symptoms especially in older patients. PMID:26937433

  2. Obscure digestive bleeding.

    PubMed

    Van Gossum, A

    2001-02-01

    Obscure digestive bleeding is defined as recurrent bleeding for which no definite source has been identified by routine endoscopic or barium studies. Mucosal vascular abnormality or 'angioectasia' is the most common course of obscure bleeding, especially in elderly patients. Small bowel tumours are more frequent in patients younger than 50 years. However, missed or underestimated upper and lower gastrointestinal lesions at the initial endoscopic investigation may be the source of a so-called obscure intestinal bleeding. The various radiological procedures, including enteroclysis, visceral angiography and CT scan as well as radioisotope bleeding scans have limitations in the case of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Recent developments in magnetic resonance imaging are promising. The different methods of enteroscopy have a similar diagnostic yield, reaching approximately 40-65%. Endoscopic cauterization of small bowel angioectasias seems to be efficacious but randomized trials are needed. Efficacy of hormonal therapy is very controversial. The extent of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies must be based on a number of factors including the patient's parameters, bleeding characteristics and also the result of previous work-up. PMID:11355906

  3. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding as a risk factor for dialysis and all-cause mortality: a cohort study of chronic kidney disease patients in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chih-Chia; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Wang, I-Kuan; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Objective Impaired renal function is associated with higher risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in patients with chronic kidney disease and not on dialysis (CKD-ND). It is unclear if UGIB increases risk of chronic dialysis. The aim of the study was to investigate risk of chronic dialysis in CKD-ND patients with UGIB. Setting All CKD-ND stage 3–5 patients of a CKD programme in one hospital between 2003 and 2009 were enrolled and prospectively followed until September 2012. Primary and secondary outcome measures Chronic dialysis (dialysis for more than 3 months) started and all-cause mortality. The risk of chronic dialysis was analysed using Cox proportional hazard regression with adjustments for age, gender and renal function, followed by competing-risks analysis. Results We analysed 3126 CKD-ND patients with a mean age of 65±14 years for 2.8 years. Of 3126 patients, 387 (12.4%) patients developed UGIB, 989 (31.6%) patients started chronic dialysis and 197 (6.3%) patients died. UGIB increased all-cause mortality (adjusted HR (aHR): 1.51, 95% CI 1.07 to 2.13) and the risk of chronic dialysis (aHR; 1.29, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.50). The subdistribution HR (SHR) of UGIB for chronic dialysis (competing event: all-cause mortality) was 1.37 (95% CI 1.15 to 1.64) in competing-risks analysis with adjustments for age, renal function, gender, diabetes, haemoglobin, albumin and urine protein/creatinine ratio. Conclusions UGIB is associated with increased risk of chronic dialysis and all-cause mortality in patients with CKD-ND stages 3–5. This association is independent of age, gender, basal renal function, haemoglobin, albumin and urine protein levels. PMID:27150184

  4. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage: evaluation with MDCT.

    PubMed

    Soto, Jorge A; Park, Seong Ho; Fletcher, Joel G; Fidler, Jeff L

    2015-06-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common medical problem, with high associated morbidity and mortality. The clinical presentation of gastrointestinal hemorrhage varies with the location of the bleeding source, the intensity of the bleed, and the presence of comorbidities that affect the ability to tolerate blood loss. Conventional endoscopic examinations are usually the initial diagnostic tests in patients presenting with overt gastrointestinal hemorrhage. However, implementation of upper tract endoscopy and colonoscopy in the emergency setting can be challenging due to inconsistent availability of the service and difficulties in achieving adequate colonic cleansing in emergent situations. Thus, imaging tests are often relied upon to establish the location and the cause of bleeding, either for initial diagnosis or after non-revealing upper and lower tract endoscopies ("obscure" bleeding). This article discusses the imaging evaluation of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding and reviews the imaging appearance of the most common causes, taking into account the two most relevant clinical presentations: overt bleeding and obscure bleeding. PMID:25637128

  5. Risk factors associated with NSAID-induced upper gastrointestinal bleeding resulting in hospital admissions: A cross-sectional, retrospective, case series analysis in valencia, spain

    PubMed Central

    Marco, José Luis; Amariles, Pedro; Boscá, Beatriz; Castelló, Ana

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background NSAIDs are a significant cause of drug-related hospital admissions and deaths. The therapeutic effects of NSAIDs have been associated with the risk for developing adverse events, mainly in the gastrointestinal tract. Objectives The focus of this study was to identify the most common risk factors associated with NSAID-induced upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) resulting in hospital admissions. A secondary end point was the relationship between use of gastroprotective treatment and relevant risk factors to NSAID-induced UGIB in the selected population. Methods This study was a cross-sectional, retrospective, case-series analysis of NSAID-induced UGIB resulting in hospital admission to the Requena General Hospital, Valencia, Spain, occurring from 1997 to 2005. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes were used to identify UGIB admissions associated with NSAIDs. To estimate the probability of association between UGIB and the use of NSAIDs, the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability was used. Patients were categorized as high-risk to develop UGIB if they met ≥1 of the following risk criteria (relevant risk factors): aged ≥65 years (age risk factor); peptic ulcer disease or NSAID gastropathy occurring in the year before their hospital admission (history risk factor); and concomitant use of other NSAIDs, systemic corticoids, oral anticoagulants, or platelet aggregation inhibitors (concomitant medication risk factor). Patients were categorized as candidates to use gastroprotections if they met ≥1 of the relevant risk factors. Patients were categorized as users of gastroprotective treatment if they used proton pump inhibitors, histamine H2-receptor antagonists, or misoprostol at hospital admission. Results This study comprised 209 cases of NSAID-induced UGIB (129 men, 80 women: mean [SD] age, 71.5 [13.8] years; 128 [61.2%] receiving acetyl salicylic acid [ASA], with 72 [34.4%] receiving low

  6. Bleeding gums

    MedlinePlus

    ... form of gum and jawbone disease known as periodontitis . Other causes of bleeding gums include: Any bleeding ... been diagnosed with a vitamin deficiency, take vitamin supplements. Avoid aspirin unless your health care provider has ...

  7. [Massive hookworm infection as a cause of intestinal bleeding and severe anemia].

    PubMed

    Nair, Gayatri V; Cazorla, Ernesto; Choque, Henry; White, A Clinton; Cabada, Miguel M

    2016-01-01

    Overt gastrointestinal bleeding caused by hookworm infection is rarely reported. We present a 34 year old male with lower gastrointestinal bleeding with evidence of massive hookworm infection on colonoscopy and discuss the need to consider hookworm infection as a possible etiology of gastrointestinal bleed in endemic areas. PMID:27131948

  8. Use of the Complete Rockall Score and the Forrest Classification to Assess Outcome in Patients with Non-variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Subject to After-hours Endoscopy: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Giese, A; Grunwald, C; Zieren, J; Büchner, NJ; Henning, BF

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the usefulness of the Forrest classification and the complete Rockall score with customary cut-off values for assessing the risk of adverse events in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGI-B) subject to after-hours emergency oesophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (E-EGD) within six hours after admission. Methods: The medical records of patients with non-variceal UGI-B proven by after-hours endoscopy were analysed. For 'high risk' situations (Forrest stage Ia–IIb/complete Rockall score > 2), univariate analysis was conducted to evaluate odds ratio for reaching the study endpoints (30-day and one-year mortality, re-bleeding, hospital stay ≥ 3 days). Results: During the study period (75 months), 86 cases (85 patients) met the inclusion criteria. Patients 'age was 66.36 ± 14.38 years; 60.5% were male. Mean duration of hospital stay was 15.21 ± 19.24 days. Mortality rate was 16.7% (30 days) and 32.9% (one year); 14% of patients re-bled. Univariate analysis of post-endoscopic Rockall score ≥ 2 showed an odds ratio of 6.09 for death within 30 days (p = 0.04). No other significant correlations were found. Conclusion: In patients with UGI-B subject to after-hours endoscopy, a 'high-risk' Rockall score permits an estimation of the risk of death within 30 days but not of re-bleeding. A 'high-risk ' Forrest score is not significantly associated with the study endpoints. PMID:25303191

  9. Management of gastrointestinal haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, S; Watts, D; Kinnear, M

    2002-01-01

    A variety of endoscopic haemostatic techniques have enabled major advances in the management of not only bleeding peptic ulcers and bleeding varices, but also in a variety of bleeding lesions in the small intestine and in the colon. Indeed, the development and widespread implementation of endoscopic haemostasis has been one of the most important developments in clinical gastroenterology in the past two decades. An increasingly ageing cohort of patients with multiple co-morbidity are being treated and therefore improving the outcome of gastrointestinal bleeding continues to pose major challenges. PMID:11796865

  10. Bleeding duodenal lipoma treated with endoscopic polypectomy.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Harish K; Suresh, Chigamthara C; Alexander, Kadakketh G; Neena, Mampallay

    2008-01-01

    Duodenal lipomas are relatively uncommon and are rarely a source of severe upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. We report the case of a 70-year-old woman who presented with significant upper GI bleed due to a large bleeding duodenal lipoma that was successfully treated by endoscopic polypectomy. PMID:19115610

  11. Bleeding Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause bleeding, such as endometriosis (EN-doh-MEE-tree-OH-suhss) Large bruises from a minor bump ... 8573 National Hemophilia Foundation Phone: 800-424-2634 World Federation of Hemophilia Phone: 514-875-7944 Return ...

  12. Bleeding time

    MedlinePlus

    A blood pressure cuff is inflated around your upper arm. While the cuff is on your arm, the health care provider makes two ... a tiny amount of bleeding. The blood pressure cuff is immediately deflated. Blotting paper is touched to ...

  13. Bleeding gums

    MedlinePlus

    ... line. This will lead to a condition called gingivitis , or inflamed gums. Plaque that is not removed ... Livingstone; 2009:chap 60. Read More Bleeding disorders Gingivitis Periodontitis Update Date 2/25/2014 Updated by: ...

  14. Endovascular Management of Acute Enteric Bleeding from Pancreas Transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Semiz-Oysu, Aslihan; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2007-04-15

    Arterioenteric fistula is a rare but serious complication of enteric drained pancreas transplant, which may lead to massive gastrointestinal bleeding. We present 3 patients with failed enteric drained pancreas transplants and massive gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to arterioenteric fistula. One patient was treated by embolization and the 2 others by stent graft placement. Bleeding was successfully controlled in all cases, at follow up of 5 days, 8 months, and 12 months, respectively. One patient died 24 days after embolization, of unknown causes.

  15. Bleeding varices: 1. Emergency management.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, S S; Warren, W D; Galambos, J T; Millikan, W J

    1981-01-01

    The aim of the emergency management of bleeding varices is to stop the hemorrhage nonoperatively if possible, avoiding emergency shunt surgery, an operation that has a higher mortality than elective shunt surgery. Patients with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage should undergo endoscopy immediately to verify the diagnosis of bleeding varices. They can then be categorized according to whether they stop bleeding spontaneously (group 1), continue to bleed slowly (group 2) or continue to bleed rapidly (group 3). Group 1 patients are discussed in the second part of this two-part series. Group 2 patients are initially treated with vasopressin given intravenously; those who fail to respond should undergo emergency angiography and receive vasopressin intra-arterially. If this fails, patients at low surgical risk should undergo urgent shunt surgery; those at high risk do better with endoscopic sclerotherapy. Group 3 patients are also given an intravenous infusion of vasopressin. Patients at low surgical risk who continue to bleed then receive tamponade with a Sengstaken--Blakemore tube. If this fails, they undergo emergency creation of an H-shaped mesocaval shunt. Patients at high surgical risk who fail to respond to vasopressin given intravenously are next treated intra-arterially. If this fails they are given either endoscopic or transhepatic sclerotherapy. PMID:7006779

  16. Bleeding during cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... by helping your blood clot. Chemotherapy , radiation , and bone marrow transplants can destroy some of your platelets. If you ... Names Cancer treatment - bleeding; Chemotherapy - bleeding; Radiation - bleeding; Bone marrow transplant - bleeding; Thrombocytopenia - cancer treatment References Doroshow JH. Approach ...

  17. Occult gastric bleeding demonstrated by bone scan and Tc-99m-DTPA renal scan

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.W.; Leiter, B.E.; Weitzman, F.; Shapiro, J.H.

    1981-10-01

    A patient is described who had coagulopathy and clinically intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding. The bleeding site was clearly shown on renal and bone imaging performed at a time when the patient was considered clinically to have stopped bleeding. A bleeding gastric ulcer was subsequently demonstrated by radionuclide and contrast angiography, and at surgery.

  18. Comparison of AIMS65, Glasgow–Blatchford score, and Rockall score in a European series of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding: performance when predicting in-hospital and delayed mortality

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Cara, Juan G; Jiménez-Rosales, Rita; Úbeda-Muñoz, Margarita; de Hierro, Mercedes López; de Teresa, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Objective AIMS65 is a score designed to predict in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and costs of gastrointestinal bleeding. Our aims were to revalidate AIMS65 as predictor of inpatient mortality and to compare AIMS65’s performance with that of Glasgow–Blatchford (GBS) and Rockall scores (RS) with regard to mortality, and the secondary outcomes of a composite endpoint of severity, transfusion requirements, rebleeding, delayed (6-month) mortality, and length of stay. Methods The study included 309 patients. Clinical and biochemical data, transfusion requirements, endoscopic, surgical, or radiological treatments, and outcomes for 6 months after admission were collected. Clinical outcomes were in-hospital mortality, delayed mortality, rebleeding, composite endpoint, blood transfusions, and length of stay. Results In receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses, AIMS65, GBS, and RS were similar when predicting inpatient mortality (0.76 vs. 0.78 vs. 0.78). Regarding endoscopic intervention, AIMS65 and GBS were identical (0.62 vs. 0.62). AIMS65 was useless when predicting rebleeding compared to GBS or RS (0.56 vs. 0.70 vs. 0.71). GBS was better at predicting the need for transfusions. No patient with AIMS65 = 0, GBS ≤ 6, or RS ≤ 4 died. Considering the composite endpoint, an AIMS65 of 0 did not exclude high risk patients, but a GBS ≤ 1 or RS ≤ 2 did. The three scores were similar in predicting prolonged in-hospital stay. Delayed mortality was better predicted by AIMS65. Conclusion AIMS65 is comparable to GBS and RS in essential endpoints such as inpatient mortality, the need for endoscopic intervention and length of stay. GBS is a better score predicting rebleeding and the need for transfusion, but AIMS65 shows a better performance predicting delayed mortality.

  19. Small bowel bleeding: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Gunjan, Deepak; Sharma, Vishal; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine is an uncommon site of gastro-intestinal (GI) bleeding; however it is the commonest cause of obscure GI bleeding. It may require multiple blood transfusions, diagnostic procedures and repeated hospitalizations. Angiodysplasia is the commonest cause of obscure GI bleeding, particularly in the elderly. Inflammatory lesions and tumours are the usual causes of small intestinal bleeding in younger patients. Capsule endoscopy and deep enteroscopy have improved our ability to investigate small bowel bleeds. Deep enteroscopy has also an added advantage of therapeutic potential. Computed tomography is helpful in identifying extra-intestinal lesions. In cases of difficult diagnosis, surgery and intra-operative enteroscopy can help with diagnosis and management. The treatment is dependent upon the aetiology of the bleed. An overt bleed requires aggressive resuscitation and immediate localisation of the lesion for institution of appropriate therapy. Small bowel bleeding can be managed by conservative, radiological, pharmacological, endoscopic and surgical methods, depending upon indications, expertise and availability. Some patients, especially those with multiple vascular lesions, can re-bleed even after appropriate treatment and pose difficult challenge to the treating physician. PMID:24874805

  20. Bleeding esophageal varices

    MedlinePlus

    ... air. This produces pressure against the bleeding veins (balloon tamponade). Once the bleeding is stopped, varices can be treated with medicines and medical procedures to prevent future bleeding including: Drugs called ...

  1. Bleeding esophageal varices

    MedlinePlus

    ... air. This produces pressure against the bleeding veins (balloon tamponade). Once the bleeding is stopped, other varices can be treated with medicines and medical procedures to prevent future bleeding, including: Drugs called ...

  2. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  3. Bleeders, bleeding rates, and bleeding score.

    PubMed

    Tosetto, A; Castaman, G; Rodeghiero, F

    2013-06-01

    Bleeding symptoms are frequently reported even in otherwise healthy subjects, and differentiating a normal subject from a patient with a mild bleeding disorder (MBD) can be extremely challenging. The concept of bleeding rate, that is, the number of bleeding episodes occurring within a definite time, could be used as the unifying framework reconciling the bleeding risk observed in congenital and acquired coagulopathies into a single picture. For instance, primary prevention trials have shown that the incidence of non-major bleeding symptoms in normal subjects is around five per 100 person-years, and this figure is in accordance with the number of hemorrhagic symptoms reported by normal controls in observational studies on hemorrhagic disorders. The incidence of non-major bleeding in patients with MBDs (e.g. in patients with type 1 VWD carrying the C1130F mutation) is also strikingly similar with that of patients taking antiplatelet drugs, and the incidence in moderately severe bleeding disorders (e.g. type 2 VWD) parallels that of patients taking vitamin K antagonists. The severity of a bleeding disorder may therefore be explained by a bleeding rate model, which also explains several common clinical observations. Appreciation of the bleeding rate of congenital and acquired conditions and of its environmental/genetic modifiers into a single framework will possibly allow the development of better prediction tools in the coming years and represents a major scientific effort to be pursued. PMID:23809118

  4. Chronic gastrointestinal haemorrhage controlled by antifibrinolytic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Antifibrinolytic agents are used chiefly for control of acute haemorrhage. Their applicability to chronic bleeding from inflammatory lesions of the gastrointestinal tract is illustrated by two case histories. PMID:2813242

  5. Lower GI Bleeding: Epidemiology and Management

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Dennis M.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from the colon is a common reason for hospitalization and is becoming more common in the elderly. While most cases will cease spontaneously, patients with ongoing bleeding or major stigmata of hemorrhage require urgent diagnosis and intervention to achieve definitive hemostasis. Colonoscopy is the primary modality for establishing a diagnosis, risk stratification, and treating some of the most common causes of colonic bleeding, including diverticular hemorrhage which is the etiology in 30 % of cases. Other interventions, including angiography and surgery, are usually reserved for instances of bleeding that cannot be stabilized or allow for adequate bowel preparation for colonoscopy. We discuss the colonoscopic diagnosis, risk stratification, and definitive treatment of colonic hemorrhage in patients presenting with severe hematochezia. PMID:23737154

  6. Obscure bleeding colonic duplication responds to proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Jérémie; Projetti, Fabrice; Legros, Romain; Valgueblasse, Virginie; Sarabi, Matthieu; Carrier, Paul; Fredon, Fabien; Bouvier, Stéphane; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique; Sautereau, Denis

    2013-09-21

    We report the case of a 17-year-old male admitted to our academic hospital with massive rectal bleeding. Since childhood he had reported recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding and had two exploratory laparotomies 5 and 2 years previously. An emergency abdominal computed tomography scan, gastroscopy and colonoscopy, performed after hemodynamic stabilization, were considered normal. High-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy was initiated and bleeding stopped spontaneously. Two other massive rectal bleeds occurred 8 h after each cessation of PPI which led to a hemostatic laparotomy after negative gastroscopy and small bowel capsule endoscopy. This showed long tubular duplication of the right colon, with fresh blood in the duplicated colon. Obscure lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a difficult medical situation and potentially life-threatening. The presence of ulcerated ectopic gastric mucosa in the colonic duplication explains the partial efficacy of PPI therapy. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding responding to empiric anti-acid therapy should probably evoke the diagnosis of bleeding ectopic gastric mucosa such as Meckel's diverticulum or gastrointestinal duplication, and gastroenterologists should be aware of this potential medical situation. PMID:24124344

  7. Successful hemostasis of intractable rectal variceal bleeding using variceal embolization.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Soo; Kim, Eun Hye; Kim, Man Deuk; Lee, Won Jae; Kim, Seung Up

    2015-02-28

    Portal hypertension causes portosystemic shunting along the gastrointestinal tract, resulting in gastrointestinal varices. Rectal varices and their bleeding is a rare complication, but it can be fatal without appropriate treatment. However, because of its rarity, no established treatment strategy is yet available. In the setting of intractable rectal variceal bleeding, a transjugular intravenous portosystemic shunt can be a treatment of choice to enable portal decompression and thus achieve hemostasis. However, in the case of recurrent rectal variceal bleeding despite successful transjugular intravenous portosystemic shunt, alternative measures to control bleeding are required. Here, we report on a patient with liver cirrhosis who experienced recurrent rectal variceal bleeding even after successful transjugular intravenous portosystemic shunt and was successfully treated with variceal embolization. PMID:25741168

  8. Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Risk of Abnormal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Sharma, Eesha

    2016-09-01

    Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) increase the risk of abnormal bleeding by lowering platelet serotonin and hence the efficiency of platelet-driven hemostasis; by increasing gastric acidity and possibly gastric ulceration; and by other mechanisms. The upper gastrointestinal tract is the commonest site of SRI-related abnormal bleeding; bleeding at this location may be increased by concurrent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy and by treatment with antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs. Bleeding at this location may be reduced by concurrent administration of acid-suppressing drugs. PMID:27514297

  9. Vaginal bleeding between periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003156.htm Vaginal bleeding between periods To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. This article discusses vaginal bleeding that occurs between a woman's monthly menstrual ...

  10. A rare cause of lower GI bleeding.

    PubMed

    Waleed, Mohammad; Ali, A Mohamed; Saraj, Othman; Babu, Sathish; Morgan, Russell

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a rare case of lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleed due to GI amyloidosis secondary to multiple myeloma. A 79-year-old lady who presented with bloody diarrhoea for 4 weeks. Flexible sigmoidoscopy showed slight oedematous mucosa extending up to the sigmoid colon. CT abdomen showed lytic lesions in the vertebral bodies. 24 h protein analysis and serum electrophoresis suggestive of multiple myeloma, which was confirmed with bone marrow biopsy, revealed plasma cell myeloma. PMID:22962379

  11. Bleeding and cupping.

    PubMed Central

    Turk, J. L.; Allen, E.

    1983-01-01

    Bleeding and cupping have been used in medicine since ancient times in the treatment of fevers and local inflammatory disorders. Local bleeding, by 'wet cupping', was effected by a scarificator or by leeches. John Hunter recommended venesection in moderation but preferred leeches for local bleeding. Bleeding as an accepted therapeutic practice went out of vogue in the middle of the nineteenth century as a result of the introduction of modern scientific methods. Dry cupping and the use of leeches, as counter irritants, persisted until the middle of this century. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6338802

  12. ACG Clinical Guideline: Diagnosis and Management of Small Bowel Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Lauren B; Fidler, Jeff L; Cave, David R; Leighton, Jonathan A

    2015-09-01

    Bleeding from the small intestine remains a relatively uncommon event, accounting for ~5-10% of all patients presenting with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given advances in small bowel imaging with video capsule endoscopy (VCE), deep enteroscopy, and radiographic imaging, the cause of bleeding in the small bowel can now be identified in most patients. The term small bowel bleeding is therefore proposed as a replacement for the previous classification of obscure GI bleeding (OGIB). We recommend that the term OGIB should be reserved for patients in whom a source of bleeding cannot be identified anywhere in the GI tract. A source of small bowel bleeding should be considered in patients with GI bleeding after performance of a normal upper and lower endoscopic examination. Second-look examinations using upper endoscopy, push enteroscopy, and/or colonoscopy can be performed if indicated before small bowel evaluation. VCE should be considered a first-line procedure for small bowel investigation. Any method of deep enteroscopy can be used when endoscopic evaluation and therapy are required. VCE should be performed before deep enteroscopy if there is no contraindication. Computed tomographic enterography should be performed in patients with suspected obstruction before VCE or after negative VCE examinations. When there is acute overt hemorrhage in the unstable patient, angiography should be performed emergently. In patients with occult hemorrhage or stable patients with active overt bleeding, multiphasic computed tomography should be performed after VCE or CTE to identify the source of bleeding and to guide further management. If a source of bleeding is identified in the small bowel that is associated with significant ongoing anemia and/or active bleeding, the patient should be managed with endoscopic therapy. Conservative management is recommended for patients without a source found after small bowel investigation, whereas repeat diagnostic investigations are recommended

  13. Endoscopic hemostasis state of the art - Nonvariceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Goelder, Stefan Karl; Brueckner, Juliane; Messmann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    New endoscopic techniques for hemostasis in nonvariceal bleeding were introduced and known methods further improved. Hemospray and Endoclot are two new compounds for topical treatment of bleeding. Initial studies in this area have shown a good hemostatic effect, especially in active large scale oozing bleeding, e.g., tumor bleedings. For further evaluation larger prospective studies comparing the substanced with other methods of endoscopic hemostasis are needed. For localized active arterial bleeding primary injection therapy in the area of ​​bleeding as well as in the four adjacent quadrants offers a good method to reduce bleeding activity. The injection is technically easy to learn and practicable. After bleeding activity is reduced the bleeding source can be localized more clearly for clip application. Today many different through-the-scope (TTS) clips are available. The ability to close and reopen a clip can aid towards good positioning at the bleeding site. Even more important is the rotatability of a clip before application. Often multiple TTS clips are required for secure closure of a bleeding vessel. One model has the ability to use three clips in series without changing the applicator. Severe arterial bleeding from vessels larger than 2 mm is often unmanageable with these conventional methods. Here is the over-the-scope-clip system another newly available method. It is similar to the ligation of esophageal varices and involves aspiration of tissue into a transparent cap before closure of the clip. Thus a greater vascular occlusion pressure can be achieved and larger vessels can be treated endoscopically. Patients with severe arterial bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract have a very high rate of recurrence after initial endoscopic treatment. These patients should always be managed in an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologist and surgeons. PMID:26962402

  14. Endoscopic hemostasis state of the art - Nonvariceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Goelder, Stefan Karl; Brueckner, Juliane; Messmann, Helmut

    2016-02-25

    New endoscopic techniques for hemostasis in nonvariceal bleeding were introduced and known methods further improved. Hemospray and Endoclot are two new compounds for topical treatment of bleeding. Initial studies in this area have shown a good hemostatic effect, especially in active large scale oozing bleeding, e.g., tumor bleedings. For further evaluation larger prospective studies comparing the substanced with other methods of endoscopic hemostasis are needed. For localized active arterial bleeding primary injection therapy in the area of ​​bleeding as well as in the four adjacent quadrants offers a good method to reduce bleeding activity. The injection is technically easy to learn and practicable. After bleeding activity is reduced the bleeding source can be localized more clearly for clip application. Today many different through-the-scope (TTS) clips are available. The ability to close and reopen a clip can aid towards good positioning at the bleeding site. Even more important is the rotatability of a clip before application. Often multiple TTS clips are required for secure closure of a bleeding vessel. One model has the ability to use three clips in series without changing the applicator. Severe arterial bleeding from vessels larger than 2 mm is often unmanageable with these conventional methods. Here is the over-the-scope-clip system another newly available method. It is similar to the ligation of esophageal varices and involves aspiration of tissue into a transparent cap before closure of the clip. Thus a greater vascular occlusion pressure can be achieved and larger vessels can be treated endoscopically. Patients with severe arterial bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract have a very high rate of recurrence after initial endoscopic treatment. These patients should always be managed in an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologist and surgeons. PMID:26962402

  15. Endoscopic Management of Tumor Bleeding from Inoperable Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Il

    2015-01-01

    Tumor bleeding is not a rare complication in patients with inoperable gastric cancer. Endoscopy has important roles in the diagnosis and primary treatment of tumor bleeding, similar to its roles in other non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases. Although limited studies have been performed, endoscopic therapy has been highly successful in achieving initial hemostasis. One or a combination of endoscopic therapy modalities, such as injection therapy, mechanical therapy, or ablative therapy, can be used for hemostasis in patients with endoscopic stigmata of recent hemorrhage. However, rebleeding after successful hemostasis with endoscopic therapy frequently occurs. Endoscopic therapy may be a treatment option for successfully controlling this rebleeding. Transarterial embolization or palliative surgery should be considered when endoscopic therapy fails. For primary and secondary prevention of tumor bleeding, proton pump inhibitors can be prescribed, although their effectiveness to prevent bleeding remains to be investigated. PMID:25844339

  16. Gastrointestinal Issues in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Olson, Jody C; Saeian, Kia

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) complications of cirrhosis are frequent in patients who require intensive care support and are often the primary indication for intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Perhaps the most worrisome GI complication for the intensivist is variceal hemorrhage. Bleeding from esophageal or gastric varices represents a life-threatening event for cirrhotic patients and provides management challenges for the ICU team. Nonvariceal GI bleeding, impaired GI motility, and malnutrition also provide significant challenges for the intensivist. This article reviews GI issues that present in critically ill cirrhotic patients and their management in the acute setting. PMID:27339677

  17. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour.

    PubMed

    Joensuu, Heikki; Hohenberger, Peter; Corless, Christopher L

    2013-09-14

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms that arise in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. They can occur at any age, the median age being 60-65 years, and typically cause bleeding, anaemia, and pain. GISTs have variable malignant potential, ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. Most tumours stain positively for the mast/stem cell growth factor receptor KIT and anoctamin 1 and harbour a kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or PDGFRA. Tumours without such mutations could have alterations in genes of the succinate dehydrogenase complex or in BRAF, or rarely RAS family genes. About 60% of patients are cured by surgery. Adjuvant treatment with imatinib is recommended for patients with a substantial risk of recurrence, if the tumour has an imatinib-sensitive mutation. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors substantially improve survival in advanced disease, but secondary drug resistance is common. PMID:23623056

  18. [The pewter bleeding bowls].

    PubMed

    Renner, Claude

    2004-01-01

    In the late seventeenth century, then along the eighteen and nineteenth centuries the amount of the bloodlettings was measured by means of three pewter bleeding bowls that held three ounces of blood, about 300 millilitres. In the middle of the nineteenth century new and large bleeding bowls with metric graduations were manufactured only by the Parisian potters. PMID:15359483

  19. Surgical bleeding in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. R.; Billica, R. D.; Johnston, S. L. 3rd

    1993-01-01

    A surgical procedure performed during space flight would occur in a unique microgravity environment. Several experiments performed during weightlessness in parabolic flight were reviewed to ascertain the behavior of surgical bleeding in microgravity. Simulations of bleeding using dyed fluid and citrated bovine blood, as well as actual arterial and venous bleeding in rabbits, were examined. The high surface tension property of blood promotes the formation of large fluid domes, which have a tendency to adhere to the wound. The use of sponges and suction will be adequate to prevent cabin atmosphere contamination with all bleeding, with the exception of temporary arterial droplet streams. The control of the bleeding with standard surgical techniques should not be difficult.

  20. New Trends in Acute Management of Colonic Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Grassi, Veronica; Cavaliere, Davide; Renzi, Claudio; Tabola, Renata; Poli, Giulia; Avenia, Stefano; Farinella, Eleonora; Arezzo, Alberto; Vettoretto, Nereo; D’Andrea, Vito; Binda, Gian Andrea; Fingerhut, Abe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Colonic diverticular disease is the most common cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. In the past, this condition was usually managed with urgent colectomy. Recently, the development of endoscopy and interventional radiology has led to a change in the management of colonic diverticular bleeding. The aim of this systematic review is to define the best treatment for colonic diverticular bleeding. A systematic bibliographic research was performed on the online databases for studies (randomized controlled trials [RCTs], observational trials, case series, and case reports) published between 2005 and 2014, concerning patients admitted with a diagnosis of diverticular bleeding according to the PRISMA methodology. The outcomes of interest were: diagnosis of diverticulosis as source of bleeding; incidence of self-limiting diverticular bleeding; management of non self-limiting bleeding (endoscopy, angiography, surgery); and recurrent diverticular bleeding. Fourteen studies were retrieved for analysis. No RCTs were found. Eleven non-randomized clinical controlled trials (NRCCTs) were included in this systematic review. In all studies, the definitive diagnosis of diverticular bleeding was always made by urgent colonoscopy. The colonic diverticular bleeding stopped spontaneously in over 80% of the patients, but a re-bleeding was not rare. Recently, interventional endoscopy and angiography became the first-line approach, thus relegating emergency colectomy to patients presenting with hemodynamic instability or as a second-line treatment after failure or complications of hemostasis with less invasive treatments. Colonoscopy is effective to diagnose diverticular bleeding. Nowadays, interventional endoscopy and angiographic treatment have gained a leading role and colectomy should only be entertained in case of failure of the former. PMID:26554768

  1. Upper GI Bleeding in Children

    MedlinePlus

    Upper GI Bleeding in Children What is upper GI Bleeding? Irritation and ulcers of the lining of the esophagus, stomach or duodenum can result in upper GI bleeding. When this occurs the child may vomit ...

  2. Primary aorto-esophageal fistula: Great masquerader of esophageal variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kokatnur, Laxmi; Rudrappa, Mohan

    2015-02-01

    Aorto-esophageal fistula is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Thoracic aneurysm, the most common cause of this condition, will slowly increase over time and can erode the wall of the aorta creating a fistula and leading to torrential bleeding. High clinical suspicion is required for timely diagnosis as common investigations routinely done for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, including esophagogastroduodenoscopy, fails to detect most cases. The classical triad of midthoracic pain, herald bleeding and fatal hematemesis described in this condition is seen in only one-third of cases. Physician should be wary of this condition, especially in elderly patients with uncontrolled GI bleeding and who are also at risk of thoracic aneurysm. Computed tomography angiogram detects most cases and emergent endovascular repair with stents controls the initial bleeding. Later, both the aorta and the esophagus are repaired and reconstructed in staged procedures. PMID:25722556

  3. [Obscure digestive bleeding by ileal carcinoid tumor].

    PubMed

    Nelly Manrique, María; Frisancho, Oscar; Zumaeta, Eduardo; Palomino, Américo; Rodriguez, César

    2011-01-01

    The patient is an 82 year-old female with a history of osteoarthritis, hypothyroidism and anemia for 14 years (receiving blood transfusions). She was admited to our hospital with a nine months history of malaise, anorexia, fatigue and weakness, associated with intermitten episodes of abdominal pain. She was diagnosed anemia and occult blood positive stools. Physical examination revealed a patient in generally fair condition, obese, with mild edema of lower limbs, no changes in the evaluation of chest, cardiovascular, abdomen, etc. Laboratory data was unremarkable, except for iron deficiency anemia. The upper endoscopy showed duodenal ulcer scar, fundic polyposis and chronic gastritis. Colonoscopy revealed some diverticula, a small sessile polyp and internal hemorrhoids. The diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding was made. The CT scan of the abdomen showed gallstones and fatty liver; a radiograph of intestinal transit detected a lesion apparently protruded intestinal loop for distal jejunum; enteroscopy was performed (with one team ball) anterograde and retrograde achieving assess distal jejunum and distal ileum without observing any injuries. The study of capsule endoscopy showed a polypoid tumor intestinal with evidence of having bleeding. Surgery detected the tumor in proximal ileum. The surgical specimen findings showed three tumors 0.7 mm, 10 mm and 15 mm on the proximal ileum. The microscopic examination revealed that these lesions were neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoid). The Ileal carcinoid tumor may rarely presented with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:21544161

  4. Esophageal Dieulafoy's lesion: an exceedingly rare cause of massive upper GI bleeding.

    PubMed

    Malliaras, George P; Carollo, Andrea; Bogen, Gregg

    2016-01-01

    Dieulafoy's lesion, a dilated aberrant submucosal vessel which erodes the overlying epithelium, is a relatively rare but potentially fatal cause of gastrointestinal (Gl) bleeding. The esophagus is a very rare location for the lesion. Here we present a case of massive upper GI bleeding, secondary to this remarkably rare occurrence, which was amendable to endoscopic intervention. PMID:27302497

  5. Esophageal Dieulafoy's lesion: an exceedingly rare cause of massive upper GI bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Malliaras, George P.; Carollo, Andrea; Bogen, Gregg

    2016-01-01

    Dieulafoy's lesion, a dilated aberrant submucosal vessel which erodes the overlying epithelium, is a relatively rare but potentially fatal cause of gastrointestinal (Gl) bleeding. The esophagus is a very rare location for the lesion. Here we present a case of massive upper GI bleeding, secondary to this remarkably rare occurrence, which was amendable to endoscopic intervention. PMID:27302497

  6. Bleeding Meckel's diverticulum diagnosed and treated by double-balloon enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Olafsson, Snorri; Yang, Julie T.; Jackson, Christian S.; Barakat, Mohamad; Lo, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum (MD) is the most common congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The diagnosis of symptomatic MD has been cumbersome. Several case reports been published regarding direct visualization of MD with double balloon enteroscopy (DBE); diagnosing a bleeding MD leading to surgical resection. We report the use of DBE for the treatment of a bleeding MD. PMID:23210023

  7. Vaginal or uterine bleeding - overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the vaginal bleeding, including: Dysfunctional uterine bleeding Endometriosis Uterine fibroids Ectopic pregnancy Polycystic ovary syndrome Treatment may include hormonal medicines, pain relievers, and possibly ...

  8. Angiodysplasia in a Child as a Cause of Lower GI Bleeding: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Abdoon, Hamed

    2010-01-01

    Angiodysplasia or vascular ectasia of the colon is a rare but important cause of recurrent lower gastro-intestinal bleeding in children and should be kept in mind as a diagnostic possibility. This case reports of intermittent rectal bleeding with early presentation caused by angiodysplasia. Therefore, early diagnosis of this rare lesion is important to avoid a possible fatal outcome, and thus the pediatrician should be aware of this lesion as a rare cause of intestinal bleeding in children. PMID:22125700

  9. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Casper, Robert F.

    1983-01-01

    Dysfunctional uterine bleeding is most commonly associated with chronic anovulation. Early diagnosis of anovulation is important; the induction of regular withdrawal periods using a progestin such as Provera prevents the development of endometrial hyperplasia with the subsequent inevitable occurrence of a heavy, frightening vaginal bleed. The etiology of dysfunctional uterine bleeding occurring during ovulatory cycles is unknown and all medical therapies at present are necessarily experimental. Hysterectomy is probably the treatment of choice for women who have finished their childbearing career and in whom persisting menorrhagia during ovulatory cycles results in anemia. PMID:21283453

  10. Familial Abdominal and Intestinal Lipomatosis Presenting with Upper GI Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Bilgic, Yilmaz; Altinsoy, Hasan Baki; Yildirim, Nezahat; Alatas, Ozkan; Kanat, Burhan Hakan; Sahin, Abdurrahman

    2015-01-01

    Although lipomas are encapsulated benign tumors, systemic lipomatosis defines infiltrative nonencapsulated tumors resembling normal adipose tissue. Abdominal lipomatosis and intestinal lipomatosis are different clinicopathological entities with similar clinical symptoms. We describe here a case presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from eroded submucosal lipoma at duodenum secondary to intestinal lipomatosis and abdominal lipomatosis. PMID:26146574

  11. Small intestine bleeding due to multifocal angiosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Zacarias Föhrding, Luisa; Macher, Arne; Braunstein, Stefan; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Topp, Stefan Andreas

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of an 84-year-old male patient with primary small intestinal angiosarcoma. The patient initially presented with anemia and melena. Consecutive endoscopy revealed no signs of upper or lower active gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient had been diagnosed 3 years previously with an aortic dilation, which was treated with a stent. Computed tomography suggested an aorto-intestinal fistula as the cause of the intestinal bleeding, leading to operative stent explantation and aortic replacement. However, an aorto-intestinal fistula was not found, and the intestinal bleeding did not arrest postoperatively. The constant need for blood transfusions made an exploratory laparotomy imperative, which showed multiple bleeding sites, predominately in the jejunal wall. A distal loop jejunostomy was conducted to contain the small intestinal bleeding and a segmental resection for histological evaluation was performed. The histological analysis revealed a less-differentiated tumor with characteristic CD31, cytokeratin, and vimentin expression, which led to the diagnosis of small intestinal angiosarcoma. Consequently, the infiltrated part of the jejunum was successfully resected in a subsequent operation, and adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel was planned. Angiosarcoma of the small intestine is an extremely rare malignant neoplasm that presents with bleeding and high mortality. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential to improve outcome. A small intestinal angiosarcoma is a challenging diagnosis to make because of its rarity, nonspecific symptoms of altered intestinal function, nonspecific abdominal pain, severe melena, and acute abdominal signs. Therefore, a quick clinical and histological diagnosis and decisive measures including surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy should be the aim. PMID:23197897

  12. Management of bleeding complications in patients with cancer on DOACs.

    PubMed

    Schulman, Sam; Shrum, Jeffrey; Majeed, Ammar

    2016-04-01

    There has been a concern that major bleeding events (MBE) on direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) will be more difficult to manage than on vitamin K antagonists. Patients with cancer and DOAC-associated bleeding may be even more of a challenge to manage. We therefore reviewed the literature on bleeding in patients with cancer on DOACs. In addition, we performed an analysis of individual patient data from 5 phase III trials on treatment with dabigatran with focus on those with cancer. In 6 randomized trials the risk of MBE in patients with cancer was similar on treatment with DOACs compared to vitamin K antagonists. Bleeding was in the majority of patients managed with supportive therapy alone. In the individual patient data analysis there were no significant differences in use of hemostatic products, transfusion of red cells, effectiveness of management, bleeding-related mortality or 30-day all-cause mortality between patients with cancer treated with dabigatran or with warfarin. Local hemostatic therapy, including resection of the cancer site was more common in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding with cancer than among those without cancer. We conclude that management of bleeding in patients with cancer and on a DOAC does not pose a greater challenge than management of bleeding in patients without cancer. PMID:27067968

  13. Update on the endoscopic management of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Holster, Ingrid Lisanne; Kuipers, Ernst Johan

    2011-12-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is the most common gastrointestinal emergency, with peptic ulcer as the most common cause. Appropriate resuscitation followed by early endoscopy for diagnosis and treatment are of major importance in these patients. Endoscopy is recommended within 24 h of presentation. Endoscopic therapy is indicated for patients with high-risk stigmata, in particular those with active bleeding and visible vessels. The role of endoscopic therapy for ulcers with adherent clots remains to be elucidated. Ablative or mechanical therapies are superior to epinephrine injection alone in terms of prevention of rebleeding. The application of an ulcer-covering hemospray is a new promising tool. High dose proton pump inhibitors should be administered intravenously for 72 h after endoscopy in high-risk patients. Helicobacter pylori should be tested for in all patients with peptic ulcer bleeding and eradicated if positive. These recommendations have been captured in a recent international guideline. PMID:21918857

  14. Vaginal bleeding in pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 9 , bleeding may be a sign of: The placenta separating from the inner wall of the uterus ... the baby is born ( abruptio placentae ) Miscarriage The placenta is covering all or part of the opening ...

  15. Understanding Minor Rectal Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever or significant rectal bleeding. Laser or infrared coagulation and sclerotherapy (injection of medicine directly into the ... or if symptoms persist despite rubber band ligation, coagulation or sclerotherapy. What are anal fissures? Tears that ...

  16. GI bleeding - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100162.htm GI bleeding - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... colon, and finally, the rectum and anus. The GI tract is a long, hollow, muscular tube through ...

  17. GI bleeding - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... colon, and finally, the rectum and anus. The GI tract is a long, hollow, muscular tube through ... Bleeding from the GI tract is a common medical problem. Patients usually notice either dark red blood or bright red blood in their ...

  18. Approach to bleeding patient

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Ramachandran; Sreekanth, Y.; Yadav, Monu

    2014-01-01

    Managing a bleeding patient is very challenging for the perioperative physician. Bleeding in a patient would be due to inherited or acquired disorders of haemostasis. Identifying the patients at risk of bleeding and utilising prophylactic treatment protocols has good outcomes. Along with clinical signs, trends in monitoring coagulation parameters and analysing blood picture are necessary. Management of patients in the postoperative period and in intensive care unit should be focused on normalization of coagulation profile as early as possible with available blood and its products. Available recombinant factors should be given priority as per the approved indications. Exploring the surgical site should be considered for persistent bleeding because haemodynamic compromise, excessive transfusion of fluids, blood and its products and more inotropic support may have a negative impact on the patient outcome. PMID:25535422

  19. Bleeding during cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... barefoot. Use only an electric razor. Use knives, scissors, and other tools carefully. Do not blow your ... bowel movements. To further prevent bleeding: Avoid heavy lifting or playing contact sports. Do not drink alcohol. ...

  20. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  1. [OMEPRAZOL VS RANITIDINE IN UPPER DIGESTIVE BLEEDING

    PubMed

    Regis R, Regina; Bisso A, Aland; Rebaza, Segundo

    1999-01-01

    Pectic ulcer is the most frequent cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. The homeostatic mechanism of bleeding, and coagulation, does not happen with values of pH less than 5,0. Therefore neutralization of gastric acidity (pH more than 5,0) is a recourse of control, improve the evolution and healing of peptic ulcer and to avoid a new bleeding. The aim of this study was to compare the results of treatment with omeprazole and ranitidine, in 57 patients admitted at emergency room of the Hospital Central de la Polic a Nacional del Per with endoscopic diagnosis of peptic ulcer, using Forrest classification. Patients received omeprazole 40 mg in bolus IV, followed by continuos infusion of 8 mg/hour for 72 hours (group A) or ranitidine 50 mg IV each 8 hours for 72 hours (group B). A new endoscopy was made 72 hours after admission demostrated a succesful therapy in both group. Bleeding stopped in 26/27 patients in group A (96,2%) and in 23/30 patients in group B (76,6%) (p<0,05). The results of this study show that the omeprazole IV is more effective than ranitidine IV in the control of UGB because of peptic ulcer and provides a faster healing. PMID:12181579

  2. Gastrointestinal fistula

    MedlinePlus

    Entero-enteral fistula; Enterocutaneous fistula; Fistula - gastrointestinal ... cause diarrhea , malabsorption of nutrients, and dehydration . Entero-enteral fistulas may have no symptoms. Enterocutaneous fistulas cause ...

  3. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in the pregnant woman

    PubMed Central

    Friedel, David; Stavropoulos, Stavros; Iqbal, Shahzad; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2014-01-01

    About 20000 gastrointestinal endoscopies are performed annually in America in pregnant women. Gastrointestinal endoscopy during pregnancy raises the critical issue of fetal safety in addition to patient safety. Endoscopic medications may be potentially abortifacient or teratogenic. Generally, Food and Drug Administration category B or C drugs should be used for endoscopy. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) seems to be relatively safe for both mother and fetus based on two retrospective studies of 83 and 60 pregnant patients. The diagnostic yield is about 95% when EGD is performed for gastrointestinal bleeding. EGD indications during pregnancy include acute gastrointestinal bleeding, dysphagia > 1 wk, or endoscopic therapy. Therapeutic EGD is experimental due to scant data, but should be strongly considered for urgent indications such as active bleeding. One study of 48 sigmoidoscopies performed during pregnancy showed relatively favorable fetal outcomes, rare bad fetal outcomes, and bad outcomes linked to very sick mothers. Sigmoidoscopy should be strongly considered for strong indications, including significant acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding, chronic diarrhea, distal colonic stricture, suspected inflammatory bowel disease flare, and potential colonic malignancy. Data on colonoscopy during pregnancy are limited. One study of 20 pregnant patients showed rare poor fetal outcomes. Colonoscopy is generally experimental during pregnancy, but can be considered for strong indications: known colonic mass/stricture, active lower gastrointestinal bleeding, or colonoscopic therapy. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) entails fetal risks from fetal radiation exposure. ERCP risks to mother and fetus appear to be acceptable when performed for ERCP therapy, as demonstrated by analysis of nearly 350 cases during pregnancy. Justifiable indications include symptomatic or complicated choledocholithiasis, manifested by jaundice, cholangitis, gallstone

  4. The use of hemospray in portal hypertensive bleeding; a case series.

    PubMed

    Smith, L A; Morris, A J; Stanley, A J

    2014-02-01

    Hemospray is a haemostatic agent licensed for endoscopic haemostasis of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) in Europe and Canada. Hemospray has been shown to be safe and effective in achieving haemostasis in bleeding peptic ulcers in a prospective clinical study and several further case series have described the use of hemospray in other non-variceal causes of gastrointestinal bleeding. Portal hypertensive gastropathy and colopathy are common in patients with portal hypertension. As hemospray is an easy to apply, non-contact method, which can cover large areas of mucosa, it may be of benefit in acute non-variceal portal hypertensive bleeding. We present data from the first four consecutive patients presenting to our institution with acute haemorrhage secondary to non-variceal diffuse portal hypertensive bleeding treated with hemospray. PMID:24140803

  5. Endoscopic sclerotherapy for hemostasis of acute esophageal variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    ROMANO, G.; AGRUSA, A.; AMATO, G.; DE VITA, G.; FRAZZETTA, G.; CHIANETTA, D.; SORCE, V.; DI BUONO, G.; GULOTTA, G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Currently the most widely used methods for endoscopic control of esophageal varices bleeding are sclerotherapy and rubber band ligation. Although the superiority of band ligation (BL) over endoscopic sclerotherapy (SCL) for the secondary prophylaxis of variceal hemorrhage has been proven, the best approach for acute bleeding remains controversial. Patients and methods We performed a retrospective study between January 2005 and May 2013. We selected 104 patients with gastrointestinal hemorrhage from rupture of esophageal varices treated with endoscopic sclerotherapy. The sclerosing agent used was 1% polidocanol in 89 cases, butyl-cyanoacrylate in 8 cases and sodium tetra-decylsulfate in 4 cases. In 3 cases had not been carried sclerosis because it was not possible to identify the bleeding site. Results Among the 101 patients who underwent endoscopic sclerotherapy 4 presented re-bleeding within 12 hours from first treatment. Other 10 patients (9.9%) presented re-bleeding within a 5-days period. The most frequent complication was ulceration, observed in 4 cases (3.8%). There was only one case of perforation treated conservatively. Conclusions The general improvement in the results of the treatment of variceal acute bleeding might be attributed to better clinical management of these patients. In literature no consensus exists regarding the preferred endoscopic treatment. To date, there is no single method applicable to all patients with bleeding esophageal varices, but sclerotherapy is considered effective, safe and repeatable in experienced hands. PMID:24841679

  6. First trimester bleeding evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Vikram; Paspulati, Raj Mohan; Bhatt, Shweta

    2005-06-01

    First trimester bleeding is a common presentation in the emergency room. Ultrasound evaluation of patients with first trimester bleeding is the mainstay of the examination. The important causes of first trimester bleeding include spontaneous abortion, ectopic pregnancy, and gestational trophoblastic disease; 50% to 70% of spontaneous abortions are due to genetic abnormalities. In normal pregnancy, the serum beta hCG doubles or increases by at least 66% in 48 hours. The intrauterine GS should be visualized by TVUS with beta hCG levels between 1000 to 2000 mIU/mL IRP. Visualization of the yolk sac within the gestational sac is definitive evidence of intrauterine pregnancy. Embryonic cardiac activity can be identified with CRL of >5 mm. A GS with a mean sac diameter (MSD) of 8 mm or more without a yolk sac and a GS with an MSD of 16 mm or more without an embryo, are important predictors of a nonviable gestation. A GS with a mean sac diameter of 16 mm or more (TVUS) without an embryo is a sonographic sign of anembryonic gestation. A difference of <5 mm between the mean sac diameter and the CRL carries an 80% risk of spontaneous abortion. Approximately 20% of women with first trimester bleeding have a subchorionic hematoma. The presence of an extra ovarian adnexal mass is the most common sonographic finding in ectopic pregnancy. Other findings include the tubal ring sign and hemorrhage. About 26% of ectopic pregnancies have normal pelvic sonograms on TVUS. Complete hydatidiform mole presents with a complex intrauterine mass with multiple anechoic areas of varying sizes (Snowstorm appearance). Twenty-five percent to 65% of molar pregnancies have associated theca-leutin cysts. Arteriovenous malformation of the uterus is a rare but life-threatening cause of vaginal bleeding in the first trimester. The sonographic findings in a patient with first trimester bleeding should be correlated with serum beta hCG levels to arrive at an appropriate clinical diagnosis. PMID:15905817

  7. Vaginal bleeding in pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... rest of your pregnancy or until the bleeding stops. The bed rest may be complete. Or, you may be able to get up to go to the bathroom, walk around the house, or do light chores. Medication is not needed in most cases. ...

  8. Gastrointestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Alby, Kevin; Nachamkin, Irving

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal infections in the immunocompromised host are caused by the common bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic agents that also cause infections in the immunocompetent host. Of special consideration is that immunocompromised patients may be at increased risk for infection or disease severity and by pathogens not seen in the competent host. This chapter reviews the various agents, risk factors, and diagnostic approaches to detect gastrointestinal infections in this patient population. PMID:27337464

  9. Bleeding complications in critically ill patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jaeyoung; Choi, Sun Mi; Yu, Su Jong; Park, Young Sik; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Min; Yim, Jae-Joon; Yoo, Chul-Gyu; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Lee, Jinwoo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Patients with liver cirrhosis (LC) are at risk for critical events leading to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission. Coagulopathy in cirrhotic patients is complex and can lead to bleeding as well as thrombosis. The aim of this study was to investigate bleeding complications in critically ill patients with LC admitted to a medical ICU (MICU). Methods: All adult patients admitted to our MICU with a diagnosis of LC from January 2006 to December 2012 were retrospectively assessed. Patients with major bleeding at the time of MICU admission were excluded from the analysis. Results: A total of 205 patients were included in the analysis. The median patient age was 62 years, and 69.3% of the patients were male. The most common reason for MICU admission was acute respiratory failure (45.4%), followed by sepsis (27.3%). Major bleeding occurred in 25 patients (12.2%). The gastrointestinal tract was the most common site of bleeding (64%), followed by the respiratory tract (20%). In a multivariate analysis, a low platelet count at MICU admission (odds ratio [OR], 0.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97 to 0.99) and sepsis (OR, 8.35; 95% CI, 1.04 to 67.05) were independent risk factors for major bleeding. The ICU fatality rate was significantly greater among patients with major bleeding (84.0% vs. 58.9%, respectively; p = 0.015). Conclusions: Major bleeding occurred in 12.2% of critically ill cirrhotic patients admitted to the MICU. A low platelet count at MICU admission and sepsis were associated with an increased risk of major bleeding during the MICU stay. Further study is needed to better understand hemostasis in critically ill patients with LC. PMID:26805633

  10. Variceal Band Ligation in the Prevention of Variceal Bleeding: A Multicenter Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ouakaa-Kchaou, Asma; Kharrat, Jamel; Mir, Khaoula; Houda, Boussourra; Abdelli, Nabil; Ajmi, Salem; Azzouz, Msaddek; Abdallah, Hatem Ben; Mami, Nabyl Ben; Bouzaidi, Slim; Chouaib, Sofiene; Golli, Lamia; Melki, Wissem; Najjar, Taoufik; Saffar, Hammouda; Belhadj, Najet; Ghorbel, Abdeljabbar

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim: Variceal bleeding is a life-threatening complication of portal hypertension with a high probability of recurrence. Treatment to prevent first bleeding or rebleeding is mandatory. The study has been aimed at investigating the effectiveness of endoscopic band ligation in preventing upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with portal hypertension and to establish the clinical outcome of patients. Patients and Methods: We analyzed in a multicenter trial, the efficacy and side effects of endoscopic band ligation for the primary and secondary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding. We assigned 603 patients with portal hypertension who were hospitalized to receive treatment with endoscopic ligation. Sessions of ligation were repeated every two to three weeks until the varices were eradicated. The primary end point was recurrent bleeding. Results: The median follow-up period was 32 months. A total of 126 patients had recurrent bleeding. All episodes were related to portal hypertension and 79 to recurrent variceal bleeding. There were major complications in 51 patients (30 had bleeding esophageal ulcers). Seventy-eight patients died, 26 deaths were related to variceal bleeding and 1 to bleeding esophageal ulcers. Conclusions: A great improvement in the prevention of variceal bleeding has emerged over the last years. However, further therapeutic options that combine higher efficacy, better tolerance and fewer side effects are needed. PMID:21372346

  11. Bleeding and Clotting Disorders Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... excessive or lengthy bleeding. breakthrough bleedbleeding between infusions of factor product. Campaign for Our Future —NHF ... in a vein for patients who need regular infusions. chromosome —structures in the cell’s nucleus that contain ...

  12. Endovascular Treatment of a Bleeding Secondary Aorto-Enteric Fistula. A Case Report with 1-Year Follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Brountzos, Elias N. Vasdekis, Spyros; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Danias, Nikolaos; Alexopoulou, Efthymia; Petropoulou, Konstantina; Gouliamos, Athanasios; Perros, Georgios

    2007-09-15

    We report a patient with life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding caused by a secondary aorto-enteric fistula. Because the patient had several comorbid conditions, we successfully stopped the bleeding by endovascular placement of a bifurcated aortic stent-graft. The patient developed periaortic infection 4 months later, but he was managed with antibiotics. The patient is well 1 year after the procedure.

  13. Preventive Strategies against Bleeding due to Nonvitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Sarah, Lessire; Anne-Sophie, Dincq; Jonathan, Douxfils; Bérangère, Devalet; Jean-Baptiste, Nicolas; Anne, Spinewine; Anne-Sophie, Larock; Jean-Michel, Dogné; Maximilien, Gourdin; François, Mullier

    2014-01-01

    Dabigatran etexilate (DE), rivaroxaban, and apixaban are nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) that have been compared in clinical trials with existing anticoagulants (warfarin and enoxaparin) in several indications for the prevention and treatment of thrombotic events. All NOACs presented bleeding events despite a careful selection and control of patients. Compared with warfarin, NOACs had a decreased risk of intracranial hemorrhage, and apixaban and DE (110 mg BID) had a decreased risk of major bleeding from any site. Rivaroxaban and DE showed an increased risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding compared with warfarin. Developing strategies to minimize the risk of bleeding is essential, as major bleedings are reported in clinical practice and specific antidotes are currently not available. In this paper, the following preventive approaches are reviewed: improvement of appropriate prescription, identification of modifiable bleeding risk factors, tailoring NOAC's dose, dealing with a missed dose as well as adhesion to switching, bridging and anesthetic procedures. PMID:25032218

  14. Bleeding after endoscopic submucosal dissection: Risk factors and preventive methods

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Yosuke; Tsuji, Yosuke; Sakaguchi, Yoshiki; Minatsuki, Chihiro; Asada-Hirayama, Itsuko; Niimi, Keiko; Ono, Satoshi; Kodashima, Shinya; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has become widely accepted as a standard method of treatment for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms because it enables en block resection even for large lesions or fibrotic lesions with minimal invasiveness, and decreases the local recurrence rate. Moreover, specimens resected in an en block fashion enable accurate histological assessment. Taking these factors into consideration, ESD seems to be more advantageous than conventional endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), but the associated risks of perioperative adverse events are higher than in EMR. Bleeding after ESD is the most frequent among these adverse events. Although post-ESD bleeding can be controlled by endoscopic hemostasis in most cases, it may lead to serious conditions including hemorrhagic shock. Even with preventive methods including administration of acid secretion inhibitors and preventive hemostasis, post-ESD bleeding cannot be completely prevented. In addition high-risk cases for post-ESD bleeding, which include cases with the use of antithrombotic agents or which require large resection, are increasing. Although there have been many reports about associated risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding, many issues remain unsolved. Therefore, in this review, we have overviewed risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding from previous studies. Endoscopists should have sufficient knowledge of these risk factors and preventive methods when performing ESD. PMID:27468187

  15. Bleeding after endoscopic submucosal dissection: Risk factors and preventive methods.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Yosuke; Tsuji, Yosuke; Sakaguchi, Yoshiki; Minatsuki, Chihiro; Asada-Hirayama, Itsuko; Niimi, Keiko; Ono, Satoshi; Kodashima, Shinya; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-07-14

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has become widely accepted as a standard method of treatment for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms because it enables en block resection even for large lesions or fibrotic lesions with minimal invasiveness, and decreases the local recurrence rate. Moreover, specimens resected in an en block fashion enable accurate histological assessment. Taking these factors into consideration, ESD seems to be more advantageous than conventional endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), but the associated risks of perioperative adverse events are higher than in EMR. Bleeding after ESD is the most frequent among these adverse events. Although post-ESD bleeding can be controlled by endoscopic hemostasis in most cases, it may lead to serious conditions including hemorrhagic shock. Even with preventive methods including administration of acid secretion inhibitors and preventive hemostasis, post-ESD bleeding cannot be completely prevented. In addition high-risk cases for post-ESD bleeding, which include cases with the use of antithrombotic agents or which require large resection, are increasing. Although there have been many reports about associated risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding, many issues remain unsolved. Therefore, in this review, we have overviewed risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding from previous studies. Endoscopists should have sufficient knowledge of these risk factors and preventive methods when performing ESD. PMID:27468187

  16. The Role of Medical Therapy for Variceal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Abdul Q; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2015-07-01

    Acute variceal hemorrhage (AVH) is a lethal complication of portal hypertension and should be suspected in every patient with liver cirrhosis who presents with upper gastrointestinal bleed. AVH-related mortality has decreased in the last few decades from 40% to 15%-20% due to advances in the general and specific management of variceal hemorrhage. This review summarizes current management of AVH and prevention of recurrent hemorrhage with a focus on pharmacologic therapy. PMID:26142033

  17. Initial failure of angiography to demonstrate a bleeding pancreatic cancer: a case for provocative agents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, FYJ; Lai, PBS; Chong, KL

    2001-01-01

    Background Mesenteric angiography is commonly employed in the modern-day investigation of gastro-intestinal bleeding if the bleeding sites cannot be identified by endoscopic means. Angiography is optimally sensitive in the presence of active bleeding. However, vasospasm may occasionally account for a negative study shortly after bleeding. Case outline A 70-year-old lady with inoperable carcinoma of the pancreas presented with gastro-intestinal bleeding. Although upper endoscopy visualised active bleeding from the tumour, which had invaded into the duodenum, haemostasis could not be achieved endoscopically. Therefore, mesenteric angiography was arranged. Results The initial angiography failed to demonstrate the bleeding site, which only became obvious on a repeat study, when embolisation was performed to achieve haemostasis. Discussion Vasospasm probably accounted for the initial negative study, as the second angiography was able to demonstrate contrast extravasation without the use of any anticoagulant or thrombolytic agent. It is not our routine to give pharmacological agents to provoke bleeding after a negative angiography, but for selected patients this manoeuvre may turn out to be more cost-effective. PMID:18333021

  18. Colonic Angioectasia Related Hemorrhage: The Importance of Evaluation During Active Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Laczek, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Colonic angioectasia is a common source of lower gastrointestinal bleeding and can be challenging to identify when active bleeding is not present. We present a case that illustrates the utility of evaluating patients with suspected angioectasia-related hemorrhage during episodes of active bleeding. Case Report A 79-year-old woman on chronic anticoagulation secondary to mitral valve replacement presented with recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding over the past three years. She had recurrent episodes of hematochezia in 2009 during which no source was identified despite multiple upper and lower endoscopies. A tagged red blood scan showed active hemorrhage in the ascending colon. Angiography showed non-bleeding angiodysplasia in the cecum and ascending colon and the ascending branch of the right colic artery was prophylactically embolized. She had a recurrent episode of hematochezia in 2010 and no source was identified on EGD, colonoscopy or wireless capsule endoscopy. In 2012, she developed recurrent hematochezia associated with a drop in her hemoglobin level from 10.8g/dL to 6.2g/dL over a two-week period. Her hemodynamics remained normal and she was admitted to our facility. She received a blood transfusion and then underwent colonoscopy while still actively bleeding. Active bleeding was seen in the ascending colon adjacent to which was a very subtle angioectasia which was treated with argon plasma coagulation. She had no further bleeding during her hospital stay. Discussion Direct visualization during colonoscopy is the preferred method to diagnose colonic angioectasia and these lesions often have a distinctive “coral reef” appearance. However, as the images in this case show, the appearance of colonic angioectasia can be subtle with the aberrant vasculature almost indistinguishable from normal vascular patter of the colonic mucosa. Performing colonoscopy during active angioectasia-related bleeding greatly helps to identify and treat

  19. Evolving techniques for gastrointestinal endoscopic hemostasis treatment.

    PubMed

    Ghassemi, Kevin A; Jensen, Dennis M

    2016-05-01

    With mortality due to gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding remaining stable, the focus on endoscopic hemostasis has been on improving other outcomes such as rebleeding rate, need for transfusions, and need for angiographic embolization or surgery. Over the past few years, a number of devices have emerged to help endoscopically assess and treat bleeding GI lesions. These include the Doppler endoscopic probe, hemostatic powder, and over-the-scope clip. Also, new applications have been described for radiofrequency ablation. In this article, we will discuss these evolving tools and techniques that have been developed, including an analysis of their efficacy and limitations. PMID:26651414

  20. Cardiac Arrest and Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Case of Medical Heuristics

    PubMed Central

    Ajayi, Tokunbo; Okudo, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient clinical data from patients is a major cause of errors in medical diagnostics. In an attempt to make a diagnosis, initial clinical information provided to the physician may be overly relied on as the only information required in making diagnosis leading to anchoring. Failure to rely on differential diagnoses in spite of new signs and symptoms or rethinking of initial hypothesis may lead to fixation on a certain diagnosis, which may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. In the event that there is an anchoring heuristic, like in our patient, it is important to consider differential diagnoses; however, it is not wrong to rely on some form of anchor. We report a case of a 62-year-old male with a history of multiple medical conditions and a history of acetaminophen overdose who presented to the hospital with large amounts of coffee ground emesis. He was subsequently transferred to the liver transplant center on discovery that he was in fulminant hepatic failure and died two days later in spite of aggressive medical treatment. PMID:27366152

  1. Acquired von Willebrand's disease associated with gastrointestinal angiodysplasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P K; Kannan, M; Chatterjee, T; Dixit, A; Mahapatra, M; Choudhry, V P; Saxena, R

    2006-07-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) is a rare and probably underestimated bleeding disorder which mimics most of the clinical symptoms and laboratory features of hereditary von Willebrand disease (VWD) in patients devoid of both personal and family history of bleeding diathesis. In this study, we present a case of 55 yrs male patient, presented with gastrointestinal bleeds since three years, diagnosed to have AVWS with inhibitors. From this study it is concluded that AVWS is rare and it is important to diagnose this bleeding disorder so that appropriate treatment with plasmapheresis and IV:Ig can effectively correct the haemostatic defect and manage severe bleeding in these patients. PMID:16834752

  2. Dieulafoy lesion of the gallbladder presenting with bleeding and a pseudo-mirizzi syndrome: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Stanes, Aaron; Mackay, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal bleeding can have significant morbidity and mortality. Pathological processes that cause it are diverse, and timely investigation and management are vital. Dieulafoy lesions are a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding and here we describe a case of a gallbladder dieulafoy lesion causing gastrointestinal bleeding. Presentation of case Recently discharged from hospital following an open anterior resection and loop ileostomy for diverticular disease, an 84-year-old female re-presented with lower abdominal pain associated with jaundice and lymphocytosis. Imaging demonstrated two possible rectal stump collections (treated with antibiotics), and heterogeneous material in the gallbladder. The patient deteriorated, developing melena, coffee ground vomitus and right upper quadrant pain. Investigation sourced the bleeding to the gallbladder that resolved following cholecystectomy, and histopathology was consistent with a dieulafoy lesion. The patient made a full recovery. Discussion Dieulafoy lesions have rarely been reported in the gallbladder, and as such can be an occult source of massive gastrointestinal bleeding. It should be considered where gastrointestinal bleeding accompanies jaundice and abdominal pain. Conclusion This case highlights that dieulafoy lesions can occur in the gallbladder. Massive gastrointestinal bleeding can occur within the gallbladder, and a gallbladder dieulafoy lesion should be considered as a potential cause of such, especially when a source has not been identified on endoscopy. It also demonstrates the effectiveness of cholecystectomy as a definitive management strategy. PMID:26878358

  3. Dramatic regression and bleeding of a duodenal GIST during preoperative imatinib therapy: case report and review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. The majority of GISTs is located in the stomach. Only 3-5% of GISTs are located in the duodenum associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding as primary manifestation. With response rates of up to 90%, but complications like bleeding due to tumor necrosis in 3%, imatinib mesylate dramatically altered the pre- and postoperative therapy for GIST patients. Case presentation A 58-year-old female patient presented with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding 2 weeks after a giant GIST of the duodenum had been diagnosed. Neoadjuvant imatinib therapy had been initiated to achieve a tumor downsizing prior to surgery. During emergency laparotomy a partial duodenopancreatectomy was performed to achieve a complete resection of the mass. Histology revealed a high-malignancy GIST infiltrating the duodenal wall. Adjuvant imatinib therapy was initiated. At follow-up (19 months) the patient is still alive and healthy. Conclusion Giant GISTs of the duodenum are rare and - in contrast to other localizations - harbour a higher risk of serious bleeding as primary manifestation. Tumor necrosis and tumor bleeding are rare but typical adverse effects of imatinib therapy especially during treatment of high-malignancy GIST. In GIST patients with increased risk of tumor bleeding neoadjuvant imatinib therapy should thoroughly be performed during hospitalization. In cases of duodenal GIST primary surgery should be considered as treatment alternative. PMID:20515511

  4. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Lucy; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common and debilitating condition with high direct and indirect costs. AUB frequently co-exists with fibroids, but the relationship between the two remains incompletely understood and in many women the identification of fibroids may be incidental to a menstrual bleeding complaint. A structured approach for establishing the cause using the Fédération International de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique (FIGO) PALM-COEIN (Polyp, Adenomyosis, Leiomyoma, Malignancy (and hyperplasia), Coagulopathy, Ovulatory disorders, Endometrial, Iatrogenic and Not otherwise classified) classification system will facilitate accurate diagnosis and inform treatment options. Office hysteroscopy and increasing sophisticated imaging will assist provision of robust evidence for the underlying cause. Increased availability of medical options has expanded the choice for women and many will no longer need to recourse to potentially complicated surgery. Treatment must remain individualised and encompass the impact of pressure symptoms, desire for retention of fertility and contraceptive needs, as well as address the management of AUB in order to achieve improved quality of life. PMID:26803558

  5. Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB).

    PubMed

    Bulletti, C; Flamigni, C; Prefetto, R A; Polli, V; Giacomucci, E

    1994-09-30

    Cyclic or irregular uterine bleeding is common in perimenarchal and perimenopausal women with or without endometrial hyperplasia. The disturbance often requires surgical treatment because of its negative effects on both blood loss and abnormal endometrial growth including the development of endometrial cancer. The endometrium is often overstimulated during the perimenopausal period when estrogen/progesterone production is unbalanced. A therapeutical approach with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) was proposed in a depot formulation (Zoladex) that induces a sustained and reversible ovarian suppression. To avoid the risk of osteoporosis and to obtain adequate endometrial proliferation and differentiation during ovarian suppression, transdermal 17-beta-estradiol and oral progestin were administered. Results of 20 cases versus 20 controls showed a reduction of metrorrhagia, a normalization of hemoglobin plasma concentration, and an adequate proliferation and secretory differentiation of the endometrium of patients with abnormal endometrial growth. Abnormal uterine bleeding is mainly due to uterine fibrosis and an inadequate estrogen and/or progesterone production or to a disordered estrogen transport from blood into the endometrium. In premenopausal women, endometrial hyperplasia may be part of a continuum that is ultimately manifested in the histological and biological pattern of endometrial carcinoma. The regression of endometrial hyperplasia obtained by using the therapeutic regimen mentioned above represents a preventive measure for endometrial cancer. Finally the normalization of blood loss offers a good medical alternative to surgery for patients with DUB. PMID:7978956

  6. Laboratory issues in bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Lillicrap, D; Nair, S C; Srivastava, A; Rodeghiero, F; Pabinger, I; Federici, A B

    2006-07-01

    The clinical history of the patient and of his/her relatives is the most important tool for making correct diagnosis of inherited or acquired bleeding disorders. Several attempts have been made by clinicians to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of bleeding symptoms. Specific and detailed questionnaires have been designed to quantify the bleeding tendency of patients with von Willebrand's disease (VWD) and a bleeding score has been calculated. VWD is considered the most frequent inherited bleeding disorder according to population studies: however, due to the complexity of its diagnosis, the number of patients with correct diagnosis of VWD in many developing countries is relatively low and most cases remain still under- or misdiagnosed. Once bleeding history is carefully evaluated by means of a bleeding score, the laboratory workout should be organized to find out the specific defect of haemostasis responsible for bleeding. Since factors involved in haemostasis are many, the correct approach must include first level screening tests with the aim to identify the abnormal phase of haemostasis involved: then, second level tests should be focused on the specific factors within the abnormal step of haemostasis. Among many other acquired bleeding disorders related to clinical conditions or to the use of drugs, the acquired inhibitors of haemostasis are rare but should be immediately characterized by appropriate laboratory tests because they can be often life-threatening for the patients. PMID:16683999

  7. Spontaneous bleeding from liver after open heart surgery☆

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Najeeb H.; Shah, Mian T.; Obeid, Mahmoud Ali; Gallo, Ricardo; Aliter, Hashem

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Intra-abdominal hemorrhage after open heart surgery is very uncommon in routine clinical practice. There are case reports of having bleeding from spleen or liver after starting low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) postoperatively. PRESENTATION OF CASE Our patient is a 58-year-old man with mitral valve regurgitation, who underwent mitral valve repair and developed intra-abdominal hemorrhage 8 h after open heart surgery. The exploratory laparotomy revealed the source of bleeding from ruptured sub-capsular liver hematoma and oozing from raw areas of the liver surface. Liver packing was done to control the bleeding. DISCUSSION The gastrointestinal complications after open heart surgery are rare and spontaneous bleeding from spleen has been reported. This is the first case from our hospital to have intra-abdominal hemorrhage after open heart surgery. CONCLUSION Spontaneous bleeding from liver is a possible complication after open heart surgery. We submit the case for the academic interest and to discuss the possible cause of hemorrhage. PMID:23948260

  8. Management of Acute Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Acute variceal bleeding could be a fatal complication in patients with liver cirrhosis. In patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis accompanied by ascites or hepatic encephalopathy, acute variceal bleeding is associated with a high mortality rate. Therefore, timely endoscopic hemostasis and prevention of relapse of bleeding are most important. The treatment goals for acute variceal bleeding are to correct hypovolemia; achieve rapid hemostasis; and prevent early rebleeding, complications related to bleeding, and deterioration of liver function. If variceal bleeding is suspected, treatment with vasopressors and antibiotics should be initiated immediately on arrival to the hospital. Furthermore, to obtain hemodynamic stability, the hemoglobin level should be maintained at >8 g/dL, systolic blood pressure >90 to 100 mm Hg, heart rate <100/min, and the central venous pressure from 1 to 5 mm Hg. When the patient becomes hemodynamically stable, hemostasis should be achieved by performing endoscopy as soon as possible. For esophageal variceal bleeding, endoscopic variceal ligation is usually performed, and for gastric variceal bleeding, endoscopic variceal obturation is performed primarily. If it is considered difficult to achieve hemostasis through endoscopy, salvage therapy may be carried out while keeping the patient hemodynamically stable. PMID:25133116

  9. Immediate Unprepped Hydroflush Colonoscopy for Severe Lower GI Bleeding: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Repaka, Aparna; Atkinson, Matthew R.; Faulx, Ashley L.; Isenberg, Gerard A.; Cooper, Gregory S.; Chak, Amitabh; Wong, Richard C. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Urgent colonoscopy is not always the preferred initial intervention in severe lower GI bleeding due to the need for a large volume of oral bowel preparation, the time required for administering the preparation, and concern regarding adequate visualization. Objective To evaluate feasibility, safety, and outcomes of immediate unprepped hydroflush colonoscopy for severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Design Prospective feasibility study of immediate colonoscopy after tap-water enema without oral bowel preparation, aided by water jet pumps and mechanical suction devices in patients admitted to the intensive care unit with a primary diagnosis of severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding Setting Tertiary referral center Main outcome measurements Primary outcome measurement was the percentage of colonoscopies where the preparation permitted satisfactory evaluation of the entire length of the colon suspected to contain the source of bleeding. Secondary outcome measurements were visualization of a definite source of bleeding, length of hospital and ICU stays, re-bleeding rates, and transfusion requirements. Results Thirteen procedures were performed in 12 patients. Complete colonoscopy to the cecum was performed in 9/13 patients (69.2 %). However, endoscopic visualization was felt to be adequate to definitively or presumptively identify the source of bleeding in all procedures, with no colonoscopy repeated due to inadequate preparation. A definite source of bleeding was identified in 5/13 procedures (38.5%). Median length of ICU stay was 1.5 days and hospital stay was 4.3 days. Recurrent bleeding during the same hospitalization, requiring repeat endoscopy, surgery or angiotherapy was seen in 3/12 patients (25%). Limitations Uncontrolled feasibility study of selected patients. Conclusion Immediate unprepped hydroflush colonoscopy in patients with severe lower GI bleeding is feasible with the hydroflush technique. PMID:22658390

  10. New Trends in Acute Management of Colonic Diverticular Bleeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Grassi, Veronica; Cavaliere, Davide; Renzi, Claudio; Tabola, Renata; Poli, Giulia; Avenia, Stefano; Farinella, Eleonora; Arezzo, Alberto; Vettoretto, Nereo; D'Andrea, Vito; Binda, Gian Andrea; Fingerhut, Abe

    2015-11-01

    Colonic diverticular disease is the most common cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. In the past, this condition was usually managed with urgent colectomy. Recently, the development of endoscopy and interventional radiology has led to a change in the management of colonic diverticular bleeding.The aim of this systematic review is to define the best treatment for colonic diverticular bleeding.A systematic bibliographic research was performed on the online databases for studies (randomized controlled trials [RCTs], observational trials, case series, and case reports) published between 2005 and 2014, concerning patients admitted with a diagnosis of diverticular bleeding according to the PRISMA methodology.The outcomes of interest were: diagnosis of diverticulosis as source of bleeding; incidence of self-limiting diverticular bleeding; management of non self-limiting bleeding (endoscopy, angiography, surgery); and recurrent diverticular bleeding.Fourteen studies were retrieved for analysis. No RCTs were found. Eleven non-randomized clinical controlled trials (NRCCTs) were included in this systematic review. In all studies, the definitive diagnosis of diverticular bleeding was always made by urgent colonoscopy. The colonic diverticular bleeding stopped spontaneously in over 80% of the patients, but a re-bleeding was not rare. Recently, interventional endoscopy and angiography became the first-line approach, thus relegating emergency colectomy to patients presenting with hemodynamic instability or as a second-line treatment after failure or complications of hemostasis with less invasive treatments.Colonoscopy is effective to diagnose diverticular bleeding. Nowadays, interventional endoscopy and angiographic treatment have gained a leading role and colectomy should only be entertained in case of failure of the former. PMID:26554768

  11. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Approach to abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant reproductive-age women Differential diagnosis of genital tract bleeding in women Postmenopausal uterine bleeding The following organizations also provide reliable health information. ● National Library of Medicine ( www.nlm.nih.gov/ ...

  12. Inflammation and endometrial bleeding.

    PubMed

    Berbic, M; Ng, C H M; Fraser, I S

    2014-12-01

    the amount of viable cellular material transiting the Fallopian tubes. All of these processes are influenced or controlled by regulatory T cells. Many of these leukocytes also have the potential to release regulatory molecules which stimulate endometrial repair mechanisms. Increasing recent evidence also implicates disturbances of immune cells and their cytokine mediators in contributing to symptoms of abnormal uterine bleeding and pelvic pain. These recent findings all point towards the importance of the 'inflammatory process' in both normal and abnormal endometrial bleeding. PMID:25247830

  13. Primary prophylaxis of variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Jawad A; Kanwal, Fasiha

    2014-12-01

    Gastroesophageal varices are present in almost half of patients with cirrhosis at the time of initial diagnosis. Variceal bleeding occurs in 25% to 35% of patients with cirrhosis. Effective and timely care can prevent variceal bleeding (primary prophylaxis). For example, clinical studies demonstrate that both beta-blockers and endoscopic variceal ligation are effective in preventing a first episode of variceal bleeding. The major challenge is to screen patients in a timely manner and institute a form of therapy that has the highest chance of success in terms of patient compliance and effectiveness. PMID:25440925

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-assisted gastrointestinal hemostasis: an evolving technique

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Thosani, Nirav; Singhal, Shashideep

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding can range from grossly visible blood in stool or vomitus to microscopic bleed. However, any kind of bleeding can lead to potential life-threatening consequences. A small proportion of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding remain refractory to initial endoscopic hemostasis. While some are successfully managed by repeat endoscopic intervention, a few fail to respond or are not amenable to endoscopic hemostasis. As of now, the next level of intervention is passed on to either surgeons or interventional radiologists. There is new evidence suggesting the increased utility of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in diagnosis and treatment of culprit vascular lesions across the gut. In addition, EUS-assisted technique has also been used in the primary prevention of bleeding from gastroesophageal varices. In this review article, we have summarized case series and reports describing the use of EUS-assisted hemostasis. Indications, techniques, complications and success rates reported are discussed. While most of the authors describe their experience with primary and secondary treatment of gastric varices, treatment of other gastrointestinal lesions with EUS assisted hemostatic techniques is also discussed. PMID:27366229

  15. [Jejunal diverticulosis: a cause of infrequent gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Case report].

    PubMed

    Zapata, R; Rojas, C; Gaete, F

    2000-10-01

    Jejunal diverticulosis is a very uncommon acquired disease. Clinical manifestations include acute life threatening complication such as perforation, obstruction and bleeding. Jejunal diverticulosis is an extremely rare site of origin of gastrointestinal bleeding, with fewer than seventy cases reported in the literature. We report a 77-year-old patient with a recurrent severe gastrointestinal bleeding manifested by melena and hematochaezia. During the hospitalization the tagged red blood cell scanning was positive for bleeding in the jejunum. At laparotomy, several large-mouthed diverticula at the proximal jejunum were identified. Approximately 30 centimeters of the involved segment was resected with primary end-to-end anastomosis. Postoperative 7 month evolution has been favorable, without any evidence of rebleeding. This report reviews the literature concerning this disease, discusses some diagnostic methods of studying small bowel bleeding and highlights the need to consider this diagnosis in old patients with a gastrointestinal hemorrhage of unknown origin (Rev Méd Chile 2000; 128: 1133-38). PMID:11349513

  16. Vaginal or uterine bleeding - overview

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal bleeding normally occurs during a woman's menstrual cycle, when she gets her period. Every woman's period is different. Most women have cycles between 24 and 34 days apart. It usually lasts ...

  17. Role of nitric oxide in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Lanas, Angel

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide osteoarthritis (OA) affects more than 9.6% of men and 18% of women older that 60 years. Treatment for OA often requires chronic use of selective or nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which have been associated with gastrointestinal and cardiovascular complications. An increased risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding with NSAIDs alone and when combined with low-dose aspirin has been described in numerous studies. Although cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors have been shown to carry a lower risk for gastrointestinal injury than nonselective NSAIDs, research continues to identify new treatments that not only are effective but also provide an improved benefit/risk profile, including better gastrointestinal tolerability. Nitric oxide (NO) is known to have a protective effect on the gastrointestinal tract. In preclinical studies NO was shown to help maintain gastric mucosal integrity, to inhibit leukocyte adherence to the endothelium, and to repair NSAID-induced damage. In addition, epidemiologic studies have shown that the use of NO-donating agents with NSAIDs or aspirin resulted in reduced risk for gastrointestinal bleeding. Recent studies have shown that cyclo-oxygenase inhibiting NO-donating drugs (CINODs), in which a NO molecule is chemically linked to an NSAID, are effective anti-inflammatory agents and may result in less gastrointestinal damage than is associated with NSAID use. Therefore, these agents provide a potential therapeutic option for patients with arthritis who require long-term NSAID therapy. PMID:19007429

  18. Challenging Case of Postmenopausal Bleeding and Complete Urogenital Duplication.

    PubMed

    Grechukhina, Olga; English, Diana P; Miller, Devin; Ratner, Elena

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Müllerian duct anomalies represent a wide spectrum of congenital abnormalities ranging from simple uterine anomalies to more complex multisystem derangements. Complete duplication of uterus, cervix, and vagina may be associated with urologic and caudal gastrointestinal malformations. CASE REPORT We present a case report detailing the management of a morbidly obese patient with postmenopausal bleeding and thickened endometrial stripe who had a very rare condition of pelvic organ duplication, including 2 hemiuteri, 2 vaginas, 2 hemibladders, and 2 each of ovaries, fallopian tubes, kidneys, and ureters. Laparoscopic hysterectomy was complicated by difficulties understanding urinary system anatomy requiring intraoperative urology consultation and imaging. CONCLUSIONS Management of patients with urogenital duplication and abnormal uterine bleeding requires a thorough understanding of possible associated malformations. Thorough preoperative evaluation, careful surgical exploration, and multidisciplinary approach may be necessary to avoid urologic injury in such patients. PMID:27180733

  19. Analysis of Non-Small Bowel Lesions Detected by Capsule Endoscopy in Patients with Potential Small Bowel Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Fatma Ebru; Yurekli, Oyku Tayfur; Demirezer Bolat, Aylin; Tahtacı, Mustafa; Koseoglu, Huseyin; Selvi, Eyup; Buyukasik, Naciye Semnur; Ersoy, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding cases in whom source cannot be identified after conventional upper and lower GI endoscopy are defined as potential small bowel bleeding. We aimed to search for lesions in the reach of conventional endoscopy in patients to whom video capsule endoscopy (VCE) had been applied for potential small bowel bleeding. 114 patients who had VCE evaluation for potential small bowel bleeding between January 2009 and August 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. Mean age of the patients was 55 ± 17 years. Female/male ratio is 39/75. In 58 patients (50.9%) bleeding lesion could be determined. Among these 58 patients 8 patients' lesions were in the reach of conventional endoscopes. Overall these 8 patients comprised 7% of patients in whom VCE was performed for potential small bowel bleeding. Among these 8 patients 5 had colonic lesions (4 angiodysplasia, 1 ulcerated polypoid cecal lesion), 2 had gastric lesions (1 GAVE, 1 anastomotic bleeding), and 1 patient had a bleeding lesion in the duodenal bulbus. Although capsule endoscopy is usually performed for potential small bowel bleeding gastroenterologists should always keep in mind that these patients may be suffering from bleeding from non-small bowel segments and should carefully review images captured from non-small bowel areas. PMID:27092029

  20. Gastroesophageal variceal bleeding caused by hepatoportal arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, J J; Lai, K H; Wen, S C; Lo, G H; Hsueh, C W; Chang, T H

    2000-08-01

    Hepatoportal arteriovenous fistulas are usually traumatic in origin and may result in portal hypertension and serious complications. We report a 34-year-old female with a history of abdominal trauma, who developed symptoms of tarry stools and hematemesis 5 years later. Esophageal and gastric varices with bleeding were diagnosed by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Abdominal ultrasonography and computerized tomography favored noncirrhotic portal hypertension. An extrahepatic hepatoportal arteriovenous fistula was demonstrated by angiography. The patient underwent surgery to correct the condition. The liver had a smooth surface and both the common hepatic and gastroduodenal arteries were ligated during surgery. The postoperative course was uneventful. The varices later disappeared. PMID:10969452

  1. Successful percutaneous angioembolisation of bleeding jejunal varix by acrylate glue and coils

    PubMed Central

    Haq, Tanveer Ul; AlQamari, Nauman; Sayani, Raza; Hilal, Kiran

    2013-01-01

    Portal hypertension is a common disease worldwide. One of its rare complications is bleeding jejunal varices which is usually asymptomatic and may present with gastrointestinal bleeding. We present a case of a jejunal bleeding that was successfully embolised with acrylate glue and embolisation coils. A middle-aged woman with a history of multiple abdominal surgeries for adenocarcinoma of right ovary, presented to us with multiple episodes of haematochezia. On a CT scan of the abdomen, she was diagnosed with chronic liver disease with portal hypertension, multiple varices at porto-systemic anastomosis and ectopic jejunal varix. She was treated by interventional radiologists by percutaneous embolisation of bleeding varix using glue and embolisation coils through a portal venous approach. PMID:24158303

  2. Bleeding due to ectopic varices in a urinary diversion: A multidisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Eduardo Mariano Albers; Reyes, Alfonsi Friera; Menéndez, Ricardo Brime

    2015-01-01

    The ectopic varices in patients with portal hypertension are those that occur at any level of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, regardless of the varices that occur at the esophageal level. These ectopic varices account for 2–5% of the causes of GI bleeding varices. The risk of bleeding is quadrupled compared to the esophagogastric area, with a mortality of up to 40%. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, should be considered in cases secondary to recurrent bleeding varices. We present a case report of an urological emergency of bleeding in a urinary diversion secondary to ectopic varices successfully treated through the placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. The condition described here is rare, but important, as it can be a life-threatening complication of portal hypertension. This kind of complication should be known by urologic surgeons managing patients with urinary diversions. PMID:26834901

  3. Surgical management of presacral bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ausobsky, JR; Vowden, P

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Presacral venous bleeding is an uncommon but potentially life threatening complication of rectal surgery. During the posterior rectal dissection, it is recommended to proceed into the plane between the fascia propria of the rectum and the presacral fascia. Incorrect mobilisation of the rectum outside the Waldeyer’s fascia can tear out the lower presacral venous plexus or the sacral basivertebral veins, causing what may prove to be uncontrollable bleeding. Methods A systematic search of the MEDLINE® and Embase™ databases was performed to obtain primary data published in the period between 1 January 1960 and 31 July 2013. Each article describing variables such as incidence of presacral venous bleeding, surgical approach, number of cases treated and success rate was included in the analysis. Results A number of creative solutions have been described that attempt to provide good tamponade of the presacral haemorrhage, eliminating the need for second operation. However, few cases are reported in the literature. Conclusions As conventional haemostatic measures often fail to control this type of haemorrhage, several alternative methods to control bleeding definitively have been described. We propose a practical comprehensive classification of the available techniques for the management of presacral bleeding. PMID:24780015

  4. Bleed Hole Flow Phenomena Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Boundary-layer bleed is an invaluable tool for controlling the airflow in supersonic aircraft engine inlets. Incoming air is decelerated to subsonic speeds prior to entering the compressor via a series of oblique shocks. The low momentum flow in the boundary layer interacts with these shocks, growing in thickness and, under some conditions, leading to flow separation. To remedy this, bleed holes are strategically located to remove mass from the boundary layer, reducing its thickness and helping to maintain uniform flow to the compressor. The bleed requirements for any inlet design are unique and must be validated by extensive wind tunnel testing to optimize performance and efficiency. To accelerate this process and reduce cost, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center initiated an experimental program to study the flow phenomena associated with bleed holes. Knowledge of these flow properties will be incorporated into computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that will aid engine inlet designers in optimizing bleed configurations before any hardware is fabricated. This ongoing investigation is currently examining two hole geometries, 90 and 20 (both with 5-mm diameters), and various flow features.

  5. [Direct oral anticoagulant associated bleeding].

    PubMed

    Godier, A; Martin, A-C; Rosencher, N; Susen, S

    2016-07-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are recommended for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. However, they are associated with hemorrhagic complications. Management of DOAC-induced bleeding remains challenging. Activated or non-activated prothrombin concentrates are proposed, although their efficacy to reverse DOAC is uncertain. Therapeutic options also include antidotes: idarucizumab, antidote for dabigatran, has been approved for use whereas andexanet alpha, antidote for anti-Xa agents, and aripazine, antidote for all DOAC, are under development. Other options include hemodialysis for the treatment of dabigatran-associated bleeding and administration of oral charcoal if recent DOAC ingestion. DOAC plasma concentration measurement is necessary to guide DOAC reversal. We propose an update on DOAC-associated bleeding, integrating the availability of dabigatran antidote and the critical place of DOAC concentration measurements. PMID:27297642

  6. Missed bleeding events after ticagrelor in PEGASUS trial: Massive non-compliance, information censoring, or both?

    PubMed

    Serebruany, Victor; Tomek, Ales

    2016-07-15

    PEGASUS trial reported reduction of composite primary endpoint after conventional 180mg/daily ticagrelor (CT), and lower 120mg/daily dose ticagrelor (LT) at expense of extra bleeding. Following approval of CT and LT for long-term secondary prevention indication, recent FDA review verified some bleeding outcomes in PEGASUS. To compare the risks after CT and LT against placebo by seven TIMI scale variables, and 9 bleeding categories considered as serious adverse events (SAE) in light of PEGASUS drug discontinuation rates (DDR). The DDR in all PEGASUS arms was high reaching astronomical 32% for CT. The distribution of some outcomes (TIMI major, trauma, epistaxis, iron deficiency, hemoptysis, and anemia) was reasonable. However, the TIMI minor events were heavily underreported when compared to similar trials. Other bleedings (intracranial, spontaneous, hematuria, and gastrointestinal) appear sporadic, lacking expected dose-dependent impact of CT and LT. Few SAE outcomes (fatal, ecchymosis, hematoma, bruises, bleeding) paradoxically reported more bleeding after LT than after CT. Many bleeding outcomes were probably missed in PEGASUS potentially due to massive non-compliance, information censoring, or both. The FDA must improve reporting of trial outcomes especially in the sponsor-controlled environment when DDR and incomplete follow-up rates are high. PMID:27128533

  7. Prevention of bleeding and hemorrhagic complications in surgical patients with inherited factor VII deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wiszniewski, Adam; Szczepanik, Andrzej; Misiak, Andrzej; Bykowska, Ksenia; Szopiński, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    Inherited factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive hemorrhagic disorder. The major clinical symptoms include: bleeding from the oral cavity, epistaxis, menorrhagia, spontaneous hemarthros, bleeding to the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system, and perioperative bleeding. The aim of this study was to present our experience in preventing bleeding and hemorrhagic disorders in surgical patients with inherited FVII deficiency by using recombinant activated FVIIa (rFVIIa), and with prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs). In 2002-2011, 17 patients with inherited FVII deficiency underwent surgery. Thirteen patients had isolated FVII deficiency below 10%, and four patients 10-25. To prevent bleeding and hemorrhagic complications, we administered small single doses of rFVIIa (Novo-Seven) at 12-h intervals to 15 patients on surgery day and on day 1 following surgery, then every 24 h; PCCs were administered (Prothromplex, Beriplex) to two patients. No symptoms of bleeding, hemorrhagic or thromboembolic complications were observed in the perioperative and 1-month observation period in surgical patients treated with rFVIIa. One patient treated with PCC (Prothromplex) developed distal deep vein thrombosis on postoperative day 7. The results suggest that small, single, every 12-h doses of rFVIIa (NovoSeven) and in next days after surgery one time every 24 h are well tolerated and effective for prevention of thromboembolic, bleeding and hemorrhagic complications in FVII-deficient patients. Antithrombotic prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin should be applied in patients using PCCs. PMID:25688458

  8. Topical tranexamic acid as a novel treatment for bleeding peptic ulcer: A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Rafeey, Mandana; Shoaran, Maryam; Ghergherechi, Robabeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peptic ulcers are among the most common causes of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in children. The standard care for GI bleeding is endoscopy for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. We aimed to assess the effect of topical tranexamic acid (TXA) via endoscopic procedures in children with GI bleeding caused by bleeding ulcers. Procedure: In this randomised controlled trial, 120 children were evaluated by diagnostic procedures for GI bleeding, of which 63 (30 girls, 33 boys) aged 1-month to 15 years were recruited. The patients were randomly divided into case and control groups. In the case group, TXA was administered directly under endoscopic therapy. In the control group, epinephrine (1/10,000) was submucosally injected to the four quadrants of ulcer margins as the routine endoscopic therapy. In both groups, the patients received supportive medical therapy with intravenous fluids and proton pump inhibitor drugs. Results: The mean ± standard deviation age of the children was 5 ± 2.03 years. Rebleeding occurred in 15 (11.4%) and 21 (9.8%) patients in the case and control groups, respectively (P = 0.50). The frequency of blood transfusion episodes (P = 0.06) and duration of hospital stay (P = 0.07) were not statistically different between the groups. Conclusion: Using topical TXA via endoscopic procedures may be effective in cases of GI bleedings caused by active bleeding ulcers. In order to establish this therapeutic effect, a large number of clinical studies are needed. PMID:27251517

  9. Transcatheter Embolization for the Treatment of Both Vaginal and Lower Intestinal Bleeding Due to Advanced Pelvic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Karaman, Bulent; Oren, Nisa Cem; Andic, Cagatay; Ustunsoz, Bahri

    2010-01-01

    We report a 31-year-old woman with end-stage cervical carcinoma who suffers both lower intestinal and vaginal bleeding. A selective internal iliac arteriogram demonstrated pseudoaneurysm formation in the vaginal branch of the left internal iliac artery. There was also a fistula between the pseudoaneurysm and the lower intestinal segments. Selective transcatheter coil embolization was performed, and the bleeding was treated successfully. We conclude that the internal iliac artery should be evaluated first in patients with advanced pelvic malignancy when searching for the source of lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Additionally, transcatheter arterial embolization is a safe and effective treatment technique. PMID:25610148

  10. Bleeding Risk of Stent Removal After EUS-Guided Cystgastrostomy and Metal Stent Placement for Drainage of a Pancreatic Fluid Collection.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Farid; Samarasena, Jason; Lee, John G

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopists are keenly aware of bleeding risks during and immediately after cystgastrostomy and reduce this risk by endoscopic ultrasound guidance to avoid manipulation near major vessels. Bleeding risk associated with cystgastrostomy stent removal after resolution of a pancreatic fluid collection, however, is less evident. We present our experience with bleeding during cystgastrostomy stent removal in a patient with resolved walled-off necrosis and will discuss the significance of unexplained spontaneous upper gastrointestinal bleeding in this setting, which may serve as a warning sign for possible stent erosion into major vessels. PMID:27622199

  11. Bleeding Risk of Stent Removal After EUS-Guided Cystgastrostomy and Metal Stent Placement for Drainage of a Pancreatic Fluid Collection

    PubMed Central

    Samarasena, Jason; Lee, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopists are keenly aware of bleeding risks during and immediately after cystgastrostomy and reduce this risk by endoscopic ultrasound guidance to avoid manipulation near major vessels. Bleeding risk associated with cystgastrostomy stent removal after resolution of a pancreatic fluid collection, however, is less evident. We present our experience with bleeding during cystgastrostomy stent removal in a patient with resolved walled-off necrosis and will discuss the significance of unexplained spontaneous upper gastrointestinal bleeding in this setting, which may serve as a warning sign for possible stent erosion into major vessels.

  12. Surgical Treatment of Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Seong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor is the most common mesenchymal tumor in the gastrointestinal tract and is most frequently developed in the stomach in the form of submucosal tumor. The incidence of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor is estimated to be as high as 25% of the population when all small and asymptomatic tumors are included. Because gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor is not completely distinguished from other submucosal tumors, a surgical excisional biopsy is recommended for tumors >2 cm. The surgical principles of gastrointestinal stromal tumor are composed of an R0 resection with a normal mucosa margin, no systemic lymph node dissection, and avoidance of perforation, which results in peritoneal seeding even in cases with otherwise low risk profiles. Laparoscopic surgery has been indicated for gastrointestinal stromal tumors <5 cm, and the indication for laparoscopic surgery is expanded to larger tumors if the above mentioned surgical principles can be maintained. A simple exogastric resection and various transgastric resection techniques are used for gastrointestinal stromal tumors in favorable locations (the fundus, body, greater curvature side). For a lesion at the gastroesophageal junction in the posterior wall of the stomach, enucleation techniques have been tried preserve the organ's function. Those methods have a theoretical risk of seeding a ruptured tumor, but this risk has not been evaluated by well-designed clinical trials. While some clinical trials are still on-going, neoadjuvant imatinib is suggested when marginally unresectable or multiorgan resection is anticipated to reduce the extent of surgery and the chance of incomplete resection, rupture or bleeding. PMID:23610714

  13. Angiographic evaluation and management of acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Walker, T Gregory; Salazar, Gloria M; Waltman, Arthur C

    2012-01-01

    Although most cases of acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage either spontaneously resolve or respond to medical management or endoscopic treatment, there are still a significant number of patients who require emergency angiography and transcatheter treatment. Evaluation with noninvasive imaging such as nuclear scintigraphy or computed tomography may localize the bleeding source and/or confirm active hemorrhage prior to angiography. Any angiographic evaluation should begin with selective catheterization of the artery supplying the most likely site of bleeding, as determined by the available clinical, endoscopic and imaging data. If a hemorrhage source is identified, superselective catheterization followed by transcatheter microcoil embolization is usually the most effective means of successfully controlling hemorrhage while minimizing potential complications. This is now well-recognized as a viable and safe alternative to emergency surgery. In selected situations transcatheter intra-arterial infusion of vasopressin may also be useful in controlling acute gastrointestinal bleeding. One must be aware of the various side effects and potential complications associated with this treatment, however, and recognize the high re-bleeding rate. In this article we review the current role of angiography, transcatheter arterial embolization and infusion therapy in the evaluation and management of nonvariceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage. PMID:22468082

  14. [Actinic enteritis as a cause of digestive bleeding of obscure origin].

    PubMed

    Vásquez, Luis; Guevara, Julissa; Aguilar, Victor; Menéndez, Monica; Bravo, Eduar; Guzman Rojas, Patricia; Pichilingue, Catherina; Zegarra, Arturo; Huerta-Mercado, Jorge; Pinto, José; Prochazka, Ricardo; Valenzuela, Vanessa; Bussalleu, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Chronic actinic enteritis is a malfunction of the small bowel, occurring in the 6 months post-radiotherapy, and it can be manifestated as malabsortion, stenosis, fistula formation, local abscesses, perforation and bleeding, We report a case of an elderly patient who presents an episode of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) secondary to actinic enteritis. She is a 64-year- old female patient with the past medical history of cervical cancer who received radiotherapy and brachytherapy. One year after the treatment, the patient presents a chronic episode of melena and symptomatic anemia and 1 week before the admission she had hematochezia. At admission she has hemodynamic instability with a hemoglobin value of 2.7 gr/dl. We did an upper endoscopy, a colonoscopy and abdomino-pelvic tomography without any findings of the bleeding’s source. Reason why an endoscopic capsule was done, showing bleeding areas in the medial and distal small bowel. The patient had another gastrointestinal bleeding requiring a surgery where they decide to do a resection of the small bowel and a right hemicholectomy. The pathology was compatible with actinic enteritis. The patient after the surgery had a torpid evolution, and finally dies. We describe this case and do a review of all the existent data around the world, because is the first case reported in Peru of an actinic enteritis as a cause of OGIB. PMID:27409093

  15. Thrombosis in rare bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sáez, Arlette

    2012-04-01

    Inherited deficiencies of blood coagulation factors are usually associated with lifelong bleeding tendency. In addition to Haemophilias A and B and von Willebrand disease, congenital deficiencies of such factors as fibrinogen, prothrombin (FII)), FV, FVII, FX, FXI, FXIII, and combined deficiencies occur and can lead to a diversity of clinical conditions. Paradoxically, for some of these disorders associated with significant bleeding tendency there are reports of thrombotic events, both arterial and venous. Thrombosis in hemophilia patients has a multifactorial pathogenesis and the main conditions associated with this complication are the use of long-term central venous catheters, intensive replacement therapy usually in the setting of surgical procedures, the use of bypassing agents or the coexistence of acquired or inherited prothrombotic risk factors. Regarding other rare bleeding disorders, thrombotic phenomena has been described particularly in patients with afibrinogenemia, FXI and FVII deficiency and the events can occur even in young patients, in the presence of concomitant risk factors or spontaneously. Replacement therapy must be individualized and should take into account past history of haemostatic challenges, family history of bleeding and thrombosis, just like the level of factor. For mild deficiencies when patients are asymptomatic the use of antithrombotic prophylaxis must be considered with or without concomitant use of replacement therapy. In patients with history of thrombosis it may be helpful to perform a thrombophilia screening to exclude coexisting prothrombotic defects and for all patients it is recommended to control known cardiovascular disease risk factors. PMID:22507808

  16. Spontaneous Bleeding Associated with Ginkgo biloba

    PubMed Central

    Bent, Stephen; Goldberg, Harley; Padula, Amy; Avins, Andrew L

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ginkgo biloba (ginkgo) is a herbal remedy used by over 2% of the adult population in the United States. Several review articles have suggested that ginkgo may increase the risk of bleeding. OBJECTIVE To report a case of bleeding associated with using ginkgo, to systematically review the literature for similar case reports, and to evaluate whether using ginkgo is causally related to bleeding. DATA SOURCES We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, IBIDS, and the Cochrane Collaboration Database from 1966 to October 2004 with no language restrictions. REVIEW METHODS Published case reports of bleeding events in persons using ginkgo were selected. Two reviewers independently abstracted a standard set of information to assess whether ginkgo caused the bleeding event. RESULTS Fifteen published case reports described a temporal association between using ginkgo and a bleeding event. Most cases involved serious medical conditions, including 8 episodes of intracranial bleeding. However, 13 of the case reports identified other risk factors for bleeding. Only 6 reports clearly described that ginkgo was stopped and that bleeding did not recur. Bleeding times, measured in 3 reports, were elevated when patients were taking ginkgo. CONCLUSION A structured assessment of published case reports suggests a possible causal association between using ginkgo and bleeding events. Given the widespread use of this herb and the serious nature of the reported events, further studies are needed. Patients using ginkgo, particularly those with known bleeding risks, should be counseled about a possible increase in bleeding risk. PMID:16050865

  17. A stubborn anemia caused by ectopic pancreas bleeding in the jejunum revealed by capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun-Ying; Yang, Xiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic pancreas is extremely rare in clinical setting. Meanwhile, a stubborn anemia without obvious dark bloody stool due to ectopic pancreas diagnosed by capsule endoscopy has not been reported. We reported a case of an ectopic pancreas inducing obscure gastrointestinal bleeding in a 70-year-old woman presenting as stubborn anemia, which was diagnosed by capsule endoscopy. The patient recovered well after resection the lesion. Diagnosis of ectopic pancreas is extremely difficult with conventional techniques. Endoscopists should pay more attention to the ectopic pancreas as a rare differential consideration for occult intestinal bleeding. PMID:26682148

  18. The importance of laparotomy in the diagnosis and management of intestinal bleeding of obscure origin.

    PubMed Central

    Brearley, S.; Hawker, P. C.; Dorricott, N. J.; Lee, J. R.; Ambrose, N. S.; Silverman, S. H.; Dykes, P. W.; Keighley, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-seven patients who had had either a colonoscopy or a selective mesenteric angiogram while being investigated for severe or persistent gastrointestinal bleeding of obscure origin were reviewed. Failure to make a prompt diagnosis was partly responsible for the 16% hospital mortality in the series. Colonoscopy was diagnostic on 6 out of 38 examinations but detected 43% of lesions in the colon. Angiography achieved only 3 diagnoses in 17 examinations. Fourteen patients had an exploratory laparotomy which was diagnostic in 9. We believe that early laparotomy still has an important place in the diagnosis and treatment of intestinal bleeding of obscure origin. PMID:3491570

  19. Bleeding risk with clopidogrel and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Sohail, Umair; Harleen, Chela; Mahdi, Amin O; Arif, Murtaza; Nguyen, Douglas L; Bechtold, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare bleeding within 48 h in patients undergoing percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) with or without clopidogrel. METHODS After institutional review board approval, a retrospective study involving a single center was conducted on adult patients having PEG (1/08-1/14). Patients were divided into two groups: Clopidogrel group consisting of those patients taking clopidogrel within 5 d of PEG and the non-clopidogrel group including those patients not taking clopidogrel within 5 d of the PEG. RESULTS Three hundred and nineteen PEG patients were found. One hundred and sixty-eight males and 151 females with mean body mass index 28.47 ± 9.75 kg/m2 and mean age 65.03 ± 16.11 years were identified. Thirty-three patients were on clopidogrel prior to PEG with 286 patients not on clopidogrel. No patients in either group developed hematochezia, melena, or hematemesis within 48 h of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). No statistical differences were observed between the two groups with 48 h for hemoglobin decrease of > 2 g/dL (2 vs 5 patients; P = 0.16), blood transfusions (2 vs 7 patients; P = 0.24), and repeat endoscopy for possible gastrointestinal bleeding (no patients in either group). CONCLUSION Based on the results, no significant post-procedure bleeding was observed in patients undergoing PEG with recent use of clopidogrel.

  20. Crohn's disease presenting as acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Podugu, Amareshwar; Tandon, Kanwarpreet; Castro, Fernando J

    2016-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a rare complication of Crohn’s disease (CD). Although several surgical and non-surgical approaches have been described over the last 2 decades this complication still poses significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Given the relative infrequency of severe bleeding in CD, available medical literature on this topic is mostly in the form of retrospective case series and reports. In this article we review the risk factors, diagnostic modalities and treatment options for the management of CD presenting as GI hemorrhage. PMID:27122659

  1. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in the cirrhotic patient.

    PubMed

    Horsley-Silva, Jennifer L; Vargas, Hugo E

    2015-07-01

    As advances in liver disease continue, including the increasing use of liver transplantation, the endoscopist needs to be familiar with the standards of care and potential complications in the management of the cirrhotic population. This includes both elective endoscopic procedures, such as screening colonoscopies and variceal banding, as well as the acutely bleeding cirrhotic patient. Peri-procedural management and standards of care for acute gastrointestinal hemorrhaging of cirrhotic patients will be emphasized. This article will focus on the plethora of data available to highlight the benefits of endoscopic intervention in the care of patients with liver disease and outline the areas of future emphasis. PMID:25967459

  2. Zinc and gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Skrovanek, Sonja; DiGuilio, Katherine; Bailey, Robert; Huntington, William; Urbas, Ryan; Mayilvaganan, Barani; Mercogliano, Giancarlo; Mullin, James M

    2014-01-01

    This review is a current summary of the role that both zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation can play in the etiology and therapy of a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. The recent literature describing zinc action on gastrointestinal epithelial tight junctions and epithelial barrier function is described. Zinc enhancement of gastrointestinal epithelial barrier function may figure prominently in its potential therapeutic action in several gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:25400994

  3. Pediatric upper gastrointestinal studies.

    PubMed

    Odgren, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal examinations are common procedures in many radiology departments. Performing this examination on pediatric patients requires understanding the formation of the gastrointestinal tract and the various disease processes and anatomical variances that can occur. The examination also requires a thorough patient history. This article discusses embryologic development and anatomy of the small bowel and colon, disease processes and conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract, and fluoroscopic upper gastrointestinal tract examinations performed on the pediatric and neonatal patient. PMID:24806054

  4. Predictors of re-bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mu-Hsien; Tsou, Yung-Kuan; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Lee, Ching-Song; Liu, Nai-Jen; Sung, Kai-Feng; Cheng, Hao-Tsai

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To predict the re-bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) bleeding. METHODS: Over a 15-year period, data from 161 patients with delayed post-ES bleeding were retrospectively collected from a single medical center. To identify risk factors for re-bleeding after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis, parameters before, during and after the procedure of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography were analyzed. These included age, gender, blood biochemistry, co-morbidities, endoscopic diagnosis, presence of peri-ampullary diverticulum, occurrence of immediate post-ES bleeding, use of needle knife precut sphincterotomy, severity of delayed bleeding, endoscopic features on delayed bleeding, and type of endoscopic therapy. RESULTS: A total of 35 patients (21.7%) had re-bleeding after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-ES bleeding. Univariate analysis revealed that malignant biliary stricture, serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL, initial bleeding severity, and bleeding diathesis were significant predictors of re-bleeding. By multivariate analysis, serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL and initial bleeding severity remained significant predictors. Re-bleeding was controlled by endoscopic therapy in a single (n = 23) or multiple (range, 2-7; n = 6) sessions in 29 of the 35 patients (82.9%). Four patients required transarterial embolization and one went for surgery. These five patients had severe bleeding when delayed post-ES bleeding occurred. One patient with decompensated liver cirrhosis died from re-bleeding. CONCLUSION: Re-bleeding occurs in approximately one-fifth of patients after initial successful endoscopic hemostasis for delayed post-ES bleeding. Severity of initial bleeding and serum bilirubin level of greater than 10 mg/dL are predictors of re-bleeding. PMID:27003996

  5. Catastrophic gastrointestinal complication of systemic immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lyn Alexandra; Gangopadhyay, Mitali; Gaya, Daniel R

    2015-02-28

    We present a case of acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in a patient with systemic vasculitis immunosuppressed on cyclophosphamide and prednisolone. The patient presented with a diffuse haemorrhagic oesophagitis and a non-specific duodenitis. Biopsies taken from the oesophagus and duodenum demonstrated infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) respectively. Viral infection of the upper gastrointestinal tract is a recognised complication of immunosuppression and HSV is one of the most common pathogens. CMV on the other hand most commonly causes a colitis or less commonly oesophagitis. CMV enteritis is rare as is the synchronous infection with two viral agents in an immunocompromised patient having being described in a few case series only. Viral infection of the gastrointestinal tract in immunocompromised patients should be treated with systemic anti-viral medication and consideration to withdrawal of the immunosuppressive therapy if possible and appropriate. The authors highlight the need for a high suspicion of viral infection in immunosuppressed patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25741165

  6. A Rare Cause of Chronic Life Threatening Bleeding in a Girl: The Ulcerated Blind Loops

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rasik; Shah, Nitin; Gupta, Tarun

    2016-01-01

    Ulceration in a blind loop can lead to massive gastrointestinal tract (GIT) bleeding. A 13-year old girl presented with symptomatic melena requiring repeated blood transfusion since childhood. She was an operated case of small bowel atresia in neonatal life. Her upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopies were normal. Operation showed presence of multiple ulcers in two blind loops (parts of previous side to side anastomosis) and at the anastomotic site. She underwent resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the small bowel leading to complete resolution of melena and anemia. PMID:27170918

  7. A Rare Cause of Chronic Life Threatening Bleeding in a Girl: The Ulcerated Blind Loops.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Abhijeet D; Shah, Rasik; Shah, Nitin; Gupta, Tarun

    2016-01-01

    Ulceration in a blind loop can lead to massive gastrointestinal tract (GIT) bleeding. A 13-year old girl presented with symptomatic melena requiring repeated blood transfusion since childhood. She was an operated case of small bowel atresia in neonatal life. Her upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopies were normal. Operation showed presence of multiple ulcers in two blind loops (parts of previous side to side anastomosis) and at the anastomotic site. She underwent resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the small bowel leading to complete resolution of melena and anemia. PMID:27170918

  8. Genetics of gastrointestinal atresias.

    PubMed

    Celli, Jacopo

    2014-08-01

    Gastrointestinal atresias are a common and serious feature within the spectrum of gastrointestinal malformations. Atresias tend to be lethal, although, now-days surgery and appropriate care can restore function to the affected organs. In spite of their frequency, their life threatening condition and report history gastrointestinal atresias' etiology remains mostly unclarified. Gastrointestinal atresias can occur as sporadic but they are more commonly seen in association with other anomalies. For the syndromic cases there is mounting evidence of a strong genetic component. Sporadic cases are generally thought to originate from mechanical or vascular incidents in utero, especially for the atresias of the lower intestinal tract. However, recent data show that a genetic component may be present also in these cases. Embryological and genetic studies are starting to uncover the mechanism of gastrointestinal development and their genetic components. Here we present an overview of the current knowledge of gastrointestinal atresias, their syndromic forms and the genetic pathways involved in gastrointestinal malformation. PMID:25019371

  9. A clinically viable capsule endoscopy video analysis platform for automatic bleeding detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Steven; Jiao, Heng; Xie, Jean; Mui, Peter; Leighton, Jonathan A.; Pasha, Shabana; Rentz, Lauri; Abedi, Mahmood

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we present a novel and clinically valuable software platform for automatic bleeding detection on gastrointestinal (GI) tract from Capsule Endoscopy (CE) videos. Typical CE videos for GI tract run about 8 hours and are manually reviewed by physicians to locate diseases such as bleedings and polyps. As a result, the process is time consuming and is prone to disease miss-finding. While researchers have made efforts to automate this process, however, no clinically acceptable software is available on the marketplace today. Working with our collaborators, we have developed a clinically viable software platform called GISentinel for fully automated GI tract bleeding detection and classification. Major functional modules of the SW include: the innovative graph based NCut segmentation algorithm, the unique feature selection and validation method (e.g. illumination invariant features, color independent features, and symmetrical texture features), and the cascade SVM classification for handling various GI tract scenes (e.g. normal tissue, food particles, bubbles, fluid, and specular reflection). Initial evaluation results on the SW have shown zero bleeding instance miss-finding rate and 4.03% false alarm rate. This work is part of our innovative 2D/3D based GI tract disease detection software platform. While the overall SW framework is designed for intelligent finding and classification of major GI tract diseases such as bleeding, ulcer, and polyp from the CE videos, this paper will focus on the automatic bleeding detection functional module.

  10. Treatment of Nonvariceal Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage by Transcatheter Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muhammad; Ul Haq, Tanveer; Salam, Basit; Beg, Madiha; Azeemuddin, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the sensitivity of mesenteric angiography, technical success of hemostasis, clinical success rate, and complications of transcatheter embolization for the treatment of acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Material and Methods. A retrospective review of 200 consecutive patients who underwent mesenteric arteriography for acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage between February 2004 and February 2011 was done. Results. Of 200 angiographic studies, 114 correctly revealed the bleeding site with mesenteric angiography. 47 (41%) patients had upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and 67 (59%) patients had lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Out of these 114, in 112 patients (98%) technical success was achieved with immediate cessation of bleeding. 81 patients could be followed for one month. Clinical success was achieved in 72 out of these 81 patients (89%). Seven patients rebled. 2 patients developed bowel ischemia. Four patients underwent surgery for bowel ischemia or rebleeding. Conclusion. The use of therapeutic transcatheter embolization for treatment of acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is highly successful and relatively safe with 98% technical success and 2.4% postembolization ischemia in our series. In 89% of cases it was definitive without any further intervention. PMID:23844289

  11. Research on Supersonic Inlet Bleed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David O.; Vyas, Manan A.; Slater, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Phase I data results of the Fundamental Inlet Bleed Experiments project at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are presented which include flow coefficient results for two single-hole boundary-layer bleed configurations. The bleed configurations tested are round holes at inclination angles of 90deg and 20deg both having length-to-diameter ratios of 2.0. Results were obtained at freestream Mach numbers of 1.33, 1.62, 1.98, 2.46, and 2.92 and unit Reynolds numbers of 0.984, 1.89, and 2.46 10(exp 7)/m. Approach boundary-layer data are presented for each flow condition and the flow coefficient results are compared to existing multi-hole data obtained under similar conditions. For the 90deg hole, the single and multi-hole distributions agree fairly well with the exception that under supercritical operation, the multi-hole data chokes at higher flow coefficient levels. This behavior is also observed for the 20deg hole but to a lesser extent. The 20deg hole also shows a markedly different characteristic at subcritical operation. Also presented are preliminary results of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of both configurations at the Mach 1.33 and a unit Reynolds number of 2.46 10(exp 7)/m. Comparison of the results shows the agreement to be very good.

  12. Genomic approaches to bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Peyvandi, F; Hayward, C P M

    2016-07-01

    The genes encoding the coagulation factors were characterized over two decades ago. Since then, significant progress has been made in the genetic diagnosis of the two commonest severe inherited bleeding disorders, haemophilia A and B. Experience with the genetic of inherited rare bleeding disorders and platelet disorders is less well advanced. Rare bleeding disorders are usually inherited as autosomal recessive disorders, while it is now clear that a number of the more common platelet function disorders are inherited as autosomal dominant traits. In both cases, DNA sequencing has been useful since most of these disorders are due to mutations located at the coding regions or splice sites of genes encoding the abnormal protein. However, in 5-10% of patients affected with severe clotting factor deficiencies, no genetic defect can be identified and until recently, the genetic characterization of inherited platelet disorders had been confined to the more prevalent conditions such as Glanzmann disease and Bernard-Soulier syndrome. In patients with no gene mutations identified, so far, the role of next-generation sequencing as well as of other new genomic technologies will very likely have increasing importance. However, such methods require extensive bioinformatics analysis that, in turn will require critical revision of our current diagnostic infrastructure. PMID:27405675

  13. Small bowel Dieulafoy lesions: An uncommon cause of obscure bleeding in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Holleran, Grainne; Hussey, Mary; McNamara, Deirdre

    2016-01-01

    Dieulafoy lesions (DLs) are an uncommon cause of gastrointestinal bleeding, accounting for up to 2% of cases overall. They are largely under recognised and difficult to treat. Up to 95% occur in the stomach, and only case reports document their occurrence in the small bowel (SB). Little is known about their pathophysiology, although there have been associations made previously with chronic liver disease, thought to be due to the erosive effects of alcohol on the mucosa overlying the abnormally dilated vessels. We present a case series of 4 patients with a long duration of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, who were diagnosed with small intestinal DLs and incidentally diagnosed with chronic liver disease. The histories describe the challenges in both diagnosis and treatment of small intestinal DLs. Our case series suggest a previously unreported link between chronic liver disease and SB DLs which may be due to anatomical vasculature changes or a shift in angiogenic factors as a consequence of portal hypertension or liver cirrhosis.

  14. Gastroesophageal Variceal Bleeding as a Complication of Cystic Fibrosis in a 3-Month-Old Patient.

    PubMed

    Motamed, Farzaneh; Fallahi, Gholamhossein; Ahmadi, Faezeh; Bazvand, Fatemeh; Ahmadi, Maedeh; Eftekhari, Kambiz; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease of mucous and sweat glands, which affects the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems. Herein, we describe a 3-month-old girl with a history of recurrent episodes of urinary tract infections that required hospitalization. She was referred to our center at the age of three months, with massive gastroesophageal variceal bleeding. In physical examination, she had clubbing, hepatosplenomegaly, and mild ascites. Laboratory studies revealed high serum levels of liver enzymes and low level of Albumin. As of suspicious to CF, sweat tests were performed twice which confirmed the diagnosis of CF. Gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastroesophageal varices is a rare complication of CF, which could result as a consequence of hepatobiliary involvement of disease. Early diagnosis of CF could prevent severe complications and even death in this group of patients. PMID:27107529

  15. Superior Mesenteric Vein Occlusion Causing Severe Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage in Two Paediatric Cases

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Anna L.; Jones, Matthew; Healey, Andrew; Auth, Marcus K. H.

    2012-01-01

    Reports about superior mesenteric vein thrombosis in childhood are very rare and have not been associated with gastrointestinal bleeding. We describe two cases of severe bleeding from the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract in children who had undergone complex abdominal surgery at considerable time before. The first child had a tracheoesophageal fistula, corrected by division, gastrostomy insertion, and repair of duodenal rupture. The child presented with severe bleeding from the gastrostomy site and was diagnosed with a thrombosis of the proximal superior mesenteric vein. The second child had a gastroschisis and duodenal atresia, and required duodenoplasty, gastrostomy insertion, hemicolectomy, and adhesiolysis. The child presented with intermittent severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding, resulting from collateral vessels at location of the surgical connections. He was diagnosed with a thrombosis of the superior mesenteric vein. In both children, the extensive previous surgery and anastomosis were considered the cause of the mesenteric thrombosis. CT angiography confirmed the diagnosis in both cases, in addition to characteristic findings on endoscopy. Paediatricians should suspect this condition in children with severe gastrointestinal bleeding, particularly in children with previous, complex abdominal surgery. PMID:23198238

  16. Massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to typhoid colitis: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    De Mel, Sanjay; Wong, Reuben K.

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of massive lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to Salmonella enterica subtype Typhi (S. Typhi) colitis, in a 29 year-old female treated for S. Typhi bacteremia. One week post-treatment, she unexpectedly developed a large volume of rectal bleeding. Endoscopy showed colonic ulcers and ileitis, but no endoscopic hemostasis was required. Treatment was supportive with transfusions and a prolonged course of antimicrobials, with the bleeding stopping spontaneously. This case illustrates the phenomenon of delayed lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage, as a rare complication of S. Typhi infection. PMID:26793465

  17. Aberrant right subclavian artery-esophageal fistula: massive upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to prolonged intubation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Elsa; Anastácio, Margarida; Marques, Anabela

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant right subclavian artery-esophageal fistula is a rare but potentially fatal complication. It may be associated with procedures, such as tracheostomy and tracheal or esophageal intubation, and yields massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding difficult to identify and to control. A high index of suspicion is essential for early diagnosis and better prognosis. We report a rare case of a patient who survived after emergent surgical procedure for massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to aberrant right subclavian artery-esophageal fistula after prolonged intubation. PMID:27108831

  18. Old technique revisited with surgical innovation: complicated Mallory–Weiss tear with bleeding gastric ulcer exclusion

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Osamu; Prichard, Peter J.; Choi, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Mallory–Weiss tears (MWTs) rarely require surgical intervention. A 60-year-old female presented with massive hematemesis secondary to MWT and gastric ulceration. After failure of endoscopic management, an operative approach was embarked on, with a direct surgical hemostasis of the Mallory–Weiss tear and exclusion of the gastric ulcer. This exclusion strategy may be applicable for other patients with uncontrolled upper gastrointestinal bleeding in whom a simple repair would be difficult. PMID:26757734

  19. Bleeding outcome during a dengue outbreak in 2005 in the East-coast region of Peninsular Malaysia: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Fariz-Safhan, M N; Tee, H P; Abu Dzarr, G A; Sapari, S; Lee, Y Y

    2014-06-01

    During a dengue outbreak in 2005 in the East-coast region of Peninsular Malaysia, one of the worst hit areas in the country at that time, we undertook a prospective study. We aimed to describe the bleeding outcome and changes in the liver and hematologic profiles that were associated with major bleeding outcome during the outbreak. All suspected cases of dengue admitted into the only referral hospital in the region during the outbreak were screened for WHO 2002 criteria and serology. Liver function, hematologic profile and severity of bleeding outcome were carefully documented. The association between symptoms, liver and hematologic impairments with the type of dengue infection (classical vs. hemorrhagic) and bleeding outcome (major vs. non-major) was tested. Dengue fever was confirmed in 183 cases (12.5/100,000 population) and 144 cases were analysed. 59.7% were dengue hemorrhagic fever, 3.5% were dengue shock syndrome and there were 3 in-hospital deaths. Major bleeding outcome (gastrointestinal bleeding, intracranial bleeding or haemoptysis) was present in 14.6%. Elevated AST, ALT and bilirubin were associated with increasing severity of bleeding outcome (all P < 0.05). Platelet count and albumin level were inversely associated with increasing severity of bleeding outcome (both P < 0.001). With multivariable analysis, dengue hemorrhagic fever was more likely in the presence of abdominal pain (OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.02- 1.6) and elevated AST (OR 1.0, 95% CI 1.0-1.1) but the presence of pleural effusion (OR 5.8, 95% CI: 1.1-29.9) and elevated AST (OR 1.008, 95% CI: 1.005-1.01) predicted a severe bleeding outcome. As a conclusion, the common presence of a severe hemorrhagic form of dengue fever may explain the rising death toll in recent outbreaks and the worst impairment in liver and hematologic profiles was seen in major bleeding outcome. PMID:25134895

  20. Gastrointestinal Pyogenic Granuloma (Lobular Capillary Hemangioma): An Underrecognized Entity Causing Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Umar M.; Hammami, Muhammad B.; Taylor, Jason R.; Omran, M. Louay; Chen, Yongxin; Lai, Jin-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic granuloma (PG), more accurately known as lobular capillary hemangioma, is a benign vascular tumor that usually occurs in the skin or oral mucosa. This lesion is rarely reported in the gastrointestinal tract but is known to bleed if not resected. We herein describe a case series with the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic findings of four cases of gastrointestinal PG at our institution. In addition, we provide a review of the literature and summation of all reported cases of PG specific to the gastrointestinal tract. Based on our experience, we suggest that the actual incidence of gastrointestinal PG may in fact be higher than reported because PG can be unrecognized or improperly diagnosed. It is important for the clinician to properly recognize this lesion as a source of anemia and its propensity to bleed during biopsy or resection. PMID:27403353

  1. Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... NY: McGraw-Hill; 2004:chap 251. Lammers RL. Principles of wound management. In: Roberts JR, Hedges JR, eds. Roberts: Clinical ... 2009:chap 39. Simon BC, Hern HG. Wound management principles. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  2. Angiodysplasia as a cause of recurrent bleeding from the small bowel in patients with von Willebrand disease. Report of 4 patients.

    PubMed

    Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Windyga, Jerzy; Maryniak, Renata K; Misiak, Andrzej; Szczepanik, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    Angiodysplasia, characterized by the presence of malformed vessels in the submucosa of the gastrointestinal tract, may be a cause of recurrent bleeding. Bleeding angiodysplasia can be associated with von Willebrand disease (vWD) and this coincidence is probably the consequence of the lack of high molecular weight molecules of von Willebrand factor in the plasma. We report four patients with unexplained repeated massive intestinal bleeding, recurrent melena and iron deficiency anemia, which required numerous blood transfusions. All patients were adults (average age 68 years). Three patients have congenital von Willebrand disease (type 1, 2A and 3) and one idiopathic acquired von Willenbrand syndrome. Correct diagnosis was made 2-5 years after the onset of the symptoms and was confirmed by histopathological examination of surgically resected small bowel, where vascular lesions were located. Elderly patients with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding and unexplained iron deficiency anemia should be diagnosed for angiodysplasia and vWD. PMID:15757205

  3. Abdominal varices mimicking an acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage during technetium-99m red blood cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Byrd, B.F.; Berger, D.E.; Turnbull, G.L.

    1985-04-01

    Abdominal varices consisting of a caput medusae and dilated mesenteric veins resulted in pooling of Tc-99m tagged red blood cells (RBC) within these dilated vessels in a 57-year-old man with severe Laennec's cirrhosis. The atypical radiotracer localization within the abdomen mimicked an acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Clinical suspicion and careful evaluation of scintigraphic gastrointestinal bleeding studies will avoid false-positive interpretations.

  4. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) with a thousand faces: atypical manifestations and causes of misdiagnosis on imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, S W; Kim, H C; Yang, D M; Won, K Y

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) can lead to emergency situations, such as gastrointestinal bleeding, intestinal obstruction, and tumoural rupture with haemoperitoneum or peritonitis. In addition, if a GIST grows exophytically to a large size, it is often misdiagnosed as a tumour arising from adjacent organs. Sometimes, the atypical appearance of GISTs on imaging causes diagnostic confusion. In this article, we illustrate a variety of GISTs with atypical presentations and also discuss the important diagnostic clues for differentiating GISTs from other lesions. PMID:26646370

  5. Gastrointestinal Morbidity in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex disease that results from increased energy intake and decreased energy expenditure. The gastrointestinal system plays a key role in the pathogenesis of obesity and facilitates caloric imbalance. Changes in gastrointestinal hormones and the inhibition of mechanisms that curtail caloric intake result in weight gain. It is not clear if the gastrointestinal role in obesity is a cause or an effect of this disease. Obesity is often associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Obesity is also associated with gastrointestinal disorders, which are more frequent and present earlier than T2DM and CVD. Diseases such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease, cholelithiasis or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis are directly related to body weight and abdominal adiposity. Our objective is to assess the role of each gastrointestinal organ in obesity and the gastrointestinal morbidity resulting in those organs from effects of obesity. PMID:24602085

  6. Outcome Following a Negative CT Angiogram for Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Victoria Tse, Donald Dixon, Shaheen; Shrivastava, Vivek; Bratby, Mark Anthony, Suzie Patel, Rafiuddin Tapping, Charles Uberoi, Raman

    2015-04-15

    ObjectiveThis study was designed to evaluate the role of a negative computed tomography angiogram (CTA) in patients who present with gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage.MethodsA review of all patients who had CTAs for GI hemorrhage over an 8-year period from January 2005 to December 2012 was performed. Data for patient demographics, location of hemorrhage, hemodynamic stability, and details of angiograms and/or the embolization procedure were obtained from the CRIS/PACS database, interventional radiology database, secure electronic medical records, and patient’s clinical notes.ResultsA total of 180 patients had 202 CTAs during the 8-year period: 87 CTAs were performed for upper GI hemorrhage (18 positive for active bleeding, 69 negative) and 115 for lower GI hemorrhage (37 positive for active bleeding, 78 negative); 58.7 % (37/63) of patients with upper GI bleed and 77.4 % (48/62) of patients with lower GI bleed who had an initial negative CTA did not rebleed without the need for radiological or surgical intervention. This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.04). The relative risk of rebleeding, following a negative CTA, in lower GI bleeding versus upper GI bleeding patients is 0.55 (95 % confidence interval 0.32–0.95).ConclusionsPatients with upper GI bleed who had negative CTAs usually require further intervention to stop the bleeding. In contrast, most patients presenting with lower GI hemorrhage who had a negative first CTA were less likely to rebleed.

  7. Massive Bleeding and Massive Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Meißner, Andreas; Schlenke, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Massive bleeding in trauma patients is a serious challenge for all clinicians, and an interdisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach is warranted within a limited time frame. Massive transfusion usually is defined as the transfusion of more than 10 units of packed red blood cells (RBCs) within 24 h or a corresponding blood loss of more than 1- to 1.5-fold of the body's entire blood volume. Especially male trauma patients experience this life-threatening condition within their productive years of life. An important parameter for clinical outcome is to succeed in stopping the bleeding preferentially within the first 12 h of hospital admission. Additional coagulopathy in the initial phase is induced by trauma itself and aggravated by consumption and dilution of clotting factors. Although different aspects have to be taken into consideration when viewing at bleedings induced by trauma compared to those caused by major surgery, the basic strategy is similar. Here, we will focus on trauma-induced massive hemorrhage. Currently there are no definite, worldwide accepted algorithms for blood transfusion and strategies for optimal coagulation management. There is increasing evidence that a higher ratio of plasma and RBCs (e.g. 1:1) endorsed by platelet transfusion might result in a superior survival of patients at risk for trauma-induced coagulopathy. Several strategies have been evolved in the military environment, although not all strategies should be transferred unproven to civilian practice, e.g. the transfusion of whole blood. Several agents have been proposed to support the restoration of coagulation. Some have been used for years without any doubt on their benefit-to-risk profile, whereas great enthusiasm of other products has been discouraged by inefficacy in terms of blood transfusion requirements and mortality or significant severe side effects. This review surveys current literature on fluid resuscitation, blood transfusion, and hemostatic agents currently

  8. Gastrointestinal nuclear imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This book contains paper grouped under the headings of: salivary scintigraphy, abscess detection with radionuclides; pediatric gastroenterology; liver spleen, and miscellaneous GI studies: gastrointestinal.

  9. Gastrointestinal disorders - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Digestive disease - resources; Resources - gastrointestinal disorders ... org American Liver Foundation -- www.liverfoundation.org National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- digestive.niddk.nih.gov

  10. Diagnosis of heavy menstrual bleeding.

    PubMed

    Herman, Malou C; Mol, Ben W; Bongers, Marlies Y

    2016-01-01

    Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is an important health problem. This paper gives an overview of the diagnosis of HMB. For each woman, a thorough history should be taken as one should ascertain whether there are underlying factors that could cause complaints of HMB. Objectively knowing whether or not the blood loss is excessive could also be very beneficial. The pictorial blood assessment chart score can help with diagnosis. Physical examination starts with standard gynecological examination. Imaging tests are widely used in the work-up for women with HMB. The first step in imaging tests should be the transvaginal ultrasound. Other diagnostic tests should only be performed when indicated. PMID:26696006

  11. Successful Control of Massive Bleeding in a Child with Burkitt's Lymphoma via a Biosimilar Recombinant Activated Factor VII (AryoSeven™)

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi Pour, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a 4-year-old girl with Burkitt's lymphoma, who suffered from a massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage 3 days after chemotherapy. In spite of applying the common practice in correction of coagulopathy, thrombocytopenia persisted and bleeding became life-threatening. In the present case report, we report a successful control of bleeding with a single-dose administration of a biosimilar recombinant activated human factor VII (AryoSeven). PMID:27478659

  12. Endoscopic resection is effective for the treatment of bleeding gastric hyperplastic polyps in patients with and without cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Matthew; Ganger, Daniel; Keswani, Rajesh; Grande, David; Komanduri, Srinadh

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastric hyperplastic polyps (GHP) have been identified as a cause of transfusion-dependent iron-deficiency anemia (tIDA) and transfusion-dependent gastrointestinal bleeding and are commonly identified in the setting of cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of endoscopic resection (ER) for the treatment of tIDA or gastrointestinal bleeding due to GHP in patients with and without liver disease. Patients and methods: This was a single-center retrospective review. The primary outcome was clinical success of ER (no transfusion or repeat ER in the following 6 months after first ER). Secondary outcomes included technical success, recurrence of GHP with tIDA or gastrointestinal bleeding, and adverse events (AEs). Results: Sixty-three patients with GHP were included of whom 20 (31 %) had cirrhosis. The majority with cirrhosis presented with gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 13, 65 %, P = 0.52), whereas the majority of non-cirrhotics presented with tIDA (n = 30, 70 %, P = 0.01). Technical success was 100 % with no AEs. The clinical success rate was 94 % (95 % in cirrhotics, 93 % in non-cirrhotics, P = 0.46). The recurrence rate was 32 % (40 % in cirrhotics and 28 % in non-cirrhotics, P = 0.35) with mean time to recurrence of 17.3 ± 13.9 months (P = 0.22). Of those with recurrence, 75 % had no further tIDA or gastrointestinal bleeding after repeat ER (mean follow-up 20 ±11 months). Conclusions: ER is an effective treatment for GHP that causes tIDA or gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients with GHP and cirrhosis tend to present with bleeding rather than anemia and have more frequent recurrence. Symptomatic recurrence of GHP is common and should be recognized early as repeat ER appears to be effective. PMID:27540576

  13. Sandostatin therapy of acute oesophageal variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    McKee, R F

    1993-01-01

    This communication deals with the emergency control of variceal bleeding rather than the prevention of rebleeding. The current main options of oesophageal tamponade, emergency sclerotherapy and drug therapy are discussed, with particular reference to the use of somatostatin. Sandostatin (Sandoz, Basel), a synthetic long-acting somatostatin analogue, was found to reduce transhepatic venous gradient by 30% with no effect on systemic haemodynamics in a study of 16 stable cirrhotic patients. In a trial comparing intravenous infusion of Sandostatin (SMS) to oesophageal tamponade (OT) in active variceal bleeding, 18 of 20 bleeds in the SMS group and 19 of 20 bleeds in the OT group were controlled at 4 h. Ten in the SMS group and 14 in the OT group had no further bleeding during the 48-hour study period. Thus SMS may be useful in the temporary control of active variceal bleeding. PMID:8359565

  14. [Diagnosis and therapy of bleeding in ENT].

    PubMed

    Schulz, T; Eßer, D

    2013-12-01

    Bleeding in the oral cavity, nose or ear are common events in the daily routine of ENT specialists. Apart from trivial cases that often get outpatient treatment, there are numerous cases of serious bleeding that require stationary treatment and if necessary, an operative or interventional therapy. In the following section the most frequent types of bleeding, their diagnosis and therapy will be explained. PMID:24285208

  15. Cyclical rectal bleeding in colorectal endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Levitt, M D; Hodby, K J; van Merwyk, A J; Glancy, R J

    1989-12-01

    Three case reports of cyclical rectal bleeding in endometriosis affecting rectum and sigmoid colon emphasize the close relationship between such cyclical bleeding and intestinal endometriosis. The cause of bleeding, however, is still unclear. The predilection of endometriotic deposits for the outer layers of the bowel wall suggests that mucosal involvement is not a prerequisite for rectal bleeding. The frequent absence of identifiable intramural haemorrhage casts doubt on the premise that intestinal endometriotic deposits 'menstruate'. The cause may simply be a transient tear in normal mucosa due to swelling of an underlying endometriotic deposit at the time of menstruation. PMID:2597100

  16. Challenging Case of Postmenopausal Bleeding and Complete Urogenital Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Grechukhina, Olga; English, Diana P.; Miller, Devin; Ratner, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 58 Final Diagnosis: Congenital duplication of genitourinary system Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic hysterectomy Specialty: Obstetrics and Gynecology Objective: Congenital defects/diseases Background: Müllerian duct anomalies represent a wide spectrum of congenital abnormalities ranging from simple uterine anomalies to more complex multisystem derangements. Complete duplication of uterus, cervix, and vagina may be associated with urologic and caudal gastrointestinal malformations. Case Report: We present a case report detailing the management of a morbidly obese patient with postmenopausal bleeding and thickened endometrial stripe who had a very rare condition of pelvic organ duplication, including 2 hemiuteri, 2 vaginas, 2 hemibladders, and 2 each of ovaries, fallopian tubes, kidneys, and ureters. Laparoscopic hysterectomy was complicated by difficulties understanding urinary system anatomy requiring intraoperative urology consultation and imaging. Conclusions: Management of patients with urogenital duplication and abnormal uterine bleeding requires a thorough understanding of possible associated malformations. Thorough preoperative evaluation, careful surgical exploration, and multidisciplinary approach may be necessary to avoid urologic injury in such patients. PMID:27180733

  17. Planar scintigraphic imaging of the gastrointestinal tract in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Michael L; Strober, Mark D

    2012-01-01

    In the last 30 years, nuclear medicine has paralleled other imaging fields with the development of 3-dimensional techniques, including single-photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography. However, conventional nuclear medicine planar scintigraphy remains a common procedure at most imaging centers. Gastrointestinal studies constitute a significant portion of these planar procedures. The most common gastrointestinal studies, including hepatobiliary, gastric emptying, and gastrointestinal bleeding evaluations, resemble their original protocol. However, serial improvements have optimized the diagnostic efficacy of these procedures. Conventional Technetium-99m sulfur colloid liver/spleen imaging and hepatic blood pool imaging with labeled red blood cells now mainly serve an adjunctive role in the evaluation of equivocal findings on computed tomography. Salivary gland imaging is a less commonly requested evaluation, but can be used to evaluate functional capacity in some disease entities. PMID:22117811

  18. Evaluation and management of massive lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Leitman, I M; Paull, D E; Shires, G T

    1989-01-01

    Sixty-eight patients with massive lower gastrointestinal (G.I.) hemorrhage underwent emergency arteriography. Patients were transfused an average of six units of packed red blood cells within 24 hours of admission. The bleeding source was localized arteriographically in 27 (40%), with a sensitivity of 65% among patients requiring emergency resection. However, twelve of the 41 patients with a negative arteriogram still required emergency intestinal resection for continued hemorrhage. Radionuclide bleeding scans had a sensitivity of 86%. The right colon was the most common site of bleeding (35%). Diverticulosis and arteriovenous malformation were the most common etiologies. Selective intra-arterial infusion of vasopressin and embolization were successful in 36% of cases in which they were employed and contributed to fatality in two patients. Twenty-three patients underwent segmental resection, whereas seven patients required subtotal colectomy for multiple bleeding sites or negative studies in the face continued hemorrhage. Intraoperative infusion of methylene blue via angiographic catheters allowed successful localization and resection of bleeding small bowel segments in three patients. Overall mortality was 21%. The mortality for patients without a malignancy, with a positive preoperative arteriogram, and emergency segmental resection was 13%. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2783842

  19. Long-lasting intestinal bleeding in an old patient with multiple mucosal vascular abnormalities and Glanzmann's thrombasthenia: 3-year pharmacological management.

    PubMed

    Coppola, A; De Stefano, V; Tufano, A; Nardone, G; Amoriello, A; Cerbone, A M; Di Minno, G

    2002-09-01

    A 75-year-old woman with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia was admitted because of persistent melaena. Endoscopic examination showed multiple angiodysplastic lesions, with active bleeding in small and large bowel. Electro-coagulation of some lesions, octreotide, conjugated oestrogens and selective embolization of jejunal vessels did not change transfusion requirements. After 8 month-transfusions, ethinylestradiol + norethisterone in association with octreotide was started, leading to no transfusion over the following 9 months. Bleeding recurred after withdrawing octreotide and substituting ethinylestradiol + norgestrel for the ethinylestradiol + norethisterone combination. Re-introduction of octreotide did not improve bleeding; however, a reduction of transfusion requirement was observed when the ethinylestradiol + norethisterone pill was re-administered. The association of octreotide and of an oestrogen-progesterone combination was helpful in the difficult management of recurrent bleeding in this patient with diffuse gastrointestinal vascular abnormalities and a severe condition predisposing to bleeding. PMID:12270009

  20. Prevention of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage: current controversies and clinical guidance

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Johanne; Warburton, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common medical emergency and associated with significant morbidly and mortality. The risk of bleeding from peptic ulceration and oesophagogastric varices can be reduced by appropriate primary and secondary preventative strategies. Helicobacter pylori eradication and risk stratification with appropriate gastroprotection strategies when used with antiplatelet drugs and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are effective in preventing peptic ulcer bleeding, whilst endoscopic screening and either nonselective beta blockade or endoscopic variceal ligation are effective at reducing the risk of variceal haemorrhage. For secondary prevention of variceal haemorrhage, the combination of beta blockade and endoscopic variceal ligation is more effective. Recent data on the possible interactions of aspirin and NSAIDs, clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), and the increased risk of cardiovascular adverse events associated with all nonaspirin cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitors have increased the complexity of choices for preventing peptic ulcer bleeding. Such choices should consider both the GI and cardiovascular risk profiles. In patients with a moderately increased risk of GI bleeding, a NSAID plus a PPI or a COX-2 selective agent alone appear equivalent but for those at highest risk of bleeding (especially those with previous ulcer or haemorrhage) the COX-2 inhibitor plus PPI combination is superior. However naproxen seems the safest NSAID for those at increased cardiovascular risk. Clopidogrel is associated with a significant risk of GI haemorrhage and the most recent data concerning the potential clinical interaction of clopidogrel and PPIs are reassuring. In clopidogrel-treated patients at highest risk of GI bleeding, some form of GI prevention is indicated. PMID:23997925

  1. Small bowel ulcerative lesions are common in elderly NSAIDs users with peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tsibouris, Panagiotis; Kalantzis, Chissostomos; Apostolopoulos, Periklis; Zalonis, Antonios; Isaacs, Peter Edward Thomas; Hendrickse, Mark; Alexandrakis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of small bowel ulcerative lesions in patients with peptic ulcer and define the significance of those lesions. METHODS: In our prospective study, 60 consecutive elderly patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a peptic ulceration (cases) and 60 matched patients with a non-bleeding peptic ulcer (controls) underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, after a negative colonoscopy (compulsory in our institution). Controls were evaluated for non-bleeding indications. Known or suspected chronic inflammatory conditions and medication that could harm the gut were excluded. During capsule endoscopy, small bowel ulcerative lesions were counted thoroughly and classified according to Graham classification. Other small bowel lesions were also recorded. Peptic ulcer bleeding was controlled endoscopically, when adequate, proton pump inhibitors were started in both cases and controls, and Helicobacter pylori eradicated whenever present. Both cases and controls were followed up for a year. In case of bleeding recurrence upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was repeated and whenever it remained unexplained it was followed by repeat colonoscopy and capsule endoscopy. RESULTS: Forty (67%) cases and 18 (30%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P = 0.0001), while 22 (37%) cases and 4 (8%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) consumers, 39 (95%) cases and 17 (33%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P < 0.0001), while 22 (55%) cases and 4 (10%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Small bowel ulcerative lesions were infrequent among patients not consuming NSAIDs. Mean entry hemoglobin was 9.3 (SD = 1.4) g/dL in cases with small bowel ulcerative lesions and 10.5 (SD = 1.3) g/dL in those without (P = 0.002). Cases with small bowel ulcers necessitate more units of packed red blood cells. During their hospitalization, 6 (27%) cases with small bowel ulcers presented

  2. Obstetric management of adolescents with bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    James, Andra H

    2010-12-01

    Adolescents with bleeding disorders who become pregnant must contend with the dual challenges of their bleeding disorder and their pregnancy. Adolescents are more likely to terminate a pregnancy than adult women, and when they do carry a pregnancy, they are more likely to deliver prematurely. Otherwise, they are at risk for the same complications that adult women with bleeding disorders experience, particularly bleeding complications postpartum. Since one half to two thirds of adolescent pregnancies are unplanned, issues related to reproduction should be addressed during routine visits with the pediatrician, hematologist or gynecologist. Girls who are at risk of being carriers for hemophilia A and B, severe von Willebrand disease, and other severe bleeding disorders should have their bleeding disorder status determined before they become pregnant. During pregnancy, a plan should be established to ensure that both mother and fetus deliver safely. Young women at risk for severe bleeding or at risk of having a severely affected infant should be referred for prenatal care and delivery to a center where, in addition to specialists in high-risk obstetrics, there is a hemophilia treatment center or a hematologist with expertise in hemostasis. Prior to delivery or any invasive procedures, young women at risk for severe bleeding should receive prophylaxis. Since administration of desmopressin may result in hyponatremia, whenever available, virally inactivated or recombinant clotting factor concentrates should be used for replacement as opposed to fresh frozen plasma or cryoprecipitate. PMID:20934895

  3. Computed tomographic staging of traumatic epidural bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1982-09-01

    The computed tomographic findings in 45 patients with post-traumatic epidural hemotomas are subdivided into three categories (acute, subacute, and chronic) and correlated with the severity of bleeding, clot formation, and clot resorption. Active epidural bleeding may be identified in acute cases.

  4. [Nutrition and gastrointestinal intolerance].

    PubMed

    Madl, C; Holzinger, U

    2013-06-01

    The functional integrity of the gastrointestinal tract is an essential prerequisite in intensive care patients for the sufficient administration of enteral nutrition. Up to 65% of patients in intensive care units develop symptoms of gastrointestinal dysfunction with high residual gastric volume, vomiting and abdominal distension. The pathophysiological alterations of gastrointestinal intolerance and the subsequent effect on the tolerance of enteral nutrition can affect the whole gastrointestinal tract. Gastroduodenal motility disorders in particular, with increased gastroesophageal reflux lead to intolerance. In more than 90% of intensive care patients with gastrointestinal motility disorders an adequate postpyloric enteral nutrition can be carried out using a jejunal tube. In addition to improved tolerance of enteral nutrition this leads to a reduction of gastroesophageal reflux and the incidence of ventilation-associated pneumonia. Apart from the possibility of endoscopic application of the jejunal tube, alternative techniques were developed which allow a faster positioning of the jejunal tube with less complications. Furthermore, there are therapeutic options for improvement of gastrointestinal motility disorders and apart from general measures, also medicinal options for treatment of gastrointestinal intolerance which allow a sufficient enteral nutrition for intensive care patients. PMID:23740106

  5. [A modified monopolar electrocoagulation probe for endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Reimold, W V

    1991-06-01

    A modified monopolar electrocoagulation probe for endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal bleedings in special situations is described. The tip of the active electrode may be moved foreward or drawn back into a teflon catheter. Thereby, blood clots are removed from the tip of the probe. The device is easy to use, reliable in emergency endoscopies and can be employed with conventional high-frequency diathermy instruments. The probe is inexpensive. 49 patients with active gastrointestinal bleedings according to Forrest Ib were treated. In 40/49 patients permanent hemostasis could be achieved. In 4/49 patients recurrent bleedings were controlled after repeated electro-coagulation. 4/49 patients needed elective operation, one patient emergency operation. Complications by application of the described monopolar electrocoagulation probe did not occur. The area of necrosis according to electrocoagulation was small. PMID:1926958

  6. Gastrointestinal Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Embil, Juan A.; Embil, John M.

    1988-01-01

    This article surveys the most important gastrointestinal parasites that affect humans. The modes of acquisition, pathology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment are all briefly examined. Gastrointestinal parasites have become increasingly important in the differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease, as a result of a number of circumstances. These circumstances include: increasing travel to developing countries; increased numbers, for one reason or another, of immunocompromised individuals; increased consumption of raw or partially cooked ethnic delicacies; more crowding in day-care centres; increased immigration from developing countries; and an endemic pocket of individuals with certain unhygienic or unsanitary practices. PMID:21253148

  7. Persistent Bleeding After Laparoscopic Supracervical Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cholkeri-Singh, Aarathi; Sulo, Suela; Miller, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In our clinical experience, there seemed to be a correlation between cervical stump bleeding and adenomyosis. Therefore, we wanted to conduct a study to determine whether there was an actual correlation and to identify other risk factors for persistent bleeding after a laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy. Methods: The study included women who underwent laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2012. Data were collected on age, postmenopausal status, body mass index (BMI), uterine weight, indication for hysterectomy, concomitant bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO), presence of endometriosis, surgical ablation of the endocervix, adenomyosis, presence of endocervix in the specimen, and postoperative bleeding. Results: The study included 256 patients, of whom 187 had no postoperative bleeding after the operation, 40 had bleeding within 12 weeks, and 29 had bleeding after 12 weeks. The 3 groups were comparable in BMI, postmenopausal status, uterine weight, indication for hysterectomy, BSO, surgical ablation of the endocervix, adenomyosis, and the presence of endocervix. However, patients who had postoperative bleeding at more than 12 weeks were significantly younger (P = .002) and had a higher rate of endometriosis (P < .001). Conclusions: Risks factors for postoperative bleeding from the cervical stump include a younger age at the time of hysterectomy and the presence of endometriosis. Therefore, younger patients and those with endometriosis who desire to have no further vaginal bleeding may benefit from total hysterectomy over supracervical hysterectomy. All patients who are undergoing supracervical hysterectomy should be counseled about the possible alternatives, benefits, and risks, including continued vaginal bleeding from the cervical stump and the possibility of requiring future treatment and procedures. PMID:25516706

  8. Gastrointestinal motility and functional gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Motoyasu; Hosaka, Hiroko; Kawada, Akiyo; Kuribayashi, Shiko; Shimoyama, Yasuyuki; Zai, Hiroaki; Kawamura, Osamu; Yamada, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Digestive tract motility patterns are closely related to the pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal diseases (FGID), and these patterns differ markedly between the interdigestive period and the postprandial period. The characteristic motility pattern in the interdigestive period is so-called interdigestive migrating contraction (IMC). IMCs have a housekeeping role in the intestinal tract, and could also be related to FGID. IMCs arising from the stomach are called gastrointestinal IMCs (GI-IMC), while IMCs arising from the duodenum without associated gastric contractions are called intestinal IMCs (I-IMC). It is thought that I-IMCs are abnormal in FGID. Transport of food residue to the duodenum via gastric emptying is one of the most important postprandial functions of the stomach. In patients with functional dyspepsia (FD), abnormal gastric emptying is a possible mechanism of gastric dysfunction. Accordingly, delayed gastric emptying has attracted attention, with prokinetic agents and herbal medicines often being administered in Japan to accelerate gastric emptying in patients who have anorexia associated with dyspepsia. Recently, we found that addition of monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) to a high-calorie liquid diet rich in casein promoted gastric emptying in healthy men. Therefore, another potential method of improving delayed gastric emptying could be activation of chemosensors that stimulate the autonomic nervous system of the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting a role for MSG in the management of delayed gastric emptying in patients with FD. PMID:23886379

  9. Endoscopic resection of superficial gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Marc, Giovannini; Lopes, Cesar Vivian

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic endoscopy plays a major role in the management of gastrointestinal (GI) neoplasia. Its indications can be generalized into four broad categories; to remove or obliterate neoplastic lesion, to palliate malignant obstruction, or to treat bleeding. Only endoscopic resection allows complete histological staging of the cancer, which is critical as it allows stratification and refinement for further treatment. Although other endoscopic techniques, such as ablation therapy, may also cure early GI cancer, they can not provide a definitive pathological specimen. Early stage lesions reveal low frequency of lymph node metastasis which allows for less invasive treatments and thereby improving the quality of life when compared to surgery. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are now accepted worldwide as treatment modalities for early cancers of the GI tract. PMID:18698673

  10. Bleeding Risk Index in an Anticoagulation Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Aspinall, Sherrie L; DeSanzo, Beth E; Trilli, Lauren E; Good, Chester B

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Outpatient Bleeding Risk Index (BRI) prospectively classified patients who were at high, intermediate, or low risk for warfarin-related major bleeding. However, there are only 2 published validation studies of the index and neither included veterans. OBJECTIVE To determine the accuracy of the BRI in patients attending a Veterans Affairs (VA) anticoagulation clinic and to specifically evaluate the accuracy of the BRI in patients with atrial fibrillation. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. PATIENTS AND MEASUREMENTS Using the BRI, all patients managed by the Anticoagulation Clinic between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2002 were classified as high, intermediate, or low risk for major bleeding. Bleeds were identified via quality-assurance reports. Poisson regression was used to determine whether there was an association between the index and the development of bleeding. RESULTS The rate of major bleeding was 10.6%, 2.5%, and 0.8% per patient-year of warfarin in the high-, intermediate-, and low-risk groups, respectively. Patients in the high-risk category had 14 times the rate of major bleeding of those in the low-risk group (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 14; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.9 to 104.7). The rate of major bleeding was significantly different between the high- and intermediate-risk categories (P<.001). Among those with atrial fibrillation, patients in the high-risk category had 6 times the major bleeding rate of those in the intermediate- and low-risk groups combined (IRR=6; 95% CI, 2.4 to 15.3). CONCLUSIONS The BRI discriminates between high- and intermediate-risk patients in a VA anticoagulation clinic, including those with atrial fibrillation. PMID:16307625

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of unexplained anemia with iron deficiency without overt bleeding.

    PubMed

    Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eivindson, Martin; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius; Jensen, Nanna Martin; Jørgensen, Søren Peter; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Rasmussen, Morten; Nathan, Torben

    2015-04-01

    A general overview is given of the causes of anemia with iron deficiency as well as the pathogenesis of anemia and the para-clinical diagnosis of anemia. Anemia with iron deficiency but without overt GI bleeding is associated with a risk of malignant disease of the gastrointestinal tract; upper gastrointestinal cancer is 1/7 as common as colon cancer. Benign gastrointestinal causes of anemia are iron malabsorption (atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, chronic inflammation, and bariatric surgery) and chronic blood loss due to gastrointestinal ulcerations. The following diagnostic strategy is recommended for unexplained anemia with iron deficiency: conduct serological celiac disease screening with transglutaminase antibody (IgA type) and IgA testing and perform bidirectional endoscopy (gastroscopy and colonoscopy). Bidirectional endoscopy is not required in premenopausal women < 40 years of age. Small intestine investigation (capsule endoscopy, CT, or MRI enterography) is not recommended routinely after negative bidirectional endoscopy but should be conducted if there are red flags indicating malignant or inflammatory small bowel disease (e.g., involuntary weight loss, abdominal pain or increased CRP). Targeted treatment of any cause of anemia with iron deficiency found on diagnostic assessment should be initiated. In addition, iron supplementation should be administered, with the goal of normalizing hemoglobin levels and replenishing iron stores. Oral treatment with a 100-200 mg daily dose of elemental iron is recommended (lower dose if side effects), but 3-6 months of oral iron therapy is often required to achieve therapeutic goals. Intravenous iron therapy is used if oral treatment lacks efficacy or causes side effects or in the presence of intestinal malabsorption or prolonged inflammation. Three algorithms are given for the following conditions: a) the paraclinical diagnosis of anemia with iron deficiency; b) the diagnostic work-up for unexplained anemia with

  12. Laser ablation of upper gastrointestinal vascular ectasias: long term results.

    PubMed Central

    Sargeant, I R; Loizou, L A; Rampton, D; Tulloch, M; Bown, S G

    1993-01-01

    Forty one patients with bleeding vascular ectasias of the upper gastrointestinal tract who required blood transfusion were treated with endoscopic Nd:YAG laser photocoagulation and followed for 34 months (median). Four distinct groups of patients were identified. There was a sustained reduction in transfusion requirements after laser treatment in all those with single (nine patients) and multiple (seven patients) angiodysplasia, in 12 of 16 (75%) patients with watermelon stomachs, and in six of nine (66%) patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. Overall, 25 patients (61%) required minimal or no transfusion after treatment and nine (22%) whose bleeding was controlled initially, later developed recurrent bleeding which was controlled with further laser (total 34 of 41, 83%). Surgery succeeded in a further three patients (7%) in whom laser had failed (in one case possibly because of laser induced haemorrhage). Five more cases of possible laser induced haemorrhage resolved with conservative treatment. One patient sustained a treatment related perforation and died: one patient with cirrhosis died of encephalopathy within one month of starting laser treatment. In two patients transfusion requirements were unchanged despite laser. Nd:YAG laser is a safe and effective treatment for most patients with upper gastrointestinal angiodysplasia. PMID:8491392

  13. Direct Percutaneous Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, Sailen G.; Castle, Erik P.; Kriegshauser, J. Scott; Huettl, Eric A.

    2010-02-15

    Stomal variceal bleeding can develop in patients with underlying cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Most patients are best treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation because this addresses the underlying problem of portal hypertension. However, some patients are not good candidates for TIPS creation because they have end-stage liver disease or encephalopathy. We describe such a patient who presented with recurrent bleeding stomal varices, which was successfully treated with percutaneous coil embolization. The patient had bleeding-free survival for 1 month before death from unrelated causes.

  14. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    DOEpatents

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  15. Potential benefits and hazards of physical activity and exercise on the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    PETERS, H; DE VRIES, W R; VANBERGE-HENEGOUW..., G; AKKERMANS, L

    2001-01-01

    G P VANBERGE-HENEGOUWEN, L M A AKKERMANS Gastrointestinal Research Unit
Departments of Surgery and Gastroenterology
University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands
 This review describes the current state of knowledge on the hazards of exercise and the potential benefits of physical activity on the gastrointestinal tract. In particular, acute strenuous exercise may provoke gastrointestinal symptoms such as heartburn or diarrhoea. A substantial part (20-50%) of endurance athletes are hampered by these symptoms which may deter them from participation in training and competitive events. Nevertheless, these acute symptoms are transient and do not hamper the athlete's health in the long term. The only exception is repeated gastrointestinal bleeding during training and competition, which in the long term may occasionally lead to iron deficiency and anaemia. In contrast, repetitive exercise periods at a relatively low intensity may have protective effects on the gastrointestinal tract. There is strong evidence that physical activity reduces the risk of colon cancer by up to 50%. Less convincing evidence exists for cholelithiasis and constipation. Physical activity may reduce the risk of diverticulosis, gastrointestinal haemorrhage, and inflammatory bowel disease although this cannot be substantiated firmly. Up to now, underlying mechanisms are poorly understood although decreased gastrointestinal blood flow, neuro-immuno-endocrine alterations, increased gastrointestinal motility, and mechanical bouncing during exercise are postulated. Future research on exercise associated digestive processes should give more insight into the relationship between physical activity and the function of the gastrointestinal tract.

 PMID:11171839

  16. Bleeding Risk with Long-Term Low-Dose Aspirin: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    García Rodríguez, Luis A.; Martín-Pérez, Mar; Hennekens, Charles H.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Lanas, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose aspirin has proven effectiveness in secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events, but is also associated with an increased risk of major bleeding events. For primary prevention, this absolute risk must be carefully weighed against the benefits of aspirin; such assessments are currently limited by a lack of data from general populations. Methods Systematic searches of Medline and Embase were conducted to identify observational studies published between 1946 and 4 March 2015 that reported the risks of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding or intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) with long-term, low-dose aspirin (75–325 mg/day). Pooled estimates of the relative risk (RR) for bleeding events with aspirin versus non-use were calculated using random-effects models, based on reported estimates of RR (including odds ratios, hazard ratios, incidence rate ratios and standardized incidence ratios) in 39 articles. Findings The incidence of GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin was 0.48–3.64 cases per 1000 person-years, and the overall pooled estimate of the RR with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2–1.7). For upper and lower GI bleeding, the RRs with low-dose aspirin were 2.3 (2.0–2.6) and 1.8 (1.1–3.0), respectively. Neither aspirin dose nor duration of use had consistent effects on RRs for upper GI bleeding. The estimated RR for ICH with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (1.2–1.7) overall. Aspirin was associated with increased bleeding risks when combined with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, clopidogrel and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors compared with monotherapy. By contrast, concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors decreased upper GI bleeding risks relative to aspirin monotherapy. Conclusions The risks of major bleeding with low-dose aspirin in real-world settings are of a similar magnitude to those reported in randomized trials. These data will help inform clinical judgements regarding the use of low-dose aspirin

  17. Self-Expandable Metal Stents for Persisting Esophageal Variceal Bleeding after Band Ligation or Injection-Therapy: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Martin; Seufferlein, Thomas; Perkhofer, Lukas; Wagner, Martin; Kleger, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Aims Despite a pronounced reduction of lethality rates due to upper gastrointestinal bleeding, esophageal variceal bleeding remains a challenge for the endoscopist and still accounts for a mortality rate of up to 40% within the first 6 weeks. A relevant proportion of patients with esophageal variceal bleeding remains refractory to standard therapy, thus making a call for additional tools to achieve hemostasis. Self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) incorporate such a tool. Methods We evaluated a total number of 582 patients admitted to our endoscopy unit with the diagnosis “gastrointestinal bleeding” according to our documentation software between 2011 and 2014. 82 patients suffered from esophageal variceal bleeding, out of which 11 cases were refractory to standard therapy leading to SEMS application. Patients with esophageal malignancy, fistula, or stricture and a non-esophageal variceal bleeding source were excluded from the analysis. A retrospective analysis reporting a series of clinically relevant parameters in combination with bleeding control rates and adverse events was performed. Results The initial bleeding control rate after SEMS application was 100%. Despite this success, we observed a 27% mortality rate within the first 42 days. All of these patients died due to non-directly hemorrhage-associated reasons. The majority of patients exhibited an extensive demand of medical care with prolonged hospital stay. Common complications were hepatic decompensation, pulmonary infection and decline of renal function. Interestingly, we found in 7 out of 11 patients (63.6%) stent dislocation at time of control endoscopy 24 h after hemostasis or at time of stent removal. The presence of hiatal hernia did not affect obviously stent dislocation rates. Refractory patients had significantly longer hospitalization times compared to non-refractory patients. Conclusions Self-expandable metal stents for esophageal variceal bleeding seem to be safe and

  18. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... babies. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often have a low level of vitamin ... Blood clotting tests will be done. The diagnosis is confirmed if a vitamin K shot stops the bleeding ...

  19. CLSM bleed water reduction test results

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.; Rajendran, N.

    1997-04-21

    Previous testing by BSRI/SRTC/Raytheon indicated that the CLSM specified for the Tank 20 closure generates about 6 gallons (23 liters) of bleed water per cubic yard of material (0.76 m3).1 This amount to about 10 percent of the total mixing water. HLWE requested that the CLSM mix be optimized to reduce bleed water while maintaining flow. Elimination of bleed water from the CLSM mix specified for High-Level Waste Tank Closure will result in waste minimization, time savings and cost savings. Over thirty mixes were formulated and evaluated at the on-site Raytheon Test Laboratory. Improved low bleed water CLSM mixes were identified. Results are documented in this report.

  20. Systemic causes of excessive uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lusher, J M

    1999-07-01

    In assessing a patient with excessive uterine bleeding, the clinician should consider systemic causes in the differential diagnosis. Both hereditary and acquired conditions can result in mucous membrane bleeding, including menorrhagia, epistaxis, and gum bleeding, as well as excessive bruising. Among hereditary conditions, von Willebrand disease (vWD) is by far the most common, affecting an estimated 1% of the population worldwide. It is important to consider the possibility of vWD, and to establish the proper diagnosis (including subtype), as safe, effective, and easy-to-use treatment is available for most persons with this disorder. This review also covers a number of other systemic conditions that can be manifested by excessive uterine bleeding, including congenital deficiency of factor XI, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and other acquired platelet disorders, acquired autoantibodies against factor VIII (FVIII), and vitamin K deficiency states. PMID:10513767

  1. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB) (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop AUB. Some illnesses (like thyroid disease or polycystic ovary syndrome ) can mess with the body's hormones. Problems like ... sex. Doctors ask these questions because conditions like polycystic ovary syndrome and some STDs can cause abnormal bleeding. If ...

  2. Genetic analysis of bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Edison, E; Konkle, B A; Goodeve, A C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of inherited bleeding disorders has been practised for over 30 years. Technological changes have enabled advances, from analyses using extragenic linked markers to next-generation DNA sequencing and microarray analysis. Two approaches for genetic analysis are described, each suiting their environment. The Christian Medical Centre in Vellore, India, uses conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis mutation screening of multiplexed PCR products to identify candidate mutations, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmation of variants identified. Specific analyses for F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions are also undertaken. The MyLifeOurFuture US project between the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network, the National Hemophilia Foundation, Bloodworks Northwest and Biogen uses molecular inversion probes (MIP) to capture target exons, splice sites plus 5' and 3' sequences and to detect F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions. This allows screening for all F8 and F9 variants in one sequencing run of multiple samples (196 or 392). Sequence variants identified are subsequently confirmed by a diagnostic laboratory. After having identified variants in genes of interest through these processes, a systematic procedure determining their likely pathogenicity should be applied. Several scientific societies have prepared guidelines. Systematic analysis of the available evidence facilitates reproducible scoring of likely pathogenicity. Documentation of frequency in population databases of variant prevalence and in locus-specific mutation databases can provide initial information on likely pathogenicity. Whereas null mutations are often pathogenic, missense and splice site variants often require in silico analyses to predict likely pathogenicity and using an accepted suite of tools can help standardize their documentation. PMID:27405681

  3. Roller and Centrifugal Pumps: A Retrospective Comparison of Bleeding Complications in Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Halaweish, Ihab; Cole, Adam; Cooley, Elaine; Lynch, William R; Haft, Jonathan W

    2015-01-01

    Centrifugal pumps are increasingly used for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) rather than roller pumps. However, shear forces induced by these types of continuousflow pumps are associated with acquired von Willebrand factor deficiency and bleeding complications. This study was undertaken to compare adverse bleeding complications with the use of centrifugal and roller pumps in patients on prolonged ECMO support. The records of all adult ECMO patients from June 2002 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed using the University of Michigan Health System database and the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization registry, focusing on patients supported for at least 5 days. Ninety-five ECMO patients met criteria for inclusion (48 roller vs. 47 centrifugal pump). Indications included pulmonary (79%), cardiac (15%), and extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (6%), without significant difference between the two groups. Despite lower heparin anticoagulation (10.9 vs. 13.7 IU/kg/hr) with centrifugal pumps, there was a higher incidence of nonsurgical bleeding (gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and neurological) in centrifugal pump patients (26.1 vs. 9.0 events/1,000 patient-days, p = 0.024). In conclusion, in our historical comparison, despite reduced anticoagulation, ECMO support using centrifugal pumps was associated with a higher incidence of nonsurgical bleeding. The mechanisms behind this are multifactorial and require further investigation. PMID:25914954

  4. Studies of GI bleeding with scintigraphy and the influence of vasopressin

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, A.; McLean, G.K.

    1981-07-01

    The management of patients with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding depends on accurate localization of the site of hemorrhage. Endoscopy and arteriography, although successful in achieving this goal in the majority of patients, are invasive and have other shortcomings. The introduction of the 99mTc-sulfur colloid technique has greatly simplified the evaluation and management of these patients. This test is useful in detecting and localizing the bleeding site in the lower GI tract. Scintigraphy is now used as the initial study of choice in patients with rectal bleeding. Advances made in angiography and nuclear medicine techniques also have resulted in improved management of patients. Conservative approaches succeed in controlling hemorrhage in most patients. Vasopressin is the most widely tested agent and has been adopted by many as the preferred preparation for this purpose. Before the introduction of the 99mTc-sulfur colloid technique, angiography was used to monitor the effectiveness of this drug, whether administered intravenously or intraarterially. With the use of scintigraphy and intravenous administration of vasopressin, these patients now can be managed noninvasively. Only when the intravenous Pitressin infusion fails to stop hemorrhage, is the intraarterial approach considered. Surgery is used as a last resort when these measures fail to stop the bleeding.

  5. Cough-induced Tracheobronchial Mucosal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hira, Harmanjit Singh

    2011-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with moderate hemoptysis. It was preceded by a severe bout of cough. Flexible bronchoscopy showed diffuse tracheobronchial mucosal petechiae and bleeding. The patient was not suffering with any coagulopathies. He did not receive antiplatelet drugs. Hemoptysis resolved with cough suppressant. Subsequent bronchoscopy revealed the complete resolution of petechiae. The mechanism of bleeding after the bout of coughing is discussed. PMID:23169019

  6. Engine bleed air reduction in DC-10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, W. H.; Viele, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    An 0.8 percent fuel savings was achieved by a reduction in engine bleed air through the use of cabin air recirculation. The recirculation system was evaluated in revenue service on a DC-10. The cabin remained comfortable with reductions in cabin fresh air (engine bleed air) as much as 50 percent. Flight test verified the predicted fuel saving of 0.8 percent.

  7. Recurrent bleeding of angiomyolipomas in tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, T; Heindel, W; Vorreuther, R; Engelmann, U; Lackner, K

    1996-01-01

    The diagnostic and therapeutic problems of renal hamartomas are illustrated by a case of recurrence of bleeding angiomyolipomas associated with tuberous sclerosis. Ultrasound and computed tomography provide clear evidence of lipomatous formation while, in rare instances, angiography can demonstrate the existence of multiple vascular tumor compartments. In view of the risk of bleeding, multiple or very large angiomyolipomas should be treated by interventional radiology in the form of superselective tumor embolization or by the most conservative surgery possible. PMID:8903555

  8. Commonly used gastrointestinal drugs.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Annu; Bhatt, Mohit

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the spectrum and mechanisms of neurologic adverse effects of commonly used gastrointestinal drugs including antiemetics, promotility drugs, laxatives, antimotility drugs, and drugs for acid-related disorders. The commonly used gastrointestinal drugs as a group are considered safe and are widely used. A range of neurologic complications are reported following use of various gastrointestinal drugs. Acute neurotoxicities, including transient akathisias, oculogyric crisis, delirium, seizures, and strokes, can develop after use of certain gastrointestinal medications, while disabling and pervasive tardive syndromes are described following long-term and often unsupervised use of phenothiazines, metoclopramide, and other drugs. In rare instances, some of the antiemetics can precipitate life-threatening extrapyramidal reactions, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, or serotonin syndrome. In contrast, concerns about the cardiovascular toxicity of drugs such as cisapride and tegaserod have been grave enough to lead to their withdrawal from many world markets. Awareness and recognition of the neurotoxicity of gastrointestinal drugs is essential to help weigh the benefit of their use against possible adverse effects, even if uncommon. Furthermore, as far as possible, drugs such as metoclopramide and others that can lead to tardive dyskinesias should be used for as short time as possible, with close clinical monitoring and patient education. PMID:24365343

  9. Oesophageal variceal bleeding in Felty's syndrome associated with nodular regenerative hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Blendis, L M; Lovell, D; Barnes, C G; Ritland, S; Cattan, D; Vesin, P

    1978-01-01

    Four patients with Felty's syndrome developed massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to oesophageal varices. The underlying hepatic pathology in all 4 was nodular regenerative hyperplasia. This appears to be a difficult histological diagnosis to make, having been initially reported as normal on percutaneous biopsy or as fibrosis or cirrhosis on wedge biopsy. This series brings the total number of cases reported in the English literature of this association to 12, suggesting a definite symptom complex. The portal hypertension seems to be due to a combination of increased splenic blood flow and postsinusoidal resistance. The clinical importance of this syndrome is that the appropriate therapy for bleeding oesophageal varices appears to be shunt procedure such as a splenorenal shunt with splenectomy, which should be well tolerated. Images PMID:306226

  10. Salvage therapy with high dose Intravenous Immunoglobulins in acquired Von Willebrand Syndrome and unresponsive severe intestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A 91-year-old woman affected with acquired Von Willebrand (VW) syndrome and intestinal angiodysplasias presented with severe gastrointestinal bleeding (hemoglobin 5 g/dl). Despite replacement therapy with VW factor/factor VIII concentrate qid, bleeding did not stop (eleven packed red blood cell units were transfused over three days). High circulating levels of anti-VW factor immunoglobulin M were documented immunoenzimatically. Heart ultrasound showed abnormalities of the mitral and aortic valves with severe flow alterations. When intravenous immunoglobulins were added to therapy, prompt clinical and laboratory responses occurred: complete cessation of bleeding, raise in hemoglobin, VW factor antigen, VW ristocetin cofactor and factor VIII levels as well as progressive reduction of the anti-VWF autoantibody levels. PMID:24926417

  11. Endoscopic Gastrointestinal Laser Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Buchi, Kenneth N.

    1985-01-01

    The development of flexible fibers for the delivery of laser energy led to the first endoscopic laser applications in humans in the early 1970s. Since that time, much has been learned about applications throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The risks appear to be minimal. The coagulative effect of laser energy is used to treat gastrointestinal hemorrhage and small, benign mucosal lesions. The ablative effect of the Nd:YAG laser on tissue is used for palliative therapy for malignant gastrointestinal disorders and incisional therapy for anatomic lesions such as strictures or cysts. New laser modalities that potentially can be tuned throughout large segments of the electromagnetic spectrum, new fiber-optic delivery systems with specialized tips and new methods of sensitizing tissue to laser energy all indicate that the endoscopic laser should continue to have many new and innovative applications. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:3911589

  12. Gastrointestinal Stent Update

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The use of self-expanding metallic stents in the upper gastrointestinal tract, placed under radiologic imaging or endoscopic guidance, is the current treatment of choice for the palliation of malignant gastrointestinal outlet obstructions. Advances in metallic stent design and delivery systems have progressed to the stage where this treatment is now considered a minimally invasive therapy. Metallic stent placement will broaden further into the field of nonsurgical therapy for the gastrointestinal tract. To date, metallic stents placed in the esophagus, gastric outlet, colorectum, and bile ducts are not intended to be curative, but rather to provide a palliative treatment for obstructions. The evolution of metallic stent technology will render such procedures not only palliative but also therapeutic, by enabling local drug delivery, and the use of biodegradable materials will reduce procedure-related complications. PMID:21103290

  13. State-of-the-Art Management of Acute Bleeding Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Al Dhahab, Hisham; McNabb-Baltar, Julia; Al-Taweel, Talal; Barkun, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The management of patients with non variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding has evolved, as have its causes and prognosis, over the past 20 years. The addition of high-quality data coupled to the publication of authoritative national and international guidelines have helped define current-day standards of care. This review highlights the relevant clinical evidence and consensus recommendations that will hopefully result in promoting the effective dissemination and knowledge translation of important information in the management of patients afflicted with this common entity. PMID:24045592

  14. Upper gastro-intestinal disease in Scotland: a survey of practice amongst Scottish gastroenterologists.

    PubMed

    Kubba, A K; Whyman, M R

    1996-10-01

    Given the range of causes of upper gastrointestinal disease (UGD), the evolving role of Helicobacter pylori in its pathogenesis and the variety of treatments available, one might expect complex management strategies in the management of these diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the current management strategies used in peptic ulcer disease and gastritis in Scotland and to identify areas where large and clinically important variations in practice exist between gastro-intestinal specialists. Between June and September 1994, 130 gastro-intestinal physicians and surgeons were sent a postal questionnaire based on their response to four hypothetical clinical scenarios. Eighty-one (63%) correspondents returned completed questionnaires. The case histories related to: bleeding duodenal ulcer; peptic ulceration whilst taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids; management of dyspepsia in the young; and management of gastritis. Thirty-eight per cent of clinicians surveyed advocated the use of intravenous acid reducing agents in peptic ulcer bleeding. A total of 88% advocated endoscopic therapy in the presence of stigmata of recent haemorrhage and 5% suggested a follow up of endoscopy to confirm healing after ulcer bleeding. In treating the patient with ulcer while on NSAIDs, 45% of clinicians would use H2 receptor antagonists, 37% would use omeprazole, 14% misoprostol and 4% helicobacter eradication. Of the clinicians surveyed, 63% said they would investigate a 25-year-old patient with dyspepsia by endoscopy and 84% of these will biopsy for H. pylori. Empirical treatment was favoured by 37% and 4% considered a barium meal. There was no consensus in the treatment of gastritis. There exists considerable divergence of opinion between clinicians in investigation and treatment of upper gastrointestinal disease. The role of endoscopy, the type and duration of medical treatment of bleeding and non bleeding ulcer and gastritis require

  15. What Are Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the digestive system. The gastrointestinal system The gastrointestinal (GI) system (or digestive system) processes food for energy ... bloodstream. This is the longest section of the GI tract, measuring more than 20 feet. The small ...

  16. Combined use of clips and nylon snare ("tulip-bundle") as a rescue endoscopic bleeding control in a mallory-weiss syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ivekovic, Hrvoje; Radulovic, Bojana; Jankovic, Suzana; Markos, Pave; Rustemovic, Nadan

    2014-01-01

    Mallory-Weiss syndrome (MWS) accounts for 6-14% of all cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Prognosis of patients with MWS is generally good, with a benign course and rare recurrence of bleeding. However, no strict recommendations exist in regard to the mode of action after a failure of primary endoscopic hemostasis. We report a case of an 83-year-old male with MWS and rebleeding after the initial endoscopic treatment with epinephrine and clips. The final endoscopic control of bleeding was achieved by a combined application of clips and a nylon snare in a "tulip-bundle" fashion. The patient had an uneventful postprocedural clinical course and was discharged from the hospital five days later. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report showing the "tulip-bundle" technique as a rescue endoscopic bleeding control in the esophagus. PMID:25328727

  17. Secondary electric power generation with minimum engine bleed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tagge, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Secondary electric power generation with minimum engine bleed is discussed. Present and future jet engine systems are compared. The role of auxiliary power units is evaluated. Details of secondary electric power generation systems with and without auxiliary power units are given. Advanced bleed systems are compared with minimum bleed systems. A cost model of ownership is given. The difference in the cost of ownership between a minimum bleed system and an advanced bleed system is given.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells in the gastrointestinal tract and patches of dark skin on various areas of the body. Some ... Cancer Society: Treating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) Cancer.Net: Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor--Diagnosis Genetic Testing Registry: Gastrointestinal ...

  19. Polyphenols and gastrointestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dryden, Gerald W.; Song, Ming; McClain, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This article will review the role of polyphenols in gastrointestinal diseases. Ingested polyphenols are concentrated in the gastrointestinal tract and are not well absorbed into the rest of the body. Thus, the high luminal concentrations achieved support a potential for therapeutic uses in the gastrointestinal tract. Additionally, there is great interest from the general public in complementary and alternative medicine. Recent findings Dietary polyphenols are a major source of antioxidants consumed by humans. Polyphenols possess not only antioxidant properties but also antiviral, antibacterial, antiinflammatory and anticarcinogenic effects, as well as the ability to modulate certain signaling pathways such as nuclear factor-κB activation. Green tea polyphenols have been shown to have efficacy in various models of inflammatory bowel disease. Silymarin, or milk thistle, is hepatoprotective against many forms of experimental liver injury and is widely used in human liver diseases, such as hepatitis C and alcoholic cirrhosis, with an excellent safety profile (but with unclear efficacy). Summary Substantial in-vitro and animal studies support the beneficial effects of polyphenols in many gastrointestinal diseases. Well designed multicenter trials in humans, such as those called for in the 2005 National Institutes of Health Requests for Applications for Silymarin Centers, will be critical for defining the safety, appropriate dosing and therapeutic efficacy of such agents. PMID:16462174

  20. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Nurten

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy has a major diagnostic and therapeutic role in most gastrointestinal disorders; however, limited information is available about clinical efficacy and safety in pregnant patients. The major risks of endoscopy during pregnancy include potential harm to the fetus because of hypoxia, premature labor, trauma and teratogenesis. In some cases, endoscopic procedures may be postponed until after delivery. When emergency or urgent indications are present, endoscopic procedures may be considered with some precautions. United States Food and Drug Administration category B drugs may be used in low doses. Endoscopic procedures during pregnancy may include upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, enteroscopy of the small bowel or video capsule endoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography. All gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures in pregnant patients should be performed in hospitals by expert endoscopists and an obstetrician should be informed about all endoscopic procedures. The endoscopy and flexible sigmoidoscopy may be safe for the fetus and pregnant patient, and may be performed during pregnancy when strong indications are present. Colonoscopy for pregnant patients may be considered for strong indications during the second trimester. Although therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be considered during pregnancy, this procedure should be performed only for strong indications and attempts should be made to minimize radiation exposure. PMID:25386072