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1

Neptune's rotational period suggested by the extraordinary stability of two features  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interior rotation and motions in giant planets have generally been probed only at radio wavelengths from spacecraft near the planet, except for Jupiter's radio emission detectable from Earth. Here I suggest that Neptune's interior can be indirectly probed at visible wavelength by tracking 10 features that are connected with a stationary latitudinal speed pattern of 7 m/s amplitude. All 10 features remained aligned at the same longitude throughout the Voyager observation period in 1989. Two of them, the South Polar Wave and South Polar Feature, have been observed from Earth for ˜20 years, but their extraordinary rotational stability was never recognized. They probably pinpoint Neptune's rotational period (15.9663 ± 0.0002 h), one of the largest improvements in 346 years of measuring the giant planets' rotations. The previous best estimate of Neptune's rotational period (16.108 ± 0.006 h) was based on Voyager 2 radio data (Lecacheux, A., Zarka, P., Desch, M.D., Evans, D.R. [1993]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 20, 2711-2714). The new result suggests an upward revision of the mass of Neptune's core. This finding may also question the accepted value of Uranus' rotational period. The first reliable wind measurements within 15° of Neptune's South Pole, based on tracking four features in Voyager images, show a 300 m/s eastward jet peaking near 76° South, while the area within 4° of the South Pole seems to be rotationally locked to the interior. These new observations of the stationary features and winds could address the long-standing question about the depth of the atmospheric circulation and may allow some constraints on convection currents in Neptune's interior.

Karkoschka, Erich

2011-09-01

2

Period analysis for simultaneous multichannel photometric observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The method of three stage weighted period analysis is generalized for simultaneous multichannel observations. The new method is based on the phase dispersion minimization over all channels simultaneously. The three stages in the full algorithm are phase dispersion minimization method (PDM), linear modeling (LM) and nonlinear modeling (NLM). Simple computational tests of the multichannel period analysis (MPA) are presented. We show that the method has advantages if compared with methods where single channels are analysed separately. We derive a general formula for spurious periods and demonstrate that the interpretation of peaks in the PDM spectra can be more complicated than in classical power spectra.

You, J.; Pelt, J.; Tuominen, I.

2000-11-01

3

THE PERIOD CHANGE OF THE CEPHEID POLARIS SUGGESTS ENHANCED MASS LOSS  

SciTech Connect

Polaris is one of the most observed stars in the night sky, with recorded observations spanning more than 200 years. From these observations, one can study the real-time evolution of Polaris via the secular rate of change of the pulsation period. However, the measurements of the rate of period change do not agree with predictions from state-of-the-art stellar evolution models. We show that this may imply that Polaris is currently losing mass at a rate of M-dot {approx}10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} based on the difference between modeled and observed rates of period change, consistent with pulsation-enhanced Cepheid mass loss. A relation between the rate of period change and mass loss has important implications for understanding stellar evolution and pulsation, and provides insight into the current Cepheid mass discrepancy.

Neilson, Hilding R.; Langer, Norbert [Argelander Institute for Astronomy, University of Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Engle, Scott G.; Guinan, Ed; Wasatonic, Richard P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 Lancaster Ave. Villanova, PA 19085 (United States); Williams, David B., E-mail: hneilson@astro.uni-bonn.de [American Association of Variable Star Observers, 49 Bay State Road, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2012-02-15

4

Irregular Periods May Be Risk Factor for Ovarian Cancer, Study Suggests  

MedlinePLUS

... death. All had at least one child, and none used fertility drugs to conceive, according to the ... 26 when they reported having irregular periods. Although none of the women was diagnosed with polycystic ovary ...

5

Urbana Meteor Radar observations during GRMWSP/CTOP periods  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observations with the Urbana Meteor Radar during three GRMWSP/CTOP observational periods are presented. These data were collected at Urbana during the periods 12-13 August 1974, 13-17 October 1975 and 14-23 January 1976. The height-averaged wind is presented for the August period. Determinations of prevailing wind and tidal variability are made during the October period. Tidal determinations and an observed temporary dominance by short period dynamics are presented for the January period. More data supporting our earlier result of a significant correlation between equatorward flow and d-region ionization during winter are shown.

Hess, G. C.; Geller, M. A.

1978-01-01

6

Periodic Pulse Interval Analysis with Outliers and Missing Observations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Analysis of periodic pulse trains based on time of arrival is considered, with perhaps very many missing observations and contaminated data. A period estimator is developed based on a modified Euclidean algorithm. This algorithm is a computationally simpl...

B. M. Sadler S. D. Casey

1996-01-01

7

Very Long Period Oscillations Observed at Iwojima, Japan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Iwojima, located at 1250 km to the south of Tokyo, Japan, is a volcanic island belonging to the Izu-Ogasawara arc. The island has a volcanic cone Suribachiyama at the southwest and a dome-like mountain Motoyama at the northeast, which is the central part of the caldera with the diameter of about 10 km. Motoyama repeats large-scale uplift every several years, and has been uplifting with the rate of more than 50 cm/year since August 2006. During the large uplift period, we observed two types of very long period seismic signals in the island. The one is a very long period earthquake (VLP earthquake), which has a short period signal at the initial part and a damped long period oscillation lasting 10 minutes. The other is a very long period tremor (VLP tremor), which lasts a few days. These seismic signals have the same nine dominant spectral peaks between 6.9s and 29.8s, and exhibit the same oscillation directions at each seismic station. The agreement of the dominant spectral peaks shows that they are caused by eigen oscillation of the same resonator. VLP earthquakes are probably originated from the damped oscillation of the resonator excited by relatively large shallow short period earthquakes. The hypocenters of the short period seismic signals at the initial phase are distributed at the shallow part of Iwojima(<2km) as well as other short period earthquakes beneath the island, but their magnitude of M~3 is larger than the other earthquakes(M<2.4). Excitation source of the resonator for VLP tremor is unknown, but we suppose continuous pressure source such as volcanic fluid flow possibly excites long lasting oscillation of the resonator. We propose that the resonator is a magma chamber beneath Motoyama on the basis of the following reasons. i) The oscillation directions are similar to the directions of displacement vectors of GPS at the seismic stations during the large uplift. The similarity suggests that an inflation source oscillates in the radial direction. ii) The nine eigen periods of the oscillation can be explained by oscillation of a low velocity fluid sphere in an infinite elastic medium (Sakuraba et al., 2002). The density and P wave velocity ratios between the sphere and the infinite medium are 1 and 6.5, respectively. iii) The diameter of the sphere should be larger than several km to explain the very long period. iv) The sphere is located at the center of Motoyama (the center of the caldera) about 6 km deep. The estimated resonator is probably a main magma chamber which caused the roof collapse during the formation of Iwojima caldera. Acknowledgements: We thank Ministry of Defense for providing us with seismometer and tiltmeter data.

Ueda, H.; Fujita, E.; Ukawa, M.

2008-12-01

8

CCD observations and period determination of fifteen minor planets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have determined the periods of fifteen minor planets using differential photometry. Eleven of these minor planets had unknown periods, one had an uncertain period, and three had well-known periods. We observed a minimum of two epochs for each object in order to construct composite lightcurves. The periods ranged from 3.7 to 15.2 hours. The objects we report results for are: 174 Phaedra, 228 Agathe, 342 Endymion, 354 Eleonora, 365 Corduba, 373 Melusina, 575 Renate, 1084 Tamariwa, 1171 Rusthawelia, 1388 Aphrodite, 1501 Baade, 1544 Vinterhanseni, 1645 Waterfield, 1799 Koussevitzky, and 2097 Galle.

Ivarsen, Kevin; Willis, Sarah; Ingleby, Laura; Matthews, Dan; Simet, Melanie

2004-06-01

9

Fremsprachliche Unterrichtsstunde. Ein Vorschlag zu ihrer Analyse (The Foreign Language Class Period. A Suggestion for an Analysis).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the possibilities and limitations of a procedure devised at the University of Marburg for objectively evaluating foreign language class instruction. Ten criteria used in observing are explained in detail. By means of an example, procedure is demonstrated for observing a 45-minute class period. (IFS/WGA)

Freudenstein, Reinhold; Puerschel, Heiner

1978-01-01

10

SDO/AIA observations of periodic and quasi-periodic phenomenon associated with an EUV jet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has long been advocated that explosive magnetic activity is responsible for the mass-balance in the solar atmosphere, supplying the corona and the solar wind with heated plasma. The explosive events are thought to be the result of emerging bi-polar (EB) regions reconnecting with pre-existing, open fields, with the size of the EB's (i.e., granular, super-granular) being related to size of the resulting feature (i.e., spicules, EUV/X-ray jets). Recent evidence has suggested a deeper relationship between spicules and EUV jets (Sterling et al., 2010). We present here observations of a EUV jet observed with SDO/AIA close to a southern coronal hole. The jet can be considered as a 'Blowout jet' (using the terminology of Moore et al., 2010), launching vast amounts of chromospheric plasma into the atmosphere along with hotter material. The hotter part of the jet appears to be composed of multiple, (quasi-)periodic ejections that individually resemble fast moving (>100 km/s) spicules. The multiple ejections appear crucial for distributing the hotter material high into the corona, possibly suggesting that larger EUV/X-ray are composed of many smaller spicule-like events. Although the event is close to the limb, evidence for reconnection at the chromospheric level is provided. Further, evidence for helicity (or torsional motion) and the presence of slow and fast Magnetohydrodynamic waves is given, with the wave mode excitation likely due to the reconnection process. Exploiting the observed wave motion, we also use magneto-seismological techniques to determine local plasma parameters with sub-resolution accuracy along one of the jets unique features.

Morton, Richard; Verth, Gary; Erdelyi, Robertus; Srivastava, Abhi

2013-04-01

11

Characteristics of quasi-periodic scintillations observed at low latitude  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quasi-periodic scintillations are characterized as primary deep fadeout in field strength, associated with regular ringing patterns before and after it. In this paper, observations of quasi-periodic scintillations using geostationary satellite (FLEETSAT) transmissions operating at frequency 250 MHz at low-latitude ground station, Varanasi (geomagnetic latitude 14°55'N, longitude 153°59'E), are reported. The results indicate that the quasi-periodic scintillations are most likely produced by plasma blobs/bubbles present in the E and F regions of the ionosphere which are helpful in identifying the generation mechanism of the associated irregularities. The various characteristic features of the different types of quasi-periodic scintillations observed at low latitude are discussed for the first time in detail based on a highly comprehensive analysis of longer data sets using autocorrelation, power spectrum, and scintillation index analysis. The computed horizontal scale size of the quasi-periodic scintillations producing irregularity varies from 100 to 1300 m which shows that the irregularities are of intermediate-scale sizes. The spectral index obtained from the slopes of power spectrum varies from -2 to -8. All of these observed results are important for identifying the generation mechanism of ionospheric irregularities associated with quasi-periodic scintillations. The observed fading patterns, especially the modulation of the diffraction patterns (fading envelopes), can be explained by considering an obstacle called radio lens in the ionosphere elongated in one direction. For the first time, we have successfully simulated the amplitude versus time plots of almost all types of quasi-periodic scintillation patches and found that our modeled and observed characteristics of quasi-periodic scintillation patches compare well with each other.

Patel, Kalpana; Singh, Ashutosh K.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, R. P.

2009-12-01

12

Quasi-periodic emissions observed by Cluster and DEMETER spacecraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quasi-periodic (QP) emissions are electromagnetic emissions in the frequency range of about 0.5-4 kHz that are characterized by a periodic modulation of wave intensity. Typical periods of this modulation are on the order of minutes. Although there are many observations of these events by ground-based instruments, satellite observations are still rather sparse. Nevertheless, these are of great importance, as they allow us to analyze wave properties in situ, close to the probable generation region, and, moreover, they are not affected by the wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. We present a survey of QP events observed by the WBD instruments on board the four Cluster spacecraft during their perigee passes at radial distances of about 4 RE. Moreover, a conjugate observation of a QP event by Cluster spacecraft and by the low-altitude DEMETER spacecraft has been identified. Simultaneous observations of the same event by several different spacecraft enable us to distinguish between spatial and temporal variations of the phenomenon. It is shown that during a QP event, the same modulation is observed at the same time at very different locations of the inner magnetosphere. The results of a detailed wave analysis based on multi-component measurements by the STAFF-SA instruments indicate that the emissions propagate unducted, with oblique wave normal angles at larger geomagnetic latitudes. Finally, ULF magnetic field data are inspected for the presence of magnetic field fluctuations with a period corresponding to the period of modulation and a possible generation mechanism of the events is discussed.

Nemec, F.; Santolik, O.; Parrot, M.; Hayosh, M.; Pickett, J. S.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

2012-12-01

13

Observations of long period earthquakes accompanying hydraulic fracturing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Waveforms of most seismic events accompanying hydraulic fracturing have been reported to contain clear P and S waves and have fault plane solutions consistent with shear displacement across a fault. This observation is surprising since classical hydraulic fracturing theory predicts the creation of a tensile opening of a cavity in response to fluid pressure. Very small long period events, similar

Dorthe Bame; Michael Fehler

1986-01-01

14

Phylogeny and oscillating expression of period and cryptochrome in short and long photoperiods suggest a conserved function in Nasonia vitripennis  

PubMed Central

Photoperiodism, the ability to respond to seasonal varying day length with suitable life history changes, is a common trait in organisms that live in temperate regions. In most studied organisms, the circadian system appears to be the basis for photoperiodic time measurement. In insects this is still controversial: while some data indicate that the circadian system is causally involved in photoperiodism, others suggest that it may have a marginal or indirect role. Resonance experiments in the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis have revealed a circadian component in photoperiodic time measurement compatible with a mechanism of internal coincidence where a two components oscillator system obtains information from dawn and dusk, respectively. The identity of this oscillator (or oscillators) is still unclear but possible candidates are the oscillating molecules of the auto-regulatory feedback loops in the heart of the circadian system. Here, we show for the first time the circadian oscillation of period and cryptochrome mRNAs in the heads of Nasonia females kept under short and long photoperiods. Period and cryptochrome mRNA levels display a synchronous oscillation in all conditions tested and persist, albeit with reduced amplitude, during the first day in constant light as well as constant darkness. More importantly, the signal for the period and cryptochrome oscillations is set by the light-on signal. These results, together with phylogenetic analyses, indicate that Nasonia’s period and cryptochrome display characteristics of homologous genes in other hymenopteran species.

van de Zande, Louis; Beukeboom, Leo W.; Beersma, Domien G. M.

2014-01-01

15

Phylogeny and oscillating expression of period and cryptochrome in short and long photoperiods suggest a conserved function in Nasonia vitripennis.  

PubMed

Photoperiodism, the ability to respond to seasonal varying day length with suitable life history changes, is a common trait in organisms that live in temperate regions. In most studied organisms, the circadian system appears to be the basis for photoperiodic time measurement. In insects this is still controversial: while some data indicate that the circadian system is causally involved in photoperiodism, others suggest that it may have a marginal or indirect role. Resonance experiments in the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis have revealed a circadian component in photoperiodic time measurement compatible with a mechanism of internal coincidence where a two components oscillator system obtains information from dawn and dusk, respectively. The identity of this oscillator (or oscillators) is still unclear but possible candidates are the oscillating molecules of the auto-regulatory feedback loops in the heart of the circadian system. Here, we show for the first time the circadian oscillation of period and cryptochrome mRNAs in the heads of Nasonia females kept under short and long photoperiods. Period and cryptochrome mRNA levels display a synchronous oscillation in all conditions tested and persist, albeit with reduced amplitude, during the first day in constant light as well as constant darkness. More importantly, the signal for the period and cryptochrome oscillations is set by the light-on signal. These results, together with phylogenetic analyses, indicate that Nasonia's period and cryptochrome display characteristics of homologous genes in other hymenopteran species. PMID:24758403

Bertossa, Rinaldo C; van de Zande, Louis; Beukeboom, Leo W; Beersma, Domien G M

2014-07-01

16

A summary of observational records on periodicities above the rotational period in the Jovian magnetosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Jovian magnetosphere is a very dynamic system. The plasma mass-loading from the moon Io and the fast planetary rotation lead to regular release of mass from the Jovian magnetosphere and to a change of the magnetic topology. These regular variations, most commonly on several (2.5-4) days scale, were derived from various data sets obtained by different spacecraft missions and instruments ranging from auroral images to in situ measurements of magnetospheric particles. Specifically, ion measurements from the Galileo spacecraft represent the periodicities, very distinctively, namely the periodic thinning of the plasma sheet and subsequent dipolarization, and explosive mass release occurring mainly during the transition between these two phases. We present a review of these periodicities, particularly concentrating on those observed in energetic particle data. The most distinct periodicities are observed for ions of sulfur and oxygen. The periodic topological change of the Jovian magnetosphere, the associated mass-release process and auroral signatures can be interpreted as a global magnetospheric instability with analogies to the two step concept of terrestrial substorms. Different views on the triggering mechanism of this magnetospheric instability are discussed.

Kronberg, E. A.; Woch, J.; Krupp, N.; Lagg, A.

2009-06-01

17

Saturn's planetary period oscillations observed during 10 years of Cassini  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Planetary period oscillations (PPOs) with periods close to Saturn's rotational period are ubiquitous throughout Saturn's magnetospheric system. Here we review the observational studies of PPOs determined from magnetospheric magnetic field data throughout the Cassini mission to date. As first shown using radio data, two oscillatory systems are present, one associated with the northern polar region and the other with the southern. We show that within the northern (southern) open-field polar region only the northern (southern) PPO oscillations are detected. However, within the equatorial 'core' region of Saturn's magnetosphere (dipole L ? 12), the two oscillations are superposed and interfere. The PPO periods are shown to lie in the range ~10.6 to 10.8 h, are persistently shorter north than south to date, and undergo a strong seasonal cycle together with the oscillation amplitudes. We discuss these observations in relation to theoretical models that have been proposed to explain them, and emphasize the importance of continued measurement of their properties during the Cassini solstice mission.

Provan, Gabrielle; Andrews, David; Cowley, Stanley; Dougherty, Michele

2014-05-01

18

Earthquake nucleation mechanisms and periodic loading: Models, Experiments, and Observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The project has two main goals: (a) Improve the understanding of how earthquakes are nucleated ¬ with specific focus on seismic response to periodic stresses (such as tidal or seasonal variations) (b) Use the results of (a) to infer on the possible existence of precursory activity before large earthquakes. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for the nucleation of earthquakes, including frictional nucleation (Dieterich 1987) and fracture (Lockner 1999, Beeler 2003). We study the relation between the observed rates of triggered seismicity, the period and amplitude of cyclic loadings and whether the observed seismic activity in response to periodic stresses can be used to identify the correct nucleation mechanism (or combination of mechanisms). A generalized version of the Ben-Zion and Rice model for disordered fault zones and results from related recent studies on dislocation dynamics and magnetization avalanches in slowly magnetized materials are used in the analysis (Ben-Zion et al. 2010; Dahmen et al. 2009). The analysis makes predictions for the statistics of macroscopic failure events of sheared materials in the presence of added cyclic loading, as a function of the period, amplitude, and noise in the system. The employed tools include analytical methods from statistical physics, the theory of phase transitions, and numerical simulations. The results will be compared to laboratory experiments and observations. References: Beeler, N.M., D.A. Lockner (2003). Why earthquakes correlate weakly with the solid Earth tides: effects of periodic stress on the rate and probability of earthquake occurrence. J. Geophys. Res.-Solid Earth 108, 2391-2407. Ben-Zion, Y. (2008). Collective Behavior of Earthquakes and Faults: Continuum-Discrete Transitions, Evolutionary Changes and Corresponding Dynamic Regimes, Rev. Geophysics, 46, RG4006, doi:10.1029/2008RG000260. Ben-Zion, Y., Dahmen, K. A. and J. T. Uhl (2010). A unifying phase diagram for the dynamics of sheared solids and granular materials, Pure Appl. Geophys., in review, 2010. Dahmen, K.A., Y. Ben-Zion, and J.T. Uhl (2009). A micromechanical model for the deformation in solids with universal predictions for stress-strain curves and slip avalanches, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 175501/1-4. Dahmen , K.A. and Y. Ben-Zion (2009). The physics of jerky motion in slowly driven magnetic and earthquake fault systems. Encyclopedia of Complexity and System Science, R. Meyers (Eds.), Vol. 5, 5021-5037, Springer. Dieterich, J. H. (1987). Nucleation and triggering of earthquake slip: effect of periodic stresses, Tectonophysics 144, 127-139. Lockner, David A. and Nick M. Beeler (1999). Premonitory slip and tidal triggering of earthquakes, J. Geophys. Res. 104, 20,133-20,151.

Dahmen, K.; Brinkman, B.; Tsekenis, G.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Uhl, J.

2010-12-01

19

313 New Asteroid Rotation Periods from Palomar Transient Factory Observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new asteroid rotation period survey has been carried out by using the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). Twelve consecutive PTF fields, which covered an area of 87 deg2 in the ecliptic plane, were observed in the R band with a cadence of ~20 minutes during 2013 February 15-18. We detected 2500 known asteroids with a diameter range of 0.5 km <=D <= 200 km. Of these, 313 objects had highly reliable rotation periods and exhibited the "spin barrier" at ~2 hr. In contrast to the flat spin-rate distribution of the asteroids with 3 km <=D <= 15 km shown by Pravec et al., our results deviated somewhat from a Maxwellian distribution and showed a decrease at the spin rate greater than 5 rev day–1. One superfast rotator candidate and two possible binary asteroids were also found in this work.

Chang, Chan-Kao; Ip, Wing-Huen; Lin, Hsing-Wen; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Yang, Ting-Chang; Waszczak, Adam; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Levitan, David; Sesar, Branimir; Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason; Prince, Thomas. A.

2014-06-01

20

The Changing Surface of Saturn's Titan: Cassini Observations Suggest Active Cryovolcanism  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

R. M. Nelson(1), L. Kamp(1), R. M. C. Lopes(1), D. L. Matson(1), S. D. Wall(1), R. L. Kirk(2), K. L Mitchell(1), G. Mitri(1), B. W. Hapke(3), M. D. Boryta(4), F. E. Leader(1) , W. D. Smythe(1), K. H. Baines(1), R. Jauman(5), C. Sotin(1), R. N. Clark(6), D. P. Cruikshank(7) , P. Drossart(9), B. J. Buratti(1) , J.Lunine(8), M. Combes(9), G. Bellucci(10), J.-P. Bibring(11), F. Capaccioni(10), P. Cerroni(10), A. Coradini(10), V. Formisano(10), G Filacchione(10), R. Y. Langevin(11), T. B. McCord(12), V. Mennella(13), P. D. Nicholson(14) , B. Sicardy(8) 1-JPL, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena CA 91109, 2-USGS, Flagstaff, 3-U Pittsburgh, 4-Mt. Sac Col, 5- DLR, Berlin, 6-USGS Denver, 7-NASA AMES, 8-U Paris-Meudon, 9-Obs de Paris, 10-ISFI-CNR Rome, 11-U Paris -Sud. Orsay, 12-Bear Flt Cntr Winthrop WA, 13-Obs Capodimonte Naples, 14-Cornell U. Several Instruments on the Cassini Saturn Orbiter have been observing the surface of Saturn's moon Titan since mid 2004. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) reports that regions near 26oS, 78oW (region 1) and 7oS, 138oW (region 2) exhibit photometric changes consistent with on-going surface activity. These regions are photometrically variable with time(1). Cassini Synthetic Aperture Rader (SAR) has investigated these regions and reports that both of these regions exhibit morphologies consistent with cryovolcanism (2). VIMS observed region 1 eight times and reported that on two occasions the region brightened two-fold and then decreased again on timescales of several weeks. Region 2 was observed on four occasions (Tb-Dec13/2004 ,T8-Oct27/2005, T10-Jan15/2006, T12-Mar18/2006) and exhibited a pronounced change in I/F betweenT8 and T10. Our photometric analysis finds that both regions do not exhibit photometric properties consistent with atmospheric phenomena such as tropospheric clouds. These changes must be at or very near the surface. Radar images of these regions reveal morphology that is consistent with cryovolcanoes. We conclude that the VIMS instrument has found two instances in which selected regions on Titan's surface became unusually reflective and remained reflective on time scales of days to months. In both cases the area of reflectance variability is large (~100000 sq km), larger than either Loki or the Big Island of Hawaii. This is a strong evidence for currently active surface processes on Titan. Pre-Cassini, Titan was thought of as a pre-biotic earth that was frozen in time. Cassini VIMS and SAR observations combined suggest that Titan is the present day is not frozen solid, and is instead an episodically changing or evolving world. References: [1] Nelson R. M. et al, LPSC 2007 , Europlanets 2007, AGU 2007, EGU 2008, Accepted in Icarus 2008. [2] Lopes et al (this meeting), Stofan et al. Icarus 185, 443-456, 2007. Lopes et al. Icarus 186, 395- 412, 2007. Kirk et al., DPS 2007. Acknowledgement: This work done at JPL under contract with NASA

Nelson, R. M.

2008-12-01

21

Observation and modeling of quasi-periodic scintillations observed at low latitude  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quasi-periodic scintillations are characterized as primary deep fade-out infield strength, associated with regular ringing patterns before and after it. In this paper, observations of quasi-periodic scintillation using geostationary satellite (FLEETSAT) transmissions operating at frequency 250 MHz at low latitude ground station, Varanasi (geomag. lat 14° 55' N, long. 154°E) are reported. The results indicate that the quasi-periodic scintillations are most likely produced by plasma blobs/bubbles present in the E and F-region of the ionosphere. The various characteristics features of the quasi periodic scintillations are discussed after the autocorrelation, power spectrum and scintillation index analysis. The computed horizontal scale size of the quasi periodic scintillation producing irregularity varies from 100 m to 1300 m which shows that the irregularities are of intermediate-scale sizes. The spectral index obtained from the slopes of power spectrum varies from -2 to -8. The observed fading patterns, especially the modulation of the diffraction pattern (fading envelope) can be explained by considering an obstacle called radio lens in the ionosphere elongated in one direction. We have simulated successfully the amplitude versus time plot of quasi periodic scintillation patches and found that our theoretical and experimental results of quasi periodic scintillation patches compares well with each other and also with the earlier published works.

Patel, Kalpana; Singh, A. K.; Singh, R. P.

2010-02-01

22

Genetic diversity patterns at the human clock gene period 2 are suggestive of population-specific positive selection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Period 2 (PER2) is a key component of the mammalian circadian clock machinery. In humans, genetic variation of clock genes or chronic disturbance of circadian rhythmicity has been implied in the onset of several phenotypes, ranging from periodic insomnias to advanced or delayed sleep phases, to more severe disorders. Peculiar geographic diversity patterns in circadian genes might represent an adaptive

Fulvio Cruciani; Beniamino Trombetta; Damian Labuda; David Modiano; Antonio Torroni; Rodolfo Costa; Rosaria Scozzari

2008-01-01

23

The Prosaics of Figurative Language in Preschool: Some Observations and Suggestions for Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a significant work, "Metaphor in educational discourse", Cameron has suggested that we study metaphor as "prosaics" (i.e. as a feature of mundane talk). In this paper, by means of some brief examples, we point to instances of such talk in the setting of preschool. We also discuss opportunities for learning that such talk could offer children,…

Pramling, Niklas; Samuelsson, Ingrid Pramling

2007-01-01

24

Are Dietary Restraint Scales Valid Measures of Acute Dietary Restriction? Unobtrusive Observational Data Suggest Not  

Microsoft Academic Search

The finding that dietary restraint scales predict onset of bulimic pathology has been interpreted as suggesting that dieting causes this eating disturbance, despite the dearth of evidence that these scales are valid measures of dietary restriction. The authors conducted 4 studies that tested whether dietary restraint scales were inversely correlated with unobtrusively measured caloric intake. These studies, which varied in

Eric Stice; Melissa Fisher; Michael R. Lowe

2004-01-01

25

Observations by a University Anatomy Teacher and a Suggestion for Curricular Change: Integrative Anatomy for Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The observation that anatomical course offerings have decreased in undergraduate biology curricula is supported by a survey of undergraduate institutions in the state of Washington. This reduction, due partially to increased emphasis in other areas of the biology curriculum, along with the lack of anatomy prerequisites for admission to most…

Darda, David M.

2010-01-01

26

HF radar observations of ionospheric backscatter during geomagnetically quiet periods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The quiet-time coherent backscatter from the F-region observed by the Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER) Bruny Island HF radar is analysed statistically in order to determine typical trends and controlling factors in the ionospheric echo occurrence. A comparison of the F-region peak density values from the IRI-2007 model and ionosonde measurements in the vicinity of the radar's footprint shows a very good agreement, particularly at subauroral and auroral latitudes, and model densities within the radar's footprint are used in the following analyses. The occurrence of F-region backscatter is shown to exhibit distinct diurnal, seasonal and solar cycle variations and these are compared with model trends in the F-region peak electron density and Pedersen conductance of the underlying ionosphere. The solar cycle effects in occurrence are demonstrated to be strong and more complex than a simple proportionality on a year-to-year basis. The diurnal and seasonal effects are strongly coupled to each other, with diurnal trends exhibiting a systematic gradual variation from month to month that can be explained when both electron density and conductance trends are considered. During the night, the echo occurrence is suggested to be controlled directly by the density conditions, with a direct proportionality observed between the occurrence and peak electron density. During the day, the echo occurrence appears to be controlled by both conductance and propagation conditions. It is shown that the range of echo occurrence values is smaller for larger conductances and that the electron density determines what value the echo occurrence takes in that range. These results suggest that the irregularity production rates are significantly reduced by the highly conducting E layer during the day while F-region density effects dominate during the night.

Kane, T. A.; Makarevich, R. A.; Devlin, J. C.

2012-01-01

27

Euthanasia policy and practice in Belgium: critical observations and suggestions for improvement.  

PubMed

The essay opens with some background information about the context of euthanasia in Belgium. It proceeds by discussing the Belgian law on euthanasia and concerns about the law, its interpretations and implementation. Finally, the major developments and controversies since the law came into effect are discussed. Suggestions as to how to improve the Belgian law and circumscribe the practice of euthanasia are made, urging Belgian legislators and the medical establishment to reflect and study so as to prevent potential abuse of vulnerable patients. PMID:19445265

Cohen-Almagor, Raphael

2009-01-01

28

Cybersemiotics: A suggestion for a transdisciplinary framework for description of observing, anticipatory and meaning producing systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ability of systems to be anticipatory seems to be intricate connected with the ability to observe and to cognate by reducing complexity through signification. The semantic capacity of living systems, the cognitive ability to assign meaning to differences perturbating the system's self-organization, seems to be the prerequisite for the phenomenon of communication, language and consciousness. In cybernetics Bateson developed the idea that information is a difference that makes a difference and second order cybernetics developed the concept of organisms as self-organized and self-produced systems (autopoietic) as the prerequisite of life and cognition. The cognitive ability seems to be qualitative different from what so far is computable on any known machine although parts of different aspects of the process can be partly simulated in AI, neutral network and AL. In semiotics the fundamental process of cognition and communication is called semiosis or signification and C. S. Peirce created a special triadic, objective idealistic, pragmatic and evolutionary philosophy to be able to give a fruitful description of the process and its relation to logic and the concept of natural law. Both second order cybernetics and semiotics sees information and meaning as something produced by individual organisms through structural couplings to the environments or other individuals through historical drift and further developed in social communication. Luhmann points out that social communication also only functions through structural couplings which he calls generalized media such as science, art, power, love and money. Peirce talks of the semiotic net as a triadic view of meanings developing through history and in animals through evolution. In accordance with this Wittgenstein points out that signification is created in language games developed in specific life forms. Life forms are the things we do in society such as seducing, commanding and explaining. As animals do not have language in the true sense I have extended his concept into ethology and bio-semiotics by talking of sign games related to specific motivations and innate response mechanisms. Life as such seems to be an anticipatory function generating expectations through evolution through open genetic programs as Konrad Lorenz pointed out. The phenomenon of imprinting in ducks for instance is a standard example of programmed anticipation. Expectations are expectations of meaning and order (information) related to the semiosphere the organism constructs as its individual world view and live in. (The Umwelt of von Uexküll). On this basis events that perpetuates the semiosphere are reduced to meaning, i.e. something related to the survival and procreation of the individual living system, it conatus, to use one of Spinoza's terms. The framework of cybersemiotics, uniting second order cybernetics, semiotics and language game theory, is created to make transdisciplinary concepts and models that can handle the process of cognition, information and communication across the domains of the sciences, the arts and social sciences in a non-reductionistic way. It is seen as an alternative based on biological and semiotic thinking (biosemiotics) to the functionalistic information processing paradigm of cognitive science that is build on the computer as paradigm and based on classical logic and mechanistic physics-and therefore has severe problems of dealing with semantics and signification.

Brier, Soren

1998-07-01

29

Period and amplitude variations in post-common-envelope eclipsing binaries observed with SuperWASP  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Period or amplitude variations in eclipsing binaries may reveal the presence of additional massive bodies in the system, such as circumbinary planets. Here, we have studied twelve previously-known eclipsing post-common-envelope binaries for evidence of such light curve variations, on the basis of multi-year observations in the SuperWASP archive. The results for HW Vir provided strong evidence for period changes consistent with those measured by previous studies, and help support a two-planet model for the system. ASAS J102322-3737.0 exhibited plausible evidence for a period increase not previously suggested; while NY Vir, QS Vir and NSVS 14256825 afforded less significant support for period change, providing some confirmation to earlier claims. In other cases, period change was not convincingly observed; for AA Dor and NSVS 07826147, previous findings of constant period were confirmed. This study allows us to present hundreds of new primary eclipse timings for these systems, and further demonstrates the value of wide-field high-cadence surveys like SuperWASP for the investigation of variable stars. Appendix A is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/566/A128

Lohr, M. E.; Norton, A. J.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Faedi, F.; Haswell, C. A.; Hellier, C.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Horne, K.; Kolb, U. C.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Pollacco, D.; Skillen, I.; Smalley, B.; West, R. G.; Wheatley, P. J.

2014-06-01

30

Examining Periodic Solar-Wind Density Structures Observed in the SECCHI Heliospheric Imagers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present an analysis of small-scale, periodic, solar-wind density enhancements (length scales as small as approximately equals 1000 Mm) observed in images from the Heliospheric Imager (HI) aboard STEREO-A. We discuss their possible relationship to periodic fluctuations of the proton density that have been identified at 1 AU using in-situ plasma measurements. Specifically, Viall, Kepko, and Spence examined 11 years of in-situ solar-wind density measurements at 1 AU and demonstrated that not only turbulent structures, but also nonturbulent, periodic density structures exist in the solar wind with scale sizes of hundreds to one thousand Mm. In a subsequent paper, Viall, Spence, and Kasper analyzed the alpha-to-proton solar-wind abundance ratio measured during one such event of periodic density structures, demonstrating that the plasma behavior was highly suggestive that either temporally or spatially varying coronal source plasma created those density structures. Large periodic density structures observed at 1 AU, which were generated in the corona, can be observable in coronal and heliospheric white-light images if they possess sufficiently high density contrast. Indeed, we identify such periodic density structures as they enter the HI field of view and follow them as they advect with the solar wind through the images. The smaller, periodic density structures that we identify in the images are comparable in size to the larger structures analyzed in-situ at 1 AU, yielding further evidence that periodic density enhancements are a consequence of coronal activity as the solar wind is formed.

Viall, Nicholeen M.; Spence, Harlan E.; Vourlidas, Angelos; Howard, Russell

2010-01-01

31

The relationship between two periodicities observed in Eta Carinae  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An 85-day periodicity in the X-ray emission of Eta Carinae has been reported, while spectrocopic events recur with a period of 5.5 years (Corcoran et al., 1997 [Natur, 390, 587]; Damineli, 1996 [ApJ, 460, L49]). If the hot X-rays are produced by colliding winds in a 5.5-year binary system, then the interval of 85 days between X-ray flares is likely to represent pulsation or rotation of the primary star, or conceivably the orbit of a third object. In a broad class of models, the 85-day recurrence interval is predicted to lengthen drastically in 1998 after the two stars pass periastron. If this effect does occur, then it can give information about the nature of the system. If it does not, then specific types of models are ruled out.

Davidson, Kris; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Corcoran, Michael F.

1998-06-01

32

Viking magnetic and electric field observations of periodic Pc 1 waves: Pearl pulsations  

SciTech Connect

Pearl pulsations, with an average repetition period of 60 s, were recorded using the magnetic and electric field experiments on the polar-orbiting Viking satellite. The wave event occurred on September 30, 1986, during Viking orbit 1212 at 1030 MLT, from L=3.6 to L=4.1, and at an altitude of 13,500 km. Electron density observations obtained from Viking show that the waves were generated at the plasmapause and at lower amplitudes in the plasmasphere. The wave Poynting flux, calculated using the magnetic and electric field, indicated that the waves generally were propagating downward toward the ionosphere, although upward Poynting fluxes were observed. Clear evidence of upward propagating waves, associated with downward propagating waves reflected at the ionosphere, was not observed. Linear convective growth rates suggest that the anisotropic ions which provide the free energy have a perpendicular temperature around 15 keV. The repetition period, calculated using the measured electron density and magnetic field strength at Viking, is consistent with the double-hop transit time for ion cyclotron waves which propagate along field lines from one hemisphere to the other. However, the absence of upward propagating waves packets implies that the upper limit of the wave ionospheric reflection coefficient is on the order of 10 to 20%. Alternative mechanism for producing the observed repetition are also investigated and include a periodic generation model of pearl pulsations at the ion bounce period. 42 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Erlandson, R.E.; Anderson, B.J.; Zanetti, L.J. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States)

1992-10-01

33

Observed dispersion curves of long period atmospheric acoustic waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently some groups reported Earth's background free oscillations even on seismically quiet days [e.g. Nawa et al., 1998]. Statistical features of them and annual variations of their amplitudes with a peak in July suggest that atmospheric disturbance is the most probable excitation source [Nishida and Kobayashi, 1999; Nishida et al., 2000]. If the atmospheric excitation mechanism is effective, atmospheric acoustic

K. Nishida; Y. Fukao; S. Watada; N. Kobayashi; M. Tahira; N. Suda; K. Nawa

2003-01-01

34

Period Spacings of Most Red Giants Observed by Kepler  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Of the more than 150 000 targets followed by the Kepler mission, about 10% were selected as red giants. Due to their high scientific value, in particular for Galaxy population studies and stellar structure and evolution, their Kepler light curves were made public in late 2011. More than 13 000 (over 85%) of these stars show intrinsic flux variability caused by solar-like oscillations making them ideal for large scale asteroseismic investigations. We automatically extracted individual frequencies and measured the period spacings of the dipole modes in nearly every red giant. These measurements naturally classify the stars into various populations, such as the Red Giant Branch, the low-mass (M / M? ? 1.8) helium-core-burning Red Clump, and the higher-mass (M / M? ? 1.8) secondary clump. The period spacings also reveal that a large fraction of the stars show rotationally induced frequency splittings. This sample of stars will undoubtedly provide an extremely valuable source for studying the stellar population in the direction of the Kepler field, in particular when combined with complementary spectroscopic surveys.

Stello, D.; Huber, D.; Bedding, T. R.; Benomar, O.; Bildsten, L.; Elsworth, Y.; Gilliland, R. L.; Mosser, B.; Paxton, B.; White, T. R.

2013-12-01

35

Large-Scale periodic solar velocities: An observational study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observations of large-scale solar velocities were made using the mean field telescope and Babcock magnetograph of the Stanford Solar Observatory. Observations were made in the magnetically insensitive ion line at 5124 A, with light from the center (limb) of the disk right (left) circularly polarized, so that the magnetograph measures the difference in wavelength between center and limb. Computer calculations are made of the wavelength difference produced by global pulsations for spherical harmonics up to second order and of the signal produced by displacing the solar image relative to polarizing optics or diffraction grating.

Dittmer, P. H.

1977-01-01

36

Onychomycosis observed in children over a 20-year period.  

PubMed

There are few reports studying the aetiology of onychomycosis in children in Spain. To study childhood dermatophyte onychomycosis, a retrospective study of children was carried out, who were <16 years of age with dermatophyte onychomycosis diagnosed between 1987 and 2007. Of 4622 nail samples from 3550 patients, 218 came from 181 children up to 16 years old. Onychomycosis caused by dermatophytes was demonstrated in 28 (15.5%) cases. Trichophyton rubrum (18 cases) was the most prevalent species, followed by Trichophyton tonsurans (five cases), Trichophyton mentagrophytes var. interdigitale (four cases) and Trichophyton mentagrophytes var. mentagrophytes (one case). Concomitant dermatophytosis at other locations was confirmed in seven cases (25%). Toenail onychomycosis was associated with tinea pedis in five cases. Distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis was the most common clinical pattern. The superficial white type was found in two cases of toenail onychomycosis caused by T. rubrum and T. tonsurans. During the period of study, only 5.1% of all investigated people were children up to 16 years. The prevalence of onychomycosis tended to increase over the years and represented 15.5% of all nail dystrophies in children. Therefore, dermatologists must consider onychomycosis in the differential diagnosis of nail alterations in children and always perform a mycological study to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:20406389

Rodríguez-Pazos, Laura; Pereiro-Ferreirós, Ma Mercedes; Pereiro, Manuel; Toribio, Jaime

2011-09-01

37

Conjugate observations of quasi-periodic emissions by Cluster and DEMETER spacecraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract<p label="1">Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> (QP) emissions are electromagnetic emissions at frequencies of about 0.5-4 kHz that are characterized by a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> time modulation of the wave intensity. Typical <span class="hlt">periods</span> of this modulation are on the order of minutes. We present a case study of a large-scale long-lasting QP event <span class="hlt">observed</span> simultaneously on board the DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions) and the Cluster spacecraft. The measurements by the Wide-Band Data instrument on board the Cluster spacecraft enabled us to obtain high-resolution frequency-time spectrograms of the event close to the equatorial region over a large range of radial distances, while the measurements by the STAFF-SA instrument allowed us to perform a detailed wave analysis. Conjugate <span class="hlt">observations</span> by the DEMETER spacecraft have been used to estimate the spatial and temporal extent of the emissions. The analyzed QP event lasted as long as 5 h and it spanned over the L-shells from about 1.5 to 5.5. Simultaneous <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the same event by DEMETER and Cluster show that the same QP modulation of the wave intensity is <span class="hlt">observed</span> at the same time at very different locations in the inner magnetosphere. ULF magnetic field fluctuations with a <span class="hlt">period</span> roughly comparable to, but somewhat larger than the <span class="hlt">period</span> of the QP modulation were detected by the fluxgate magnetometers instrument on board the Cluster spacecraft near the equatorial region, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> these are likely to be related to the QP generation. Results of a detailed wave analysis show that the QP emissions detected by Cluster propagate unducted, with oblique wave normal angles at higher geomagnetic latitudes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N?Mec, F.; SantolíK, O.; Parrot, M.; Pickett, J. S.; Hayosh, M.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">38</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21578297"> <span id="translatedtitle">SPITZER <span class="hlt">OBSERVATIONS</span> OF GX17+2: CONFIRMATION OF A <span class="hlt">PERIODIC</span> SYNCHROTRON SOURCE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">GX17+2 is a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) that is also a member of a small family of LMXBs known as 'Z-sources' that are believed to have persistent X-ray luminosities that are very close to the Eddington limit. GX17+2 is highly variable at both radio and X-ray frequencies, a feature common to Z-sources. What sets GX17+2 apart is its dramatic variability in the near-infrared, where it changes by {Delta}K {approx} 3 mag. Previous investigations have shown that these brightenings are <span class="hlt">periodic</span>, recurring every 3.01 days. Given its high extinction (A{sub V} {>=} 9 mag), it has not been possible to ascertain the nature of these events with ground-based <span class="hlt">observations</span>. We report mid-infrared Spitzer <span class="hlt">observations</span> of GX17+2 which indicate a synchrotron spectrum for the infrared brightenings. In addition, GX17+2 is highly variable in the mid-infrared during these events. The combination of the large-scale outbursts, the presence of a synchrotron spectrum, and the dramatic variability in the mid-infrared <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the infrared brightening events are due to the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> transit of a synchrotron jet across our line of sight. An analysis of both new, and archival, infrared <span class="hlt">observations</span> has led us to revise the <span class="hlt">period</span> for these events to 3.0367 days. We also present new Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data for GX17+2 obtained during two predicted infrared brightening events. Analysis of these new data, and data from the RXTE archive, indicates that there is no correlation between the X-ray behavior of this source and the <span class="hlt">observed</span> infrared brightenings. We examine various scenarios that might produce <span class="hlt">periodic</span> jet emission.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harrison, Thomas E.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Bornak, Jillian [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States); Gelino, Dawn M. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wachter, Stefanie [Spitzer Science Center, Caltech M/S 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rupen, Michael P. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Gelino, Christopher R., E-mail: tharriso@nmsu.edu, E-mail: bmcnamar@nmsu.edu, E-mail: jbornak@nmsu.edu, E-mail: dawn@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: wachter@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: mrupen@aoc.nrao.edu, E-mail: cgelino@ipac.caltech.edu [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Caltech M/S 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">39</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ApJ...736...54H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spitzer <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of GX17+2: Confirmation of a <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Synchrotron Source</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">GX17+2 is a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) that is also a member of a small family of LMXBs known as "Z-sources" that are believed to have persistent X-ray luminosities that are very close to the Eddington limit. GX17+2 is highly variable at both radio and X-ray frequencies, a feature common to Z-sources. What sets GX17+2 apart is its dramatic variability in the near-infrared, where it changes by ?K ~ 3 mag. Previous investigations have shown that these brightenings are <span class="hlt">periodic</span>, recurring every 3.01 days. Given its high extinction (A V >= 9 mag), it has not been possible to ascertain the nature of these events with ground-based <span class="hlt">observations</span>. We report mid-infrared Spitzer <span class="hlt">observations</span> of GX17+2 which indicate a synchrotron spectrum for the infrared brightenings. In addition, GX17+2 is highly variable in the mid-infrared during these events. The combination of the large-scale outbursts, the presence of a synchrotron spectrum, and the dramatic variability in the mid-infrared <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the infrared brightening events are due to the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> transit of a synchrotron jet across our line of sight. An analysis of both new, and archival, infrared <span class="hlt">observations</span> has led us to revise the <span class="hlt">period</span> for these events to 3.0367 days. We also present new Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data for GX17+2 obtained during two predicted infrared brightening events. Analysis of these new data, and data from the RXTE archive, indicates that there is no correlation between the X-ray behavior of this source and the <span class="hlt">observed</span> infrared brightenings. We examine various scenarios that might produce <span class="hlt">periodic</span> jet emission.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harrison, Thomas E.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Bornak, Jillian; Gelino, Dawn M.; Wachter, Stefanie; Rupen, Michael P.; Gelino, Christopher R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">40</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://learningcenter.nsta.org/product_detail.aspx?id=10.2505/9780873552394.3"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodicity</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In thinking about a title for this chapter, the word <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> came to mind. I was sure this had some kind of pop culture reference. After discussing this with my wife, we figured I was thinking of synchronicity, which is a reference to music by the band, The Police. Looking the word <span class="hlt">Periodicity</span> up on the internet, I found that I was, in fact, a science geek and had not made a hip reference. <span class="hlt">Periodicity</span> refers mainly to the <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table, which is a focus of this chapter. No music, just science.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robertson, William C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">2</a> <a onClick='return 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">41</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1511149N"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observation</span> of flow processes in the vadose zone using ERT on different space and time scales: results, obstacles, and <span class="hlt">suggestions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) <span class="hlt">observes</span> the flow processes in the vadose zone indirectly. ERT has been used to estimate water flow in different soil types and under different flow conditions using active experiments or monitoring the natural process in many cases. Our experiments in sand and loess soil connected ERT with local soil probing using TDR devices and tensiometers in order to proof the reliability of the ERT inversion results in terms of infiltration velocity. Additionally, a colour tracer was used and sections through the infiltration zones were excavated in order to compare the shape of the dye -stained infiltration zone with the results of the ERT inversion. The data revealed the complicated infiltration pattern with a higher transport velocity in sand and a different shape than expected by classical soil hydraulic models. These results indicate the need for independent <span class="hlt">observations</span> in order to correctly assess the water storage in the vadose zone with its hydrological consequences, the groundwater recharge and the contamination risk caused by rapid movement of water. ERT can be used for this purpose on different spatial- and time scales but for reliable results various obstacles need to be dealt with. Firstly, the ambiguity of the resistivity because soil resistivity depends on both, soil water content and electrical soil/water conductivity. This obstacle is less severe when the infiltration velocity is investigated, because then only the first onset of resistivity change is interpreted as the water arrival time. Our results show that the arrival of the water front as well as the final infiltration depth can be reliably detected. In contrast, this obstacle is very severe when the amount of water stored is <span class="hlt">observed</span> using conductive tracer. The problem is not critical during a passive experiment when the natural rain fall and the waters fate through the vadose zone is monitored. The second obstacle is the limited resolution of ERT which deteriorates with depth. The resolution depends on the electrode distances and the depth resolution can be increased by using borehole electrodes. However, if one ha of land is to be <span class="hlt">observed</span> with a reasonable number of electrodes (some 100) the resolution will be some 10 m. The structures, however, that influence the infiltration process, might be much smaller. Therefore, it is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> to use ERT as the tool to <span class="hlt">observe</span> and quantify the infiltration process with regard to time and space on a scale of some meters. For independent proof local TDR devices should be inserted within the investigated area for calibration. These results should then be used to establish a physical soil model that grasps the <span class="hlt">observed</span> process correctly in time and space. The next step would then be to repeat these local measurements at different locations where the similarity of the processes is at doubt. Only when this is confirmed or discarded, further upscaling steps can be done reliably.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Noell, Ursula; Ganz, Christina; Lamparter, Axel; Duijnisveld, Wilhelmus; Bachmann, Jörg</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">42</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19229771"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental <span class="hlt">Observation</span> of a <span class="hlt">Periodically</span> Oscillating Plasma Sphere in a Gridded Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Device</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere (POPS) [D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel, Phys. Plasmas 5, 2498 (1998).] oscillation has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device. In these experiments, ions in the virtual cathode exhibit resonant behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the <span class="hlt">observed</span> POPS resonance frequency and theoretical predictions has been <span class="hlt">observed</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. A. Nebel; S. Stange; S. Krupakar Murali</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">43</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AcA....62..377O"> <span id="translatedtitle">New <span class="hlt">Observations</span> and <span class="hlt">Period</span> Change Study for the Anomalous Cepheid in M 92</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">New <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the variable star V7 in the globular cluster M 92 have been used to determine the parameters of its B, V and IC light curves. The star's classification as an anomalous Cepheid type is confirmed. The asymmetric shape of the light curve and position in the <span class="hlt">observed</span> <span class="hlt">period</span>-luminosity relation for anomalous Cepheids indicate the star is pulsating in the fundamental mode. Data from photographic plates, extending back to 1900, have been combined with published material and recent CCD <span class="hlt">observations</span> to carry out a <span class="hlt">period</span> change study. No evidence of a <span class="hlt">period</span> change is found. Expected <span class="hlt">period</span> change rates have been calculated using theoretical relations for the pulsational <span class="hlt">periods</span> of anomalous Cepheids and evolutionary tracks for metal-poor horizontal branch stars with masses 1.0?M/Msun?1.6. Only models for stars close to central helium exhaustion show measurable rates, which indicates V7 is in the core helium burning phase of evolution.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Osborn, W.; Kopacki, G.; Haberstroh, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">44</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54011033"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of long-<span class="hlt">period</span> motions of the Earth at the South Pole</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Vertical gravity data from 6.3 years of <span class="hlt">observations</span> at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station are used to investigate the response of the Earth at <span class="hlt">periods</span> much longer than the usual seismic or free-mode band of oscillations. At the Poles the vertical components of the short-<span class="hlt">period</span> diurnal and semidiurnal tides shoul in theory vanish while the long-<span class="hlt">period</span> tides attain their maximum</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. A. Rydelek</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">45</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ann-geophys.net/16/1486/1998/angeo-16-1486-1998.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Transient eastward-propagating long-<span class="hlt">period</span> waves <span class="hlt">observed</span> over the South Pole</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of the horizontal wind field over the South Pole were made during 1995 using a meteor radar. These data have revealed the presence of a rich spectrum of waves over the South Pole with a distinct annual occurrence. Included in this spectrum are long- <span class="hlt">period</span> waves, whose <span class="hlt">periods</span> are greater than one solar day, which are propagating eastward. These</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. E. Palo; Y. I. Portnyagin; J. M. Forbes; N. A. Makarov; E. G. Merzlyakov</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">46</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52372644"> <span id="translatedtitle">Transient eastward-propagating long-<span class="hlt">period</span> waves <span class="hlt">observed</span> over the South Pole</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of the horizontal wind field over the South Pole were made during 1995 using a meteor radar. These data have revealed the presence of a rich spectrum of waves over the South Pole with a distinct annual occurrence. Included in this spectrum are long-<span class="hlt">period</span> waves, whose <span class="hlt">periods</span> are greater than one solar day, which are propagating eastward. These waves</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. E. Palo; Y. I. Portnyagin; J. M. Forbes; N. A. Makarov; E. G. Merzlyakov</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">47</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860013037&hterms=Astronomical+Almanac&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DAstronomical%2BAlmanac"> <span id="translatedtitle">Archive of <span class="hlt">observations</span> of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> comet Crommelin made during its 1983-84 apparition</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This is an archive of 680 reduced <span class="hlt">observations</span> of <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Comet Crommelin made during its 1984 apparition. The archive integrates reports by members of the eight networks of the International Halley Watch (IHW) and presents the results of a trial run designed to test the preparedness of the IHW organization for the current apparition of <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Comet Halley.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sekanina, Z. (editor); Aronsson, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">48</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA047841"> <span id="translatedtitle">An <span class="hlt">Observational</span> Search for Solar Pulsations at <span class="hlt">Periods</span> from Seven to Seventy Minutes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The large-scale solar velocity field has been measured by comparing Doppler shifts from the center and limb of the disk, using the non-magnetic line FeI 5123.730A. No statistically significant <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> are <span class="hlt">observed</span> at <span class="hlt">periods</span> between seven and sevent...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. H. Dittmer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">49</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2004.07.005"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of deep long-<span class="hlt">period</span> (DLP) seismic events beneath Aleutian arc volcanoes; 1989-2002</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Between October 12, 1989 and December 31, 2002, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 162 deep long-<span class="hlt">period</span> (DLP) events beneath 11 volcanic centers in the Aleutian arc. These events generally occur at mid- to lower-crustal depths (10-45 km) and are characterized by emergent phases, extended codas, and a strong spectral peak between 1.0 and 3.0 Hz. <span class="hlt">Observed</span> wave velocities and particle motions indicate that the dominant phases are P- and S-waves. DLP epicenters often extend over broad areas (5-20 km) surrounding the active volcanoes. The average reduced displacement of Aleutian DLPs is 26.5 cm2 and the largest event has a reduced displacement of 589 cm2 (or ML 2.5). Aleutian DLP events occur both as solitary events and as sequences of events with several occurring over a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 1-30 min. Within the sequences, individual DLPs are often separated by lower-amplitude volcanic tremor with a similar spectral character. Occasionally, volcano-tectonic earthquakes that locate at similar depths are contained within the DLP sequences. At most, Aleutian volcanoes DLPs appear to loosely surround the main volcanic vent and occur as part of background seismicity. A likely explanation is that they reflect a relatively steady-state process of magma ascent over broad areas in the lower and middle portions of the crust. At Mount Spurr, DLP seismicity was initiated by the 1992 eruptions and then slowly declined until 1997. At Shishaldin Volcano, a short-lived increase in DLP seismicity occurred about 10 months prior to the April 19, 1999 eruption. These <span class="hlt">observations</span> <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a link between eruptive activity and magma flux in the mid- to lower-crust and uppermost mantle.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Power, J. A.; Stihler, S. D.; White, R. A.; Moran, S. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">50</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17902984"> <span id="translatedtitle">Globally enumerating unstable <span class="hlt">periodic</span> orbits for <span class="hlt">observed</span> data using symbolic dynamics.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The unstable <span class="hlt">periodic</span> orbits of a chaotic system provide an important skeleton of the dynamics in a chaotic system, but they can be difficult to find from an <span class="hlt">observed</span> time series. We present a global method for finding <span class="hlt">periodic</span> orbits based on their symbolic dynamics, which is made possible by several recent methods to find good partitions for symbolic dynamics from <span class="hlt">observed</span> time series. The symbolic dynamics are approximated by a Markov chain estimated from the sequence using information-theoretical concepts. The chain has a probabilistic graph representation, and the cycles of the graph may be exhaustively enumerated with a classical deterministic algorithm, providing a global, comprehensive list of symbolic names for its <span class="hlt">periodic</span> orbits. Once the symbolic codes of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> orbits are found, the partition is used to localize the orbits back in the original state space. Using the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> orbits found, we can estimate several quantities of the attractor such as the Lyapunov exponent and topological entropy. PMID:17902984</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Buhl, Michael; Kennel, Matthew B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">51</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012RAA....12..322G"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodicity</span> in the most violent solar eruptions: recent <span class="hlt">observations</span> of coronal mass ejections and flares revisited</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using the Hilbert-Huang Transform method, we investigate the <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> in the monthly occurrence numbers and monthly mean energy of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) <span class="hlt">observed</span> by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment on board the Solar and Heliographic Observatory from 1999 March to 2009 December. We also investigate the <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> in the monthly occurrence numbers of H? flares and monthly mean flare indices from 1996 January to 2008 December. The results show the following. (1) The <span class="hlt">period</span> of 5.66 yr is found to be statistically significant in the monthly occurrence numbers of CMEs; the <span class="hlt">period</span> of 10.5 yr is found to be statistically significant in the monthly mean energy of CMEs. (2) The <span class="hlt">periods</span> of 3.05 and 8.70yr are found to be statistically significant in the monthly occurrence numbers of H? flares; the <span class="hlt">period</span> of 9.14yr is found to be statistically significant in the monthly mean flare indices.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gao, Peng-Xin; Xie, Jing-Lan; Liang, Hong-Fei</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">52</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19960021447&hterms=IMPS&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DIMPS"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solar wind plasma <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> <span class="hlt">observed</span> at 1 AU by IMP 8</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The IMP 8 spacecraft has been in Earth orbit since 1973, gathering plasma data over one complete 22-year solar cycle. These data are being examined to look for <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> at time scales ranging from several hours to the entire span of the data set. A 1.3-year <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> in the radial speed <span class="hlt">observed</span> by IMP 8 and Voyager 2 has already been reported for the years from 1987 to 1993. The periodogram method, useful for unevenly sampled data such as the IMP 8 plasma data, has been used to search for other <span class="hlt">periods</span>. It is interesting to note that the 13-year <span class="hlt">period</span> is not present in the out-of-the-ecliptic component of the velocity (Vz), although a 1-year <span class="hlt">period</span> is very obvious both visually and on the periodogram. Both components show a very strong peak associated with the 11-year solar cycle variation. This work will be extended to the thermal speed (a measure of the wind's temperature) and density, although the frequent correlations between these parameters and the velocity are expected to cause similar results. Additionally, the fine resolution data will be examined for shorter time <span class="hlt">periods</span> than are visible using the hourly average data which are appropriate for longer <span class="hlt">periods</span>. A comparison with <span class="hlt">periods</span> <span class="hlt">observed</span> at other spacecraft may also be made.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paularena, K. I.; Szabo, A.; Lazarus, A. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">53</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ACPD...1128013S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observed</span> temporal evolution of global mean age of stratospheric air for the 2002 to 2010 <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An extensive <span class="hlt">observational</span> data set, consisting of more than 106 SF6 vertical profiles distributed globally from MIPAS measurements has been condensed into monthly zonal means of mean age of air for the <span class="hlt">period</span> September 2002 to January 2010, binned at 10° latitude and 1-2 km altitude. The data were analysed with respect to their temporal variation by fitting a regression model consisting of a constant and a linear increase term, 2 proxies for the QBO variation, sinusoidal terms for the seasonal and semi-annual variation and overtones for the correction of the shapes to the <span class="hlt">observed</span> data set. The impact of subsidence of mesospheric SF6-depleted air and in-mixing into non-polar latitudes on mid-latitudinal absolute age of air and its linear increase was assessed and found to be small. The linear increase of mean age of stratospheric air was found to be positive and partly larger than the trend derived by Engel et al. (2009) for most of the Northern mid-latitudes, the middle stratosphere in the tropics, and parts of the Southern mid-latitudes, as well as for the Southern polar upper stratosphere. Multi-year decrease of age of air was found for the lowermost and the upper stratospheric tropics, for parts of Southern mid-latitudes, and for the Northern polar regions. Analysis of the amplitudes and phases of the seasonal variation shed light on the coupling of stratospheric regions to each other. In particular, the Northern mid-latitude stratosphere is well coupled to the tropics, while the Northern lowermost mid-latitudinal stratosphere is decoupled, confirming the separation of the shallow branch of the Brewer-Dobson circulation from the deep branch. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> an overall increased tropical upwelling, together with weakening of mixing barriers, especially in the Northern Hemisphere, as a hypothetical model to explain the <span class="hlt">observed</span> pattern of linear multi-year increase/decrease, and amplitudes and phase shifts of the seasonal variation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stiller, G. P.; von Clarmann, T.; Haenel, F.; Funke, B.; Glatthor, N.; Grabowski, U.; Kellmann, S.; Kiefer, M.; Linden, A.; Lossow, S.; López-Puertas, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">54</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52229583"> <span id="translatedtitle">Latitudinal variation of perturbation electric fields during magnetically disturbed <span class="hlt">periods</span> - 1986 Sundial <span class="hlt">observations</span> and model results</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">F-region incoherent scatter radar drift <span class="hlt">observations</span> from Millstone Hill and Jicamarca, h-prime F <span class="hlt">observations</span> from Huancayo, and high latitude ground-magnetometer measurements taken during the Sundial 1986 campaign are used to study the relationship between plasmaspheric electric field perturbations and high latitude currents during disturbed <span class="hlt">periods</span>. The <span class="hlt">observations</span> are in good agreement with numerical results from a Rice Covection Model run</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. G. Fejer; R. W. Spiro; R. A. Wolf; J. C. Foster</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">55</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013E%26PSL.379...88P"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observed</span> <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> and the spectrum of field variations in Holocene magnetic records</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In order to understand mechanisms that maintain and drive the evolution of the Earth's magnetic field, a characterization of its behavior on time scales of centuries to millennia is required. We have conducted a search for <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in Holocene sediment magnetic records, by applying three techniques: multitaper spectral estimation, wavelet analysis and empirical mode decomposition. When records are grouped according to their geographical locations, we find encouraging consistency amongst the <span class="hlt">observed</span> <span class="hlt">periods</span>, especially in nearby inclination records. No evidence was obtained for discrete, globally <span class="hlt">observed</span>, <span class="hlt">periods</span>. Rather we find a continuous broadband spectrum, with a slope corresponding to a power law with exponent of -2.3±0.6 for the <span class="hlt">period</span> range between 300 and 4000 yr. This is consistent with the hypothesis that chaotic convection in the outer core drives the majority of secular variation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Panovska, S.; Finlay, C. C.; Hirt, A. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">56</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jz/v065/i005/JZ065i005p01413/JZ065i005p01413.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of Geomagnetic Fluctuations in the <span class="hlt">Period</span> Range 0.3 to 120 Seconds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Data are presented from a 5-year series of <span class="hlt">observations</span> of geomagnetic fluctua- tions in the <span class="hlt">period</span> range 0.3 to 120 seconds, approximately. These were carried on with flux rate .variographs using pickup coils with 1-second-<span class="hlt">period</span> galvanometers recording photo- graphically at a trace speed of I mm\\/sec with maximum sensitivities of 0.05 gamma\\/sec per trace millimeter. Four characteristic types of oscillations</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hugo Benioff</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1960-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">57</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999AdSpR..24..579G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tidal <span class="hlt">Periodicities</span> in <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of the OH(6-2) Emission from Mawson, Antarctica</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High-resolution Fabry-Perot spectrometer <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the OH (6-2) Q1(1) line, ?834.460 nm, have been made at Mawson, Antarctica on a limited campaign basis since 1993. In August 1995, some data were obtained on 14 days in a 15 day <span class="hlt">period</span>. <span class="hlt">Periodicities</span> have been identified using the Lomb-Scargle technique. The most significant <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> in the zonal wind and the meridional wind and intensity is at twelve hours. These results are compared with other measurements and a model of high latitude semidiurnal tidal oscillations</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Greet, P. A.; Dyson, P. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">58</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.G53C..08G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimating the <span class="hlt">Period</span> and Q of the Chandler Wobble from <span class="hlt">Observations</span> and Models of its Excitation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Any irregularly shaped solid body rotating about some axis that is not aligned with its figure axis will freely wobble as it rotates. For the Earth, this free wobble is known as the Chandler wobble in honor of S. C. Chandler, Jr. who first <span class="hlt">observed</span> it in 1891. Unlike the forced wobbles of the Earth, such as the annual wobble, whose <span class="hlt">periods</span> are the same as the <span class="hlt">periods</span> of the forcing mechanisms, the <span class="hlt">period</span> of the free Chandler wobble is a function of the internal structure and rheology of the Earth, and its decay time constant, or quality factor Q, is a function of the dissipation mechanism(s), like mantle anelasticity, that are acting to dampen it. Improved estimates of the <span class="hlt">period</span> and Q of the Chandler wobble can therefore be used to improve our understanding of these properties of the Earth. Here, estimates of the <span class="hlt">period</span> and Q of the Chandler wobble are obtained by finding those values that minimize the power within the Chandler band of the difference between <span class="hlt">observed</span> and modeled polar motion excitation spanning 1962-2010. Atmosphere, ocean, and hydrology models are used to model the excitation caused by both mass and motion variations within these global geophysical fluids. Direct <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the excitation caused by mass variations as determined from GRACE time varying gravitational field measurements are also used. The resulting estimates of the <span class="hlt">period</span> and Q of the Chandler wobble will be presented along with a discussion of the robustness of the estimates.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gross, R. S.; Nastula, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">59</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910001192&hterms=Land+intensive&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DLand%2Bintensive"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cloud parameters derived from GOES during the 1987 marine stratocumulus FIRE Intensive Field <span class="hlt">Observation</span> (IFO) <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) is well suited for <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the variations of clouds over many temporal and spatial scales. For this reason, GOES data taken during the Marine Stratocumulus Intensive Field <span class="hlt">Observations</span> (IFO) (June 29 to July 19, 1987, Kloessel et al.) serve several purposes. One facet of the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) is improvement of the understanding of cloud parameter retrievals from satellite-<span class="hlt">observed</span> radiances. This involves comparisons of coincident satellite cloud parameters and high resolution data taken by various instruments on other platforms during the IFO <span class="hlt">periods</span>. Another aspect of FIRE is the improvement of both large- and small-scale models of stratocumulus used in general circulation models (GCMs). This may involve, among other studies, linking the small-scale processes <span class="hlt">observed</span> during the IFO to the variations in large-scale cloud fields <span class="hlt">observed</span> with the satellites during the IFO and Extended Time <span class="hlt">Observation</span> (ETO) <span class="hlt">periods</span>. Preliminary results are presented of an analysis of GOES data covering most of the IFO <span class="hlt">period</span>. The large scale cloud-field characteristics are derived, then related to a longer <span class="hlt">period</span> of measurements. Finally, some point measurements taken from the surface are compared to regional scale cloud parameters derived from satellite radiances.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Young, David F.; Minnis, Patrick; Harrison, Edwin F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">60</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JASTP.105..253V"> <span id="translatedtitle">High latitude artificial <span class="hlt">periodic</span> irregularity <span class="hlt">observations</span> with the upgraded EISCAT heating facility</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a recently developed ionospheric modification experiment that produces artificial <span class="hlt">periodic</span> irregularities in the ionosphere and uses them to make <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the spatiotemporal behaviour of the irregularities. In addition, the method can be used to measure Faraday rotation and vertical velocities. We also introduce a novel experiment that allows monitoring the formation of the irregularities during heating, in addition to <span class="hlt">observing</span> their decay after heating. The first measurements indicate, contrary to existing theory, that the amplitude of the radar echoes from the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> irregularities grows faster than they decay. We focus on the API effects in the D- and E-region of the ionosphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vierinen, Juha; Kero, Antti; Rietveld, Michael T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' 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showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">61</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SoPh..289.1983E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-<span class="hlt">Period</span> Oscillations of Sunspots <span class="hlt">Observed</span> by SOHO/MDI</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We processed magnetograms that were obtained with the Michaelson Doppler Imager onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO/MDI). The results confirm the basic properties of long-<span class="hlt">period</span> oscillations of sunspots that have previously been established and also reveal new properties. We show that the limiting (lowest) eigenmode of low-frequency oscillations of a sunspot as a whole is the mode with a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 10 - 12 up to 32 - 35 hours (depending on the sunspot's magnetic-field strength). This mode is <span class="hlt">observed</span> consistently throughout an <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> of 5 - 7 days, but its amplitude is subject to quasi-cyclic changes, which are separated by about 1.5 - 2 days. As a result, the lower mode with a <span class="hlt">period</span> of about 35 - 48 hours appears in the power spectrum of sunspot oscillations. But this lowest mode is apparently not an eigenmode of a sunspot because its <span class="hlt">period</span> does not depend on the magnetic field of the sunspot. Perhaps the mode reflects the quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> sunspot perturbations caused by supergranulation cells that surround it. We also analyzed SOHO/MDI artifacts, which may affect the low-frequency power spectra of sunspots.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Efremov, V. I.; Parfinenko, L. D.; Solov'ev, A. A.; Kirichek, E. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">62</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52200273"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental <span class="hlt">Observation</span> of a <span class="hlt">Periodically</span> Oscillating Plasma Sphere in a Gridded Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Device</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere (POPS) [D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel, Phys. Plasmas 5, 2498 (1998)., PHPAEN, 1070-664X, 10.1063\\/1.872933] oscillation has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device. In these experiments, ions in the virtual cathode exhibit resonant behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the <span class="hlt">observed</span> POPS resonance frequency and theoretical predictions</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. A. Nebel; S. Stange; S. Krupakar Murali</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">63</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006MNRAS.366.1243O"> <span id="translatedtitle">BVR <span class="hlt">observations</span> and <span class="hlt">period</span> variation of the near-contact binary ZZ Aurigae</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">BVR light curves of ZZ Aurigae were obtained with the 60-cm Cassegrain reflector at the Sobaek Observatory, Korea, between 2000 February and 2001 February. All collected times of minimum light, including our <span class="hlt">observations</span>, were used for the <span class="hlt">period</span> study. The <span class="hlt">period</span> variation could be of quasi-sinusoidal form superposed on an upward parabola. A continuous <span class="hlt">period</span> increase of dP/dt=+2.3 × 10-8 d yr-1 was determined for ZZ Aur. The <span class="hlt">period</span> of quasi-sinusoidal variation is about ~26-31 yr. Photometric solutions were found using the Wilson-Devinney method. The Roche configuration of ZZ Aur is that of an Algol-type semidetached system where the primary star nearly fills its Roche lobe and the secondary star fills its lobe. The spot model was used to explain the asymmetry in the light curve known as the O'Connell effect.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oh, Kyu-Dong; Kim, Chun-Hwey; Lee, Woo-Baik; Kim, Ho-il; Kang, Young Woon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">64</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.4375S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observed</span> temporal evolution of global mean age of stratospheric air for the 2002 to 2010 <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An extensive <span class="hlt">observational</span> data set from MIPAS measurements, consisting of more than one million SF6 vertical profiles distributed globally has been condensed into monthly zonal means of mean age of air for the <span class="hlt">period</span> September 2002 to January 2010, binned at 10° latitude and 1-2 km altitude. The data were analysed with respect to their temporal variation by fitting a regression model consisting of: a constant and a linear increase term, 2 proxies for the QBO variation, sinusoidal terms for the seasonal and semi-annual variation and overtones for the correction of the shapes to the <span class="hlt">observed</span> data set. The impact of subsidence of mesospheric SF6-depleted air and in-mixing into non-polar latitudes on mid-latitudinal age of air and its linear increase was assessed and found to be small. The linear increase of mean age of stratospheric air was found to be positive and partly larger than the trend derived by Engel et al. (2009) for most of the Northern mid-latitudes, the middle stratosphere in the tropics, and parts of the Southern mid-latitudes, as well as for the Southern polar upper stratosphere. Multi-year decrease of age of air was found for the lowermost and the upper stratospheric tropics, for parts of Southern mid-latitudes, and for the Northern polar regions. Analyses of the amplitudes and phases of the seasonal variation shed light on the coupling between different stratospheric regions. In particular, the Northern mid-latitude stratosphere is well coupled to the tropics, while the Northern lowermost mid-latitudinal stratosphere is decoupled, confirming the separation of the shallow branch of the Brewer-Dobson circulation from the deep branch. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> an overall increased tropical upwelling, together with a weakening of mixing barriers, especially in the Northern hemisphere, as possible explanations for the <span class="hlt">observed</span> patterns. Reference: Engel, A., Möbius, T., Bönisch, H., Schmidt, U., Heinz, R., Levin, I., Atlas, E., Aoki, S., Nakazawa, T., Sugawara, S., Moore, F., Hurst, D., Elkins, J., Schauffler, S., Andrews, A., and Boering, K.: Age of stratospheric air unchanged within uncertainties over the past 30 years, Nature Geosci., 2, 28-31, doi:10.1038/ngeo388, 2009.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stiller, G. P.; von Clarmann, T.; Haenel, F.; Funke, B.; Glatthor, N.; Grabowski, U.; Kellmann, S.; Kiefer, M.; Linden, A.; Lossow, S.; López-Puertas, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">65</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ACP....12.3311S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observed</span> temporal evolution of global mean age of stratospheric air for the 2002 to 2010 <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An extensive <span class="hlt">observational</span> data set, consisting of more than 106 SF6 vertical profiles from MIPAS measurements distributed over the whole globe has been condensed into monthly zonal means of mean age of air for the <span class="hlt">period</span> September 2002 to January 2010, binned at 10° latitude and 1-2 km altitude. The data were analysed with respect to their temporal variation by fitting a regression model consisting of a constant and a linear increase term, 2 proxies for the QBO variation, sinusoidal terms for the seasonal and semi-annual variation and overtones for the correction of the shapes to the <span class="hlt">observed</span> data set. The impact of subsidence of mesospheric SF6-depleted air and in-mixing into non-polar latitudes on mid-latitudinal absolute age of air and its linear increase was assessed and found to be small. The linear increase of mean age of stratospheric air was found to be positive and partly larger than the trend derived by Engel et al. (2009) for most of the Northern mid-latitudes, the middle stratosphere in the tropics, and parts of the Southern mid-latitudes, as well as for the Southern polar upper stratosphere. Multi-year decrease of age of air was found for the lowermost and the upper stratospheric tropics, for parts of Southern mid-latitudes, and for the Northern polar regions. Analysis of the amplitudes and phases of the seasonal variation shed light on the coupling of stratospheric regions to each other. In particular, the Northern mid-latitude stratosphere is well coupled to the tropics, while the Northern lowermost mid-latitudinal stratosphere is decoupled, confirming the separation of the shallow branch of the Brewer-Dobson circulation from the deep branch. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> an overall increased tropical upwelling, together with weakening of mixing barriers, especially in the Northern Hemisphere, as a hypothetical model to explain the <span class="hlt">observed</span> pattern of linear multi-year increase/decrease, and amplitudes and phase shifts of the seasonal variation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stiller, G. P.; von Clarmann, T.; Haenel, F.; Funke, B.; Glatthor, N.; Grabowski, U.; Kellmann, S.; Kiefer, M.; Linden, A.; Lossow, S.; López-Puertas, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">66</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20696429"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental <span class="hlt">Observation</span> of a <span class="hlt">Periodically</span> Oscillating Plasma Sphere in a Gridded Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Device</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere (POPS) [D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel, Phys. Plasmas 5, 2498 (1998).] oscillation has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device. In these experiments, ions in the virtual cathode exhibit resonant behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the <span class="hlt">observed</span> POPS resonance frequency and theoretical predictions has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> for a wide range of potential well depths and for three different ion species. The results provide the first experimental validation of the POPS concept proposed by Barnes and Nebel [R. A. Nebel and D. C. Barnes, Fusion Technol. 34, 28 (1998).].</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, J.; Nebel, R.A.; Stange, S.; Murali, S. Krupakar [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">67</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16090625"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental <span class="hlt">observation</span> of a <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere (POPS) [D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel, Phys. Plasmas 5, 2498 (1998).] oscillation has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device. In these experiments, ions in the virtual cathode exhibit resonant behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the <span class="hlt">observed</span> POPS resonance frequency and theoretical predictions has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> for a wide range of potential well depths and for three different ion species. The results provide the first experimental validation of the POPS concept proposed by Barnes and Nebel [R. A. Nebel and D. C. Barnes, Fusion Technol. 34, 28 (1998).]. PMID:16090625</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, J; Nebel, R A; Stange, S; Murali, S Krupakar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">68</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014HESS...18.1953F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Overview of the first HyMeX Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> over Italy: <span class="hlt">observations</span> and model results</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> (SOP1), part of the HyMeX campaign (Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean Experiments, 5 September-6 November 2012), was dedicated to heavy precipitation events and flash floods in the western Mediterranean, and three Italian hydro-meteorological monitoring sites were identified: Liguria-Tuscany, northeastern Italy and central Italy. The extraordinary deployment of advanced instrumentation, including instrumented aircrafts, and the use of several different operational weather forecast models, including hydrological models and marine models, allowed an unprecedented monitoring and analysis of high-impact weather events around the Italian hydro-meteorological sites. This activity has seen strong collaboration between the Italian scientific and operational communities. In this paper an overview of the Italian organization during SOP1 is provided, and selected Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Periods</span> (IOPs) are described. A significant event for each Italian target area is chosen for this analysis: IOP2 (12-13 September 2012) in northeastern Italy, IOP13 (15-16 October 2012) in central Italy and IOP19 (3-5 November 2012) in Liguria and Tuscany. For each IOP the meteorological characteristics, together with special <span class="hlt">observations</span> and weather forecasts, are analyzed with the aim of highlighting strengths and weaknesses of the forecast modeling systems, including the hydrological impacts. The usefulness of having different weather forecast operational chains characterized by different numerical weather prediction models and/or different model set up or initial conditions is finally shown for one of the events (IOP19).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ferretti, R.; Pichelli, E.; Gentile, S.; Maiello, I.; Cimini, D.; Davolio, S.; Miglietta, M. M.; Panegrossi, G.; Baldini, L.; Pasi, F.; Marzano, F. S.; Zinzi, A.; Mariani, S.; Casaioli, M.; Bartolini, G.; Loglisci, N.; Montani, A.; Marsigli, C.; Manzato, A.; Pucillo, A.; Ferrario, M. E.; Colaiuda, V.; Rotunno, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">69</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012A%26A...543A..40C"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Period</span> of the Slichter mode of Mercury and its possible <span class="hlt">observation</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aims: We study the <span class="hlt">period</span> of the Slichter mode (vibrational mode of the inner core of a planet) of Mercury in relation to its interior structure and assess the possibility to <span class="hlt">observe</span> this mode with the probes MESSENGER and BepiColombo. Methods: The methodology of Grinfeld & Wisdom (2005, Phys. Earth Planet. Int., 151, 77) for the determination of the <span class="hlt">period</span> of the polar Slichter modes of a planetary interior consisting of three homogeneous layers is generalized to models with an arbitrary but finite number of layers. Slichter modes <span class="hlt">periods</span> are calculated for a large set of interior structure models of Mercury. We study the possible excitation of Slichter modes by a colllision with a meteoroid and estimate the minimal size of the meteoroid that could lead to a detection of these modes by BepiColombo. Results: The Slichter mode <span class="hlt">period</span> obtained is on the order of several hours. <span class="hlt">Observation</span> of the Slichter mode of Mercury allows constraining the inner core. An impact by a meteoroid with a radius of at least 100 m could excite the Slichter mode to a level <span class="hlt">observable</span> by BepiColombo (assuming that the Slichter mode is the only excited mode), but since the estimated damping time of the Slichter mode is well below the average time between impacts of at least that size such an impact must have occured recently (less than 0.5 My ago).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Coyette, A.; Van Hoolst, T.; Dehant, V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">70</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AAS...22315412G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Optical <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of the Cataclysmic Variable FL Ceti, Evidence for a Decrease in Orbital <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">FL Ceti is a short <span class="hlt">period</span> cataclysmic variable star belonging to the highly magnetic subclass of polars. Our one second time resolution light curves show dramatic eclipses, as well as a well defined ingress and egress features. We collected 35 hours of broad band optical photometry on FL Ceti at the 82" reflector in the McDonald Observatory. We <span class="hlt">observed</span> 23 eclipses of the system in 2011. Combining timings of these eclipses with previously publish data we obtain preliminary evidence which indicate that the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> of the system is decreasing. We discuss the implications for the derived <span class="hlt">period</span> derivative and mass transfer rate. This research is supported in part by NSF grant 0958783.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gomez, Sebastian; Mason, P. A.; Robinson, E. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">71</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JGRD..11518108J"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coastal <span class="hlt">observations</span> of weather features in Senegal during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis Special <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> 3</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During 15 August through 30 September 2006 (Special <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> 3, SOP3), key weather measurements are obtained from ground and aircraft platforms during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis campaign. Key measurements are aimed at investigating African easterly waves (AEWs) and mesoscale convective systems in a coastal environment as they transition to the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Ground and aircraft instruments include polarimetric radar, a coarse and a high-density rain gauge network, surface chemical measurements, 12 m meteorological measurement, broadband IR, solar and microwave measurements, rawinsonde, aircraft dropsonde, lidar, and cloud radar measurements. Ground <span class="hlt">observations</span> during SOP3 show that Senegal was influenced by 5 squall lines, 6 Saharan air layer intrusions, and 10 AEWs. Downstream tropical cyclones developed were associated with the passage of four AEWs. FA-20 aircraft measurements of microphysical aspects of 22 September squall line and several nondeveloping AEWs over the extreme eastern Atlantic Ocean are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jenkins, G.; Kucera, P.; Joseph, E.; Fuentes, J.; Gaye, A.; Gerlach, J.; Roux, F.; Viltard, N.; Papazzoni, M.; Protat, A.; Bouniol, D.; Reynolds, A.; Arnault, J.; Badiane, D.; Kebe, F.; Camara, M.; Sall, S.; Ndiaye, S. A.; Deme, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">72</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.G32B..01B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recent Advances in <span class="hlt">Observation</span> and Modeling of Polar Motion at Diurnal and Subdiurnal <span class="hlt">Periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Polar motion contains physical signals with diurnal and subdiurnal <span class="hlt">periods</span>. This part of the polar motion spectrum is dominated by the tidal effects which are regular and predictable. The largest components express the influence of the gravitationally forced ocean tides with diurnal and semidiurnal <span class="hlt">periods</span> and amplitudes up to 0.3 milliarcseconds (mas). There are also smaller (amplitudes up to 0.03 mas) diurnal components due to direct influence of the tidal gravitation on the triaxial structure of the Earth. The remaining part, with expected total amplitude between 0.01 and 0.03 mas, comprises geophysical signals which are either quasi-harmonic or irregular. These are the atmospheric and nontidal oceanic influences driven by daily cycle in solar heating, with main components S1 (<span class="hlt">period</span> 24 hrs) and S2 (<span class="hlt">period</span> 12 hrs). There are also contributions from the atmospheric normal modes ?^1_1, ?^1_2 with central <span class="hlt">periods</span> of 1.2 and 0.6 days, respectively. The <span class="hlt">observational</span> evidence of diurnal and subdiurnal polar motions concerns mostly the purely harmonic tidal components which are expressed by conventional models (IERS Conventions 2003). In case of geophysical signals the adequate representation is by time series, therefore these signals should be monitored in some way. Special <span class="hlt">observation</span> campaigns, like CONT94, CONT02, CONT05, have been organized to estimate the high frequency variations in Earth rotation. There were also attempts to estimate such variations from the routine space-geodetic <span class="hlt">observations</span>: VLBI (e.g., Herring and Dong, 1994), SLR (Watkins and Eanes, 1994) and GPS (Rothacher et al., 2001). An important independent estimation is from the high-resolution atmospheric and oceanic excitation data (atmospheric and oceanic angular momenta -- AAM, OAM). This paper gives an overview of the recent advances in <span class="hlt">observation</span> and modeling of polar motion at diurnal and subdiurnal <span class="hlt">periods</span>. I will also present results of my own research on this subject. The approach is based on the so-called complex demodulation technique used to extract the high frequency signals from both the space- geodetic <span class="hlt">observations</span> and the subdaily excitation data. The demodulated signals are expressed by the low frequency time series which are particularly convenient for analysis and geophysical interpretation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brzezinski, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">73</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51309553"> <span id="translatedtitle">IUE <span class="hlt">observations</span> of long <span class="hlt">period</span> eclipsing binaries - A study of accretion onto non-degenerate stars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">IUE <span class="hlt">observations</span> made in 1978-1979 recorded a whole class of interacting long-<span class="hlt">period</span> binaries similar to beta Lyrae, which includes RX Cas, SX Cas, V 367 Cyg, W Cru, beta Lyr, and W Ser, called the W Serpentis stars. These mass-transferring binaries with relatively high mass transfer rate show two prominent features in the far ultraviolet: a continuum with a color</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. J. Plavec</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">74</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993JAVSO..22....2H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Calibration of Hipparcos Long <span class="hlt">Period</span> Variable Start Fields Using Multi-Color CCD <span class="hlt">Observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The first set of 4-color AAVSO CCD finder charts has been prepared using the 0.9-m telescope at Kitt peak national Observatory in Arizona. The stars selected were northern long <span class="hlt">period</span> variable stars <span class="hlt">observed</span> with the Hipparcos astrometric satellite, since multicolor photometry was needed on these stars to calibrate and reduce the photometric and astrometric data obtained by the satellite. We describe the criteria in choosing the stars for which to prepare CCD finder charts, the <span class="hlt">observation</span> process, and the reduction of the CCD to obtain 4-color CCD magnitude sequences to use in the creation of AAVSO finder charts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Howell, Steve B.; Mattei, Janet; Benson, Priscilla J.; Reyes, Adriana</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">75</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002GeoRL..29.1530P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Low altitude quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> radar echoes <span class="hlt">observed</span> by the Gadanki VHF radar</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report here on the low altitude quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> (LQP) radar echoes from low latitude sporadic E layer (Es) <span class="hlt">observed</span> by the Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E geomagnetic latitude 6.3°N) VHF radar. The LQP echoes occurred both during daytime and nighttime and are confined to a slowly descending layer with a thickness of about 2-4 km in the height range of 90-100 km. The <span class="hlt">periods</span> are found to range from tens of seconds to less than about 3 minutes. The Doppler velocities vary over a range of -20 to +20 m/s during daytime and 0 to 10 m/s during nighttime and are known to be sensitive to the layer height, being dominated by the effect of zonal electric field above and meridional neutral wind below a height of ~97 km for the type 2 irregularities [Krishna Murthy et al., 1998]. The spectral widths are found to be of the order of 50 to 75 m/s during daytime and 30 to 60 m/s during nighttime. The LQP echoes reported here are similar to that <span class="hlt">observed</span> recently over midlatitudes [Rao et al., 2000; Urbina et al., 2000], but distinctly different from the widely reported quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> (QP) echoes occurring at higher altitudes (>100 km). The <span class="hlt">observations</span> are discussed briefly in terms of the potential source mechanisms.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pan, C. J.; Rao, P. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">76</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.A31D0114S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observed</span> Temporal Evolution of Global Mean Age of Stratospheric Air for the 2002 to 2010 <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">According to model calculations, the meridional circulation is expected to intensify as a result of climate change, and mean age of stratospheric air is expected to decrease. However, an <span class="hlt">observational</span> data set presented recently (Engel et al., 2009) and consisting of 27 balloon samples of the age of air tracers carbon dioxide and sulfur hexafluoride covering the years 1975 to 2005 did not confirm the model predictions. As a contribution to the ongoing discussion, an extensive <span class="hlt">observational</span> data set, consisting of more than 1 Million SF6 vertical profiles distributed globally is presented here. It has been derived from the MIPAS instrument covering the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2002 to 2010 and has been converted into mean age of stratospheric air by referring to a combined data set of in-situ and flask global mean tropospheric SF6 measurements provided by NOAA/ESRL. During conversion into age of air, the non-linearity of tropospheric SF6 increase has been corrected for by convolution with the age spectrum within an iterative approach. Monthly zonal means of mean age of air, binned at 10 deg latitude and 1-2 km altitude, were analyzed with respect to their temporal variation by fitting a regression model consisting of a constant and a linear increase term, 2 proxies for the QBO variation, sinusoidal terms for the seasonal and semi-annual variation and overtones for the correction of the shapes to the <span class="hlt">observed</span> data set. The impact of subsidence of mesospheric SF6-depleted air and in-mixing into non-polar latitudes on mid-latitudinal absolute age of air and the age-of-air linear increase was assessed and found to be small. The linear increase of mean age of stratospheric air was found to be positive and partly larger than the trend derived by Engel et al. (2009) for most of the Northern mid-latitudes, the middle stratosphere in the tropics, and parts of the Southern mid-latitudes, as well as for the Southern polar upper stratosphere. Multi-year decrease of age of air was found for the lowermost and the upper stratospheric tropics, for parts of Southern mid-latitudes, and for the Northern polar regions. Analysis of the amplitudes and phases of the seasonal variation shed light on the coupling of stratospheric regions to each other. In particular, the Northern mid-latitude stratosphere is well coupled to the tropics, while the Northern lowermost mid-latitudinal stratosphere is decoupled, confirming the separation of the shallow branch of the Brewer-Dobson circulation from the deep branch. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> an overall increased tropical upwelling, together with weakening of mixing barriers, especially in the Northern hemisphere, as a hypothetical model to explain the <span class="hlt">observed</span> pattern of linear multi-year increase/decrease, and amplitudes and phase shifts of the seasonal variation. Reference: Engel, A., Möbius, T., Bönisch, H., Schmidt, U., Heinz, R., Levin, I., Atlas, E., Aoki, S., Nakazawa, T., Sugawara, S., Moore, F., Hurst, D., Elkins, J., Schauffler, S., Andrews, A., and Boering, K.: Age of stratospheric air unchanged within uncertainties over the past 30 years, Nature Geosci., 2, 28--31, doi:10.1038/ngeo388, 2009.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stiller, G. P.; von Clarmann, T.; Haenel, F.; Funke, B.; Glatthor, N.; Grabowski, U.; Kellmann, S.; Kiefer, M.; Linden, A.; Lossow, S.; Lopez-Puertas, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">77</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050137669&hterms=land+capability&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dland%2Bcapability"> <span id="translatedtitle">Local Scale Radiobrightness Modeling During the Intensive <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span>-4 of the Cold Land Processes Experiment-1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX-1) was designed to provide microwave remote sensing <span class="hlt">observations</span> and ground truth for studies of snow and frozen ground remote sensing, particularly issues related to scaling. CLPX-1 was conducted in 2002 and 2003 in Colorado, USA. One of the goals of the experiment was to test the capabilities of microwave emission models at different scales. Initial forward model validation work has concentrated on the Local-Scale <span class="hlt">Observation</span> Site (LSOS), a 0.8 ha study site consisting of open meadows separated by trees where the most detailed measurements were made of snow depth and temperature, density, and grain size profiles. Results obtained in the case of the 3& Intensive <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> (IOP3) <span class="hlt">period</span> (Feb., 2003, dry snow) <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that a model based on Dense Medium Radiative Transfer (DMRT) theory is able to model the recorded brightness temperatures using snow parameters derived from field measurements. This paper focuses on the ability of forward DMRT modelling, combined with snowpack measurements, to reproduce the radiobrightness signatures <span class="hlt">observed</span> by the University of Michigan s Truck-Mounted Radiometer System (TMRS) at 19 and 37 GHz during the 4th IOP (IOP4) in March, 2003. Unlike IOP3, conditions during IOP4 include both wet and dry <span class="hlt">periods</span>, providing a valuable test of DMRT model performance. In addition, a comparison will be made for the one day of coincident <span class="hlt">observations</span> by the University of Tokyo's Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer-7 (GBMR-7) and the TMRS. The plot-scale study in this paper establishes a baseline of DMRT performance for later studies at successively larger scales. And these scaling studies will help guide the choice of future snow retrieval algorithms and the design of future Cold Lands <span class="hlt">observing</span> systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Edward J.; Tedesco, Marco; deRoo, Roger; England, Anthony W.; Gu, Hao-Yu; Pham, Hanh; Boprie, David; Graf, Tobias; Koike, Toshio; Armstrong, Richard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">78</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5259757"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coordinated optical and ultraviolet <span class="hlt">observations</span> of short <span class="hlt">period</span> RS CVn and W UMa type stars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Data from the Fiber Optic Echelle Charge Coupled Device (CCD) Spectrograph at KPNO as well as IUE data were analyzed in this study of short <span class="hlt">period</span> RS CVn and W UMa type binaries. Optical data were analyzed using a spectral subtraction technique to find excess emission (or absorption) in the component spectra. Analysis of data for the W UMa type contact binary VW Cep strongly <span class="hlt">suggests</span> the existence of extended material near the contact region but clearly outside the Roche lobes. This material is presumably confined in magnetic loops bridging the two components. Making simple assumptions, the density can be estimated at 4 to 5 times 10 {sup 12} cm (sup {minus}3). A possible prominence was also detected on the secondary component of the detached short <span class="hlt">period</span> RS CVn system DH Leo.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Newmark, J.S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">79</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMSM32A..04M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Saturn's Ionospheric Clock(s): A Concept for Generating and Maintaining Saturn's <span class="hlt">Observed</span> Magnetospheric <span class="hlt">Periodicities</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Saturn’s 10.X hour <span class="hlt">periodicity</span>, <span class="hlt">observed</span> throughout the magnetosphere, remains a mystery. It has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in many regions, modulating many phenomena. During the Cassini mission most <span class="hlt">observations</span> have shown a <span class="hlt">period</span> at about 10.8 hours, expressed in Saturn kilometric radiation from the high latitude auroral zone, in magnetic field components (both equatorial and high latitude) from 3 to 12 Rs, in current sheet encounters in the outer magnetosphere and magnetotail, in energetic neutral atom emission from the equatorial magnetosphere, and in plasma and energetic particles throughout the magnetosphere. More recently, various authors have shown at least two dominant <span class="hlt">periods</span> expressed (in SKR and in magnetic field components), with slightly different values in the southern and northern hemispheres. The cause of this behavior is still not accounted for. Although loosely associated with Saturn’s rotation, the variability in the <span class="hlt">period</span> precludes a direct connection with Saturn’s interior (e.g., a magnetic anomaly). Other candidates that have been discussed by others are an ionospheric source (conductivity anomaly), a perturbation in the cold plasma circulation pattern, a magnetospheric cam, asymmetric ring current particle pressure, and/or a natural frequency of the magnetosphere (cavity mode or traveling wave front of some sort). In this paper we present a concept that derives its energy from the subcorotating cold, dense plasma (which exhibits a rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> on the order of 13 to 14 hours throughout L-shells between ~3 and 20), but is triggered by a process linked with the ionosphere. Key components of the model include significant slippage between the ionosphere and the magnetosphere (with the ionosphere rotating at the expressed <span class="hlt">period</span> in each hemisphere, only slightly more slowly than the planet interior), subcorotating cold dense plasma with a source in the inner magnetosphere, predominantly radial transport of the cold dense plasma in the rotational frame of the cold plasma, and the episodic release of plasma, primarily from the night side outer magnetosphere, when a critical loading criterion has been reached. For one dominant ionospheric driver, the cartoon in the figure describes the behavior of the cold plasma.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mitchell, D. G.; Brandt, P. C.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">80</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.7529L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Progresses on the Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> of Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (WATER) is an intensively simultaneous airborne, satellite-borne and ground based remote sensing experiment aiming to improve the <span class="hlt">observability</span>, understanding, and predictability of hydrological and related ecological processes at catchment scale. It was taken place in the Heihe River Basin, the second largest inland river basin in the arid regions of northwest China. WATER consists of the cold region, forest, and arid region hydrological experiments as well as a hydrometeorology experiment. It was divided into 4 phases, namely, the experiment planning <span class="hlt">period</span>, pre-<span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span>, intensive <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> (IOP) and persistent <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span>. The field campaigns have been completed, with the IOP lasting from March 7 to April 12, May 15 to July 22, and August 23 to September 5, 2008, in total, 120 days, more than 280 individuals of scientists, engineers, students, and aircrews from 28 different institutes and universities were involved in. A total of 26 airborne missions, about 110 hours were flown. Airborne sensors including microwave radiometers at L, K and Ka bands, imaging spectrometer, thermal imager, CCD and LIDAR were used. Ground measurements were carried out concurrently with the airborne and space-borne remote sensing at four scales, i.e., key experimental area, foci experimental area, experiment site and elementary sampling plot. A network of hydro meteorological and flux <span class="hlt">observations</span> was established in the upper and middle reaches of the Heihe River Basin. The network was composed of 12 super Automatic Meteorological Stations (AMS), 6 Eddy Covariance (EC) systems, 2 Large Aperture Scintillometers (LAS), and plenty of China Meteorological Administration (CMA) operational meteorological and hydrological stations. Additionally, we also used ground-based remote sensing instruments, such as Doppler Radar, ground based microwave radiometer and truck-mounted scatterometer and lots of auto measurements instruments. Various and abundant satellite data were collected, consisting of visible/near infrared, thermal infrared, active microwave, LIDAR and other data. In the presentation, we introduced the preliminary results obtained from the <span class="hlt">observations</span> of hydrological variables, particularly on snow, frozen soil, precipitation, soil moisture and evapotranspiration. The retrievals of the forest structure, biogeophysical and biogeochemical parameters from remote sensing were also introduced. The developments of scaling methods and catchment-scale hydrological data assimilation system were briefly described. With the accomplishment of the IOP, WATER has achieved a preliminary goal of establishing a public experimental field and developing a multi-scale, multi-resolution and high quality integrated dataset. The analysis of the data, developing and validation for models and algorithms, and building of the information system of WATER will continue in the next stage and limited revisits to the field are anticipated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Xin; Li, Xiaowen; Li, Zengyuan; Ma, Mingguo; Wang, Jian; Liu, Qiang; Xiao, Qing; Chen, Erxue; Che, Tao; Hu, Zeyong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img 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href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">81</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PASP..121..699Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">BVR <span class="hlt">Observations</span> and <span class="hlt">Period</span> Variation of the Neglected Contact Binary V343 Orionis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">BVR light curves of V343 Orionis were <span class="hlt">observed</span> with the 85 cm telescope at Xinglong Station of the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in 2007 and 2008. Using the Wilson-Devinney program, the photometric solution of V343 Ori was first deduced from those <span class="hlt">observations</span>. Photometric results indicated that V343 Ori is an A-subtype W Ursae Majoris binary, whose mass ratio and overcontact degree are q=0.253(±0.004) and f=86.9%(±2.1%), respectively. The asymmetric light curves (i.e., O'Connell effect) were modeled by the spot model. The spot area is up to 1.21% of the area of the more massive component. All light minimum times for V343 Ori, spanning over 80 yr, were used in analyzing the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> change. From the O-C curve, there exists a long-term orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> increase at a rate of dP/dt=+4.32×10 d yr, which may be caused by the mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. With mass transfer, the orbital angular momentum decreases while the spin angular momentum increases. When J >13J, this kind of binary (e.g., V343 Ori), with high overcontact degree and <span class="hlt">period</span> increase, may evolve into a rapid-rotating single star.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang, Y.-G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">82</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20110020642&hterms=Tidal+Power&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DTidal%2BPower"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observing</span> and Modeling Long-<span class="hlt">Period</span> Tidal Variations in Polar Motion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">By exchanging angular momentum with the solid Earth, ocean tides cause the Earth's rotation to change. While hydrodynamic tide models have been used to study the effect of ocean tides on polar motion, it is shown here that none of the published models can fully account for the <span class="hlt">observed</span> variations. An empirical ocean tide model is therefore determined by fitting <span class="hlt">periodic</span> terms at the tidal frequencies to polar motion excitation <span class="hlt">observations</span>, from which atmospheric and non-tidal oceanic effects were removed. While the empirical ocean tide model does fully account for allof the <span class="hlt">observed</span> tidal power, tests indicate that the model may not have completely converged. So better models of the effects of ocean tides on polar motion are still needed, both dynamical and empirical.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gross, Richard S.; Dickman, S. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">83</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.1448S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodicity</span> in the spatial-temporal earthquake distributions for the Pacific region: <span class="hlt">observation</span> and modeling.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the course of the last century a cyclic increasing and decreasing of the Earth's seismic activity (SA) was marked. The variations of the SA for the events with M>=7.0 from 1900 up to date were under study. The two subsets of the worldwide NEIC (USGS) catalog were used: USGS/NEIC from 1973 to 2012 and catalog of the significant worldwide earthquakes (2150 B.C. - 1994 A.D.), compiled by USGS/NEIC from the NOAA agency. The preliminary standardization of magnitudes and elimination of aftershocks from list of events was performed. The entire <span class="hlt">period</span> of <span class="hlt">observations</span> was subdivided into 5-year intervals. The temporal distributions of the earthquake (EQ) density and released energy density were calculated separately for the Southern hemisphere (SH), and for the Northern hemisphere (NH) and for eighteen latitudinal belts: 90°-80°N, 80°-70°N, 70°-60°N, 60°-50°N and so on (the size of each belt is equal to 10°). The <span class="hlt">periods</span> of the SA was compared for different latitudinal belts of the Earth. The peaks and decays of the seismicity do not coincide in time for different latitudinal belts and especially for the belts located in NH and SH. The peaks and decays of the SA for the events (with M>=8) were marked in the temporal distributions of the EQ for all studied latitudinal belts. The two-dimension distributions (over latitudes and over time) of the EQ density and released energy density highlighted that the <span class="hlt">periods</span> of amplification of the SA are equal to 30-35 years approximately. Next, we check the existence of a non-random component in the EQ occurrence between the NH and the SH. All events were related to the time axis according to their origin time. We take into consideration the set of the EQs in the studied catalog as the sequence of events if each event may have only one of two possible outcome (occurrence in the NH or in the SH). A nonparametric run test was used for testing of hypothesis about an existence the nonrandom component in the examined sequence of events. The statistical value Z was calculated. The confidence interval for a=1% (significance value) defined by the condition |Zcrit|<2.58. If |Z|>=|Zcrit| then given sample may contain non-random components. The Z values for all magnitude ranges exceeded |Zcrit| in several times, thus a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> transfer of the seismic activity between the Northern Hemisphere and the Southern Hemispheres is confirmed. The digital model (superposition of the random processes and the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> process) was proposed. It was shown that statistical validity of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> component according to run test depends on: the frequency of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> function, and the duration of the <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span>, and the probability of random component occurrence (P1) as function of time and the probability of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> component occurrence (P2) as function of time. The digital model enables to comprehend some particular features of the <span class="hlt">observation</span> data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sasorova, Elena; Levin, Boris</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">84</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SoPh..285..141C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Results of IPS <span class="hlt">Observations</span> in the <span class="hlt">Period</span> Near Solar Activity Minimum</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">IPS <span class="hlt">observations</span> with the Big Scanning Array of Lebedev Physical Institute (BSA LPI) radio telescope at the frequency 111 MHz have been monitored since 2006. All the sources, about several hundred daily, with a scintillating flux greater than 0.2 Jy are recorded for 24 hours in the 16 beams of the radio telescope covering a sky strip of 8? declination width. We present some results of IPS <span class="hlt">observations</span> for the recent <span class="hlt">period</span> of low solar activity considering a statistical ensemble of scintillating radio sources. The dependences of the averaged over ensemble scintillation index on heliocentric distance are considerably weaker than the dependence expected for a spherically symmetric geometry. The difference is especially pronounced in the year 2008 during the very deep solar activity minimum <span class="hlt">period</span>. These features are explained by the influence of the heliospheric current sheet that is seen as a strong concentration of turbulent solar wind plasma aligned with the solar equatorial plane. A local maximum of the scintillation index is found in the anti-solar direction. Future prospects of IPS <span class="hlt">observations</span> using BSA LPI are briefly discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chashei, I. V.; Shishov, V. I.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Subaev, I. A.; Oreshko, V. V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">85</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMSA41B1863M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Time <span class="hlt">Periods</span> of Unusual Density Behavior <span class="hlt">Observed</span> by GRACE and CHAMP</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Time <span class="hlt">periods</span> of low cross correlation between precision orbit ephemeris (POE) derived density and accelerometer density for CHAMP and GRACE are examined. In particular, the cross correlation for GRACE dropped from typical values near 0.9 to much lower values and then returned to typical over the time <span class="hlt">period</span> of late October to late December of 2005. This time <span class="hlt">period</span> includes a maneuver where GRACE-A and GRACE-B swapped positions. However, the drop in cross correlation begins and reaches its low point before the maneuvers begin. In addition, the densities were found using GRACE-A, but GRACE-B did most of the maneuvering. The time <span class="hlt">period</span> is characterized by high frequency variations in accelerometer density of the same magnitude as the daylight to eclipse variations over the course of an orbit. However, the daylight to eclipse variations are particularly small during this time <span class="hlt">period</span> because the orbit plane is near the terminator. Additionally, the difference between the accelerometer and POE derived densities are not unusually large during this time <span class="hlt">period</span>. This implies the variations are not unusual, just more significant when the orbit plane is near terminator. Cyclical variations in correlation of the POE derived densities with accelerometer derived densities are seen for both GRACE and CHAMP, but the magnitude of the variations are much larger for GRACE, possibly because of the higher altitude of GRACE. The cycles seem to be phased so that low correlations occur with low beta angle when the orbit plane is near the terminator. The low correlation is possibly caused by the lower amplitude of the daylight to eclipse signal making higher frequency variations relatively more important. However, another possible explanation is terminator waves in density that propagate to the thermosphere from lower in the atmosphere. These waves have been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in CHAMP accelerometer data and global circulation model simulations. Further investigation is needed to see if the variations correspond to terminator waves or if they represent typical high frequency signal from another source that is more apparent when the orbit plane is near the terminator. 1. C. A. McLaughlin, E. Fattig, D. Mysore Krishna, and P. M. Mehta, "Time <span class="hlt">Periods</span> of Anomalous Density for GRACE and CHAMP," AAS/AIAA Astrodynamics Specialists Conference, AAS 11-613, Girdwood, AK, August 2011. 2. C. A. McLaughlin, A. Hiatt, and T. Lechtenberg, "Calibrating Precision Orbit Derived Total Density," Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, Vol. 48, No. 1, January-February 2011, pp. 166-174.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McLaughlin, C. A.; Fattig, E.; Mysore Krishna, D.; Locke, T.; Mehta, P. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">86</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24040024"> <span id="translatedtitle">mtDNA from the early Bronze Age to the Roman <span class="hlt">period</span> <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a genetic link between the Indian subcontinent and Mesopotamian cradle of civilization.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ancient DNA methodology was applied to analyse sequences extracted from freshly unearthed remains (teeth) of 4 individuals deeply deposited in slightly alkaline soil of the Tell Ashara (ancient Terqa) and Tell Masaikh (ancient Kar-Assurnasirpal) Syrian archaeological sites, both in the middle Euphrates valley. Dated to the <span class="hlt">period</span> between 2.5 Kyrs BC and 0.5 Kyrs AD the studied individuals carried mtDNA haplotypes corresponding to the M4b1, M49 and/or M61 haplogroups, which are believed to have arisen in the area of the Indian subcontinent during the Upper Paleolithic and are absent in people living today in Syria. However, they are present in people inhabiting today's Tibet, Himalayas, India and Pakistan. We anticipate that the analysed remains from Mesopotamia belonged to people with genetic affinity to the Indian subcontinent since the distribution of identified ancient haplotypes indicates solid link with populations from the region of South Asia-Tibet (Trans-Himalaya). They may have been descendants of migrants from much earlier times, spreading the clades of the macrohaplogroup M throughout Eurasia and founding regional Mesopotamian groups like that of Terqa or just merchants moving along trade routes passing near or through the region. None of the successfully identified nuclear alleles turned out to be ?F508 CFTR, LCT-13910T or ?32 CCR5. PMID:24040024</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Witas, Henryk W; Tomczyk, Jacek; J?drychowska-Da?ska, Krystyna; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; P?oszaj, Tomasz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">87</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1013227"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clinical and ultrastructural <span class="hlt">observations</span> in a kindred with normo-hyperkalaemic <span class="hlt">periodic</span> paralysis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Electron microscopic studies of muscle biopsies from clinically unaffected sibs in a family with normo-hyperkalaemic <span class="hlt">periodic</span> paralysis with variable myotonia have revealed dilatation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum similar to that <span class="hlt">observed</span> in affected members. This supports the view that such dilatation is not only a significant and likely primary ultrastructural change but that it may precede clinical manifestations and represent an anatomical marker of the genetic trait. Identical dilatation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum was found in the clinically unaffected father of the affected and unaffected grandchildren of the propositus. This raises the possibility that this non-consanguineous member contributed to the genetic trait or its manifestations in the grandchildren of the index patient since similar dilatation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum was not <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the muscles of healthy control subjects. Images</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Danowski, T S; Fisher, E R; Vidalon, C; Vester, J W; Thompson, R; Nolan, S; Stephan, T; Sunder, J H</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">88</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800069598&hterms=rx&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3D%2522rx%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">IUE <span class="hlt">observations</span> of long <span class="hlt">period</span> eclipsing binaries - A study of accretion onto non-degenerate stars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">IUE <span class="hlt">observations</span> made in 1978-1979 recorded a whole class of interacting long-<span class="hlt">period</span> binaries similar to beta Lyrae, which includes RX Cas, SX Cas, V 367 Cyg, W Cru, beta Lyr, and W Ser, called the W Serpentis stars. These mass-transferring binaries with relatively high mass transfer rate show two prominent features in the far ultraviolet: a continuum with a color temperature higher than the one <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the optical region (about 12,000 K), and a strong emission line spectrum with the N V doublet at 1240 A, C IV doublet at 1550 A and lines of Si II, Si III, Si IV, C II, Fe III, AI III, etc. These phenomena are discussed on the assumption that they are due to accretion onto non-degenerate stars.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Plavec, M. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">89</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900037856&hterms=nwo&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dnwo"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ginga <span class="hlt">observations</span> of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations in type II bursts from the Rapid Burster</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During Ginga <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the 'Rapid Burster' in August 1988, strong quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) were detected in its X-ray intensity. The QPOs had centroid frequencies of 5 and 2 Hz during type II X-ray bursts which lasted for 10 and 30 s, respectively. The presence of the QPOs is correlated with the time scale-invariant burst profile. They are very strong during the initial peak in the burst, absent in the second peak, and strong again at the onset of the third peak. From an analysis of the X-ray spectrum as <span class="hlt">observed</span> during the maxima and minima of the oscillations, it is found that the oscillations can be described by changes of the temperature of a blackbody emitter of constant apparent area.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dotani, T.; Mitsuda, K.; Inoue, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Kawai, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">90</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760026034&hterms=ray+phase&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dx%2Bray%252C%2Bphase"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observation</span> of gamma rays with a 4.8 hour <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> from CYG X-3</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Energetic (E35 MeV) Gamma rays were <span class="hlt">observed</span> from Cyg X-3 with the SAS-2 Gamma ray telescope. They are modulated at the 4.8 sup h <span class="hlt">period</span> <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the X-ray and infrared regions, and within the statistical error are in phase with this emission. The flux above 100 MeV has an average value of (4.4 + or - 1.1)x 10 to the -6 power/sq cm/sec. If the distance to Cyg X-3 is 10 kpcs, this flux implies a luminosity of more than 10 to the 37th power ergs/s if the radiation is isotropic and about 10 to the 36th power ergs/s if the radiation is restricted to a cone of one steradian, as it might be in a pulsar.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lamb, R. C.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">91</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060009467&hterms=gsm&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3D%2522gsm%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cluster <span class="hlt">observations</span> of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> impulsive signatures in the dayside northern lobe: High-latitude flux transfer events?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on a series of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> reversals in GSM B(sub Z) <span class="hlt">observed</span> by the four Cluster spacecraft in the northern dayside lobe poleward of the cusp on 23 February 2001. During an interval of about 35 min, multiple reversals (negative to positive) in B(sub Z) of approximately 1-min duration with an approximate 8-min recurrence time were <span class="hlt">observed</span>. The individual structures do not resemble low-latitude flux transfer events (FTE) [Russell and Elphic, 1979] but the 8-min recurrence frequency <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that intermittent reconnection may be occurring .Measurements (appropriately lagged) of the solar wind at ACE show that the IMF was southward-oriented with a strong B(sub X) and that a modest dynamic pressure increased as the events started. The multi-point <span class="hlt">observations</span> afforded by the Cluster spacecraft were used to infer the motion (direction and speed) of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> magnetic field reversals. The associated currents were also calculated and they are consistent with the spatial confinement of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> magnetic field reversals. We propose that the <span class="hlt">observed</span> reversals are due to flux tubes reconnecting with closed field lines on the dayside. Ancillary data from the Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) and Plasma Electron And Current Experiment (PEACE) instruments were used to develop a physical picture of the reversals.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thompson, S. M.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K. K.; Balogh, A.; Reme, H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Kistler, L. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">92</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27.3852P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Combined In-situ and Ground-based <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> Radar Echoes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A series of combined rocket/radar investigation of the electrodynamics and neutral- plasma coupling associated with sporadic-E layers and quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> backscatter radar echoes has been carried out from launch sites at both Puerto Rico and the Wallops Flight Facility, Virginia (USA) between 1998-2001. The instrumented rock- ets consisted of main and sub-payloads and were launched while strong quasi- <span class="hlt">periodic</span> VHF echoes were <span class="hlt">observed</span> simultaneously with the Univ. of Illinois 50 MHz backscatter radar. The rocket apogee was purposely limited so that the payloads would dwell in the sporadic-E region (90-115 km). The main payload included vector DC and AC electric field detectors, a DC magnetometer, an ion mass spectrometer, an ioniza- tion gauge, and spaced-electric field receivers to measure the wavelength and phase velocity of the unstable plasma waves. The sub-payload was instrumented to measure DC and wave electric fields and plasma density. In one case, a separate rocket was launched a few minutes later which released luminous TMA trails to measure the neu- tral wind, its velocity shear, and embedded neutral structures. In this experiment, the payloads successfully pierced a well-defined, 2-3 km thick metallic sporadic-E layer of approximately 10**5 e/cc near 103 km altitude. In-situ DC electric field measure- ments revealed ~5mV/m ambient meridional fields above and below the layer with 1-2 mV/m amplitude, large scale structures superimposed. The wavelengths of these structures were approximately 2-4 km and may be related to the seat of the quasi- <span class="hlt">periodic</span> echoes. Intense (~5 mV/m), higher frequency (shorter scale) broadband waves were also <span class="hlt">observed</span> in-situ, both above and below the layer, consistent with the VHF backscatter <span class="hlt">observations</span> during the time of the launch. Neither the large scale nor short scale plasma waves appeared to be distinctly organized by the sporadic-E den- sity layer. The TMA release showed large amplitude (~ 100 m/s) meridional winds near 102-105 km, with the most intense shears directly below these altitudes, where the short scale electric field fluctuations were most intense. We summarize the ob- servations from the different experiments and discuss them in the context of current theories regarding quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> echoes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pfaff, R.; Kudeki, E.; Larsen, M.; Clemmons, J.; Earle, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">93</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060036692&hterms=low+frequency&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dlow%2Bfrequency"> <span id="translatedtitle">(abstract) Role of Long Equatorial Wave Reflection in the Low-Frequency Variability <span class="hlt">Observed</span> During the TOPEX/POSEIDON <span class="hlt">Period</span>: Data Analysis and Coupled Model Study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The analysis of TOPEX/POSEIDON sea level and ERS-1 zonal wind stress data gives evidence that first mode meridonal long Rossby waves fully reflected into Kelvin waves at the equatorial western Pacific boundary at different <span class="hlt">periods</span> including the January-June 1994 <span class="hlt">period</span>. The evolution of the conditions (zonal wind stress, sea surface temperature and sea level anomalies) in the central Pacific <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that this reflection may have played a role in the reversal of cold to warm anomalies <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the central Pacific in June-July 1994. To investigate the actual role of reflected Kelvin waves <span class="hlt">observed</span> by TOPEX/POSEIDON, a simple ocean-atmosphere coupled model is designed. Starting from these initial conditions, several simulations are run for testing the role western bundary reflection evidenced in TOPEX/POSEIDON data. Coupled mechanisms are <span class="hlt">suggested</span> to explain the low-frequency variability <span class="hlt">observed</span> during this <span class="hlt">period</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boulanger, J. P.; Perigaud, C.; Fu, L. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">94</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900064186&hterms=sundial&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dsundial"> <span id="translatedtitle">Latitudinal variation of perturbation electric fields during magnetically disturbed <span class="hlt">periods</span> - 1986 Sundial <span class="hlt">observations</span> and model results</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">F-region incoherent scatter radar drift <span class="hlt">observations</span> from Millstone Hill and Jicamarca, h-prime F <span class="hlt">observations</span> from Huancayo, and high latitude ground-magnetometer measurements taken during the Sundial 1986 campaign are used to study the relationship between plasmaspheric electric field perturbations and high latitude currents during disturbed <span class="hlt">periods</span>. The <span class="hlt">observations</span> are in good agreement with numerical results from a Rice Covection Model run that involved a sharp increase in the polar cap potential drop followed by a subsequent decrease. The zonal disturbance electric field pattern is latitude independent, and the corresponding amplitudes change approximately as L exp n (where n is about 1.5). The meridional electric field patterns and amplitudes have larger latitudinal variations. The mid-, low, and equatorial electric fields from the Rice Convection Model are in good agreement with previous results from the semianalytic, Senior-Blanc (1987) model. Also discussed are three physical mechanisms (over-shielding, fossil winds, and magnetic reconfiguration) that contribute to the long lasting (1-2 h) equatorial zonal electric field perturbations associated with a sudden northward turning of the IMF. It is predicted that the penetration of high latitude electric fields to low latitudes should, in general, be closely related to the rate of motion of the shielding layer and the equatorward edge of the diffuse aurora.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fejer, B. G.; Spiro, R. W.; Wolf, R. A.; Foster, J. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">95</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013OAP....26..123U"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multiphase Spectroscopic <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of the Long-<span class="hlt">Period</span> Cepheids l Carinae</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thirty three spectra (one spectrum for the each of 33 <span class="hlt">observational</span> nights) have been performed to coverall pulsational <span class="hlt">period</span> of the 35.5-days Cepheid l Car. Due to these data we have obtained for the first time the detailed curves of effective temperature, gravity and turbulent velocity. Curves of gravity and turbulent velocity show complicated changes, connected probably with dynamics of extensive Cepheid's atmosphere. The mean atmosphere parameters of l Car are: Teff =4984±15K; log g = 1.13; Vt =6.67kms-1. Having a solar metallicity[Fe/H]=+0.02dex, this Cepheid demonstrate sudden results for the "key" elements abundances of yellow supergiants evolution, - all they are close to the solar ones. In this case l Car resembles to SV Vul, - Cepheid with 45-days pulsational <span class="hlt">period</span> and nearly like spectral type. It is possible that l Car is an object crossing the Cepheids instability strip for the first time. The content of other elements is close to solar one too.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Usenko, I. A.; Kravtsov, V. V.; Kovtyukh, V. V.; Berdnikov, L. N.; Knyazev, A. Yu.; Chini, R.; Fokin, A. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">96</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890024840&hterms=soil+evaporation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dsoil%2Bevaporation"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaporation over land surfaces - First results from HAPEX-MOBILHY Special <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Preliminary results are presented from the May 7-July 15, 1986 Special <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> (SOP) of the HAPEX-MOBILHY program, which examines the hydrological budget and evaporation flux at the scale of a 10,000 sq km GCM grid square to determine soil moisture, surface-energy budgets, and surface hydrology. The SOP used two highly instrumented remote sensing aircraft to obtain detailed measurements of atmospheric fluxes and surface properties. It is noted that the measurements are reliable at spatially local and short time scales, as well as on the monthly time scale. The data base obtained may be used in parametrization schemes against which land-surface water budgets can be tested.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andre, Jean-Claude; Goutorbe, Jean-Paul; Bessemoulin, Pierre; Perrier, Alain; Becker, Francois</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">97</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002cosp...34E2358P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Combined in-situ and ground-based <span class="hlt">observations</span> of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> radar echoes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A series of combined rocket/radar investigation of the electrodynamics and neutralplasma coupling associated with sporadic-E layers and quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> backscatter radar echoes has been carried out from launch sites at both Puerto Rico and the Wallops Flight Facility, Virginia (USA) between 1998-2001. The instrumented rockets consisted of main and sub-payloads and were launched while strong quasiperiodic VHF echoes were <span class="hlt">observed</span> simultaneously with the Univ. of Illinois 50 MHz backscatter radar. The rocket apogee was purposely limited so that the payloads would dwell in the sporadic-E region (90-115 km). The main payload included vector DC and AC electric field detectors, a DC magnetometer, an ion mass spectrometer, an ionization gauge, and spaced-electric field receivers to measure the wavelength and phase velocity of the unstable plasma waves. The sub-payload was instrumented to measure DC and wave electric fields and plasma density. In one case, a separate rocket was launched a few minutes later which released luminous TMA trails to measure the neutral wind, its velocity shear, and embedded neutral structures. In this experiment, the payloads successfully pierced a well-defined, 2-3 km thick metallic sporadic-E layer of approximately 10**5 e/cc near 103 km altitude. In-situ DC electric field measurements revealed ~5mV/m ambient meridional fields above and below the layer with 1-2 mV/m amplitude, large scale structures superimposed. The wavelengths of these structures were approximately 2-4 km and may be related to the seat of the quasiperiodic echoes. Intense (~5 mV/m), higher frequency (shorter scale) broadband waves were also <span class="hlt">observed</span> in-situ, both above and below the layer, consistent with the VHF backscatter <span class="hlt">observations</span> during the time of the launch. Neither the large scale nor short scale plasma waves appeared to be distinctly organized by the sporadic-E density layer. The TMA release showed large amplitude (~ 100 m/s) meridional winds near 102-105 km, with the most intense shears directly below these altitudes, where the short scale electric field fluctuations were most intense. We summarize the <span class="hlt">observations</span> from the different experiments and discuss them in the context of current theories regarding quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> echoes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pfaff, R.; Kudeki, E.; Larsen, M.; Clemmons, J.; Earle, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">98</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.2205D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Constraining lowermost mantle structure using seismic <span class="hlt">observations</span> of Earth's long <span class="hlt">period</span> free oscillations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Earth's lowermost mantle (also called D") is bounded by a thermal boundary layer forming a discontinuous interface with the core. The range of seismic structures found in this region, including ultra low velocity zones, anisotropy, discontinuities and anti-correlations between shear and bulk sound velocity, rival the structures found in the lithosphere, the mantle's top thermal boundary layer. The majority of these structures have been found using body wave <span class="hlt">observations</span>, but normal mode <span class="hlt">observations</span> have been lacking. Even though seismic body wave studies of the core mantle boundary region have revealed a range of structures, many fundamental questions remain unanswered, including: Is there partial melting or compositional heterogeneity? What causes ultra low velocity layers? Which is the importance of post-perovskite? Here, we will use long <span class="hlt">period</span> whole Earth oscillations to study structures that have only been studied using short <span class="hlt">period</span> body waves before. The splitting of Earth's free-oscillation spectra is especially interesting, because they place important constraints not only on the wave speed but also on the density structure of the Earth's mantle. We present a new set of splitting functions for mantle sensitive modes, of which almost half had not been measured before. In particular, we have made measurements of Stoneley modes which are uniquely sensitive to the core mantle boundary region, and have also added over 30 new modes which are predominantly sensitive to compressional velocity. Our <span class="hlt">observations</span> are derived from modal spectra up to 10 mHz for 91 events with Mw × 7.4 from the last 34 years (1976-2010). Our data include the 23 June 2001 Peru event (Mw=8.4), the Sumatra events of 2004 (Mw=9.0) and 2005 (Mw=8.6), the 2008 Wenchuan, China event (Mw=7.9) and the 2010 Chile event (Mw=8.8). The new events provide significant improvement of data coverage particularly in continental areas. We are using our new measurements in a tomographic inversion for mantle shear and compressional velocity, especially focussing on the lower most mantle region and D". The addition of compressional sensitive modes provides improved constraints on the large scale compressional structure, and on the scaling ratio between ?vs-vs and ?vp-vp, allowing us to estimate the amount of compositional heterogeneity in the lowermost mantle.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Deuss, Arwen; Koelemeijer, Paula; Ritsema, Jeroen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">99</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014TCry....8..439H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Empirical sea ice thickness retrieval during the freeze-up <span class="hlt">period</span> from SMOS high incident angle <span class="hlt">observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sea ice thickness information is important for sea ice modelling and ship operations. Here a method to detect the thickness of sea ice up to 50 cm during the freeze-up season based on high incidence angle <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite working at 1.4 GHz is <span class="hlt">suggested</span>. By comparison of thermodynamic ice growth data with SMOS brightness temperatures, a high correlation to intensity and an anticorrelation to the difference between vertically and horizontally polarised brightness temperatures at incidence angles between 40 and 50° are found and used to develop an empirical retrieval algorithm sensitive to thin sea ice up to 50 cm thickness. The algorithm shows high correlation with ice thickness data from airborne measurements and reasonable ice thickness patterns for the Arctic freeze-up <span class="hlt">period</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huntemann, M.; Heygster, G.; Kaleschke, L.; Krumpen, T.; Mäkynen, M.; Drusch, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">100</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950045560&hterms=approximately+100&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dapproximately%2B100"> <span id="translatedtitle">Irregular, long-<span class="hlt">period</span> boundary oscillations beyond approximately 100 R(sub e): GEOTAIL plasma <span class="hlt">observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Near the tail boundary beyond about 100 Re, GEOTAIL often measures irregular, long-<span class="hlt">period</span> oscillations in plasma velocity and density. Flow speed and density oscillate between magnetosheath values and values an order of magnitude less. The oscillations can persist for days. A typical oscillation lasts 100 minutes, but the range is large. The oscillations are highly asymmetric in that the increasing phase of the oscillation is an order of magnitude faster than the decreasing phase. This asymmetry shows that they are a distinct class of oscillations, not previously explicitly reported, and that they are not mere consequences of tail flapping in a variable solar wind. The changes in flow direction through an oscillation imply that the oscillation results from a motion of the boundary toward and away from the spacecraft with an amplitude between 5 and 10 R(sub e). A consideration of options <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the most plausible cause of these oscillations is the 'breathing' of the magnetotail that attends the substorm cycle.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Siscoe, G. L.; Frank, L. A.; Ackerson, K. L.; Paterson, W. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">101</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42003270"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> magnetospheric substorms: Multiple space-based and ground-based instrumental <span class="hlt">observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span>, sawtooth-like variations of energetic plasma particle fluxes are often measured at geosynchronous orbit during magnetic storms. The outstanding problems are whether the sawtooth flux variations represent particle injections from the tail to the inner magnetosphere, whether the sawtooth variations correspond to substorm onsets, and what mechanism is responsible for the generation of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> particle injections (or <span class="hlt">periodic</span> substorms). In</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chao-Song Huang; J. C. Foster; G. D. Reeves; G. Le; H. U. Frey; C. J. Pollock; J.-M. Jahn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">102</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GeoRL..40.5581N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Concentric waves and short-<span class="hlt">period</span> oscillations <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the ionosphere after the 2013 Moore EF5 tornado</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We detected clear concentric waves and short-<span class="hlt">period</span> oscillations in the ionosphere after an Enhanced Fujita scale (EF)5 tornado hit Moore, Oklahoma, U.S., on 20 May 2013 using dense wide-coverage ionospheric total electron content (TEC) <span class="hlt">observations</span> in North America. These concentric waves were nondispersive, with a horizontal wavelength of ~120 km and a <span class="hlt">period</span> of ~13 min. They were <span class="hlt">observed</span> for more than 7 h throughout North America. TEC oscillations with a <span class="hlt">period</span> of ~4 min were also <span class="hlt">observed</span> to the south of Moore for more than 8 h. A comparison between the TEC <span class="hlt">observations</span> and infrared cloud image from the GOES satellite indicates that the concentric waves and short-<span class="hlt">period</span> oscillations are caused by supercell-induced atmospheric gravity waves and acoustic resonances, respectively. This <span class="hlt">observational</span> result provides the first clear evidence of a severe meteorological event causing atmospheric waves propagating upward in the upper atmosphere and reaching the ionosphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nishioka, Michi; Tsugawa, Takuya; Kubota, Minoru; Ishii, Mamoru</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">103</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1017111"> <span id="translatedtitle">Weekly <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> of aerosol properties <span class="hlt">observed</span> at an urban location in India</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Multi-year (~7 years) <span class="hlt">observations</span> of aerosol optical and microphysical properties were conducted at a tropical urban location in Bangalore, India. As a consequence of rapid urbanization, Bangalore presents high local atmospheric emissions, which makes it an interesting site to study the effect of anthropogenic activities on aerosol properties. It has been found that both column (aerosol optical depth, AOD) and ground-level measurements (black carbon (BC) and composite aerosol mass) exhibit a weekly cycle with low aerosol concentrations on weekends. In comparison to the weekdays, the weekend reductions of aerosol optical depth, black carbon and composite aerosol mass concentrations were ~15%, 25% and 24%, respectively. The magnitude of weekend reduction of black carbon is as much as ~1 ?g m?3. The similarity in the weekly cycle between the column and surface measurements <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the aerosol column loading at this location is governed by local anthropogenic emissions. The strongest weekly cycle in composite aerosol mass concentration was <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the super micron mass range (N1 ?m). The weekly cycle of composite aerosol mass in the sub micron mass range (b1 ?m) was weak in comparison to the super micron aerosol mass.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Satheesh, S. K.; Vinoj, V.; Moorthy, K. Krishna</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">104</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/43131525"> <span id="translatedtitle">Whole earth telescope <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the white dwarf G29-38 - Phase variations of the 615 second <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An extensive set of high-speed photometric <span class="hlt">observations</span> obtained with the Whole Earth Telescope network is used to show that the complex light curve of the ZZ Zeti (DAV) star G29-38 is dominated by a single, constant amplitude <span class="hlt">period</span> of 615 s during the time span of these <span class="hlt">observations</span>. The pulse arrival times for this <span class="hlt">period</span> exhibit a systematic variation in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. E. Winget; R. E. Nather; J. C. Clemens; J. Provencal; S. J. Kleinman; P. A. Bradley; M. A. Wood; C. F. Claver; E. L. Robinson; A. D. Grauer; B. P. Hine; G. Fontaine; N. Achilleos; T. M. K. Marar; S. Seetha; B. N. Ashoka; D. O'Donoghue; B. Warner; D. W. Kurtz; P. Martinez; G. Vauclair; M. Chevreton; A. Kanaan; S. O. Kepler; T. Augusteijn; J. van Paradijs; C. J. Hansen; James Liebert</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">105</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013hell.conf...39N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tracing non-conservative mass transfer eras in close binaries from <span class="hlt">observed</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> variations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The pure information directly taken from the <span class="hlt">observed</span> orbital evolution of eclipsing binary stars (centuries at most) is valuable for the study of many important physical mechanisms related to the stellar structure. Especially in the case of eclipsing binary systems, this may happen by monitoring their eclipse timing variations, i.e. by means of an O-C diagram analysis. As long as a binary system attains a semi-detached configuration, material begins to flow from the component that fills its Roche lobe toward its mate through the first Lagrangian (L1) point. Here, we examine two non conservative mass transfer (MT) paths. The MT process is then accompanied by mass and angular momentum loss from the system. In the first path, angular momentum is removed through a hot spot which re-emits part of the incoming material, and in the second, angular momentum is carried away via an outer Lagrangian point (L2/L3) due to the small accumulating efficiency of the accretion disk surrounding the gainer. Dealing with the less massive component as the donor in the latter path, it is shown that there is always a critical mass ratio over which the <span class="hlt">period</span> is expected to decrease, contrary to what the fully conservative MT predicts. Consistent with our expectations, the critical values become progressively smaller as the degree of liberalism is gradually widened. The O-C diagram of several semi-detached systems, expecting to experience a liberal era, is individually examined aiming to estimate both the mass transfer and the mass loss rate.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nanouris, N.; Kalimeris, A.; Antonopoulou, E.; Rovithis-Livaniou, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">106</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52485664"> <span id="translatedtitle">Low latitude <span class="hlt">observations</span> of VLF <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> and Chorus emissions during disturbed and quiet magnetospheric conditions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">VLF\\/ELF emissions are electromagnetic emissions that arise in the magnetosphere due to interaction of whistler mode waves and energetic electrons present in the magnetosphere. They are broadly grouped as: (a) unstructured emissions and (b) structured discrete emissions with a repetitive and even <span class="hlt">periodic</span> character that tends to be transient, like chorus, <span class="hlt">periodic</span> emissions, etc. Unlike mid and high latitude very</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rajesh Singh; A. K. Singh; B. Veenadhari; P. Pant; R. P. Patel; P. Vohat; D. Siingh; R. P. Singh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">107</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JAVSO..41....1P"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Period</span> Analysis of AAVSO Visual <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of 55 Semiregular (SR/SRa/SRb) Variable Stars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have used AAVSO visual data, and Fourier analysis and self-correlation analysis, to study the <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of 55 semiregular (SR) variables - 21 SRa and 34 SRb. According to the standard system of variable star classification, these are pulsating red giants, with visual amplitudes less than 2.5 magnitudes, which show noticeable <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> (SRa) or less-obvious <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> (SRb). We find that their behavior ranges from highly <span class="hlt">periodic</span> to irregular; some are not significantly variable. We have used a simple index, based on self-correlation analysis, to show that, on average, the SRa variables have a larger component of <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> than the SRb variables, as expected. The distributions of this index for the two groups, however, overlap considerably. Of our 55 stars, 11 definitely or possibly show two radial <span class="hlt">periods</span>, and at least 16 definitely or possibly show a long secondary <span class="hlt">period</span>. We also analyzed three non-SR stars: T Cet is a double-mode SRc star; T Cen is an RVa star which should be reclassified as RVb; V930 Cyg is an irregular (Lb) star with a strong 250-day <span class="hlt">period</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Percy, J. R.; Tan, P. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">108</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EP%26S...64..459F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Polar cap ionosphere and thermosphere during the solar minimum <span class="hlt">period</span>: EISCAT Svalbard radar <span class="hlt">observations</span> and GCM simulations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The IPY long-run data were obtained from the European Incoherent Scatter Svalbard radar (ESR) <span class="hlt">observations</span> during March 2007 and February 2008. Since the solar and geomagnetic activities were quite low during the <span class="hlt">period</span>, this data set is extremely helpful for describing the basic states (ground states) of the thermosphere and ionosphere in the polar cap region. The monthly-averaged ion temperatures for 12 months show similar local time (or UT) variations to each other. The ion temperatures also show significant seasonal variations. The amplitudes of the local time and seasonal variations <span class="hlt">observed</span> are much larger than the ones predicted by the IRI-2007 model. In addition, we performed numerical simulations with a general circulation model (GCM), which covers all the atmospheric regions, to investigate variations of the neutrals in the polar thermosphere. The GCM simulations show significant variations of the neutral temperature in the polar region in comparison with the NRLMSISE-00 empirical model. These results indicate that both the ions and neutrals would show larger variations than those described by the empirical models, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> significant heat sources in the polar cap region even under solar minimum and geomagnetically quiet conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fujiwara, H.; Nozawa, S.; Maeda, S.; Ogawa, Y.; Miyoshi, Y.; Jin, H.; Shinagawa, H.; Terada, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">109</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70017592"> <span id="translatedtitle">Diurnal-<span class="hlt">period</span> currents trapped above Fieberling Guyot: <span class="hlt">observed</span> characteristics and model comparisons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Current measurements at depths of 19, 115, 264 and 464 m above the summit of Fieberling Guyot (32??28???N, 127??47???W) for 13 months in 1989 show that the diurnal tides are strongly amplified. The measured variances for K1, P1 and O1 at the 115 m depth were 810, 140 and 80 times larger than the variances of the respective estimated barotropic tides. The diurnal currents closer to the summit were also strongly amplified, through the variance ratios were 40-50% of the ratios <span class="hlt">observed</span> at 115 m. The diurnal band currents were only amplified at the precise tidal frequencies; the bandwidth of the response was less than 0.0002 cph. The discrete character of the response <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that only currents with large spatial scales will be amplified. The characteristics of the amplified diurnal currents are compared to those predicted by a model for Fieberling Guyot of seamount-trapped waves driven by the barotropic tide. The amplitudes of the responses at this one site on the seamount compare favourably to the predicted. ?? 1994.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Noble, M. A.; Brink, K. H.; Eriksen, C. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">110</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040088493&hterms=fat+wang&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dfat%2Bwang"> <span id="translatedtitle">Entrainment in solution of an oscillating NADH oxidase activity from the bovine milk fat globule membrane with a temperature-compensated <span class="hlt">period</span> length <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of an ultradian time-keeping (clock) function</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Entrainment in solution of an oscillating activity with a temperature compensated <span class="hlt">period</span> of 24 min is described for a NADH oxidase (NOX) activity of the bovine milk fat globule membrane, a derivative of the mammary epithelial cell plasma membrane. The <span class="hlt">period</span> of 24 min remained unchanged at 17 degrees C, 27 degrees C and 37 degrees C whereas the amplitude approximately doubled with each 10 degree C rise in temperature (Q(10)congruent with 2). The <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> was <span class="hlt">observed</span> with both intact milk fat globule membranes and with detergent-solubilized membranes, demonstrating that the oscillations did not require an association with membranes. The <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> was not the result of instrument variation or of chemical interactions among reactants in solution. Preparations with different <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> entrained (autosynchronized) when mixed. Upon mixing, the preparations exhibited two oscillatory patterns but eventually a single pattern representing the mean of the farthest separated maxima of the two preparations analyzed separately emerged. The cell surface NOX protein is the first reported example of an entrainable biochemical entity with a temperature-compensated <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> potentially capable of functioning as an ultradian or circadian clock driver.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morre, D. James; Lawler, Juliana; Wang, Sui; Keenan, Thomas W.; Morre, Dorothy M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">111</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820050186&hterms=global+sensitivity+analysis&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dglobal%2Bsensitivity%2Banalysis"> <span id="translatedtitle">An assessment of the FGGE satellite <span class="hlt">observing</span> system during SOP-1. [Special <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> in First GARP Global Experiment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The sensitivity of a Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences global objective analysis cycle to the addition of FGGE level II-b data is assessed. The GOAS system comprises a predictive continuity provided by a model first-guess forecast integrated from a previous forecast and updated by data gathered in the interim. FGGE data originated in the Jan.-Mar. 1979 <span class="hlt">period</span> and were acquired by rawinsondes, pilot balloons, surface stations, satellites, ships, and drifting buoys deployed during SOP-1. Focussing on 2-5 and 8-day forecasts, comparisons were made of the 6 hr forecast error at the 300 mb height in three experiments using all, no-satellite (NOSAT), and without rawinsondes or pilot balloons modes. Larger errors occurred in the case of NOSAT, while significant corrections to the GOAS predictions were noted using all the FGGE data. It was concluded that all forecasts were improved by inclusion of full FGGE data sets, including forecasting beyond one week.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Halem, M.; Kalnay, E.; Baker, W. E.; Atlas, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">112</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010Ap.....53..212Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of a 30-year series of photoelectric <span class="hlt">observations</span> of RY Tauri. I. Search for possible <span class="hlt">periodicities</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Searches for <span class="hlt">periodic</span> variations in the brightness of RY Tauri over various time intervals are conducted on the basis of photoelectric <span class="hlt">observations</span> made by the author at the Crimean Station of the Shternberg State Astronomical Institute (GAISh) from 1965 through 2000 and of data published by others. The total duration of the series of <span class="hlt">observations</span> is 12500 days. The existence of a long cycle lasting about 2000 days is confirmed. Short <span class="hlt">periods</span> owing to rotational modulation of the brightness are not always present. During a time when the brightness of the star was increasing in 1966, a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 7.5 days showed up. The detection of fluctuations which might be identified with rotational modulation evidently depends on the star’s level of brightness. In 1993 and 1996, respectively, <span class="hlt">periods</span> of 20.0 and 29.4 days were discovered which are most likely caused by inhomogeneities in the circumstellar disk.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zajtseva, G. V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">113</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008SPIE.6879E..27T"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observation</span> of self-assembled <span class="hlt">periodic</span> nano-structures induced by femtosecond laser in both ablation and deposition regimes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We <span class="hlt">observed</span> the spontaneous formation of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> nano-structures in both femtosecond laser ablation and deposition. The former involved 400-nm femtosecond pulses from a 250-KHz regenerated amplified mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser and <span class="hlt">periodic</span> nanocracks and the nano-structure are in the form of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> nanocracks in the substrate, the latter applied an 80-MHz mode-locked Ti:sapphire oscillator with pulse energy less than half nanojoule in a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition configuration and tungsten nanogratings grow heterogeneously on top of the substrates. These two <span class="hlt">observed</span> <span class="hlt">periodic</span> nanostructures have opposite orientations respecting to laser polarization: the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> nanocracks are perpendicular to, whereas the deposited tungsten nanogratings are parallel to laser polarization direction. By translating the substrate respecting to the laser focus, both the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> nanocrack and tungsten nanograting extend to the whole scanning range. The deposited tungsten nanogratings possess excellent uniformity on both the grating <span class="hlt">period</span> and tooth length. Both the attributes can be tuned precisely by controlling the laser power and scanning speed. Furthermore, we discovered that the teeth of transverse tungsten nanogratings are self aligned along their axial direction during multiple scanning with appropriate offset between scans. We demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating large-area one-dimensional grating by exploiting such unique property. These distinct phenomena of nanocracks and tungsten nanogratings indicate different responsible mechanisms.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tang, Mingzhen; Zhang, Haitao; Her, Tsing-Hua</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">114</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/n3502t5874815437.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> variability of surface ozone concentration over western and central Europe from <span class="hlt">observational</span> data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Characteristics of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> variability of surface ozone concentration at 98 western and central European stations participating\\u000a in the EMEP program for at least 7 (up to 14) years are determined. Daily and hourly model concentrations of surface ozone\\u000a for each station are given in an analytical form that presents a sum of a constant constituent and basic harmonics that determine</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. M. Zvyagintsev; G. Kakadzhanova; G. M. Kruchenitskii; O. A. Tarasova</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">115</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998GeoRL..25.1533A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> behavior of ion events and wave activity upstream from Jupiter's Bow Shock: Ulysses' <span class="hlt">observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new insight into the ways that the Jovian magnetosphere influences the near Jupiter interplanetary space becomes possible thanks to Ulysses' collection of magnetic field, plasma and energetic ion (HI-SCALE) data during its inbound trajectory (d22-d34, 1992). The most striking new results from the analysis of those data are the following: a) presence of large amplitude (?B?/B?1) near plane polarized Alfvén waves upstream from the Jovian bow shock with a <span class="hlt">period</span> equal to the planet’s rotation (˜10h) at times when the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) was in contact with the bow shock/magnetopause and lay well outside the ecliptic; b) <span class="hlt">observation</span> of ˜10h quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> variation in the ion plasma and energetic ion data up to energies of ˜2 MeV, c) existence of a variation with a <span class="hlt">period</span> 2.5 h ?T ?6.5 h in the magnetic field and the ion data, in several cases, d) detection of magnetic waves and charged particle modulation with a <span class="hlt">period</span> of ˜40min, e) <span class="hlt">observation</span> of an ˜10 h inward/outward motion of the Jovian magnetopause. The <span class="hlt">observations</span> are consistent with generation of the low frequency upstream (Alfvén) waves through <span class="hlt">periodic</span> injection of plasma/energetic ions from within the magnetosphere into the upstream region.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anagnostopoulos, G. C.; Balogh, A.; Marhavilas, P. K.; Rigas, A. G.; Sarris, E. T.; Trochoutsos, P. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">116</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvE..86f1125A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spatial log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations of first-passage <span class="hlt">observables</span> in fractals</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For transport processes in geometrically restricted domains, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) admits a general scaling dependence on space parameters for diffusion, anomalous diffusion, and diffusion in disordered or fractal media. For transport in self-similar fractal structures, we obtain an expression for the source-target distance dependence of the MFPT that exhibits both the leading power-law behavior, depending on the Hausdorff and spectral dimension of the fractal, as well as small log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations that are a clear and definitive signal of the underlying fractal structure. We also present refined numerical results for the Sierpinski gasket that confirm this oscillatory behavior.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Akkermans, Eric; Benichou, Olivier; Dunne, Gerald V.; Teplyaev, Alexander; Voituriez, Raphael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">117</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23367911"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spatial log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations of first-passage <span class="hlt">observables</span> in fractals.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For transport processes in geometrically restricted domains, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) admits a general scaling dependence on space parameters for diffusion, anomalous diffusion, and diffusion in disordered or fractal media. For transport in self-similar fractal structures, we obtain an expression for the source-target distance dependence of the MFPT that exhibits both the leading power-law behavior, depending on the Hausdorff and spectral dimension of the fractal, as well as small log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations that are a clear and definitive signal of the underlying fractal structure. We also present refined numerical results for the Sierpinski gasket that confirm this oscillatory behavior. PMID:23367911</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Akkermans, Eric; Benichou, Olivier; Dunne, Gerald V; Teplyaev, Alexander; Voituriez, Raphael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">118</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.classzone.com/books/earth_science/terc/content/visualizations/es3006/es3006page01.cfm?chapter_no=visualization"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observe</span> an animation of an asteroid impact at the end of the Cretaceous <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This Earth science animation shows middle and high school students how an asteroid that struck the Earth at the end of the Cretaceous <span class="hlt">period</span> may have caused a mass extinction that killed the dinosaurs. The introduction explains the basis of the asteroid theory of extinction. The animation depicts an artist's conception, presented from space, of an asteroid hitting the Gulf of Mexico and releasing a cloud that prevented sunlight from reaching the Earth. Movie controls allow students to repeat, pause, or step through the animation, which can give students more time to analyze the images. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Education, Terc. C.; Littell, Mcdougal</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">119</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.5827W"> <span id="translatedtitle">DEMETER ULF <span class="hlt">observations</span> of turbulence during the <span class="hlt">period</span> before large earthquakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the <span class="hlt">period</span> before a major earthquake, the electrical properties of the crust change as the stresses increase. These changes can generate perturbations in the electric and magnetic fields, generating waves which may propagate through the atmosphere, resulting in perturbations of the ionosphere. In this present paper, data from the DEMETER satellite is analysed to search for enhancements in ULF wave activity in the vicinity of earthquakes as a prelude to the seismic event. Results are presented for two seismic events, the Sichuan event in 2008 and l'Aquila 2009 which show enhancements in wave activity with frequencies f~0.05Hz during the build up to a major earthquake.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Walker, S. N.; Balikhin, M. A.; Pokhotelov, O. A.; Parrott, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">120</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUSM.G42A..06S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Short-<span class="hlt">period</span> Variations of the Earth Rotation Parameters <span class="hlt">Observed</span> by Very Long Baseline Interferometry</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High-frequency polar motion and universal time variations are obtained from Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). The goal is to detect short-<span class="hlt">period</span> and episodic events with signatures below the 100 microarcseconds (7.5 microseconds) level. Ter-diurnal variations in the order of 40 microarcseconds in polar motion have been reported during the VLBI campaign CONT02, from October 16 to 31, 2002. But, no geophysical explanation with similar amplitudes was provided. To resolve this enigma, we re-processed the VLBI data obtained during the CONT96, CONT02, and CONT05 campaigns using identical an the most recent reduction models. Two independent software packages were used, OCCAM61E and CALC SOLVE, to assure robustness of the Earth rotation parameters (ERP) estimated with semi-hourly resolution over the fortnightly data sets. The long wavelength signal was removed by a smooth function from the final ERP. Jumps in the ERP values at session boundaries were identified. A heuristic and Fourier frequency analysis shows no significant ter-diurnal <span class="hlt">periods</span>. In addition, this high-frequency analysis allows to detect incorrect daily ERP values in the International Earth Rotation and reference Systems (IERS) C04 series.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schuh, H.; Artz, T.; Nothnagel, A.; Mendes Cerveira, P. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">121</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5528743"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observation</span> of a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> pattern in the persistent-current fields of the superconducting HERA magnets</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The time dependence of persistent current multipoles in superconducting magnets is still unexplained. The decay is too large to be accounted for by flux creep and it does not show the expected dependence on temperature. Furthermore the decay is influenced by a preceding field sweep in the magnet, it becomes more pronounced if the magnet was previously excited to its maximum field. For a detailed study of the decay mechanism a special sensor has been developed which allows to record small sexupole components in superconducting dipole magnets. During an experimental study of the time dependence of a HERA dipole it was found that the sextupole field exhibits a sinusoidal structure along the axis of the magnet. A similar <span class="hlt">periodic</span> structure was found for the main dipole field with the help of a nuclear magnetic resonance probe. The wavelength of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> pattern is compatible with the transposition pitch of the Rutherford-type cable in the magnet coils. The structure was found to exist in all HERA dipoles measured afterwards and also in a superconducting coil without iron yoke. With a specially developed 2 cm long pickup coil it was found that all accessible multipole components in dipole and quadrupole magnets are modulated along their axis. 3 refs., 6 figs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brueck, H.; Gall, D.; Krzywinski, J.; Meinke, R.; Preissner, H. (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany, F.R.)); Halemeyer, M.; Schmueser, P.; Stolzenburg, C. (Hamburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). 2. Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik); Stiening, R. (Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (USA)); ter Avest, D.; van de Klundert, L.J.M. (Technische Hogeschool Twente, Enschede (Netherlands</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">122</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55666715"> <span id="translatedtitle">Breaking of Thunderstorm-Generated Gravity Waves as a Source of Short-<span class="hlt">Period</span> Ducted Waves <span class="hlt">Observed</span> at Mesopause Altitudes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atmospheric gravity waves with <span class="hlt">periods</span> of 5 to 8 minutes have been <span class="hlt">observed</span> at airglow altitudes [Taylor et al., GRL, 22, 2849, 1995; Walterscheid et al., JASTP, 61, 461, 1999; Hecht et al., JGR, 106, 5181, 2001; and references cited therein]. These waves are believed to propagate as thermally-ducted wave modes, trapped in the Brunt-Väisälä frequency minimum of the upper</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. B. Snively; V. P. Pasko</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">123</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4903431"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observation</span> of <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Fine Structure in Reflectance from Biological Tissue: A New Technique for Measuring Nuclear Size Distribution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report <span class="hlt">observation</span> of a fine structure component in backscattered light from mucosal tissue which is <span class="hlt">periodic</span> in wavelength. This structure is ordinarily masked by a diffusive background. We have identified the origin of this component as being due to light which is Mie scattered by surface epithelial cell nuclei. By analyzing the amplitude and frequency of the fine structure,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. T. Perelman; V. Backman; M. Wallace; G. Zonios; R. Manoharan; A. Nusrat; S. Shields; M. Seiler; C. Lima; T. Hamano; I. Itzkan; J. Van Dam; J. M. Crawford; M. S. Feld</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">124</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54589365"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observing</span> Evolution in the Supergranular Network Length Scale During <span class="hlt">Periods</span> of Low Solar Activity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the initial results of an <span class="hlt">observational</span> study into the variation of the dominant length scale of quiet solar emission: supergranulation. The distribution of magnetic elements in the lanes that from the network affects, and reflects, the radiative energy in the plasma of the upper solar chromosphere and transition region at the magnetic network boundaries forming as a result</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Scott W. McIntosh; Robert J. Leamon; Rachel A. Hock; Mark P. Rast; Roger K. Ulrich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">125</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50913582"> <span id="translatedtitle">An approach to <span class="hlt">observer</span>-based decentralized control under <span class="hlt">periodic</span> protocols</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper provides an approach to analyze and design decentralized <span class="hlt">observer</span>-based controllers for large-scale linear plants subject to network communication constraints and varying sampling intervals. Due to communication constraints, it is impossible to transmit all input and output data simultaneously over the communication network that connects sensors, actuators and controllers. A protocol orchestrates what data is sent over the network</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. W. Bauer; M. C. F. Donkers; W. P. M. H. Heemels; N. van de Wouw</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">126</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/671914"> <span id="translatedtitle">Daytime Raman lidar measurements of water vapor during the ARM 1997 water vapor intensive <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Because of the importance of water vapor, the ARM program initiated a series of three intensive operating <span class="hlt">periods</span> (IOPs) at its CART (Cloud And Radiation Testbed) site. The goal of these IOPs is to improve and validate the state-of-the-art capabilities in measuring water vapor. To date, two of the planned three IOPs have occurred: the first was in September of 1996, with an emphasis on the lowest kilometer, while the second was conducted from September--October 1997 with a focus on both the upper troposphere and lowest kilometer. These IOPs provided an excellent opportunity to compare measurements from other systems with those made by the CART Raman lidar. This paper addresses primarily the daytime water vapor measurements made by the lidar system during the second of these IOPs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Turner, D.D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Goldsmith, J.E.M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">127</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMSM21D..07F"> <span id="translatedtitle">CLUSTER <span class="hlt">observation</span> of polar electron precipitation above the polar caps during <span class="hlt">periods</span> of Northward IMF</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The CLUSTER spacecraft revealed the presence of successive current sheets of opposite polarity above the polar caps during <span class="hlt">periods</span> of northward or weak IMF. We first present the general electrodynamical context. At CLUSTER altitude (5-7 RE), the upward part of this current system consists of ion beams accelerated by quasi-static electric fields, associated with precipitating electrons. They are surrounded by low energy upflowing electron beams carrying a downward current. We then focus on the precipitating electrons above the polar cap which form acceleration structures at about 100 - 300 eV. This acceleration is interpreted as the effect of an electrostatic potential along magnetic field lines located above CLUSTER altitude, i.e. typically above 5-7 RE. We present statistics on the characteristics of these precipitating electron structures and we discuss the source regions and the mechanisms possibly at their origin.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fontaine, D.; Maggiolo, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">128</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900060410&hterms=piecewise&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3D%2522piecewise%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of symbolic <span class="hlt">observations</span> of piecewise smooth discrete-time systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A study is made of the behavior of discrete-time systems composed of a set of smooth transition maps coupled by a quantized feedback function. The feedback function partitions the state space into disjoint regions and assigns a smooth transition function to each region. The main result is that under a constraint on the norm of the derivative of the transition maps, a bounded state trajectory with limit points in the interior of the switching regions leads to a region index sequence that is eventually <span class="hlt">periodic</span>. Under these assumptions, it is shown that eventually the feedback function is determined by a finite state automaton. A similar result is proved in the case of finite state dynamic feedback.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ramadge, Peter J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">129</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFMAE51B..01P"> <span id="translatedtitle">African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) : The Special <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> of 2006</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The AMMA project aims at enhancing our understanding of the West African monsoon and its underlying physical, chemical and biological processes. This enhanced knowledge of the processes involved in the establishment and variability of the monsoon will be used to improve our capacity to predict it and evaluate the impacts on land-productivity, management of water resources and public health. The objective is to provide societies in Africa with improved tools to manage their dependence on environmental conditions. In the framework of AMMA a dense <span class="hlt">observational</span> network has been established both as routine and campaign- based facilities. The aim is to provide a complete picture of the physical, chemical and biological processes over the ocean, the continent and in the atmosphere. The base network has been established over the last few year and covers surface states and surface flux monitoring in a number catchments over the climatic gradient of the region. The upper-air sounding network was upgraded and enhanced to improve the data available for operational weather forecasting. During 2006 AMMA supported a large field campaign to cover the dry season (SOP0), the monsoon onset (SOP1) and the wet season (SOP2). The enhancement to the <span class="hlt">observing</span> system in 2006 included balloon borne instruments, a lightning network over northern Benin, 3 research vessels and 5 research aircraft stationed in the Niamey and Ouagadougou. Most of SOP2 <span class="hlt">observations</span> were dedicated to the intense mesoscale convective systems which are generated in the region and travel to the West. Their impact on the circulation in the troposphere and lower stratosphere, the water cycle in the region and the transport of trace gases and aerosols have been <span class="hlt">observed</span> at different stages of the life cycle of these systems. This talk will provide a overview of the AMMA project and the <span class="hlt">observations</span> carried out in 2006, focusing on the most relevant events.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Polcher, J.; Cairo, F.; Fierli, F.; Höller, H.; Law, K.; Mari, C.; Reeves, C.; Schlager, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">130</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUSMSM53A..07W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Space Technology 5 <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of Short-<span class="hlt">Period</span> ULF Waves: Temporal and Spatial Patterns</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The three microsatellites that comprise the Space Technology 5 (ST5) mission were launched into a dawn-dusk, 300 x 4500 km sun-synchronous orbit in a "pearls-on-a-string" configuration, with spacings ranging from >5000 km down to under 50 km. Fluxgate magnetometers on board each spacecraft collected vector magnetic field data from March 26 through June 30, 2006. In this study we present the first results of a survey of ULF waves in the Pc 1-2 frequency range, with a total of 105 events, recorded by these spacecraft. Waves in the middle magnetosphere (L from 4 to 7) were <span class="hlt">observed</span> to have a nearly uniform diurnal occurrence rate. At higher latitudes (L > 7) occurrence was maximum in the dawn-noon sector, consistent with stimulation by magnetospheric compressions. Only five wave events were <span class="hlt">observed</span> at L < 4. The temporal occurrence distribution roughly followed the occurrence of Pc 1-2 activity recorded at Halley, Antarctica (L = 4.5), in that the number and intensity of events was increased during magnetospheric compressions, during the recovery phase of magnetic storms, and during one extended interval of disturbed but only modestly negative Dst. Somewhat surprisingly, only eight events were <span class="hlt">observed</span> by all three spacecraft as they passed over similar L shells, and only 14 events, including two each on three days, were <span class="hlt">observed</span> by two spacecraft. Nearly all of these events occurred during storm recovery. We interpret the lack of more multi-spacecraft <span class="hlt">observations</span> as indicating the highly localized nature of regions in the magnetosphere that become unstable to electromagnetic ion cyclotron instabilities.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Westerman, A.; Otto, N.; Engebretson, M.; Slavin, J.; Le, G.; Strangeway, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">131</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15..475K"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of quasi-inertial and short-<span class="hlt">period</span> internal waves from stationary platform in the Black Sea</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is well known that the major factor of the generation of the intensive internal waves on the shelves of the oceans and open seas is barotropic tide. Despite of the Black sea is closed and free-tidal sea nevertheless there are exist quite intense internal wave field in here. The results of long-term <span class="hlt">observations</span> of long- and short-<span class="hlt">period</span> internal waves measured in the Black Sea are analyzed. These studies were carried out from the stationary platform of the Marine Hydrophysical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine in the summer 2010 and 2011. The platform is situated on the Southern coast of Crimea in 600 m from the shore, where sea depth is about 30 m. The measurements were taken by acoustic Doppler current profilometer (ADCP) "Rio Grande 600 kHz", thermistor chain of ten sensors "Star-Oddi" and oceanographic mini profiler «MiniSVP» with measuring parameters of sound velocity and temperature. We <span class="hlt">observed</span> the well-defined temporal thermocline oscillations with <span class="hlt">period</span> close to local inertial (17.2 hours) <span class="hlt">period</span>. At the same time the clockwise rotation of the vector of currents with the inertial <span class="hlt">period</span> was detected. During the expedition in 2011 the whole water column synchronous oscillations of the first-mode were <span class="hlt">observed</span> for the first 5 days, which than changed into the second-mode oscillations. <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of 2011 were for conditions when thermocline was in the middle of water column. <span class="hlt">Observed</span> oscillations of inertial waves in 2010 were for conditions of bottom thermocline. The amplitudes of thermocline oscillations were up to 10 -12 m. Also intense short-<span class="hlt">period</span> waves with <span class="hlt">period</span> from 2 to 20 minutes and heights from 1 to 6 m were registered. Several cases of second mode short-<span class="hlt">period</span> internal waves were <span class="hlt">observed</span>. Also several passages of solitary internal waves were noticed. The peaks of inertial and high-frequency oscillations were revealed by the spectral analysis of current data and temperature records. This work was partly supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Khymchenko, Ielizaveta; Serebryany, Andrey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">132</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27604284"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observing</span> Evolution in the Supergranular Length Scale During <span class="hlt">Periods</span> of Low Solar Activity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the initial results of an <span class="hlt">observational</span> study into the variation\\u000aof the dominant length-scale of quiet solar emission: supergranulation. This\\u000alength-scale reflects the radiative energy in the plasma of the upper solar\\u000achromosphere and transition region at the magnetic network boundaries forming\\u000aas a result of the relentless interaction of magnetic fields and convective\\u000amotions of the Sun's</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Scott W. McIntosh; Robert J. Leamon; Rachel A. Hock; Mark P. Rast; Roger K. Ulrich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">133</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...789..113B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tidally Distorted Exoplanets: Density Corrections for Short-<span class="hlt">period</span> Hot-Jupiters Based Solely on <span class="hlt">Observable</span> Parameters</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The close proximity of short-<span class="hlt">period</span> hot-Jupiters to their parent star means they are subject to extreme tidal forces. This has a profound effect on their structure and, as a result, density measurements that assume that the planet is spherical can be incorrect. We have simulated the tidally distorted surface for 34 known short-<span class="hlt">period</span> hot-Jupiters, assuming surfaces of constant gravitational equipotential for the planet, and the resulting densities have been calculated based only on <span class="hlt">observed</span> parameters of the exoplanet systems. Comparing these results to the density values, assuming the planets are spherical, shows that there is an appreciable change in the measured density for planets with very short <span class="hlt">periods</span> (typically less than two days). For one of the shortest-<span class="hlt">period</span> systems, WASP-19b, we determine a decrease in bulk density of 12% from the spherical case and, for the majority of systems in this study, this value is in the range of 1%-5%. On the other hand, we also find cases where the distortion is negligible (relative to the measurement errors on the planetary parameters) even in the cases of some very short <span class="hlt">period</span> systems, depending on the mass ratio and planetary radius. For high-density gas planets requiring apparently anomalously large core masses, density corrections due to tidal deformation could become important for the shortest-<span class="hlt">period</span> systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Burton, J. R.; Watson, C. A.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Pollacco, D.; Moulds, V.; Littlefair, S. P.; Wheatley, P. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">134</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMSM42C..04B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cassini <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of Saturn's Nightside UV Auroral Oval: In Situ Evidence of its <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Motion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In recent years we have benefitted greatly from the first in-orbit multi-wavelength images of Saturn's polar atmosphere from the Cassini spacecraft. Specifically, images obtained from the UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) on board the Cassini spacecraft provide an excellent view of the planet's auroral emissions, which in turn give an account of the large-scale magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and dynamics within the system. However, obtaining a simultaneous view of the auroral regions with measurements of the magnetic field and plasma populations at high-latitudes is more difficult to routinely achieve. Here we present an unusual example, during Revolution 99 in 2009, where UVIS images the entire northern UV auroral oval while Cassini traverses the magnetic flux tubes connecting to the auroral oval on the nightside sampling the related magnetic field and particle signatures present. We will discuss the relationship of the field-aligned currents (derived from the magnetic field), radio waves, and associated plasma electron and ion signatures to the properties of the auroral oval. The motion of the auroral oval evident in the UVIS images will be discussed in the context of the "planetary <span class="hlt">period</span> oscillations" and previous field-aligned current studies.Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Colorado/ESA/University of Liege/University of Leicester</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bunce, E. J.; Grodent, D. C.; Provan, G.; Jinks, S.; Cowley, S. W.; Andrews, D. J.; Arridge, C. S.; Badman, S. V.; Dougherty, M. K.; Kurth, W. S.; Mitchell, D. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">135</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AdSpR..43..573A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Jovian <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> (˜10 h, ˜40 min) on Ulysses’ Distant Jupiter Encounter <span class="hlt">observations</span> around the Halloween CIR events</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyzed data from four different instruments (HI-SCALE, URAP, SWOOPS, VHM/FGM) onboard Ulysses spacecraft (s/c) and we searched for possible evidence of Jovian emissions when the s/c approached Jupiter during the times of Halloween events (closest time approach/position to Jupiter: February 5, 2004/ R = 1683 R J, ? = ˜49°). In particular, we analyzed extensively the low energy ion measurements obtained by the HI-SCALE experiment in order to examine whether low energy ion/electron emissions show a symmetry, and whether they are <span class="hlt">observed</span> at north high latitudes upstream from the jovian bow shock, as is known to occur in the region upstream from the south bow shock as well ( Marhavilas et al., 2001). We studied the <span class="hlt">period</span> from October 2003 to March 2004, as Ulysses moved at distances 0.8-1.2 AU from the planet at north Jovicentric latitudes <75°, and we present here an example of characteristic Jovian <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in the measurements around a CIR <span class="hlt">observed</span> by Ulysses on days ˜348-349/2003 ( R = 1894 R J, ? = 72°). We show that Ulysses <span class="hlt">observed</span> low energy ion (˜0.055-4.7 MeV) and electron (>˜40 keV) flux and/or spectral modulation with the Jupiter rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> (˜10 h) as well as variations with the same <span class="hlt">period</span> in solar wind parameters, radio and magnetic field directional data. In addition, characteristic strong ˜40 min <span class="hlt">periodic</span> variations were found superimposed on the ˜10 h ion spectral modulation. Both the ˜10 h and ˜40 min ion <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in HI-SCALE measurements were present in several cases during the whole <span class="hlt">period</span> examined (October 2003 to March 2004) and were found to be more evident during some special conditions, for instance during enhanced fluxes around the start (forward shock) and the end (reverse shock) of CIRs. We infer that the Jovian magnetosphere was triggered by the impact of the CIRs, after the Halloween events, and it was (a) a principal source of forward and reverse shock-associated ion flux structures and (b) the cause of generation of ˜10 h quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> magnetic field and plasma modulation <span class="hlt">observed</span> by Ulysses at those times.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anagnostopoulos, G. C.; Louri, I.; Marhavilas, P.; Sarris, E. T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">136</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhLA..376.1295L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental <span class="hlt">observation</span> of chaotic phase synchronization of a <span class="hlt">periodically</span> pump-modulated multimode microchip Nd:YVO4 laser</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this Letter we demonstrate the experimental <span class="hlt">observation</span> of chaotic phase synchronization (CPS) in a <span class="hlt">periodically</span> pump-modulated multimode microchip Nd:YVO4 laser. PS transition is displayed via the stroboscopic technique. We apply the recurrence probability and correlation probability of recurrence to estimate the degree of PS. The degree of PS is studied taking into account the modulation amplitude and modulation frequency. We also propose an experimental compatible numerical simulation to reflect the fact that the Arnold tongues are experimentally and numerically exhibited in the <span class="hlt">periodically</span> pump-modulated multimode microchip Nd:YVO4 laser.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lin, Chien-Hui; Kuo, Chie-Tong; Hsu, Tzu-Fang; Jan, Hengtai; Han, Shiang-Yi; Ho, Ming-Chung; Jiang, I.-Min</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">137</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21560441"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">OBSERVING</span> EVOLUTION IN THE SUPERGRANULAR NETWORK LENGTH SCALE DURING <span class="hlt">PERIODS</span> OF LOW SOLAR ACTIVITY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the initial results of an <span class="hlt">observational</span> study into the variation of the dominant length scale of quiet solar emission: supergranulation. The distribution of magnetic elements in the lanes that from the network affects, and reflects, the radiative energy in the plasma of the upper solar chromosphere and transition region at the magnetic network boundaries forming as a result of the relentless interaction of magnetic fields and convective motions of the Suns' interior. We demonstrate that a net difference of {approx}0.5 Mm in the supergranular emission length scale occurs when comparing <span class="hlt">observation</span> cycle 22/23 and cycle 23/24 minima. This variation in scale is reproduced in the data sets of multiple space- and ground-based instruments and using different diagnostic measures. By means of extension, we consider the variation of the supergranular length scale over multiple solar minima by analyzing a subset of the Mount Wilson Solar Observatory Ca II K image record. The <span class="hlt">observations</span> and analysis presented provide a tantalizing look at solar activity in the absence of large-scale flux emergence, offering insight into times of 'extreme' solar minimum and general behavior such as the phasing and cross-dependence of different components of the spectral irradiance. Given that the modulation of the supergranular scale imprints itself in variations of the Suns' spectral irradiance, as well as in the mass and energy transport into the entire outer atmosphere, this preliminary investigation is an important step in understanding the impact of the quiet Sun on the heliospheric system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McIntosh, Scott W.; Rast, Mark P. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Leamon, Robert J. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Hock, Rachel A. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Ulrich, Roger K. [Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-03-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">138</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1030530"> <span id="translatedtitle">Suzaku And Multi-Wavelength <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of OJ 287 During the <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Optical Outburst in 2007</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Suzaku <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the blazar OJ 287 were performed in 2007 April 10-13 and November 7-9. They correspond to a quiescent and a flaring state, respectively. The X-ray spectra of the source can be well described with single power-law models in both exposures. The derived X-ray photon index and the flux density at 1 keV were found to be {Lambda} = 1.65 {+-} 0.02 and S{sub 1keV} = 215 {+-} 5 nJy, in the quiescent state. In the flaring state, the source exhibited a harder X-ray spectrum ({Lambda} = 1.50 {+-} 0.01) with a nearly doubled X-ray flux density S{sub 1keV} = 404{sub -5}{sup +6} nJy. Moreover, significant hard X-ray signals were detected up to {approx} 27 keV. In cooperation with the Suzaku, simultaneous radio, optical, and very-high-energy {gamma}-ray <span class="hlt">observations</span> of OJ 287 were performed with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array, the KANATA telescope, and the MAGIC telescope, respectively. The radio and optical fluxes in the flaring state (3.04 {+-} 0.46 Jy and 8.93 {+-} 0.05 mJy at 86.75 Hz and in the V-band, respectively) were found to be higher by a factor of 2-3 than those in the quiescent state (1.73 {+-} 0.26 Jy and 3.03 {+-} 0.01 mJy at 86.75 Hz and in the V-band, respectively). No notable {gamma}-ray events were detected in either <span class="hlt">observation</span>. The spectral energy distribution of OJ 287 indicated that the X-ray spectrum was dominated by inverse Compton radiation in both <span class="hlt">observations</span>, while synchrotron radiation exhibited a spectral cutoff around the optical frequency. Furthermore, no significant difference in the synchrotron cutoff frequency was found between the quiescent and flaring states. According to a simple synchrotron self-Compton model, the change of the spectral energy distribution is due to an increase in the energy density of electrons with small changes of both the magnetic field strength and the maximum Lorentz factor of electrons.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Seta, Hiromi; /Saitama U.; Isobe, N.; /Kyoto U.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; /Saitama U.; Yaji, Yuichi; /Saitama U.; Arai, Akira; /Hiroshima U.; Fukuhara, Masayuki; /Tokyo U. /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Kohno, Kotaro; /Tokyo U.; Nakanishi, Koichiro; /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Sasada, Mahito; /Hiroshima U.; Shimajiri, Yoshito; /Tokyo U. /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Tosaki, Tomoka; /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Uemura, Makoto; /Hiroshima U.; Anderhub, Hans; /Zurich, ETH; Antonelli, L.A.; /INFN, Rome; Antoranz, Pedro; /Madrid U.; Backes, Michael; /Dortmund U.; Baixeras, Carmen; /Barcelona, Autonoma U.; Balestra, Silvia; /Madrid U.; Barrio, Juan Abel; /Madrid U.; Bastieri, Denis; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua; Becerra Gonzalez, Josefa; /IAC, La Laguna /Dortmund U. /Lodz U. /Lodz U. /DESY /Zurich, ETH /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Barcelona, IEEC /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Madrid U. /Zurich, ETH /Wurzburg U. /Zurich, ETH /Madrid U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Zurich, ETH /Madrid U. /Barcelona, IFAE /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /INFN, Rome /Dortmund U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Barcelona, IEEC /Madrid U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /IAC, La Laguna /Madrid, CIEMAT /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Zurich, ETH /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Wurzburg U. /Barcelona, IFAE /UC, Davis /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Madrid U. /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /Barcelona, IFAE /IAC, La Laguna /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /SLAC /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /Zurich, ETH /Wurzburg U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Zurich, ETH /INFN, Rome /UC, Davis /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Turku U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Zurich, ETH /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /DESY /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Wurzburg U. /INFN, Rome /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Wurzburg U. /Madrid U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Barcelona, IFAE /Madrid U. /Turku U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /UC, Santa Cruz /Madrid U. /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Barcelona, IEEC /Turku U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Zurich, ETH /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /INFN, Trieste /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Dortmund U. /Barcelona, IEEC /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IFAE /Zurich, ETH /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Wurzburg U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /INFN, Rome /Sierra Nevada Observ. /DESY /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IEEC /Turku U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Lodz U. /Lodz U. /Wurzburg U. /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Zurich, ETH /Turku U. /INFN, Rome /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Barcelona, IFAE /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /DESY /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IEEC /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, Autonoma U.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">139</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5496693"> <span id="translatedtitle">Plasma-wave <span class="hlt">observations</span> at Uranus from Voyager 2. Progress report for <span class="hlt">period</span> ending February 1986</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Radio emissions from Uranus were detected by the Voyager 2 plasma-wave instrument about 5 days before closest approach at frequencies of 31.1 and 56.2 khz. The bow shock was identified by an abrupt broadband burst of electrostatic turbulence about 10 hours before closest approach at a radial distance of 23.5 ru. Once inside of the magnetosphere, strong whistler mode hiss and chorus emissions were <span class="hlt">observed</span> at radial distances less than about 8 R/sub u/, in the same region where the energetic-particle instruments detected intense fluxes of energetic electrons. A variety of other plasma waves, such as (f sub c) electron-cyclotron waves, were also <span class="hlt">observed</span> in this same region. At the ring plane crossing, the plasma wave instrument detected a large number of impulsive events that are interpreted as impacts of micron-sized dust particles on the spacecraft. The maximum impact rate was about 20 to 30 impacts/sec, and the north-south thickness of the impact region was about 4000 km. This paper presents an overview of the principal results from the plasma-wave instrument, starting with the first detection of radio emissions from Uranus, and ending a few days after closest approach.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gurnett, D.A.; Kurth, W.S.; Scarf, F.L.; Poynter, R.L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-03-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">140</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1035089"> <span id="translatedtitle">Incidence of cancer among ferrochromium and ferrosilicon workers: an extended <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results are presented of a cohort study on the incidence of cancers and crude death rates in ferrochromium and ferrosilicon workers. The whole cohort was <span class="hlt">observed</span> from 1 January 1953 to 31 December 1985. Two sets of results are presented; one restricted to workers first employed before 1960 and one to workers first employed before 1965. The latter cohort consists of 1235 workers. The total mortality in the whole cohort was low (SMR = 81) as was the overall incidence of cancers (SIR = 84). There was an overall deficit of deaths and cases of cancer in the ferrosilicon group. An excess of lung cancer (SIR = 154) and cancer of the prostate (SIR = 151) was <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the ferrochromium workers employed before 1965. Cancer of the kidney was also in excess (SIR = 273) in the ferrochromium group, with a mean "latency time" of 39 years. Two cases of malignant melanomas had occurred versus 0.19 expected in a small subgroup of workers in electrical shops and an electric power station.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Langard, S; Andersen, A; Ravnestad, J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" 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onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">141</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/671917"> <span id="translatedtitle">Water vapor measurements by Raman lidar during the ARM 1997 water vapor intensive <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, as it is the most active infrared absorber and emitter of radiation, and it also plays an important role in energy transport and cloud formation. Accurate, high resolution measurements of this variable are critical in order to improve the understanding of these processes and thus their ability to model them. Because of the importance of water vapor, the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program initiated a series of three intensive operating <span class="hlt">periods</span> (IOPs) at its Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in northern Oklahoma. The goal of these IOPs is to improve and validate the state-of-the-art capabilities in measuring water vapor. To date, two of the planned three IOPs have occurred: the first was in September of 1996, with an emphasis on the lowest kilometer, while the second was conducted from September--October 1997 with a focus on both the upper troposphere and lowest kilometer. The ARM CART site is the home of several different water vapor measurement systems. These systems include a Raman lidar, a microwave radiometer, a radiosonde launch site, and an instrumented tower. During these IOPs, additional instrumentation was brought to the site to augment the normal measurements in the attempt to characterize the CART instruments and to address the need to improve water vapor measurement capabilities. Some of the instruments brought to the CART site include a scanning Raman lidar system from NASA/GSFC, additional microwave radiometers from NOAA/ETL, a chilled mirror that was flown on a tethersonde and kite system, and dewpoint hygrometer instruments flow on the North Dakota Citation. This paper will focus on the Raman lidar intercomparisons from the second IOP.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Turner, D.D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Whiteman, D.N.; Schwemmer, G.K. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center; Evans, K.D. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center; Melfi, S.H. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States); Goldsmith, J.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">142</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AGUFMSA51A0498S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Breaking of Thunderstorm-Generated Gravity Waves as a Source of Short-<span class="hlt">Period</span> Ducted Waves <span class="hlt">Observed</span> at Mesopause Altitudes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atmospheric gravity waves with <span class="hlt">periods</span> of 5 to 8 minutes have been <span class="hlt">observed</span> at airglow altitudes [Taylor et al., GRL, 22, 2849, 1995; Walterscheid et al., JASTP, 61, 461, 1999; Hecht et al., JGR, 106, 5181, 2001; and references cited therein]. These waves are believed to propagate as thermally-ducted wave modes, trapped in the Brunt-Väisälä frequency minimum of the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere [e.g., Walterscheid et al., 1999]. Many of these recently <span class="hlt">observed</span> waves have been traced to thunderstorm activity located hundreds of kilometers from the point of <span class="hlt">observation</span>. However, these gravity waves would be evanescent in most regions of atmosphere, where their frequency exceeds the local Brunt-Väisälä frequency. It is therefore improbable that the <span class="hlt">observed</span> waves with short <span class="hlt">periods</span> (? ˜=5 min) would be able to propagate freely from a tropospheric convective source to the lower thermosphere. Thunderstorms are known radiators of gravity waves, with typical forcing <span class="hlt">periods</span> of 10 to 16 minutes (approximately equal to the Brunt-Väisälä <span class="hlt">period</span> of the upper troposphere) [e.g., Pierce and Coroniti, Nature, 210(5042), 1209, 1966]. Recent numerical studies have demonstrated that the breaking of low frequency gravity waves can excite harmonic secondary waves, with frequencies and horizontal wavenumbers approximately twice that of the primary waves [e.g., Franke and Robinson, J. Atmos. Sci., 56, 3010, 1999, Zhou et al., JGR, 107(D7), doi:10.1029/2001JD001204, 2002]. It has also been proposed that these radiated secondary waves may be subject to ducting near the breaking region [Vadas et al., J. Atmos. Sci., 60, 194, 2003]. It can thus be predicted that if thunderstorm-generated gravity waves, with <span class="hlt">periods</span> of 10 to 16 minutes, were to break near mesopause, they may excite secondary waves with short <span class="hlt">periods</span> of 5 to 8 minutes. These waves would be trapped in the lower thermospheric duct. Using a high-resolution, two-dimensional, nonlinear numerical model, we examine this process in a thermally-realistic atmosphere for a tropospheric oscillatory source modeling the effects of convection. Simulated results demonstrate that breaking thunderstorm-generated gravity waves may be able to excite quasi-monochromatic, short-<span class="hlt">period</span>, thermally ducted wave modes at airglow altitudes. These results will be compared with linear mechanisms (such as ``kissing" modes [e.g., Walterscheid et al. JGR, 106, 31825, 2001]); the applicability and limitations of the different mechanisms will be discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Snively, J. B.; Pasko, V. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">143</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...788...32W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> Variations in X-Ray Emission and Long-term Radio <span class="hlt">Observations</span>: Evidence for a Two-component Jet in Sw J1644+57</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The continued <span class="hlt">observations</span> of Sw J1644+57 in X-ray and radio bands accumulated a rich data set to study the relativistic jet launched in this tidal disruption event. The X-ray light curve of Sw J1644+57 from 5-30 days presents two kinds of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> variations: a 200 s quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillation (QPO) and a 2.7 day quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> variation. The latter has been interpreted by a precessing jet launched near the Bardeen-Petterson radius of a warped disk. Here we <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the ~200 s QPO could be associated with a second, narrower jet sweeping the <span class="hlt">observer</span> line-of-sight <span class="hlt">periodically</span>, which is launched from a spinning black hole in the misaligned direction with respect to the black hole's angular momentum. In addition, we show that this two-component jet model can interpret the radio light curve of the event, especially the re-brightening feature starting ~100 days after the trigger. From the data we infer that inner jet may have a Lorentz factor of ?j ~ 5.5 and a kinetic energy of E k, iso ~ 3.0 × 1052 erg, while the outer jet may have a Lorentz factor of ?j ~ 2.5 and a kinetic energy of E k, iso ~ 3.0 × 1053 erg.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, Jiu-Zhou; Lei, Wei-Hua; Wang, Ding-Xiong; Zou, Yuan-Chuan; Zhang, Bing; Gao, He; Huang, Chang-Yin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">144</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JGRB..11610303M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interference of long-<span class="hlt">period</span> seismic wavefield <span class="hlt">observed</span> by the dense Hi-net array in Japan</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In order to recover small signals of long-<span class="hlt">period</span> ground motions recorded by a short-<span class="hlt">period</span> seismometer, we designed a time domain recursive filter that simulates seismic waves recorded with broadband seismometers. We applied the time domain filter to seismograms recorded by the dense Hi-net array, which consists of 800 stations at intervals of approximately 20 km. The effectiveness of the time domain filter is demonstrated through the comparison of broadband waveforms obtained by the filter and STS-2 true broadband seismograms from the F-net at the same site. Good agreement is <span class="hlt">observed</span> between filtered and true broadband waveforms with high correlation coefficients for <span class="hlt">periods</span> of up to 100 s for waveforms from the 2007 Sumatra earthquake (M7.9), which occurred approximately 5000-5800 km away from Japan. The applicability of the time domain filter to the recovery of long-<span class="hlt">period</span> signals from the record of a short-<span class="hlt">period</span> seismometer depends on the signal-to-noise ratio. As a result, a limited bandwidth of broadband signal is recovered for smaller earthquake. From the spatiotemporal variation of the long-<span class="hlt">period</span> (T = 20-100 s) wavefield obtained by the time domain filter, we newly found an anomalous phase pattern of splitting of polarity along the wavefront, particularly for the relatively short <span class="hlt">period</span> band of from 20-50 s. Array analysis of the dense broadband waveforms revealed multipathing of the Rayleigh waves, which propagated toward central Japan from two directions with slightly different slowness vectors. The interference of two Rayleigh waves caused such splitting of wavefield.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maeda, Takuto; Obara, Kazushige; Furumura, Takashi; Saito, Tatsuhiko</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">145</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/43129359"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Period</span> differences between X-ray and very high energy gamma-ray <span class="hlt">observations</span> of accreting X-ray pulsars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Very high energy pulsed gamma-rays have been reported from several accreting X-ray binaries. A model is considered here which gives efficient gamma-ray production in 1000-second bursts and <span class="hlt">period</span> differences of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> magnitude. The key feature is acceleration of ultrahigh energy particles through the inner accretion disk in which there is radial flow toward the star as well as Keplerian</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. S. Cheng; Malvin Ruderman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">146</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27692196"> <span id="translatedtitle">XMM-Newton <span class="hlt">observation</span> of the long-<span class="hlt">period</span> polar V1309 Ori: The case for pure blobby accretion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using XMM-Newton we have obtained the first X-ray <span class="hlt">observation</span> covering a\\u000acomplete orbit of the longest <span class="hlt">period</span> polar, V1309 Ori. The X-ray light curve is\\u000adominated by a short, bright phase interval with EPIC pn count rates reaching\\u000aup to 15 cts\\/sec per 30 sec resolution bin. The bright phase emission is well\\u000adescribed by a single blackbody component with</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Schwarz; K. Reinsch; K. Beuermann; V. Burwitz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">147</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42157343"> <span id="translatedtitle">XMM-Newton <span class="hlt">observation</span> of the long-<span class="hlt">period</span> polar V1309 Orionis: the case for pure blobby accretion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using XMM-Newton we have obtained the first continuous X-ray <span class="hlt">observation</span> covering a complete orbit of the longest <span class="hlt">period</span> polar, V1309 Ori. The X-ray light curve is dominated by a short, bright phase interval with EPIC pn count rates reaching up to 15 cts s-1 per 30 s resolution bin. The bright phase emission is well described by a single blackbody</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Schwarz; K. Reinsch; K. Beuermann; V. Burwitz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">148</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48904028"> <span id="translatedtitle">Overview of the Dust and Biomass-burning Experiment and African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis Special <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span>0</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) is a major international campaign investigating far-reaching aspects of the African monsoon, climate and the hydrological cycle. A special <span class="hlt">observing</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> was established for the dry season (SOP0) with a focus on aerosol and radiation measurements. SOP0 took place during January and February 2006 and involved several ground-based measurement sites across west Africa. These</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. M. Haywood; J. Pelon; P. Formenti; N. Bharmal; M. Brooks; G. Capes; P. Chazette; C. Chou; S. Christopher; H. Coe; J. Cuesta; Y. Derimian; K. Desboeufs; G. Greed; M. Harrison; B. Heese; E. J. Highwood; B. Johnson; M. Mallet; B. Marticorena; J. Marsham; S. Milton; G. Myhre; S. R. Osborne; D. J. Parker; J.-L. Rajot; M. Schulz; A. Slingo; D. Tanré; P. Tulet</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">149</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SCPMA..53...54L"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observation</span> of modulated spontaneous emission of Rhodamine 6G in low refractive index contrast 1D-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> gelatin film</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The modulation of the spontaneous emission of Rhodamine 6G has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in one-dimensional <span class="hlt">periodic</span> dielectric structure of dichromated gelatin film with refractive index contrast as low as 0.01. The spontaneous emission is enhanced at the band edges and inhibits in the band gap, which agree well with the theoretical analysis on the redistribution of the fractional local density of optical states.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Wei; Zhang, Xinzheng; Wang, Zhenhua; Wu, Qiang; Liu, Longchang; Xu, Jingjun; Tang, Baiquan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">150</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ACP....12.4723M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aerosol chemical composition at Cabauw, The Netherlands as <span class="hlt">observed</span> in two intensive <span class="hlt">periods</span> in May 2008 and March 2009</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of aerosol chemical composition in Cabauw, the Netherlands, are presented for two intensive measurement <span class="hlt">periods</span> in May 2008 and March 2009. Sub-micron aerosol chemical composition was measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and is compared to <span class="hlt">observations</span> from aerosol size distribution measurements as well as composition measurements with a Monitor for AeRosol and GAses (MARGA) based instrument and a Thermal-Desorption Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass-Spectrometer (TD-PTR-MS). An overview of the data is presented and the data quality is discussed. In May 2008 enhanced pollution was <span class="hlt">observed</span> with organics contributing 40% to the PM1 mass. In contrast the <span class="hlt">observed</span> average mass loading was lower in March 2009 and a dominance of ammonium nitrate (42%) was <span class="hlt">observed</span>. The semi-volatile nature of ammonium nitrate is evident in the diurnal cycles with maximum concentrations <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the morning hours in May 2008 and little diurnal variation <span class="hlt">observed</span> in March 2009. Size dependent composition data from AMS measurements are presented and show a dominance of organics in the size range below 200 nm. A higher O:C ratio of the organics is <span class="hlt">observed</span> for May 2008 than for March 2009. Together with the time series of individual tracer ions this shows the dominance of OOA over HOA in May 2008.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mensah, A. A.; Holzinger, R.; Otjes, R.; Trimborn, A.; Mentel, Th. F.; ten Brink, H.; Henzing, B.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">151</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870032207&hterms=uma&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3D%2522uma%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">X-ray and optical <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the ultrashort <span class="hlt">period</span> dwarf nova SW Ursae Majoris - A likely new DQ Herculis star</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Time-resolved X-ray and optical photometric and optical spectroscopic <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the ultrashort <span class="hlt">period</span> cataclysmic variable SW UMa are reported. The spectroscopic <span class="hlt">observations</span> reveal the presence of an s-wave component which is almost in phase with the extreme line wings and presumably the white dwarf. This very unusual phasing in conjunction with the available optical and X-ray data seems to indicate that a region of enhanced emission exists on the opposite side of the disk from the expected location of the hot spot. The photometric <span class="hlt">observations</span> reveal the presence of a hump in the light curve occurring at an orbital phase which is consistent with the phase at which the region of enhanced line emission is most favorably seen. Changes in the hump amplitude are seen from night to night, and a 15.9 min <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> is evident in the light curve. The optical and X-ray <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that SW UMa is a member of the DQ Her class of cataclysmic variables.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shafter, A. W.; Szkody, P.; Thorstensen, J. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">152</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JGRB..118.6311B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Change of apparent segmentation of the San Andreas fault around Parkfield from space geodetic <span class="hlt">observations</span> across multiple <span class="hlt">periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sequences of earthquakes are commonly represented as a succession of <span class="hlt">periods</span> of interseismic stress accumulation followed by coseismic and postseismic phases of stress release. Because the recurrence time of large earthquakes is often greater than the available span of space geodetic data, it has been challenging to monitor the evolution of interseismic loading in its entire duration. Here we analyze large data sets of surface deformation at different key episodes around the Cholame, Parkfield and creeping segments of the San Andreas Fault that show evidence of significant deceleration of fault slip during the interseismic <span class="hlt">period</span>. We compare the average fault slip rates before and after the 2004 Mw6 Parkfield earthquake, in the 1986-2004 and 2006-2012 <span class="hlt">periods</span>, respectively, avoiding 2 years of postseismic deformation after 2004. Using a combination of GPS data from the Plate Boundary Observatory, the Southern California Earthquake Center Crustal Motion Map and the Bay Area Velocity Unification networks and interferometric synthetic aperture radar from the Advanced Land <span class="hlt">Observing</span> Satellite (ALOS) and Envisat satellites, we show that the area of coupling at the transition between the Parkfield and Cholame segments appears larger later in the interseismic <span class="hlt">period</span> than it does earlier on. While strong plate coupling is uniform across the Parkfield and Cholame segments in the 1986-2004 <span class="hlt">period</span>, creep occurs south of the 2004 epicenter after 2006, making segmentation of the San Andreas Fault south of Parkfield more clearly apparent. These <span class="hlt">observations</span> indicate that analyses of surface deformation late in the earthquake cycle may overestimate the area of plate coupling. A fault surface creeping much below plate rate may in some case be a region that does not promote earthquake nucleation but rather just be at a slower stage of its evolution. Our analysis also shows signs of large variation of slip velocity above and below plate rate in the creeping segment indicating that cycles of weakening and hardening can also be at play in dominantly aseismic areas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barbot, Sylvain; Agram, Piyush; De Michele, Marcello</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">153</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987P%26SS...35..785H"> <span id="translatedtitle">A simultaneous <span class="hlt">observation</span> of large-scale <span class="hlt">periodic</span> TIDs in both hemispheres following an onset of auroral disturbances</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An analysis of midatlantic ionograms obtained in 1979 <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that rapid onsets in auroral precipitation at the time of commencements of the intense geomagnetic substorms in the northern and southern auroral zones can be associated with a simultaneous launching of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> large-scale (LS) TIDs, propagating equatorwards in both hemispheres. Data indicate that <span class="hlt">periodic</span> LS TIDs probably produce a constructive interference effect at the points of their encounter near the equator, and that LS TID sources in both hemispheres were elongated along the L-shell with an L-value of 4-5 and a longitudinal extent greater than 60 deg. Source locations were consistent with the positions of the belts of energetic particle precipitations, and the large quasi-linear extent of the source is shown to be consistent with the wide horizontal wavefronts of LS TIDs and with their large propagation distance.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hajkowicz, L. A.; Hunsucker, R. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">154</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AAS...22332308C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Superorbital <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Modulation in Wind-Accretion High-Mass X-ray Binaries from Swift BAT <span class="hlt">Observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the discovery using data from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) of superorbital modulation in the wind-accretion supergiant high-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1909+07 (= X 1908+075), IGR J16418-4532, and IGR J16479-4514. Together with already known superorbital <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in 2S 0114+650 and IGR J16493-4348, the systems exhibit a monotonic relationship between superorbital and orbital <span class="hlt">periods</span>. These systems include both supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) and classical supergiant systems, and have a range of inclination angles. This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> an underlying physical mechanism which is connected to the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span>. In addition to these sources with clear detections of superorbital <span class="hlt">periods</span>, IGR J16393-4643 (= AX J16390.4-4642) is identified as a system that may have superorbital modulation due to the coincidence of low-amplitude peaks in power spectra derived from BAT, RXTE PCA, and INTEGRAL light curves. 1E 1145.1-6141 may also be worthy of further attention due to the amount of low-frequency modulation of its light curve. However, we find that the presence of superorbital modulation is not a universal feature of wind-accretion supergiant X-ray binaries. Two <span class="hlt">suggested</span> mechanisms to drive superorbital modulation are pulsations in the primary star and a 3 body system. However, both of these models appear to have problems and detailed multiwavelength data over a superorbital cycle are required to investigate the cause(s) of the modulation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Corbet, Robin H.; Krimm, H. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">155</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ACPD...1127661M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aerosol chemical composition at Cabauw, the Netherlands as <span class="hlt">observed</span> in two intensive <span class="hlt">periods</span> in May 2008 and March 2009</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of aerosol chemical composition in Cabauw, the Netherlands, are presented for two intensive measurement <span class="hlt">periods</span> in May 2008 and March 2009. Sub-micron aerosol chemical composition was measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and is compared to <span class="hlt">observations</span> from aerosol size distribution measurements as well as composition measurements with a Monitor for AeRosol and GAses (MARGA) based instrument and a Thermal-desorption Proton-transfer-reaction Mass-spectrometer (TD-PTR-MS). An overview of the data is presented and the data quality is discussed. In May 2008 enhanced pollution was <span class="hlt">observed</span> with organics contributing 40% to the PM1 mass. In contrast the <span class="hlt">observed</span> average mass loading was lower in March 2009 and a dominance of ammonium nitrate (42%) was <span class="hlt">observed</span>. The semi-volatile nature of ammonium nitrate is evidenced in the diurnal cycles with maximum concentrations <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the morning hours in May 2008 and little diurnal variation <span class="hlt">observed</span> in March 2009. Size dependent composition data from AMS measurements are presented and show a dominance of organics in the size range below 200 nm.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mensah, A. A.; Holzinger, R.; Otjes, R.; Trimborn, A.; Mentel, T. F.; ten Brink, H.; Henzing, B.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">156</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17948742"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of Ovaprim doses and latency <span class="hlt">periods</span> on induced spawning of Clarias batrachus: <span class="hlt">observation</span> on larval deformity.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Induced spawning of C. batrachus was conducted at different Ovaprim dose and latency <span class="hlt">period</span> combinations to <span class="hlt">observe</span> the deformed larvae among the hatchlings. For the purpose, four doses of Ovaprim (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 ml/kg body weight) and five latency <span class="hlt">periods</span> (11, 14, 17, 20 and 23 hr) were considered in 20 different combinations. There were no deformed larvae in the females injected with all four doses and stripped at 11 hr latency, as the eggs did not hatch. The percentage of deformed larvae (4-7%) did not vary significantly at 1.0-2.0 ml dose level in combination with 14-17 hr latency <span class="hlt">periods</span>. While increasing the latency <span class="hlt">period</span> beyond 17 hr at 1-1.5 ml dose level, the percentage of deformed larvae increased significantly and touched as high as 11%. The results indicated that 1-1.5 ml dose in combination with 14-17 hr latency are suitable to reduce the deformed larvae among the hatchlings during induced spawning of C. batrachus. PMID:17948742</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sahoo, S K; Giri, S S; Chandra, S; Sahu, A K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">157</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.G21B0760P"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> signals are <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the GRACE SMB time series over Greenland and Antarctica by the IMF analysis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets are vulnerable to ongoing climate change. The Gravity Recovery and Climate experiment (GRACE) satellite mission allows for the estimation of ice mass variations at a near monthly timescales. Changes in Stokes coefficients from month to month allow computation of maps of spatial SMB variations. The limited range of Stokes coefficients (typically to degree of order 60) fundamentally limits spatial resolution. Furthermore, noise contamination generally increases with increasing degree and order. As the time <span class="hlt">period</span> of GRACE <span class="hlt">observations</span> is short, natural <span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations influence the calculation of the long-term trends. The GRACE monthly SMB over Antarctica and Greenland are used to investigate the dominant oscillations such as semi-annual oscillation (SAO), annual oscillation (AO), Quasi-biennial Oscillation (QBO), El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and 11-year solar cycle using novel method called empirical mode decomposition (EMD). The EMD is an interesting approach to decompose signals into locally <span class="hlt">periodic</span> components, the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), and will easily identify the embedded structures, even those with small amplitudes. Our analysis will help identify the prevailing <span class="hlt">periodic</span> mass signals in the Greenland and Antarctica regions and help constrain the long-term trends.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pangaluru, K.; Velicogna, I.; Sutterley, T. C.; van den Broeke, M. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">158</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JGRD..113.0C18P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microlidar <span class="hlt">observations</span> of biomass burning aerosol over Djougou (Benin) during African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> 0: Dust and Biomass-Burning Experiment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Microlidar <span class="hlt">observations</span> have been performed at the Djougou-Nangatchori site in northern Benin during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> 0 in the dry season, combined with the Dust and Biomass-Burning Experiment (DABEX) from mid-January to mid-February 2006. During the dry season, the Djougou area is a region where biomass burning aerosols are heavily produced from agriculture fires. The aerosol vertical distribution is also controlled by dynamics, and the penetration of the winter monsoon flux to the north and northern winds bringing mineral dust to the South leads to a frontal discontinuity location close to Djougou latitude. During the early dry season, the aerosol vertical distribution was <span class="hlt">observed</span> to be structured in two layers, the lower being the boundary layer reaching altitudes up to 2 km and the upper one corresponding to the trade wind layer extending up to 5 km. Lidar data are used to retrieve the time evolution and vertical profile of extinction and discuss transport processes during the <span class="hlt">period</span> analyzed. As the monsoon flux during the dry season is steadily progressing to the north but also moving back and forth according to shorter timescale forcings, biomass burning particles are transported from the boundary layer into the upper troposphere. This transport has a strong impact on the distribution of aerosol particles on the vertical, and extinction values larger than 0.3 km-1 have been retrieved at altitudes close to 3 km. A particular event of biomass burning air mass outbreak associated with a synoptic forcing is studied, where satellite <span class="hlt">observations</span> are used to discuss <span class="hlt">observations</span> of biomass burning particles over Djougou and at the regional scale.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pelon, J.; Mallet, M.; Mariscal, A.; Goloub, P.; Tanré, D.; Bou Karam, D.; Flamant, C.; Haywood, J.; Pospichal, B.; Victori, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">159</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JGRD..114.3107R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radar-<span class="hlt">observed</span> squall line propagation and the diurnal cycle of convection in Niamey, Niger, during the 2006 African Monsoon and Multidisciplinary Analyses Intensive <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Surface radar <span class="hlt">observations</span> near Niamey, Niger, during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) campaign in 2006 documented the structure, motion, and precipitation of cloud systems during the monsoon season. These unique <span class="hlt">observations</span> for that part of the Sahel were combined with satellite rain estimates and infrared satellite imagery to study the diurnal cycle of rainfall in Niamey, Niger. This study confirms the bimodal structure of the diurnal rainfall cycle in Niamey during AMMA, seen by previous studies of West African rainfall. Radar analysis of squall line mesoscale convective systems (SLMCS) and non-MCS isolated convection clearly demonstrated that the nocturnal maximum was associated with the <span class="hlt">observed</span> arrival time of westward propagating SLMCS. Satellite imagery <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that these SLMCS formed in elevated terrain to the east of Niamey the prior afternoon. Radar <span class="hlt">observations</span> showed that local isolated convection produced the smaller afternoon maximum. Early in the monsoon season, locally generated convection produced an afternoon diurnal rainfall maximum that was delayed by several hours compared to midseason when African easterly wave (AEW) activity was much greater. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the <span class="hlt">observed</span> greater mean convective inhibition early in the season, perhaps tied to the absence of large-scale forcing from AEW, played a role in the delayed initiation time.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rickenbach, Thomas; Nieto Ferreira, Rosana; Guy, Nick; Williams, Earle</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">160</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006JGRD..111.5S06R"> <span id="translatedtitle">A comparison of aerosol optical properties obtained from in situ measurements and retrieved from Sun and sky radiance <span class="hlt">observations</span> during the May 2003 ARM Aerosol Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aerosol single scattering albedo and phase function were retrieved from Cimel Sun photometer <span class="hlt">observations</span> of sky radiance during the May 2003 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerosol Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span>. Single scattering albedo and backscattered fraction were compared to data obtained from the ARM program In situ Aerosol Profile (IAP) flights and a similar airborne experiment conducted by the University of Washington. The retrieved single scattering albedo was within about 0.05 of the in situ measurements for many of the considered cases, though much larger deviations were also seen. The retrieved aerosol properties were also used to compute the ratio of diffuse and direct irradiance at the surface, which was compared to the same ratio measured by a Multi Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer. The radiation model included correction factors to account for the effect of the instrument cosine response on both the direct and diffuse irradiance components. These comparisons showed very good agreement for most of the cases considered.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ricchiazzi, Paul; Gautier, Catherine; Ogren, John A.; Schmid, Beat</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">161</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22224072"> <span id="translatedtitle">SWIFT <span class="hlt">OBSERVATIONS</span> OF THE HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARY IGR J16283-4838 UNVEIL A 288 DAY ORBITAL <span class="hlt">PERIOD</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on the temporal and spectral properties of the high-mass X-ray binary IGR J16283-4838 in the hard X-ray band. We searched the first 88 months of Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey data for long-term <span class="hlt">periodic</span> modulations. We also investigated the broad band (0.2-150 keV) spectral properties of IGR J16283-4838 complementing the BAT dataset with soft X-ray data from the available Swift-XRT pointed <span class="hlt">observations</span>. The BAT light curve of IGR J16283-4838 revealed a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> modulation at P{sub o} = 287.6 ± 1.7 days (with a significance higher than 4 standard deviations). The profile of the light curve folded at P{sub o} shows a sharp peak lasting ?12 days over a flat plateau. The long-term light curve also shows a ?300 day interval of prolonged enhanced emission. The <span class="hlt">observed</span> phenomenology <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that IGR J16283-4838 has a Be nature, where the narrow <span class="hlt">periodic</span> peaks and the ?300 day outburst can be interpreted as Type I and Type II outbursts, respectively. The broad band 0.2-150 keV spectrum can be described with an absorbed power-law and a steepening in the BAT energy range.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cusumano, G.; Segreto, A.; La Parola, V. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Palermo, Via U. La Malfa 153, I-90146, Palermo (Italy)] [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Palermo, Via U. La Malfa 153, I-90146, Palermo (Italy); D'Aì, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Palermo, via Archirafi 36, I-90123, Palermo (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Palermo, via Archirafi 36, I-90123, Palermo (Italy); Masetti, N. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129, Bologna (Italy)] [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129, Bologna (Italy); Tagliaferri, G., E-mail: cusumano@ifc.inaf.it [INAF-Brera Astronomical Observatory, via Bianchi 46, I-23807, Merate (Italy)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">162</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ApJ...775L..25C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Swift <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of the High-mass X-Ray Binary IGR J16283-4838 Unveil a 288 Day Orbital <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on the temporal and spectral properties of the high-mass X-ray binary IGR J16283-4838 in the hard X-ray band. We searched the first 88 months of Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey data for long-term <span class="hlt">periodic</span> modulations. We also investigated the broad band (0.2-150 keV) spectral properties of IGR J16283-4838 complementing the BAT dataset with soft X-ray data from the available Swift-XRT pointed <span class="hlt">observations</span>. The BAT light curve of IGR J16283-4838 revealed a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> modulation at Po = 287.6 ± 1.7 days (with a significance higher than 4 standard deviations). The profile of the light curve folded at Po shows a sharp peak lasting ~12 days over a flat plateau. The long-term light curve also shows a ~300 day interval of prolonged enhanced emission. The <span class="hlt">observed</span> phenomenology <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that IGR J16283-4838 has a Be nature, where the narrow <span class="hlt">periodic</span> peaks and the ~300 day outburst can be interpreted as Type I and Type II outbursts, respectively. The broad band 0.2-150 keV spectrum can be described with an absorbed power-law and a steepening in the BAT energy range.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cusumano, G.; Segreto, A.; La Parola, V.; D'Aì, A.; Masetti, N.; Tagliaferri, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">163</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AtmRe.145...12C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-term trends and extremes in <span class="hlt">observed</span> daily precipitation and near surface air temperature in the Philippines for the <span class="hlt">period</span> 1951-2010</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Observed</span> daily precipitation and near surface air temperature data from 34 synoptic weather stations in the Philippines for the <span class="hlt">period</span> 1951-2010 were subjected to trend analysis which revealed an overall warming tendency compared to the normal mean values for the <span class="hlt">period</span> 1961-1990. This warming trend can be <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the annual mean temperatures, daily minimum mean temperatures and to a lesser extent, daily maximum mean temperatures. Precipitation and temperature extremes for the <span class="hlt">period</span> 1951-2010 were also analysed relative to the mean 1961-1990 baseline values. Some stations (Cotabato, Iloilo, Laoag and Tacloban,) show increases in both frequency and intensity of extreme daily rainfall events which are significant at the 95% level with none of the stations showing decreasing trends. The frequency of daily temperature maximum above the 99th percentile (hot days) and nights at the 1st percentile (cold nights) <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that both days and nights in particular are becoming warmer. Such indicators of a warming trend and increase in extreme events in the Philippines are discussed in the context of similar national, regional (Asia Pacific) and global studies. The relevance of such empirically based climatology studies, particularly for nations such as the Philippines which are increasingly vulnerable to the multiple impacts of global climate change, is also considered.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cinco, Thelma A.; de Guzman, Rosalina G.; Hilario, Flaviana D.; Wilson, David M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">164</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ACPD...13.2641B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variability of aerosol properties over Eastern Europe <span class="hlt">observed</span> from ground and satellites in the <span class="hlt">period</span> from 2003 to 2011</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The paper presents the study of aerosol variability in the <span class="hlt">period</span> from 2003 to 2011 over Eastern Europe region with latitude ranging from 40° N to 60° N and longitude from 20° E to 50° E. The analysis was based on the POLDER/PARASOL and POLDER-2/ADEOS satellites and AERONET ground-based sunphotometer <span class="hlt">observations</span>. The aerosol optical thickness (AOT) of the studied area is characterized by the values (referenced to 870 nm wavelength) ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 except the <span class="hlt">period</span> of July-August 2010 with strong forest and peat wildfires when the AOT typical values range from 0.3 to 0.5. The analysis of seasonal dynamics of aerosol loading has revealed two AOT high value peaks. The first peak <span class="hlt">observed</span> in April-May is the result of solitary transportation of Sahara dust in the atmosphere over Eastern Europe, infrequent agricultural fires, transportation of sea salt aerosols by southern winds to Ukraine and Moldova from the Black and Azov Seas. The second peak in August-September is associated with forest and peat wildfires, considerable transportation of Sahara dust and presence of soil dust aerosols due to harvesting activity. The maximum values of AOT are <span class="hlt">observed</span> in May 2006 (0.1-0.15), April 2009 (0.07-0.15) and August 2010 (0.2-0.5). Furthermore, the study has identified a distinct pattern of anthropogenic aerosols over the industrial areas, especially in the central Ukraine, eastern Belarus, as well as Moscow, Nizhny Novgorod and Stavropol regions in Russia. The comparison of the fine mode AOT (particle radius < 0.3 ?m) derived by standard algorithm POLDER/PARASOL from reflected polarized radiances with those recomputed from AERONET inversions was performed over a number of AERONET sites: over Kyiv and Sevastopol sites for the <span class="hlt">period</span> of 2008-2009 and over Moscow, Minsk, Belsk, and Moldova sites for the <span class="hlt">period</span> of 2005-2009. The correlation coefficients are 0.78 for Moscow, 0.76 - Minsk, 0.86 - Belsk, 0.93 - Kyiv, 0.81 - Moldova and 0.63 for Sevastopol sites. The deviations are explained by the spatial inhomogeneity of the surface polarization that has stronger effect on aerosol retrieval for clear atmospheric conditions with low aerosol loading when surface impact on satellite <span class="hlt">observations</span> is more pronounced. In addition, the preliminary analysis of the detailed aerosol properties derived by new generation PARASOL algorithm was accomplished. The AOT and single scattering albedo retrieved by the algorithm over Kyiv were compared with the closest AERONET retrievals within two hour of satellite overpass time and the stable atmospheric conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bovchaliuk, A.; Milinevsky, G.; Danylevsky, V.; Goloub, P.; Dubovik, O.; Holdak, A.; Ducos, F.; Sosonkin, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">165</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AtmEn..40.1722P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aerosol size distributions <span class="hlt">observed</span> at the Seoul National University campus in Korea during the Asian dust and non-Asian dust <span class="hlt">periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aerosol size distributions of <span class="hlt">observed</span> mass concentration and number concentration at the Seoul National University (SNU) campus site in Korea during the non-Asian dust and the Asian dust (Hwangsa) <span class="hlt">periods</span> have been examined using the 8-stage cascade impactor and the 8-channel airborne particle counting system, respectively. The particle size distribution of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> mass concentration during the Asian dust <span class="hlt">period</span> at the SNU site is compared with that <span class="hlt">observed</span> at the Asian dust source site of Duolun in Inner Mongolia, China. The results indicate that the size distribution of both the mass concentration and the number concentration shows a bi-modal distribution that can be regressed optimally with two log-normal distribution functions. It is found that the optimally regressed probability density function of the mass concentration distribution during the non-Asian dust <span class="hlt">period</span> at the SNU site shows two log-normal distributions with the particle mean diameters of 0.66 and 8.51 ?m and the standard deviations of 1.78 and 2.14 ?m, respectively. The probability density of the small size mode is slightly smaller than that of the large size mode. During the Asian dust <span class="hlt">period</span> at the SNU site the estimated probability density function of the mass concentration also composes of two log-normal distributions with the particle mean diameters of 0.89 and 9.12 ?m and the standard deviations of 2.40 and 2.14 ?m, respectively. However, the high probability density is greatly shifted to the large size mode. The probability density of the small size mode is only 6% of that of the large size mode. A quite similar size distribution pattern is found in the Asian dust source region of Duolun, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> the high probability density at the large particle-size mode during the Asian dust <span class="hlt">period</span> being mainly attributed to long-range transport of particles from the Asian dust source region. It is also found that the estimated probability density function of the number concentration distribution <span class="hlt">observed</span> at the SNU site during the non-Asian dust <span class="hlt">period</span> has a bi-modal distribution with the particle mean diameters of 0.36 and 1.12 ?m and the mean standard deviations of 1.48 and 1.91 ?m, respectively. Much higher probability density is found in the small size mode in contrast to that of the mass concentration distribution where the probability density of both modes is almost the same.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, Soon-Ung; Kim, Jong-Won</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">166</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AcA....63..275K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multi-Resonance Orbital Model Applied to High-Frequency Quasi-<span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Oscillations <span class="hlt">Observed</span> in Sgr A*</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The multi-resonance orbital model of high-frequency quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations (HF QPOs) enables precise determination of the black hole dimensionless spin a if <span class="hlt">observed</span> set of oscillations demonstrates three (or more) commensurable frequencies. The black hole spin a is related to the frequency ratio only, while its mass M is related to the frequency magnitude. The model is applied to the triple frequency set of HF QPOs <span class="hlt">observed</span> in Sgr A* source with frequency ratio 3:2:1. Acceptable versions of the multi-resonance model are determined by the restrictions on the Sgr A* supermassive black hole mass. The version of strong resonances related to the black hole "magic" spin a=0.983 is acceptable but the version demonstrating the best agreement with the mass restrictions predicts spin a=0.980.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kotrlová, A.; Stuchlík, Z.; Török, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">167</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001PhDT........22W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rocket and radar <span class="hlt">observations</span> of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> structures associated with mid-latitude sporadic E layers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This thesis concerns the experimental verification of current theories explaining the formation of quasi- <span class="hlt">periodic</span> field-aligned irregularities (QP) associated with mid-latitude sporadic E layers. To address the gravity-wave modulation process common to both Woodman's and Tsunoda's theories, a detailed modelling study was performed with the full-wave model of Hickey et al. (2000). Both theories require short-wavelength, short-<span class="hlt">period</span> gravity waves propagating in a region occupied by a ES layer, assumed to be organized by neutral winds according to wind-shear theory [Whitehead, 1961]. The results show that gravity waves with <span class="hlt">periods</span> and wavelengths comparable to the required temporal and spatial quasi-<span class="hlt">periodicities</span> are unlikely to exist at E region altitudes. In the majority of cases examined, the waves dissipated well below the mesosphere and had propagation directions that varied considerably in the presence of even moderate winds. This contradicts both the stringent requirements of the Woodman model and also causes difficulties for the less restrictive Tsunoda model. In addition, the background polarization fields were determined from in situ electric field measurements. The conclusion must be that such fields, if they do exist, are by no means ubiquitous. This result causes difficulty for the Tsunoda theory, which is predicated on a mechanism that implies large fields should be <span class="hlt">observed</span> regularly during QP-like conditions. To assess the Larsen model, a comprehensive analysis of E S and QP data was performed. Generation of Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instabilities is likely whenever a neutral wind shear becomes unstable in the Richardson number sense. A large number of region wind studies indicate that large wind shears are common and often fulfill the requirements for instability. The very shear that is assumed to organize the ES layer, if unstable, would subsequently generate K-H structures. These K-H billows have been shown to exhibit primary horizontal wavelengths of approximately 8 times the shear layer depth. In the case of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> shears during ES with vertical scales of 1-2 km, this gives horizontal wavelengths of approximately 8-16 km, which agrees well with the spatial separations <span class="hlt">observed</span> for QP structures. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wilson, William Robert</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">168</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMSM43A2288R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of long decay <span class="hlt">periods</span> <span class="hlt">observed</span> from the HEO satellites in the vicinity of the slot region</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Long decay <span class="hlt">periods</span> of electron counts, that follow abrupt rises and last from weeks to months, have been measured by HEO3 in the vicinity of the slot region between the years 1998 and 2007. After selecting the most stable decay <span class="hlt">periods</span>, i.e. lasting the longest, spread over L values ranging between 2.2 to 3.5, and stable for each one of the six HEO energy channels (between >100 keV to >3 MeV), e-folding timescales are extracted for every location and energy. These values will be compared to the timescales previously <span class="hlt">observed</span> from SAMPEX during the same <span class="hlt">period</span> [Meredith et al., 2007; Baker et al., 2007], to the first HEO ones extracted at L=3 [Fennell et al., 2012] and to the ones measured by CRRES [Meredith et al., 2006]. Another challenge is to be able to reproduce the <span class="hlt">observed</span> timescales from simulations of pitch angle diffusion by the different acting waves of the plasmasphere, mostly plasmaspheric hiss, lightning-generated, and VLF transmitter waves. To do that, the recently developed analytical model of [Mourenas and Ripoll, 2012] is used to narrow the ranges of all wave amplitudes, as well as to locate the resonance domains associated with each of the different waves. Full numerical simulations are then performed, with the use of either the wave parameters from CRRES or the ones from [Abel & Thorne, 1998], to compute accurately the electron lifetimes. Similarities and differences between measurements and simulations will be discussed. We will also show how such understanding leads eventually to relate particular wave properties to the diffused electron energy and the implication it has on future analysis.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ripoll, J.; Chen, Y.; Fennell, J. F.; Friedel, R. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">169</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ACP....14.3623I"> <span id="translatedtitle">Regional modeling of tropospheric NO2 vertical column density over East Asia during the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2000-2010: comparison with multisatellite <span class="hlt">observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Satellite <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the tropospheric NO2 vertical column density (VCD) are closely correlated to, and thus can be used to estimate, surface NOx emissions. In this study, the NO2 VCD simulated by a regional chemical transport model with emissions data from the updated Regional Emission inventory in ASia (REAS) version 2.1 were validated through comparison with multisatellite <span class="hlt">observations</span> during the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2000-2010. Rapid growth in NO2 VCD (~11% year-1) driven by the expansion of anthropogenic NOx emissions was identified above the central eastern China (CEC) region, except for the <span class="hlt">period</span> during the economic downturn. In contrast, slightly decreasing trends (~2% year-1) were identified above Japan accompanied by a decline in anthropogenic emissions. To systematically compare the modeled NO2 VCD, we estimated sampling bias and the effect of applying the averaging kernel information, with particular focus on the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) data. Using the updated REAS, the modeled NO2 VCD reasonably reproduced annual trends <span class="hlt">observed</span> by multisatellites, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the rate of increase of NOx emissions estimated by the updated REAS inventory would be robust. Province-scale revision of emissions above CEC is needed to further refine emission inventories. Based on the close linear relationship between modeled and <span class="hlt">observed</span> NO2 VCD and anthropogenic NOx emissions, NOx emissions in 2009 and 2010, which were not covered by the updated REAS inventory, were estimated. NOx emissions from anthropogenic sources in China in 2009 and 2010 were determined to be 26.4 and 28.5 Tg year-1, respectively, indicating that NOx emissions increased more than twofold between 2000 and 2010. This increase reflected the strong growth of anthropogenic emissions in China following the rapid recovery from the economic downturn from late 2008 until mid-2009. Our method consists of simple estimations from satellite <span class="hlt">observations</span> and provides results that are consistent with the most recent inventory of emissions data for China.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Itahashi, S.; Uno, I.; Irie, H.; Kurokawa, J.-I.; Ohara, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">170</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001JGR...10628199H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reflection of a long-<span class="hlt">period</span> gravity wave <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the nightglow over Arecibo on May 8-9, 1989?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the Arecibo Initiative for Dynamics of the Atmosphere (AIDA) campaign in 1989 a characteristic of gravity wave perturbations <span class="hlt">observed</span> in mesopause region airglow emissions was that airglow brightness fluctuations and airglow-derived temperature fluctuations often occurred either in phase or in antiphase. This stimulated the development of a theory <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that such in-phase fluctuations were most probably the result of strong reflections occurring in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region. Recent examination of a particular wave event and application of simple WKB-type theory has appeared to support this hypothesis. Here we use a full-wave model and a WKB-type model, each coupled with a chemical-airglow fluctuation model describing O2 atmospheric and OH Meinel airglow fluctuations, to assess the strength of wave reflection and also to explicitly calculate the phase difference between the airglow brightness and the temperature fluctuations. Our results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that reflection is not strong for the particular wave event, and the model produces fairly large phase differences between the airglow brightness and the temperature fluctuations (˜35° and ˜134°-165° for the O2 atmospheric and OH airglow emissions, respectively). These results are not particularly sensitive to the nominal mean winds used in the simulations. There is an instance when a region of minimum refractive index occurs directly above a region in which reflection is strongest, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the two are related. However, the reflection does not appear to be strong. Our results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that chemical effects can account for the inferred phases of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> airglow fluctuations and that effects associated with wave reflection appear to play a relatively minor role in the airglow fluctuations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hickey, Michael P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">171</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ACP....13.6587B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variability of aerosol properties over Eastern Europe <span class="hlt">observed</span> from ground and satellites in the <span class="hlt">period</span> from 2003 to 2011</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The paper presents some results of the study on aerosol variability in the <span class="hlt">period</span> from 2003 to 2011 over the Eastern Europe region, with latitude ranging from 40° N to 60° N and longitude from 20° E to 50° E. The analysis was based on the POLDER/PARASOL and POLDER-2/ADEOS satellites and AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based sun photometer <span class="hlt">observations</span>. The aerosol optical thickness (AOT) of the studied area is characterized by values (referenced to 870 nm wavelength) ranging from 0.05 to 0.2, except for in the <span class="hlt">period</span> of July-August 2010 with strong forest and peat wildfires when the AOT typical values range from 0.3 to 0.5 according to both retrievals. The analysis of seasonal dynamics of aerosol loading has revealed two AOT high value peaks. The spring peak <span class="hlt">observed</span> in April-May is the result of solitary transportation of Saharan dust in the atmosphere over Eastern Europe, infrequent agricultural fires, transportation of sea salt aerosols by southern winds to Ukraine and Moldova from the Black and Azov seas. The autumn peak in August-September is associated with forest and peat wildfires, considerable transportation of Saharan dust and the presence of soil dust aerosols due to harvesting activity. The maximum values of AOT are <span class="hlt">observed</span> in May 2006 (0.1-0.15), April 2009 (0.07-0.15) and August 2010 (0.2-0.5). Furthermore, the study has identified a distinct pattern of anthropogenic aerosols over the industrial areas, especially in central Ukraine and eastern Belarus as well as Moscow region in Russia. The comparison of the AOT derived by standard algorithm POLDER/PARASOL with those recomputed from AERONET inversions for fine mode particles with radius < 0.3 ?m was performed over several AERONET sites. The correlation coefficients for the POLDER/AERONET AOT retrieval comparisons are equal: 0.78 for Moscow site, 0.76 - Minsk, 0.86 - Belsk, 0.81 - Moldova (<span class="hlt">period</span> 2005-2009), 0.93 - Kyiv and 0.63 for Sevastopol sites (2008-2009). The deviations are explained by the spatial inhomogeneity of the surface polarization that has a stronger effect on aerosol retrieval for clear atmospheric conditions with low aerosol loading when surface impact on satellite <span class="hlt">observations</span> is more pronounced. In addition, the preliminary analysis of the detailed aerosol properties derived by a new generation PARASOL algorithm was evaluated. The comparison of AOT and single scattering albedo retrieved from the POLDER/PARASOL <span class="hlt">observations</span> over Kyiv with the closest AERONET retrievals within 30 min of satellite overpass time and with a cloudless day shows acceptable agreement of the aerosol dynamics. The correspondence of those data is <span class="hlt">observed</span> even for extreme AOT440 value 1.14, which was caused by the forest and peat fires in August 2010.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bovchaliuk, A.; Milinevsky, G.; Danylevsky, V.; Goloub, P.; Dubovik, O.; Holdak, A.; Ducos, F.; Sosonkin, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">172</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870039751&hterms=chinese+media&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dchinese%2Bmedia"> <span id="translatedtitle">Vertical structure of the wind field during the Special <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> I of the Global Weather Experiment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The vertical structure of the global atmosphere is analyzed for selected <span class="hlt">periods</span> of the Special <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> I (SOP-I) for the Global Weather Experiment (GWE). The analysis consists of projection of the stream-function and velocity potential at 200 and 850 mb on spherical harmonics and of the wind and height fields on the normal modes of a linearized form of the primitive equations for a basic state at rest. The kinematic vertical structure is discussed in terms of correlation coefficients of the 200 mb and 850 mb winds and analysis of the internal and external normal modes of the primitive equations. The reliability of the results is checked by applying the same analysis methods to data sets obtained from three different institutions: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF), and Goddard Laboratory for the Atmospheres (GLA). It is found that, on a global basis, vertically reversing circulations are as important as the equivalent barotropic structures. For the verticaly reversing components, the gravity and mixed Rossby-gravity modes have contributions of the same order of magnitude as those of the Rossby modes in tropical latitudes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paegle, J. N.; Paegle, J.; Zhen, Z.; Sampson, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">173</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1512367G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Assessing spatial patterns of extreme droughts associated to return <span class="hlt">periods</span> from <span class="hlt">observed</span> dataset: Case study of Segura River Basin (Spain)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In basins of South-eastern Spain, such as the Segura River Basin (SRB), a strong decrease in runoff from the end of the 1970s has been <span class="hlt">observed</span>. In the SRB, due to intensive reforestation aimed at halting desertification and erosion, added to climate variability and change, the default assumption of stationarity in water resources systems cannot be guaranteed. Therefore there is an important need for improvement in the ability of monitoring and predicting the impacts associated with the change of hydrologic regime. It is thus necessary to apply non-stationary probabilistic models, which are able to reproduce probability density functions whose parameters vary with time. From a high-resolution daily gridded rainfall dataset of more than 50 years (1950-2007 time <span class="hlt">period</span>), the spatial distribution of lengths of maximum dry spells for several thresholds are assessed, applying GAMLSS (Generalized Additive Models for Location Scale and Shape) models at grid site. Results reveal an intensification of extreme drought events in some headbasins of the SRB important for water supply. The identification of spatial patterns of drought hazards at basin scale, associated to return <span class="hlt">periods</span>, contribute to designing strategies of drought contingency preparedness and recovery operations, which are the leading edge of adaptation strategies.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">García Galiano, Sandra G.; Diego Giraldo Osorio, Juan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">174</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/891111"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shortwave Radiative Closure Studies for Clear Skies During the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement 2003 Aerosol Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program sponsored a large aerosol intensive <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> (AIOP) to study aerosol during the month of May 2003 around the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF) in north central Oklahoma. Redundant measurements of aerosol optical properties were made using different techniques at the surface as well as in vertical profile with sensors aboard two aircraft. One of the principal motivations for this experiment was to resolve the disagreement between models and measurements of diffuse horizontal broadband shortwave irradiance at the surface, especially for modest aerosol loading. This paper focuses on using the redundant aerosol and radiation measurements during this AIOP to compare direct beam and diffuse horizontal broadband shortwave irradiance measurements and models at the surface for a wide range of aerosol cases that occurred during 30 clear-sky <span class="hlt">periods</span> on 13 days of May 2003. Models and measurements are compared over a large range of solar-zenith angles. Six different models are used to assess the relative agreement among them and the measurements. Better agreement than previously achieved appears to be the result of better specification of input parameters and better measurements of irradiances than in prior studies. Biases between modeled and measured direct irradiances are in the worst case 1%, and biases between modeled and measured diffuse irradiances are less than 1.9%.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michalsky, Joseph J.; Anderson, Gail; Barnard, James C.; Delamere, Jennifer; Gueymard, C.; Kato, Seiji; Kiedron, P.; McComiskey, A.; Ricchiazzi, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-07-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">175</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUSMSH22C..07H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Low-Energy Anomalous Cosmic Ray <span class="hlt">Observation</span> of Negative Latitudinal Intensity Gradients During an A > 0 <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The motion of the Voyager 1 & 2 spacecraft through the outer heliosphere during the 1994 to 1999 <span class="hlt">period</span> provides the opportunity to probe the spatial variations of anomalous cosmic ray (ACR) intensities during an A > 0 solar minimum phase (i.e., with positive heliomagnetic polarity). Applying a "quasi-local" method to determine spatial intensity gradients, we find that the radial gradients of 0.6- to 40-MeV/nucleon ACRs at this time are positive, and larger as particle rigidity decreases. Additionally, the bulk features of the ACR recovery that took place during this <span class="hlt">period</span> can be reproduced with a surprisingly simple drift-free transport model indicating, for instance, that the <span class="hlt">observed</span> exponential growth of the lower-rigidity ACR intensities is primarily due to the motion of the Voyager spacecraft through sizeable radial intensity gradients, in quantitative agreement with the first result of the quasi-local gradient (QLG) method. Interpretation of our transport model and the more sophisticated modeling of other scientists supports the second result of the QLG method, that ACRs with rigidities below ~2 GV have significant negative latitudinal gradients, and small positive gradients at higher rigidities. In the outer heliosphere, 2 GV appears to correspond to the ACR rigidity below which the estimated drift velocity is small compared to the solar wind speed. We explore the interpretation that the relative lack of drift effects for lower-rigidity ACRs permits other phenomena, such as the positive latitudinal gradient of the solar wind velocity, to cause the negative latitudinal intensity gradients we have <span class="hlt">observed</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hill, M. E.; Hamilton, D. C.; Krimigis, S. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">176</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.A22D..06B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of Non-Methane Hydrocarbons Over India During the Asian Summer Monsoon <span class="hlt">Period</span>: Results from CARIBIC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The CARIBIC project (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container, www.caribic-atmospheric.com) involves the monthly deployment of an instrument container equipped to make atmospheric measurements from onboard a long-range commercial airliner. Since December 2004, flights for the second phase of CARIBIC have been aboard a Lufthansa Airbus A340-600 traveling between Frankfurt, Germany and destinations in Asia, North America and South America. The instrument package housed in the container (1.5 ton) is fully automated and during each monthly set of flights carries out a variety of real-time trace gas and aerosol measurements, and also collects 28 air samples, which are analyzed upon return to the laboratory. Routine measurements made from the sampling flasks include non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) analysis, and these measurements provide the basis for the data presented here. Between April and September of 2008, the container was deployed monthly on two sequential roundtrip flights between Frankfurt and Chennai, India. To achieve greater resolution, air samples were collected only on the first of the roundtrip flights, with 14 samples collected on the flight to Chennai and 14 collected on the return. These flights provided the opportunity to study the composition of the upper troposphere in this region during the Asian summer monsoon <span class="hlt">period</span> (typically June-September), which is characterized by anticyclonic circulation in the upper troposphere coupled with deep convection. Samples collected during the monsoon <span class="hlt">period</span> exhibit elevated levels of NMHCs relative to samples collected outside of the monsoon <span class="hlt">period</span>, with enhancements in ethyne and benzene being more substantial than enhancements in the alkanes. Enhanced mixing ratios are <span class="hlt">observed</span> between 15N and 40N, and correspond to enhancements in other trace gases, namely methane and CO. Ethyne in particular is strongly correlated with both methane and CO in this region; while CO and ethyne share a common, combustion, source, methane and ethyne do not, and this relationship indicates convection of a well-mixed air mass that is strongly and recently influenced by both agricultural and anthropogenic/urban sources. Trends in and relationships between NMHCs during the monsoon <span class="hlt">period</span> will be discussed here, as well as their relationships to other trace gases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baker, A. K.; Schuck, T. J.; Slemr, F.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">177</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.A53K0293Y"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of Sub-3 nm Particles and Sulfuric acid Concentrations during Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> 2011 in Long Island, New York</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is an important source of aerosol particles. But the NPF processes are not well understood, in part because of our limited understanding of the formation of atmospheric sub-3 nm size aerosols and the limited number of simultaneous <span class="hlt">observations</span> of particle size distributions and the aerosol nucleation precursors. During Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> (July-August 2011) in Long Island, New York, we deployed a particle size magnifier (Airmodus A09) running at different working fluid saturation ratios and a TSI CPC3776 to extract the information of sub-3 nm particles formation. A scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS), a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS), and a number of atmospheric trace gas analyzers were used to simultaneously measure aerosol size distributions, sulfuric acid, and other possible aerosol precursors, respectively. Our <span class="hlt">observation</span> results show that sub-3 nm particles existed during both NPF and non-NPF events, indicating the formation of sub-3nm particle didn't always lead to NPF characterized by typical banana shaped aerosol size distributions measured by SMPS. However, sub-3 nm particles were much higher during NPF events. Sub-3 nm particles were well-correlated with sulfuric acid showing the same diurnal variations and noontime peaks, especially for NPF days. These results are consistent with laboratory studies showing that formation of sub-3 nm particles is very sensitive to sulfuric acid (than amines and ammonia) [Yu et al. GRL 2012]. HYSPLIT back trajectory analysis indicates that air masses from Great Lakes, containing more SO2, VOCs and secondary organics, may contribute to growth of sub-3 nm particles and NPF.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yu, H.; Kanawade, V. P.; You, Y.; Hallar, A. G.; Mccubbin, I. B.; Chirokova, G.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Kuang, C.; Lee, Y.; McGraw, R. L.; Mikkila, J.; Lee, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EP%26S...62..413K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Substorm and pseudo-substorm Pi2 pulsations <span class="hlt">observed</span> during the interval of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> magnetotail flow bursts: A case study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We studied the relationship between midtail flow bursts <span class="hlt">observed</span> by the Geotail spacecraft and eight Pi2 pulsations near midnight <span class="hlt">observed</span> at low-latitude Kakioka (KAK, L = 1.26) and high-latitude Tixie (TIX, L = 5.9) stations on 26 October (day 299) 1997, 1100-1600 UT. The Pi2 pulsations at KAK have a great similarity with those at TIX with an out of phase signature. Three of the Pi2 bursts were associated with substorm onsets/intensifications and other five events were associated with pseudo-substorm onsets. The pseudo-substorm Pi2 pulsations exhibited longitudinal phase variations similar to substorm-related Pi2 pulsations. From this <span class="hlt">observation</span> we <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that pseudo-substorm associated current system is morphologically the same as substorm current wedge. The substorm Pi2s are enhanced at higher frequency band (˜15-20 mHz) than the frequency band (˜6-15 mHz) of pseudo-substorm Pi2s. We do not attribute these frequency variations to the change of the plasmapause distance, which is favored in the plasmaspheric resonance model. During the five-hour interval, Geotail <span class="hlt">observed</span> quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> high-speed flow bursts (perpendicular flow velocity V?x > 300 km/s) preceding the low-latitude Pi2 pulsations by ˜35-150 s. It is found that there is no obvious relationship between the speed of the earthward flow burst events and the power of the Pi2 events. This means that enhanced flow speed is not a main factor in controlling a Pi2 power. The waveform and <span class="hlt">period</span> of the Pi2 pulsations are different from those of the flow bursts except for one event, which was previously reported as BBF-driven Pi2.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, K.-H.; Takahashi, K.; Ohtani, S.; Yumoto, K.; Lee, D.-H.; Jin, H.; Seon, J.; Sung, S.-K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012A%26A...539A.135S"> <span id="translatedtitle">The quasi-biennial <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> (QBP) in velocity and intensity helioseismic <span class="hlt">observations</span>. The seismic QBP over solar cycle 23</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aims: We looked for signatures of quasi-biennial <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> (QBP) over different phases of solar cycle by means of acoustic modes of oscillation. Low-degree p-mode frequencies are shown to be sensitive to changes in magnetic activity due to the global dynamo. Recently there has been reported evidence of two-year variations in p-mode frequencies. Methods: Long high-quality helioseismic data are provided by BiSON (Birmingham Solar Oscillation Network), GONG (Global Oscillation Network Group), GOLF (Global Oscillation at Low Frequency) and VIRGO (Variability of Solar IRradiance and Gravity Oscillation) instruments. We determined the solar cycle changes in p-mode frequencies for spherical degree ? = 0, 1, 2 with their azimuthal components in the frequency range 2.5 mHz ? ? ? 3.5 mHz. Results: We found signatures of QBP at all levels of solar activity in the modes more sensitive to higher latitudes. The signal strength increases with latitude and the equatorial component also seems to be modulated by the 11-year envelope. Conclusions: The persistent nature of the seismic QBP is not <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the surface activity indices, where mid-term variations are found only from time to time and mainly in <span class="hlt">periods</span> of high activity. This feature, together with the latitudinal dependence, provides more evidence of a mechanism that is almost independent and different from the one that brings the active regions up to the surface. Therefore, these findings can be used to provide more constraints on dynamo models that consider a further cyclic component on top of the 11-year cycle.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Simoniello, R.; Finsterle, W.; Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Turck-Chièze, S.; Jiménez, A.; Roth, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.4765K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparisons of <span class="hlt">observed</span> and modeled OH and HO2 concentrations during the ambient measurement <span class="hlt">period</span> of the HOxComp field campaign</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A photochemical box model constrained by ancillary <span class="hlt">observations</span> was used to simulate OH and HO2 concentrations for three days of ambient <span class="hlt">observations</span> during the HOxComp field campaign held in Jülich, Germany in July 2005. Daytime OH levels <span class="hlt">observed</span> by four instruments were fairly well reproduced to within 33% by a base model run (Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism with updated isoprene chemistry adapted from Master Chemical Mechanism ver. 3.1) with high R2 values (0.72-0.97) over a range of isoprene (0.3-2 ppb) and NO (0.1-10 ppb) mixing ratios. Daytime HO2(*) levels, reconstructed from the base model results taking into account the sensitivity toward speciated RO2 (organic peroxy) radicals, as recently reported from one of the participating instruments in the HO2 measurement mode, were 93% higher than the <span class="hlt">observations</span> made by the single instrument. Adding isomerization of isoprene peroxy radicals to the model increased OH and HO2(*) by 28% and 13% on average. Although these are still only 4% higher than the OH <span class="hlt">observations</span> made by one of the instruments, larger overestimations (42-70%) occurred with respect to the OH <span class="hlt">observations</span> made by the other three instruments. These model runs tend to underestimate <span class="hlt">observed</span> OH reactivity which may be explained by unmeasured hydrocarbon species. In the base run, the good agreement for the OH levels was retained when four different types of hydrocarbons were added as mixture to explain the missing OH reactivity. In the model run with isomerization of isoprene peroxy radicals, on the other hand, OH levels agreed to the ensemble of <span class="hlt">observations</span> only when unmeasured anthropogenic hydrocarbons was added at implausibly high concentrations, implying that the rates of the isomerization were not readily supported by the ensemble of radical <span class="hlt">observations</span>. The overprediction of the HO2(*) levels by the model occurred independently of the inclusion of the isoprene isomerization scheme, indicating that more loss processes for peroxy radicals were necessary to explain the <span class="hlt">observations</span>. One of the measurement days was characterized by low isoprene concentrations (~0.5 ppb) and OH reactivity that was well explained by the <span class="hlt">observed</span> species, especially before noon. For this selected <span class="hlt">period</span>, as opposed to the general behavior, the model tended to underestimate HO2(*). We found that this tendency is associated with high NOx concentrations, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that some HO2 production or regeneration processes under high NOx conditions were being overlooked; this might require revision of ozone production regimes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kanaya, Y.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Dorn, H.-P.; Brauers, T.; Fuchs, H.; Holland, F.; Rohrer, F.; Bohn, B.; Tillmann, R.; Wegener, R.; Wahner, A.; Kajii, Y.; Miyamoto, K.; Nishida, S.; Watanabe, K.; Yoshino, A.; Kubistin, D.; Martinez, M.; Rudolf, M.; Harder, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ACP....12.2567K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparisons of <span class="hlt">observed</span> and modeled OH and HO2 concentrations during the ambient measurement <span class="hlt">period</span> of the HOxComp field campaign</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A photochemical box model constrained by ancillary <span class="hlt">observations</span> was used to simulate OH and HO2 concentrations for three days of ambient <span class="hlt">observations</span> during the HOxComp field campaign held in Jülich, Germany in July 2005. Daytime OH levels <span class="hlt">observed</span> by four instruments were fairly well reproduced to within 33% by a base model run (Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism with updated isoprene chemistry adapted from Master Chemical Mechanism ver. 3.1) with high R2 values (0.72-0.97) over a range of isoprene (0.3-2 ppb) and NO (0.1-10 ppb) mixing ratios. Daytime HO2(*) levels, reconstructed from the base model results taking into account the sensitivity toward speciated RO2 (organic peroxy) radicals, as recently reported from one of the participating instruments in the HO2 measurement mode, were 93% higher than the <span class="hlt">observations</span> made by the single instrument. This also indicates an overprediction of the HO2 to OH recycling. Together with the good model-measurement agreement for OH, it implies a missing OH source in the model. Modeled OH and HO2(*) could only be matched to the <span class="hlt">observations</span> by addition of a strong unknown loss process for HO2(*) that recycles OH at a high yield. Adding to the base model, instead, the recently proposed isomerization mechanism of isoprene peroxy radicals (Peeters and Müller, 2010) increased OH and HO2(*) by 28% and 13% on average. Although these were still only 4% higher than the OH <span class="hlt">observations</span> made by one of the instruments, larger overestimations (42-70%) occurred with respect to the OH <span class="hlt">observations</span> made by the other three instruments. The overestimation in OH could be diminished only when reactive alkanes (HC8) were solely introduced to the model to explain the missing fraction of <span class="hlt">observed</span> OH reactivity. Moreover, the overprediction of HO2(*) became even larger than in the base case. These analyses imply that the rates of the isomerization are not readily supported by the ensemble of radical <span class="hlt">observations</span>. One of the measurement days was characterized by low isoprene concentrations (∼0.5 ppb) and OH reactivity that was well explained by the <span class="hlt">observed</span> species, especially before noon. For this selected <span class="hlt">period</span>, as opposed to the general behavior, the model tended to underestimate HO2(*). We found that this tendency is associated with high NOx concentrations, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that some HO2 production or regeneration processes under high NOx conditions were being overlooked; this might require revision of ozone production regimes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kanaya, Y.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Dorn, H.-P.; Brauers, T.; Fuchs, H.; Holland, F.; Rohrer, F.; Bohn, B.; Tillmann, R.; Wegener, R.; Wahner, A.; Kajii, Y.; Miyamoto, K.; Nishida, S.; Watanabe, K.; Yoshino, A.; Kubistin, D.; Martinez, M.; Rudolf, M.; Harder, H.; Berresheim, H.; Elste, T.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Stange, G.; Kleffmann, J.; Elshorbany, Y.; Schurath, U.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20130013865&hterms=dataset&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Ddataset"> <span id="translatedtitle">The HyMeX Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> in Central Italy: Precipitation Measurements, Retrieval Techniques and Preliminary Results</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Mediterranean area concentrates the major natural risks related to the water cycle, including heavy precipitation and flash-flooding during the fall season. The capability to predict such high-impact events remains weak because of the contribution of very fine-scale processes and their non-linear interactions with the larger scale processes. These societal and science issues motivate the HyMeX (Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment, http://www.hymex.orgl) experimental programme. HyMeX aims at a better quantification and understanding of the water cycle in the Mediterranean with emphasis on intense events. The <span class="hlt">observation</span> strategy of HyMEX is organized in a long-term (4 years) Enhanced <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Periods</span> (EOP) and short-term (2 months) Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Periods</span> (SOP). HyMEX has identified 3 main Mediterranean target areas: North-West (NW), Adriatic (A) and South-East (SE). Within each target area several hydrometeorological sites for heavy rainfall and flash flooding have been set up. The hydrometeorological sire in Central Italy (CI) is interested by both western and eastern fronts coming from the Atlantic Ocean and Siberia, respectively. Orographic precipitations play an important role due to the central Apennine range, which reaches nearly 3000 m (Gran Sasso peak). Moreover, convective systems commonly develop in CI during late summer and beginning of autumn, often causing localized hailstorms with cluster organized cells. Western fronts may heavily hit the Tiber basin crossing large urban areas (Rome), whereas eastern fronts can cause flash floods along the Adriatic coastline. Two major basins are involved within Cl region: Tiber basin (1000 km long) and its tributary Aniene and the Aterno-Pescara basin (300 km long). The first HyMeX SOP1.1 was carried out from Sept. till Nov. 2012 in the NW target area The Italian SOP1.1 was coordinated by the Centre of Excellence CETEMPS, University of L'Aquila, a city located in the CI heart. The CI area was covered by a uniquely dense meteorological instrumentation thanks to a synergy between Italian institutions and NASA-GSFC. The following RADARs were operated: a Doppler single-polarization C-band radar located at Mt Midia; the Polar 55C Doppler dual-polarization C-band radar located in Rome; a Doppler C-hand polarimetric radar located at Il Monte (Abnazo); a polarimetric X-band mini-radar in L' Aquila; a polarimetric X-hand portable mini-radar in Rome; a single-polarization X-band mini-radar in Rome. DISDROMETERs were also deployed: 4 Parsivel optical disdrometers in Rome (at Sapienza, CNR-ISAC and CNR-INSEAN); 1 2D-video disdrometer in Rome; 3 Parsivels optical disdrometer respectively in L'Aquila (Abnazo), Avezzano (Abruzzo) and Pescara (Abnazo). Other INSTRUMENTS were available: 1 K-band vertically-pointing micro rain-radar (MRR), 2 Pludix X-band disdrometers, 1 VLF lightning sensor, 1 microwave radiometer at 23-31 GHz in Rome (at Sapienza); the raingauge network with more than 200 stations in Central Italy. Three overpasses in CI were also performed by the Falcon 20 aircraft equipped with the 950Hz cloud radar RASTA Analysis of the SOP1.1 main events in CI will be described by focusing on the raindrop size distribution statistics and its geographical variability. Intercomparison of rainfall estimates from disdrometers, raingauges and radars will be illustrated with the aim to provide a quality-controlled and physically consistent rainfall dataset for meteorological modeling validation and assimilation purposes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gatlin, Patrick; Wingo, Matt; Petersen, Walt; Marzano, Frank Silvio; Baldini, Luca; Picciotti, Errico; Colantonio, Matteo; Barbieri, Stefano; Di Fabio, Saverio; Montopoli, Mario; Roberto, Nicoletta; Adirosi, Elisa; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Anagnostou, Emmanoil N..; Ferretti, Rossella</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=TOE&pg=5&id=EJ346869"> <span id="translatedtitle">Open to <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Offers (1) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for improving college students' study skills; (2) a system for keeping track of parent, teacher, and community contacts; (3) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for motivating students using tic tac toe; (4) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for using etymology to improve word retention; (5) a word search grid; and (6) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for using postcards in remedial reading…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Journal of Reading, 1987</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MNRAS.436..807B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Detecting multiple <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in <span class="hlt">observational</span> data with the multifrequency periodogram - I. Analytic assessment of the statistical significance</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We consider the `multifrequency' periodogram, in which the putative signal is modelled as a sum of two or more sinusoidal harmonics with independent frequencies. It is useful in cases when the data may contain several <span class="hlt">periodic</span> components, especially when their interaction with each other and with the data sampling patterns might produce misleading results. Although the multifrequency statistic itself was constructed earlier, for example by G. Foster in his CLEANest algorithm, its probabilistic properties (the detection significance levels) are still poorly known and much of what is deemed known is not rigorous. These detection levels are nonetheless important for data analysis. We argue that to prove the simultaneous existence of all n components revealed in a multiperiodic variation, it is mandatory to apply at least 2n - 1 significance tests, among which most involve various multifrequency statistics, and only n tests are single-frequency ones. The main result of this paper is an analytic estimation of the statistical significance of the frequency tuples that the multifrequency periodogram can reveal. Using the theory of extreme values of random fields (the generalized Rice method), we find a useful approximation to the relevant false alarm probability. For the double-frequency periodogram, this approximation is given by the elementary formula (?/16)W2e- zz2, where W denotes the normalized width of the settled frequency range, and z is the <span class="hlt">observed</span> periodogram maximum. We carried out intensive Monte Carlo simulations to show that the practical quality of this approximation is satisfactory. A similar analytic expression for the general multifrequency periodogram is also given, although with less numerical verification.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baluev, Roman V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ACP....14.5807Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimating Asian terrestrial carbon fluxes from CONTRAIL aircraft and surface CO2 <span class="hlt">observations</span> for the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2006-2010</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Current estimates of the terrestrial carbon fluxes in Asia show large uncertainties particularly in the boreal and mid-latitudes and in China. In this paper, we present an updated carbon flux estimate for Asia ("Asia" refers to lands as far west as the Urals and is divided into boreal Eurasia, temperate Eurasia and tropical Asia based on TransCom regions) by introducing aircraft CO2 measurements from the CONTRAIL (Comprehensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> Network for Trace gases by Airline) program into an inversion modeling system based on the CarbonTracker framework. We estimated the averaged annual total Asian terrestrial land CO2 sink was about -1.56 Pg C yr-1 over the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2006-2010, which offsets about one-third of the fossil fuel emission from Asia (+4.15 Pg C yr-1). The uncertainty of the terrestrial uptake estimate was derived from a set of sensitivity tests and ranged from -1.07 to -1.80 Pg C yr-1, comparable to the formal Gaussian error of ±1.18 Pg C yr-1 (1-sigma). The largest sink was found in forests, predominantly in coniferous forests (-0.64 ± 0.70 Pg C yr-1) and mixed forests (-0.14 ± 0.27 Pg C yr-1); and the second and third large carbon sinks were found in grass/shrub lands and croplands, accounting for -0.44 ± 0.48 Pg C yr-1 and -0.20 ± 0.48 Pg C yr-1, respectively. The carbon fluxes per ecosystem type have large a priori Gaussian uncertainties, and the reduction of uncertainty based on assimilation of sparse <span class="hlt">observations</span> over Asia is modest (8.7-25.5%) for most individual ecosystems. The ecosystem flux adjustments follow the detailed a priori spatial patterns by design, which further increases the reliance on the a priori biosphere exchange model. The peak-to-peak amplitude of inter-annual variability (IAV) was 0.57 Pg C yr-1 ranging from -1.71 Pg C yr-1 to -2.28 Pg C yr-1. The IAV analysis reveals that the Asian CO2 sink was sensitive to climate variations, with the lowest uptake in 2010 concurrent with a summer flood and autumn drought and the largest CO2 sink in 2009 owing to favorable temperature and plentiful precipitation conditions. We also found the inclusion of the CONTRAIL data in the inversion modeling system reduced the uncertainty by 11% over the whole Asian region, with a large reduction in the southeast of boreal Eurasia, southeast of temperate Eurasia and most tropical Asian areas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, H. F.; Chen, B. Z.; Machida, T.; Matsueda, H.; Sawa, Y.; Fukuyama, Y.; Langenfelds, R.; van der Schoot, M.; Xu, G.; Yan, J. W.; Cheng, M. L.; Zhou, L. X.; Tans, P. P.; Peters, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=JPRS65447"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hypnosis and <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The report contains a description of the use of hypnosis and <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> and examines the physiological foundation. It includes a determination of the degree of susceptibility to <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> and hypnosis, the techniques to hypnosis, and the reactions of pat...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. I. Bul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.alzinfo.org/12/alz-guide/suggest-memory-screening"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggesting</span> a Memory Screening</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Suggesting</span> a Memory Screening... Text Size: Email This Post Print This Post <span class="hlt">Suggesting</span> a Memory Screening By Kevin Gault It can be a ... cognitive abilities, want to <span class="hlt">suggest</span> screening for possible memory deficit, but aren’t sure how to go ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3933256"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stable time patterns of railway suicides in Germany: comparative analysis of 7,187 cases across two <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">periods</span> (1995-1998; 2005-2008)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background The majority of fatalities on the European Union (EU) railways are suicides, representing about 60% of all railway fatalities. The aim of this study was to compare time patterns of suicidal behaviour on railway tracks in Germany between two <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">periods</span> (1995–1998 and 2005–2008) in order to investigate their stability and value in railway suicide prevention. Methods Cases were derived from the National Central Registry of person accidents on the German railway network (STABAG). The association of daytime, weekday and month with the mean number of suicides was analysed applying linear regression. Potential differences by <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> were assessed by adding <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> and the respective interaction terms into the linear regression. A 95% confidence interval for the mean number of suicides was computed using the t distribution. Results A total of 7,187 railway suicides were recorded within both <span class="hlt">periods</span>: 4,102 (57%) in the first <span class="hlt">period</span> (1995–1998) and 3,085 (43%) in the second (2005–2008). The number of railway suicides was highest on Mondays and Tuesdays in the first <span class="hlt">period</span> with an average of 3.2 and 3.5 events and of 2.6 events on both days in the second <span class="hlt">period</span>. In both <span class="hlt">periods</span>, railway suicides were more common between 6:00 am and noon, and between 6:00 pm and midnight. Seasonality was only prominent in the <span class="hlt">period</span> 1995–1998. Conclusions Over the course of two <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">periods</span>, the weekday and circadian patterns of railway suicides remained stable. Therefore, these patterns should be an integral part of railway suicide preventive measures, e.g. gatekeeper training courses.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ACPD...1327597Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimating Asian terrestrial carbon fluxes from CONTRAIL aircraft and surface CO2 <span class="hlt">observations</span> for the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2006 to 2010</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Current estimates of the terrestrial carbon fluxes in Asia ("Asia" refers to lands as far west as the Urals and is divided into Boreal Eurasia, Temperate Eurasia and tropical Asia based on TransCom regions) show large uncertainties particularly in the boreal and mid-latitudes and in China. In this paper, we present an updated carbon flux estimate for Asia by introducing aircraft CO2 measurements from the CONTRAIL (Comprehensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> Network for Trace gases by Airline) program into an inversion modeling system based on the CarbonTracker framework. We estimated the averaged annual total Asian terrestrial land CO2 sink was about -1.56 Pg C yr-1 over the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2006-2010, which offsets about one-third of the fossil fuel emission from Asia (+4.15 Pg C yr-1). The uncertainty of the terrestrial uptake estimate was derived from a set of sensitivity tests and ranged from -1.07 to -1.80 Pg C yr-1, comparable to the formal Gaussian error of ±1.18 Pg C yr-1 (1-sigma). The largest sink was found in forests, predominantly in coniferous forests (-0.64 Pg C yr-1) and mixed forests (-0.14 Pg C yr-1); and the second and third large carbon sinks were found in grass/shrub lands and crop lands, accounting for -0.44 Pg C yr-1 and -0.20 Pg C yr-1, respectively. The peak-to-peak amplitude of inter-annual variability (IAV) was 0.57 Pg C yr-1 ranging from -1.71 Pg C yr-1 to -2.28 Pg C yr-1. The IAV analysis reveals that the Asian CO2 sink was sensitive to climate variations, with the lowest uptake in 2010 concurrent with summer flood/autumn drought and the largest CO2 sink in 2009 owing to favorable temperature and plentiful precipitation conditions. We also found the inclusion of the CONTRAIL data in the inversion modeling system reduced the uncertainty by 11% over the whole Asian region, with a large reduction in the southeast of Boreal Eurasia, southeast of Temperate Eurasia and most Tropical Asian areas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, H. F.; Chen, B. Z.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; Machida, T.; Matsueda, H.; Sawa, Y.; Fukuyama, Y.; Labuschagne, C.; Langenfelds, R.; van der Schoot, M.; Xu, G.; Yan, J. W.; Zhou, L. X.; Tans, P. P.; Peters, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=motivating+AND+reluctant+AND+student&pg=2&id=EJ277928"> <span id="translatedtitle">Open to <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Offers <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for (1) using microcomputer programs for reading and spelling instruction, (2) helping students analyze multiple-choice tests, and (3) motivating reluctant readers through sports. (AEA)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Journal of Reading, 1983</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ac+AND+dc+AND+current&pg=2&id=ED245913"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chemistry Curricula. Course <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Listings of <span class="hlt">suggested</span> topics aimed at helping university and college faculties plan courses in the main areas of the chemistry curricula are provided. The <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> were originally offered as appendices to the American Chemical Society's (ACS) Committee on Professional Training's 1983 guidelines for ACS-approved schools. The course data included…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20030111483&hterms=wavelength&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3D%2522wavelength%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Comet 2P/Encke: Physical Properties of the Nucleus and First Visual-Wavelength Detection of Its Dust Trail</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We are conducting an <span class="hlt">observational</span> program designed to determine the overall distributions of size, shape, rotation <span class="hlt">period</span>, and surface characteristics of cometary nuclei. Here, we present results from a study of the Jupiter- family comet 2P/Encke based on <span class="hlt">observations</span> from Steward Observatory's 2.3m Bok Telescope at Kitt Peak. This comet has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> extensively in the past and was one of the primary flyby targets of the recently failed CONTOUR mission.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lowry, Stephen C.; Weissman, Paul R.; Sykes, Mark V.; Reach, William T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Ap%26SS.tmp..174E"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observation</span> of the <span class="hlt">period</span> ratio P 1/P 2 of transversal oscillations in solar macro-spicules</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze the time series of oxygen line profiles (Ouc(vi) 1031.93 Å and Ouc(vi) 1037.61 Å) obtained from SUMER/SOHO on the solar south limb. We calculated Doppler shifts and consequently Doppler velocities in three heights 4?, 14?, and 24? from the limb on a coronal hole region. Then, we performed wavelet analysis with Morlet wavelet transform to determine the <span class="hlt">periods</span> of fundamental mode and its first harmonic mode. The calculated <span class="hlt">period</span> ratios have departures from its canonical value of 2. The density stratification and magnetic twist are two main factors which may cause these departures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ebadi, H.; Khoshrangbaf, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42014582"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radar-<span class="hlt">observed</span> squall line propagation and the diurnal cycle of convection in Niamey, Niger, during the 2006 African Monsoon and Multidisciplinary Analyses Intensive <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Surface radar <span class="hlt">observations</span> near Niamey, Niger, during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) campaign in 2006 documented the structure, motion, and precipitation of cloud systems during the monsoon season. These unique <span class="hlt">observations</span> for that part of the Sahel were combined with satellite rain estimates and infrared satellite imagery to study the diurnal cycle of rainfall in Niamey, Niger. This study</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thomas Rickenbach; Rosana Nieto Ferreira; Nick Guy; Earle Williams</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22hexagonal%22&pg=4&id=EJ100730"> <span id="translatedtitle">Research <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Students</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Describes how to perform accurate research. Also includes <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for specific research projects under such headings as: (1) types; (2) environments; (3) interactions; (4) classification; (5) hexagonal model; and (6) differentiation. (HMV)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Holland, John L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000KFNT...16...49K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oscillations of the sun with a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 159.966 minutes in the Crimean 25-year <span class="hlt">observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Measurements of low-degree oscillations of the Sun were carried out at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory during 25 years (1974-1998; in all 1530 days, about 9733 hours). These data showed that within the frequency range near the 9th daily harmonic the most significant oscillation corresponds to the <span class="hlt">period</span> P1 = 159.9660± 0.0010 min. It agrees well with the main <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> PSt = 159.9663±0.0014 min found earlier in the similar Doppler measurements of the solar photosphere performed at the Stanford University in 1977-1994. The initial phase of the P1 oscillation is found to be remarkably stable over the entire 25-year interval. This phenomenon cannot be ascribed to some terrestrial cause or to an artifact of the data reduction procedure. It presents a challenging problem for the physics of the Sun and models of its interior structure.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kotov, V. A.; Khaneychuk, V. I.; Tsap, T. T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22889552"> <span id="translatedtitle">Babesia ovis infections: detailed clinical and laboratory <span class="hlt">observations</span> in the pre- and post-treatment <span class="hlt">periods</span> of 97 field cases.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ovine babesiosis, caused by Babesia ovis, is of major economic importance in Turkey. The changes in the blood profile of infected animals are informative about the course of infection. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the hematological and biochemical changes in the pre- and post-treatment <span class="hlt">periods</span> of the natural B. ovis infections. The presence of the parasites was confirmed by microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. On the basis of the clinical and laboratory findings, the infections were categorized into different groups according to the degree of anemia and the level of parasitemia. All infected sheep were treated with imidocarb dipropionate (IMDP). The blood pictures in the pre- and post-treatment <span class="hlt">periods</span> were compared. Pancytopenia occurred in animals with severe anemia and very high parasitemia, and bicytopenia in the other groups. The platelet count (PLT), plateletcrit (PCT) and mean platelet volume (MPV) returned to the normal ranges after treatment, except those in the group with severe anemia. In the biochemical profile, B. ovis infection caused an increase in blood urea nitrogen and total bilirubin, and these parameters returned to normal levels after treatment. The indirect fluorescein antibody test (IFAT) results showed that 38.1% of the cases raised specific antibodies during the <span class="hlt">period</span> of infection, with titers ranging from 1/160 to 1/640. All of 45 animals re-examined after treatment were seropositive, with high titers that rose up to 1/5120. PMID:22889552</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sevinc, Ferda; Sevinc, Mutlu; Ekici, Ozlem Derinbay; Yildiz, Ramazan; Isik, Nermin; Aydogdu, Ugur</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006MNRAS.367.1562W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dwarf nova oscillations and quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations in cataclysmic variables - IV. <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of frequency doubling and tripling in VW Hyi</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present new <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the rapid oscillations in the dwarf nova VW Hyi, made late in outburst. These dwarf nova oscillations (DNOs) increase in <span class="hlt">period</span> until they reach 33 s, when a transition to a strong 1st harmonic and weak fundamental takes place. After further <span class="hlt">period</span> increase, the 2nd harmonic appears; often all three components are present simultaneously. This 1:2:3 frequency suite is similar to what has been seen in some neutron star and black hole X-ray binaries, but has not previously been seen in a cataclysmic variable. When studied in detail, the fundamental and 2nd harmonic vary similarly in phase, but the 1st harmonic behaves independently, though keeping close to twice the frequency of the fundamental. The fundamental <span class="hlt">period</span> of the DNOs, as directly <span class="hlt">observed</span> or inferred from the harmonics, increases to ~100 s before the oscillation disappears as the star reaches quiescence. Its maximum <span class="hlt">period</span> is close to that of the `longer-<span class="hlt">period</span>' DNOs <span class="hlt">observed</span> in VW Hyi. The quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs), which have fundamental <span class="hlt">periods</span> 400-1000 s, behave in the same way, showing 1st and 2nd harmonics at approximately the same times as the DNOs. We explore some possible models. One in which the existence of the 1st harmonic is due to the transition from viewing a single accretion region to viewing two regions, and the rate of accretion on to the primary is modulated at the frequency of the 1st harmonic, as in the `beat frequency model', can generate the suite of DNO frequencies <span class="hlt">observed</span>. But the behaviour of the QPOs is not yet understood.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Warner, Brian; Woudt, Patrick A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=joining+AND+special&pg=6&id=ED109896"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> on Japanese Materials.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">After commenting briefly on the current state of instructional materials available to students and teachers of Japanese at a college level, the paper underlines the need for materials that deal specifically with aspects of Japanese culture, and outlines <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for possible materials. Graded intermediate materials that stress particularly the…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Miller, Roy Andrew</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jd/jd0415/2003JD003693/2003JD003693.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Physicochemical characteristics and radiative properties of Asian dust particles <span class="hlt">observed</span> at Kwangju, Korea, during the 2001 ACE-Asia intensive <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Optical properties of atmospheric extinction, scattering, and absorption coefficients were measured continuously with a transmissometer, an integrating nephelometer, and an aethalometer, respectively. Three Asian dust storm events had been <span class="hlt">observed</span> at Kwangju on 22 March, 11–13 April, and 25–26 April 2001. The physicochemical and optical properties of Asian dust aerosols were analyzed for those three cases and compared with those</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kyung W. Kim; Zhuanshi He; Young J. Kim</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54280659"> <span id="translatedtitle">Physicochemical characteristics and radiative properties of Asian dust particles <span class="hlt">observed</span> at Kwangju, Korea, during the 2001 ACE-Asia intensive <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Optical properties of atmospheric extinction, scattering, and absorption coefficients were measured continuously with a transmissometer, an integrating nephelometer, and an aethalometer, respectively. Three Asian dust storm events had been <span class="hlt">observed</span> at Kwangju on 22 March, 11-13 April, and 25-26 April 2001. The physicochemical and optical properties of Asian dust aerosols were analyzed for those three cases and compared with those</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kyung W. Kim; Zhuanshi He; Young J. Kim</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MNRAS.431.1167B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Detecting non-sinusoidal <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in <span class="hlt">observational</span> data: the von Mises periodogram for variable stars and exoplanetary transits</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper introduces an extension of the linear least-squares (or Lomb-Scargle) periodogram for the case when the model of the signal to be detected is non-sinusoidal and depends on unknown parameters in a non-linear manner. The problem of estimating the statistical significance of candidate <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> found using such non-linear periodograms is examined. This problem is related to the task of quantifying the distributions of the maximum values of these periodograms. Based on recent results in the mathematical theory of extreme values of a random field (the generalized Rice method), a general approach is provided to find a useful analytic approximation for these distributions. This approximation has the general form e^{-z} P(?{z}), where P is an algebraic polynomial and z is the periodogram maximum. The general tools developed in this paper can be used in a wide variety of astronomical applications, for instance in the study of variable stars and extra-solar planets. With this in mind, we develop and consider in detail the so-called von Mises periodogram - a specialized non-linear periodogram in which the signal is modelled by the von Mises <span class="hlt">periodic</span> function exp (? cos ?t). This simple function with an additional non-linear parameter ? can model the light curves of many astronomical objects that show various types of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> photometric variability. We prove that our approach can be perfectly applied to this non-linear periodogram. We provide a package of auxiliary C++ programs, attached as online-only material. These programs should facilitate the use of the von Mises periodogram in practice.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baluev, Roman V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMSM13D2117R"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> and Analysis of Whistler Mode Echoes during Quiet and Disturbed <span class="hlt">Periods</span>: Measurement of the Electron Density and Ion Effective Mass as a Function of Geomagnetic Activity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents the variation of electron density and ion effective mass (meff) as a function of geomagnetic activity. The study is based on the (1) analysis of whistler mode echoes <span class="hlt">observed</span> by RPI/IMAGE, (2) DMSP electron and ion density measurements at 840 km, and (3) ground transmitter signals spectral broadening <span class="hlt">observed</span> by RPI/IMAGE during both quiet (Kp<2-3 and -20 nT < Dst < 20 nT) and disturbed <span class="hlt">periods</span> in Aug-Dec 2005. A disturbed <span class="hlt">period</span> includes one or more geomagnetic storms (Kp >5 and Dst <-50 nT), their onset and recovery <span class="hlt">periods</span>. From Aug-Dec 2005, there was one disturbed <span class="hlt">period</span> (Aug 23-Sep 24), which includes three major (Dst < -100 nT) and two moderate (< -50 nT) geomagnetic storms. During this <span class="hlt">period</span> magnetospherically reflected (MR) and specularly reflected (SR) whistler mode (WM) echoes have been <span class="hlt">observed</span> on IMAGE [Sonwalkar et al., 2011]. Most often SR echoes are patchy, i.e. at few frequencies echoes are absent. A study of patchy echoes indicated that large scale irregularities, believed to be responsible for the absence of echoes, are present during both quiet and disturbed <span class="hlt">periods</span>. The ground transmitter signals showed evidence of spectral broadening during both quiet and disturbed <span class="hlt">periods</span>. The analysis of MR and SR echoes <span class="hlt">observed</span> during this disturbed <span class="hlt">period</span> allow us to study the variations in electron density and ion effective mass as a function of storm onset, main phase, and recovery <span class="hlt">period</span>. We selected six cases of WM radio sounding at L~2.0 at similar MLTs, one case before the first storm onset, one case during the main phase of the third storm, two cases during the subsequent recovery <span class="hlt">period</span> of the second storm, and two cases at the end of the recovery <span class="hlt">period</span> of the last storm. Raytracing analysis of these cases revealed that: (1) Compared to the preceding quiet time of the storm there was an increase in the electron density and then a decrease during the recovery <span class="hlt">period</span>. ( 2) Compared to the quiet conditions before and after the storm, there was an increase in meff at altitudes below ~ 1500 km during the recovery <span class="hlt">period</span>. The meff during the main phase of the storm is comparable to those calculated before the onset of the storm. An increase in meff during the recovery <span class="hlt">period</span> of the storm indicates an increase in the oxygen ion density and thus an increase in the O+- H+ transition height. (3) The transition height before the onset of the storm is ~1150 km, during the recovery <span class="hlt">period</span> of the storm it increased to ~ 1600 km and at the end of the recovery <span class="hlt">period</span> it again decreased to ~840 km. The results obtained from this analysis are in general agreement with those measured by the DMSP satellite at ~ 840 km. We believe that our work will shed light on understanding the response of the inner magnetosphere to geomagnetic storms.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reddy, A.; Sonwalkar, V. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001hell.confE..51M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energetic Ion Distributions, Spectra and <span class="hlt">Periodicities</span> (~5/10hr) <span class="hlt">observed</span> by Ulysses in the outer high latitude dusk-side Jovian magnetosphere</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Examination of Ulysses' <span class="hlt">observations</span> during the spacecraft fly-by of Jupiter reveals the following picture for energetic ions in the Jovian outer (high latitude) dusk-side magnetosphere: (1) The ion flux decreases as Ulysses moves toward higher south latitudes; more intense decrease was detected at higher energies. (2) At middle latitudes, the energy spectrum is well described by a power law over the whole energy range (~60 - ~4000 keV) covered by the HI-SCALE instrument. At higher latitudes, the spectrum is softer and is composed by two parts described by different power laws. (3) The spectral shape varies <span class="hlt">periodically</span> (5/10hr <span class="hlt">period</span>). The <span class="hlt">observations</span> are explained in terms of a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> motion of the s/c within a large scale region of energetic ions in the outer magnetosphere with different characteristics from the magnetodisc plasma sheet.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marhavilas, P. K.; Anagnostopoulos, G. C.; Sarris, E. T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2334-8-137.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Blood culture collection technique and pneumococcal surveillance in Malawi during the four year <span class="hlt">period</span> 2003–2006: an <span class="hlt">observational</span> study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">BACKGROUND: Blood culture surveillance will be used for assessing the public health effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in Africa. Between 2003 and 2006 we assessed blood culture outcome and performance in adult patients in the central public hospital in Blantyre, Malawi, before and after the introduction of a dedicated nurse led blood culture team. METHODS: A prospective <span class="hlt">observational</span> study. RESULTS:</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Neema Mtunthama; Stephen B Gordon; Eduard E Zijlstra; Malcolm E Molyneux; Neil French</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010cosp...38.1019B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Signatures of long <span class="hlt">period</span> Kelvin waves in the low latitude mesosphere <span class="hlt">observed</span> by MF radar winds and SABER/TIMED temperature during 2007 Indian summer monsoon</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of MF radar winds and SABER/TIMED temperature reveals that the presence of long <span class="hlt">period</span> Kelvin waves with <span class="hlt">period</span> nearly 23 days and 16 days in the low latitude mesosphere during Indian summer monsoon <span class="hlt">period</span> (June-September). Spectral analysis of MF radar winds and SABER temperature for the year 2007 indicate the presence of these waves with <span class="hlt">periods</span> nearly 16 and 23 day during Indian summer monsoons. Consistent with the characteristics of the Kelvin waves, these waves are dominantly present in zonal winds, and in SABER Temper-ature. These waves are <span class="hlt">observed</span> with maximum amplitudes of 7 m/s and vertical wavelength of 40 km in the mesospheric winds and maximum amplitude of 5 K in SABER Temperature. The dominant presence of these slow-phase speed waves at mesospheric altitudes motivated us to investigate the origin and vertical propagation characteristics of these waves. The NCEP winds at underlying stratospheric altitudes and OLR data as a proxy for tropical convection are also employed for the analysis. Space-time Fourier analysis of NCEP winds and OLR show the presence of these <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> with zonal wavenumber 1 indicating that tropical convection is the potential source for these waves and westward phase of stratospheric QBO winds might have favoured these waves to reach mesosphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bhagavathiammal G. J.; Sundararaman, Sathishkumar; Sundhararajan, Sridharan; Lal, Manohar; Gurubaran, Subramanian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/11295242"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inner magnetosphere variations after Solar Proton Events. <span class="hlt">Observations</span> on Mir space station in 1989–1994 time <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Measurements on board the Mir space station have been used to study the dose rate and the particle flux distribution in the inner magnetosphere. The measurements have been performed with the Bulgarian-Russian dosimeter-radiometer Liulin. The paper concentrates on the dynamics of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> “new” and “second” maxima which were created after Solar Proton Events (SPE) in the 1989–1994 time. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ts. P. Dachev; J. V. Semkova; Yu. N Matviichuk; B. T. Tomov; R. T. Koleva; P. T. Baynov; V. M. Petrov; V. V. Shurshakov; Yu. Ivanov</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRA..117.9318T"> <span id="translatedtitle">First <span class="hlt">observational</span> evidence for opposite zonal electric fields in equatorial E and F region altitudes during a geomagnetic storm <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The strong westward electrojet and simultaneous upward drift of the equatorial ionospheric peak <span class="hlt">observed</span> over South-East Asia and Indian equatorial regions during the prolonged Dst minimum phase of an intense geomagnetic storm during 14-15 December 2006 are investigated for the altitudinal variation of zonal electric field polarity using ground based and space-borne <span class="hlt">observations</span>. The results show first <span class="hlt">observational</span> evidence for simultaneous existence of daytime westward and eastward zonal electric fields at equatorial E and F region altitudes, respectively, in a wide longitude sector. While the westward electric fields at E region altitudes cause westward electrojet, at the same time, the eastward zonal electric fields at F region altitudes cause the upward drift of the equatorial ionospheric peak and reinforcement of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) even in the topside ionosphere (˜660 km). The reversal of the electric fields is found to occur at ˜280 km height. A clear bifurcation of F region plasma at ˜280 km is evident in the iso-electron density contours due to these oppositely polarized zonal electric fields, which manifests as an unusually deep cusp between F1 and F2 layers on equatorial ionograms.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tulasi Ram, S.; Balan, N.; Veenadhari, B.; Gurubaran, S.; Ravindran, S.; Tsugawa, T.; Liu, H.; Niranjan, K.; Nagatsuma, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004JGRD..10919S02K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Physicochemical characteristics and radiative properties of Asian dust particles <span class="hlt">observed</span> at Kwangju, Korea, during the 2001 ACE-Asia intensive <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Optical properties of atmospheric extinction, scattering, and absorption coefficients were measured continuously with a transmissometer, an integrating nephelometer, and an aethalometer, respectively. Three Asian dust storm events had been <span class="hlt">observed</span> at Kwangju on 22 March, 11-13 April, and 25-26 April 2001. The physicochemical and optical properties of Asian dust aerosols were analyzed for those three cases and compared with those <span class="hlt">observed</span> under clean, marine, and hazy urban atmospheric conditions. Their chemical composition varied depending on the source region and the transport path of the air mass. The first Asian dust storm particles, which originated from the northwestern Chinese desert regions, showed typical dust aerosol characteristics of high loading of mineral dust. The second one, which originated initially from the northwestern Chinese desert regions, had been impacted by long-range-transported air pollutants, resulting in increased concentrations of sulfate and organic carbon particles. The third one, which originated from the northeastern Chinese sandy areas, had traveled south to Kwangju, resulting in increased elemental carbon and organic carbon concentrations. Aerosol chemical and optical properties under clean continental, southeastern marine, and stagnant local pollution conditions were also analyzed. The mass scattering coefficient and single-scattering albedo in the fine and coarse modes were determined for three Asian dust event days. The concentration of black carbon (BC) aerosol in the fine and coarse modes was measured with an aethalometer by alternately switching between a particulate-matter-smaller-than-2.5-?m (PM2.5) and a PM10 inlet to it. It was found that BC mass concentration in the coarse mode measured by an aethalometer (BCac) increased because of agglomerated black carbon particles and high loading of dust particles. Single-scattering albedo ? increased to 0.93, 0.90, and 0.84 for the three Asian dust events, respectively, while it was 0.85 for mean ? during other times.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Kyung W.; He, Zhuanshi; Kim, Young J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010093230&hterms=MIT&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DMIT"> <span id="translatedtitle">Earth <span class="hlt">Observing</span>-1 Advanced Imager Flight Performance Assessment: Investigating Dark Current Stability Over One-Half Orbit <span class="hlt">Period</span> during the First 60 Days</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The stability of the EO-1 Advanced Land Imager dark current levels over the <span class="hlt">period</span> of one-half orbit is investigated. A series of two-second dark current collections, over the course of 40 minutes, was performed during the first sixty days the instrument was in orbit. Analysis of this data indicates only two dark current reference <span class="hlt">periods</span>, obtained entering and exiting eclipse, are required to remove ALI dark current offsets for 99.9% of the focal plane to within 1.5 digital numbers for any <span class="hlt">observation</span> on the solar illuminated portion of the orbit.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mendenhall, J. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRD..119.2990A"> <span id="translatedtitle">The low-level jet dust emission mechanism in the central Sahara: <span class="hlt">Observations</span> from Bordj-Badji Mokhtar during the June 2011 Fennec Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">paper presents the first detailed analysis of low-level jets (LLJs) in the central Sahara from ground-based <span class="hlt">observations</span> at Bordj-Badji Mokhtar, Algeria, and addresses their operation as a dust emission mechanism. On LLJ mornings, composite wind speeds in the core (300 m aboveground level) reach 13.5 m s-1 at 0400. Surface temperatures increase from 0545 (30 min after sunrise), and jet decay begins around 0600. Ten meter winds lag those in the core by 5 h; peak 10 m wind speed, 7.5 m s-1, occurs at 0900. Only the deepest and strongest LLJs lead to dust emission. At 0600, these five LLJs have core wind speeds ?16 m s-1, below-core wind shear ? 0.6 m s-1/30 m, and wind shear between the core and 500 m above the core ?-1.8 m s-1. On these occasions, momentum mixes down from the LLJ after surface heating, leading to emission. On nondusty LLJ mornings, the convective boundary layer is 100 m shallower, and the LLJ is too weak to provide enough momentum to be mixed down for emission. LLJs are most frequently embedded in the monsoon flow or in the Harmattan; there is a clear association with the Saharan Heat Low. ERA-Interim reanalysis underestimates both Harmattan and monsoon LLJ core winds (by 4 m s-1 and 6 m s-1, respectively). The Met Office Africa Limited Area Model underestimates Harmattan LLJ core winds by only 0.2 m s-1. Monsoon LLJ core winds, however, are underestimated by 8.5 m s-1. Surface winds at 0900 are underestimated in both cases by up to 6 m s-1.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Allen, Christopher J. T.; Washington, Richard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jc/v086/iC10/JC086iC10p09698/JC086iC10p09698.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inertio-Gravity Wave Induced Accelerations of Mean Flow Having an Imposed <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Component: Implications for Tidal <span class="hlt">Observations</span> in the Meteor Region</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The semidiurnal harmonic exhibits great day-to-day variability in amplitude and phase. In addition, the variability appears to be substantially local and random, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a connection with gravity wave activity. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that a significant contribution to the <span class="hlt">observed</span> semidiurnal harmonic at meteor heights might result from inertio-gravity wave induced accelerations of the mean flow. The rate of wave forcing of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. L. Walterscheid</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA004426"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hypnosuggestive Therapy (Treatment by <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span> in Hypnosis).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Contents: A brief history of hypnosis; The theoretical foundations of hypnosis; The method of hypnotizing and verbal <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> in hypnosis; Indications for treatment by hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>; Clinical <span class="hlt">observations</span>; The role of hypno <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> therapy in e...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. M. Varshavskii</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1785/0120050090"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-<span class="hlt">period</span> effects of the Denali earthquake on water bodies in the Puget Lowland: <span class="hlt">Observations</span> and modeling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Analysis of strong-motion instrument recordings in Seattle, Washington, resulting from the 2002 Mw 7.9 Denali, Alaska, earthquake reveals that amplification in the 0.2-to 1.0-Hz frequency band is largely governed by the shallow sediments both inside and outside the sedimentary basins beneath the Puget Lowland. Sites above the deep sedimentary strata show additional seismic-wave amplification in the 0.04- to 0.2-Hz frequency range. Surface waves generated by the Mw 7.9 Denali, Alaska, earthquake of 3 November 2002 produced pronounced water waves across Washington state. The largest water waves coincided with the area of largest seismic-wave amplification underlain by the Seattle basin. In the current work, we present reports that show Lakes Union and Washington, both located on the Seattle basin, are susceptible to large water waves generated by large local earthquakes and teleseisms. A simple model of a water body is adopted to explain the generation of waves in water basins. This model provides reasonable estimates for the water-wave amplitudes in swimming pools during the Denali earthquake but appears to underestimate the waves <span class="hlt">observed</span> in Lake Union.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barberopoulou, A.; Qamar, A.; Pratt, T. L.; Steele, W. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JASS...30..175O"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observation</span> of <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> and Transient Cosmic Ray Flux Variations by the Daejeon Neutron Monitor and the Seoul muon Detector</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recently, two instruments of cosmic ray are operating in South Korea. One is Seoul muon detector after October 1999 and the other is Daejeon neutron monitor (Kang et al. 2012) after October 2011. The former consists of four small plastic scintillators and the latter is the standard 18 NM 64 type. In this report, we introduce the characteristics of both instruments. We also analyze the flux variations of cosmic ray such as diurnal variation and Forbush decrease. As the result, the muon flux shows the typical seasonal and diurnal variations. The neutron flux also shows the diurnal variation. The phase which shows the maximum flux in the diurnal variation is around 13-14 local time. We found a Forbush decrease on 7 March 2012 by both instruments. It is also identified by Nagoya multi-direction muon telescope and Oulu neutron monitor. The <span class="hlt">observation</span> of cosmic ray at Jangbogo station as well as in Korean peninsula can support the important information on space weather in local area. It can also enhance the status of Korea in the international community of cosmic ray experiments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oh, Suyeon; Kang, Jeongsoo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24824766"> <span id="translatedtitle">Difference in production routes of water-soluble organic carbon in PM2.5 <span class="hlt">observed</span> during non-biomass and biomass burning <span class="hlt">periods</span> in Gwangju, Korea.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">4 h integrated PM2.5 samples were collected from an urban site of Gwangju, Korea, for five days and analyzed for organic carbon and elemental carbon (OC and EC), total water-soluble OC (WSOC), hydrophilic and hydrophobic WSOC fractions (WSOCHPI and WSOCHPO), oxalate, and inorganic ionic species (sodium (Na(+)), ammonium (NH4(+)), potassium (K(+)), calcium (Ca(2+)), magnesium (Mg(2+)), chloride (Cl(-)), nitrate (NO3(-)), and sulfate (SO4(2-))) to investigate the possible sources of water-soluble organic aerosols. Two types of sampling <span class="hlt">periods</span> were classified according to the regression relationship between black carbon (BC) concentrations measured at wavelengths of 370 nm (BC370nm) and 880 nm (BC880nm) using an aethalometer; the first <span class="hlt">period</span> was traffic emission influence ("non-biomass burning (BB) <span class="hlt">period</span>") and the second was biomass burning influence ("BB <span class="hlt">period</span>"). The slope of the regression equation (BC370nm/BC880nm) was 0.95 for the non-BB <span class="hlt">period</span> and 1.29 for the BB <span class="hlt">period</span>. However, no noticeable difference in the WSOC/OC ratio, which can be used to infer the extent of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, was found between the non-BB (0.61, range = 0.43-0.75) and BB (0.61, range = 0.52-0.68) <span class="hlt">periods</span>, due to significant contribution of primary BB emissions to the WSOC. The concentrations of OC, WSOC and K(+), which were used as the BB emission markers, were 15.7 ?g C m(-3) (11.5-24.3), 9.4 ?g C m(-3) (7.0-12.7), and 1.2 ?g m(-3) (0.6-2.7), respectively, during the BB <span class="hlt">period</span>, and these results were approximately 1.7, 1.7, and 3.9 times higher than those during the non-BB <span class="hlt">period</span>. During the non-BB <span class="hlt">period</span>, good correlations among WSOC, SO4(2-) and oxalate, and poor correlations among WSOC, EC, and K(+) <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that SOA is probably an important source of WSOC (and WSOCHPI) concentration. For the WSOC fractions, better correlations among WSOCHPI, oxalate (R(2) = 0.52), and SO4(2-) (R(2) = 0.57) were found than among WSOCHPO, oxalate (R(2) = 0.23), and SO4(2-) (R(2) = 0.20), <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that a significant proportion of the WSOCHPI fraction of OC could be produced through processes (gas-phase and heterogeneous oxidations) such as SOA formation. However, during the BB <span class="hlt">period</span>, the BB emission source accounted for the high correlations between total WSOC (and WSOC fractions) and other relevant atmospheric parameters (EC, Na(+), Cl(-), K(+), and oxalate), with higher correlations in WSOCHPI than in WSOCHPO. These results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a significant contribution of BB emissions to WSOC. PMID:24824766</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yu, Geun-Hye; Cho, Sung-Yong; Bae, Min-Suk; Park, Seung-Shik</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JASTP..99..123M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Non-typical ground-based quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> VLF emissions <span class="hlt">observed</span> at L˜5.3 under quiet geomagnetic conditions at night</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Non-typical long lasting quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> (QP) VLF emissions have been recorded in Northern Finland at L˜5.3 during the recent Finnish VLF campaign held in December 2011. Contrary to the typical daytime QP emissions, the night-time and early morning (00-05UT) event reported here for the first time is a sequence of 1.5-3.5kHz noise bursts lasting for several tens of seconds with an unusually long repetition <span class="hlt">period</span> which gradually decreases from ˜700s to ˜50s. These QP emissions were <span class="hlt">observed</span> under conditions of very quiet geomagnetic activity (Kp=0). In spite of that, the interplanetary magnetic field generally had a small southward component, and a high-latitude substorm occurred on the night-side. After this substorm, the repetition <span class="hlt">period</span> of the VLF bursts suddenly dropped from ˜200s to˜60s and the spectral structure of QP wave changed. We attribute these QP emissions to auto-oscillations of the cyclotron instability of the Earth's radiation belts. According to the theory, the repetition <span class="hlt">period</span> of the QP should be inversely proportional to the flux of the gyroresonant energetic electrons. Thus the increased flux of energetic electrons injected by the substorm probably led to the decreasing QP repetition <span class="hlt">periods</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Manninen, J.; Kleimenova, N. G.; Kozyreva, O. V.; Bespalov, P. A.; Kozlovsky, A. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48271657"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relations between Sea Surface Temperature and Air-Sea Heat Flux at <span class="hlt">Periods</span> from 1 Day to 1 Year <span class="hlt">Observed</span> at Ocean Buoy Stations around Japan</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Relations between sea-surface temperature (T\\u000a s) and heat flux at the sea surface (F) have been investigated using data from ocean <span class="hlt">observation</span> buoys located off Shikoku in the Sea of Japan and in the East China\\u000a Sea. Wavelet transformation decomposed F and T\\u000a s to wavelet coefficients (WLC) in the <span class="hlt">period</span>-time domain. Assuming one-dimensional heat transfer by eddy diffusion in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hiroshi Murakami; Hiroshi Kawamura</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12388012"> <span id="translatedtitle">Swift\\/XRT <span class="hlt">observes</span> the fifth outburst of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> supergiant fast X-ray transient IGR J11215-5952</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Context: The hard X-ray transient source IGR J11215-5952 was discovered in April 2005 with INTEGRAL and is a confirmed member of the new class of high mass X-ray binaries, the supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs). Archival INTEGRAL data and RXTE <span class="hlt">observations</span> have shown that the outbursts occur with a <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of ~330 days. Thus, IGR J11215-5952 is the first SFXT</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. Romano; L. Sidoli; V. Mangano; S. Mereghetti; G. Cusumano</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48903493"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of modeled electron densities and electron and ion temperatures with Arecibo <span class="hlt">observations</span> during undisturbed and geomagnetic storm <span class="hlt">periods</span> of 7–11 September 2005</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The electron density and the electron and ion temperatures measured by the Arecibo radar at 496 km altitude and NmF2 <span class="hlt">observed</span> by the Puerto Rico ionosonde are compared with those produced by the model of the ionosphere and plasmasphere to study the time-dependent response of the ionosphere to geomagnetic forcing during the undisturbed and geomagnetic storm <span class="hlt">periods</span> of 7–11 September</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. V. Pavlov; N. M. Pavlova</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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style="font-weight: bold;">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20788215"> <span id="translatedtitle">An <span class="hlt">observational</span> study <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> clinical benefit for adjuvant postoperative chemoradiation in a population of over 500 cases after gastric resection with D2 nodal dissection for adenocarcinoma of the stomach</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose: The role of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in D2-resected gastric-cancer patients has not been defined yet. We investigated the effect of postoperative chemoradiotherapy on the relapse rate and survival rate of patients with D2-resected gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: From August 1995 to April 2001, 544 patients received postoperative CRT after curative D2 resection. During the same <span class="hlt">period</span> of time, 446 patients received surgery without further adjuvant treatment. The adjuvant CRT consisted of 400 mg/m{sup 2} of fluorouracil plus 20 mg/m{sup 2} of leucovorin for 5 days, followed by 4,500 cGy of radiotherapy for 5 weeks, with fluorouracil and leucovorin on the first 4 and the last 3 days of radiotherapy. Two 5-day cycles of fluorouracil and leucovorin were given 4 weeks after the completion of radiotherapy. Results: The median duration of overall survival was significantly longer in the CRT group than in the comparison group (95.3 months vs. 62.6 months), which corresponds to a hazard ratio for death of 0.80 (p = 0.0200) or a reduction of 20% in the risk of death in the CRT group. The 5-year survival rates were consistently longer in the CRT group at Stages II, IIIA, IIIB, and IV than those in the comparison group. The CRT was associated with increases in the median duration of relapse-free survival (75.6 months vs. 52.7 months; hazard ratio for relapse, 0.80, p = 0.0160). Conclusion: Our results highly <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the postoperative chemoradiotherapy in D2-resected gastric-cancer patients can prolong survival and decrease recurrence.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Sung [Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Do Hoon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeeyun [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Won Ki [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: wkkang@smc.samsung.co.kr; MacDonald, John S. [Gastrointestinal Oncology Service, Saint Vincent's Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Park, Chan Hyung [Center for the Improvement of Human Functioning International, Inc., Wichita, KS (United States); Park, Se Hoon [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Se-Hoon [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kihyun [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Joon Oh; Kim, Won Seog; Jung, Chul Won; Park, Young Suk; Im, Young-Hyuck [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Tae Sung; Noh, Jae Hyung; Heo, Jin Seok; Kim, Yong Il [Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chul Keun [Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Keunchil [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001tysc.confE..46B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chandra HETGS and VLA Radio <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of the Active Coronae on the Short-<span class="hlt">Period</span> Binary ER Vul (G0 V + G5 V)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present results from a long (114 ksec) Chandra HETGS <span class="hlt">observation</span> of the short <span class="hlt">period</span> (Porb = 0.69 d) active binary ER Vul, which consists of two solar-like dwarfs with rotation rates ~ 40 times that of the Sun. X-ray spectra were obtained on 2001 March 29-30 along with 12 hours of simultaneous VLA monitoring at 3.6 and 20 cm. The Chandra Medium Energy Grating (MEG) covers the wavelength range 1.8 - 25 Å in first order, while the High Energy Grating (HEG) covers 1.8-18 Å. ER Vul showed continuous low-level variability throughout the <span class="hlt">observation</span> with the largest flare peaking at slightly more than twice the ``quiescent'' level. Contrary to the behaviour of most longer <span class="hlt">period</span> active binaries, no large, long-duration flares were detected, consistent with previous X-ray <span class="hlt">observations</span> of this binary. The largest flare detected has a duration of only ~ 30 minutes, and appears to be very ``solar-like''. Unfortunately this flare was not <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the radio. The 20 cm radio emission does show a highly polarized (LCP) flare that has at best only a weak X-ray resonse. We characterise the flare-related variability seen in the coronal line and continuum emission, place limits on any orbital phase-related variability, and quantify the quiescent coronal temperature and density distributions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brown, Alexander; Osten, Rachel A.; Ayres, Thomas R.; Harper, Graham</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55895045"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> quasicrystal</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is shown that the icosahedral quasicrystal and the recently <span class="hlt">observed</span> T phase are closely related to each other. The latter is a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> stacking of two-dimensional quasilattices with mirror symmetry. Their diffraction patterns, though appearing very different, can be indexed by a set of primary vectors that are only small deformations of each other. However, because of the mirror</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T.-L. Ho</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3958923"> <span id="translatedtitle">Prognostic Factors for Long-Term Survival in Patients with Ampullary Carcinoma: The Results of a 15-Year <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> after Pancreaticoduodenectomy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Introduction. Although ampullary carcinoma has the best prognosis among all periampullary carcinomas, its long-term survival remains low. Prognostic factors are only available for a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 10 years after pancreaticoduodenectomy. The aim of this retrospective study was to identify factors that influence the long-term patient survival over a 15-year <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span>. Methods. From 1992 to 2007, 143 patients with ampullary carcinoma underwent pancreatic resection. 86 patients underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (60%) and 57 patients underwent standard Kausch-Whipple pancreaticoduodenectomy (40%). Results. The overall 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year survival rates were 79%, 40%, 24%, and 10%, respectively. Within a mean <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> of 30 (0–205) months, 100 (69%) patients died. Survival analysis showed that positive lymph node involvement (P = 0.001), lymphatic vessel invasion (P = 0.0001), intraoperative administration of packed red blood cells (P = 0.03), an elevated CA 19-9 (P = 0.03), jaundice (P = 0.04), and an impaired patient condition (P = 0.01) are strong negative predictors for a reduced patient survival. Conclusions. Patients with ampullary carcinoma have distinctly better long-term survival than patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Long-term survival depends strongly on lymphatic nodal and vessel involvement. Moreover, a preoperative elevated CA 19-9 proved to be a significant prognostic factor. Adjuvant therapy may be essential in patients with this risk constellation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jacob, Dietmar; Bahra, Marcus; Puhl, Gero; Krannich, Alexander; Andreou, Andreas; Gul, Safak; Guckelberger, Olaf</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21713602"> <span id="translatedtitle">From "<span class="hlt">Periodical</span> <span class="hlt">Observations</span>" to "Anthochronology" and "Phenology" - the scientific debate between Adolphe Quetelet and Charles Morren on the origin of the word "Phenology".</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mankind has <span class="hlt">observed</span> and documented life cycle stages of plants and animals for a long time. However, it was comparatively recently that the newly emerging science was given its name. The name of Charles Morren and the year 1853 are being cited, although not frequently. Exact information is hardly known among present-day phenologists, yet new evidence shows that the term "phenology" was already in use in 1849. In the early 1840s, physicist and astronomer Adolphe Quetelet set up an <span class="hlt">observational</span> network named "<span class="hlt">Observations</span> of <span class="hlt">periodical</span> Phenomena of the Animal and Vegetable Kingdom" and issued instructions for it. Even though biologist Charles Morren welcomed Quetelet's initiative, differences between Morren and Quentlet regarding the instructions for the <span class="hlt">observations</span> and the potential results soon arose and a debate started, which lasted for nearly 10 years. In the wake of these disagreements, Morren was compelled to create a new term to denote his ideas on "<span class="hlt">periodical</span> phenomena". At first, he temporally used the word anthochronology, but in the end he coined the word phenology. The term was first used in a public lecture at the Académie royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique' in Brussels on 16 December 1849, and simultaneously in the December 1849 issue of volume V of the Annales de la Société royale d'Agriculture et de Botanique de Gand. One had to wait until 1853 before the new name appeared in the title of one of Morren's publications. Based on evidence from archives and original publications, we trace the 10-year-long scientific debate between Morren and Quetelet. Morren states his biologist's view on the subject and extends the more climate-related definition of Quetelet of "<span class="hlt">periodical</span> phenomena". PMID:21713602</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Demarée, Gaston R; Rutishauser, This</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004PhyB..346..387O"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observation</span> of high-order quasi-one-dimensional <span class="hlt">periodic</span> orbit resonance in (DMET) 2I 3 and its fermi surface</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Magneto-optical measurements of a quasi-one-dimensional (q1D) organic superconductor (DMET) 2I 3 has been performed by using a cavity perturbation technique. Several resonant absorption lines, which can be attributed to the q1D <span class="hlt">periodic</span> orbit resonance (q1D POR), as well as the quite unusual high-order q1D POR coming from the corrugated Fermi surface (FS) in the interlayer direction were <span class="hlt">observed</span>. Moreover, other harmonic resonances are also <span class="hlt">observed</span> when the AC electric field is applied along the c*-axis. We will also show its estimated q1D FS from the data analysis where the estimated FS clearly shows why there is no spin-density-wave or charge-density-wave transition in (DMET) 2I 3 despite having a q1D FS.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oshima, Y.; Kimata, M.; Kishigi, K.; Ohta, H.; Koyama, K.; Motokawa, M.; Nishikawa, H.; Kikuchi, K.; Ikemoto, I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014A%26A...561A.117E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Swift X-ray and ultraviolet <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the shortest orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> double-degenerate system RX J0806.3+1527 (HM Cnc)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The system RX J0806.3+1527 (HM Cnc) is a pulsating X-ray source with 100 per cent modulation on a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 321.5 s (5.4 min). This <span class="hlt">period</span> reflects the orbital motion of a close binary consisting of two interacting white dwarfs. Here we present a series of simultaneous X-ray (0.2-10 keV) and near-ultraviolet (2600 Å and 1928 Å) <span class="hlt">observations</span> that were carried out with the Swift satellite. In the near-ultraviolet, the counterpart of RX J0806.3+1527 was detected at flux densities consistent with a blackbody with a temperature of (27 ± 8) × 103 K. We found that the emission at 2600 Å is modulated at the 321.5-s <span class="hlt">period</span> with the peak ahead of the X-ray one by 0.28 ± 0.02 cycles and is coincident within ± 0.05 cycles with the optical. This phase-shift measurement confirms that the X-ray hot spot (located on the primary white dwarf) is at about 80°-100° from the direction that connects the two white dwarfs. Albeit at lower significance, the 321.5-s signature is also present in the 1928-Å data; at this wavelength, however, the pulse peak is better aligned with that <span class="hlt">observed</span> at X-rays. We use the constraints on the source luminosity and the geometry of the emitting regions to discuss the merits and limits of the main models for RX J0806.3+1527.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Esposito, Paolo; Israel, Gian Luca; Dall'Osso, Simone; Covino, Stefano</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JGRA..114.7105M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Short-<span class="hlt">period</span> variability in the galactic cosmic ray intensity: High statistical resolution <span class="hlt">observations</span> and interpretation around the time of a Forbush decrease in August 2006</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On 20 August 2006 a Forbush decrease <span class="hlt">observed</span> at Polar in the Earth's magnetosphere was also seen at the INTEGRAL spacecraft outside the magnetosphere during a very active time in the solar wind. High-resolution energetic particle data from ACE SIS, the Polar high-sensitivity telescope, and INTEGRAL's Ge detector saturation rate, which measures the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) background with a threshold of ˜200 MeV, show similar, short-<span class="hlt">period</span> GCR variations in and around the Forbush decrease. Focusing upon the GCR intensity within a 3-day interval from 19 August 2006 to 21 August 2006 reveals many intensity variations in the GCR on a variety of time scales and amplitudes. These intensity variations are greater than the 3? error in all the data sets used. The fine structures in the GCR intensities along with the Forbush decrease are propagated outward from ACE to the Earth with very little change. The solar wind speed stays relatively constant during these <span class="hlt">periods</span>, indicating that parcels of solar wind are transporting the GCR population outward in the heliosphere. This solar wind convection of GCR fine structure is <span class="hlt">observed</span> for both increases and decreases in GCR intensity, and the fine structure increases and decreases are bracketed by solar wind magnetic field discontinuities associated with interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) magnetosheath regions, clearly seen as discontinuous rotations of the field components at ACE and at Wind. Interestingly, the electron heat flux shows different flux tube connectivity also associated with the different regions of the ICME and magnetosheath. Gosling et al. (2004) first discussed the idea that solar energetic particle intensities commonly undergo dispersionless modulation in direct association with discontinuous changes in the solar wind electron strahl. The <span class="hlt">observations</span> show that the intensity levels in the GCR flux may undergo a similar partitioning, possibly because of the different magnetic field regions having differing magnetic topologies.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mulligan, T.; Blake, J. B.; Shaul, D.; Quenby, J. J.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Galametz, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27..438C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Low Latitude Field-aligned Irregularities <span class="hlt">Observed</span> In The E Region With The Piura Vhf Radar: Morphology, Long-term <span class="hlt">Periodicities</span> and Their Relationship With Sporadic E Layers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Between 1991 and 1999, the Piura VHF radar (5.2S, 80.6W, 7.0N dip latitude) in northern Peru has been operated intermittently to <span class="hlt">observe</span> coherent backscatter from 3-m E-region field-aligned irregularities. These echoes are detected by pointing the antenna beam to the north at 14 zenith angle, i.e., perpendicular to the magnetic field lines, in an area just outside the equatorial electrojet zone and far from mid latitudes. Studies of these <span class="hlt">observations</span> have shown that the spectral and diurnal characteris- tics of backscatter are reminiscent of midlatitude E region irregularities rather than those at the equatorial electrojet. Since January 2000, "continuous" (2 minutes every 12 minutes) <span class="hlt">observations</span> have been started in order to study in more detail the diur- nal and seasonal morphology of backscatter. In this paper, we analyze these data to study the morphology of the echoes (diurnal and seasonal) and compare it to the mor- phology of sporadic E (Es) layers <span class="hlt">observed</span> in low latitude ionosonde stations. The results show the occurrence of the Piura E region irregularities to be in close relation with the characteristics of Es layers and their morphology. This indicates that E re- gion coherent backscatter even at very low latitudes is basically of the same nature as that <span class="hlt">observed</span> at midlatitude, therefore it relates to plasma instabilities operating inside Es layers. In addition, we investigate the long-term (<span class="hlt">periods</span> of days) variability seen in echo occurrence and intensity of the Piura backscatter and examine how these variations compare with similar ones measured at midlatitude, and also their possible relationship with planetary waves which are known to exist in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chau, J. L.; Haldoupis, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/15010671"> <span id="translatedtitle">Twenty-Four-Hour Raman Lidar Water Vapor Measurements During the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's 1996 and 1997 Water Vapor Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Prior to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's first water vapor intensive <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> (WVIOP) at the Cloud and Radiation Testbed site near Lamont, Oklahoma, an automated 24-h Raman lidar was delivered to the site. This instrument, which makes high-resolution measurements of water vapor both spatially and temporally, is capable of making these measurements with no operator interaction (other than initial startup) for days at a time. Water vapor measurements collected during the 1996 and 1997 WVIOPs are discussed here, illustrating both the nighttime and daytime capabilities of this system. System characteristics, calibration issues, and techniques are presented. Finally, detailed intercomparisons of the lidar's data with those from a microwave radiometer, radiosondes, an instrumented tower, a chilled mirror flown on both a tethersonde and a kite, and measurements from aircraft are shown and discussed, highlighting the accuracy and stability of this system for both nighttime and daytime measurements.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Turner, David D.; Goldsmith, JE M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940017132&hterms=indian+navy&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dindian%2Bnavy"> <span id="translatedtitle">A synoptic-scale overview of the TOGA COARE intensive <span class="hlt">observing</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> November 1992 to February 1993 based on analyses from US operational global data assimilation systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The operational global analyses from the two major U.S. numerical weather prediction centers, the Navy's Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center and the National Meteorological Center, are used to describe the synoptic-scale features of the 1 Nov. 1992 to 28 Feb. 1993 TOGA COARE intensive <span class="hlt">observing</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> (IOP). TOGA COARE is an international field experiment in which a large number of research scientists from the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (Code 910) and the Laboratory for Hydrospheres (Code 970) participated. Two high-amplitude intraseasonal (30-60 day) oscillations passed through the TOGA COARE <span class="hlt">observational</span> network located in the equatorial western Pacific. Associated with the oscillations were two 6-10 day <span class="hlt">periods</span> of persistent westerly surface winds at the equator or 'westerly wind bursts.' These events are depicted through time series and time-longitude cross sections of divergence/velocity potential, surface winds, precipitation, ocean mixed-layer depth, and sea surface temperature. The high and low frequency components of the flow in which the intraseasonal oscillations were embedded are shown using seasonal, monthly, and 5-day averages of the surface, 850 and 200 mb winds, precipitation, and sea-level pressure, and a time-longitude cross section of tropical cyclone activity. Independent verification of precipitation comes from near real-time satellite estimates, and a reference climatology is given based on 9 years of ECMWF analyses. Daily 00 UTC analyses of surface winds and sea-level pressure for the entire western Pacific and Indian Ocean are provided to trace the evolution of individual synoptic events.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fiorino, M.; Lord, S. J.; Lau, W. K.-M.; Phoebus, P. A.; Strey, C. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16950683"> <span id="translatedtitle">Types of <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>: Relationships among compliance, indirect, and direct <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is commonly believed that direct <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, referring to overt influence, and indirect <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, in which the intention to influence is hidden, correlate poorly. This study demonstrates that they are substantially related, provided that they tap similar areas of influence. Test results from 103 students, 55 women and 48 men, were entered into regression analyses. Indirect <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, as measured by the Sensory <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> Scale for Groups, and compliance, measured by the Gudjonsson Compliance Scale, were predictors of direct <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, assessed with the Barber <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> Scale. Spectral analyses showed that indirect <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> is more related to difficult tasks on the BSS, but compliance is more related to easy tasks on this scale. PMID:16950683</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Polczyk, Romuald; Pasek, Tomasz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=JPRS59163"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental Studies of Mental <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The report contains a survey of studies of mental (nonverbal) <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>. It includes problems related to <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> of motor acts, visual images and sensations, sleep and waking. Fundamentals of the electromagnetic theory of mental <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> are examine...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. L. Vasilev</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22apc%22&pg=2&id=ED543135"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Promotion of Peace. I. <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for the <span class="hlt">Observance</span> of Peace Day (May 18) in Schools; II. Agencies and Associations for Peace. Bulletin, 1913, No. 12. Whole Number 519</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Within the past few years the subjects of international peace and arbitration have come to have a place of importance in schools of all grades in the United States, and the interest in these subjects is increasing from year to year. As one means of fostering this interest many schools <span class="hlt">observe</span> in a special way the 18th days of May, the anniversary…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andrews, Fannie Fern, Comp.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1913-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760031346&hterms=s3&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Ds3"> <span id="translatedtitle">Explorer 45 /S3-A/ <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the magnetosphere and magnetopause during the August 4-6, 1972, magnetic storm <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Explorer 45 (S3-A) satellite performed extensive field and particle measurements in the heart of the magnetosphere during the double magnetic storm <span class="hlt">period</span> of August 4-6, 1972. Both the ground level magnetic records and the magnetic field deformations measured along the orbit by the satellite indicated the existence of only a moderate ring current. This was confirmed by the measurements of the total proton energy density by the on-board particle detectors, which showed a maximum energy density less than the densities <span class="hlt">observed</span> during the December 1971 and June 1972 magnetic storms. The plasmapause in the noon quadrant was eroded continuously from the onset of the first storm at the beginning of August 4 to an altitude below L = 2.07 at about 1800 hours on August 5. Throughout the entire orbit during which the second sudden commencement occurred, a large amount of low-frequency electric and magnetic field noise was encountered. The most remarkable <span class="hlt">observation</span> during this orbit was the contraction of the magnetopause to distances inside the satellite location at L = 5.2.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hoffman, R. A.; Maynard, N. C.; Smith, P. H.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Anderson, R. R.; Gurnett, D. A.; Fritz, T. A.; Williams, D. J.; Konradi, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRD..11711304Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal variations of midlatitude mesospheric Na layer and their tidal <span class="hlt">period</span> perturbations based on full diurnal cycle Na lidar <span class="hlt">observations</span> of 2002-2008</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Na lidar facility at Colorado State University (41°N, 105°W) started the full diurnal cycle <span class="hlt">observations</span> of mesopause region temperature and zonal and meridional winds as well as mesospheric Na density in May 2002. In this paper, monthly means and seasonal variations of the density of mesospheric Na based on lidar <span class="hlt">observations</span> from May 2002 to December 2008 are reported along with the amplitude and phase of tidal <span class="hlt">period</span> perturbations. The revealed seasonal behaviors of mesospheric Na layer are generally consistent with published nocturnal climatology, with thick layers and high abundance in winter but thin layers and low abundance near summer. Tidal amplitudes of Na density are large in February-April and August-November with a dominant peak between 85 and 90 km; they are weak in summer months (May-July). The Na density tidal phase profiles, while showing downward progression, show a significant and abrupt phase shift (ideally 180 degrees). The center altitude of this phase shifting (termed switching altitude) is found to coincide with the fractional tidal amplitude (tidal amplitude over diurnal mean) minimum about 2-4 km above the centroid altitude of the associated Na layer. Taking advantage of the established temperature tidal climatology deduced from the same data set, the tidal phase behaviors between temperature and Na density and associated fractional Na density tidal amplitudes are discussed in terms of the theoretical prediction by Gardner and Shelton (1985).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yuan, Tao; She, C.-Y.; Kawahara, Takuya D.; Krueger, D. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19960021096&hterms=derived+categories&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dderived%2Bcategories"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cloud Properties Derived From GOES-7 for Spring 1994 ARM Intensive <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> Using Version 1.0.0 of ARM Satellite Data Analysis Program</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document describes the initial formulation (Version 1.0.0) of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program satellite data analysis procedures. Techniques are presented for calibrating geostationary satellite data with Sun synchronous satellite radiances and for converting narrowband radiances to top-of-the-atmosphere fluxes and albedos. A methodology is documented for combining geostationary visible and infrared radiances with surface-based temperature <span class="hlt">observations</span> to derive cloud amount, optical depth, height, thickness, temperature, and albedo. The analysis is limited to two grids centered over the ARM Southern Great Plains central facility in north-central Oklahoma. Daytime data taken during 5 Apr. - 1 May 1994, were analyzed on the 0.3 deg and 0.5 deg latitude-longitude grids that cover areas of 0.9 deg x 0.9 deg and 10 deg x 14 deg, respectively. Conditions ranging from scattered low cumulus to thin cirrus and thick cumulonimbus occurred during the study <span class="hlt">period</span>. Detailed comparisons with hourly surface <span class="hlt">observations</span> indicate that the mean cloudiness is within a few percent of the surface-derived sky cover. Formats of the results are also provided. The data can be accessed through the World Wide Web computer network.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Minnis, Patrick; Smith, William L., Jr.; Garber, Donald P.; Ayers, J. Kirk; Doelling, David R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JHyd..516..330H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Precipitation, soil moisture and runoff variability in a small river catchment (Ardèche, France) during HyMeX Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> 1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Flash flooding is a potentially destructive natural hazard known to occur in the Cévennes-Vivarais region in southern France. HyMeX (Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment) is an international program focused on understanding the hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean basin. Soil moisture is known to be a useful indicator of catchment response, however, establishing a meaningful estimation of soil moisture at the catchment level can be difficult due to its high variability in space and time. In a small gauged catchment in the Cévennes-Vivarais region in southern France, a series of manual soil moisture measurements was taken from September to December 2012 at both the field and catchment scale during the Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> 1 (SOP1) as part of the HyMeX program. Six plots were selected along a trajectory of a microwave link installed in the catchment and were chosen to represent different elevations in the catchment. Within each field plot, surface soil moisture was measured along a 50 m transect at 2 m intervals. This allowed the study of changes in within-field variability as well as between-field variability in response to precipitation events and during the drying out phase. Several precipitation events occurred over this autumn 2012 <span class="hlt">period</span> which caused a significant wetting-up of the catchment, allowing the study of soil moisture processes over a wide range of wetness conditions. The influence of antecedent catchment conditions (soil moisture) on rainfall-runoff dynamics is demonstrated through the comparison of storm hydrographs for the various events. Dry catchment conditions result in minimal response in event flow, whereas large precipitation events occurring during wetter conditions produce much stronger responses in event flow. This further confirms the importance of quantifying catchment initial conditions to enhance the prediction of flash flood occurrences.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huza, Jessica; Teuling, Adriaan J.; Braud, Isabelle; Grazioli, Jacopo; Melsen, Lieke A.; Nord, Guillaume; Raupach, Timothy H.; Uijlenhoet, Remko</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900015536&hterms=room+impulse+response&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Droom%2Bimpulse%2Bresponse"> <span id="translatedtitle">Summary of Sonic Boom Rise Times <span class="hlt">Observed</span> During FAA Community Response Studies over a 6-Month <span class="hlt">Period</span> in the Oklahoma City Area</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The sonic boom signature data acquired from about 1225 supersonic flights, over a 6-month <span class="hlt">period</span> in 1964 in the Oklahoma City area, was enhanced with the addition of data relating to rise times and total signature duration. These later parameters, not available at the time of publication of the original report on the Oklahoma City sonic boom exposures, are listed in tabular form along with overpressure, positive impulse, positive duration, and waveform category. Airplane operating information along with the surface weather <span class="hlt">observations</span> are also included. Sonic boom rise times include readings to the 1/2, 3/4, and maximum overpressure values. Rise time relative probabilities for various lateral locations from the ground track of 0, 5, and 10 miles are presented along with the variation of rise times with flight altitude. The tabulated signature data, along with corresponding airplane operating conditions and surface and upper level atmospheric information, are also available on electronic files to provide it in the format for more efficient and effective utilization.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maglieri, Domenic J.; Sothcott, Victor E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMOS33D1853Y"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observation</span> and modelling of turbulent mixing in the Kuril and Aleutian Straits and impact of its 18.6-year <span class="hlt">period</span> tidal cycle on ocean and climate</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Direct turbulent <span class="hlt">observations</span> in the Kuril Straits and Aleutian Straits reveal that tide-induced strong vertical mixing corresponds to strong shear of combined diurnal tidal and/or mean currents and significantly modifies the water-mass and potential vorticity distribution. Bi-decadal variability synchronized with 18.6-year <span class="hlt">period</span> moon-tidal cycle were found in various parts of the ocean and climate indices: water-mass variability in the subarctic North Pacific, especially near the strong diurnal tide regions as Kuril Straits and Aleutian Islands, and in long-term climate indices as Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and El-Nino and Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in proxy-reconstructed records. In low-frequency part of the PDO and SOI records, negative (positive)-PDO and positive (negative)-SOI tend to occur in the 4-6-th (10-12-th) year after the maximum diurnal tide, which is consistent with the climate model experiments with locally enhanced vertical mixing around Kuril Straits showing that tidal mixing and its variability could generate bi-decadal variability in ocean and climate. Ocean and climate model experiments with parameterized tidal mixing explain some of the water-mass modifications and bi-decadal variability of water-masses and climate.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yasuda, I.; Tanaka, Y.; Itoh, S.; Hasumi, H.; Komatsu, K.; Osafune, S.; Yagi, M.; Tanaka, T.; Kaneko, H.; Ikeya, T.; Konda, S.; Nishioka, J.; Nakatsuka, T.; Katsumata, K.; Tatebe, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Hiroe, Y.; Nakamura, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return 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onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED105541.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Early Motion Picture Research.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Only by examining the motion picture as a mass medium, shaped and defined within a specific socio-cultural <span class="hlt">period</span> in history, can we increase our understanding of the function and contribution of this entertainment form. This paper offers several <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for further research into early motion picture history. One glaring deficiency among…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jowett, Garth S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999MNRAS.305..505S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous photometry and spectroscopy of the Be star 28 (omega) CMa - I. <span class="hlt">Observational</span> evidence of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> components of rapid variability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyse the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> variability of the Be star 28 (omega) CMa. The data consist of 275 new He I 6678 line profiles of high spectral and temporal resolution, and new Strömgren and Geneva photometry. The photometric analysis has been extended by including previously published data to cover an interval of 16 yr. The principal spectroscopic <span class="hlt">period</span> of 1.37 d is confirmed by analysis of He I 6678 modes and moments. There is evidence to show that a single <span class="hlt">period</span> is insufficient to explain the variation in the line wings. In particular, the variation of the second moment, which samples the line wings, is best described when a second <span class="hlt">period</span> is included. The photometric data have been divided into 10 sets in which the time is sufficiently contiguous for <span class="hlt">period</span> analysis. These sets have been smoothed to remove as well as possible the long-term irregular variations which are always present in Be stars. The residuals have then been analysed for coherent <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> using several techniques. Evidence for one or the other of the two known spectroscopic <span class="hlt">periods</span> can be found in individual data sets. By an analysis in which two <span class="hlt">periods</span> are assumed, it is possible to recover both the principal spectroscopic <span class="hlt">period</span> and the satellite <span class="hlt">period</span> of 1.46 d. Unlike in the He I 6678 line profiles, the latter <span class="hlt">period</span> seems to be most often present in the light variations. The amplitude of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> components of the light variation is only a few millimagnitudes, in contrast to the very large radial velocity amplitude. We find that the photometric amplitudes of the two <span class="hlt">periodic</span> components, and their ratio, vary smoothly on a time-scale of years. The amplitudes are larger in seasons when the mean brightness is higher.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Štefl, S.; Aerts, C.; Balona, L. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001GeoRL..28.1911R"> <span id="translatedtitle">The rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> of Jupiter</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">period</span> with which radio bursts recur on Jupiter (the System III <span class="hlt">period</span>) is defined by the IAU to be 9h 55m 29.71s based on early radio astronomical data, and is generally assumed to represent the <span class="hlt">period</span> of rotation of the Jovian interior. A recent estimate of the System III <span class="hlt">period</span> from radio burst data is 0.025s shorter than the IAU value. In apparent contradiction to the radio <span class="hlt">observations</span>, in situ measurements of the rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> of Jupiter using the orientation of the dipole moment are consistent with the original rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> defined by the IAU and inconsistent with the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> decrease. Thus, the present IAU <span class="hlt">period</span> should be retained as the best estimate of the rotation rate of the Jovian interior. Since the radio bursts are generated near the base of the Io field line while the dipole field is measured by Galileo near the equatorial plane, the difference between the two rotation <span class="hlt">periods</span> could be explained if Jupiter's magnetic field is undergoing perceptible secular variation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Russell, C. T.; Yu, Z. J.; Kivelson, M. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=AA+AND+meetings&pg=2&id=ED140216"> <span id="translatedtitle">Practical <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Remedial Teachers.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents a series of practical <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for remedial reading teachers, particularly those who are newly appointed or who have been assigned to a new school setting. The <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> are organized into five main sections: structuring the job, planning for efficient use of the remedial teacher's time, developing relationships with…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harris, Albert J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040079819&hterms=GRS1915+105&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DGRS1915%252B105"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectral Index and Quasi-<span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole (BH) Sources: <span class="hlt">Observational</span> Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in BHs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are <span class="hlt">observed</span> between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several Black Hole (BH) candidate sources, in low hard states, steep power-law (soft) states and in transition between these states. The <span class="hlt">observations</span> indicate that the X-ray spectrum of such state (phases) show the presence of a power-law component and are sometimes related to simultaneous radio emission indicated the probable presence of a jet. Strong QPOs (less than 20% rms) are present in the power density spectrum in the spectral range where the power-law component is dominant ( i.e. 60-90% ). This evidence contradicts the dominant long standing interpretation of QPOs as a signature of the thermal accretion disk. We present the data from the literature and our own data to illustrate the dominance of power-law index-QPO frequency correlations. We provide a model, that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of power-law flux component. We argue the existence of a bounded compact coronal region which is a natural consequence of the adjustment of Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT approx. greater than 50 keV) producing photon upscattering via thermal Componization; the photon spectrum index Gamma appprox.1.5 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius; (2) a soft state which is optically thick and relatively cold (approx. less than 5 keV); the index for this state, Gamma approx. 2.8 is determined by soft-photon upscattering and photon trapping in converging flow into BH. In the TL model for corona the QPO frequency vnu(sub high) is related to the gravitational (close to Keplerian) frequency nu(sub K) at the outer (adjustment) radius and nu(sub low) is related to the TL s normal mode (magnetoacoustic) oscillation frequency nu(sub MA). The <span class="hlt">observed</span> correlations between index and low and high QPO frequencies are readily explained in terms of this model. We also <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a new method for evaluation of the BH mass using the index-frequency correlation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Titarchuk, Lev; Fiorito, Ralph</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30523309"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> <span class="hlt">Suggesting</span> Allelism of the Achondroplasia and Hypochondroplasia Genes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is argued that there are at least two alleles at the achondroplasia locus: one responsible for classic achondroplasia and one responsible for hypochondroplasia. Homozygosity for the achondroplasia gene produces a lethal skeletal dysplasia; homozygosity for hypochondroplasia has not been described. We report here a child considered to be a genetic compound for the achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia alleles.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Victor A. McKusick; Thaddeus E. Kelly; John P. Dorst</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24398260"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestion</span> overrides automatic audiovisual integration.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cognitive scientists routinely distinguish between controlled and automatic mental processes. Through learning, practice, and exposure, controlled processes can become automatic; however, whether automatic processes can become deautomatized - recuperated under the purview of control - remains unclear. Here we show that a <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> derails a deeply ingrained process involving involuntary audiovisual integration. We compared the performance of highly versus less hypnotically <span class="hlt">suggestible</span> individuals (HSIs versus LSIs) in a classic McGurk paradigm - a perceptual illusion task demonstrating the influence of visual facial movements on auditory speech percepts. Following a posthypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> to prioritize auditory input, HSIs but not LSIs manifested fewer illusory auditory perceptions and correctly identified more auditory percepts. Our findings demonstrate that a <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> deautomatized a ballistic audiovisual process in HSIs. In addition to guiding our knowledge regarding theories and mechanisms of automaticity, the present findings pave the road to a more scientific understanding of top-down effects and multisensory integration. PMID:24398260</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Déry, Catherine; Campbell, Natasha K J; Lifshitz, Michael; Raz, Amir</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://learningcenter.nsta.org/product_detail.aspx?id=10.2505/4/ss09_032_09_38"> <span id="translatedtitle">Current Research: Summer Reading <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To supplement your summer reading, NSTA's affiliates would like to <span class="hlt">suggest</span> some recent articles on education research. These articles cover a variety of topics that include diversity, technology, and science teacher retention. The abstracts of these impor</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22988653"> <span id="translatedtitle">Randomized, <span class="hlt">observer</span>-blind, split-face study to compare the irritation potential of 2 topical acne formulations over a 14-day treatment <span class="hlt">period</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This randomized, <span class="hlt">observer</span>-blind, split-face study assessed the irritation potential and likelihood of continued use of clindamycin phosphate 1.2%--benzoyl peroxide (BPO) 2.5% gel or adapalene 0.1%--BPO 2.5% gel once daily over a 14-day treatment <span class="hlt">period</span> in 21 participants (11 males; 10 females) with acne who were 18 years or older. Investigator clinical assessment (erythema and dryness) and self-assessment (dryness and burning/stinging) were performed at baseline and each study visit (days 1-14) using a 4-point scale (O = none; 3 = severe). Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and corneometry measurements were performed at baseline and days 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, and 14. Lesions were counted at baseline and on day 14. Participant satisfaction questionnaires were completed on days 7 and 14. At the end of the study, investigators reported none or only mild erythema in 86% (18/21) of participants treated with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%--BPO 2.5% gel compared with 62% (13/21) of participants treated with adapalene 0.1%--BPO 2.5% gel. No severe erythema was reported with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%--BPO 2.5% gel. Adapalene 0.1%--BPO 2.5% gel was prematurely discontinued due to severe erythema in 1 participant on day 5 and a second participant on day 9. Additionally, 2 more participants reported severe erythema on day 14. Mean erythema scores were 0.9 (mean change from baseline, 0.7) with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%--BPO 2.5% gel and 1.4 (mean change from baseline, 1.3) with adapalene 0. 1%--BPO 2.5% gel on day 14 (P < .05 for days 6-14). Similar results were seen with dryness. Mean scores were 0.5 (mean change from baseline, 0.4) and 1.0 (mean change from baseline, 1.0), respectively (P < .05 for days 6-14). Self-assessment, TEWL, and corneometry results underscored the investigator clinical assessment. Participant preference and likelihood of continued usage was greater with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%--BPO 2.5% gel. Continued use and efficacy results for the treatment of acne were influenced by the potential of the product to cause irritation and the participant preferences. Irritation potential was more pronounced and severe with adapalene 0.1%--BPO 2.5% gel. Undoubtedly, as a result more participants preferred treatment with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%--BPO 2.5% gel and were more likely to continue to use the product. PMID:22988653</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ting, William</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://kidshealth.org/teen/sexual_health/girls/irregular_periods.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Irregular <span class="hlt">Periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... some later. The first <span class="hlt">period</span> is known as menarche (pronounced: MEH-nar-kee). What would you do ... unusual, especially in the first 2 years after menarche, to skip <span class="hlt">periods</span> or to have an irregular ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=salton&pg=3&id=EJ203536"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Library Network Design.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Various approaches to the design of automatic library systems are described, <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for the design of rational and effective automated library processes are posed, and an attempt is made to assess the importance and effect of library network systems on library operations and library effectiveness. (Author/CWM)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Salton, Gerald</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=humor+AND+styles&pg=2&id=EJ891901"> <span id="translatedtitle">10 <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Enhancing Lecturing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Criticism of the lecture method remains a staple of discussion and writing in academia--and most of the time it's deserved! Those interested in improving this aspect of their teaching might wish to consider some or all of the following <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for enhancing lectures. These include: (1) Lectures must start with a "grabber"; (2) Lectures must be…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heitzmann, Ray</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD643591"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous and <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Posthypnotic Amnesia.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The investigation was carried out to obtain comparable figures on the prevalence of spontaneous and <span class="hlt">suggested</span> posthypnotic amnesia. Ninety-one introductory psychology students were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups, and were required to serve as Ss for t...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. R. Hilgard L. M. Cooper</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1965-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4243008"> <span id="translatedtitle">Query <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> using hitting time</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Generating alternative queries, also known as query sugges- tion, has long been proved useful to help a user explore and express his information need. In many scenarios, such sug- gestions can be generated from a large scale graph of queries and other accessory information, such as the clickthrough. However, how to generate <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> while ensuring their semantic consistency with the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Qiaozhu Mei; Dengyong Zhou; Kenneth Ward Church</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10658175"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> paralyses.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodic</span> paralyses are a group of muscle diseases with abnormalities of channels. These abnormalities result in paralysis or weakness with or without poor relaxation of muscle. Hypokalemic <span class="hlt">periodic</span> paralyses, potassium-sensitive <span class="hlt">periodic</span> paralyses, and paramyotonia congenita are reviewed. The clinical findings, pathophysiologic abnormalities, diagnostic evaluations, and possible treatments are included in this article. PMID:10658175</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gutmann, L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ATel.3079....1C"> <span id="translatedtitle">A 160 day <span class="hlt">Period</span> in the Be star X-ray Binary IGR J01363+6610 from Swift BAT <span class="hlt">Observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The hard X-ray source IGR J01363+6610 has been proposed to be a Be star X-ray binary (e.g. Reig et al. 2005, A&A, 440, 637; Tomsick et al. 2010, arXiv:1012.2817v1). We have analyzed the Swift BAT 15 - 50 keV light curve of IGR J01363+6610 obtained between MJD 53,414 to 55,544 (2005-02-13 to 2010-12-14) to search for <span class="hlt">periodic</span> modulation that could reveal the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> of the system. From a power spectrum we find an apparently significant peak (false alarm probability ~2E-7 for a search for <span class="hlt">periods</span> longer than 2 days) at approximately 160 days.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Corbet, R. H. D.; Krimm, H. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE83004901"> <span id="translatedtitle">Operation of a Digital Seismic Network on Mount St. Helens Volcano and <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of Long-<span class="hlt">Period</span> Seismic Events That Originate under the Volcano.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the <span class="hlt">period</span> May through October 1981, a nine station digital seismic array was operated on the flanks of Mount St. Helens volcano in the state of Washington. The purpose was to obtain high quality digital seismic data from a dense seismic array oper...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Fehler B. Chouet</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2378884"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodically</span> curved bilayer structures <span class="hlt">observed</span> in hyphal cells or stable L-form cells of a Streptomyces strain, and in liposomes formed by the extracted lipids.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodically</span> curved bilayer structures showing a tetragonal pattern were revealed by freeze-fracture electron microscopy in hyphal cells, stable L-form cells, and liposomes prepared from extracted lipids of Streptomyces hygroscopicus NG 33-354. The pattern is formed by alternating convex and concave curvatures of the bilayer. It has been found with different repeat distances (multiples of about 15 nm) and with a different degree of expression (from just visible to very pronounced). An interpretation as infinite <span class="hlt">periodic</span> minimal surface (IPMS) structures is more probable than an inducement of the pattern by underlying small vesicles. The occurrence of nonbilayer textures and the similarity of the tetragonal pattern with a 'bilayer sector' from a cubic phase structure (Anderson, S. et al. (1988) Chem. Rev. 88, 221-242) support such an interpretation. PMID:2378884</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Meyer, H W; Richter, W; Gumpert, J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-07-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/treatment/colon-and-rectal/exercise"> <span id="translatedtitle">Studies <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> Exercise Improves Colorectal Cancer Outcomes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The results of two new prospective, <span class="hlt">observational</span> studies offer compelling evidence to <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that regular physical activity in the months following treatment may decrease the risk of cancer recurrence and death from colorectal cancer, according to the Aug. 1, 2006, issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22774684"> <span id="translatedtitle">Building false memories without <span class="hlt">suggestions</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">People can come to remember doing things they have never done. The question we asked in this study is whether people can systematically come to remember performing actions they never really did, in the absence of any <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> from the experimenter. People built LEGO vehicles, performing some steps but not others. For half the people, all the pieces needed to assemble each vehicle were laid out in order in front of them while they did the building; for the other half, the pieces were hidden from view. The next day, everyone returned for a surprise recognition test. People falsely and confidently remembered having carried out steps they did not; those who saw all the pieces while they built each vehicle were more likely to correctly remember performing steps they did perform but equally likely to falsely remember performing steps they did not. We explain our results using the source monitoring framework: People used the relationships between actions to internally generate the missing, related actions, later mistaking that information for genuine experience. PMID:22774684</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Foster, Jeffrey L; Garry, Maryanne</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17970816"> <span id="translatedtitle">Design and analysis of arm-in-cage experiments: inference for three-state progressive disease models with common <span class="hlt">periodic</span> <span class="hlt">observation</span> times.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We develop statistical methods for designing and analyzing arm-in-cage experiments used to test the efficacy of insect repellents and other topical treatments. In these experiments, a controlled amount of the treatment is applied to a volunteer's forearm, which then is exposed to the insects by being placed into a special cage. Arms are not kept in the cages continuously, but rather placed there <span class="hlt">periodically</span> for a brief <span class="hlt">period</span> of time, during which it is noted whether an insect lands (but does not bite) or (lands and) bites. Efficacy of a repellent can be described using a progressive three-state model in which the first two states represent varying degrees of protection (no landing and landing without biting) and the third state occurs once protection is completely lost (biting). Because subjects within a treatment group follow the same cage visit schedule, transition times between states are interval censored into one of several fixed intervals. We develop an approach that uses a mixture of nonparametric and parametric techniques for estimating the parameters of interest when sojourn times are dependent. Design considerations for arm-in-cage experiments are addressed and the proposed methods are illustrated on data from a recent arm-in-cage experiment as well as simulated data. PMID:17970816</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Griffin, B A; Lagakos, S W</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.girlshealth.gov/body/period/problems.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Problem <span class="hlt">Periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... condition that causes <span class="hlt">period</span> problems is PCOS, or polycystic ovary syndrome. Read our information on PCOS for teens , and see your doctor if you think you may have PCOS. Major weight loss. Girls who have anorexia will ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010cosp...38.1722F"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Hale <span class="hlt">period</span> and climate forcing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">From the presence of the 11-year Schwabe and the 22-year Hale <span class="hlt">period</span> in numerous time series of climate indicators like tree rings, varves, precipitation, droughts or temperatures it has been concluded that solar activity has an influence on the terrestrial climate. While at present it is unclear, however, whether this influence is direct (solar) or indirect (cosmic rays) and exactly which processes establish such relation, it is likely that the <span class="hlt">observed</span> <span class="hlt">periods</span> do contain valuable information. Here we follow up on our earlier <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> that the Hale <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> provides the ability to differentiate between climate forcings related to either solar electromagnetic or galactic cosmic radiation. We perform a detailed, comparative <span class="hlt">period</span> analysis of solar irradiance and cosmic ray flux and we offer a hypothesis why the Hale <span class="hlt">period</span> does occur in certain climate-indicative time series despite the insignificance or even absence of the Schwabe <span class="hlt">period</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fichtner, Horst; Scherer, Klaus; Heber, Bernd</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48929748"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimation of radial gradients of phase space density from POLAR <span class="hlt">observations</span> during a quiet <span class="hlt">period</span> prior to a sudden solar wind dynamic pressure enhancement</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have analyzed POLAR electron flux data to estimate the radial gradients of electron phase space density (PSD) immediately prior to a sudden solar wind dynamic pressure enhancement at ?1135 UT on 12 August 2001. In this event, the instantaneous flux changes from the magnetospheric compression at L ? 7.6 in the postmidnight magnetic local time sector are <span class="hlt">observed</span> to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H.-J. Kim; E. Zesta; K.-C. Kim; Y. Shprits; Y. Shi; L. R. Lyons</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AtmEn..67..448C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-term <span class="hlt">observations</span> of saccharides in remote marine aerosols from the western North Pacific: A comparison between 1990-1993 and 2006-2009 <span class="hlt">periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anhydrosugars (galactosan, mannosan and levoglucosan), sugars (xylose, fructose, glucose, sucrose and trehalose) and sugar alcohols (erythritol, arabitol, mannitol and inositol) were measured in the aerosol samples collected in a remote island (Chichi-Jima, Japan) in the western North Pacific from 1990 to 1993 and from 2006 to 2009. Total concentrations of anhydrosugars, the biomass burning tracers, were 0.01-5.57 ng m-3 (average 0.76 ng m-3) during 1990-1993 versus 0.01-7.19 ng m-3 (0.64 ng m-3) during 2006-2009. Their seasonal variations were characterized by winter/spring maxima and summer/fall minima. Such a seasonal pattern should be caused by the enhanced long-range atmospheric transport of biomass burning products and terrestrial organic matter (such as higher plant detritus and soil dust) from the Asian continent in winter/spring seasons, when the westerly or winter monsoon system prevails over the western North Pacific. Sugars and sugar alcohols showed different seasonal patterns. The monthly mean concentrations of erythritol, arabitol, mannitol, inositol, fructose, glucose and trehalose were found to be higher in spring/summer and lower in fall/winter during both 1990-1993 and 2006-2009 <span class="hlt">periods</span>, indicating an enhanced biogenic emission of aerosols in warm seasons. Interestingly, saccharides showed a gradual decrease in their concentrations from 1991 to 1993 and an increase from 2006 to 2009. In addition, the monthly averaged concentrations of sugars and sugar alcohols showed maxima in early summer during 1990-1993, which occurred about 1-2 months earlier than those during 2006-2009. Such a clear seasonal shift may be attributable to the changes in the strength of westerly and trade wind systems during two <span class="hlt">periods</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, Jing; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Liu, Cong-Qiang; Fu, Pingqing</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AIPC..900...26D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stone Morphology <span class="hlt">Suggestive</span> of Randall's Plaque</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Randall's plaques are found in a number of calcium oxalate stone formers. Stones developed on a Randall's plaque typically present a small depressed zone (``umbilication'') corresponding to the tip of the papilla and containing material detached from the plaque. By examining the morphology and infrared composition of 45,774 calculi referred to our laboratory over the past three decades, we identified 8,916 umbilicated calculi (19.5%). We have selected three <span class="hlt">periods</span> of time corresponding to the first years of each decade. Over these <span class="hlt">periods</span>, we analyzed 26,182 consecutive calculi. Among them, we identified 5,401 umbilicated calculi, of which 91.5% had an identifiable plaque. We analyzed the relative prevalence of umbilicated stones over time and the respective composition of Randall's plaque and stones. The proportion of umbilicated stones rose significantly from 10% in <span class="hlt">period</span> 1 (1978-1984) to 21% in <span class="hlt">period</span> 2 (1990-1993) and 22.2% in <span class="hlt">period</span> 3 (2000-2006), with a parallel rise in the prevalence of stones with identifiable Randall's plaque. The main component of plaques was carbapatite in 90.8% of cases, whereas other components such as amorphous carbonated calcium phosphate, sodium hydrogen urate or uric acid were found in other cases. The morphology of plaques made of carbapatite was diverse, as was their carbonate content, thus <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> variable pathophysiological mechanisms. Stones were made of whewellite as the main component in 51.4% of cases, or admixed with weddellite in 26.8%, predominant weddellite in 12.5% and other components (mainly uric acid) in 7.5% of cases. Our findings confirm that Randall's plaques are made of carbapatite in the great majority of cases, but with the stones more frequently composed of calcium oxalate monohydrate (which is associated with hyperoxaluria) than of calcium oxalate dihydrate (associated with hypercalciuria). In conclusion, in our country, stones developed on a carbapatite Randall's plaque are as frequently made of monohydrate than dihydrate calcium oxalate, thus <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a role for a high urine concentration in both oxalate and calcium ions in the lithogenic process.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Daudon, Michel; Traxer, Olivier; Jungers, Paul; Bazin, Dominique</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900036529&hterms=1447&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3D1447"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> chiral structures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The electromagnetic properties of a structure that is both chiral and <span class="hlt">periodic</span> are investigated using coupled-mode equations. The <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> is described by a sinusoidal perturbation of the permittivity, permeability, and chiral admittance. The coupled-mode equations are derived from physical considerations and used to examine bandgap structure and reflected and transmitted fields. Chirality is <span class="hlt">observed</span> predominantly in transmission, whereas <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> is present in both reflection and transmission.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jaggard, Dwight L.; Engheta, Nader; Pelet, Philippe; Liu, John C.; Kowarz, Marek W.; Kim, Yunjin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFM.S41C1035A"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of Long-<span class="hlt">Period</span> Free Oscillations From the 2004 Great Sumatra Earthquake With two Laser Extensometers at Gran Sasso, Italy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Free oscillations excited by the 26 December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake have been clearly recorded by two laser extensometers operating in the Gran Sasso underground observatory (Central Italy, average 1400 m rock coverage). The two orthogonal baselines are 90-m long. Nominal sensitivity is about 3 × 10-12 and recording rate is 5 Hz. S/N ratio of the shear component of strain, obtained after subtraction of the two strain records, is higher than that of each separate extensometer, since the shear component is poorly affected by changes in environmental parameters (temperature and pressure inside the underground observatory) and unaffected by laser frequency fluctuations. We are improving S/N of each extensometer through correction for changes in environmental parameters to obtain more information from recorded data, but for the moment we have performed a preliminary analysis of the shear component of strain only. Particular attention has been paid to the time history of the clearest oscillations, using several different spectral analysis techniques. Envelopes of sub-millihertz oscillations evidence a delayed ramp-up in modal amplitude, reaching the peak amplitude 30-35 hours after the earthquake and then showing a rapid decrease. Shorter-<span class="hlt">period</span> modes are not affected by this behavior. We are modelling the splitting of some of the free oscillations to compare the effect of frequency splitting on the envelops of the free oscillations and looking for similar features in seismic records.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Amoruso, A.; Crescentini, L.; Park, J.; Boschi, E.; Scarpa, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21563073"> <span id="translatedtitle">Revisiting the Brazilian scenario of registry and protection of cultivars: an analysis of the <span class="hlt">period</span> from 1998 to 2010, its dynamics and legal <span class="hlt">observations</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the last 20 years, the national production of grains has increased 156.1%; productivity increased 93.8% and there has been an increase of 29.1% in cultivated area. Currently, agribusiness is responsible for 40% of Brazilian exports. Nevertheless, there is little quantitative information on the main plant species of economic interest that have been registered and protected in the Agriculture, Fisheries and Food Supply Ministry (MAPA) by public and private companies, as well as by public-private partnerships. Consequently, we investigated the registry and protection of 27 species of economic interest, including the 15 that are the basis of the Brazilian diet, based on the information available on the site CultivarWeb, of MAPA, for the <span class="hlt">period</span> from 1998 to August 30, 2010. We also examined the legislation that regulates registration and protection procedures and its implications for plant breeding and plant product development. It was found that the private sector controls 73.1% of the registrations and 53.56% of the protections, while 10.73% of the protections were of material developed overseas. Public-private partnerships contributed little to the development of new cultivars, with 0.5% of the registries and 3.61% of the protections. We conclude that plant protection directed private investment to development of wheat and rice varieties, with the greatest public investments directed to corn and sorghum. After the Cultivar Protection Law was implemented, there was restriction of access to germplasm banks, which could inhibit advances in Brazilian plant breeding programs, indicating a need for revision of this legal barrier. PMID:21563073</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marinho, C D; Martins, F J O; Amaral, S C S; Amaral Júnior, A T; Gonçalves, L S A; de Mello, M P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989AJ.....97..570K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rotation of Hyperion. I - <span class="hlt">Observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Precise and well sampled <span class="hlt">observations</span> of Hyperion over a long <span class="hlt">period</span> of time have been performed to test the prediction of Wisdom et al. (1984) that the satellite is in a state of chaotic rotation. CCD data for a 13-week <span class="hlt">period</span> were obtained in Chile and in Arizona. A phase-dispersion-minimization analysis of the light curve indicates that Hyperion is not in a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> rotational state, thus <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that it is chaotic.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Klavetter, J. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70047665"> <span id="translatedtitle">Annual water-level measurements in <span class="hlt">observation</span> wells, 1951-1955, and atlas of maps showing changes in water levels for various <span class="hlt">periods</span> from beginning of record through 1954, New Mexico</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report tabulates the annual measurements of water level in the <span class="hlt">observation</span> wells in the various irrigated areas, primarily from 1951 through 1955. It summarizes changes in water level by discussion and with an atlas of nearly all the maps of change of water level for the <span class="hlt">period</span> of record to 1955 for each area in which <span class="hlt">observations</span> are being made. Included also are hydrographs for the <span class="hlt">period</span> of record through 1954 of several selected wells in the various areas irrigated from ground-water sources. The annual measurements of water level before 1951, seasonal measurements, and daily records of water levels in wells equipped with recording gages have been published in an annual series of U. S. Geological Survey water-supply papers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reeder, Harold O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1959-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.A33D0188C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Light absorption-related optical properties of aerosol <span class="hlt">observed</span> during episodic <span class="hlt">periods</span> at Conghua, Guangdong Province, China during the 2008 PRD Campaign</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The magnitude of aerosol light absorption and its contribution to radiative forcing is subject to considerable uncertainty. Surface in-situ measurements of aerosol optical parameters were made at a continental background site in Conghua, Guangdong Province, China (23°39’0.7”N, 113°37’28.7” E) during the 2008 Pearl River Delta campaign in the fall of 2008. Aerosol absorption (Babs) and scattering (Bscatt) coefficients were measured using in- situ optical instruments, which were then used as combined input for an inversion algorithm for the retrieval of single scattering albedo (SSA) and complex refractive index, m (m=n-ik). Two episodic cases were identified from high aerosol loading events: Case 1 with air mass originating from the southeast (heavily industrialized PRD and Hong Kong) and Case 2 with air mass originating from northeast (Shanghai region). Two clean air mass cases with different aerosol characteristics were also identified: one with high SSA and the other with low SSA due to impact of local absorbing aerosols. Average Bscatt during the clean events was measured to be ~ 31.9 ± 7.3 Mm-1, while it increased to 306.1 ± 112.3 Mm-1 during the high aerosol loading episodic events. Angstrom exponent of Babs (?_abs) did not show large differences on episodic events. However, clear separation between episodic cases was <span class="hlt">observed</span> for the imaginary part of the refractive index , k=0.005 for Case 1 and k=0.015-0.02 for Case 2, which can be used as indicator of aerosol types. Spectral absorption coefficient data showed a distinct peak at 880 nm, which is signature of soot particles. Spectral absorption characteristics of aerosols can provide additional information on the aerosol type and composition.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cayetano, M. G.; Jung, J.; Mueller, D.; Kim, Y. J.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, X.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22707043"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">suggested</span> new bacteriophage genus: "Viunalikevirus".</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a bacteriophage genus, "Viunalikevirus", as a new genus within the family Myoviridae. To date, this genus includes seven sequenced members: Salmonella phages ViI, SFP10 and ?SH19; Escherichia phages CBA120 and PhaxI; Shigella phage phiSboM-AG3; and Dickeya phage LIMEstone1. Their shared myovirus morphology, with comparable head sizes and tail dimensions, and genome organization are considered distinguishing features. They appear to have conserved regulatory sequences, a horizontally acquired tRNA set and the probable substitution of an alternate base for thymine in the DNA. A close examination of the tail spike region in the DNA revealed four distinct tail spike proteins, an arrangement which might lead to the umbrella-like structures of the tails visible on electron micrographs. These properties set the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> genus apart from the recently ratified subfamily Tevenvirinae, although a significant evolutionary relationship can be <span class="hlt">observed</span>. PMID:22707043</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adriaenssens, Evelien M; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang; Anany, Hany; Blasdel, Bob; Connerton, Ian F; Goulding, David; Griffiths, Mansel W; Hooton, Steven P; Kutter, Elizabeth M; Kropinski, Andrew M; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Maes, Martine; Pickard, Derek; Ryu, Sangryeol; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Shahrbabak, S Sabouri; Toribio, Ana L; Lavigne, Rob</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhPl...21c2307P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pressure-driven reconnection and quasi <span class="hlt">periodical</span> oscillations in plasmas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents a model for an ohmically heated plasma in which a feedback exists between thermal conduction and transport, on one side, and the magneto-hydro-dynamical stability of the system, on the other side. In presence of a reconnection threshold for the magnetic field, a variety of <span class="hlt">periodical</span> or quasi <span class="hlt">periodical</span> oscillations for the physical quantities describing the system are evidenced. The model is employed to interpret the <span class="hlt">observed</span> quasi <span class="hlt">periodical</span> oscillations of electron temperature and perturbed magnetic field around the so called "Single Helical" state in the reversed field pinch, but its relevance for other <span class="hlt">periodical</span> phenomena <span class="hlt">observed</span> in magnetic confinement systems, especially in tokamaks, is <span class="hlt">suggested</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paccagnella, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55599505"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multiple <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in long-<span class="hlt">period</span> variables</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The variety of types of variability is reviewed. Special attention is paid to <span class="hlt">observations</span> and mathematical models of one-harmonic, multi-harmonic, multi-frequency, multi-shift and quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> pulsations (cf. Andronov 1994). Methods of local smoothing are discussed and compared: running parabolae (Andronov 1997), running trigonometric polynomials (Chinarova et al., 1994), asymptotic parabolae (Marsakova and Andronov, 1996), splines (Andronov 1995) and ordinary polynomials are</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">I. L. Andronov</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18506202"> <span id="translatedtitle">Forest-obligate Sabethes mosquitoes <span class="hlt">suggest</span> palaeoecological perturbations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The origin of tropical forest diversity has been hotly debated for decades. Although specific mechanisms vary, many such explanations propose some vicariance in the distribution of species during glacial cycles and several have been supported by genetic evidence in Neotropical taxa. However, no consensus exists with regard to the extent or time frame of the vicariance events. Here, we analyse the cytochrome oxidase II mitochondrial gene of 250 Sabethes albiprivus B mosquitoes sampled from western Sao Paulo in Brazil. There was very low population structuring among collection sites (Phi(ST)=0.03, P=0.04). Historic demographic analyses and the contemporary geographic distribution of genetic diversity <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the populations sampled are not at demographic equilibrium. Three distinct mitochondrial clades were <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the samples, one of which differed significantly in its geographic distribution relative to the other two within a small sampling area (approximately 70 x 35 km). This fact, supported by the inability of maximum likelihood analyses to achieve adequate fits to simple models for the population demography of the species, <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a more complex history, possibly involving disjunct forest refugia. This hypothesis is supported by a genetic signal of recent population growth, which is expected if population sizes of this forest-obligate insect increased during the forest expansions that followed glacial <span class="hlt">periods</span>. Although a time frame cannot be reliably inferred for the vicariance event leading to the three genetic clades, molecular clock estimates place this at approximately 1 Myr before present. PMID:18506202</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pedro, P M; Sallum, M A; Butlin, R K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JGRA..11611205A"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> motion of Saturn's nightside plasma sheet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Saturn's magnetosphere is replete with magnetospheric <span class="hlt">periodicities</span>; magnetic fields, plasma parameters, energetic particle fluxes, and radio emissions have all been <span class="hlt">observed</span> to vary at a <span class="hlt">period</span> close to that of Saturn's assumed sidereal rotation rate. In particular, <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in Saturn's magnetotail can be interpreted in terms of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> vertical motion of Saturn's outer magnetospheric plasma sheet. The phase relationships between <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in different measurable quantities are a key piece of information in validating the various published models that attempt to relate <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in different quantities at different locations. It is important to empirically extract these phase relationships from the data in order to distinguish between these models, and to provide further data on which to base new conceptual models. In this paper a simple structural model of the flapping of Saturn's plasma sheet is developed and fitted to plasma densities in the outer magnetosphere, measured by the Cassini electron spectrometer. This model is used to establish the phase relationships between magnetic field <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in the cam region of the magnetosphere and the flapping of the plasma sheet. We find that the plasma sheet flaps in phase with Br and B$\\theta$ and in quadrature with the B$\\varphi$ component in the core/cam region. The plasma sheet phase also has a strong local time asymmetry. These results support some conceptual <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> models but are in apparent contradiction with others, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that future work is required to either modify the models or study additional phase relationships that are important for these models.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arridge, C. S.; André, N.; Khurana, K. K.; Russell, C. T.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Provan, G.; Andrews, D. J.; Jackman, C. M.; Coates, A. J.; Sittler, E. C.; Dougherty, M. K.; Young, D. T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GeoRL..40.2602C"> <span id="translatedtitle">California foreshock sequences <span class="hlt">suggest</span> aseismic triggering process</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Foreshocks are one of the few well-documented precursors to large earthquakes; therefore, understanding their nature is very important for earthquake prediction and hazard mitigation. However, the triggering role of foreshocks is not yet clear. It is possible that foreshocks are a self-triggering cascade of events that simply happen to trigger an unusually large aftershock; alternatively, foreshocks might originate from an external aseismic process that ultimately triggers the mainshock. In the former case, the foreshocks will have limited utility for forecasting. The latter case has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> for several individual large earthquakes; however, it remains unclear how common it is and how to distinguish foreshock sequences from other seismicity clusters that do not lead to large earthquakes. Here we analyze foreshocks of three M>7 mainshocks in southern California. These foreshock sequences appear similar to earthquake swarms, in that they do not start with their largest events and they exhibit spatial migration of seismicity. Analysis of source spectra shows that all three foreshock sequences feature lower average stress drops and depletion of high-frequency energy compared with the aftershocks of their corresponding mainshocks. Using a longer-term stress-drop catalog, we find that the average stress drop of the Landers and Hector Mine foreshock sequences is comparable to nearby swarms. Our <span class="hlt">observations</span> <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that these foreshock sequences are manifestations of aseismic transients occurring close to the mainshock hypocenters, possibly related to localized fault zone complexity, which have promoted the occurrence of both the foreshocks and the eventual mainshock.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, Xiaowei; Shearer, Peter M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/10129021"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Subsidies are Suboptimal Unless Combined with an Output Tax</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Because of difficulties measuring pollution, many prior papers <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a subsidy to some <span class="hlt">observable</span> method of reducing pollution. We take three such papers as examples, and we extend each of them to show how welfare under the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> subsidy can be increased by the addition of an output tax. While the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> subsidy reduces damage per unit of output, it</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Don Fullerton; Robert D. Mohr</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S51F..02C"> <span id="translatedtitle">California foreshock sequences <span class="hlt">suggest</span> underlying aseismic process</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Foreshocks are the clearest precursors to mainshocks, and understanding their characteristics is of great interest. In this study, we analyze immediate foreshock sequences (within 2 days and 5 km) for mainshocks in California using precisely relocated catalogs and find that 27 out of 61 mainshocks of M ? 5 have at least one immediate foreshock. Among the 27 foreshock sequences, 9 consist of just one event, 3 are aftershocks of a previous event, and 13 are swarm-like sequences (more than 4 events, not starting with the largest foreshock). For 5 swarm-like foreshock sequences (Landers, Hector Mine, El Mayor-Cucapah, Chalfant, Mt-Lewis earthquakes), there are enough events to determine that they exhibit significant spatial migration, with migration velocities comparable to swarms in southern California (e.g., Chen et al., 2011). To study if there are systematic changes between foreshocks and aftershocks, we apply an iterative deconvolution approach [Shearer et al., 2006] to obtain earthquake source spectra. We then estimate earthquake stress drops using a multi-event empirical Green's function (EGF) method. These 5 foreshock sequences have much lower median stress drops than aftershocks from the same region. To confirm this difference, we shift the source spectra along an f^-3 curve to facilitate a direct comparison of the frequency content of the source spectra for different sized events. The foreshocks have a stronger fall off at high frequencies compared to the aftershocks. We are currently studying, using a source-specific EGF approach, whether attenuation changes could explain some of these frequency differences. These <span class="hlt">observations</span> of spatially migrating foreshock sequences and their apparently low stress drops indicate that there is likely an underlying aseismic process, such as fluid flow or slow slip, that triggers both the foreshocks and the mainshocks. Such aseismic processes are thought to drive many swarms and some <span class="hlt">observations</span> have <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that aseismic slip may occur prior to large earthquakes [e.g., Roeloffs, 2006].</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, X.; Shearer, P. M.; Hauksson, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return 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Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/k5833h822hk7036h.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Linkage data <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> allelic heterogeneity for paramyotonia congenita and hyperkalemic <span class="hlt">periodic</span> paralysis on chromosome 17</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Paramyotonia congenita (PC), an autosomal dominant non-progressive muscle disorder, is characterised by cold-induced stiffness followed by muscle weakness. The weakness is caused by a dysfunction of the sodium channel in muscle fibre. Parts of the gene coding for the a-subunit of the sodium channel of the adult human skeletal muscle (SCN4A) have been localised on chromosome 17. To investigate the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Manuela C. Koch; Kenneth Ricker; Michael Otto; Tiemo Grimm; Klaus Bender; Barbara Zoll; Peter S. Harper; Frank Lehmann-Horn; Reinhardt Riidel; Eric P. Hoffman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890012014&hterms=mass+extinctions&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dmass%2Bextinctions"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodicity</span> of extinction: A 1988 update</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The hypothesis that events of mass extinction recur <span class="hlt">periodically</span> at approximately 26 my intervals is an empirical claim based on analysis of data from the fossil record. The hypothesis has become closely linked with catastrophism because several events in the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> series are associated with evidence of extraterrestrial impacts, and terrestrial forcing mechanisms with long, <span class="hlt">periodic</span> recurrences are not easily conceived. Astronomical mechanisms that have been hypothesized include undetected solar companions and solar oscillation about the galactic plane, which induce comet showers and result in impacts on Earth at regular intervals. Because these mechanisms are speculative, they have been the subject of considerable controversy, as has the hypothesis of <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of extinction. In response to criticisms and uncertainties, a data base was developed on times of extinction of marine animal genera. A time series is given and analyzed with 49 sample points for the per-genus extinction rate from the Late Permian to the Recent. An unexpected pattern in the data is the uniformity of magnitude of many of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> extinction events. <span class="hlt">Observations</span> <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the sequence of extinction events might be the result of two sets of mechanisms: a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> forcing that normally induces only moderate amounts of extinction, and independent incidents or catastrophes that, when coincident with the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> forcing, amplify its signal and produce major-mass extinctions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sepkowski, J. John, Jr.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/pa3416.photos.359958p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photocopy of photograph. Photographer unknown. Typical <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> award photograph from ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Photocopy of photograph. Photographer unknown. Typical <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> award photograph from the World War II <span class="hlt">period</span>. Useful <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> were awarded a $ 50 bond and usually a photo in the shipyard newspaper, the beacon. This photo shows an improved bilge block template layout table left to right: Stuart S. Sanders, Rosalie Moschella, Eddie Ormond, Lt. CDR. J.M. Ballinger, and A.A. Goldman. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993AAS...183.5508T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> changes in V2051 OPH</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the identification of orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> changes in the short-<span class="hlt">period</span> eclipsing cata\\-clysmic variable V2051 Oph. We used times of mid-eclipse collected from the literature and timings from our unpublished data to construct an <span class="hlt">observed</span>-minus-calculated eclipse time diagram covering 13 years of <span class="hlt">observations</span> (1979-92). At present there is no evidence of secular orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> (P_orb) decrease. The uncertainty in the quadratic fit sets an upper limit for <span class="hlt">period</span> changes of P_orb/P\\:> 5.9 times 10(7) yr. Assuming a secondary mass of M_2 = 0.2\\:M_sun this yields M_2 < 3.4 times 10(-9) \\:M_{sun yr}(-1) as an upper limit for the mass transfer rate in the system. The data present cyclical variations that can be fitted by a linear plus sinusoidal function with <span class="hlt">periods</span> 4.7 yr and 7.6 yr. The statistical significance of these <span class="hlt">periods</span> by an F-test are, respectively, 93% and 97%. The multiplicity of possible solutions <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that V2051 Oph exhibits cyclical but non-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> P_orb changes, which could be explained in terms of a magnetic activity cycle in its secondary star. An incremental radius variation of Delta R_2/R_2 =~ 10(-6) is required to explain the <span class="hlt">observed</span> amplitude of the cycle. This is of the same order of the values found for EX Hya (Warner 1988) and V4140 Sgr (Baptista, Jablonski & Steiner 1992), and is an order of magnitude smaller than the calculated values for systems above the <span class="hlt">period</span> gap (implying proportionally smaller magnetic field strenghts). This result, along with the evidence from V4140 Sgr and EX Hya (and possibly also Z Cha), <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that if the magnetic cycle hypothesis is correct, the secondaries of cata\\-clysmic variables below the <span class="hlt">period</span> gap also have magnetic fields, although weaker than those of secondaries above the gap. This may serve to constraint current models attempting to explain the existence of the <span class="hlt">period</span> gap.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Triplett, L.; Baptista, R.; Steiner, J. E.; Jablonski, F. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24265898"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestive</span> techniques connected to medical interventions.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The paper introduces a series of articles where several detailed clinical examples will be presented on the effectiveness of using <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> techniques in various fields of interventional medicine. The aim of this series is to raise the attention to the patients heightened openness to <span class="hlt">suggestions</span>. By recognizing the unavoidable nature of <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> effects on one hand we can eliminate unfavourable, negative <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> and on the other hand go on and consciously apply positive, helpful variations. Research materials, reviews and case study will describe the way <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> can reduce anxiety and stress connected to medical intervention, improve subjective well-being and cooperation, and increase efficiency by reducing treatment costs. PMID:24265898</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Varga, Katalin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED044989.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for the Classical Shelves of a School Library.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This bibliography is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> for use by students and teachers of Latin, Greek and ancient civilizations. Entries are compiled under the headings of: (1) bibliographies and journals including booklists, <span class="hlt">periodicals</span>, and books for teachers; (2) reference works in literature, mythology, history and antiquities, and language; (3) texts and…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Colebourn, R., Comp.; Cleeve, Marigold, Comp.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Animal+AND+rights&pg=2&id=EJ401067"> <span id="translatedtitle">Animal Rights: Selected Resources and <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Further Study.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Presents an annotated list of selected resources intended to serve as a guide to the growing amount of material on animal rights. <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> to aid in additional research include subject headings used to find books, indexes used to locate <span class="hlt">periodical</span> articles, sources for locating organizations, and a selected list of animal rights organizations.…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Davidoff, Donald J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23679114"> <span id="translatedtitle">The relationships between <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, influenceability, and relaxability.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This research explores the relationships between relaxability and various aspects of <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> and influenceability. The Jacobson Progressive Muscle Relaxation procedure was used to induce relaxation. Tests of direct <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, relating to the susceptibility of overt <span class="hlt">suggestions</span>, and indirect <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, referring to indirect hidden influence, as well as self-description questionnaires on <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> and the tendency to comply were used. Thayer's Activation-Deactivation Adjective Check List, measuring various kinds of activation and used as a pre- and posttest, determined the efficacy of the relaxation procedure. Indirect, direct, and self-measured <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> proved to be positively related to the ability to relax, measured by Thayer's subscales relating to emotions. Compliance was not related to relaxability. The results are discussed in terms of the aspects of relaxation training connected with <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>. PMID:23679114</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Polczyk, Romuald; Frey, Olga; Szpitalak, Malwina</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006SPIE.6103..125Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Efficient broadband difference frequency generation in a direct-bonded <span class="hlt">periodically</span>-poled LiNbO3 waveguide and the <span class="hlt">observation</span> of CO isotopomer absorption from 2.3 to 2.45 ?m</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Efficient difference frequency generation (DFG) is obtained in the 2-?m region by using a direct-bonded <span class="hlt">periodically</span>-poled LiNbO3 (PPLN) ridge waveguide. The direct-bonding technique can utilize the bulk LN characteristics, which provide certain advantages including no additional absorption, precise device design and reproducible device fabrication. We achieved a conversion efficiency of 100%/W in the fabricated waveguide with a 0.94-?m pump laser diode (LD) and a 1.5-?m band tunable signal LD source. We also achieved a wide tunable range of over 0.1 ?m in a 50-mm-long waveguide with a single-pitch PPLN at a constant temperature. This is because the DFG bandwidth is decided by the phase mismatch ?k. Generally, ?k=0 is only obtained at a certain wavelength, however, the Sellmeier equation shows that ?k~0 is easy to realize in the 2-?m region when the pump is set at 0.90-0.96 ?m. Subtle ?k changes around 0 realized group velocity matching and a broadband output could be obtained. Compact and broadband tunable light sources are expected to be used for trace gas sensing in the near to medium infrared regions. This report also describes the bundle <span class="hlt">observation</span> of carbon monoxide isotopomer absorption lines. The DFG output bandwidth is sufficient to <span class="hlt">observe</span> 12CO and 13CO simultaneously. The absorption lines of the P and R branches for each gas are clearly <span class="hlt">observed</span> between 2.30 and 2.45 ?m. DFG in the 2-?m region using direct-bonded PPLN ridge waveguides is a promising approach for opening up new broadband applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yanagawa, Tsutomu; Tadanaga, Osamu; Nishida, Yoshiki; Miyazawa, Hiroshi; Magari, Katsuaki; Asobe, Masaki; Suzuki, Hiroyuki</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18662974"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of stereotypes and <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> on memory.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study, the interactive effect of stereotype and <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> on accuracy of memory was examined by presenting 645 participants (native Israelis and immigrants from the former Soviet Union and Ethiopia) with three versions of a story about a worker who is waiting in a manager's office for a meeting. All versions were identical except for the worker's name, which implied a Russian or an Ethiopian immigrant or a person of no ethnic origin. Each participant was presented with one version of the story. After an hour delay, the participants' memories were tested via two questionnaires that differed in terms of level of <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>. Data analyses show that (a) when a <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> matched the participant's stereotypical perception, the <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> was incorporated into memory but (b) when the <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> contradicted the stereotype, it did not influence memory. The conclusion was that recall is influenced by stereotypes but can be enhanced by compatible <span class="hlt">suggestions</span>. PMID:18662974</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shechory, Mally; Nachson, Israel; Glicksohn, Joseph</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12530759"> <span id="translatedtitle">Individual personality characteristics related to <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The current study investigated the relationship between <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> of memory, personality characteristics identified by the Millon Index of Personality Traits, and tolerance for ambiguity measured by MacDonald's Ambiguity Tolerance-20. 85 female and 16 male college students were assigned to either an experimental group receiving the <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> information or a control group. <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> was assessed using Lindberg's <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> measure consisting of a short video, followed by a questionnaire used to assess memory, and a second administration one week later. Logistical regression analyses were used to construct a model of the personality characteristics predictive of <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> and indicated that susceptibility to <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> information may differ across personalities for variables such as sensing, innovating, agreeing, and low tolerance of ambiguity. PMID:12530759</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Van Hook, Cheryl W; Steele, Connie</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.hull.ac.uk/hifi/publications/papers/Nunnetal07d.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variations in the spawning <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of eight fish species in three English lowland rivers over a 6 year <span class="hlt">period</span>, inferred from 0+ year fish length distributions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The spawning <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of eight fish species was investigated in three English lowland rivers over a 6 year <span class="hlt">period</span> from patterns in 0þ year fish standard length (LS) distributions. A single cohort of 0þ year dace Leuciscus leuciscus, roach Rutilus rutilus and perch Perca fluviatilis was <span class="hlt">observed</span> each year, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that these species spawned only once annually. By contrast, populations</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. D. Nunn; J. P. Harvey; I. G. Cowx</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/2820534"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cerebral Mechanisms of Hypnotic Induction and <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The neural mechanisms underlying hypnotic states and responses to hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> remain largely unknown and, to date, have been studied only with indirect methods. Here, the effects of hypnosis and <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> to alter pain perception were investigated in hypnotizable subjects by using positron emission tomography (PET) measures of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and electroencephalographic (EEG) measures of brain electrical</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pierre Rainville; Robert K. Hofbauer; Tomáš Paus; Gary H. Duncan; M. Catherine Bushnell; Donald D. Price</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/37857444"> <span id="translatedtitle">Qualitative research articles: guidelines, <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> and needs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to give ideas and <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> to avoid some typical problems of qualitative articles. The aim is not to debate quality in qualitative research but to indicate some practical solutions. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper discusses the design of qualitative research and the structure of a qualitative article giving some methodological <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> to make</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alberto Crescentini; Giuditta Mainardi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=forensic+AND+psychology&pg=4&id=EJ779930"> <span id="translatedtitle">Maltreated Children's Memory: Accuracy, <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span>, and Psychopathology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Memory, <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, stress arousal, and trauma-related psychopathology were examined in 328 3- to 16-year-olds involved in forensic investigations of abuse and neglect. Children's memory and <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> were assessed for a medical examination and venipuncture. Being older and scoring higher in cognitive functioning were related to fewer…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eisen, Mitchell L.; Goodman, Gail S.; Qin, Jianjian; Davis, Suzanne; Crayton, John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/pp175018"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radar interferometry <span class="hlt">observations</span> of surface displacements during pre- and coeruptive <span class="hlt">periods</span> at Mount St. Helens, Washington, 1992-2005: Chapter 18 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyzed hundreds of interferograms of Mount St. Helens produced from radar images acquired by the ERS-1/2, ENVISAT, and RADARSAT satellites during the 1992-2004 preeruptive and 2004-2005 coeruptive <span class="hlt">periods</span> for signs of deformation associated with magmatic activity at depth. Individual interferograms were often contaminated by atmospheric delay anomalies; therefore, we employed stacking to amplify any deformation patterns that might exist while minimizing random noise. Preeruptive interferograms show no signs of volcanowide deformation between 1992 and the onset of eruptive activity in 2004. Several patches of subsidence in the 1980 debris-avalanche deposit were identified, however, and are thought to be caused by viscoelastic relaxation of loosely consolidated substrate, consolidation of water-saturated sediment, or melting of buried ice. Coeruptive interferometric stacks are dominated by atmospheric noise, probably because individual interferograms span only short time intervals in 2004 and 2005. Nevertheless, we are confident that at least one of the seven coeruptive stacks we constructed is reliable at about the 1-cm level. This stack <span class="hlt">suggests</span> deflation of Mount St. Helens driven by contraction of a source beneath the volcano.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Poland, Michael; Lu, Zhong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/37385897"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observational</span> learning</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Inconsistencies in the use of terms such as “modelling,” “copying,” “imitation,” and “<span class="hlt">observational</span> learning” impede progress in studies of natural, behavioural, and cultural selection. Recent evidence <span class="hlt">suggests</span> distinctions between the effects of <span class="hlt">observation</span> on: (a) emission of previously acquired repertoires, (b) acquisition of new repertoires, (c) acquisition of conditioned reinforcers, and (d) acquisition of <span class="hlt">observational</span> learning as a new repertoire.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Douglas Greer; Grant Gautreaux</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6980040"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> bursting activities of locus coerulleus neurons in the rat.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Unit activity of locus coeruleus (LC) neurons in rats was investigated. After the animal recovered from anesthesia, the spontaneous activity exhibited <span class="hlt">periodic</span> bursting discharges at about 15-30 s intervals. The oscillation was <span class="hlt">observed</span> to last for a long time (1-3 h). It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that many LC neurons exhibited the oscillation synchronously during stress in the awake animal. PMID:6980040</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Akaike, T</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-05-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_145608.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Girls Suffer Worse Concussions, Study <span class="hlt">Suggests</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... been several studies <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> there are differences between boys and girls as far as [concussion] symptom reporting and the ... at a pediatric concussion clinic. Compared to the boys, the girls reported more severe symptoms and took nearly 22 ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA537057"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Documenting SOA-Based Systems.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report provides <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for documenting service-oriented architecture-based systems based on the Views & Beyond (V&B) software documentation approach. The V&B documentation approach is a lightweight and flexible approach to documenting software a...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Bellomo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://serc.carleton.edu/sp/mnstep/activities/26404.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Group and <span class="hlt">periodic</span> properties lab</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Students will <span class="hlt">observe</span> and perform experiments with the elements sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, sulfur and phosphorus. Conclusions will be made about trends down groups, across <span class="hlt">periods</span> and relating to acidity/basicity of metal oxides vs. nonmetal oxides</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shaffer, Dan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PolSc...6..155T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of global synthetic seismograms calculated using the spherical 2.5-D finite-difference method with <span class="hlt">observed</span> long-<span class="hlt">period</span> waveforms including data from the intra-Antarctic region</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have been developing an accurate and efficient numerical scheme, which uses the finite-difference method (FDM) in spherical coordinates, for the computation of global seismic wave propagation through laterally heterogeneous realistic Earth models. In the field of global seismology, traditional axisymmetric modeling has been used widely as an efficient approach since it can solve the 3-D elastodynamic equation in spherical coordinates on a 2-D cross-section of the Earth, assuming structures to be invariant with respect to the axis through the seismic source. However, it has the severe disadvantages that asymmetric structures about the axis cannot be incorporated and the source mechanisms with arbitrary shear dislocation have not been attempted for a long time. Our scheme is based on the framework of axisymmetric modeling but has been extended to treat asymmetric structures, arbitrary moment-tensor point sources, anelastic attenuation, and the Earth center which is a singularity of wave equations in spherical coordinates. All these types of schemes which solve 3-D wavefields on a 2-D model cross-section are classified as 2.5-D modeling, so we have named our scheme the spherical 2.5-D FDM. In this study, we compare synthetic seismograms calculated using our FDM scheme with three-component <span class="hlt">observed</span> long-<span class="hlt">period</span> seismograms including data from stations newly installed in Antarctica in conjunction with the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008. Seismic data from inland Antarctica are expected to reveal images of the Earth's deep interior with enhanced resolution because of the high signal-to-noise ratio and wide extent of this region, in addition to the rarity of sampling paths along the rotation axis of the Earth. We calculate synthetic seismograms through the preliminary reference earth model (PREM) including attenuation using a moment-tensor point source for the November 9, 2009 Fiji earthquake. Our results show quite good agreement between synthetic and <span class="hlt">observed</span> seismograms, which indicates the accuracy of <span class="hlt">observations</span> in the Antarctica, as well as the feasibility of the spherical 2.5-D modeling scheme.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Toyokuni, Genti; Takenaka, Hiroshi; Kanao, Masaki; Wiens, Douglas A.; Nyblade, Andrew</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20976531"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fractional-<span class="hlt">period</span> excitations in continuum <span class="hlt">periodic</span> systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the generation of fractional-<span class="hlt">period</span> states in continuum <span class="hlt">periodic</span> systems. As an example, we consider a Bose-Einstein condensate confined in an optical-lattice potential. We show that when the potential is turned on nonadiabatically, the system explores a number of transient states whose <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> is a fraction of that of the lattice. We illustrate the origin of fractional-<span class="hlt">period</span> states analytically by treating them as resonant states of a parametrically forced Duffing oscillator and discuss their transient nature and potential <span class="hlt">observability</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nistazakis, H. E.; Frantzeskakis, D. J. [Department of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, Athens 15784 (Greece); Porter, Mason A. [Department of Physics and Center for the Physics of Information, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Kevrekidis, P. G. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003-4515 (United States); Nicolin, A. [Niels Bohr Institute, DK-2100, Blegdamsvej 17, Copenhagen (Denmark); Chin, J. K. [Department of Physics, MIT-Harvard Center for Ultracold Atoms, and Research Laboratory of Electronics, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3794044"> <span id="translatedtitle">Placebo-<span class="hlt">Suggestion</span> Modulates Conflict Resolution in the Stroop Task</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Here, we ask whether placebo-<span class="hlt">suggestion</span> (without any form of hypnotic induction) can modulate the resolution of cognitive conflict. Naïve participants performed a Stroop Task while wearing an EEG cap described as a “brain wave” machine. In Experiment 1, participants were made to believe that the EEG cap would either enhance or decrease their color perception and performance on the Stroop task. In Experiment 2, participants were explicitly asked to imagine that their color perception and performance would be enhanced or decreased (non-hypnotic imaginative <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>). We <span class="hlt">observed</span> effects of placebo-<span class="hlt">suggestion</span> on Stroop interference on accuracy: interference was decreased with positive <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> and increased with negative <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> compared to baseline. Intra-individual variability was also increased under negative <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> compared to baseline. Compliance with the instruction to imagine a modulation of performance, on the other hand, did not influence accuracy and only had a negative impact on response latencies and on intra-individual variability, especially in the congruent condition of the Stroop Task. Taken together, these results demonstrate that expectations induced by a placebo-<span class="hlt">suggestion</span> can modulate our ability to resolve cognitive conflict, either facilitating or impairing response accuracy depending on the <span class="hlt">suggestion’s</span> contents. Our results also demonstrate a dissociation between placebo-<span class="hlt">suggestion</span> and non-hypnotic imaginative <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Caspar, Emilie A.; Gevers, Wim; Cleeremans, Axel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20090001918&hterms=toma&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dtoma"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">Period</span>-Amplitude and Amplitude-<span class="hlt">Period</span> Relationships</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Examined are <span class="hlt">Period</span>-Amplitude and Amplitude-<span class="hlt">Period</span> relationships based on the cyclic behavior of the 12-month moving averages of monthly mean sunspot numbers for cycles 0.23, both in terms of Fisher's exact tests for 2x2 contingency tables and linear regression analyses. Concerning the <span class="hlt">Period</span>-Amplitude relationship (same cycle), because cycle 23's maximum amplitude is known to be 120.8, the inferred regressions (90-percent prediction intervals) <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that its <span class="hlt">period</span> will be 131 +/- 24 months (using all cycles) or 131 +/- 18 months (ignoring cycles 2 and 4, which have the extremes of <span class="hlt">period</span>, 108 and 164 months, respectively). Because cycle 23 has already persisted for 142 months (May 1996 through February 2008), based on the latter prediction, it should end before September 2008. Concerning the Amplitude-<span class="hlt">Period</span> relationship (following cycle maximum amplitude versus preceding cycle <span class="hlt">period</span>), because cycle 23's <span class="hlt">period</span> is known to be at least 142 months, the inferred regressions (90-percent prediction intervals) <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that cycle 24's maximum amplitude will be about less than or equal to 96.1 +/- 55.0 (using all cycle pairs) or less than or equal to 91.0 +/- 36.7 (ignoring statistical outlier cycle pairs). Hence, cycle 24's maximum amplitude is expected to be less than 151, perhaps even less than 128, unless cycle pair 23/24 proves to be a statistical outlier.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985EOSTr..66..642B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Further <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for writing memorable geophysical papers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In an earlier article in Eos (December 21, 1982, p. 1219), I <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that members of AGU had been seriously remiss in not forming proper author teams in order to write “memorable” geophysical research papers. A number of the original <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> were rejected either on the grounds of good taste (see the “unabridged” preprint version of the paper, available from the author) or else because of political sensitivity (e.g., “Crooked magnetic field lines” by AGU members Agnew and Nixon). Nonetheless, several examples of what might be done survived censorship and appeared in the Eos article. In summary, it was concluded that geophysicists could be a lot more active in this area.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baker, D. N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820017198&hterms=plasma+research&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3D%2522plasma%2Bresearch%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structure of the solar oscillation with <span class="hlt">period</span> near 160 minutes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The solar oscillation with <span class="hlt">period</span> near 160 minutes is found to be unique in a spectrum computed over the range of <span class="hlt">periods</span> from about 71 to 278 minutes. A best estimate of the <span class="hlt">period</span> is 160.0095 + or - 0.001 minutes, which is different from 160 minutes (one ninth of a day) by a highly significant amount. The width of the peak is approximately equal to the limiting resolution that can be obtained from an <span class="hlt">observation</span> lasting 6 years, which <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the damping time of the oscillations is considerably longer than 6 years. A <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> that this peak might be the result of a beating phenomenon between the five minute data averages and a solar oscillation with <span class="hlt">period</span> near five minutes is shown to be incorrect by recomputing a portion of the spectrum using 15 second data averages.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Scherrer, P. H.; Wilcox, J. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=articles&pg=3&id=EJ845945"> <span id="translatedtitle">Qualitative Research Articles: Guidelines, <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> and Needs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to give ideas and <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> to avoid some typical problems of qualitative articles. The aim is not to debate quality in qualitative research but to indicate some practical solutions. Design/methodology/approach: The paper discusses the design of qualitative research and the structure of a qualitative article…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Crescentini, Alberto; Mainardi, Giuditta</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Material+AND+science+AND+research&pg=5&id=EJ1018315"> <span id="translatedtitle">Current Research: 2013 Summer Reading <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To supplement the summer reading of National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) members, the NSTA Committee on Research in Science Education <span class="hlt">suggested</span> a list of science education research articles that were published in the journals of NSTA's affiliates in 2012. These articles covered a variety of topics that include learning about…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Journal of College Science Teaching, 2013</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED043001.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Universals in the Ontogenesis of Grammar.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper represents a preliminary attempt to determine universals of grammatical development in children. On the basis of language acquisition data, a limited number of findings are presented in the form of <span class="hlt">suggested</span> developmental universals. These universals are grouped according to the psychological variables which may determine them, in the…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Slobin, Dan I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/37029524"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the mechanism of <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> and hypnosis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The nature of hypnosis is not adequately explained by conditioned responses or conditioned attitudes. The writer agrees with R. W. White that the hypnotized subject must be motivated, but not necessarily to behave like a hypnotized person. She postulates, rather, that <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> are effective only if the subject actively strives to imagine himself in the situation described by the operator.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. B. Arnold</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1946-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Online+AND+Project-based+AND+Learning&pg=3&id=EJ603813"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Model for a Working Cyberschool.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Suggests</span> a model for a working cyberschool based on a case study of Kamiak Cyberschool (Washington), a technology-driven public high school. Topics include flexible hours; one-to-one interaction with teachers; a supportive school environment; use of computers, interactive media, and online resources; and self-paced, project-based learning.…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Javid, Mahnaz A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD645433"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous and <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Posthypnotic Source Amnesia.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The occurrence of spontaneous and/or <span class="hlt">suggested</span> posthypnotic source amnesia was investigated in a sample of 93 introductory psychology students. Ss were randomly assigned to one of two groups, and served as Ss on 2 successive days. The standard induction o...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. M. Cooper</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1965-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Tachyons&id=EJ068448"> <span id="translatedtitle">Physics Courses--Some <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Case Studies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To communicate the relevance and excitement of science activity to students, the use of more imaginative, and even openly speculative, case studies in physics courses is <span class="hlt">suggested</span>. Some useful examples are Magnetic Monopoles, Constants, Black Holes, Antimatter, Zero Mass Particles, Tachyons, and the Bootstrap Hypothesis. (DF)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Swetman, T. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Osborn&pg=7&id=EJ698356"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seven Salutary <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Counselor Stamina</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Counselor stamina is deemed essential in the midst of a consistently challenging, complex, and changing mental health care environment. Rather than perpetuating conversations about "burnout" and "burnout prevention," this article provides a salutary or health-promoting perspective. Seven <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for counselor stamina are presented and…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Osborn, Cynthia J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60886545"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">SUGGESTED</span> URINARY TOLERANCE LEVELS FOR ENRICHED URANIUM</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The animal experimentation basis for estimates of permissible levels of ; airborne, soluble, and insoluble natural uranium is briefly reviewed. It ; <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that permissibie air and urinary levels for enriched uranium be set at ; values equivalent to those for natural uranium in terms of disintegrations per ; minute per unit volume. An attempt is made to calculate the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hursh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1957-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Income+AND+taxation&pg=2&id=EJ178875"> <span id="translatedtitle">Accounting: <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Content for Postsecondary Tax Course</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Surveys of community college graduates and of certified public accountants were made to determine employment relevance of the accounting curriculum. The article <span class="hlt">suggests</span> topics from the study data which should be included in taxation courses, e.g., income tax accounting, corporate taxation accounting, and tax law. (MF)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">King, Patricia H.; Morgan, Samuel D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED355680.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Conducting a Literature Review: Tips and <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This guide offers <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> on conducting literature reviews on topics relating to children and youth with disabilities. The guide recommends that the researcher begin by accessing a computerized database at a university, public, or private library. It specifically describes the ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center) database and the…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Interstate Research Associates, McLean, VA.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900053374&hterms=Halley+Comet&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DHalley%2527s%2BComet"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rationalization of Comet Halley's <span class="hlt">periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The sense of long axis orientation of Comet Halley during the Vega 1 encounter must be reversed from that deduced by Sagdeev et al. (1986) in order to harmonize the comet nucleus' Vega/Giotto-<span class="hlt">observed</span> orientations with <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> extracted from time-series brightness data. It is also demonstrated that Vega/Giotto <span class="hlt">observations</span> can be satisfied by either a 2.2- or 3.7-day long-axis free precession <span class="hlt">period</span>. A novel Fourier algorithm is used to reanalyze five independent data sets; strong evidence is adduced for <span class="hlt">periods</span> harmonically related to a 7.4-day <span class="hlt">period</span>. The preferred candidate models for Halley's nuclear rotation are characterized by a long-axis precession <span class="hlt">period</span> of 3.7 days.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Belton, Michael J. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6862967"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rationalization of Comet Halley's <span class="hlt">periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The sense of long axis orientation of Comet Halley during the Vega 1 encounter must be reversed from that deduced by Sagdeev et al. (1986) in order to harmonize the comet nucleus' Vega/Giotto-<span class="hlt">observed</span> orientations with <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> extracted from time-series brightness data. It is also demonstrated that Vega/Giotto <span class="hlt">observations</span> can be satisfied by either a 2.2- or 3.7-day long-axis free precession <span class="hlt">period</span>. A novel Fourier algorithm is used to reanalyze five independent data sets; strong evidence is adduced for <span class="hlt">periods</span> harmonically related to a 7.4-day <span class="hlt">period</span>. The preferred candidate models for Halley's nuclear rotation are characterized by a long-axis precession <span class="hlt">period</span> of 3.7 days. 79 refs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Belton, M.J.S. (National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ (USA))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24130735"> <span id="translatedtitle">Placebo-<span class="hlt">suggestion</span> modulates conflict resolution in the Stroop Task.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Here, we ask whether placebo-<span class="hlt">suggestion</span> (without any form of hypnotic induction) can modulate the resolution of cognitive conflict. Naïve participants performed a Stroop Task while wearing an EEG cap described as a "brain wave" machine. In Experiment 1, participants were made to believe that the EEG cap would either enhance or decrease their color perception and performance on the Stroop task. In Experiment 2, participants were explicitly asked to imagine that their color perception and performance would be enhanced or decreased (non-hypnotic imaginative <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>). We <span class="hlt">observed</span> effects of placebo-<span class="hlt">suggestion</span> on Stroop interference on accuracy: interference was decreased with positive <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> and increased with negative <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> compared to baseline. Intra-individual variability was also increased under negative <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> compared to baseline. Compliance with the instruction to imagine a modulation of performance, on the other hand, did not influence accuracy and only had a negative impact on response latencies and on intra-individual variability, especially in the congruent condition of the Stroop Task. Taken together, these results demonstrate that expectations induced by a placebo-<span class="hlt">suggestion</span> can modulate our ability to resolve cognitive conflict, either facilitating or impairing response accuracy depending on the <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>'s contents. Our results also demonstrate a dissociation between placebo-<span class="hlt">suggestion</span> and non-hypnotic imaginative <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>. PMID:24130735</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Magalhães De Saldanha da Gama, Pedro A; Slama, Hichem; Caspar, Emilie A; Gevers, Wim; Cleeremans, Axel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002PhRvE..65c6142G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> route to fractal functions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations have been found to decorate the usual power-law behavior found to describe the approach to a critical point, when the continuous scale-invariance symmetry is partially broken into a discrete-scale invariance symmetry. For Ising or Potts spins with ferromagnetic interactions on hierarchical systems, the relative magnitude of the log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> corrections are usually very small, of order 10-5. In growth processes [diffusion limited aggregation (DLA)], rupture, earthquake, and financial crashes, log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations with amplitudes of the order of 10% have been reported. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a ``technical'' explanation for this 4 order-of-magnitude difference based on the property of the ``regular function'' g(x) embodying the effect of the microscopic degrees of freedom summed over in a renormalization group (RG) approach F(x)=g(x)+?-1F(?x) of an <span class="hlt">observable</span> F as a function of a control parameter x. For systems for which the RG equation has not been derived, the previous equation can be understood as a Jackson q integral, which is the natural tool for describing discrete-scale invariance. We classify the ``Weierstrass-type'' solutions of the RG into two classes characterized by the amplitudes An of the power-law series expansion. These two classes are separated by a novel ``critical'' point. Growth processes (DLA), rupture, earthquake, and financial crashes thus seem to be characterized by oscillatory or bounded regular microscopic functions that lead to a slow power-law decay of An, giving strong log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> amplitudes. If in addition, the phases of An are ergodic and mixing, the <span class="hlt">observable</span> presents self-affine nondifferentiable properties. In contrast, the regular function of statistical physics models with ``ferromagnetic''-type interactions at equibrium involves unbound logarithms of polynomials of the control variable that lead to a fast exponential decay of An giving weak log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> amplitudes and smoothed <span class="hlt">observables</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gluzman, S.; Sornette, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11898585"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> paralysis: understanding channelopathies.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Familial <span class="hlt">periodic</span> paralyses are typical channelopathies (i.e., caused by functional disturbances of ion channel proteins). The episodes of flaccid muscle weakness <span class="hlt">observed</span> in these disorders are due to underexcitability of sarcolemma leading to a silent electromyogram and the lack of action potentials even upon electrical stimulation. Interictally, ion channel malfunction is well compensated, so that special exogenous or endogenous triggers are required to produce symptoms in the patients. An especially obvious trigger is the level of serum potassium (K+), the ion responsible for resting membrane potential and degree of excitability. The clinical symptoms can be caused by mutations in genes coding for ion channels that mediate different functions for maintaining the resting potential or propagating the action potential, the basis of excitability. The phenotype is determined by the type of functional defect brought about by the mutations, rather than the channel effected, because the contrary phenotypes hyperkalemic <span class="hlt">periodic</span> paralysis (HyperPP) and hypokalemic <span class="hlt">periodic</span> paralysis (HypoPP) may be caused by point mutations in the same gene. Still, the common mechanism for inexcitability in all known episodic-weakness phenotypes is a long-lasting depolarization that inactivates sodium ion (Na+) channels, initiating the action potential. PMID:11898585</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lehmann-Horn, Frank; Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Rüdel, Reinhardt</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/x31puj8626618557.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inducing resistance to <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> in children</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thirty 7-year-olds, 30 12-year-olds, and 39 adults were administered the Gudjonsson <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> Scale, which consists of a story followed by 20 questions, 15 of which are misleading. After subjects were told that their answers were not all correct, the questions were readministered to look for “shifts.” Approximately half of the subjects in each age group had been warned that the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Amye Warren; Katherine Hulse-Trotter; Ernest C. Tubbst</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51939988"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relativistic timescale analysis <span class="hlt">suggests</span> lunar theory revision</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The SI second of the atomic clock was calibrated to match the Ephemeris Time (ET) second in a mutual four year effort between the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the United States Naval Observatory (USNO). The ephemeris time is 'clocked' by <span class="hlt">observing</span> the elapsed time it takes the Moon to cross two positions (usually occultation of stars relative to a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Steven D. Deines; Carol A. Williams</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012MPBu...39..147O"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Period</span> Determination for 1660 Wood</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lightcurve analysis for asteroid 1660 Wood was performed in collaboration with <span class="hlt">observers</span> in Australia and Uruguay from <span class="hlt">observations</span> obtained during the asteroid's favorable opposition in 2012. The synodic rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> was found to be 6.8090 ± 0.0002 h and the lightcurve amplitude was 0.14 ± 0.03 mag.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oey, Julian; Alvarez, Eduardo Manuel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3831813"> <span id="translatedtitle">Examples of positive <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> given to patients undergoing orthopaedic surgeries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery in the University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary, we examined the effectiveness of positive <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> used in the perioperative <span class="hlt">period</span> in hip and knee arthroplasties performed under spinal anaesthesia. The goal of the <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> was to reduce the need for red blood cell transfusion and for analgesics, and to increase the patients’ satisfaction. The objective of this article is to present our method with concrete examples of positive <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> which were given first before the surgery (via personal conversation), then during the operation as well (via audiotaped method). We hope that our article will contribute to the wide-spread awareness of this relatively easy to learn communication method.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Csernatony, Zoltan; Balogh, Agnes; Varga, Katalin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24657632"> <span id="translatedtitle">Using <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> to model different types of automatic writing.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Our sense of self includes awareness of our thoughts and movements, and our control over them. This feeling can be altered or lost in neuropsychiatric disorders as well as in phenomena such as "automatic writing" whereby writing is attributed to an external source. Here, we employed <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> in highly hypnotically <span class="hlt">suggestible</span> participants to model various experiences of automatic writing during a sentence completion task. Results showed that the induction of hypnosis, without additional <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>, was associated with a small but significant reduction of control, ownership, and awareness for writing. Targeted <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> produced a double dissociation between thought and movement components of writing, for both feelings of control and ownership, and additionally, reduced awareness of writing. Overall, <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> produced selective alterations in the control, ownership, and awareness of thought and motor components of writing, thus enabling key aspects of automatic writing, <span class="hlt">observed</span> across different clinical and cultural settings, to be modelled. PMID:24657632</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Walsh, E; Mehta, M A; Oakley, D A; Guilmette, D N; Gabay, A; Halligan, P W; Deeley, Q</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.G33B0983C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Anomalous ocean tide loading displacements in western Europe <span class="hlt">suggest</span> mantle anelasticity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using GPS data from over 200 continuously-operating sites in western Europe, at a range of latitudes and distances from the coast, we <span class="hlt">observe</span> ocean tide loading displacements (OTLD) at a selection of semi-diurnal and diurnal tidal <span class="hlt">periods</span>. Our processing strategy uses the GIPSY-OASIS II software with reprocessed satellite orbits and clocks, and either (1) 24-hour batch solutions with 3-d harmonic motions estimated at fixed tidal <span class="hlt">periods</span> and later combined over the 2+ year data span, or (2) kinematic solutions from which 3-d harmonic motions are later estimated over the whole data span. Excepting the K1 and K2 tidal <span class="hlt">periods</span> which are problematic because of their coincidence with the sidereal rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> and GPS satellite geometry repeat interval, and GPS orbital <span class="hlt">period</span>, we obtain good (better than 0.5 mm) agreement between these two strategies, with little sensitivity to the quality of a priori OTLD model used. Compared with OTLD computed from modern numerical ocean tide models convolved with Green's functions derived from the PREM global Earth model, we <span class="hlt">observe</span> differences in the vertical component of OTLD for the M2 tidal constituent approaching 3 mm in SW England and NW France (nearly 10 per cent of the signal amplitude). These differences are too large to be explained by errors in the numerical ocean tide models, which show good agreement with each other and with local tide gauge data, and too large and widespread to be explained by plausible changes to the Green's functions reflecting regional crustal structure. Instead, they show clear correlation with the contribution to OTLD from ocean tidal signals at distances of 100-200 km, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> an asthenospheric upper mantle origin for the discrepancy. OTLD offers a window onto the possible anelastic behaviour of the upper mantle at tidal timescales, which cannot be detected by solid Earth tides that are largely sensitive to lower mantle rheology.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Clarke, P. J.; Bos, M. S.; Penna, N. T.; Keshin, M.; Baker, T. F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22652609"> <span id="translatedtitle">Diagnostic inflation: causes and a <span class="hlt">suggested</span> cure.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">There have been a striking diagnostic inflation and a corresponding increase in the use of psychotropic drugs during the past 30 years. DSM-5, scheduled to appear in May 2013, proposes another grand expansion of mental illness. In this article, we will review the causes of diagnostic exuberance and associated medical treatment. We will then <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a method of stepped care combined with stepped diagnosis, which may reduce overdiagnosis without risking undertreatment of those who really need help. The goal is to control diagnostic inflation, to reduce the harms and costs of unnecessary treatment, and to save psychiatry from overdiagnosis and ridicule. PMID:22652609</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Batstra, Laura; Frances, Allen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AcSpe..96...69C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Limits of quantitation - Yet another <span class="hlt">suggestion</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The work presented herein <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the limit of quantitation concept may be rendered substantially less ambiguous and ultimately more useful as a figure of merit by basing it upon the significant figure and relative measurement error ideas due to Coleman, Auses and Gram, coupled with the correct instantiation of Currie's detection limit methodology. Simple theoretical results are presented for a linear, univariate chemical measurement system with homoscedastic Gaussian noise, and these are tested against both Monte Carlo computer simulations and laser-excited molecular fluorescence experimental results. Good agreement among experiment, theory and simulation is obtained and an easy extension to linearly heteroscedastic Gaussian noise is also outlined.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Carlson, Jill; Wysoczanski, Artur; Voigtman, Edward</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20736607"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere, or POPS, is a novel fusion concept first proposed by D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel [Fusion Technol. 38, 28 (1998)]. POPS utilizes the self-similar collapse of an oscillating ion cloud in a spherical harmonic oscillator potential well formed by electron injection. Once the ions have been phase-locked, their coherent motion simultaneously produces very high densities and temperatures during the collapse phase of the oscillation. A requirement for POPS is that the electron injection produces a stable harmonic oscillator potential. This has been demonstrated in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device and verified by particle simulation. Also, the POPS oscillation has been confirmed experimentally through <span class="hlt">observation</span> that the ions in the potential well exhibit resonance behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the <span class="hlt">observed</span> POPS frequencies and the theoretical predictions has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> for a wide range of potential well depths and three different ion species. Practical applications of POPS require large plasma compressions. These large compressions have been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in particle simulations, although space charge neutralization remains a major issue.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, J.; Nebel, R.A.; Stange, S.; Murali, S. Krupakar [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-05-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3622029"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> bursts of Jovian non-Io decametric radio emission</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the years 2000–2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian <span class="hlt">periodic</span> radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong <span class="hlt">periodic</span> reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a <span class="hlt">period</span> ?1.5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically <span class="hlt">observed</span> between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300° and 60° (via 360°). The stereoscopic multispacecraft <span class="hlt">observations</span> have shown that the radio sources of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every ?25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that <span class="hlt">periodic</span> non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H.O.; Farrell, W.M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23585696"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> bursts of Jovian non-Io decametric radio emission.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the years 2000-2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian <span class="hlt">periodic</span> radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong <span class="hlt">periodic</span> reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a <span class="hlt">period</span> [Formula: see text] longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically <span class="hlt">observed</span> between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300° and 60° (via 360°). The stereoscopic multispacecraft <span class="hlt">observations</span> have shown that the radio sources of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every [Formula: see text] days. The polarization measurements have shown that the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that <span class="hlt">periodic</span> non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind. PMID:23585696</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Panchenko, M; Rucker, H O; Farrell, W M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001JGR...10630389B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ionospheric effects of major magnetic storms during the international space weather <span class="hlt">period</span> of September and October 1999: GPS <span class="hlt">observations</span>, VHF/UHF scintillations, and in situ density structures at middle and equatorial latitudes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper we present a study of the ionospheric effects of a halo coronal mass ejection (CME) initiated on the Sun on September 20, 1999, and causing the largest magnetic storm during this month on September 22-23, 1999, with the hourly Dst index being -167 nT at ~2400 UT on September 22. The recurrent CME on October 18 caused an even larger magnetic storm on October 22, 1999, with Dst of -231 nT at ~0700 UT. The ionospheric effects of these two major magnetic storms are studied through their effects on a prototype of a Global Positioning System (GPS)-based navigation system called Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) being developed by the Federal Aviation Administration for use in the continental United States and their impact on global VHF/UHF communication systems. It is shown that the penetration of transient magnetospheric electric fields equatorward of the shielding region at midlatitudes, which have been well-correlated in the past with rapid changes in the well-known Dst index (or through its recently available high resolution 1-min counterpart the SYM-H index), can cause large increases of total electron content (TEC), TEC fluctuations, and saturated 250-MHz scintillation, and these, in turn, may have significant impacts on WAAS. The local time of Dst changes (and not just Dst magnitude) was found to be very important for WAAS, since the largest effects on TEC are seen near dusk. The prompt penetration of these magnetospheric electric fields all the way to the magnetic equator causes augmentation or inhibition of equatorial spread F. The global ionospheric response to these storms has been obtained from ground-based TEC <span class="hlt">observations</span> with a GPS network and space-based in situ density and electric field measurements using the Republic of China Satellite-1 (ROCSAT-1) and several Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellites. These prompt penetration electric fields cause VHF/UHF scintillations and GPS TEC variations at low latitudes in the specific longitude sector for which the early evening <span class="hlt">period</span> corresponds to the time of rapid Dst variations and maximum Dst phase. The effects of the delayed ionospheric disturbance dynamo and those of decreased magnetospheric convection on postmidnight irregularity generation are shown to be confined to a part of the same longitude range that actively responded to the prompt penetration of electric fields in the early evening sector.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Basu, Sunanda; Basu, Santimay; Valladares, C. E.; Yeh, H.-C.; Su, S.-Y.; MacKenzie, E.; Sultan, P. J.; Aarons, J.; Rich, F. J.; Doherty, P.; Groves, K. M.; Bullett, T. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3110760"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dinosaur Peptides <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> Mechanisms of Protein Survival</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a ‘preservation motif’, and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a chemical mechanism for survival.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P. R. O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1021193"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dinosaur Peptides <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> Mechanisms of Protein Survival</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a 'preservation motif', and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a chemical mechanism for survival.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O. (Harvard-Med); (IIT); (NCSU); (UPENN); (Manchester); (Orthovita)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15839394"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ankyloglossia in the infant and young child: clinical <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for diagnosis and management.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Since the recommended time for a child's first dental visit is early, it is essential that pediatric dentists be familiar with all possible pathologies occurring during this early <span class="hlt">period</span> of life. The parents of infants and toddlers who notice in their child a "tongue-tie" (ankyloglossia) are likely to turn first to their pediatric dentist for advice and help. Treatment options such as <span class="hlt">observation</span>, speech therapy, frenotomy without anesthesia, and frenectomy under general anesthesia have all been <span class="hlt">suggested</span> in the literature. The purposes of this report are to describe ankyloglossia, its clinical significance, and the timing of treatment. The frenotomy procedure is presented for the pediatric dentist with clinical <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for the diagnosis and management of ankyloglossia. PMID:15839394</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kupietzky, Ari; Botzer, Eyal</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JGRA..116.4225P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetospheric <span class="hlt">period</span> magnetic field oscillations at Saturn: Equatorial phase “jitter” produced by superposition of southern and northern <span class="hlt">period</span> oscillations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate magnetic field oscillations near the planetary rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> in Saturn's magnetosphere <span class="hlt">observed</span> during the initial near-equatorial phase of the Cassini mission. Phase determinations on 28 periapsis passes during this ˜2 year interval display pronounced nonrandom “jitter” relative to the ˜10.8 h modulations in the dominant southern Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR) emissions. Phase deviations in the radial and azimuthal components are strongly positively correlated, while being anticorrelated with the phase deviations in the colatitudinal component. This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> the presence in the equatorial magnetosphere of superposed weaker field oscillations at the ˜10.6 h <span class="hlt">period</span> of the northern SKR modulations, the phase deviations being shown to be <span class="hlt">periodic</span> near the corresponding ˜23 day “beat” <span class="hlt">period</span>. Modeling the effect of the northern <span class="hlt">period</span> oscillations shows that their amplitude is ˜30%-40% of the southern <span class="hlt">period</span> oscillations, producing phase deviations of ˜±25°. The relative phasing of the northern <span class="hlt">period</span> radial and azimuthal fields is such as to form a rotating quasi-uniform field, as for the southern <span class="hlt">period</span> oscillations, while the phasing of the colatitudinal component indicates perturbation field lines arched with apices pointing to the south, opposite to the southern <span class="hlt">period</span> field lines that are arched with apices pointing to the north. The northern <span class="hlt">period</span> field points sunward at northern SKR maxima, consistent with previous <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the northern polar oscillations and opposite to the southern <span class="hlt">period</span> field that points tailward at southern SKR maxima. The results support the view that the field oscillations are due to two auroral current systems that rotate with differing <span class="hlt">periods</span> in the two hemispheres.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Provan, G.; Andrews, D. J.; Cecconi, B.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Dougherty, M. K.; Lamy, L.; Zarka, P. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17087580"> <span id="translatedtitle">Proactive and retroactive effects of negative <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The negative effects of false information presented either prior to (proactive interference; PI) or following (retroactive interference; RI) true information was examined with word definitions (Experiment 1) and trivia facts (Experiment 2). Participants were explicitly aware of which information was true and false when shown, and true-false discrimination was evaluated via multiple-choice tests. Negative <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>, defined as poorer performance on interference items than noninterference (control) items, consistently occurred when the wrong information followed the correct information (RI) but not when it preceded the correct information (PI). These effects did not change as a function of retention interval (immediate, 1 week, or 3 weeks) or number of incorrect alternatives (1 or 3). Implications of this outcome for experiencing incorrect information in both academic and nonacademic situations are considered. PMID:17087580</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brown, Alan S; Brown, Christine M; Mosbacher, Joy L; Dryden, W Erich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/june2000/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recent Images <span class="hlt">Suggesting</span> Liquid Water on Mars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recently, the press reported that the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) had captured compelling images of gullies and slope failures that might be associated with the presence of liquid water on Mars. Now you can see these famous images at Malin Space Science Systems' MOC Website. These sharp, beautiful, color images (.jpeg, .gif) are featured on pages containing descriptions of how such physical features are formed on earth. The images are available in two sizes (small = 360K, large = 690K). Highlights include the "gully landform" compared to channel and apron features on Mount Saint Helens on Earth, a 3-D image (3-D glasses required) of a "weeping" alcove in an impact crater, and clues <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the suspected liquid water on Mars is relatively young.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2603236"> <span id="translatedtitle">Extant mammal body masses <span class="hlt">suggest</span> punctuated equilibrium</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Is gradual microevolutionary change within species simultaneously the source of macroevolutionary differentiation between species? Since its first publication, Darwin's original idea that phenotypic differences between species develop gradually over time, as the accumulation of small selection-induced changes in successive generations has been challenged by palaeontologists claiming that, instead, new species quickly acquire their phenotypes to remain virtually unchanged until going extinct again. This controversy, widely known as the ‘punctuated equilibrium’ debate, remained unresolved, largely owing to the difficulty of distinguishing biological species from fossil remains. We analysed body masses of 2143 existing mammal species on a phylogeny comprising 4510 (i.e. nearly all) extant species to estimate rates of gradual (anagenetic) and speciational (cladogenetic) evolution. Our Bayesian estimates from mammals as well as separate sub-clades such as primates and carnivores <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that gradual evolution is responsible for only a small part of body size variation between mammal species.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mattila, Tiina M; Bokma, Folmer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992AcAau..26..243V"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for a large southern radio telescope</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A southern partner is needed for the Arecibo telescope (213 m illuminated aperture, 38°N to 2°S declination range with up to 5° vignetting). We ask for a similar design: spherical primary fixed to ground, a movable focal system with two shaped Gregorian ancillaries, and 213 m aperture. But we want a larger declination range without any vignetting, optimized for minimum primary surface. Three special designs are <span class="hlt">suggested</span>, for different requirements. First, a minimum tracking time of one hour can simply be given by a rotating asymmetrical illumination offset of 32 m (7.5°); the EW diameter of the primary, 215 m, is thus defined by the aperture itself. In order to give 4° overlap with Arecibo and to cover both Magellanic clouds, a declination range of 78° is needed, provided by a NS diameter of 436 m, and a shift of the focal system along a fixed NS arm 143 m long. Second, for planetary radar up to Saturn, a tracking time of three hours is needed, which calls for a rotating azimuth arm as at Arecibo. The minimum EW diameter, 308 m, is obtained with 47 m (11.25°) offset; and 78° declination range has a NS diameter of 418 m. Third, if polarization purity is required, a completely symmetrical system with smaller radius of curvature but a large secondary is <span class="hlt">suggested</span>; and 321 m EW and 369 m NS diameter for the same pointing range, 45°EW and 78°NS. The last two systems are more expensive than the first one, or their NS range must be reduced, say, to 45° (14° south of Galactic center).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">von Hoerner, Sebastian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4099162"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enhancing Business Intelligence by Means of <span class="hlt">Suggestive</span> Reviews</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Appropriate identification and classification of online reviews to satisfy the needs of current and potential users pose a critical challenge for the business environment. This paper focuses on a specific kind of reviews: the <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> type. <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> have a significant influence on both consumers' choices and designers' understanding and, hence, they are key for tasks such as brand positioning and social media marketing. The proposed approach consists of three main steps: (1) classify comparative and <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> sentences; (2) categorize <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> sentences into different types, either explicit or implicit locutions; (3) perform sentiment analysis on the classified reviews. A range of supervised machine learning approaches and feature sets are evaluated to tackle the problem of <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> opinion mining. Experimental results for all three tasks are obtained on a dataset of mobile phone reviews and demonstrate that extending a bag-of-words representation with <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> and comparative patterns is ideal for distinguishing <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> sentences. In particular, it is <span class="hlt">observed</span> that classifying <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> sentences into implicit and explicit locutions works best when using a mixed sequential rule feature representation. Sentiment analysis achieves maximum performance when employing additional preprocessing in the form of negation handling and target masking, combined with sentiment lexicons.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Qazi, Atika</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19720028233&hterms=1926&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3D%252C%2B.%2B.%252C1926"> <span id="translatedtitle">A rotating solar magnetic "dipole' <span class="hlt">observed</span> from 1926 to 1968.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A recurring pattern with a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 26 7/8 days <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the polar geomagnetic field during the interval from 1926 to 1941 appears to persist in the interplanetary magnetic field polarity <span class="hlt">observed</span> with spacecraft during the interval from 1963 to 1968. This <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">suggests</span> the existence of a rotating solar magnetic ?dipole' with a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 26 7/8 plus or minus 0.003 days.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1971-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvE..83d1919K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ergodicity convergence test <span class="hlt">suggests</span> telomere motion obeys fractional dynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anomalous diffusion, <span class="hlt">observed</span> in many biological processes, is a generalized description of a wide variety of processes, all obeying the same law of mean-square displacement. Identifying the basic mechanisms of these <span class="hlt">observations</span> is important for deducing the nature of the biophysical systems measured. We implement a previously <span class="hlt">suggested</span> method for distinguishing between fractional Langevin dynamics, fractional Brownian motion, and continuous time random walk based on the ergodic nature of the data. We apply the method together with the recently <span class="hlt">suggested</span> P-variation test and the displacement correlation to the lately measured dynamics of telomeres in the nucleus of mammalian cells and find strong evidence that the telomeres motion obeys fractional dynamics. The ergodic dynamics are <span class="hlt">observed</span> experimentally to fit fractional Brownian or Langevin dynamics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kepten, E.; Bronshtein, I.; Garini, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3691610"> <span id="translatedtitle">In vitro circadian <span class="hlt">period</span> is associated with circadian/sleep preference</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Evaluation of circadian phenotypes is crucial for understanding the pathophysiology of diseases associated with disturbed biological rhythms such as circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSDs). We measured clock gene expression in fibroblasts from individual subjects and <span class="hlt">observed</span> circadian rhythms in the cells (in vitro rhythms). <span class="hlt">Period</span> length of the in vitro rhythm (in vitro <span class="hlt">period</span>) was compared with the intrinsic circadian <span class="hlt">period</span>, ?, measured under a forced desynchrony protocol (in vivo <span class="hlt">period</span>) and circadian/sleep parameters evaluated by questionnaires, sleep log, and actigraphy. Although no significant correlation was <span class="hlt">observed</span> between the in vitro and in vivo <span class="hlt">periods</span>, the in vitro <span class="hlt">period</span> was correlated with chronotype, habitual sleep time, and preferred sleep time. Our data demonstrate that the in vitro <span class="hlt">period</span> is significantly correlated with circadian/sleep preference. The findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that fibroblasts from individual patients can be utilized for in vitro screening of therapeutic agents to provide personalized therapeutic regimens for CRSD patients.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hida, Akiko; Kitamura, Shingo; Ohsawa, Yosuke; Enomoto, Minori; Katayose, Yasuko; Motomura, Yuki; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Nozaki, Kentaro; Watanabe, Makiko; Aritake, Sayaka; Higuchi, Shigekazu; Kato, Mie; Kamei, Yuichi; Yamazaki, Shin; Goto, Yu-ichi; Ikeda, Masaaki; Mishima, Kazuo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910018813&hterms=audrey&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Daudrey"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggested</span> criteria for evaluating systems engineering methodologies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Systems engineering is the application of mathematical and scientific principles to practical ends in the life-cycle of a system. A methodology for systems engineering is a carefully developed, relatively complex procedure or process for applying these mathematical and scientific principles. There are many systems engineering methodologies (or possibly many versions of a few methodologies) currently in use in government and industry. These methodologies are usually designed to meet the needs of a particular organization. It has been <span class="hlt">observed</span>, however, that many technical and non-technical problems arise when inadequate systems engineering methodologies are applied by organizations to their systems development projects. Various criteria for evaluating systems engineering methodologies are discussed. Such criteria are developed to assist methodology-users in identifying and selecting methodologies that best fit the needs of the organization.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gates, Audrey; Paul, Arthur S.; Gill, Tepper L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24462776"> <span id="translatedtitle">Metabolic brain activity <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of persistent pain in a rat model of neuropathic pain.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Persistent pain is a central characteristic of neuropathic pain conditions in humans. Knowing whether rodent models of neuropathic pain produce persistent pain is therefore crucial to their translational applicability. We investigated the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain and the formalin pain model in rats using positron emission tomography (PET) with the metabolic tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to determine if there is ongoing brain activity <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of persistent pain. For the formalin model, under brief anesthesia we injected one hindpaw with 5% formalin and the FDG tracer into a tail vein. We then allowed the animals to awaken and <span class="hlt">observed</span> pain behavior for 30min during the FDG uptake <span class="hlt">period</span>. The rat was then anesthetized and placed in the scanner for static image acquisition, which took place between minutes 45 and 75 post-tracer injection. A single reference rat brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) was used to align the PET images with the Paxinos and Watson rat brain atlas. Increased glucose metabolism was <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the somatosensory region associated with the injection site (S1 hindlimb contralateral), S1 jaw/upper lip and cingulate cortex. Decreases were <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the prelimbic cortex and hippocampus. Second, SNI rats were scanned 3weeks post-surgery using the same scanning paradigm, and region-of-interest analyses revealed increased metabolic activity in the contralateral S1 hindlimb. Finally, a second cohort of SNI rats was scanned while anesthetized during the tracer uptake <span class="hlt">period</span>, and the S1 hindlimb increase was not <span class="hlt">observed</span>. Increased brain activity in the somatosensory cortex of SNI rats resembled the activity produced with the injection of formalin, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the SNI model may produce persistent pain. The lack of increased activity in S1 hindlimb with general anesthetic demonstrates that this effect can be blocked, as well as highlights the importance of investigating brain activity in awake and behaving rodents. PMID:24462776</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thompson, Scott J; Millecamps, Magali; Aliaga, Antonio; Seminowicz, David A; Low, Lucie A; Bedell, Barry J; Stone, Laura S; Schweinhardt, Petra; Bushnell, M Catherine</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21452814"> <span id="translatedtitle">AN INTERPRETATION OF THE ORBITAL <span class="hlt">PERIOD</span> DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HOT JUPITERS AND GIANT PLANETS ON LONG-<span class="hlt">PERIOD</span> ORBITS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is believed that a hot Jupiter (giant planet with a short <span class="hlt">period</span> less than 10 days) forms in the outer region of a protoplanetary disk, then migrates inward to an orbit with a short <span class="hlt">period</span> around 3 days, and stops there by a final stopping mechanism. The prominent problem is why hot Jupiters migrate inward to short-<span class="hlt">period</span> orbits, while other extrasolar giant planets and Jovian planets in our solar system exist on long-<span class="hlt">period</span> orbits. Here we show that this difference in orbital <span class="hlt">periods</span> is caused by two populations of protoplanetary disks. One population experiences gravitational instability during some <span class="hlt">periods</span> of their lifetime (GI disks), while the other does not (No-GI disks). In GI disks, planets can quickly migrate inward to short-<span class="hlt">period</span> orbits to become hot Jupiters. In No-GI disks, the migration is so slow that planets can exist on long-<span class="hlt">period</span> orbits. Protoplanetary disks are classified into the two populations because of the differences in properties of molecular cloud cores, from which disks from. We specifically compare our theory with <span class="hlt">observations</span>. Our theory is supported by <span class="hlt">observations</span> of extrasolar planets. We analyze the current status of our solar system and find that our solar nebula belongs to the population with a low migration rate. This is consistent with the <span class="hlt">observation</span> that Jupiter and Saturn are indeed on long-<span class="hlt">period</span> orbits. Our results further <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that, in the future <span class="hlt">observations</span>, a hot Jupiter cannot be found around a star with mass below a critical mass (0.14-0.28 M {sub sun}).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jin Liping, E-mail: jinlp@jlu.edu.c [College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995ptti.meet..209D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relativistic timescale analysis <span class="hlt">suggests</span> lunar theory revision</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The SI second of the atomic clock was calibrated to match the Ephemeris Time (ET) second in a mutual four year effort between the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the United States Naval Observatory (USNO). The ephemeris time is 'clocked' by <span class="hlt">observing</span> the elapsed time it takes the Moon to cross two positions (usually occultation of stars relative to a position on Earth) and dividing that time span into the predicted seconds according to the lunar equations of motion. The last revision of the equations of motion was the Improved Lunar Ephemeris (ILE), which was based on E. W. Brown's lunar theory. Brown classically derived the lunar equations from a purely Newtonian gravity with no relativistic compensations. However, ET is very theory dependent and is affected by relativity, which was not included in the ILE. To investigate the relativistic effects, a new, noninertial metric for a gravitated, translationally accelerated and rotating reference frame has three sets of contributions, namely (1) Earth's velocity, (2) the static solar gravity field and (3) the centripetal acceleration from Earth's orbit. This last term can be characterized as a pseudogravitational acceleration. This metric predicts a time dilation calculated to be -0.787481 seconds in one year. The effect of this dilation would make the ET timescale run slower than had been originally determined. Interestingly, this value is within 2 percent of the average leap second insertion rate, which is the result of the divergence between International Atomic Time (TAI) and Earth's rotational time called Universal Time (UT or UTI). Because the predictions themselves are significant, regardless of the comparison to TAI and UT, the authors will be rederiving the lunar ephemeris model in the manner of Brown with the relativistic time dilation effects from the new metric to determine a revised, relativistic ephemeris timescale that could be used to determine UT free of leap second adjustments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Deines, Steven D.; Williams, Carol A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950025912&hterms=dilation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Ddilation"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relativistic timescale analysis <span class="hlt">suggests</span> lunar theory revision</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The SI second of the atomic clock was calibrated to match the Ephemeris Time (ET) second in a mutual four year effort between the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the United States Naval Observatory (USNO). The ephemeris time is 'clocked' by <span class="hlt">observing</span> the elapsed time it takes the Moon to cross two positions (usually occultation of stars relative to a position on Earth) and dividing that time span into the predicted seconds according to the lunar equations of motion. The last revision of the equations of motion was the Improved Lunar Ephemeris (ILE), which was based on E. W. Brown's lunar theory. Brown classically derived the lunar equations from a purely Newtonian gravity with no relativistic compensations. However, ET is very theory dependent and is affected by relativity, which was not included in the ILE. To investigate the relativistic effects, a new, noninertial metric for a gravitated, translationally accelerated and rotating reference frame has three sets of contributions, namely (1) Earth's velocity, (2) the static solar gravity field and (3) the centripetal acceleration from Earth's orbit. This last term can be characterized as a pseudogravitational acceleration. This metric predicts a time dilation calculated to be -0.787481 seconds in one year. The effect of this dilation would make the ET timescale run slower than had been originally determined. Interestingly, this value is within 2 percent of the average leap second insertion rate, which is the result of the divergence between International Atomic Time (TAI) and Earth's rotational time called Universal Time (UT or UTI). Because the predictions themselves are significant, regardless of the comparison to TAI and UT, the authors will be rederiving the lunar ephemeris model in the manner of Brown with the relativistic time dilation effects from the new metric to determine a revised, relativistic ephemeris timescale that could be used to determine UT free of leap second adjustments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Deines, Steven D.; Williams, Carol A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900041490&hterms=meteors+comets&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dmeteors%2Bcomets"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Comet Machholz and its idiosyncrasies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The dynamics and physical characteristics of Comet P/Machholz are analyzed. The discovery of the comet (Machholz, 1986) is discussed, including the <span class="hlt">observational</span> conditions and the theory that the comet is inactive over extensive <span class="hlt">periods</span> of time. Consideration is given to <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the two tails of Comet P/Machholz (Emerson, 1986), the brightness variations and light curve of the comet, and nuclear photometry of the comet (Green, 1987). It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the increase in activity beginning one day after perihelion was triggered by a discrete source within 15 deg of the rotation pole that became sunlit after perihelion. Also, the possibility that Comet P/Machholz is associated with a meteor stream is examined.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sekanina, Zdenek</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24105926"> <span id="translatedtitle">Testing increases <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> for narrative-based misinformation but reduces <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> for question-based misinformation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A number of recent studies have found that recalling details of an event following its occurrence can increase people's <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> to later presented misinformation. However, several other studies have reported the opposite result, whereby earlier retrieval can reduce subsequent eyewitness <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>. In the present study, we investigated whether differences in the way misinformation is presented can modulate the effects of testing on <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>. Participants watched a video of a robbery and some were questioned about the event immediately afterwards. Later, participants were exposed to misinformation in a narrative (Experiment 1) or in questions (Experiment 2). Consistent with previous studies, we found that testing increased <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> when misinformation was presented via a narrative. Remarkably, when misinformation was presented in questions, testing decreased <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>. PMID:24105926</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">LaPaglia, Jessica A; Chan, Jason C K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013prpl.conf2B057K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Keplerian <span class="hlt">Periodicity</span> in the Photometric Variability of VV Serpentis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the results of our long-term photometric monitoring effort of VV Serpentis, a Herbig Ae star with an edge-on disk that is known to undergo <span class="hlt">periodic</span> extinction events. We combine our 177 nights of data from the ANDICAM simultaneous visible/IR imager with two data sets from the literature to create a large, statistically significant, 1834 night data set spanning 23 <span class="hlt">observing</span> seasons. A Lomb-Scargle analysis of this data set shows a broad peak in the periodigram at 30-35 days. This <span class="hlt">period</span> corresponds to the Keplerian orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> of the inner rim of the disk, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> extinction events are caused by protoplanetary structure, which is expected to form in the same inner regions of the disk.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kopon, Derek; Close, Laird; Skemer, Andrew</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930049539&hterms=Jablonski&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3D%2522Jablonski%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nova V2214 Ophiuchi 1988 - A magnetic nova inside the <span class="hlt">period</span> gap</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The discovery of a coherent photometric modulation in Nova Oph 1988 with <span class="hlt">period</span> 0.117515 +/- 0.000002 d, which is associated with the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> of the underlying binary, is reported. On the basis of photometric <span class="hlt">observations</span>, it is concluded that Nova V2214 Oph 1988 is a magnetic nova with an orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> inside the <span class="hlt">period</span> gap. The inclusion of this system in the statistics of novae <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that there is no <span class="hlt">period</span> gap for novae and that there is a clear correlation between the occurrence of novae with short orbital <span class="hlt">periods</span> and the presence of magnetic white dwarfs. It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that funneling of the accretion flow onto the magnetic poles favors the conditions for a thermonuclear runaway, increasing the frequency of eruptions for magnetic systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baptista, R.; Jablonski, F. J.; Cieslinski, D.; Steiner, J. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MPBu...41..170F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rotational <span class="hlt">Period</span> of 2770 Tsvet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Photometric <span class="hlt">observations</span> of main-belt asteroid 2770 Tsvet were made over three nights during 2014 March. Lightcurve analysis shows a synodic <span class="hlt">period</span> P = 7.82 ± 0.01 h with an amplitude A = 0.47 ± 0.03 mag.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Franco, Lorenzo; Papini, Riccardo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MPBu...40..197F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rotational <span class="hlt">Period</span> of Asteroid Francis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Photometric <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the main-belt asteroid 2050 Francis were made over three nights during 2013 May and June. Analysis shows a synodic <span class="hlt">period</span> of 3.069 ± 0.001 h with an amplitude 0.20 ± 0.03 mag.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Franco, Lorenzo; Tomassini, Angelo; Scardella, Maurizio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MPBu...41...77H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rotation <span class="hlt">Period</span> of 983 Gunila</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For the ASTR315 class at University of Maryland, we present a lightcurve analysis for 983 Gunila. The asteroid was <span class="hlt">observed</span> on three nights from 2013 Oct 19 to Nov 1 using iTelescope’s T7 Telescope in Nerpio, Spain. After the analysis of the lightcurve, we found a rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> of 8.37 ± 0.12 h.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hayes-Gehrke, Melissa; Berenhaus, Joshua; Mascone, Anthony; Lopez-Lahocki, Michael; Levantis, George; Haigh, Evan; Yang, Zhihan; Guerci, John; Wasli, Zacharv; Koester, Kenneth</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://prevention.cancer.gov/programs-resources/groups/b/software/screening"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Screening Evaluation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Statistical Software <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Screening Evaluation (Written by Stuart G. Baker) New Approach (Simplified Approximation): See Baker SG. Evaluating <span class="hlt">periodic</span> cancer screening without a randomized control group: a simplified design and analysis. In: Duffy</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a 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Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://mypages.iit.edu/~smile/ph95p3.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Motion - The Pendulum</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The objective of this activity is to teach students the concept of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> motion and relate it to the movement of a pendulum. Students use different sized, colored bobs to test the effect of amplitude on <span class="hlt">period</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lojkutz, Deborah</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-02-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19829403"> <span id="translatedtitle">Optical bistability in nonlinear <span class="hlt">periodic</span> structures.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Optical switching and optical bistability and multistability are <span class="hlt">observed</span> experimentally with a nonlinear <span class="hlt">periodic</span> structure. The <span class="hlt">periodic</span> dielectric is a colloidal crystal that exhibits a large electrostrictive nonlinearity. The transmission characteristics of these crystals as a function of incident intensity are presented for several different frequencies of light within the stopgap of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> structures. PMID:19829403</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Herbert, C J; Malcuit, M S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE86015444"> <span id="translatedtitle">Genealogy of <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Trajectories.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodic</span> solutions of non-integrable classical Hamiltonian systems with two degrees of freedom are numerically investigated. Curves of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> families are given in plots of energy vs. <span class="hlt">period</span>. Results are presented for this Hamiltonian: H = 1/2(p/sub...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. A. M. de Adguiar C. P. Maldta E. J. V. de Passos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=atoms&pg=2&id=EJ1028694"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Pyramid</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The chemical elements present in the modern <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table are arranged in terms of atomic numbers and chemical <span class="hlt">periodicity</span>. <span class="hlt">Periodicity</span> arises from quantum mechanical limitations on how many electrons can occupy various shells and subshells of an atom. The shell model of the atom predicts that a maximum of 2, 8, 18, and 32 electrons can occupy…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hennigan, Jennifer N.; Grubbs, W. Tandy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFMSM11B0310M"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Substorms, Sawtooth Oscillations And Their Contribution To The Ring Current.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> substorm occurences or sawtooth oscillations have been noted in the measurments of the energetic particle fluxes, by geosynchronous satellites. <span class="hlt">Observations</span> have led to statistical characterization of these events, which have a mean <span class="hlt">period</span> of about 120 min. In this study we simulate <span class="hlt">periodic</span> substorms or sawtooth oscillations, under storm-time conditions, by using a three-dimensional dynamic ion-tracing model. We follow the transport and acceleration of plasma sheet ions, under the influence of a convection electric field with superposed <span class="hlt">periodic</span> impulsive electric fields due to magnetic field dipolarizations, as <span class="hlt">observed</span> by spacecraft during substorm expansions. Our aim is to evaluate the contribution of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> substorms and sawtooth events to the build-up of high pressure ring current plasmas in the inner magnetosphere. The relative influence of plasma sheet O+ and H+ ions has been examined. Initial results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that multiple <span class="hlt">periodic</span> substorms have a cumulative effect on the ring current development.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Metallinou, F.; Moore, T. E.; Fok, M.; Daglis, I. A.; Delcourt, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11909200"> <span id="translatedtitle">Log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> route to fractal functions.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations have been found to decorate the usual power-law behavior found to describe the approach to a critical point, when the continuous scale-invariance symmetry is partially broken into a discrete-scale invariance symmetry. For Ising or Potts spins with ferromagnetic interactions on hierarchical systems, the relative magnitude of the log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> corrections are usually very small, of order 10(-5). In growth processes [diffusion limited aggregation (DLA)], rupture, earthquake, and financial crashes, log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations with amplitudes of the order of 10% have been reported. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a "technical" explanation for this 4 order-of-magnitude difference based on the property of the "regular function" g(x) embodying the effect of the microscopic degrees of freedom summed over in a renormalization group (RG) approach F(x)=g(x)+mu(-1)F(gamma x) of an <span class="hlt">observable</span> F as a function of a control parameter x. For systems for which the RG equation has not been derived, the previous equation can be understood as a Jackson q integral, which is the natural tool for describing discrete-scale invariance. We classify the "Weierstrass-type" solutions of the RG into two classes characterized by the amplitudes A(n) of the power-law series expansion. These two classes are separated by a novel "critical" point. Growth processes (DLA), rupture, earthquake, and financial crashes thus seem to be characterized by oscillatory or bounded regular microscopic functions that lead to a slow power-law decay of A(n), giving strong log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> amplitudes. If in addition, the phases of A(n) are ergodic and mixing, the <span class="hlt">observable</span> presents self-affine nondifferentiable properties. In contrast, the regular function of statistical physics models with "ferromagnetic"-type interactions at equilibrium involves unbound logarithms of polynomials of the control variable that lead to a fast exponential decay of A(n) giving weak log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> amplitudes and smoothed <span class="hlt">observables</span>. PMID:11909200</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gluzman, S; Sornette, D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRB..119.1498R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-<span class="hlt">period</span> tidal variations in the length of day</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new model of long-<span class="hlt">period</span> tidal variations in length of day is developed. The model comprises 80 spectral lines with <span class="hlt">periods</span> between 18.6 years and 4.7 days, and it consistently includes effects of mantle anelasticity and dynamic ocean tides for all lines. The anelastic properties follow Wahr and Bergen; experimental confirmation for their results now exists at the fortnightly <span class="hlt">period</span>, but there remains uncertainty when extrapolating to the longest <span class="hlt">periods</span>. The ocean modeling builds on recent work with the fortnightly constituent, which <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that oceanic tidal angular momentum can be reliably predicted at these <span class="hlt">periods</span> without data assimilation. This is a critical property when modeling most long-<span class="hlt">period</span> tides, for which little <span class="hlt">observational</span> data exist. Dynamic ocean effects are quite pronounced at shortest <span class="hlt">periods</span> as out-of-phase rotation components become nearly as large as in-phase components. The model is tested against a 20 year time series of space geodetic measurements of length of day. The current international standard model is shown to leave significant residual tidal energy, and the new model is found to mostly eliminate that energy, with especially large variance reduction for constituents Sa, Ssa, Mf, and Mt.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ray, Richard D.; Erofeeva, Svetlana Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23362807"> <span id="translatedtitle">Children's Memory for Their Mother's Murder: Accuracy, <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span>, and Resistance to <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">From its inception, child eyewitness memory research has been guided by dramatic legal cases that turn on the testimony of children. Decades of scientific research reveal that, under many conditions, children can provide veracious accounts of traumatic experiences. Scientific studies also document factors that lead children to make false statements. In this paper we describe a legal case in which children testified about their mother's murder. We discuss factors that may have influenced the accuracy of the children's eyewitness memory. Children's <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> and resistance to <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> are illustrated. Expert testimony, based on scientific research, can aid the trier of fact when children provide crucial evidence in criminal investigations and courtroom trials about tragic events. PMID:23362807</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McWilliams, Kelly; Narr, Rachel; Goodman, Gail S; Ruiz, Sandra; Mendoza, Macaria</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MNRAS.434..186C"> <span id="translatedtitle">The orbital <span class="hlt">periods</span> of subdwarf B binaries produced by the first stable Roche Lobe overflow channel</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Long-orbital-<span class="hlt">period</span> subdwarf B (sdB) stars with main-sequence companions are believed to be the product of stable Roche Lobe overflow (RLOF), a scenario challenged by recent <span class="hlt">observations</span>. Here, we represent the results of a systematic study of the orbital-<span class="hlt">period</span> distribution of sdB binaries in this channel using detailed binary evolution calculations. We show that the <span class="hlt">observed</span> orbital-<span class="hlt">period</span> distribution of long-<span class="hlt">period</span> sdB binaries can be well explained by this scenario. Furthermore, we find that, if the progenitors of the sdB stars have initial masses below the helium flash mass, the sdB binaries produced from stable RLOF follow a unique mass-orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> relation for a given metallicity Z; increasing the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> from ˜400 to ˜1100 d corresponds to increasing the mass of the sdB star from ˜0.40 to ˜0.49 M? for Z = 0.02. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the longest sdB binaries (with orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> >1100 d) could be the result of atmospheric RLOF. The mass-orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> relation can be tested <span class="hlt">observationally</span> if the mass of the sdB star can be determined precisely, e.g. from asteroseismology. Using this relation, we revise the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> distribution of sdB binaries produced by the first stable RLOF channel for the best-fitting model of Han et al (2003), and show that the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> has a peak around 830 d.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, Xuefei; Han, Zhanwen; Deca, Jan; Podsiadlowski, Philipp</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/ja/v101/iA12/96JA01285/96JA01285.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics in the thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model comparisons with global ionospheric and thermospheric <span class="hlt">observations</span> during the GEM\\/SUNDIAL <span class="hlt">period</span> of March 28-29, 1992</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Satellite and ground-based <span class="hlt">observations</span> from March 28 to 29, 1992, were combined in the assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure to derive realistic global distributions of the auroral precipitation and ionospheric convection which were used as inputs to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model (TIGCM). Comparisons of neutral model winds were made with Fabry-Perot</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. A. Emery; G. Lu; E. P. Szuszczewicz; R. G. Roble; P. G. Richards; K. L. Miller; R. Niciejewski; D. S. Evans; F. J. Rich; W. F. Denig; D. L. Chenette; P. Wilkinson; S. Pulinets; K. F. O'Loughlin; R. Hanbaba; M. Abdu; P. Jiao; K. Igarashi; B. M. Reddy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996JGR...10126681E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics in the thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model comparisons with global ionospheric and thermospheric <span class="hlt">observations</span> during the GEM/SUNDIAL <span class="hlt">period</span> of March 28-29, 1992</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Satellite and ground-based <span class="hlt">observations</span> from March 28 to 29, 1992, were combined in the assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure to derive realistic global distributions of the auroral precipitation and ionospheric convection which were used as inputs to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model (TIGCM). Comparisons of neutral model winds were made with Fabry-Perot measurements and meridional winds derived from ionosondes. The peak equatorward winds occurred 1-2 hours later in the model. Gravity waves launched from high-latitude Joule heating sources reached the equator in about 2 hours and agreed with <span class="hlt">observed</span> variations in the height of the maximum electron density (hmF2) and in the meridional winds. Joule heating events produced minima in the O/N2 ratio that moved equatorward and usually westward in longitudinal strips which lasted about a day. Changes in the O/N2 ratio and in the peak electron density (NmF2) were strongly correlated so the <span class="hlt">observed</span> daytime NmF2 values for stations near 50° magnetic latitude were generally reproduced by AMIE-TIGCM on the second day of the simulation. The AMIE-TIGCM underestimated the electron density after midnight by up to a factor of 2 in midlatitudes, while the modeled F2 layer was about 35 km lower than the <span class="hlt">observations</span> at midnight. Shifting the model winds 2 hours earlier at night could double the NmF2 at 0400 LT and increase hmF2 by 20 km. NmF2 could also be increased at night by realistically increasing the TIGCM nighttime downward fluxes of O+ at the upper boundary.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Emery, B. A.; Lu, G.; Szuszczewicz, E. P.; Richmond, A. D.; Roble, R. G.; Richards, P. G.; Miller, K. L.; Niciejewski, R.; Evans, D. S.; Rich, F. J.; Denig, W. F.; Chenette, D. L.; Wilkinson, P.; Pulinets, S.; O'Loughlin, K. F.; Hanbaba, R.; Abdu, M.; Jiao, P.; Igarashi, K.; Reddy, B. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3233548"> <span id="translatedtitle">6-Year <span class="hlt">Periodicity</span> and Variable Synchronicity in a Mass-Flowering Plant</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodical</span> organisms, such as bamboos and <span class="hlt">periodical</span> cicadas, are very famous for their synchronous reproduction. In bamboos and other <span class="hlt">periodical</span> plants, the synchronicity of mass-flowering and withering has been often reported indicating these species are monocarpic (semelparous) species. Therefore, synchronicity and <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> are often suspected to be fairly tightly coupled traits in these <span class="hlt">periodical</span> plants. We investigate the <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> and synchronicity of Strobilanthes flexicaulis, and a closely related species S. tashiroi on Okinawa Island, Japan. The genus Strobilanthes is known for several <span class="hlt">periodical</span> species. Based on 32-year <span class="hlt">observational</span> data, we confirmed that S. flexicaulis is 6-year <span class="hlt">periodical</span> mass-flowering monocarpic plant. All the flowering plants had died after flowering. In contrast, we found that S. tashiroi is a polycarpic perennial with no mass-flowering from three-year individual tracking. We also surveyed six local populations of S. flexicaulis and found variation in the synchronicity from four highly synchronized populations (>98% of plants flowering in the mass year) to two less synchronized one with 11–47% of plants flowering before and after the mass year. This result might imply that synchrony may be selected for when <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> is established in monocarpic species. We found the selective advantages for mass-flowering in pollinator activities and predator satiation. The current results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the <span class="hlt">periodical</span> S. flexicaulis might have evolved <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> from a non-<span class="hlt">periodical</span> close relative. The current report should become a key finding for understanding the evolution of <span class="hlt">periodical</span> plants.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kakishima, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Jin; Murata, Hiroko; Murata, Jin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00338-010-0705-3"> <span id="translatedtitle">The use (and misuse) of sediment traps in coral reef environments: Theory, <span class="hlt">observations</span>, and <span class="hlt">suggested</span> protocols</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sediment traps are commonly used as standard tools for monitoring “sedimentation” in coral reef environments. In much of the literature where sediment traps were used to measure the effects of “sedimentation” on corals, it is clear from deployment descriptions and interpretations of the resulting data that information derived from sediment traps has frequently been misinterpreted or misapplied. Despite their widespread use in this setting, sediment traps do not provide quantitative information about “sedimentation” on coral surfaces. Traps can provide useful information about the relative magnitude of sediment dynamics if trap deployment standards are used. This conclusion is based first on a brief review of the state of knowledge of sediment trap dynamics, which has primarily focused on traps deployed high above the seabed in relatively deep water, followed by our understanding of near-bed sediment dynamics in shallow-water environments that characterize coral reefs. This overview is followed by the first synthesis of near-bed sediment trap data collected with concurrent hydrodynamic information in coral reef environments. This collective information is utilized to develop nine protocols for using sediment traps in coral reef environments, which focus on trap parameters that researchers can control such as trap height (H), trap mouth diameter (D), the height of the trap mouth above the substrate (z o ), and the spacing between traps. The hydrodynamic behavior of sediment traps and the limitations of data derived from these traps should be forefront when interpreting sediment trap data to infer sediment transport processes in coral reef environments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Storlazzi, C. D.; Field, M. E.; Bothner, M. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.apsarchive.org/resource.cfm?submissionID=6589&BEN=1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> by a University Anatomy Teacher and a <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span> for Curricular Change: Integrative anatomy for undergraduates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article describes the need, purpose, and establishment of an undergraduate integrative anatomy course. The article also explains a survey conducted to evaluate the number of anatomy programs in undergraduate institutes in Washington.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David Darda (Central Washington University Biological Sciences)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70010737"> <span id="translatedtitle">Composition and evolution of the continental crust as <span class="hlt">suggested</span> by seismic <span class="hlt">observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The average composition of the continental crust is more mafic than hitherto supposed. The conterminous United States can be divided, on the basis of seismic structure, into ten regions. The seven western and the three eastern regions can be termed western and eastern superprovinces. Seismic studies show that the crust is thinner and more silicic in tectonically active regions (western superprovince - average crustal thickness 34 km), than in stable regions (eastern superprovince - average crustal thickness 44 km). Mafic rocks are estimated to average 55% of the continental crust: 45% in the western and 59% in the eastern superprovince. These results express quantitatively the ideas expressed qualitatively by Pakiser and Zietz (1965). The computations of percentages of major oxides in the crust associate seismic velocities with rock compositions. ?? 1956.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pakiser, L. C.; Robinson, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1966-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012NTA.....3..191A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stochastic extinction of tumor cells due to synchronization effect through time <span class="hlt">periodic</span> treatment in a tumor-immune interaction model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The response to a time <span class="hlt">periodic</span> treatment of the immunotherapy in a stochastic model of tumor-immune interaction is numerically investigated. Due to the effect of synchronization among the intrinsic oscillation and the treatment, an enhanced extinction of the tumor cells is <span class="hlt">observed</span>. It <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that compared with the static treatment, by controlling the <span class="hlt">period</span> of the treatment, the time <span class="hlt">periodic</span> treatment could be an effective way of treatment leading to tumor extinction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aisu, Ryota; Horita, Takehiko</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830029065&hterms=composite+circular+cylindrical&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dcomposite%2Bcircular%2Bcylindrical"> <span id="translatedtitle">On composites with <span class="hlt">periodic</span> structure</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The overall moduli of a composite with an isotropic elastic matrix containing <span class="hlt">periodically</span> distributed (anisotropic) inclusions or voids, can be expressed in terms of several infinite series which only depend on the geometry of the inclusions or voids, and hence can be computed once and for all for given geometries. For solids with <span class="hlt">periodic</span> structures these infinite series play exactly the same role as does Eshelby's tensor for a single inclusion or void in an unbounded elastic medium. For spherical and circular-cylindrical geometries, the required infinite series are calculated and the results are tabulated. These are then used to estimate the overall elastic moduli when either the overall strains or the overall stresses are prescribed, obtaining the same results. These results are compared with other estimates and with experimental data. It is found that the model of composites with <span class="hlt">periodic</span> structure yields estimates in excellent agreement with the experimental <span class="hlt">observations</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nemat-Nasser, S.; Iwakuma, T.; Hejazi, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhDT.........1V"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> solar wind density structures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This dissertation addresses a specific aspect of the Sun-Earth connection: we show that coronal activity creates <span class="hlt">periodic</span> density structures in the solar wind which convect radially outward and interact with Earth's magnetosphere. First, we analyze 11 years (1995-2005) of in situ solar wind density <span class="hlt">observations</span> from the Wind spacecraft and find that <span class="hlt">periodic</span> density structures occur at particular sets of radial length-scales more often than others. This indicates that these density fluctuations, which have radial length-scales of hundreds of megameters, cannot be attributed entirely to turbulence. Next, we analyze their effect on Earth's magnetosphere. Though these structures are not waves in the solar wind rest frame, they appear at discrete frequencies in Earth's reference frame. They compress the magnetosphere as they convect past, driving global magnetospheric oscillations at the same discrete frequencies as the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> density structures. Last, we investigate source regions and mechanisms of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> solar wind density structures. We analyze the alpha particle to proton abundance ratio during events of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> density structures. In many events, the proton and alpha density fluctuations are anti- correlated, which strongly argues for either temporally or spatially varying coronal source plasma. We examine white light images of the solar wind taken with SECCHI HI1 on the STEREO spacecraft and find <span class="hlt">periodic</span> density structures as near to the Sun as 15 solar radii. The smallest resolvable <span class="hlt">periodic</span> structures that we identify are of comparable length to those found at 1 AU, providing further evidence that at least some <span class="hlt">periodic</span> density structures are generated in the solar corona as the solar wind is formed. Guided by the properties <span class="hlt">observed</span> during previous studies and the characteristics established through the work presented here, we examine possible candidate mechanisms in the solar corona that can form <span class="hlt">periodic</span> density structures. We conclude that: coronal activity creates coherent structures in the solar wind at smaller size scales than previously thought; corona-formed coherent structures persist to 1 AU largely intact; finally, a significant amount of discrete frequency wave power in Earth's magnetosphere is directly driven by these structures once they reach Earth.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Viall, Nicholeen Mary</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://learningcenter.nsta.org/product_detail.aspx?id=10.2505/4/ss04_027_04_32"> <span id="translatedtitle">Science Sampler: <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Teaching the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table can be a mundane task filled with repetition and rote memorization. The techniques for engaging activities outlined in this article will help students become familiar with the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table in fun and exciting ways through mediums such as games, silly stories, jokes, puzzles, and songs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Galus, Pamela</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55770285"> <span id="translatedtitle">Model Valid Prediction <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new concept, valid prediction <span class="hlt">period</span> (VPP), is presented here to evaluate model predictability. VPP is defined as the time <span class="hlt">period</span> when the prediction error first exceeds a pre-determined criterion (i.e., the tolerance level). It depends not only on the instantaneous error growth, but also on the noise level, the initial error, and tolerance level. The model predictability skill is</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. C. Chu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998SPIE.3458...48B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wavelet <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> detection algorithms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper deals with the analysis of time series with respect to certain known <span class="hlt">periodicities</span>. In particular, we shall present a fast method aimed at detecting <span class="hlt">periodic</span> behavior inherent in noise data. The method is composed of three steps: (1) Non-noisy data are analyzed through spectral and wavelet methods to extract specific <span class="hlt">periodic</span> patterns of interest. (2) Using these patterns, we construct an optimal piecewise constant wavelet designed to detect the underlying <span class="hlt">periodicities</span>. (3) We introduce a fast discretized version of the continuous wavelet transform, as well as waveletgram averaging techniques, to detect occurrence and <span class="hlt">period</span> of these <span class="hlt">periodicities</span>. The algorithm is formulated to provide real time implementation. Our procedure is generally applicable to detect locally <span class="hlt">periodic</span> components in signals s which can be modeled as s(t) equals A(t)F(h(t)) + N(t) for t in I, where F is a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> signal, A is a non-negative slowly varying function, and h is strictly increasing with h' slowly varying, N denotes background activity. For example, the method can be applied in the context of epileptic seizure detection. In this case, we try to detect seizure <span class="hlt">periodics</span> in EEG and ECoG data. In the case of ECoG data, N is essentially 1/f noise. In the case of EEG data and for t in I,N includes noise due to cranial geometry and densities. In both cases N also includes standard low frequency rhythms. <span class="hlt">Periodicity</span> detection has other applications including ocean wave prediction, cockpit motion sickness prediction, and minefield detection.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benedetto, John J.; Pfander, Goetz E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012IAUS..282..391M"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Period</span> Analyses Without O-C Diagrams</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a versatile method appropriate for the <span class="hlt">period</span> analyses of <span class="hlt">observations</span> containing phase information of all kinds of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> or nearly <span class="hlt">periodic</span> variable stars on the basis of phenomenological modelling of their phase curves and phase functions. The approach is based on rigorous application of a non-linear weighted least-squares method exploiting all available <span class="hlt">observational</span> data and does not need an O-C diagram as an intermediate stage for <span class="hlt">period</span> analyses. However, this approach enables us to determine precise times of extrema of light curves, to calculate ephemerides and construct plausible O-C diagrams. We substantiate the general applicability of the method on eclipsing binaries research.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mikulášek, Zden?k; Zejda, Miloslav; Janík, Jan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov/NASADocs/magbook2002.pdf#page=40"> <span id="translatedtitle">What is an Oscillation <span class="hlt">Period</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This is an activity about oscillation. Learners will <span class="hlt">observe</span>, time, and graph the data of the side to side motion of the mirror used in the soda bottle magnetometer activity to determine the mirror's oscillation <span class="hlt">period</span>. This activity requires prior construction and experience in use of a soda bottle magnetometer, which is the eighth activity in the Exploring the Earth's Magnetic Field: An IMAGE Satellite Guide to the Magnetosphere educators guide. This is the ninth activity in the guide.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9671803"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clines of nuclear DNA markers <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a largely neolithic ancestry of the European gene pool.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Comparisons between archaeological findings and allele frequencies at protein loci <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that most genes of current Europeans descend from populations that have been expanding in Europe in the last 10, 000 years, in the Neolithic <span class="hlt">period</span>. Recent mitochondrial data have been interpreted as indicating a much older, Paleolithic ancestry. In a spatial autocorrelation study at seven hypervariable loci in Europe (four microsatellites, two larger, tandem-repeat loci, and a sequence polymorphism) broad clinal patterns of DNA variation were recognized. The <span class="hlt">observed</span> clines closely match those described at the protein level, in agreement with a possible Near Eastern origin for the ancestral population. Separation times between populations were estimated on the basis of a stepwise mutation model. Even assuming low mutation rates and long generation times, we found no evidence for population splits older than 10,000 years, with the predictable exception of Saami (Lapps). The simplest interpretation of these results is that the current nuclear gene pool largely reflects the westward and northward expansion of a Neolithic group. This conclusion is now supported by purely genetic evidence on the levels and patterns of microsatellite diversity, rather than by correlations of biological and nonbiological data. We argue that many mitochondrial lineages whose origin has been traced back to the Paleolithic <span class="hlt">period</span> probably reached Europe at a later time. PMID:9671803</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chikhi, L; Destro-Bisol, G; Bertorelle, G; Pascali, V; Barbujani, G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-07-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.H11A0782B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Slug Tests in a Sandstone Bedding Plane Fracture</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> aquifer tests are conducted by varying the flow and/or head in a well at repeated intervals. The primary difference between <span class="hlt">periodic</span> tests and traditional slug and pump tests is that the well is kept in a continuously transient state. Increased hydraulic transience leads to unique interpretations of aquifer storage as water is alternately withdrawn from and returned to the formation. We show results from <span class="hlt">period</span> slug tests conducted in a sandstone bedding-plane fracture. A sinusoidal head variation is induced in a well by oscillating a slug with a programmed step motor. Head in four <span class="hlt">observation</span> wells is monitored. All wells are 7 meters from the disturbed well and the fracture is isolated using inflatable packers. In spite of the fact that all wells are isolated in single fracture and are in close proximity, the <span class="hlt">observation</span> wells exhibit a wide variation in both amplitude and phase response to head oscillations. Cross-hole pumping tests in the same well set show similar response in 3 of 4 monitoring wells, indicating that the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> tests may be more sensitive to local changes in hydraulic conductivity and/or storativity. Independent hydraulic, tracer, and GPR experiments in this formation <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> tests may be responding to flow channels that develop in response to hydraulic disturbance in the formation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Becker, M. W.; Guiltinan, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/211651"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodized</span> Daubechies wavelets</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The properties of <span class="hlt">periodized</span> Daubechies wavelets on [0,1] are detailed and counterparts which form a basis for L{sup 2}(R). Numerical examples illustrate the analytical estimates for convergence and demonstrated by comparison with Fourier spectral methods the superiority of wavelet projection methods for approximations. The analytical solution to inner products of <span class="hlt">periodized</span> wavelets and their derivatives, which are known as connection coefficients, is presented, and their use ius illustrated in the approximation of two commonly used differential operators. The <span class="hlt">periodization</span> of the connection coefficients in Galerkin schemes is presented in detail.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Restrepo, J.M.; Leaf, G.K.; Schlossnagle, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1461778"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Fever as <span class="hlt">periodic</span> disorder].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Slight, moderate but also high rises in temperature, excluding other causes of fever, can be considered symptoms of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> syndrome originating by hypothalamic centers as soon as headache, recurrent abdominal pains, growing pains, dizziness, kinetosis. These rises aren't uncommon, but often aren't considered important and this few statistics are available. The Authors present 16 case reports of fever as <span class="hlt">periodic</span> symptom and discuss how common factors exist in the mechanism of hyperthermia and other clinical signs of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> syndrome (ex. migraine) but they are generally modulated differently so that disturbance of temperature regulation predominates in the first case, pain in the second. PMID:1461778</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Castelli, S; Domenici, R; Meossi, C; Stefani, G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://matdl.org/repository/view/matdl:857"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> boundary conditions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Schematic of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> boundary conditions. When using <span class="hlt">periodic</span> boundary conditions, a particle which exits the system on the right, will reappear on the left. In the schematic, our simulation volume is colored in red. As the yellow particle exits on the right, it will re-enter on the left. This can be thought of as having identical simulation boxes surrounding the system. As the yellow particle enters the next simulation on the right, a particle from the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> image on the left will enter.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Iacovella, Christopher R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-09-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.8968E..0DR"> <span id="translatedtitle">Laser-induced <span class="hlt">periodic</span> surface structures, modeling, experiments, and applications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Laser-induced <span class="hlt">periodic</span> surface structures (LIPSSs) consist of regular wavy surface structures, or ripples, with amplitudes and <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> in the sub-micrometer range. A summary of experimentally <span class="hlt">observed</span> LIPSSs is presented, as well as our model explaining their possible origin. Linearly polarized continuous wave (cw) or pulsed laser light, at normal incidence, can produce LIPSSs with a <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> close to the laser wavelength, and direction orthogonal to the polarization on the surface of the material. Ripples with a <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> (much) smaller than the laser wavelength develop when applying laser pulses with ultra-short durations in the femtosecond and picosecond regime. The direction of these ripples is either parallel or orthogonal to the polarization direction. Finally, when applying numerous pulses, structures with <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> larger than the laser wavelength can form, which are referred to as "grooves". The physical origin of LIPSSs is still under debate. The strong correlation of the ripple <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> to the laser wavelength, <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that their formation can be explained by an electromagnetic approach. Recent results from a numerical electromagnetic model, predicting the spatially modulated absorbed laser energy, are discussed. This model can explain the origin of several characteristics of LIPSSs. Finally, applications of LIPSSs will be discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Römer, G. R. B. E.; Skolski, J. Z. P.; Obo?a, J. Vincenc; Ocelík, V.; de Hosson, J. T. M.; Huis in't Veld, A. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/lsps07.sci.phys.matter.graphperiodic/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Graphing the <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This interactive activity from the American Chemical Society presents the properties and electron configurations for all the elements in the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table. Discover patterns by plotting the elements' properties according to their place in the table.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Foundation, Wgbh E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-08-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.thundercloudconsulting.com/default.html?periodictable"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interactive <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This interactive <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table (application/applet) has been designed as a learning tool to help the beginning high school or undergraduate chemistry student gain insight. It could be used either as a lecture aid or distributed to students.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD756567"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Directional Filter.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The report presents computational methods for the analysis of <span class="hlt">periodically</span> coupled transmission lines. Two methods are described for obtaining the scattering matrix of two cascaded four-port networks where the S-matrix of the individual networks are known...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. Tsukada</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/teachers/lessons/time/time_period.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Time that <span class="hlt">Period</span>!</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this activity, students learn to recognize <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> within a set of data by using the examples of pendulums and binary star systems. Included are prerequisites, enrichment activities, materials lists, datasets, instructions, and links to additional information..</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57404788"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of C3 <span class="hlt">Suggests</span> Three <span class="hlt">Periods</span> of Positive Selection Events and Different Evolutionary Patterns between Fish and Mammals</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">BackgroundThe third complement component (C3) is a central protein of the complement system conserved from fish to mammals. It also showed distinct characteristics in different animal groups. Striking features of the fish complement system were unveiled, including prominent levels of extrahepatic expression and isotypic diversity of the complement components. The evidences of the involvement of complement system in the enhancement</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fanxing Meng; Yuena Sun; Xuezhu Liu; Jianxin Wang; Tianjun Xu; Rixin Wang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://insects.ummz.lsa.umich.edu/fauna/michigan_cicadas/Periodical/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodical</span> Cicada Page</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This site, from the University of Michigan's Museum of Zoology, provides a variety of short information entries about <span class="hlt">periodical</span> cicadas including photos, and song clips. Information about cicada life cycles, broods and distribution, behavior, various species, and diseases and deformities can also be found here. For you "on the go types" who need basic information right now, there link to the "Quick <span class="hlt">periodical</span> cicada FAQ."</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cooley, John; Marshall, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6174907"> <span id="translatedtitle">Four short-<span class="hlt">period</span> Algols</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The light curves of four close binary star systems (BV 267, RU UMi, XZ CMi, and VV UMa) have been analyzed using the Wilson-Devinney differential corrections model. The present system geometries of these binaries is that of short-<span class="hlt">period</span> semi-detached systems with Roche-lobe-filling secondaries and main-sequence primaries. Differential coordinates in the mass-luminosity and mass-radius diagrams indicate that the secondary components lie near the main sequence, except in the case of BV 267. It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that these systems are binaries with slightly overluminous and oversized secondaries which have undergone case A mass transfer. This contention is supported by timing information, and qualitatively by the <span class="hlt">period</span>-frequency relation. These very-nearly contact binaries are likely candidates for postcontact system evolution. 34 refs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rafert, J.B. (Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne (USA))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhyA..391.4891M"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">suggested</span> statistical test for measuring bivariate nonlinear dependence</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We devise a new asymptotic statistical test to assess independence in bivariate continuous distributions. Our approach is based on the Cramér-von Mises test, in which the empirical process is viewed as the Kullback-Leibler divergence, that is, as the distance between the data under the independence hypothesis and the data empirically <span class="hlt">observed</span>. We derive the theoretical characteristic function of the limit distribution of the test statistic and find the critical values through computer simulation. A Monte Carlo experiment is considered as assessing the validation and power performance of the test by assuming a bivariate nonlinear dependence structure with fat tails. Two extra examples, respectively, consider stationary and conditionally nonstationary series. Results confirm that our <span class="hlt">suggested</span> test is consistent and powerful in the presence of bivariate nonlinear dependence even if the environment is non-Gaussian. Our case is illustrated with high-frequency data from stocks listed on the NYSE that recently experienced so-called mini-flash crashes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matsushita, Raul; Figueiredo, Annibal; Da Silva, Sergio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/944534"> <span id="translatedtitle">Membrane proteomics of phagosomes <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a connection to autophagy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Phagocytosis is the central process by which macrophage cellsinternalize and eliminate infectious microbes as well as apoptoticcells. During maturation, phagosomes containing engulfed particlesfuse with various endosomal compartments through theaction of regulatory molecules on the phagosomal membrane. Inthis study, we performed a proteomic analysis of the membranefraction from latex bead-containing (LBC) phagosomes isolatedfrom macrophages. The profile, which comprised 546 proteins,<span class="hlt">suggests</span> diverse functions of the phagosome and potential connectionsto secretory processes, toll-like receptor signaling, andautophagy. Many identified proteins were not previously knownto reside in the phagosome. We characterized several proteins inLBC phagosomes that change in abundance on induction of autophagy,a process that has been previously implicated in the hostdefense against microbial pathogens. These <span class="hlt">observations</span> suggestcrosstalk between autophagy and phagocytosis that may be relevantto the innate immune response of macrophages.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shui, Wenqing; Sheu, Leslie; Liu, Jun; Smart, Brian; Petzold, Christopher J.; Hsieh, Tsung-yen; Pitcher, Austin; Keasling*, Jay D.; Bertozzi*, Carolyn R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-11-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22david%22&id=EJ788802"> <span id="translatedtitle">David's Understanding of Functions and <span class="hlt">Periodicity</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This is a study of David, a senior enrolled in a high school precalculus course. David's understandings of functions and <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> was explored, through clinical interviews and contextualized through classroom <span class="hlt">observations</span>. Although David's precalculus class was traditional his understanding of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> functions was unconventional David engaged…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gerson, Hope</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="flo