These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Observation of Periodic Spinodal Decomposition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Periodic spinodal decomposition has been observed in a critical binary mixture of isobutyric acid and water. As predicted by Onuki, phase separation can be dramatically slowed down by a periodic quench of appropriately chosen mean value and amplitude of the temperature variations. Depending on details of the quench conditions, two steady-state conditions can be achieved, in one of which the system has completely separated.

Joshua, M.; Maher, J. V.; Goldburg, W. I.

1983-07-01

2

Experimental observation of a complex periodic window  

E-print Network

The existence of a special periodic window in the two-dimensional parameter space of an experimental Chua's circuit is reported. One of the main reasons that makes such a window special is that the observation of one implies that other similar periodic windows must exist for other parameter values. However, such a window has never been experimentally observed, since its size in parameter space decreases exponentially with the period of the periodic attractor. This property imposes clear limitations for its experimental detection.

D. M. Maranhão; M. S. Baptista; J. C. Sartorelli; I. L. Caldas

2008-03-11

3

Neptune's rotational period suggested by the extraordinary stability of two features  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interior rotation and motions in giant planets have generally been probed only at radio wavelengths from spacecraft near the planet, except for Jupiter's radio emission detectable from Earth. Here I suggest that Neptune's interior can be indirectly probed at visible wavelength by tracking 10 features that are connected with a stationary latitudinal speed pattern of 7 m/s amplitude. All 10 features remained aligned at the same longitude throughout the Voyager observation period in 1989. Two of them, the South Polar Wave and South Polar Feature, have been observed from Earth for ˜20 years, but their extraordinary rotational stability was never recognized. They probably pinpoint Neptune's rotational period (15.9663 ± 0.0002 h), one of the largest improvements in 346 years of measuring the giant planets' rotations. The previous best estimate of Neptune's rotational period (16.108 ± 0.006 h) was based on Voyager 2 radio data (Lecacheux, A., Zarka, P., Desch, M.D., Evans, D.R. [1993]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 20, 2711-2714). The new result suggests an upward revision of the mass of Neptune's core. This finding may also question the accepted value of Uranus' rotational period. The first reliable wind measurements within 15° of Neptune's South Pole, based on tracking four features in Voyager images, show a 300 m/s eastward jet peaking near 76° South, while the area within 4° of the South Pole seems to be rotationally locked to the interior. These new observations of the stationary features and winds could address the long-standing question about the depth of the atmospheric circulation and may allow some constraints on convection currents in Neptune's interior.

Karkoschka, Erich

2011-09-01

4

Rational reduction of periodic propagators for off-period observations.  

PubMed

Many common solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance problems take advantage of the periodicity of the underlying Hamiltonian to simplify the computation of an observation. Most of the time-domain methods used, however, require the time step between observations to be some integer or reciprocal-integer multiple of the period, thereby restricting the observation bandwidth. Calculations of off-period observations are usually reduced to brute force direct methods resulting in many demanding matrix multiplications. For large spin systems, the matrix multiplication becomes the limiting step. A simple method that can dramatically reduce the number of matrix multiplications required to calculate the time evolution when the observation time step is some rational fraction of the period of the Hamiltonian is presented. The algorithm implements two different optimization routines. One uses pattern matching and additional memory storage, while the other recursively generates the propagators via time shifting. The net result is a significant speed improvement for some types of time-domain calculations. PMID:14729029

Blanton, Wyndham B; Logan, John W; Pines, Alexander

2004-02-01

5

Periodic Properties and Inquiry: Student Mental Models Observed during a Periodic Table Puzzle Activity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The mental models of both novice and advanced chemistry students were observed while the students performed a periodic table activity. The mental model framework seems to be an effective way of analyzing student behavior during learning activities. The analysis suggests that students do not recognize periodic trends through the examination of…

Larson, Kathleen G.; Long, George R.; Briggs, Michael W.

2012-01-01

6

The single-period (news-vendor) problem: literature review and suggestions for future research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The single-period problem (SPP), also known as the newsboy or news-vendor problem, is to find the order quantity which maximizes the expected profit in a single period probabilistic demand framework. Interest in the SPP remains unabated and many extensions to it have been proposed in the last decade. These extensions include dealing with different objectives and utility functions, different supplier

Moutaz Khouja

1999-01-01

7

Observations of long period earthquakes accompanying hydraulic fracturing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Waveforms of most seismic events accompanying hydraulic fracturing have been reported to contain clear P and S waves and have fault plane solutions consistent with shear displacement across a fault. This observation is surprising since classical hydraulic fracturing theory predicts the creation of a tensile opening of a cavity in response to fluid pressure. Very small long period events, similar

Dorthe Bame; Michael Fehler

1986-01-01

8

A search for evidence of short period polar motion in VLBI and supergravimetry observations.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work reports on a search for evidence of short period polar motion using VLBI and supergravimetry data sets. Two searches for evidence for short period polar motion were conducted. In the first effort the polar motion observations from VLBI Extended Research and Development Experiment (VLBI/ERDE) data sets were compared with simultaneous gravimetric signals recorded on a supergravimeter to seek evidence of the expected gravimetric signal. In the second effort the post-fit group delay residuals from the IRIS VLBI observations were analyzed for evidence of short period polar motion. Encouraging results were obtained suggesting the presence, at the 1? level, of short period polar motions of a few centimeters amplitude. Polar motions found at periods near 14 hours are consistent with observed gravimetric signals of 11 nanogals obtained over the same time interval.

Aldridge, K. D.; Cannon, W. H.

9

Saturn's planetary period oscillations observed during 10 years of Cassini  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Planetary period oscillations (PPOs) with periods close to Saturn's rotational period are ubiquitous throughout Saturn's magnetospheric system. Here we review the observational studies of PPOs determined from magnetospheric magnetic field data throughout the Cassini mission to date. As first shown using radio data, two oscillatory systems are present, one associated with the northern polar region and the other with the southern. We show that within the northern (southern) open-field polar region only the northern (southern) PPO oscillations are detected. However, within the equatorial 'core' region of Saturn's magnetosphere (dipole L ? 12), the two oscillations are superposed and interfere. The PPO periods are shown to lie in the range ~10.6 to 10.8 h, are persistently shorter north than south to date, and undergo a strong seasonal cycle together with the oscillation amplitudes. We discuss these observations in relation to theoretical models that have been proposed to explain them, and emphasize the importance of continued measurement of their properties during the Cassini solstice mission.

Provan, Gabrielle; Andrews, David; Cowley, Stanley; Dougherty, Michele

2014-05-01

10

The Search for Periodic Components in Observational Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This review is devoted to the problem of searching for periodicities in observational data using periodograms based on the general statistical likelihood ratio test and special variants of it, including the classical Lomb-Scargle periodogram. Primary emphasis is on the problem of estimating the statistical significance of the periodicities detected in this manner. We assume that a universal solution of this problem exists involving an effective method in which the periodogram is regarded as a random process (or random field), while an approximation for the required "false alarm probability" is constructed by a generalized Rice method. Besides a unified method for determining the expected noise levels (or significance levels) of these periodograms, we also examine some important special cases with different models of periodic signals (linear and nonlinear). The false alarm probability associated with an observed signal is approximated in most cases by a formula of the type , where z is the observed maximum readout in the periodogram and P is an algebraic polynomial with coefficients that depend on the conditions of the problem. We also examine the problem of separating composite signals with several frequencies from noise. In this case correct analysis of the data requires the use of so-called multifrequency periodograms based on models of signals containing several periodic components. We show that a complete solution to this problem requires construction of 2n-1 such periodograms, where n is the total number of possible frequencies. Finally, we describe some program packages that we have developed which make it easier to perform practical frequency analysis of series using this theory.

Baluev, R. V.

2014-09-01

11

Are Dietary Restraint Scales Valid Measures of Acute Dietary Restriction? Unobtrusive Observational Data Suggest Not  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The finding that dietary restraint scales predict onset of bulimic pathology has been interpreted as suggesting that dieting causes this eating disturbance, despite the dearth of evidence that these scales are valid measures of dietary restriction. The authors conducted 4 studies that tested whether dietary restraint scales were inversely…

Stice, Eric; Fisher, Melissa; Lowe, Michael R.

2004-01-01

12

Observations by a University Anatomy Teacher and a Suggestion for Curricular Change: Integrative Anatomy for Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The observation that anatomical course offerings have decreased in undergraduate biology curricula is supported by a survey of undergraduate institutions in the state of Washington. This reduction, due partially to increased emphasis in other areas of the biology curriculum, along with the lack of anatomy prerequisites for admission to most…

Darda, David M.

2010-01-01

13

Quasi-Periodic Pulsations with Varying Period in Multi-Wavelength Observations of an X-class Flare  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work presents an interesting phenomenon of the period variation in quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) observed during the impulsive phase of a coronal mass ejection-related X1.1 class flare on 2012 July 6. The period of QPPs was changed from 21 s at soft X-rays (SXR) to 22-23 s at microwaves, to ~24 s at extreme ultraviolet emissions (EUV), and to 27-32 s at metric-decimetric waves. The microwave, EUV, and SXR QPPs, emitted from flare loops of different heights, were oscillating in phase. Fast kink mode oscillations were proposed to be the modulation mechanism, which may exist in a wide region in the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to the upper corona or even to the interplanetary space. Changed parameters of flare loops through the solar atmosphere could result in the varying period of QPPs at different wavelengths. The first appearing microwave QPPs and quasi-periodic metric-decimetric type III bursts were generated by energetic electrons. This may imply that particle acceleration or magnetic reconnection were located between these two non-thermal emission sources. Thermal QPPs (in SXR and EUV emissions) occurred later than the nonthermal ones, which would suggest a some time for plasma heating or energy dissipation in flare loops during burst processes. At the beginning of flare, a sudden collapse and expansion of two separated flare loop structures occurred simultaneously with the multi-wavelength QPPs. An implosion in the corona, including both collapse and expansion of flare loops, could be a trigger of loop oscillations in a very large region in the solar atmosphere.

Huang, Jing; Tan, Baolin; Zhang, Yin; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana

2014-08-01

14

Stratospheric hydroxyl radical concentrations - New limitations suggested by observations of gaseous and particulate sulfur  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A one-dimensional aerosol model is employed in investigating the sensitivity of the stratospheric distributions of gaseous sulfur compounds and sulfate aerosol particles to changes in OH and CS2 concentrations, in eddy diffusion coefficients, and in important chemical rate constants. By comparing model predictions with recent observational data for SO2, OCS, and particulates, it is found that, with regard to atmospheric sulfur, CS2 is only a secondary source of sulfur for the stratosphere relative to OCS and that background tropospheric CS2 concentrations by volume are likely to be less than 70 parts per trillion. It is also established that under stratospheric conditions the rate coefficients for the reactions of OH with OCS and CS2 may be substantially smaller than the room temperature laboratory values of Kurylo (1978).

Turco, R. P.; Whitten, R. C.; Toon, O. B.; Inn, E. C. Y.; Hamill, P.

1981-01-01

15

Examining Periodic Solar-Wind Density Structures Observed in the SECCHI Heliospheric Imagers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an analysis of small-scale, periodic, solar-wind density enhancements (length scales as small as ? 1000 Mm) observed in images from the Heliospheric Imager (HI) aboard STEREO-A. We discuss their possible relationship to periodic fluctuations of the proton density that have been identified at 1 AU using in-situ plasma measurements. Specifically, Viall, Kepko, and Spence ( J. Geophys. Res. 113, A07101, 2008) examined 11 years of in-situ solar-wind density measurements at 1 AU and demonstrated that not only turbulent structures, but also nonturbulent, periodic density structures exist in the solar wind with scale sizes of hundreds to one thousand Mm. In a subsequent paper, Viall, Spence, and Kasper ( Geophys. Res. Lett. 36, L23102, 2009) analyzed the ?-to-proton solar-wind abundance ratio measured during one such event of periodic density structures, demonstrating that the plasma behavior was highly suggestive that either temporally or spatially varying coronal source plasma created those density structures. Large periodic density structures observed at 1 AU, which were generated in the corona, can be observable in coronal and heliospheric white-light images if they possess sufficiently high density contrast. Indeed, we identify such periodic density structures as they enter the HI field of view and follow them as they advect with the solar wind through the images. The smaller, periodic density structures that we identify in the images are comparable in size to the larger structures analyzed in-situ at 1 AU, yielding further evidence that periodic density enhancements are a consequence of coronal activity as the solar wind is formed.

Viall, Nicholeen M.; Spence, Harlan E.; Vourlidas, Angelos; Howard, Russell

2010-11-01

16

Examining Periodic Solar-Wind Density Structures Observed in the SECCHI Heliospheric Imagers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present an analysis of small-scale, periodic, solar-wind density enhancements (length scales as small as approximately equals 1000 Mm) observed in images from the Heliospheric Imager (HI) aboard STEREO-A. We discuss their possible relationship to periodic fluctuations of the proton density that have been identified at 1 AU using in-situ plasma measurements. Specifically, Viall, Kepko, and Spence examined 11 years of in-situ solar-wind density measurements at 1 AU and demonstrated that not only turbulent structures, but also nonturbulent, periodic density structures exist in the solar wind with scale sizes of hundreds to one thousand Mm. In a subsequent paper, Viall, Spence, and Kasper analyzed the alpha-to-proton solar-wind abundance ratio measured during one such event of periodic density structures, demonstrating that the plasma behavior was highly suggestive that either temporally or spatially varying coronal source plasma created those density structures. Large periodic density structures observed at 1 AU, which were generated in the corona, can be observable in coronal and heliospheric white-light images if they possess sufficiently high density contrast. Indeed, we identify such periodic density structures as they enter the HI field of view and follow them as they advect with the solar wind through the images. The smaller, periodic density structures that we identify in the images are comparable in size to the larger structures analyzed in-situ at 1 AU, yielding further evidence that periodic density enhancements are a consequence of coronal activity as the solar wind is formed.

Viall, Nicholeen M.; Spence, Harlan E.; Vourlidas, Angelos; Howard, Russell

2010-01-01

17

Cybersemiotics: A suggestion for a transdisciplinary framework for description of observing, anticipatory and meaning producing systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ability of systems to be anticipatory seems to be intricate connected with the ability to observe and to cognate by reducing complexity through signification. The semantic capacity of living systems, the cognitive ability to assign meaning to differences perturbating the system's self-organization, seems to be the prerequisite for the phenomenon of communication, language and consciousness. In cybernetics Bateson developed the idea that information is a difference that makes a difference and second order cybernetics developed the concept of organisms as self-organized and self-produced systems (autopoietic) as the prerequisite of life and cognition. The cognitive ability seems to be qualitative different from what so far is computable on any known machine although parts of different aspects of the process can be partly simulated in AI, neutral network and AL. In semiotics the fundamental process of cognition and communication is called semiosis or signification and C. S. Peirce created a special triadic, objective idealistic, pragmatic and evolutionary philosophy to be able to give a fruitful description of the process and its relation to logic and the concept of natural law. Both second order cybernetics and semiotics sees information and meaning as something produced by individual organisms through structural couplings to the environments or other individuals through historical drift and further developed in social communication. Luhmann points out that social communication also only functions through structural couplings which he calls generalized media such as science, art, power, love and money. Peirce talks of the semiotic net as a triadic view of meanings developing through history and in animals through evolution. In accordance with this Wittgenstein points out that signification is created in language games developed in specific life forms. Life forms are the things we do in society such as seducing, commanding and explaining. As animals do not have language in the true sense I have extended his concept into ethology and bio-semiotics by talking of sign games related to specific motivations and innate response mechanisms. Life as such seems to be an anticipatory function generating expectations through evolution through open genetic programs as Konrad Lorenz pointed out. The phenomenon of imprinting in ducks for instance is a standard example of programmed anticipation. Expectations are expectations of meaning and order (information) related to the semiosphere the organism constructs as its individual world view and live in. (The Umwelt of von Uexküll). On this basis events that perpetuates the semiosphere are reduced to meaning, i.e. something related to the survival and procreation of the individual living system, it conatus, to use one of Spinoza's terms. The framework of cybersemiotics, uniting second order cybernetics, semiotics and language game theory, is created to make transdisciplinary concepts and models that can handle the process of cognition, information and communication across the domains of the sciences, the arts and social sciences in a non-reductionistic way. It is seen as an alternative based on biological and semiotic thinking (biosemiotics) to the functionalistic information processing paradigm of cognitive science that is build on the computer as paradigm and based on classical logic and mechanistic physics—and therefore has severe problems of dealing with semantics and signification.

Brier, Soren

1998-07-01

18

A suggested periodic table up to Z? 172, based on Dirac-Fock calculations on atoms and ions.  

PubMed

Extended Average Level (EAL) Dirac-Fock calculations on atoms and ions agree with earlier work in that a rough shell-filling order for the elements 119-172 is 8s < 5g? 8p(1/2) < 6f < 7d < 9s < 9p(1/2) < 8p(3/2). The present Periodic Table develops further that of Fricke, Greiner and Waber [Theor. Chim. Acta 1971, 21, 235] by formally assigning the elements 121-164 to (nlj) slots on the basis of the electron configurations of their ions. Simple estimates are made for likely maximum oxidation states, i, of these elements M in their MX(i) compounds, such as i = 6 for UF(6). Particularly high i are predicted for the 6f elements. PMID:20967377

Pyykkö, Pekka

2011-01-01

19

Conjugate observations of quasi-periodic emissions by Cluster and DEMETER spacecraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract<p label="1">Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> (QP) emissions are electromagnetic emissions at frequencies of about 0.5-4 kHz that are characterized by a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> time modulation of the wave intensity. Typical <span class="hlt">periods</span> of this modulation are on the order of minutes. We present a case study of a large-scale long-lasting QP event <span class="hlt">observed</span> simultaneously on board the DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions) and the Cluster spacecraft. The measurements by the Wide-Band Data instrument on board the Cluster spacecraft enabled us to obtain high-resolution frequency-time spectrograms of the event close to the equatorial region over a large range of radial distances, while the measurements by the STAFF-SA instrument allowed us to perform a detailed wave analysis. Conjugate <span class="hlt">observations</span> by the DEMETER spacecraft have been used to estimate the spatial and temporal extent of the emissions. The analyzed QP event lasted as long as 5 h and it spanned over the L-shells from about 1.5 to 5.5. Simultaneous <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the same event by DEMETER and Cluster show that the same QP modulation of the wave intensity is <span class="hlt">observed</span> at the same time at very different locations in the inner magnetosphere. ULF magnetic field fluctuations with a <span class="hlt">period</span> roughly comparable to, but somewhat larger than the <span class="hlt">period</span> of the QP modulation were detected by the fluxgate magnetometers instrument on board the Cluster spacecraft near the equatorial region, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> these are likely to be related to the QP generation. Results of a detailed wave analysis show that the QP emissions detected by Cluster propagate unducted, with oblique wave normal angles at higher geomagnetic latitudes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N?Mec, F.; SantolíK, O.; Parrot, M.; Pickett, J. S.; Hayosh, M.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">20</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19770019112&hterms=Periodic+table&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3D%2528Periodic%2Btable%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Large-Scale <span class="hlt">periodic</span> solar velocities: An <span class="hlt">observational</span> study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of large-scale solar velocities were made using the mean field telescope and Babcock magnetograph of the Stanford Solar Observatory. <span class="hlt">Observations</span> were made in the magnetically insensitive ion line at 5124 A, with light from the center (limb) of the disk right (left) circularly polarized, so that the magnetograph measures the difference in wavelength between center and limb. Computer calculations are made of the wavelength difference produced by global pulsations for spherical harmonics up to second order and of the signal produced by displacing the solar image relative to polarizing optics or diffraction grating.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dittmer, P. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a style="font-weight: bold;">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_1 div --> <div id="page_2" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">21</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1167617"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of and <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Improvements to the WSM6 Microphysics in WRF- ARW Using Synthetic and <span class="hlt">Observed</span> GOES-13 Imagery</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Synthetic satellite imagery can be employed to evaluate simulated cloud fields. Past studies have revealed that the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) WRF Single-Moment 6-class (WSM6) microphysics in WRF-ARW produces less upper level ice clouds within synthetic images compared to <span class="hlt">observations</span>. Synthetic Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-13 imagery at 10.7 ?m of simulated cloud fields from the 4 km National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) WRF-ARW is compared to <span class="hlt">observed</span> GOES-13 imagery. Histograms <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that too few points contain upper level simulated ice clouds. In particular, side-by-side examples are shown of synthetic and <span class="hlt">observed</span> convective anvils. Such images illustrate the lack of anvil cloud associated with convection produced by the NSSL WRF-ARW. A vertical profile of simulated hydrometeors <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that too much cloud water mass may be converted into graupel mass, effectively reducing the main source of ice mass in a simulated anvil. Further, excessive accretion of ice by snow removes ice from an anvil by precipitation settling. Idealized sensitivity tests reveal that a 50% reduction of the conversion of cloud water mass to graupel and a 50% reduction of the accretion rate of ice by snow results in a significant increase in anvil ice of a simulated storm. Such results provide guidance as to which conversions could be reformulated, in a more physical manner, to increase simulated ice mass in the upper troposphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grasso, Lewis; Lindsey, Daniel T.; Lim, Kyo-Sun; Clark, Adam; Bikos, Dan; Dembek, Scott R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">22</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ece.uic.edu/~vmetlush/PRB-2010-1s.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Direct <span class="hlt">observation</span> of superconducting vortex clusters pinned by a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> array of magnetic dots in ferromagnetic/superconducting hybrid structures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Direct <span class="hlt">observation</span> of superconducting vortex clusters pinned by a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> array of magnetic dots flux quanta by a square array of 1- m-sized ferromagnetic dots in a magnetic-vortex state magnetoresistance measurements on the hybrid structures but <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a modified picture of the pinning mechanism. DOI</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Metlushko, Vitali</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">23</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRA..119.4348M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> minor ion existence in the inner magnetosphere <span class="hlt">observed</span> by the Akebono satellite</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is well known that electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves exhibit characteristic frequencies on the basis of dispersion relations in multiple-component plasma. We present a case of EMIC waves exhibiting a sudden decrease in intensity (characteristic lower cutoff) to just above half of the proton cyclotron frequency <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the vicinity of the geomagnetic equator by the Akebono satellite along its trajectory during a magnetic storm in April 1989. It was found that the waves propagate with a large wave normal angle with respect to the geomagnetic field line and that they had a crossover frequency above the characteristic lower cutoff. Because of stormy conditions, ion constituents were expected to fluctuate, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the characteristic frequencies of EMIC waves should have been fluctuating as well. However, the characteristic frequencies of each event did not vary despite disturbances in the inner magnetosphere, represented by a sudden decrease in the Dst index and electron density fluctuation. In addition, the waves were repeatedly <span class="hlt">observed</span> within a half day after sudden decreases in Dst; however, they disappeared when the recovery of the Dst index became moderate. Wave generation appears to be closely correlated to fresh energetic particle injection. We study the dispersion relations of EMIC waves under the condition of multiple ion species and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the existence of a few percent of alpha particles (He++) or deuterons (D+), which can explain the lower cutoff of EMIC waves in the inner magnetosphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matsuda, S.; Kasahara, Y.; Goto, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">24</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009GeoRL..36.6813G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Two contrasting dust-dominant <span class="hlt">periods</span> over India <span class="hlt">observed</span> from MODIS and CALIPSO data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Each year, prior to the onset of the Indian Summer Monsoon, the Gangetic Plains (GP), bounded by the high-altitude Himalayan mountains, are strongly influenced by the transport of dust outbreaks originating in the northwestern desert in India (known as the Thar Desert). Dust particles constitute the bulk of the regional aerosol loading which peaks annually during the pre-monsoon season. This paper integrates <span class="hlt">observations</span> from space-borne sensors, namely MODIS and CALIPSO, together with ground sunphotometer measurements, to infer dust loading in the pre-monsoon aerosol build-up over source and sink regions in northern India. Detailed aerosol characterization from the synergetic <span class="hlt">observational</span> assessment <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the two pre-monsoon seasons of 2007 and 2008 were strikingly contrasting in terms of the dust loading over both the Thar Desert and the GP. Further analysis of aerosol loading and optical properties, from the entire record of MODIS and sunphotometer <span class="hlt">observations</span>, reveals that the 2007 pre-monsoon season was an unusually weak dust-laden <span class="hlt">period</span>. Our findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the plausible role of the immediately preceding excess winter monsoon rainfall in the suppressed dust activity during the 2007 pre-monsoon season.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gautam, Ritesh; Liu, Zhaoyan; Singh, Ramesh P.; Hsu, N. Christina</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">25</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52192314"> <span id="translatedtitle">EUVE <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of Two UltraShort <span class="hlt">Period</span> Magnetic Cataclysmic Variables</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We propose to make the first EUVE <span class="hlt">observations</span> of two newly discovered magnetic cataclysmic variables. The orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> for one star is poorly defined but appears to be near 80 min, while the other, an eclipsing system, has an orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> of 98 min. Both systems are interesting in that one shows an 8.45 min <span class="hlt">periodicity</span>, indicative of a white</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Steven B. Howell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">26</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2626767"> <span id="translatedtitle">Direct <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the kinetics of migrating T cells <span class="hlt">suggest</span> active retention by endothelial cells with continual bidirectional migration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The kinetics and regulatory mechanisms of T cell migration through the endothelium have not been fully defined. In experimental, filter-based assays in vitro, transmigration of lymphocytes takes hours, compared with minutes, in vivo. We cultured endothelial cell (EC) monolayers on filters, solid substrates, or collagen gels and treated them with TNF-?, IFN-?, or both prior to analysis of lymphocyte migration in the presence or absence of flow. PBL, CD4+ cells, or CD8+ cells took many hours to migrate through EC-filter constructs for all cytokine treatments. However, direct microscopic <span class="hlt">observations</span> of EC filters, which had been mounted in a flow chamber, showed that PBL crossed the endothelial monolayer in minutes and were highly motile in the subendothelial space. Migration through EC was also <span class="hlt">observed</span> on clear plastic, with or without flow. After a brief settling without flow, PBL and isolated CD3+ or CD4+ cells crossed EC in minutes, but the numbers of migrated cells varied little with time. Close <span class="hlt">observation</span> revealed that lymphocytes migrated back and forth continuously across endothelium. Under flow, migration kinetics and the proportions migrating back and forth were altered little. On collagen gels, PBL again crossed EC in minutes and migrated back and forth but showed little penetration of the gel over hours. In contrast, neutrophils migrated efficiently through EC and into gels. These <span class="hlt">observations</span> <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a novel model for lymphoid migration in which EC support migration but retain lymphocytes (as opposed to neutrophils), and additional signal(s) are required for onward migration. PMID:18948550</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McGettrick, Helen M.; Hunter, Kirsty; Moss, Paul A.; Buckley, Christopher D.; Rainger, G. Ed; Nash, Gerard B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">27</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013E%26PSL.375..291W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Moroccan speleothem and tree ring records <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a variable positive state of the North Atlantic Oscillation during the Medieval Warm <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a magnesium (Mg) and strontium (Sr) record from an aragonitic speleothem (Grotte de Piste, Morocco, 34?°N; 04°W) providing a reconstruction of effective rainfall from 619 to 1962 AD. The corresponding drip site was monitored over 2 yr for drip water Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios. Results show evidence for prior aragonite precipitation, which can explain negative correlations between speleothem Mg and Sr concentrations. The data shown here have important climate implications concerning the evolution of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). A comparison of the stalagmite data from Grotte de Piste with an updated tree ring based drought reconstruction from Morocco and other NAO related proxy records confirms that the Medieval Warm <span class="hlt">Period</span> (MWP) was dominated by NAO+ conditions. The stalagmite record and multiple proxy records from the Iberian Peninsula, however, <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that considerable rainfall variability occurred during the MWP. This implies that the NAO has been more variable during the MWP than formerly <span class="hlt">suggested</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wassenburg, J. A.; Immenhauser, A.; Richter, D. K.; Niedermayr, A.; Riechelmann, S.; Fietzke, J.; Scholz, D.; Jochum, K. P.; Fohlmeister, J.; Schröder-Ritzrau, A.; Sabaoui, A.; Riechelmann, D. F. C.; Schneider, L.; Esper, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">28</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3438871"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodization</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Clinicians are constantly faced with the challenge of designing training programs for injured and noninjured athletes that maximize healing and optimize performance. <span class="hlt">Periodization</span> is a concept of systematic progression—that is, resistance training programs that follow predictable patterns of change in training variables. The strength training literature is abundant with studies comparing <span class="hlt">periodization</span> schemes on uninjured, trained, and untrained athletes. The rehabilitation literature, however, is scarce with information about how to optimally design resistance training programs based on <span class="hlt">periodization</span> principles for injured athletes. The purpose of this review is to discuss relevant training variables and methods of <span class="hlt">periodization</span>, as well as <span class="hlt">periodization</span> program outcomes. A secondary purpose is to provide an anecdotal framework regarding implementation of <span class="hlt">periodization</span> principles into rehabilitation programs. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search from 1979 to 2009 was implemented with the keywords <span class="hlt">periodization</span>, strength training, rehabilitation, endurance, power, hypertrophy, and resistance training with the Boolean term AND in all possible combinations in the English language. Each author also undertook independent hand searching of article references used in this review. Results: Based on the studies researched, <span class="hlt">periodized</span> strength training regimens demonstrate improved outcomes as compared to nonperiodized programs. Conclusions: Despite the evidence in the strength training literature supporting <span class="hlt">periodization</span> programs, there is a considerable lack of data in the rehabilitation literature about program design and successful implementation of <span class="hlt">periodization</span> into rehabilitation programs. PMID:23015982</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lorenz, Daniel S.; Reiman, Michael P.; Walker, John C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">29</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19229771"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental <span class="hlt">Observation</span> of a <span class="hlt">Periodically</span> Oscillating Plasma Sphere in a Gridded Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Device</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere (POPS) [D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel, Phys. Plasmas 5, 2498 (1998).] oscillation has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device. In these experiments, ions in the virtual cathode exhibit resonant behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the <span class="hlt">observed</span> POPS resonance frequency and theoretical predictions has been <span class="hlt">observed</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. A. Nebel; S. Stange; S. Krupakar Murali</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">30</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860013037&hterms=Periodic+table&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3D%2528Periodic%2Btable%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Archive of <span class="hlt">observations</span> of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> comet Crommelin made during its 1983-84 apparition</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This is an archive of 680 reduced <span class="hlt">observations</span> of <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Comet Crommelin made during its 1984 apparition. The archive integrates reports by members of the eight networks of the International Halley Watch (IHW) and presents the results of a trial run designed to test the preparedness of the IHW organization for the current apparition of <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Comet Halley.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sekanina, Z. (editor); Aronsson, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">31</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012RaSc...47.2019D"> <span id="translatedtitle">MST radar <span class="hlt">observations</span> of short-<span class="hlt">period</span> gravity wave during overhead tropical cyclone</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Short-<span class="hlt">period</span> gravity waves associated with the passage of tropical cyclone using mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar located at Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E) has been discussed. The <span class="hlt">observed</span> stratospheric gravity wave is found to have a <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of ˜42 min, vertical and horizontal wavelength of ˜3.5 km and 14 km, respectively. Maximum amplitude of gravity wave is <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) region due to which <span class="hlt">periodic</span> updrafts and downdrafts are <span class="hlt">observed</span>. This weakens the stability of tropopause, which is <span class="hlt">observed</span> in radar signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The enhancement of vertical momentum flux of order ˜-0.6 m2/s2 <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the lower stratosphere is attributed to the cyclone generated gravity waves. The obstacle effect is found to be the generative mechanism for the <span class="hlt">observed</span> gravity waves associated with the tropical cyclone.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Das, Siddarth Shankar; Uma, K. N.; Das, Subrata Kumar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">32</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/539470"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dwarf Nova Oscillations and Quasi-<span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Oscillations in Cataclysmic Variables I. <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of VW Hyi</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">From archived and recent high speed photometry of VW Hyi we find Dwarf Nova Oscillations (DNOs) occasionally present throughout outburst, evolving from 14.06 s <span class="hlt">period</span> at maximum to > 40 s near the end of outburst. A relatively slow increase of <span class="hlt">period</span> is followed by rapid increase and subsequent decrease. Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> Oscillations (QPOs) are seen at <span class="hlt">periods</span> of hundreds of seconds. For the first time, an evolution of QPO <span class="hlt">period</span> is seen, steadily increasing during the final decline of an outburst. The occasional presence of two DNOs, separated in frequency by the QPO frequency, <span class="hlt">suggests</span> reprocessing of the rotating DNO beam by a `wall' rotating progradely in the disc at the QPO <span class="hlt">period</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Woudt, P A; Woudt, Patrick A.; Warner, Brian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">33</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900032298&hterms=young+1987&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dyoung%2B1987"> <span id="translatedtitle">Marine stratocumulus cloud parameters from GOES during the 1987 FIRE intensive field <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">GOES was used to perform the Marine Stratocumulus Intensive Field <span class="hlt">Observations</span> (IFO) from June 29 to July 19, 1987. Preliminary results of an analysis of GOES data covering most of the IFO <span class="hlt">period</span> are discussed. The large-scale cloud-field characteristics are derived, and then related to a longer <span class="hlt">period</span> of measurements and to surface <span class="hlt">observations</span>. Some preliminary point measurements taken from the surface are compared to regional-scale cloud parameters derived from satellite radiances.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Young, David F.; Heck, Patrick W.; Minnis, Patrick; Harrison, Edwin F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">34</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19960021447&hterms=wind+speed+average&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dwind%2Bspeed%2Baverage"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solar wind plasma <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> <span class="hlt">observed</span> at 1 AU by IMP 8</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The IMP 8 spacecraft has been in Earth orbit since 1973, gathering plasma data over one complete 22-year solar cycle. These data are being examined to look for <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> at time scales ranging from several hours to the entire span of the data set. A 1.3-year <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> in the radial speed <span class="hlt">observed</span> by IMP 8 and Voyager 2 has already been reported for the years from 1987 to 1993. The periodogram method, useful for unevenly sampled data such as the IMP 8 plasma data, has been used to search for other <span class="hlt">periods</span>. It is interesting to note that the 13-year <span class="hlt">period</span> is not present in the out-of-the-ecliptic component of the velocity (Vz), although a 1-year <span class="hlt">period</span> is very obvious both visually and on the periodogram. Both components show a very strong peak associated with the 11-year solar cycle variation. This work will be extended to the thermal speed (a measure of the wind's temperature) and density, although the frequent correlations between these parameters and the velocity are expected to cause similar results. Additionally, the fine resolution data will be examined for shorter time <span class="hlt">periods</span> than are visible using the hourly average data which are appropriate for longer <span class="hlt">periods</span>. A comparison with <span class="hlt">periods</span> <span class="hlt">observed</span> at other spacecraft may also be made.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paularena, K. I.; Szabo, A.; Lazarus, A. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">35</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52229583"> <span id="translatedtitle">Latitudinal variation of perturbation electric fields during magnetically disturbed <span class="hlt">periods</span> - 1986 Sundial <span class="hlt">observations</span> and model results</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">F-region incoherent scatter radar drift <span class="hlt">observations</span> from Millstone Hill and Jicamarca, h-prime F <span class="hlt">observations</span> from Huancayo, and high latitude ground-magnetometer measurements taken during the Sundial 1986 campaign are used to study the relationship between plasmaspheric electric field perturbations and high latitude currents during disturbed <span class="hlt">periods</span>. The <span class="hlt">observations</span> are in good agreement with numerical results from a Rice Covection Model run</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. G. Fejer; R. W. Spiro; R. A. Wolf; J. C. Foster</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">36</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003ChA%26A..27..426X"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observational</span> evidence for solar coronal decimetric radio pulsations with very short <span class="hlt">periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using the decimetric (700-1500 MHz) radio spectrometer and the synchronous <span class="hlt">observational</span> system with high temporal resolution at four frequencies (1420, 2130, 2840 and 4260 MHz) of Yunnan Observatory, two rare events were <span class="hlt">observed</span> on 2001 June 24 and 1990 July 30. The former was a small radio burst exhibiting pulsations with short <span class="hlt">periods</span> (about 29, 40 and 100 ms) in the impulsive phase. The latter was a large radio burst, which at 2840 MHz produced radio pulsations with <span class="hlt">period</span> of about 30 ms. This paper focuses on pulsations with very short <span class="hlt">periods</span> in the range of 29-40 ms. The mechanism of generation of such pulsations may be modulation of radio radiation by the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> trains of whistler packets originating in unstable regions of the corona. Alternatively, these pulsations can be attributed to wave-wave non-linear interactions of electrostatic upper hybrid waves driven by beams of precipitating electrons in flaring loops.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xie, Rui-xiang; Wang, Min; Shi, Shuo-biao; Xu, Chun; Li, Wei-hua; Yan, Yi-hua</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">37</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910001192&hterms=young+1987&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dyoung%2B1987"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cloud parameters derived from GOES during the 1987 marine stratocumulus FIRE Intensive Field <span class="hlt">Observation</span> (IFO) <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) is well suited for <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the variations of clouds over many temporal and spatial scales. For this reason, GOES data taken during the Marine Stratocumulus Intensive Field <span class="hlt">Observations</span> (IFO) (June 29 to July 19, 1987, Kloessel et al.) serve several purposes. One facet of the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) is improvement of the understanding of cloud parameter retrievals from satellite-<span class="hlt">observed</span> radiances. This involves comparisons of coincident satellite cloud parameters and high resolution data taken by various instruments on other platforms during the IFO <span class="hlt">periods</span>. Another aspect of FIRE is the improvement of both large- and small-scale models of stratocumulus used in general circulation models (GCMs). This may involve, among other studies, linking the small-scale processes <span class="hlt">observed</span> during the IFO to the variations in large-scale cloud fields <span class="hlt">observed</span> with the satellites during the IFO and Extended Time <span class="hlt">Observation</span> (ETO) <span class="hlt">periods</span>. Preliminary results are presented of an analysis of GOES data covering most of the IFO <span class="hlt">period</span>. The large scale cloud-field characteristics are derived, then related to a longer <span class="hlt">period</span> of measurements. Finally, some point measurements taken from the surface are compared to regional scale cloud parameters derived from satellite radiances.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Young, David F.; Minnis, Patrick; Harrison, Edwin F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">38</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AcASn..44..139X"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">observational</span> evidence of solar coronal decimetric radio pulsations with very short <span class="hlt">periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two rare events were <span class="hlt">observed</span> with the decimetric (700---1500MHz) radio spectrometer and the synchronous <span class="hlt">observational</span> system with high temporal resolution at four frequencies (1420, 2130, 2840, and 4260MHz) at Yunnan Observatory, National Astronomical Observatories of China on June 24, 2001 and July 30, 1990, respectively. The former is a small radio burst, associated with the pulsations with short <span class="hlt">periods</span> (about 30, 40, and 100 milliseconds) in impulsive phase. The latter is a great radio burst, with the <span class="hlt">periods</span> of the order of 30 milliseconds at 2840MHz. In this paper, the pulsations with very short <span class="hlt">periods</span> of the order of 29---40 milliseconds are mainly emphasized and discussed. Such radio emission pulsations with very short <span class="hlt">periods</span> may be generated by the modulation of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> trains of whistler packets originating in unstable region in the corona. Alternatively, these pulsations may be attributed to the wave-wave nonlinear interactions when a beam of precipitating electrons in a flaring loop drives electrostatic upper hybrid waves. These electrostatic waves can interact coherently with each other via the nonlinear oscillations to produce electromagnetic radiation with the <span class="hlt">periods</span> of about 30 milliseconds at twice upper hybrid frequency.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xie, R. X.; Wang, M.; Shi, S. B.; Xu, C.; Li, W. H.; Yan, Y. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">39</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52200273"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental <span class="hlt">Observation</span> of a <span class="hlt">Periodically</span> Oscillating Plasma Sphere in a Gridded Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Device</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere (POPS) [D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel, Phys. Plasmas 5, 2498 (1998)., PHPAEN, 1070-664X, 10.1063\\/1.872933] oscillation has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device. In these experiments, ions in the virtual cathode exhibit resonant behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the <span class="hlt">observed</span> POPS resonance frequency and theoretical predictions</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. A. Nebel; S. Stange; S. Krupakar Murali</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">40</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22270925"> <span id="translatedtitle">LOW-FREQUENCY <span class="hlt">OBSERVATIONS</span> OF TRANSIENT QUASI-<span class="hlt">PERIODIC</span> RADIO EMISSION FROM THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report low-frequency <span class="hlt">observations</span> of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span>, circularly polarized, harmonic type III radio bursts whose associated sunspot active regions were located close to the solar limb. The measured <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of the bursts at 80 MHz was ?5.2 s, and their average degree of circular polarization (dcp) was ?0.12. We calculated the associated magnetic field B (1) using the empirical relationship between the dcp and B for the harmonic type III emission, and (2) from the <span class="hlt">observed</span> quasi-<span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of the bursts. Both the methods result in B ? 4.2 G at the location of the 80 MHz plasma level (radial distance r ? 1.3 R{sub ?}) in the active region corona.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sasikumar Raja, K.; Ramesh, R., E-mail: sasikumar@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, II Block, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_2 div --> <div id="page_3" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">41</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1982481"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ultrashort-<span class="hlt">period</span> MS eclipsing systems. New <span class="hlt">observations</span> and light curve solutions of six NSVS binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We carried out photometric and low-resolution spectral <span class="hlt">observations</span> of six eclipsing ultrashort-<span class="hlt">period</span> binaries with MS components. The light curve solutions of the Rozhen <span class="hlt">observations</span> show that all targets are overcontact systems. We found well-defined empirical relation "<span class="hlt">period</span> -- semi-major axis" for the short-<span class="hlt">period</span> binaries and used it for estimation of the global parameters of the targets. Our results revealed that NSVS 925605 is quite interesting target: (a) it is one of a few contact binaries with M components; (b) it exhibits high activity (emission in H$\\alpha$ line, X-ray emission, large cool spots, non-Planck energy distribution); (c) its components differ in temperature by 700 K. All appearances of high magnetic activity and huge fillout factor (0.7) of NSVS 925605 might be assumed as a precursor of the predicted merging of close magnetic binaries. Another unusual binary is NSVS 2700153 which reveals considerable long-term variability.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dimitrov, Dinko</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">42</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/32597415"> <span id="translatedtitle">Validation of a 6-hour <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> for cocaine body stuffers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Often, patients are brought in to the emergency department after ingesting large amounts of cocaine in an attempt to conceal it. This act is known as body stuffing. The <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> required to recognize potential toxic adverse effects in these patients is not well described in the literature. We sought to validate a treatment algorithm for asymptomatic cocaine body stuffers</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maria Moreira; Jennie Buchanan; Kennon Heard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">43</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18688451"> <span id="translatedtitle">Return <span class="hlt">period</span> of enhanced gamma ray dose rates: regional differences <span class="hlt">observed</span> in Japan.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We estimated the return <span class="hlt">period</span> of an increased gamma ray dose rate (Delta gamma) derived from (222)Rn progeny deposited with precipitation. The approximate probability distribution for Delta gamma followed a Hazen plot, which is an empirical plotting equation, indicating that the distribution of Delta gamma was approximated by a nearly double-exponential. The distribution of Delta gamma was well represented by the Gumbel distribution, and the return <span class="hlt">period</span> for Delta gamma was estimated theoretically. There was a notable regional difference in the return <span class="hlt">period</span> between the coast of the Japan Sea and the inland or Pacific coast areas: the return <span class="hlt">period</span> for a given Delta gamma at monitoring sites on the Sea of Japan coast was 1.5 to 2.5 times shorter than that in the inland or Pacific coast areas. This variation with locality <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the rate of wet-deposition of (222)Rn progeny is larger at sites on the Sea of Japan coast than inland or on the Pacific coast areas. The expected return <span class="hlt">period</span> for the maximum Delta gamma at each site was about 10 years. This estimation of the return <span class="hlt">period</span> of Delta gamma is a novel approach to the study of environmental science in fields such as radioactivity. PMID:18688451</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Inomata, Yayoi; Igarashi, Yasuhito; Chiba, Masaru; Aoyama, Michio; Hirose, Katsumi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">44</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApJ...798...57M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Is Compton Cooling Sufficient to Explain Evolution of <span class="hlt">Observed</span> Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> Oscillations in Outburst Sources?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In outburst sources, quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillation (QPO) frequency is known to evolve in a certain way: in the rising phase, it monotonically goes up until a soft intermediate state is achieved. In the propagating oscillatory shock model, oscillation of the Compton cloud is thought to cause QPOs. Thus, in order to increase QPO frequency, the Compton cloud must collapse steadily in the rising phase. In decline phases, the exact opposite should be true. We investigate cause of this evolution of the Compton cloud. The same viscosity parameter that increases the Keplerian disk rate also moves the inner edge of the Keplerian component, thereby reducing the size of the Compton cloud and reducing the cooling timescale. We show that cooling of the Compton cloud by inverse Comptonization is enough for it to collapse sufficiently so as to explain the QPO evolution. In the two-component advective flow configuration of Chakrabarti-Titarchuk, centrifugal force-induced shock represents the boundary of the Compton cloud. We take the rising phase of 2010 outburst of Galactic black hole candidate H 1743-322 and find an estimation of variation of the ? parameter of the sub-Keplerian flow to be monotonically rising from 0.0001 to 0.02, well within the range <span class="hlt">suggested</span> by magnetorotational instability. We also estimate the inward velocity of the Compton cloud to be a few meters per second, which is comparable to what is found in several earlier studies of our group by empirically fitting the shock locations with the time of <span class="hlt">observations</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mondal, Santanu; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Debnath, Dipak</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">45</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20696429"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental <span class="hlt">Observation</span> of a <span class="hlt">Periodically</span> Oscillating Plasma Sphere in a Gridded Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Device</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere (POPS) [D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel, Phys. Plasmas 5, 2498 (1998).] oscillation has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device. In these experiments, ions in the virtual cathode exhibit resonant behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the <span class="hlt">observed</span> POPS resonance frequency and theoretical predictions has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> for a wide range of potential well depths and for three different ion species. The results provide the first experimental validation of the POPS concept proposed by Barnes and Nebel [R. A. Nebel and D. C. Barnes, Fusion Technol. 34, 28 (1998).].</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, J.; Nebel, R.A.; Stange, S.; Murali, S. Krupakar [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">46</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16090625"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental <span class="hlt">observation</span> of a <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere (POPS) [D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel, Phys. Plasmas 5, 2498 (1998).] oscillation has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device. In these experiments, ions in the virtual cathode exhibit resonant behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the <span class="hlt">observed</span> POPS resonance frequency and theoretical predictions has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> for a wide range of potential well depths and for three different ion species. The results provide the first experimental validation of the POPS concept proposed by Barnes and Nebel [R. A. Nebel and D. C. Barnes, Fusion Technol. 34, 28 (1998).]. PMID:16090625</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, J; Nebel, R A; Stange, S; Murali, S Krupakar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">47</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008cosp...37.3143T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Case study of magnetosphere <span class="hlt">periodic</span> substorms by multi-satellite and ground-based <span class="hlt">observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Magnetospheric <span class="hlt">periodic</span> substorms and the onset are very important elements in magnetospheric physics. During the last decade significant progress has been made in understanding them. The multipoint measurements available from the satellite mission and ground-based stations enable spatiotemporal effects in data sets to be resolved. In this paper, by combining CANOPUS stations, IMAGE, geosynchronous satellite data with magnetotail satellites <span class="hlt">observations</span>, we study the substorm responses in the ionosphere and in the magnetosphere during one selected event, try to detect the position of substorm onset and discuss the nature of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> substorm and their drivers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tang, Rongxin; Deng, Xiaohua; Yuan, Zhigang; Nakamura, Rumi; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Balogh, Andre; Reme, Henri; Liu, Zhenxing; Zhou, Meng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">48</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1502.00397v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Revolution of S-stars and oscillation of solar and terrestrial <span class="hlt">observables</span>: nonrandom coincidence of <span class="hlt">periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A striking coincidence of revolution <span class="hlt">periods</span> of S-stars orbiting a supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center of the Milky Way and oscillation <span class="hlt">periods</span> of such solar and terrestrial <span class="hlt">observables</span> as the sunspot number, the geomagnetic field Y-component and the global temperature is established on basis of the corresponding experimental data. Rejecting randomness of this discovered coincidence, we put forward a hypothesis that modulation of dark matter flows in the Milky Way by the S-stars is responsible for such a frequency transfer from the Galactic Center to the Solar System.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">V. D. Rusov; V. P. Smolyar; M. V. Eingorn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-02-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">49</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1502.00397.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Revolution of S-stars and oscillation of solar and terrestrial <span class="hlt">observables</span>: nonrandom coincidence of <span class="hlt">periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A striking coincidence of revolution <span class="hlt">periods</span> of S-stars orbiting a supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center of the Milky Way and oscillation <span class="hlt">periods</span> of such solar and terrestrial <span class="hlt">observables</span> as the sunspot number, the geomagnetic field Y-component and the global temperature is established on basis of the corresponding experimental data. Rejecting randomness of this discovered coincidence, we put forward a hypothesis that modulation of dark matter flows in the Milky Way by the S-stars is responsible for such a frequency transfer from the Galactic Center to the Solar System.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rusov, V D; Eingorn, M V</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">50</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013HESSD..1011643F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Overview of the first HyMeX Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> over Italy: <span class="hlt">observations</span> and model results</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the first Hymex campaign (5 September-6 November 2012) referred to as Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> (SOP-1), dedicated to heavy precipitation events and flash floods in Western Mediterranean, three Italian hydro-meteorological monitoring sites were activated: Liguria-Tuscany, North-Eastern Italy and Central Italy. The extraordinary deployment of advanced instrumentation, including instrumented aircrafts, and the use of several different operational weather forecast models has allowed an unprecedented monitoring and analysis of high impact weather events around the Italian hydro-meteorological sites. This activity has seen the strict collaboration between the Italian scientific and operational communities. In this paper, an overview of the Italian organization during the SOP-1 is provided, and selected Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Periods</span> (IOPs) are described. A significant event for each Italian target area is chosen for this analysis: IOP2 (12-13 September 2012) in North-Eastern Italy, IOP13 (15-16 October 2012) in Central Italy and IOP19 (3-5 November 2012) in Liguria and Tuscany. For each IOP the meteorological characteristics, together with special <span class="hlt">observations</span> and weather forecasts, are analyzed with the aim of highlighting strengths and weaknesses of the forecast modeling systems. Moreover, using one of the three events, the usefulness of different operational chains is highlighted.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ferretti, R.; Pichelli, E.; Gentile, S.; Maiello, I.; Cimini, D.; Davolio, S.; Miglietta, M. M.; Panegrossi, G.; Baldini, L.; Pasi, F.; Marzano, F. S.; Zinzi, A.; Mariani, S.; Casaioli, M.; Bartolini, G.; Loglisci, N.; Montani, A.; Marsigli, C.; Manzato, A.; Pucillo, A.; Ferrario, M. E.; Colaiuda, V.; Rotunno, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">51</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014HESS...18.1953F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Overview of the first HyMeX Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> over Italy: <span class="hlt">observations</span> and model results</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> (SOP1), part of the HyMeX campaign (Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean Experiments, 5 September-6 November 2012), was dedicated to heavy precipitation events and flash floods in the western Mediterranean, and three Italian hydro-meteorological monitoring sites were identified: Liguria-Tuscany, northeastern Italy and central Italy. The extraordinary deployment of advanced instrumentation, including instrumented aircrafts, and the use of several different operational weather forecast models, including hydrological models and marine models, allowed an unprecedented monitoring and analysis of high-impact weather events around the Italian hydro-meteorological sites. This activity has seen strong collaboration between the Italian scientific and operational communities. In this paper an overview of the Italian organization during SOP1 is provided, and selected Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Periods</span> (IOPs) are described. A significant event for each Italian target area is chosen for this analysis: IOP2 (12-13 September 2012) in northeastern Italy, IOP13 (15-16 October 2012) in central Italy and IOP19 (3-5 November 2012) in Liguria and Tuscany. For each IOP the meteorological characteristics, together with special <span class="hlt">observations</span> and weather forecasts, are analyzed with the aim of highlighting strengths and weaknesses of the forecast modeling systems, including the hydrological impacts. The usefulness of having different weather forecast operational chains characterized by different numerical weather prediction models and/or different model set up or initial conditions is finally shown for one of the events (IOP19).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ferretti, R.; Pichelli, E.; Gentile, S.; Maiello, I.; Cimini, D.; Davolio, S.; Miglietta, M. M.; Panegrossi, G.; Baldini, L.; Pasi, F.; Marzano, F. S.; Zinzi, A.; Mariani, S.; Casaioli, M.; Bartolini, G.; Loglisci, N.; Montani, A.; Marsigli, C.; Manzato, A.; Pucillo, A.; Ferrario, M. E.; Colaiuda, V.; Rotunno, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">52</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140010418&hterms=solar&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dsolar"> <span id="translatedtitle">Elemental GCR <span class="hlt">Observations</span> during the 2009-2010 Solar Minimum <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using <span class="hlt">observations</span> from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), we present new measurements of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) elemental composition and energy spectra for the species B through Ni in the energy range approx. 50-550 MeV/nucleon during the record setting 2009-2010 solar minimum <span class="hlt">period</span>. These data are compared with our <span class="hlt">observations</span> from the 1997-1998 solar minimum <span class="hlt">period</span>, when solar modulation in the heliosphere was somewhat higher. For these species, we find that the intensities during the 2009-2010 solar minimum were approx. 20% higher than those in the previous solar minimum, and in fact were the highest GCR intensities recorded during the space age. Relative abundances for these species during the two solar minimum <span class="hlt">periods</span> differed by small but statistically significant amounts, which are attributed to the combination of spectral shape differences between primary and secondary GCRs in the interstellar medium and differences between the levels of solar modulation in the two solar minima. We also present the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe for both solar minimum <span class="hlt">periods</span>, and demonstrate that these ratios are reasonably well fit by a simple "leaky-box" galactic transport model that is combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lave, K. A.; Israel, M. H.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; deNolfo, G. A.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">53</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999PApGe.155..609I"> <span id="translatedtitle">Use of Statistical Models to Analyze <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Seismicity <span class="hlt">Observed</span> for Clusters in the Kanto Region, Central Japan</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">periodic</span> pattern of seismicity has been reported for the Kinugawa cluster in the Kanto region, where several earthquake clusters are <span class="hlt">observed</span> at depths between 40 and 90 km. To analyze this <span class="hlt">periodicity</span>, statistical studies are performed for the Kinugawa cluster together with eight other clusters. Hypocentral parameters of the earthquakes with magnitudes 4.5 and larger for the <span class="hlt">period</span> between 1950 and 1995 are taken from the JMA catalogue. The simple sinusoidal function, the exponential of sinusoidal function and the stress release model are applied as the intensity function. Model parameters are determined by the maximum likelihood method and the best model for each cluster is selected by using the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). In six cases the sinusoidal model or the exponential of the sinusoidal model is selected as the best option and achieves AIC reductions of values between 2.4 and 13.2 units from the simple Poisson model. The stress release model is selected for two clusters. The three clusters, the Kinugawa, Kasumigaura, and Choshi clusters, have a similar optimal <span class="hlt">period</span> of about 10 years, and align in the northwest-southeast direction at a similar depth range of 40 to 70 km. A model modified from the stress release model is applied to the three clusters so to analyze the relationship among them. In the modified model, an earthquake occurrence in one zone increases the stress in the other zone, which is different from the original stress release model which assumes a linear increase with time. Applying the modified model to the Kinugawa cluster, an AIC reduction from the Poisson model is significantly larger than the value obtained with the sinusoidal model. This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> seismicity <span class="hlt">observed</span> for the Kinugawa cluster can be explained with the more comprehensive model than the sinusoidal model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Imoto, M.; Maeda, K.; Yoshida, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">54</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AGUFM.S51E0093D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-<span class="hlt">Period</span> Microtremor <span class="hlt">Observations</span> in the Santa Clara Valley, California</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In our previous work we investigated the 3D velocity structure of the Santa Clara Valley (SCV) by modeling the teleseismic P-waves recorded by the 41 seismic stations of the SCV Seismic Experiment (USGS/UCB/PASSCAL, 6/98-12/98). To complement these results, we now focused on the microseisms that were recorded during the same SCV seismic experiment. Microseisms are generated by the pressure variations on the sea floor due to the ocean waves and can be <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the 0.1 to 5 Hz frequency range. The seismic noise level of several earthquake-free <span class="hlt">periods</span> was first compared to the ocean wave heights recorded at the Santa Cruz weather buoy and showed that the two are correlated. Horizontal to vertical (H/V) spectral ratios of microtremor signals for a 5-day earthquake-free <span class="hlt">period</span> were then calculated for each station. The H/V spectral ratios for the 5-minute segments at the beginning of each hour were first calculated and then averaged over the 5 days. The results showed that the dominant <span class="hlt">period</span> of the H/V spectral ratios in the 0.1 to 1 Hz frequency range is stable with time and is a function of the USGS model basin depth. The longer <span class="hlt">periods</span> can be <span class="hlt">observed</span> for the stations above the two basins and the shorter <span class="hlt">periods</span> for the stations in-between the basins. There was no correlation between the amplitudes of the H/V spectral ratios and the USGS model basin depths. We measured the peak ground velocity (PGV) and the recorded energy for the two local earthquakes recorded during the SCV seismic experiment (San Juan Bautista, M5.4, and Gilroy, M4.0). The PGV and the recorded energy are also a function of the station location. The results obtained with the local earthquakes as well as the results obtained with the previous teleseismic study validated the use of the microtremor H/V method in the prediction of the effects of the deep basin structure on long-<span class="hlt">period</span> earthquake ground motions as well as provided the calibration for the H/V method. In addition we modeled the response of the sedimentary layers using the 1D structure from the USGS and the UCB model under each SCV seismic station to simulate the <span class="hlt">observations</span> and to test if the results could be used to refine the basin model structure.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dolenc, D.; Dreger, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">55</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000052549&hterms=ability+comparison&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dability%2Bcomparison"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of Sunphotometric Measurements During the Fall 1997 ARM Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the Fall of 1997 the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program held an intensive <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> (IOP) to study atmospheric aerosols using in situ and remote sensing techniques at its Southern Great Plains (SGP) site near Lamont, Oklahoma. As part of this experiment five automated, tracking sunphotometers were present to measure total column aerosol optical depth over the three-week <span class="hlt">period</span>. which included many clear days or parts of days that were clear. The World Meteorological Organization (WMO 1993) has recommended a comparison of tracking sunphotometers to assess the ability of different instruments to arrive at similar aerosol optical depths. It was further recommended that the comparison be staged at a clean mountain site. In fact, this comparison has not occurred, but the comparison that we describe in this paper is representative of what contemporary instruments may accomplish in an environment more typical of sites where aerosols measurements will be required. The measurements were made over the <span class="hlt">period</span> 15 September to 5 October 1997. The aerosol loading varied from extremely clean to moderately turbid conditions. In the next section the instruments will be described along with a brief explanation of the calibration techniques. The third section contains the results compared graphically on moderately turbid and fairly clean days and in a table representing the whole <span class="hlt">period</span>. The paper ends with a section of discussion and a summary of the results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michalsky, J. J.; Schmid, B.; Halthore, R. N.; Pavloski, C. F.; Ackerman, T. P.; Beauharnois, M. C.; Harrison, L. C.; Livingston, J. M.; Russell, P. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">56</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ApJ...728...16H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Infrared Spectroscopic <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of the Secondary Stars of Short-<span class="hlt">period</span> Sub-gap Cataclysmic Variables</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present K-band spectroscopy of short-<span class="hlt">period</span>, "sub-gap" cataclysmic variable (CV) systems obtained using ISAAC on the Very Large Telescope. We show the infrared (IR) spectra for nine systems below the 2-3 hr <span class="hlt">period</span> gap: V2051 Oph, V436 Cen, EX Hya, VW Hyi, Z Cha, WX Hyi, V893 Sco, RZ Leo, and TY PsA. We are able to clearly detect the secondary star in all but WX Hyi, V893 Sco, and TY PsA. We present the first direct detection of the secondary stars of V2051 Oph, V436 Cen, and determine new spectral classifications for EX Hya, VW Hyi, Z Cha, and RZ Leo. We find that the CO band strengths of all but Z Cha appear normal for their spectral types, in contrast to their longer <span class="hlt">period</span> cousins above the <span class="hlt">period</span> gap. This brings the total number of CVs and pre-CVs with moderate resolution (R >~ 1500) IR spectroscopy to 61 systems: 19 pre-CVs, 31 non-magnetic systems, and 11 magnetic or partially magnetic systems. We discuss the trends seen in the IR abundance patterns thus far and highlight a potential link between anomalous abundances seen in the IR with the C IV/N V anomaly seen in the ultraviolet. We present a compilation of all systems with sufficient resolution IR <span class="hlt">observations</span> to assess the CO band strengths and, by proxy, obtain an estimate on the C abundance on the secondary star.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hamilton, Ryan T.; Harrison, Thomas E.; Tappert, Claus; Howell, Steve B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">57</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012cosp...39.1272E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Confrontation Between a Quantized <span class="hlt">Periods</span> of Some Exo-planetary Systems and <span class="hlt">Observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Confrontation Between a Quantized <span class="hlt">Periods</span> of Some Exo-planetary Systems and <span class="hlt">Observations</span> A.B. Morcos Corot and Kepler were designed to detect Earth-like extra solar planets. The orbital elements and <span class="hlt">periods</span> of these planets will contain some uncertainties. Many theoretical treatments depend on the idea of quantization were done aiming to find orbital elements of these exoplenets. In the present work, as an extension of previous works, the <span class="hlt">periods</span> of some extoplanetary systems are calculated by using a simple derived formula. The orbital velocities of some of them are predicted . A comparison between the calculated and <span class="hlt">observed</span> data is done References 1-J.M. Barnothy , the stability of the Solar System and of small Stellar Systems . (Y.Kazai edn,IAU,1974). 2-L.Nottale,Fractal Space-Time and Microphysics,Towards a Theory of Scale Relativity,( World Scientific, London,1994). 3-L. Nottale, A&A Lett. 315, L9 (1996). 4-L. Nottale, G. Schumacher and J. Gay, A&A , 322, 1018 , (1997). 5-L. Nottale, A&A , 361, 379 (2000). 6-A.G. Agnese and R.Festa, arXiv:astro-ph/9807186v1, (1998). 7-A.G. Agnese and R.Festa, arXiv:astro-ph/9910534v2. (1999). 8- A.B.Morcos, MG 12 , France (2009). 9- A.B.Morcs, Cospar 38 , Bremen , Germany (2010)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">El Fady Morcos, Abd</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">58</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20110020642&hterms=Tidal+power&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3D%2528Tidal%2Bpower%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observing</span> and Modeling Long-<span class="hlt">Period</span> Tidal Variations in Polar Motion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">By exchanging angular momentum with the solid Earth, ocean tides cause the Earth's rotation to change. While hydrodynamic tide models have been used to study the effect of ocean tides on polar motion, it is shown here that none of the published models can fully account for the <span class="hlt">observed</span> variations. An empirical ocean tide model is therefore determined by fitting <span class="hlt">periodic</span> terms at the tidal frequencies to polar motion excitation <span class="hlt">observations</span>, from which atmospheric and non-tidal oceanic effects were removed. While the empirical ocean tide model does fully account for allof the <span class="hlt">observed</span> tidal power, tests indicate that the model may not have completely converged. So better models of the effects of ocean tides on polar motion are still needed, both dynamical and empirical.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gross, Richard S.; Dickman, S. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">59</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/88/75/60/PDF/hal-00887560.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">these experiments <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that a particular <span class="hlt">period</span> exists around the 3oth and 6oth day of life of piglets having passive immunity. During this <span class="hlt">period</span>, maternal passive immunity protects piglets</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">of piglets having passive immunity. During this <span class="hlt">period</span>, maternal passive immunity protects piglets against virulent infections, but also allows induction of active immunity following vaccination with live vaccine. New investigations are needed to determine limits and characteristics of this <span class="hlt">period</span>. Immune response</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">60</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.1448S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodicity</span> in the spatial-temporal earthquake distributions for the Pacific region: <span class="hlt">observation</span> and modeling.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the course of the last century a cyclic increasing and decreasing of the Earth's seismic activity (SA) was marked. The variations of the SA for the events with M>=7.0 from 1900 up to date were under study. The two subsets of the worldwide NEIC (USGS) catalog were used: USGS/NEIC from 1973 to 2012 and catalog of the significant worldwide earthquakes (2150 B.C. - 1994 A.D.), compiled by USGS/NEIC from the NOAA agency. The preliminary standardization of magnitudes and elimination of aftershocks from list of events was performed. The entire <span class="hlt">period</span> of <span class="hlt">observations</span> was subdivided into 5-year intervals. The temporal distributions of the earthquake (EQ) density and released energy density were calculated separately for the Southern hemisphere (SH), and for the Northern hemisphere (NH) and for eighteen latitudinal belts: 90°-80°N, 80°-70°N, 70°-60°N, 60°-50°N and so on (the size of each belt is equal to 10°). The <span class="hlt">periods</span> of the SA was compared for different latitudinal belts of the Earth. The peaks and decays of the seismicity do not coincide in time for different latitudinal belts and especially for the belts located in NH and SH. The peaks and decays of the SA for the events (with M>=8) were marked in the temporal distributions of the EQ for all studied latitudinal belts. The two-dimension distributions (over latitudes and over time) of the EQ density and released energy density highlighted that the <span class="hlt">periods</span> of amplification of the SA are equal to 30-35 years approximately. Next, we check the existence of a non-random component in the EQ occurrence between the NH and the SH. All events were related to the time axis according to their origin time. We take into consideration the set of the EQs in the studied catalog as the sequence of events if each event may have only one of two possible outcome (occurrence in the NH or in the SH). A nonparametric run test was used for testing of hypothesis about an existence the nonrandom component in the examined sequence of events. The statistical value Z was calculated. The confidence interval for a=1% (significance value) defined by the condition |Zcrit|<2.58. If |Z|>=|Zcrit| then given sample may contain non-random components. The Z values for all magnitude ranges exceeded |Zcrit| in several times, thus a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> transfer of the seismic activity between the Northern Hemisphere and the Southern Hemispheres is confirmed. The digital model (superposition of the random processes and the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> process) was proposed. It was shown that statistical validity of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> component according to run test depends on: the frequency of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> function, and the duration of the <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span>, and the probability of random component occurrence (P1) as function of time and the probability of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> component occurrence (P2) as function of time. The digital model enables to comprehend some particular features of the <span class="hlt">observation</span> data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sasorova, Elena; Levin, Boris</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_3 div --> <div id="page_4" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">61</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JHyd..520...52M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solute transport in <span class="hlt">periodical</span> heterogeneous porous media: Importance of <span class="hlt">observation</span> scale and experimental sampling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper focuses on the effects of the <span class="hlt">observation</span> scale and sampling on the dispersion of tracers in <span class="hlt">periodical</span> heterogeneous porous media. A Model Heterogeneous Porous Medium (MHPM) with a high degree of heterogeneity was built. It consists of a preferential flow path surrounded by glass beads. 44 tracer experiments were carried out on several series of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> MHPM to investigate the effect of the <span class="hlt">observation</span> scale on solute dispersion. Each series was replicated several times, allowing for a statistical description of the unit transfer function of the MHPM. No significant trend was found for the dispersion coefficient as a function of the size of the MHPM. However, given the variability of the breakthrough curves from one experiment replicate to another, under-sampling might easily lead to conclude that the dispersion coefficient is variable with distance. Depending on the samples used, it would be as easy to (wrongly) detect an increasing trend as to detect a decreasing one. A confidence interval analysis of the experimental breakthrough curves in the Laplace space shows that (i) there exists a model with scale independent parameters that can describe the experimental breakthrough curves within the limits of experimental uncertainty, (ii) this model is not the advection-dispersion (AD) model, (iii) the modelling error of the AD model decreases with the number of <span class="hlt">periods</span>, (iv) the size of the Reference Elementary Volume for the dispersion coefficient is between 10 and 20 <span class="hlt">periods</span>. The effects of sampling prove to override those of scaling. This, with the invalidity of the AD model, leads to question attempts to calibrate and/or identify trends in the dispersion coefficient at intermediate scales from a limited number of experiment replicates.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Majdalani, S.; Chazarin, J. P.; Delenne, C.; Guinot, V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">62</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMSA41B1863M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Time <span class="hlt">Periods</span> of Unusual Density Behavior <span class="hlt">Observed</span> by GRACE and CHAMP</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Time <span class="hlt">periods</span> of low cross correlation between precision orbit ephemeris (POE) derived density and accelerometer density for CHAMP and GRACE are examined. In particular, the cross correlation for GRACE dropped from typical values near 0.9 to much lower values and then returned to typical over the time <span class="hlt">period</span> of late October to late December of 2005. This time <span class="hlt">period</span> includes a maneuver where GRACE-A and GRACE-B swapped positions. However, the drop in cross correlation begins and reaches its low point before the maneuvers begin. In addition, the densities were found using GRACE-A, but GRACE-B did most of the maneuvering. The time <span class="hlt">period</span> is characterized by high frequency variations in accelerometer density of the same magnitude as the daylight to eclipse variations over the course of an orbit. However, the daylight to eclipse variations are particularly small during this time <span class="hlt">period</span> because the orbit plane is near the terminator. Additionally, the difference between the accelerometer and POE derived densities are not unusually large during this time <span class="hlt">period</span>. This implies the variations are not unusual, just more significant when the orbit plane is near terminator. Cyclical variations in correlation of the POE derived densities with accelerometer derived densities are seen for both GRACE and CHAMP, but the magnitude of the variations are much larger for GRACE, possibly because of the higher altitude of GRACE. The cycles seem to be phased so that low correlations occur with low beta angle when the orbit plane is near the terminator. The low correlation is possibly caused by the lower amplitude of the daylight to eclipse signal making higher frequency variations relatively more important. However, another possible explanation is terminator waves in density that propagate to the thermosphere from lower in the atmosphere. These waves have been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in CHAMP accelerometer data and global circulation model simulations. Further investigation is needed to see if the variations correspond to terminator waves or if they represent typical high frequency signal from another source that is more apparent when the orbit plane is near the terminator. 1. C. A. McLaughlin, E. Fattig, D. Mysore Krishna, and P. M. Mehta, "Time <span class="hlt">Periods</span> of Anomalous Density for GRACE and CHAMP," AAS/AIAA Astrodynamics Specialists Conference, AAS 11-613, Girdwood, AK, August 2011. 2. C. A. McLaughlin, A. Hiatt, and T. Lechtenberg, "Calibrating Precision Orbit Derived Total Density," Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, Vol. 48, No. 1, January-February 2011, pp. 166-174.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McLaughlin, C. A.; Fattig, E.; Mysore Krishna, D.; Locke, T.; Mehta, P. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">63</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985iue..prop.2211R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coordinated <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of Rotational Modulation in Long <span class="hlt">Period</span> RS CVn Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This proposal requests IUE time to obtain SWP low dispersion spectra during 10 US2 shifts during the Fall of 1985. The targets are all late G or early K giants in long <span class="hlt">period</span> active chromosphere RS Canum Venaticorum binary systems. The research goal is to discern the spatial relationship and extent of the surface active regions in both the horizontal and vertical directions. Ground based <span class="hlt">observations</span> will be obtained contemporaneously over the fall season. We will use the C IV line as the primary activity indicator in the stellar transition region, whereas ground based <span class="hlt">observations</span> will supply information on the chromosphere and photosphere. We will particularly be seeking information on the relative shape and phase lead or lag of the transition region emission relative to the chromospheric and photospheric rotational phase behavior.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ramsey, Lawrence</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">64</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24040024"> <span id="translatedtitle">mtDNA from the early Bronze Age to the Roman <span class="hlt">period</span> <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a genetic link between the Indian subcontinent and Mesopotamian cradle of civilization.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ancient DNA methodology was applied to analyse sequences extracted from freshly unearthed remains (teeth) of 4 individuals deeply deposited in slightly alkaline soil of the Tell Ashara (ancient Terqa) and Tell Masaikh (ancient Kar-Assurnasirpal) Syrian archaeological sites, both in the middle Euphrates valley. Dated to the <span class="hlt">period</span> between 2.5 Kyrs BC and 0.5 Kyrs AD the studied individuals carried mtDNA haplotypes corresponding to the M4b1, M49 and/or M61 haplogroups, which are believed to have arisen in the area of the Indian subcontinent during the Upper Paleolithic and are absent in people living today in Syria. However, they are present in people inhabiting today's Tibet, Himalayas, India and Pakistan. We anticipate that the analysed remains from Mesopotamia belonged to people with genetic affinity to the Indian subcontinent since the distribution of identified ancient haplotypes indicates solid link with populations from the region of South Asia-Tibet (Trans-Himalaya). They may have been descendants of migrants from much earlier times, spreading the clades of the macrohaplogroup M throughout Eurasia and founding regional Mesopotamian groups like that of Terqa or just merchants moving along trade routes passing near or through the region. None of the successfully identified nuclear alleles turned out to be ?F508 CFTR, LCT-13910T or ?32 CCR5. PMID:24040024</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Witas, Henryk W; Tomczyk, Jacek; J?drychowska-Da?ska, Krystyna; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; P?oszaj, Tomasz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">65</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3972713"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dorsal Raphe Serotonin Neurons in Mice: Immature Hyperexcitability Transitions to Adult State during First Three Postnatal Weeks <span class="hlt">Suggesting</span> Sensitive <span class="hlt">Period</span> for Environmental Perturbation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Trauma during early life is a major risk factor for the development of anxiety disorders and <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the developing brain may be particularly sensitive to perturbation. Increased vulnerability most likely involves altering neural circuits involved in emotional regulation. The role of serotonin in emotional regulation is well established, but little is known about the postnatal development of the raphe where serotonin is made. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recording and immunohistochemistry, we tested whether serotonin circuitry in the dorsal and median raphe was functionally mature during the first 3 postnatal weeks in mice. Serotonin neurons at postnatal day 4 (P4) were hyperexcitable. The increased excitability was due to depolarized resting membrane potential, increased resistance, increased firing rate, lack of 5-HT1A autoreceptor response, and lack of GABA synaptic activity. Over the next 2 weeks, membrane resistance decreased and resting membrane potential hyperpolarized due in part to potassium current activation. The 5-HT1A autoreceptor-mediated inhibition did not develop until P21. The frequency of spontaneous inhibitory and excitatory events increased as neurons extended and refined their dendritic arbor. Serotonin colocalized with vGlut3 at P4 as in adulthood, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> enhanced release of glutamate alongside enhanced serotonin release. Because serotonin affects circuit development in other brain regions, altering the developmental trajectory of serotonin neuron excitability and release could have many downstream consequences. We conclude that serotonin neuron structure and function change substantially during the first 3 weeks of life during which external stressors could potentially alter circuit formation. PMID:24695701</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rood, Benjamin D.; Calizo, Lyngine H.; Piel, David; Spangler, Zachary P.; Campbell, Kaitlin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">66</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2905856"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonparametric Inference and Uniqueness for <span class="hlt">Periodically-Observed</span> Progressive Disease Models</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In many studies examining the progression of HIV and other chronic diseases, subjects are <span class="hlt">periodically</span> monitored to assess their progression through disease states. This gives rise to a specific type of panel data which have been termed “chain-of-events data”; e.g. data that result from <span class="hlt">periodic</span> <span class="hlt">observation</span> of a progressive disease process whose states occur in a prescribed order and where state transitions are not <span class="hlt">observable</span>. Using a discrete time semi-Markov model, we develop an algorithm for nonparametric estimation of the distribution functions of sojourn times in a J state progressive disease model. Issues of uniqueness for chain-of-events data are not well-understood. Thus, a main goal of this paper is to determine the uniqueness of the nonparametric estimators of the distribution functions of sojourn times within states. We develop sufficient conditions for uniqueness of the nonparametric maximum likelihood estimator, including situations where some but not all of its components are unique. We illustrate the methods with three examples. PMID:19629683</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Griffin, Beth Ann; Lagakos, Stephen W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">67</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AdSpR..49..500E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> frequency fluctuations <span class="hlt">observed</span> during coronal radio sounding experiments 1991-2009</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Coronal radio sounding experiments were carried out using the dual-frequency signals of the spacecraft Ulysses, Galileo, Mars Express, Venus Express, and Rosetta. The change in differential frequency recorded at the NASA and ESA ground stations, a quantity sensitive only to the plasma along the radio ray path from spacecraft to receiver, has been analyzed in this work. This large volume of <span class="hlt">observational</span> data provides evidence for the occasional presence of a quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> component (QPC) in the derived frequency fluctuation spectra. First seen in data from the Mars Express conjunction in 2004, further evidence for the QPC has now been found in data recorded at other solar conjunction opportunities from 1991 to 2009, thereby better defining the statistical characteristics of the QPC. The level of QPC spectral density is a factor of three higher than the expected power-law background level. The characteristic frequency of the spectral density maximum is roughly 4 mHz, corresponding to a QPC fluctuation <span class="hlt">period</span> of about 4 min. The bandwidth of the spectral line is comparable to the maximum frequency. The QPC are <span class="hlt">observed</span> at heliocentric distances between 3 and 40 solar radii, both in equatorial regions and at high heliolatitudes. The QPC is detected with an occurrence frequency of about 20% and is occasionally accompanied by its second harmonic. The most likely progenitors of the QPC are quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> electron density fluctuations associated with magnetosonic waves, which are generated locally from nonlinear interactions of 5-min band Alfvén waves propagating from the coronal base.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Efimov, A. I.; Lukanina, L. A.; Samoznaev, L. N.; Rudash, V. K.; Chashei, I. V.; Bird, M. K.; Pätzold, M.; MEX, VEX, ROS Radio Science Team</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">68</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.8306F"> <span id="translatedtitle">The French component of the FENNEC Saharan Climate project 2011 Special <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The central Sahara has one of the most extreme climates on Earth. During the northern summer months, a large low pressure system caused by intense solar heating develops over a huge, largely uninhabited expanse of northern Mali, southern Algeria and eastern Mauritania. This Saharan heat low plays a pivotal role in the West African Monsoon. Based on this, the interested French, British and German communities have decided to propose the FENNEC project which aims at (i) characterizing the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer, (ii) evaluating its representation in regional and global models, and (iii) improving "aerosol" products issued from space-borne <span class="hlt">observations</span>. A key element of this programme was the organization of an international field campaign in June 2011 over the Saharan heat low region, which will include both ground-based and airborne detachments. The Special <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> component of FENNEC-France included the implementation of the SAFIRE Falcon 20 to conduct research on the atmospheric boundary layer and the dust cycle of the Sahara, the installation of a remote sensing station in southern Spain, equipped with a backscatter lidar and a sunphotometer, to study the transport of desert dust to Europe, as well as a couple of GPS stations installed in southern Morocco to investigate the moisture inflow from the Atlantic Ocean into the Sahara. For the first time, the ALADIN and AROME models (5 and 24 km grid spacing, respectively) have been implemented operationally to provide forecasts of dust events over the Sahara and parts of the Sahel in June 2011 to assist in planning for airborne operations. This effort was complemented by the forecasts made with the Meso-NH model (5 and 20 km resolution). During the SOP <span class="hlt">period</span>, the ground-based, airborne and space-borne <span class="hlt">observations</span> have documented the evolution of dynamic properties of thermodynamic and the atmospheric boundary layer Saharan Africa (Mauritania and Mali) during the installation phase of the Saharan heat low west of the continent as well as the increase in aerosol loading associated with the phase shift of the heat low from east to west. During this <span class="hlt">period</span>, episodes of intense uplift of desert aerosols associated with various dynamic phenomena (fronts, "Mediterannean surges", "Atlantic inflow" of low-level jets, etc ...) have also been documented as well as the export of dust over the Atlantic Ocean. An overview of implementation plan and of the first <span class="hlt">observational</span> and modelling results acquired during the time of the SOP will be presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Flamant, C.; Chaboureau, J.-P.; Kocha, C.; Lavaysse, C.; Schepanski, K.; Chazette, P.; Bock, O.; Marticorena, B.; Tulet, P.; Pelon, J.; Marnas, F.; Mokhtari, M.; Lafore, J.-P.; Roehrig, R.; Koulali Idrissi, A.; Tsamalis, C.; Chedin, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">69</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AAS...22534520A"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Bayesian Estimation for Spica's Apsidal <span class="hlt">Period</span> from 111 years of Spectroscopic <span class="hlt">Observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Toward the goal of constraining the short <span class="hlt">period</span> (P = 4.01 d) massive binary star Spica's apsidal constant, which in turn constrains the internal structure of the primary star (B1.5 IV), we have modified the Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo code EXOFAST (Eastman et al. 2013) to fit six radial velocity (RV) data sets obtained between 1889 to 2000. The code was modified to take radial velocity input from two stars rather than a single exoplanet host star. In addition the apsidal <span class="hlt">period</span> (U) and the RV amplitude of the secondary star (K2) have been added as fit parameters, and the longitude of periastron is now a function of time. Measurements from Vogel (1889), Baker (1910), Struve & Ebigghausen (1934), Struve et al. (1958), Shobbrook et al. (1972) and Riddle (2000) provide 338 and 239 RV measurements for the primary and secondary stars respectively.Preliminary results yield: (1) a median apsidal <span class="hlt">period</span> (U) of 118.9±1.3 years with 68% confidence consistent with the value of Herbison-Evans et al. (1971), 124±11 years. The ratio of the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> to the apsidal <span class="hlt">period</span> (P/U), one of three parameters needed for <span class="hlt">observationally</span> determined apsidal-motion constant k2obs (Claret & Willems 2002), is now tentatively constrained to 1%, P/U = 9.24±0.01x10-5. (2) The eccentricity is constrained in our solution with an uncertainty of 9%, down from an uncertainly of 20% found by Riddle (2000). (3) The uncertainty in k2obs is dominated by the uncertainty of the ratio of the primary star radius, R1,to the semi-major axis, a, since k2obs is proportional to (R1/a)5. The semi-major axis can be found from a?sini which is constrained with an uncertainty of 3%, similar to previous work. The influence of the prior values on the posterior distributions will be described. The next step is to constrain the inclination from the light curve and long-baseline near-IR interferometry.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aufdenberg, Jason P.; Robinette, Timothy M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">70</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900064186&hterms=sundial&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dsundial"> <span id="translatedtitle">Latitudinal variation of perturbation electric fields during magnetically disturbed <span class="hlt">periods</span> - 1986 Sundial <span class="hlt">observations</span> and model results</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">F-region incoherent scatter radar drift <span class="hlt">observations</span> from Millstone Hill and Jicamarca, h-prime F <span class="hlt">observations</span> from Huancayo, and high latitude ground-magnetometer measurements taken during the Sundial 1986 campaign are used to study the relationship between plasmaspheric electric field perturbations and high latitude currents during disturbed <span class="hlt">periods</span>. The <span class="hlt">observations</span> are in good agreement with numerical results from a Rice Covection Model run that involved a sharp increase in the polar cap potential drop followed by a subsequent decrease. The zonal disturbance electric field pattern is latitude independent, and the corresponding amplitudes change approximately as L exp n (where n is about 1.5). The meridional electric field patterns and amplitudes have larger latitudinal variations. The mid-, low, and equatorial electric fields from the Rice Convection Model are in good agreement with previous results from the semianalytic, Senior-Blanc (1987) model. Also discussed are three physical mechanisms (over-shielding, fossil winds, and magnetic reconfiguration) that contribute to the long lasting (1-2 h) equatorial zonal electric field perturbations associated with a sudden northward turning of the IMF. It is predicted that the penetration of high latitude electric fields to low latitudes should, in general, be closely related to the rate of motion of the shielding layer and the equatorward edge of the diffuse aurora.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fejer, B. G.; Spiro, R. W.; Wolf, R. A.; Foster, J. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">71</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0403186v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Searching for <span class="hlt">periods</span> in X-ray <span class="hlt">observations</span> using Kuiper's test. Application to the ROSAT PSPC archive</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We use Kuiper's test to detect <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in X-ray and gamma-ray <span class="hlt">observations</span>. Like Rayleigh's test, it uses the individual photon arrival times, and is therefore well suited to the analysis of faint sources. Our method makes it possible to take into account the discontinuities in the <span class="hlt">observation</span>, and to completely get rid of the contamination that results from them. This makes it particularly adapted to the search of <span class="hlt">periods</span> long compared to the total <span class="hlt">observation</span> duration. We propose a semi-analytical approach to determine the effective number of trial frequencies when searching for unknown <span class="hlt">periods</span> over a frequency range. This approach can be easily adapted to other tests. We show that, using Kuiper's test, we can recover <span class="hlt">periods</span> in frequency domains where other tests are completely confused by contamination. We finally search the entire ROSAT Position-Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) archive for long <span class="hlt">periods</span>, and find 28 new <span class="hlt">periodic</span>-source candidates.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Paltani</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-03-08</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">72</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFMSM22A..07L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multipoint <span class="hlt">observations</span> of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> substorms associated with ULF pulsations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using auroral images from the IMAGE WIC instrument, geomagnetic data from various ground stations, and geosynchronous particle data, we have identified six consecutive substorms separated by about 45 min to 1.6 hr on November 8, 2000. Most of these substorms are of small to medium size and occurred under a weakly northward IMF condition: IMF Bz was near zero to about +5 nT prior to each substorm. IMF By was also weak, being within about ¢®¨ú3 nT. Most interestingly, we have found that for most of the substorms, about 10-15 min <span class="hlt">period</span> ULF pulsation begins to amplify prior to each onset and tends to decline near the time of onset. The pulsation features are clearly seen at auroral zone and some higher latitude stations of the CANOPUS magnetic network when they cover morning side MLT regions. Similar features are also seen in the GOES magnetic field <span class="hlt">observations</span> in similar MLT regions. For the first two substorms, the IMAGE magnetic network stations were at postnoon MLT regions and indicated similar ULF pulsation features. The SuperDARN data show that for most of the substorms, the ionospheric convection within the polar cap shows high-amplitude oscillations with a <span class="hlt">period</span> of about 15 min that tend to amplify prior to onset and to decline after the onset. Based on the results, we will discuss the possible association between substorm triggering and convection associated with large-amplitude ULF pulsations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee, D.; Lyons, L.; Zou, S.; Kim, K.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Weygand, J. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">73</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AIPC.1216...90E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> Fluctuations Detected in Mars Express Coronal Radio Sounding <span class="hlt">Observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spectral analysis of the high-quality dual-frequency data obtained with the radio sounding experiment MaRS on the ESA spacecraft Mars Express has revealed a quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> component (QPC) at heliocentric distances from 4 to 10 solar radii. The QPC typically appears as a broad maximum in the temporal frequency fluctuation spectrum centered at a frequency in the range 3.7 mHz<?<5.3 mHz, and can sometimes be as much as four times stronger than the background power-law spectrum at the same frequency. Occurring sporadically in about 18% of the spectra, the QPC power level can increase rapidly within about 30 minutes, only to vanish again on the same time scale. Two distinct QPCs are evident in a few selected spectra, possibly a main wave and its second harmonic. It is conjectured that MHD waves with <span class="hlt">periods</span> near 4 minutes (?~4 mHz) are continuously present in the solar wind acceleration region and can be occasionally detected in radio sounding data under conditions with a favorable <span class="hlt">observational</span> geometry. The electron density fluctuations are most probably associated with fast magnetosonic waves generated locally via nonlinear interactions of weakly damped Alfvén waves.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Efimov, A. I.; Lukanina, L. A.; Samoznaev, L. N.; Rudash, V. K.; Chashei, I. V.; Bird, M. K.; Pätzold, M.; Tellmann, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">74</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0803.2104v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimating the birth <span class="hlt">period</span> of pulsars through GLAST/LAT <span class="hlt">observations</span> of their wind nebulae</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper we show that the high energy $\\gamma$-ray flux in the GeV domain from mature pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) scales as the change in rotational kinetic energy $I(\\Omega_0^2-\\Omega^2)/2$ since birth, rather than the present day spindown power $I\\Omega\\dot{\\Omega}$. This finding holds as long as the lifetime of inverse Compton emitting electrons exceeds the age of the system. For a typical $\\gamma^{-2}$ electron spectrum, the predicted flux depends mostly on the pulsar birth <span class="hlt">period</span>, conversion efficiency of spindown power to relativistic electrons and distance to the PWN, so that first order estimates of the birth <span class="hlt">period</span> can be assessed from {\\it GLAST/LAT} <span class="hlt">observations</span> of PWN. For this purpose we derive an analytical expression. The associated (``uncooled'') photon spectral index in the GeV domain is expected to cluster around $\\sim 1.5$, which is bounded at low energies by an intrinsic spectral break, and at higher energies by a second spectral break where the photon index steepens to $\\sim 2$ due to radiation losses. Mature PWN are expected to have expanded to sizes larger than currently known PWN, resulting in relatively low magnetic energy densities and hence survival of GeV inverse Compton emitting electrons. Whereas such a PWN may be radio and X-ray quiet in synchrotron radiation, it may still be detectable as a {\\it GLAST/LAT} source as a result of the relic electrons in the PWN.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">O. C. de Jager</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-03-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">75</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhDT.......215S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observing</span> and Modeling the Optical Counterparts of Short-<span class="hlt">Period</span> Binary Millisecond Pulsars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this dissertation, I explore the subject of short-<span class="hlt">period</span> binary millisecond pulsars discovered by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and radio follow-up teams, and present <span class="hlt">observations</span> of fields containing eight recently discovered short-<span class="hlt">period</span> (Porb < 1 d) binary millisecond pulsars using the telescopes at MDM Observatory. The goal of these <span class="hlt">observations</span> was to detect the optical counterparts of the binaries and, for the best-suited counterparts detected, to <span class="hlt">observe</span> the photometric variation of the companion that happens over the course of the orbit in various filters. The hope was to then use the light curves to model the systems and obtain constraints on the mass of the neutron stars which are likely to be some of the most massive neutron stars in the galaxy. Optical counterparts to four of these systems are detected, one of which, PSR J2214+3000, is a novel detection. Additionally, I present the fully orbital phase-resolved B, V , and R light curves of the optical counterparts to two objects, PSR J1810+1744 and PSR J2215+5135, for which I employ the ELC model of Orosz & Hauschildt (2000) to measure the unknown system parameters. For PSR J1810+1744 I find that the system parameters cannot be fit even assuming that 100% of the spin-down luminosity of the pulsar is irradiating the secondary, and so radial velocity measurements of this object will be required for the complete solution. However, PSR J2215+5135 exhibits light curves that are extremely well constrained using the ELC model and we find that the mass of the neutron star is constrained by these and the radio <span class="hlt">observations</span> to be MNS > 1.75 solar masses; at the 3-sigma level. I also find a discrepancy between the model temperature and the measured colors of this object which I interpret as possible evidence for an additional high-temperature source such as a quiescent disk. Given this and the fact that PSR J2215+5135 contains a relatively high mass companion (Mc > 0.1 solar masses), I propose that similar to the binary pulsar systems PSR J1023+0038 and IGR J18245-2452, the pulsar may transition between accretion- and rotation-powered modes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schroeder, Joshua</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">76</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1513795B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multi-sensor precipitation measurements during HyMeX Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> in Northeast Italy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Northeast Italy Hydrometeorological Observatory represents one of the three HyMeX sites that participated in the first Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> (Sept-Nov 2012). Located in the center of the Alps, the site represents a strategic location for collecting hydrometeorological <span class="hlt">observations</span> on heavy rainfall events triggering flash floods and debris flows in complex terrain. The intensively monitored area (1600 km2) is located in the Upper Adige river basin (Italy), at the boundary between Italy, Austria and Switzerland. The area covers a partially glaciated surface ranging in altitude from 600 m to 4000 m asl. Within this area, a set of experimental watersheds (ranging in size from 8 to 64 km2) with dedicated instrumentation for the high frequency sampling of runoff, soil moisture, piezometric response and sediment transport are included. The instrumentation dedicated to the <span class="hlt">observation</span> of rainfall parameters involves: a dense network of raingauges located at different elevations, an X-band polarimetric mobile radar, two C-band Doppler radar covering the area at a 60-70 km range, one 2DVD and two Parsivel disdrometers. The hydrometeorological data collected in this experiment range in scale from in situ to regional radar <span class="hlt">observations</span> that can facilitate studies of hydrological processes and remote sensing of precipitation in complex terrain basins. In this study we will compare rainfall data derived from three <span class="hlt">observational</span> scales: in situ stations (1 meter, 1 min), locally deployed X-POL radar (200 meters, 1 min) and two regional radars (1km, 5-10 min). We will present a methodology to transfer radar algorithm calibration across scales considering the in situ <span class="hlt">observations</span> as ground truth, then transferring calibration to the local XPOL radar <span class="hlt">observations</span>, which will be finally used to transfer calibration to the regional C-band radar-rainfall algorithms. Regional radar-rainfall estimates will then be used to investigate hydrological processes at a range of basin scales and evaluate high-resolution satellite rainfall retrievals during two major flood events that took place during the SOP.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Borga, Marco; Kalogiros, John; Nikolopoulos, Efthymios; Anagnostou, Marios; Anagnostou, Emmanouil; Petersen, Walter; Tollardo, Mauro; Marra, Francesco; Bertoldi, Giacomo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">77</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013CSR....65...73G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Changes in ENACW <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the Bay of Biscay over the <span class="hlt">period</span> 1975-2010</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Trends in Eastern North Atlantic Central Water (ENACW) were calculated in the Bay of Biscay over the <span class="hlt">period</span> 1975-2010 using the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) package. This approach, which reanalyzes data from different sources, allows obtaining information beneath the sea surface on a fine 0.5°×0.5° grid with 40 vertical layers, providing a complete view of the different hydrographic processes in the area. ENACW, which was associated to salinity and temperature values corresponding to the density interval 27.0-27.2 kg m-3, was <span class="hlt">observed</span> to warm and salinificate in most of the area at a maximum rate of 0.11 °C per decade and 0.03 psu per decade, respectively. Trends are more intense in the middle part of the Bay and near the northeastern boundary. The origin of the changes in ENACW <span class="hlt">observed</span> inside the Bay of Biscay is not due to local effects. Actually, trends seem to be related to changes in the subpolar mode of ENACW (ENACWsp), affecting a wider North Atlantic area. The highest trends (0.3 °C per decade in temperature and 0.05 psu per decade in salinity) were <span class="hlt">observed</span> north of the bay, especially at the shallow area that stretches from Brest to Ireland, which is characterized by deep winter mixing. The dependence of changes in ENACW on the two main modes of variability over the North Atlantic (NAO and EA) was also analyzed. Trends in salinity and temperature showed to be consistent with changes <span class="hlt">observed</span> in EA. In addition, air temperature and precipitation minus evaporation (P-E) balance showed to contribute to warming and salinification of ENACW.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gómez-Gesteira, M.; deCastro, M.; Santos, F.; Álvarez, I.; Costoya, X.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">78</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3706885"> <span id="translatedtitle">Overdiagnosis in breast cancer screening: the importance of length of <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> and lead time</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Overdiagnosis in breast cancer screening is a controversial topic. One difficulty in estimation of overdiagnosis is the separation of overdiagnosis from lead time that is the advance in the time of diagnosis of cancers, which confers an artificial increase in incidence when a screening programme is introduced. Methods We postulated a female population aged 50-79 with a similar age structure and age-specific breast cancer incidence as in England and Wales before the screening programme. We then imposed a two-yearly screening programme; screening women aged 50-69, to run for twenty years, with exponentially distributed lead time with an average of 40 months in screen-detected cancers. We imposed no effect of the screening on incidence other than lead time. Results Comparison of age- and time-specific incidence between the screened and unscreened populations showed a major effect of lead time, which could only be adjusted for by follow-up for more than two decades and including ten years after the last screen. From lead time alone, twenty-year <span class="hlt">observation</span> at ages 50-69 would confer an <span class="hlt">observed</span> excess incidence of 37%. The excess would only fall below 10% with 25 years or more follow-up. For the excess to be nullified, we would require 30 year follow-up including <span class="hlt">observation</span> up to 10 years above the upper age limit for screening. Conclusion Studies using shorter <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">periods</span> will overestimate overdiagnosis by inclusion of cancers diagnosed early due to lead time among the nominally overdiagnosed tumours. PMID:23680223</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">79</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011Icar..212..167P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rotation <span class="hlt">periods</span> of binary asteroids with large separations - Confronting the Escaping Ejecta Binaries model with <span class="hlt">observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Durda et al. (Durda, D.D., Bottke, W.F., Enke, B.L., Merline, W.J., Asphaug, E., Richardson, D.C., Leinhardt, Z.M. [2004]. Icarus 170, 243-257), using numerical models, <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that binary asteroids with large separation, called Escaping Ejecta Binaries (EEBs), can be created by fragments ejected from a disruptive impact event. It is thought that six binary asteroids recently discovered might be EEBs because of the high separation between their components (?100 > a/Rp > ?20). However, the rotation <span class="hlt">periods</span> of four out of the six objects measured by our group and others and presented here show that these suspected EEBs have fast rotation rates of 2.5-4 h. Because of the small size of the components of these binary asteroids, linked with this fast spinning, we conclude that the rotational-fission mechanism, which is a result of the thermal YORP effect, is the most likely formation scenario. Moreover, scaling the YORP effect for these objects shows that its timescale is shorter than the estimated ages of the three relevant Hirayama families hosting these binary asteroids. Therefore, only the largest (D ? 19 km) suspected asteroid, (317) Roxane, could be, in fact, the only known EEB. In addition, our results confirm the triple nature of (3749) Balam by measuring mutual events on its lightcurve that match the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> of a nearby satellite in addition to its distant companion. Measurements of (1509) Esclangona at different apparitions show a unique shape of the lightcurve that might be explained by color variations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Polishook, D.; Brosch, N.; Prialnik, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">80</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GeoRL..40.5581N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Concentric waves and short-<span class="hlt">period</span> oscillations <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the ionosphere after the 2013 Moore EF5 tornado</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We detected clear concentric waves and short-<span class="hlt">period</span> oscillations in the ionosphere after an Enhanced Fujita scale (EF)5 tornado hit Moore, Oklahoma, U.S., on 20 May 2013 using dense wide-coverage ionospheric total electron content (TEC) <span class="hlt">observations</span> in North America. These concentric waves were nondispersive, with a horizontal wavelength of ~120 km and a <span class="hlt">period</span> of ~13 min. They were <span class="hlt">observed</span> for more than 7 h throughout North America. TEC oscillations with a <span class="hlt">period</span> of ~4 min were also <span class="hlt">observed</span> to the south of Moore for more than 8 h. A comparison between the TEC <span class="hlt">observations</span> and infrared cloud image from the GOES satellite indicates that the concentric waves and short-<span class="hlt">period</span> oscillations are caused by supercell-induced atmospheric gravity waves and acoustic resonances, respectively. This <span class="hlt">observational</span> result provides the first clear evidence of a severe meteorological event causing atmospheric waves propagating upward in the upper atmosphere and reaching the ionosphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nishioka, Michi; Tsugawa, Takuya; Kubota, Minoru; Ishii, Mamoru</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_4 div --> <div id="page_5" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">81</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12651469"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of evapotranspiration in a break of slope plantation susceptible to <span class="hlt">periodic</span> drought stress.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Break of slope (BOS) plantations are advocated as a means of water table control in areas where groundwater flows through colluvial deposits overlying low permeability bedrock. It is also believed that BOS plantations can supplement their water use requirements by exploiting shallow groundwater at the breaks in topographic slope. We compared measurements of BOS plantation and pasture evapotranspiration during spring, when the weather was warm and soils moist, and late summer when drought conditions prevailed. Microlysimeters and ventilated chambers were used to determine pasture and plantation floor evaporation, and heat pulse sensors were used to determine transpiration of the plantation. In spring, pasture evapotranspiration was 65% of that of the plantation, whereas, in summer, pasture evapotranspiration was equivalent to only 35% of that of the plantation. Rainfall interception by the canopy of the plantation was twice that of the pasture, reinforcing the notion that trees can help reduce groundwater recharge and alleviate dryland salinity and waterlogging. During the summer drought <span class="hlt">period</span>, daily plantation transpiration was only 20% of that measured during spring, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the plantation was not utilizing groundwater supplies but was instead drawing from soil water supplies. This hypothesis was supported by the comparison of relative abundances of the isotopes of water ((2)H and (18)O) in soil and wood samples. We conclude that the BOS plantation is not behaving in the manner predicted, and our findings raise doubts about the predicted advantages of establishing plantations in break of slope positions. PMID:12651469</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McJannet, D. L.; Vertessy, R. A.; Clifton, C. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">82</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1012.4810.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rotation <span class="hlt">Periods</span> of Binary Asteroids with Large Separations - Confronting the Escaping Ejecta Binaries Model with <span class="hlt">Observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Durda et al. (2004), using numerical models, <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that binary asteroids with large separation, called Escaping Ejecta Binaries (EEBs), can be created by fragments ejected from a disruptive impact event. It is thought that six binary asteroids recently discovered might be EEBs because of the high separation between their components (~100 > a/Rp > ~20). However, the rotation <span class="hlt">periods</span> of four out of the six objects measured by our group and others and presented here show that these suspected EEBs have fast rotation rates of 2.5 to 4 hours. Because of the small size of the components of these binary asteroids, linked with this fast spinning, we conclude that the rotational-fission mechanism, which is a result of the thermal YORP effect, is the most likely formation scenario. Moreover, scaling the YORP effect for these objects shows that its timescale is shorter than the estimated ages of the three relevant Hirayama families hosting these binary asteroids. Therefore, only the largest (D~19 km) suspected astero...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Polishook, D; Prialnik, D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">83</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3946471"> <span id="translatedtitle">Familial Alzheimer’s Disease Osaka Mutant (?E22) ?-Barrels <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> an Explanation for the Different A?1–40/42 Preferred Conformational States <span class="hlt">Observed</span> by Experiment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An unusual ?E693 mutation in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) producing a ?-amyloid (A?) peptide lacking glutamic acid at position 22 (Glu22) was recently discovered, and dabbed the Osaka mutant (?E22). Previously, several point mutations in the A? peptide involving Glu22 substitutions were identified and implicated in the early onset of familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD). Despite the absence of Glu22, the Osaka mutant is also associated with FAD, showing a recessive inheritance in families affected by the disease. To see whether this aggregation-prone A? mutant could directly relate to the A? ion channel-mediated mechanism as <span class="hlt">observed</span> for the wild type (WT) A? peptide in AD pathology, we modeled Osaka mutant ?-barrels in a lipid bilayer. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, two conformer ?E22 barrels with the U-shaped monomer conformation derived from NMR-based WT A? fibrils were simulated in explicit lipid environment. Here, we show that the ?E22 barrels obtain the lipid-relaxed ?-sheet channel topology, indistinguishable from the WT A?1–42 barrels, as do the outer and pore dimensions of octadecameric (18-mer) ?E22 barrels. Although the ?E22 barrels lose the cationic binding site in the pore which is normally provided by the negatively charged Glu22 side-chains, the mutant pores gain a new cationic binding site by Glu11 at the lower bilayer leaflet, and exhibit ion fluctuations similar to the WT barrels. Of particular interest, this deletion mutant <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that toxic WT A?1–42 would preferentially adopt a less C-terminal turn similar to that <span class="hlt">observed</span> for A?17–42, and explains why the solid state NMR data for A?1–40 point to a more C-terminal turn conformation. The <span class="hlt">observed</span> ?E22 barrels conformational preferences also <span class="hlt">suggest</span> an explanation for the lower neurotoxicity in rat primary neurons as compared to WT A?1–42. PMID:24000923</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jang, Hyunbum; Arce, Fernando Teran; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Kagan, Bruce L.; Lal, Ratnesh; Nussinov, Ruth</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">84</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JASTP.105....1E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Short <span class="hlt">period</span> gravity wave momentum fluxes <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the tropical troposphere, stratosphere and mesosphere</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using long-term data (1998-2008) collected from mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar and Rayleigh Lidar located at a tropical station, Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E), India, vertical flux of the momentum from troposphere to mesosphere associated with the gravity waves of <span class="hlt">periods</span> in the range 20 min to 2 h is investigated for the first time. The emphasis is on seasonal variability of mean zonal and meridional momentum fluxes in mesosphere and troposphere and vertical flux of horizontal momentum in the stratosphere. At tropospheric altitudes of 11-16 km large enhancement in flux is noticed during equinoxes. In the lower mesosphere in the altitude region 58-62 km the maximum values of flux (?2.8 m2/s2) <span class="hlt">observed</span> are pragmatic in winter and spring. Interestingly, the vertical flux of horizontal momentum estimated from lidar is in the range of those estimated from radar data in the overlap altitude region, though the estimates are from two different techniques. In the mesosphere, large variations with altitude in zonal momentum flux are noticed with a magnitude ?0-4 m2/s2 in summer. In winter and summer the zonal wind direction is opposite to the momentum flux direction between 73 and 80 km and in equinoxes zonal wind follows the momentum flux. The meridional fluxes in the mesosphere are higher in equinoxes (?10-12 m2/s2).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eswaraiah, S.; Ratnam, M. Venkat; Murthy, B. V. Krishna; Guharay, A.; Rao, S. Vijaya Bhaskara</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">85</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EP%26S...64..459F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Polar cap ionosphere and thermosphere during the solar minimum <span class="hlt">period</span>: EISCAT Svalbard radar <span class="hlt">observations</span> and GCM simulations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The IPY long-run data were obtained from the European Incoherent Scatter Svalbard radar (ESR) <span class="hlt">observations</span> during March 2007 and February 2008. Since the solar and geomagnetic activities were quite low during the <span class="hlt">period</span>, this data set is extremely helpful for describing the basic states (ground states) of the thermosphere and ionosphere in the polar cap region. The monthly-averaged ion temperatures for 12 months show similar local time (or UT) variations to each other. The ion temperatures also show significant seasonal variations. The amplitudes of the local time and seasonal variations <span class="hlt">observed</span> are much larger than the ones predicted by the IRI-2007 model. In addition, we performed numerical simulations with a general circulation model (GCM), which covers all the atmospheric regions, to investigate variations of the neutrals in the polar thermosphere. The GCM simulations show significant variations of the neutral temperature in the polar region in comparison with the NRLMSISE-00 empirical model. These results indicate that both the ions and neutrals would show larger variations than those described by the empirical models, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> significant heat sources in the polar cap region even under solar minimum and geomagnetically quiet conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fujiwara, H.; Nozawa, S.; Maeda, S.; Ogawa, Y.; Miyoshi, Y.; Jin, H.; Shinagawa, H.; Terada, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">86</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040088493&hterms=fat+wang&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dfat%2Bwang"> <span id="translatedtitle">Entrainment in solution of an oscillating NADH oxidase activity from the bovine milk fat globule membrane with a temperature-compensated <span class="hlt">period</span> length <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of an ultradian time-keeping (clock) function</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Entrainment in solution of an oscillating activity with a temperature compensated <span class="hlt">period</span> of 24 min is described for a NADH oxidase (NOX) activity of the bovine milk fat globule membrane, a derivative of the mammary epithelial cell plasma membrane. The <span class="hlt">period</span> of 24 min remained unchanged at 17 degrees C, 27 degrees C and 37 degrees C whereas the amplitude approximately doubled with each 10 degree C rise in temperature (Q(10)congruent with 2). The <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> was <span class="hlt">observed</span> with both intact milk fat globule membranes and with detergent-solubilized membranes, demonstrating that the oscillations did not require an association with membranes. The <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> was not the result of instrument variation or of chemical interactions among reactants in solution. Preparations with different <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> entrained (autosynchronized) when mixed. Upon mixing, the preparations exhibited two oscillatory patterns but eventually a single pattern representing the mean of the farthest separated maxima of the two preparations analyzed separately emerged. The cell surface NOX protein is the first reported example of an entrainable biochemical entity with a temperature-compensated <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> potentially capable of functioning as an ultradian or circadian clock driver.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morre, D. James; Lawler, Juliana; Wang, Sui; Keenan, Thomas W.; Morre, Dorothy M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">87</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JAVSO..41....1P"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Period</span> Analysis of AAVSO Visual <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of 55 Semiregular (SR/SRa/SRb) Variable Stars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have used AAVSO visual data, and Fourier analysis and self-correlation analysis, to study the <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of 55 semiregular (SR) variables - 21 SRa and 34 SRb. According to the standard system of variable star classification, these are pulsating red giants, with visual amplitudes less than 2.5 magnitudes, which show noticeable <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> (SRa) or less-obvious <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> (SRb). We find that their behavior ranges from highly <span class="hlt">periodic</span> to irregular; some are not significantly variable. We have used a simple index, based on self-correlation analysis, to show that, on average, the SRa variables have a larger component of <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> than the SRb variables, as expected. The distributions of this index for the two groups, however, overlap considerably. Of our 55 stars, 11 definitely or possibly show two radial <span class="hlt">periods</span>, and at least 16 definitely or possibly show a long secondary <span class="hlt">period</span>. We also analyzed three non-SR stars: T Cet is a double-mode SRc star; T Cen is an RVa star which should be reclassified as RVb; V930 Cyg is an irregular (Lb) star with a strong 250-day <span class="hlt">period</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Percy, J. R.; Tan, P. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">88</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54255752"> <span id="translatedtitle">FASTSAT-HSV01 synergistic <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the magnetospheric response during active <span class="hlt">periods</span>: MINI-ME, PISA and TTI</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Understanding the complex processes within the inner magnetosphere of Earth particularly during storm <span class="hlt">periods</span> requires coordinated <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the particle and field environment using both in-situ and remote sensing techniques. In fact in order to gain a better understand-ing of our Heliophysics and potentially improve our space weather forecasting capabilities, new <span class="hlt">observation</span> mission approaches and new instrument technologies which can</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Joseph Casas; Michael Collier; Douglas Rowland; John Sigwarth; Mark Boudreaux</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">89</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19256359"> <span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Observational</span> study of black carbon aerosol during straw-burning <span class="hlt">period</span>].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Black carbon aerosol (BC) has been measured at three sites in Hefei City during May and June, 2007. Analyzing these real-time BC data, the concentration characters and the sources of black carbon aerosol can be found. The average concentrations of BC in normal <span class="hlt">period</span> and straw-burning <span class="hlt">period</span> are 4.85 microg/m3 and 8.38 microg/m3, respectively. The significant difference shows that the straw-burning is one of the main sources. The correlation coefficients between daily average concentration of BC and PM10 is 0.74, while the values of BC/PM10 in normal <span class="hlt">period</span> and straw-burning <span class="hlt">period</span> are 4.7% and 7.9%, respectively. Through comparing to the BC concentration during straw-burning <span class="hlt">period</span> in 2004, the results indicated that pollution of BC has reduced after straw-burning was forbidden by the government. PMID:19256359</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wu, De-xia; Wei, Qing-nong; Wei, Jian-li; Liu, Shi-sheng; Feng, Wei-wei</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">90</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JGRD..113.0C17H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Overview of the Dust and Biomass-burning Experiment and African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis Special <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span>-0</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) is a major international campaign investigating far-reaching aspects of the African monsoon, climate and the hydrological cycle. A special <span class="hlt">observing</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> was established for the dry season (SOP0) with a focus on aerosol and radiation measurements. SOP0 took place during January and February 2006 and involved several ground-based measurement sites across west Africa. These were augmented by aircraft measurements made by the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) aircraft during the Dust and Biomass-burning Experiment (DABEX), measurements from an ultralight aircraft, and dedicated modeling efforts. We provide an overview of these measurement and modeling studies together with an analysis of the meteorological conditions that determined the aerosol transport and link the results together to provide a balanced synthesis. The biomass burning aerosol was significantly more absorbing than that measured in other areas and, unlike industrial areas, the ratio of excess carbon monoxide to organic carbon was invariant, which may be owing to interaction between the organic carbon and mineral dust aerosol. The mineral dust aerosol in situ filter measurements close to Niamey reveals very little absorption, while other measurements and remote sensing inversions <span class="hlt">suggest</span> significantly more absorption. The influence of both mineral dust and biomass burning aerosol on the radiation budget is significant throughout the <span class="hlt">period</span>, implying that meteorological models should include their radiative effects for accurate weather forecasts and climate simulations. Generally, the operational meteorological models that simulate the production and transport of mineral dust show skill at lead times of 5 days or more. Climate models that need to accurately simulate the vertical profiles of both anthropogenic and natural aerosols to accurately represent the direct and indirect effects of aerosols appear to do a reasonable job, although the magnitude of the aerosol scattering is strongly dependent upon the emission data set.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Haywood, J. M.; Pelon, J.; Formenti, P.; Bharmal, N.; Brooks, M.; Capes, G.; Chazette, P.; Chou, C.; Christopher, S.; Coe, H.; Cuesta, J.; Derimian, Y.; Desboeufs, K.; Greed, G.; Harrison, M.; Heese, B.; Highwood, E. J.; Johnson, B.; Mallet, M.; Marticorena, B.; Marsham, J.; Milton, S.; Myhre, G.; Osborne, S. R.; Parker, D. J.; Rajot, J.-L.; Schulz, M.; Slingo, A.; Tanré, D.; Tulet, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">91</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014A%26A...569A..12N"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observation</span> of a high-quality quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> rapidly propagating wave train using SDO/AIA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Context. We present a new event of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> wave trains <span class="hlt">observed</span> in EUV wavebands that rapidly propagate away from an active region after a flare. Aims: We measured the parameters of a wave train <span class="hlt">observed</span> on 7 December 2013 after an M1.2 flare, such as the phase speeds, <span class="hlt">periods</span> and wavelengths, in relationship to the local coronal environment and the energy sources. Methods: We compared our <span class="hlt">observations</span> with a numerical simulation of fast magnetoacoustic waves that undergo dispersive evolution and leakage in a coronal loop embedded in a potential magnetic field. Results: The wave train is <span class="hlt">observed</span> to propagate as several arc-shaped intensity disturbances for almost half an hour, with a speed greater than 1000 km s-1 and a <span class="hlt">period</span> of about 1 min. The wave train followed two different patterns of propagation, in accordance with the magnetic structure of the active region. The oscillatory signal is found to be of high-quality, i.e. there is a large number (10 or more) of subsequent wave fronts <span class="hlt">observed</span>. The <span class="hlt">observations</span> are found to be consistent with the numerical simulation of a fast wave train generated by a localised impulsive energy release. Conclusions: Transverse structuring in the corona can efficiently create and guide high-quality quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> propagating fast wave trains. The movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nisticò, G.; Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">92</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFMNG23B1086T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Non-linear dynamics of singular long-<span class="hlt">period</span> long-lasting volcanic earthquakes <span class="hlt">observed</span> at Mt. Asama</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On September 1, 2004, a middle-scale eruption occurred at Mt. Asama. Before the eruption, we had <span class="hlt">observed</span> several kinds of singular events since October 2003. These singular events are classified into three types depending on these waveforms. The first type event (Type-1 event) has an impulsive ground velocity with a dominant <span class="hlt">period</span> up to 10 sec and outgoing initial motion from the vent. The second type event (Type-2 event) is a long-<span class="hlt">period</span> and long-lasting earthquake followed by two large high frequency earthquakes. The third type event (Type-3 event) is a tremor whose tip of the waveform is sharp, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a non-linear dynamics of the source process. Takeo (2007) revealed the non-linear dynamics of Type-3 event using an embedding method of time delays and surrogate data analysis, and made clear that there existed a deterministic non-linear dynamics in the tremor excitation, which could be modeled with the system dimension between 3 to 7. In this paper, we apply the embedding method of time delays to Type-2 events and estimate geometrical and dynamical non-linear parameters of them to constrain the dynamics in the excitation. Embedding by the method of time delays has become the standard procedure in non-linear dynamical system analysis of a single time series. The first step for the nonlinear analysis of a single time series is to reconstruct a topologically equivalent attractor to the original in a relatively low-dimensional delay-coordinate space. The key questions are how the minimum embedding dimension can be determined for reconstructing the original dynamics, and how we select the delay time. We employed some reliable and robust techniques in the estimation of optimum delay time and minimum embedding dimension. Concretely speaking, we used higher-order correlations to select an optimum delay time (Albano et al., 1991). A practical method for determining minimum embedding dimension proposed by Cao (1997) was used in this paper. The waveforms of Type-2 events were similar to each other, so we selected a typical Type-2 event that occurred at 12:34 on June 12, 2004. We employed a FIR low-pass filter with a cut-off frequency of 1 Hz to omit high frequency component. The optimum time lag of 0.24 sec and the minimum embedding dimension of 7 were obtained by employing these methods. We succeed in reconstructing the attractor of the tremor using these dimension and time lag. Next, we calculated a correlation integral curve of the reconstructed attractor, founding a scaling region over one decade with the correlation dimension of 2.27 plus minus 0.27. The correlation dimension converged a certain value as increasing the embedding dimension, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the time series was not random data and the correlation dimension was estimated correctly. These results indicated that the source process of Type-2 event could be modeled on a non-linear dynamics with a system dimension between 3 to 6, which is similar dimension range with the source process of Type-3 events. Modifying a hydraulic control valve model, we simulated a long-<span class="hlt">period</span> oscillation resembling with the long-<span class="hlt">period</span> component of Type-2 event.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Takeo, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">93</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760020565&hterms=Periodic+table&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3D%2528Periodic%2Btable%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantization and symmetry in <span class="hlt">periodic</span> coverage patterns with applications to earth <span class="hlt">observation</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Analytical approaches based on an idealized physical model and concepts from number theory show that in <span class="hlt">periodic</span> coverage patterns, uniquely defined by their revolution numbers R (orbital) and N (rotational), the subnodal points are earth-fixed, and they divide the equator into R equal segments of length s. The ascending subsatellite trace crosses each point once (only) each <span class="hlt">period</span>. The descending subnodal points coincide with the ascending points if the integers N and R have like parity, and bisect the intervals between them if opposite. The interval between consecutive unidirectional crossings is Ns. Symmetries extend the equatorial results to all parallels of latitude. Complete <span class="hlt">periodic</span> patterns of traces exhibit an overall symmetry, with trace intersections confined to discrete coordinate values which are quantized in longitude (basic s-unit) and symmetric in latitude.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">King, J. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">94</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60748440"> <span id="translatedtitle">Daytime Raman lidar measurements of water vapor during the ARM 1997 water vapor intensive <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Because of the importance of water vapor, the ARM program initiated a series of three intensive operating <span class="hlt">periods</span> (IOPs) at its CART (Cloud And Radiation Testbed) site. The goal of these IOPs is to improve and validate the state-of-the-art capabilities in measuring water vapor. To date, two of the planned three IOPs have occurred: the first was in September of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. D. Turner; J. E. M. Goldsmith</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">95</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50120547"> <span id="translatedtitle">Water vapor measurements by Raman lidar during the ARM 1997 Water Vapor Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program initiated a series of three intensive operating <span class="hlt">periods</span> (IOPs) at its Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in northern Oklahoma. The goal of these IOPs is to improve and validate the state-of-the-art capabilities in measuring water vapor. To date, two of the planned three IOPs have occurred: the first was in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. D. Turner; D. N. Whiteman; K. D. Evans; S. H. Melfi; J. E. M. Goldsmith; G. K. Schwemmer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">96</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3417418"> <span id="translatedtitle">Small molecule chemokine mimetics <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a molecular basis for the <span class="hlt">observation</span> that CXCL10 and CXCL11 are allosteric ligands of CXCR3</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The chemokine receptor CXCR3 directs migration of T-cells in response to the ligands CXCL9/Mig, CXCL10/IP-10 and CXCL11/I-TAC. Both ligands and receptors are implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders, including atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we describe the molecular mechanism by which two synthetic small molecule agonists activate CXCR3. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH As both small molecules are basic, we hypothesized that they formed electrostatic interactions with acidic residues within CXCR3. Nine point mutants of CXCR3 were generated in which an acidic residue was mutated to its amide counterpart. Following transient expression, the ability of the constructs to bind and signal in response to natural and synthetic ligands was examined. KEY RESULTS The CXCR3 mutants D112N, D195N and E196Q were efficiently expressed and responsive in chemotaxis assays to CXCL11 but not to CXCL10 or to either of the synthetic agonists, confirmed with radioligand binding assays. Molecular modelling of both CXCL10 and CXCR3 <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the small molecule agonists mimic a region of the ‘30s loop’ (residues 30–40 of CXCL10) which interacts with the intrahelical CXCR3 residue D112, leading to receptor activation. D195 and E196 are located in the second extracellular loop and form putative intramolecular salt bridges required for a CXCR3 conformation that recognizes CXCL10. In contrast, CXCL11 recognition by CXCR3 is largely independent of these residues. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS We provide here a molecular basis for the <span class="hlt">observation</span> that CXCL10 and CXCL11 are allosteric ligands of CXCR3. Such findings may have implications for the design of CXCR3 antagonists. LINKED ARTICLE This article is commented on by O'Boyle, pp. 895–897 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01759.x PMID:21895630</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nedjai, Belinda; Li, Hubert; Stroke, Ilana L; Wise, Emma L; Webb, Maria L; Merritt, J Robert; Henderson, Ian; Klon, Anthony E; Cole, Andrew G; Horuk, Richard; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Pease, James E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">97</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930009964&hterms=Periodic+table&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3D%2528Periodic%2Btable%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">IUE <span class="hlt">observations</span> of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> comets Tempel-2, Kopff, and Tempel-1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We summarize the results of <span class="hlt">observations</span> made between 10 Jun. - 18 Dec. 1988 with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUS) of comet P/Tempel-2 during its 1988 appearance. The derived water production rate and relative gas/dust ratio are compared with those of P/Halley, <span class="hlt">observed</span> with IUE in 1985-86, and other potential Comet Rendezvous/Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) target comets, P/Kopff and P/Tempel-1, both <span class="hlt">observed</span> with IUE in 1983.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Feldman, Paul D.; Festou, Michel C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">98</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4903431"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observation</span> of <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Fine Structure in Reflectance from Biological Tissue: A New Technique for Measuring Nuclear Size Distribution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report <span class="hlt">observation</span> of a fine structure component in backscattered light from mucosal tissue which is <span class="hlt">periodic</span> in wavelength. This structure is ordinarily masked by a diffusive background. We have identified the origin of this component as being due to light which is Mie scattered by surface epithelial cell nuclei. By analyzing the amplitude and frequency of the fine structure,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. T. Perelman; V. Backman; M. Wallace; G. Zonios; R. Manoharan; A. Nusrat; S. Shields; M. Seiler; C. Lima; T. Hamano; I. Itzkan; J. Van Dam; J. M. Crawford; M. S. Feld</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">99</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22036925"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">OBSERVATIONAL</span> STUDY OF THE QUASI-<span class="hlt">PERIODIC</span> FAST-PROPAGATING MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND THE ASSOCIATED FLARE ON 2011 MAY 30</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On 2011 May 30, quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> fast-propagating (QFP) magnetosonic waves accompanied by a C2.8 flare were directly imaged by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The QFP waves successively emanated from the flare kernel, they propagated along a cluster of open coronal loops with a phase speed of {approx}834 km s{sup -1} during the flare's rising phase, and the multiple arc-shaped wave trains can be fitted with a series of concentric circles. We generate the k - {omega} diagram of the Fourier power and find a straight ridge that represents the dispersion relation of the waves. Along the ridge, we find a lot of prominent nodes which represent the available frequencies of the QFP waves. On the other hand, the frequencies of the flare are also obtained by analyzing the flare light curves using the wavelet technique. The results indicate that almost all the main frequencies of the flare are consistent with those of the QFP waves. This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the flare and the QFP waves were possibly excited by a common physical origin. On the other hand, a few low frequencies (e.g., 2.5 mHz (400 s) and 0.7 mHz (1428 s)) revealed by the k - {omega} diagram cannot be found in the accompanying flare. We propose that these low frequencies were possibly due to the leakage of the pressure-driven p-mode oscillations from the photosphere into the low corona, which should be a noticeable mechanism for driving the QFP waves <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the corona.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu, E-mail: ydshen@ynao.ac.cn [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming 650011 (China)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">100</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23367911"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spatial log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations of first-passage <span class="hlt">observables</span> in fractals.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For transport processes in geometrically restricted domains, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) admits a general scaling dependence on space parameters for diffusion, anomalous diffusion, and diffusion in disordered or fractal media. For transport in self-similar fractal structures, we obtain an expression for the source-target distance dependence of the MFPT that exhibits both the leading power-law behavior, depending on the Hausdorff and spectral dimension of the fractal, as well as small log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations that are a clear and definitive signal of the underlying fractal structure. We also present refined numerical results for the Sierpinski gasket that confirm this oscillatory behavior. PMID:23367911</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Akkermans, Eric; Benichou, Olivier; Dunne, Gerald V; Teplyaev, Alexander; Voituriez, Raphael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_5 div --> <div id="page_6" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">101</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.classzone.com/books/earth_science/terc/content/visualizations/es3006/es3006page01.cfm?chapter_no=visualization"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observe</span> an animation of an asteroid impact at the end of the Cretaceous <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This Earth science animation shows middle and high school students how an asteroid that struck the Earth at the end of the Cretaceous <span class="hlt">period</span> may have caused a mass extinction that killed the dinosaurs. The introduction explains the basis of the asteroid theory of extinction. The animation depicts an artist's conception, presented from space, of an asteroid hitting the Gulf of Mexico and releasing a cloud that prevented sunlight from reaching the Earth. Movie controls allow students to repeat, pause, or step through the animation, which can give students more time to analyze the images. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Education, Terc. C.; Littell, Mcdougal</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">102</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1006.0688v1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observation</span> of Log-<span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Oscillations in the Quantum Dynamics of Electrons on the One-Dimensional Fibonacci Quasicrystal</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We revisit the question of quantum dynamics of electrons on the off-diagonal Fibonacci tight-binding model. We find that typical dynamical quantities, such as the probability of an electron to remain in its original position as a function of time, display log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations on top of the leading-order power-law decay. These <span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations with the logarithm of time are similar to the oscillations that are known to exist with the logarithm of temperature in the specific heat of Fibonacci electrons, yet they offer new possibilities for the experimental <span class="hlt">observation</span> of this unique phenomenon.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ron Lifshitz; Shahar Even-Dar Mandel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-06-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">103</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870032207&hterms=szkody&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dszkody"> <span id="translatedtitle">X-ray and optical <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the ultrashort <span class="hlt">period</span> dwarf nova SW Ursae Majoris - A likely new DQ Herculis star</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Time-resolved X-ray and optical photometric and optical spectroscopic <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the ultrashort <span class="hlt">period</span> cataclysmic variable SW UMa are reported. The spectroscopic <span class="hlt">observations</span> reveal the presence of an s-wave component which is almost in phase with the extreme line wings and presumably the white dwarf. This very unusual phasing in conjunction with the available optical and X-ray data seems to indicate that a region of enhanced emission exists on the opposite side of the disk from the expected location of the hot spot. The photometric <span class="hlt">observations</span> reveal the presence of a hump in the light curve occurring at an orbital phase which is consistent with the phase at which the region of enhanced line emission is most favorably seen. Changes in the hump amplitude are seen from night to night, and a 15.9 min <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> is evident in the light curve. The optical and X-ray <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that SW UMa is a member of the DQ Her class of cataclysmic variables.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shafter, A. W.; Szkody, P.; Thorstensen, J. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">104</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006GeoRL..3313804P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Satellite and surface <span class="hlt">observations</span> of Nauru Island clouds: Differences between El Nino and La Nina <span class="hlt">periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Island cloud trails represent only a small fraction of ocean boundary layer clouds. However, they can be an important key to understanding how marine boundary layer clouds respond to perturbation. During the La Niña <span class="hlt">period</span> of 1999-2001 the island cloud of Nauru demonstrated daytime persistence over 100 kilometers. Our results show that boundary layer clouds over the eastern margin of the warm pool are affected by regional subsidence and lack of CCN (Cloud Condensation Nuclei) during this active warm pool convection phase of the ENSO (El Nino Southern Oscillation). The increased persistence of boundary layer clouds during the day, as reflected by the island cloud trails, combined with the dissipation of boundary layer clouds at night contribute to cooling the ocean surface. During La Nina, boundary layer cloudiness around Nauru decreased by a factor of 1.9 and SSTs decreased by about 3°C.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Porch, William M.; Olsen, Seth C.; Chylek, Petr; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Henderson, Bradley G.; Clodius, William</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">105</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/671914"> <span id="translatedtitle">Daytime Raman lidar measurements of water vapor during the ARM 1997 water vapor intensive <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Because of the importance of water vapor, the ARM program initiated a series of three intensive operating <span class="hlt">periods</span> (IOPs) at its CART (Cloud And Radiation Testbed) site. The goal of these IOPs is to improve and validate the state-of-the-art capabilities in measuring water vapor. To date, two of the planned three IOPs have occurred: the first was in September of 1996, with an emphasis on the lowest kilometer, while the second was conducted from September--October 1997 with a focus on both the upper troposphere and lowest kilometer. These IOPs provided an excellent opportunity to compare measurements from other systems with those made by the CART Raman lidar. This paper addresses primarily the daytime water vapor measurements made by the lidar system during the second of these IOPs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Turner, D.D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Goldsmith, J.E.M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">106</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009A%26A...504..959K"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observational</span> studies of Cepheid amplitudes. I. <span class="hlt">Period</span>-amplitude relationships for Galactic Cepheids and interrelation of amplitudes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Context: The dependence of amplitude on the pulsation <span class="hlt">period</span> differs from other Cepheid-related relationships. Aims: We attempt to revise the <span class="hlt">period</span>-amplitude (P-A) relationship of Galactic Cepheids based on multi-colour photometric and radial velocity data. Reliable P-A graphs for Galactic Cepheids constructed for the U, B, V, R_C, and IC photometric bands and pulsational radial velocity variations facilitate investigations of previously poorly studied interrelations between <span class="hlt">observable</span> amplitudes. The effects of both binarity and metallicity on the <span class="hlt">observed</span> amplitude, and the dichotomy between short- and long-<span class="hlt">period</span> Cepheids can both be studied. Methods: A homogeneous data set was created that contains basic physical and phenomenological properties of 369 Galactic Cepheids. Pulsation <span class="hlt">periods</span> were revised and amplitudes were determined by the Fourier method. P-A graphs were constructed and an upper envelope to the data points was determined in each graph. Correlations between various amplitudes and amplitude-related parameters were searched for, using Cepheids without known companions. Results: Large amplitude Cepheids with companions exhibit smaller photometric amplitudes on average than solitary ones, as expected, while s-Cepheids pulsate with an arbitrary (although small) amplitude. The ratio of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> radial velocity to blue photometric amplitudes, AV_RAD/A_B, is not as good an indicator of the pulsation mode as predicted theoretically. This may be caused by an incorrect mode assignment to a number of small amplitude Cepheids, which are not necessarily first overtone pulsators. The dependence of the pulsation amplitudes on wavelength is used to identify duplicity of Cepheids. More than twenty stars previously classified as solitary Cepheids are now suspected to have a companion. The ratio of photometric amplitudes <span class="hlt">observed</span> in various bands confirms the existence of a dichotomy among normal amplitude Cepheids. The limiting <span class="hlt">period</span> separating short- and long-<span class="hlt">period</span> Cepheids is 10.47 days. Conclusions: Interdependences of pulsational amplitudes, the <span class="hlt">period</span> dependence of the amplitude parameters, and the dichotomy have to be taken into account as constraints in modelling the structure and pulsation of Cepheids. Studies of the P-L relationship must comply with the break at 10.47° instead of the currently used “convenient” value of 10 days. Table 1 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/504/959</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Klagyivik, P.; Szabados, L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">107</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUSMSM41A..04L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Plasma Wave <span class="hlt">Observations</span> in the Cleft during a <span class="hlt">Period</span> of Upflowing Ions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On Jan 18th , 2008 at 0730 UT a high altitude sounding rocket, SCIFER-2 (Sounding of the Cleft Ion Fountain Energization Region-2), was launched into dayside cusp aurora from Andoya Rocket Range and closely over flew the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR) and the Kjell Henrikson Observatory with an apogee of 1467 km. During flight ESR recorded upwelling ions with a flux of ~20*1012 m-2s-1 and velocity of ~400 m/s at 400 km altitude. Initial results from a 6m VLF wave receiver are presented. Strong wave signatures are <span class="hlt">observed</span> between 3 kHz and 5 kHz with amplitudes of up to 40 mV/m peak to peak. These waves are roughly ordered by the hydrogen gyrofrequency indicating possible Bernstein mode waves over an altitude range from 1000 km to above 1400 km. Associated with these waves are measured ion populations between 50 and 100eV. At lower frequencies possible broadband ELF waves are <span class="hlt">observed</span> above 1200 km at amplitudes of up to 20mV/m peak to peak. Additionally, banded waves are <span class="hlt">observed</span> between 300 Hz and 600 Hz throughout the entire flight, from 300 Km to over 1400 km, with an amplitude of 5-20 mV/m peak to peak.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lundberg, E. T.; Kintner, P. M.; Lynch, K.; Mella, M. R.; Sigernes, F.; Oksavik, K.; Ogawa, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">108</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...790..150S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Imaging <span class="hlt">Observation</span> of Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> Disturbances' Amplitudes Increasing with Height in the Polar Region of the Solar Corona</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">At present, there have been few extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging <span class="hlt">observations</span> of spatial variations of the density perturbations due to the slow magnetoacoustic waves (SMWs) propagating along the solar coronal magnetic fields. In this paper, we present such <span class="hlt">observations</span> taken from the polar region of the corona with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and investigate the amplitude of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> propagating disturbances that increase with height in the lower corona (0-9 Mm over the solar limb). We statistically determined the following parameters associated with the disturbances: pressure scale height, <span class="hlt">period</span>, and wavelength in AIA 171 Å, 193 Å, and 211 Å channels. The scale height and wavelength are dependent of temperature, while the <span class="hlt">period</span> is independent of temperature. The acoustic velocities inferred from the scale height highly correlate with the ratios of wavelength to <span class="hlt">period</span>, i.e., phase speeds. They provide evidence that the propagating disturbances in the lower corona are likely SMWs and the spatial variations in EUV intensity in the polar region likely reflects the density compressional effect by the propagating SMWs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Su, J. T.; Liu, Y.; Shen, Y. D.; Priya, T. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">109</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AJ....149...66N"> <span id="translatedtitle">VI-Band Follow-Up <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of Ultra-Long-<span class="hlt">Period</span> Cepheid Candidates in M31</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The ultra-long-<span class="hlt">period</span> Cepheids (ULPCs) are classical Cepheids with pulsation <span class="hlt">periods</span> exceeding ? 80 days. The intrinsic brightness of ULPCs are ? 1 to ? 3 mag brighter than their shorter <span class="hlt">period</span> counterparts. This makes them attractive in future distance scale work to derive distances beyond the limit set by the shorter <span class="hlt">period</span> Cepheids. We have initiated a program to search for ULPCs in M31, using the single-band data taken from the Palomar Transient Factory, and identified eight possible candidates. In this work, we presented the VI-band follow-up <span class="hlt">observations</span> of these eight candidates. Based on our VI-band light curves of these candidates and their locations in the color–magnitude diagram and the <span class="hlt">Period</span>–Wesenheit diagram, we verify two candidates as being truly ULPCs. The six other candidates are most likely other kinds of long-<span class="hlt">period</span> variables. With the two confirmed M31 ULPCs, we tested the applicability of ULPCs in distance scale work by deriving the distance modulus of M31. It was found to be {{? }M31,ULPC}=24.30+/- 0.76 mag. The large error in the derived distance modulus, together with the large intrinsic dispersion of the <span class="hlt">Period</span>–Wesenheit (PW) relation and the small number of ULPCs in a given host galaxy, means that the question of the suitability of ULPCs as standard candles is still open. Further work is needed to enlarge the sample of calibrating ULPCs and reduce the intrinsic dispersion of the PW relation before re-considering ULPCs as suitable distance indicators.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Yang, Michael Ting-Chang, Michael; Lin, Chi-Sheng; Hsiao, Hsiang-Yao; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Lin, I.-Ling; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Ip, Wing-Huen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">110</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21560441"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">OBSERVING</span> EVOLUTION IN THE SUPERGRANULAR NETWORK LENGTH SCALE DURING <span class="hlt">PERIODS</span> OF LOW SOLAR ACTIVITY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the initial results of an <span class="hlt">observational</span> study into the variation of the dominant length scale of quiet solar emission: supergranulation. The distribution of magnetic elements in the lanes that from the network affects, and reflects, the radiative energy in the plasma of the upper solar chromosphere and transition region at the magnetic network boundaries forming as a result of the relentless interaction of magnetic fields and convective motions of the Suns' interior. We demonstrate that a net difference of {approx}0.5 Mm in the supergranular emission length scale occurs when comparing <span class="hlt">observation</span> cycle 22/23 and cycle 23/24 minima. This variation in scale is reproduced in the data sets of multiple space- and ground-based instruments and using different diagnostic measures. By means of extension, we consider the variation of the supergranular length scale over multiple solar minima by analyzing a subset of the Mount Wilson Solar Observatory Ca II K image record. The <span class="hlt">observations</span> and analysis presented provide a tantalizing look at solar activity in the absence of large-scale flux emergence, offering insight into times of 'extreme' solar minimum and general behavior such as the phasing and cross-dependence of different components of the spectral irradiance. Given that the modulation of the supergranular scale imprints itself in variations of the Suns' spectral irradiance, as well as in the mass and energy transport into the entire outer atmosphere, this preliminary investigation is an important step in understanding the impact of the quiet Sun on the heliospheric system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McIntosh, Scott W.; Rast, Mark P. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Leamon, Robert J. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Hock, Rachel A. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Ulrich, Roger K. [Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-03-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">111</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990ASPC...11...22C"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observational</span> tests for stellar evolution and pulsation theory - The Sandage <span class="hlt">period</span>-shift effect</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">By demanding a full agreement among some key <span class="hlt">observables</span> of RR Lyrae stars in globular clusters, a rather constant value is derived for parameter A, at variance with the correlation A-(Fe/H) found by Sandage. Alternatively were the Sandage effect actually present, some significant changes are needed in the currently used theoretical instability strip. In this latter case, the comparison with theoretical RGB and HB star evolution leads to exclude the anticorrelation of Y with (Fe/H), in favor of the requirement for an anticorrelation of DeltaMc (the enhancement of He-core mass with respect to the canonical one) and metallicity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Caputo, Filippina</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">112</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1030530"> <span id="translatedtitle">Suzaku And Multi-Wavelength <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of OJ 287 During the <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Optical Outburst in 2007</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Suzaku <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the blazar OJ 287 were performed in 2007 April 10-13 and November 7-9. They correspond to a quiescent and a flaring state, respectively. The X-ray spectra of the source can be well described with single power-law models in both exposures. The derived X-ray photon index and the flux density at 1 keV were found to be {Lambda} = 1.65 {+-} 0.02 and S{sub 1keV} = 215 {+-} 5 nJy, in the quiescent state. In the flaring state, the source exhibited a harder X-ray spectrum ({Lambda} = 1.50 {+-} 0.01) with a nearly doubled X-ray flux density S{sub 1keV} = 404{sub -5}{sup +6} nJy. Moreover, significant hard X-ray signals were detected up to {approx} 27 keV. In cooperation with the Suzaku, simultaneous radio, optical, and very-high-energy {gamma}-ray <span class="hlt">observations</span> of OJ 287 were performed with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array, the KANATA telescope, and the MAGIC telescope, respectively. The radio and optical fluxes in the flaring state (3.04 {+-} 0.46 Jy and 8.93 {+-} 0.05 mJy at 86.75 Hz and in the V-band, respectively) were found to be higher by a factor of 2-3 than those in the quiescent state (1.73 {+-} 0.26 Jy and 3.03 {+-} 0.01 mJy at 86.75 Hz and in the V-band, respectively). No notable {gamma}-ray events were detected in either <span class="hlt">observation</span>. The spectral energy distribution of OJ 287 indicated that the X-ray spectrum was dominated by inverse Compton radiation in both <span class="hlt">observations</span>, while synchrotron radiation exhibited a spectral cutoff around the optical frequency. Furthermore, no significant difference in the synchrotron cutoff frequency was found between the quiescent and flaring states. According to a simple synchrotron self-Compton model, the change of the spectral energy distribution is due to an increase in the energy density of electrons with small changes of both the magnetic field strength and the maximum Lorentz factor of electrons.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Seta, Hiromi; /Saitama U.; Isobe, N.; /Kyoto U.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; /Saitama U.; Yaji, Yuichi; /Saitama U.; Arai, Akira; /Hiroshima U.; Fukuhara, Masayuki; /Tokyo U. /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Kohno, Kotaro; /Tokyo U.; Nakanishi, Koichiro; /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Sasada, Mahito; /Hiroshima U.; Shimajiri, Yoshito; /Tokyo U. /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Tosaki, Tomoka; /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Uemura, Makoto; /Hiroshima U.; Anderhub, Hans; /Zurich, ETH; Antonelli, L.A.; /INFN, Rome; Antoranz, Pedro; /Madrid U.; Backes, Michael; /Dortmund U.; Baixeras, Carmen; /Barcelona, Autonoma U.; Balestra, Silvia; /Madrid U.; Barrio, Juan Abel; /Madrid U.; Bastieri, Denis; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua; Becerra Gonzalez, Josefa; /IAC, La Laguna /Dortmund U. /Lodz U. /Lodz U. /DESY /Zurich, ETH /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Barcelona, IEEC /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Madrid U. /Zurich, ETH /Wurzburg U. /Zurich, ETH /Madrid U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Zurich, ETH /Madrid U. /Barcelona, IFAE /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /INFN, Rome /Dortmund U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Barcelona, IEEC /Madrid U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /IAC, La Laguna /Madrid, CIEMAT /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Zurich, ETH /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Wurzburg U. /Barcelona, IFAE /UC, Davis /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Madrid U. /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /Barcelona, IFAE /IAC, La Laguna /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /SLAC /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /Zurich, ETH /Wurzburg U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Zurich, ETH /INFN, Rome /UC, Davis /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Turku U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Zurich, ETH /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /DESY /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Wurzburg U. /INFN, Rome /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Wurzburg U. /Madrid U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Barcelona, IFAE /Madrid U. /Turku U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /UC, Santa Cruz /Madrid U. /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Barcelona, IEEC /Turku U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Zurich, ETH /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /INFN, Trieste /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Dortmund U. /Barcelona, IEEC /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IFAE /Zurich, ETH /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Wurzburg U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /INFN, Rome /Sierra Nevada Observ. /DESY /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IEEC /Turku U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Lodz U. /Lodz U. /Wurzburg U. /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Zurich, ETH /Turku U. /INFN, Rome /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Barcelona, IFAE /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /DESY /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IEEC /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, Autonoma U.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">113</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920006241&hterms=water+wave+theory+advection&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dwater%2Bwave%2Btheory%2Badvection"> <span id="translatedtitle">Theory and <span class="hlt">observations</span>: Model simulations of the <span class="hlt">period</span> 1955-1985</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The main objective of the theoretical studies presented here is to apply models of stratospheric chemistry and transport in order to understand the processes that control stratospheric ozone and that are responsible for the <span class="hlt">observed</span> variations. The model calculations are intended to simulate the <span class="hlt">observed</span> behavior of atmospheric ozone over the past three decades (1955-1985), for which there exists a substantial record of both ground-based and, more recently, satellite measurements. Ozone concentrations in the atmosphere vary on different time scales and for several different causes. The models described here were designed to simulate the effect on ozone of changes in the concentration of such trace gases as CFC, CH4, N2O, and CO2. Changes from year to year in ultraviolet radiation associated with the solar cycle are also included in the models. A third source of variability explicitly considered is the sporadic introduction of large amounts of NO sub x into the stratosphere during atmospheric nuclear tests.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Isaksen, Ivar S. A.; Eckman, R.; Lacis, A.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Prather, M.; Pyle, J.; Rodhe, H.; Stordal, Frode; Stolarski, R. S.; Turco, R. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">114</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5496693"> <span id="translatedtitle">Plasma-wave <span class="hlt">observations</span> at Uranus from Voyager 2. Progress report for <span class="hlt">period</span> ending February 1986</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Radio emissions from Uranus were detected by the Voyager 2 plasma-wave instrument about 5 days before closest approach at frequencies of 31.1 and 56.2 khz. The bow shock was identified by an abrupt broadband burst of electrostatic turbulence about 10 hours before closest approach at a radial distance of 23.5 ru. Once inside of the magnetosphere, strong whistler mode hiss and chorus emissions were <span class="hlt">observed</span> at radial distances less than about 8 R/sub u/, in the same region where the energetic-particle instruments detected intense fluxes of energetic electrons. A variety of other plasma waves, such as (f sub c) electron-cyclotron waves, were also <span class="hlt">observed</span> in this same region. At the ring plane crossing, the plasma wave instrument detected a large number of impulsive events that are interpreted as impacts of micron-sized dust particles on the spacecraft. The maximum impact rate was about 20 to 30 impacts/sec, and the north-south thickness of the impact region was about 4000 km. This paper presents an overview of the principal results from the plasma-wave instrument, starting with the first detection of radio emissions from Uranus, and ending a few days after closest approach.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gurnett, D.A.; Kurth, W.S.; Scarf, F.L.; Poynter, R.L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-03-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">115</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/671917"> <span id="translatedtitle">Water vapor measurements by Raman lidar during the ARM 1997 water vapor intensive <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, as it is the most active infrared absorber and emitter of radiation, and it also plays an important role in energy transport and cloud formation. Accurate, high resolution measurements of this variable are critical in order to improve the understanding of these processes and thus their ability to model them. Because of the importance of water vapor, the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program initiated a series of three intensive operating <span class="hlt">periods</span> (IOPs) at its Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in northern Oklahoma. The goal of these IOPs is to improve and validate the state-of-the-art capabilities in measuring water vapor. To date, two of the planned three IOPs have occurred: the first was in September of 1996, with an emphasis on the lowest kilometer, while the second was conducted from September--October 1997 with a focus on both the upper troposphere and lowest kilometer. The ARM CART site is the home of several different water vapor measurement systems. These systems include a Raman lidar, a microwave radiometer, a radiosonde launch site, and an instrumented tower. During these IOPs, additional instrumentation was brought to the site to augment the normal measurements in the attempt to characterize the CART instruments and to address the need to improve water vapor measurement capabilities. Some of the instruments brought to the CART site include a scanning Raman lidar system from NASA/GSFC, additional microwave radiometers from NOAA/ETL, a chilled mirror that was flown on a tethersonde and kite system, and dewpoint hygrometer instruments flow on the North Dakota Citation. This paper will focus on the Raman lidar intercomparisons from the second IOP.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Turner, D.D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Whiteman, D.N.; Schwemmer, G.K. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center; Evans, K.D. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center; Melfi, S.H. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States); Goldsmith, J.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">116</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ApJ...778...45C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Superorbital <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Modulation in Wind-accretion High-mass X-Ray Binaries from Swift Burst Alert Telescope <span class="hlt">Observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the discovery using data from the Swift-Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) of superorbital modulation in the wind-accretion supergiant high-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1909+07 (= X 1908+075), IGR J16418-4532, and IGR J16479-4514. Together with already known superorbital <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in 2S 0114+650 and IGR J16493-4348, the systems exhibit a monotonic relationship between superorbital and orbital <span class="hlt">periods</span>. These systems include both supergiant fast X-ray transients and classical supergiant systems, and have a range of inclination angles. This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> an underlying physical mechanism which is connected to the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span>. In addition to these sources with clear detections of superorbital <span class="hlt">periods</span>, IGR J16393-4643 (= AX J16390.4-4642) is identified as a system that may have superorbital modulation due to the coincidence of low-amplitude peaks in power spectra derived from BAT, Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array, and International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory light curves. 1E 1145.1-6141 may also be worthy of further attention due to the amount of low-frequency modulation of its light curve. However, we find that the presence of superorbital modulation is not a universal feature of wind-accretion supergiant X-ray binaries.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Corbet, Robin H. D.; Krimm, Hans A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">117</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140017166&hterms=wind&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dwind"> <span id="translatedtitle">Superorbital <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Modulation in Wind-Accretion High-Mass X-Ray Binaries from Swift Burst Alert Telescope <span class="hlt">Observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the discovery using data from the Swift-Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) of superorbital modulation in the wind-accretion supergiant high-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1909+07 (= X 1908+075), IGR J16418-4532, and IGR J16479-4514. Together with already known superorbital <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in 2S 0114+650 and IGR J16493-4348, the systems exhibit a monotonic relationship between superorbital and orbital <span class="hlt">periods</span>. These systems include both supergiant fast X-ray transients and classical supergiant systems, and have a range of inclination angles. This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> an underlying physical mechanism which is connected to the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span>. In addition to these sources with clear detections of superorbital <span class="hlt">periods</span>, IGR J16393-4643 (= AX J16390.4-4642) is identified as a system that may have superorbital modulation due to the coincidence of low-amplitude peaks in power spectra derived from BAT, Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array, and International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory light curves. 1E 1145.1-6141 may also be worthy of further attention due to the amount of low-frequency modulation of its light curve. However, we find that the presence of superorbital modulation is not a universal feature of wind-accretion supergiant X-ray binaries.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Corbet, Robin H. D.; Krimm, Hans A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">118</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ApJ...775L..25C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Swift <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of the High-mass X-Ray Binary IGR J16283-4838 Unveil a 288 Day Orbital <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on the temporal and spectral properties of the high-mass X-ray binary IGR J16283-4838 in the hard X-ray band. We searched the first 88 months of Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey data for long-term <span class="hlt">periodic</span> modulations. We also investigated the broad band (0.2-150 keV) spectral properties of IGR J16283-4838 complementing the BAT dataset with soft X-ray data from the available Swift-XRT pointed <span class="hlt">observations</span>. The BAT light curve of IGR J16283-4838 revealed a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> modulation at Po = 287.6 ± 1.7 days (with a significance higher than 4 standard deviations). The profile of the light curve folded at Po shows a sharp peak lasting ~12 days over a flat plateau. The long-term light curve also shows a ~300 day interval of prolonged enhanced emission. The <span class="hlt">observed</span> phenomenology <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that IGR J16283-4838 has a Be nature, where the narrow <span class="hlt">periodic</span> peaks and the ~300 day outburst can be interpreted as Type I and Type II outbursts, respectively. The broad band 0.2-150 keV spectrum can be described with an absorbed power-law and a steepening in the BAT energy range.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cusumano, G.; Segreto, A.; La Parola, V.; D'Aì, A.; Masetti, N.; Tagliaferri, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">119</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AAS...22332308C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Superorbital <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Modulation in Wind-Accretion High-Mass X-ray Binaries from Swift BAT <span class="hlt">Observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the discovery using data from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) of superorbital modulation in the wind-accretion supergiant high-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1909+07 (= X 1908+075), IGR J16418-4532, and IGR J16479-4514. Together with already known superorbital <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in 2S 0114+650 and IGR J16493-4348, the systems exhibit a monotonic relationship between superorbital and orbital <span class="hlt">periods</span>. These systems include both supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) and classical supergiant systems, and have a range of inclination angles. This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> an underlying physical mechanism which is connected to the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span>. In addition to these sources with clear detections of superorbital <span class="hlt">periods</span>, IGR J16393-4643 (= AX J16390.4-4642) is identified as a system that may have superorbital modulation due to the coincidence of low-amplitude peaks in power spectra derived from BAT, RXTE PCA, and INTEGRAL light curves. 1E 1145.1-6141 may also be worthy of further attention due to the amount of low-frequency modulation of its light curve. However, we find that the presence of superorbital modulation is not a universal feature of wind-accretion supergiant X-ray binaries. Two <span class="hlt">suggested</span> mechanisms to drive superorbital modulation are pulsations in the primary star and a 3 body system. However, both of these models appear to have problems and detailed multiwavelength data over a superorbital cycle are required to investigate the cause(s) of the modulation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Corbet, Robin H.; Krimm, H. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">120</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002ApJ...571L.137K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Can Any ``Invariants'' Be Revealed in Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> Phenomena <span class="hlt">Observed</span> from Scorpius X-1?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using a large number of Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer <span class="hlt">observations</span> of Scorpius X-1, we present a detailed investigation of the transition layer and relativistic precession models (TLM and RPM, respectively). These models predict the existence of the invariant quantities: an inclination angle ? of the magnetospheric axis with the normal to the disk for the TLM and a neutron star (NS) mass MNS for the RPM. Theoretical predictions of both models are tested, and their self-consistency is checked. We establish the following: (1) The inferred ?-value is 5.56d+/-0.09d. Correlation of the ?-values with the horizontal-branch oscillation (HBO) frequency is rather weak. (2) There is a strong correlation between an inferred MNS and the HBO frequency in the RPM frameworks. (3) We infer MNS for different assumptions regarding the relations between the HBO frequency ?HBO and the nodal frequency ?nod. We find that the inferred MNS=2.7+/-0.1 Msolar cannot be consistent with any equation of state of NS matter. We conclude that the RPM fails to describe the data while the TLM seems to be compatible.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kuznetsov, Sergey; Titarchuk, Lev</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_6 div --> <div id="page_7" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">121</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.G21B0760P"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> signals are <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the GRACE SMB time series over Greenland and Antarctica by the IMF analysis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets are vulnerable to ongoing climate change. The Gravity Recovery and Climate experiment (GRACE) satellite mission allows for the estimation of ice mass variations at a near monthly timescales. Changes in Stokes coefficients from month to month allow computation of maps of spatial SMB variations. The limited range of Stokes coefficients (typically to degree of order 60) fundamentally limits spatial resolution. Furthermore, noise contamination generally increases with increasing degree and order. As the time <span class="hlt">period</span> of GRACE <span class="hlt">observations</span> is short, natural <span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations influence the calculation of the long-term trends. The GRACE monthly SMB over Antarctica and Greenland are used to investigate the dominant oscillations such as semi-annual oscillation (SAO), annual oscillation (AO), Quasi-biennial Oscillation (QBO), El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and 11-year solar cycle using novel method called empirical mode decomposition (EMD). The EMD is an interesting approach to decompose signals into locally <span class="hlt">periodic</span> components, the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), and will easily identify the embedded structures, even those with small amplitudes. Our analysis will help identify the prevailing <span class="hlt">periodic</span> mass signals in the Greenland and Antarctica regions and help constrain the long-term trends.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pangaluru, K.; Velicogna, I.; Sutterley, T. C.; van den Broeke, M. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">122</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21567730"> <span id="translatedtitle">TESTING THE NO-HAIR THEOREM WITH <span class="hlt">OBSERVATIONS</span> IN THE ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM. III. QUASI-<span class="hlt">PERIODIC</span> VARIABILITY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">According to the no-hair theorem, astrophysical black holes are uniquely described by their masses and spins. An <span class="hlt">observational</span> test of the no-hair theorem can be performed by measuring at least three different multipole moments of the spacetime of a black hole and verifying whether their values are consistent with the unique combinations of the Kerr solution. In this paper, we study quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> variability <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the emission from black holes across the electromagnetic spectrum as a test of the no-hair theorem. We derive expressions for the Keplerian and epicyclic frequencies in a quasi-Kerr spacetime, in which the quadrupole moment is a free parameter in addition to mass and spin. We show that, for moderate spins, the Keplerian frequency is practically independent of small deviations of the quadrupole moment from the Kerr value, while the epicyclic frequencies exhibit significant variations. We apply this framework to quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) in black hole X-ray binaries in two different scenarios. In the case that a pair of QPOs can be identified as the fundamental g- and c-modes in the accretion disk, we show that the no-hair theorem can be tested in conjunction with an independent mass measurement. If pairs of oscillations are identified with non-parametric resonance of dynamical frequencies in the accretion disk, then testing the no-hair theorem also requires an independent measurement of the black hole spin. In addition, we argue that VLBI <span class="hlt">observations</span> of Sgr A* may test the no-hair theorem through a combination of imaging <span class="hlt">observations</span> and the detection of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> variability.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Johannsen, Tim [Physics Department, University of Arizona, 1118 East 4th Street, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Psaltis, Dimitrios, E-mail: timj@physics.arizona.edu, E-mail: dpsaltis@email.arizona.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">123</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JGRD..113.0C18P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microlidar <span class="hlt">observations</span> of biomass burning aerosol over Djougou (Benin) during African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> 0: Dust and Biomass-Burning Experiment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Microlidar <span class="hlt">observations</span> have been performed at the Djougou-Nangatchori site in northern Benin during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> 0 in the dry season, combined with the Dust and Biomass-Burning Experiment (DABEX) from mid-January to mid-February 2006. During the dry season, the Djougou area is a region where biomass burning aerosols are heavily produced from agriculture fires. The aerosol vertical distribution is also controlled by dynamics, and the penetration of the winter monsoon flux to the north and northern winds bringing mineral dust to the South leads to a frontal discontinuity location close to Djougou latitude. During the early dry season, the aerosol vertical distribution was <span class="hlt">observed</span> to be structured in two layers, the lower being the boundary layer reaching altitudes up to 2 km and the upper one corresponding to the trade wind layer extending up to 5 km. Lidar data are used to retrieve the time evolution and vertical profile of extinction and discuss transport processes during the <span class="hlt">period</span> analyzed. As the monsoon flux during the dry season is steadily progressing to the north but also moving back and forth according to shorter timescale forcings, biomass burning particles are transported from the boundary layer into the upper troposphere. This transport has a strong impact on the distribution of aerosol particles on the vertical, and extinction values larger than 0.3 km-1 have been retrieved at altitudes close to 3 km. A particular event of biomass burning air mass outbreak associated with a synoptic forcing is studied, where satellite <span class="hlt">observations</span> are used to discuss <span class="hlt">observations</span> of biomass burning particles over Djougou and at the regional scale.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pelon, J.; Mallet, M.; Mariscal, A.; Goloub, P.; Tanré, D.; Bou Karam, D.; Flamant, C.; Haywood, J.; Pospichal, B.; Victori, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">124</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ACPD...1128851K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparisons of <span class="hlt">observed</span> and modeled OH and HO2 concentrations during the ambient measurement <span class="hlt">period</span> of the HOxComp field campaign</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A photochemical box model constrained by ancillary <span class="hlt">observations</span> was used to simulate OH and HO2 concentrations for three days of ambient <span class="hlt">observations</span> during the HOxComp field campaign held in Jülich, Germany in July 2005. OH and HO2 levels, <span class="hlt">observed</span> by four and three instruments, respectively, were fairly well reproduced to within 33% by a base model run (Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism with updated isoprene chemistry adapted from Master Chemical Mechanism ver. 3.1) with high R2 values (0.72-0.97) over a range of isoprene (0.3-2 ppb) and NO (0.1-10 ppb) mixing ratios. Adding isomerization of isoprene peroxy radicals to the model increased OH and HO2 by 43% and 48% on average. Although these are still only 15% and 21% higher than the <span class="hlt">observations</span> made by one of the instruments, larger overestimations (>60%) occurred with respect to the <span class="hlt">observations</span> made by the other three instruments, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the rates of the isomerization were not readily supported by the ensemble of radical <span class="hlt">observations</span>. These model runs tend to underestimate <span class="hlt">observed</span> OH reactivity which may be explained by unmeasured hydrocarbon species. By selecting hydrocarbon types to be added to the model in amounts that accounted for the missing fractions of <span class="hlt">observed</span> OH reactivity, the gaps between HOx <span class="hlt">observations</span> and model results with and without isomerization could be individually diminished to within uncertainty levels. In this case, however, the HO2/OH ratio rose on addition of hydrocarbons and diverged from <span class="hlt">observations</span>. In the case where we used modeled HO2(*), taking into account the sensitivity toward speciated RO2 (organic peroxy) radicals, as recently reported from one of the participating instruments in the HO2 measurement mode, the model's overestimation for HO2 became evident (by factors of more than 1.8). These results strongly indicated that more loss processes for peroxy radicals were necessary to explain the <span class="hlt">observations</span>. One of the measurement days was characterized by low isoprene concentrations (~0.5 ppb) and OH reactivity that was well explained by the <span class="hlt">observed</span> species, especially before noon. For this selected <span class="hlt">period</span>, as opposed to the general behavior, the model tended to underestimate HO2 (and HO2(*)) with respect to <span class="hlt">observations</span> made by the three instruments. We found that this tendency is associated with high NOx concentrations, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that some HO2 production or HO2 regeneration processes under high NOx conditions were being overlooked; this might require revision of ozone production regimes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kanaya, Y.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Dorn, H.-P.; Brauers, T.; Fuchs, H.; Holland, F.; Rohrer, F.; Bohn, B.; Tillmann, R.; Wegener, R.; Wahner, A.; Kajii, Y.; Miyamoto, K.; Nishida, S.; Watanabe, K.; Yoshino, A.; Kubistin, D.; Martinez, M.; Rudolf, M.; Harder, H.; Berresheim, H.; Elste, T.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Stange, G.; Kleffmann, J.; Elshorbany, Y.; Schurath, U.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">125</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24147635"> <span id="translatedtitle">Direct <span class="hlt">observation</span> of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> swelling and collapse of polymer chain induced by the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">By utilizing a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), we directly <span class="hlt">observed</span> the self-oscillating behavior of a polymer chain induced by the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction. We succeeded in measuring self-oscillations of the resonance frequency (?f) and dissipation (?D), which originate in the self-oscillating behavior of the polymer chain on a gold surface induced by the BZ reaction. We synthesized a self-oscillating polymer chain with Ru as the catalyst of the BZ reaction and a chemical adsorption site, so as to directly <span class="hlt">observe</span> its <span class="hlt">periodic</span> swelling and collapse on the gold surface. Distinct self-oscillation of ?D synchronized with the self-oscillation ?f was <span class="hlt">observed</span>. The <span class="hlt">period</span> of the ?f self-oscillation was about 400 s, and the induction time was about 6.5 h. In QCM-D measurements, we found that the peaks of ?f and ?D oscillations did not coincide in time because the state of the Gaussian chain did not coincide with the maximum value of ?f. Moreover, examination of the relationship between ?f and ?D revealed that their oscillatory waveforms were identical in frequency but differed in phase and amplitude. PMID:24147635</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hara, Yusuke; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yoshinori; Takenaka, Yoshiko; Fukuda, Ryushi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">126</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/135027"> <span id="translatedtitle">The growth of the oceanic boundary layer during the COARE intensive <span class="hlt">observational</span> <span class="hlt">period</span>: Large Eddy simulation results</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A principal goal of the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) is to gain an understanding of the processes that control mixing in the upper 100 m of the western tropical Pacific warm pool. The warm pool is an important heat reservoir for the global ocean and is responsible for many of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> climatic changes associated with El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events. This water mass is highly sensitive to mixed-layer processes that are controlled by surface heat, salinity, and momentum fluxes. During most of the year, these fluxes are dominated by solar heating and occasional squalls that freshen the top of the mixed layer and force shallow mixing of about 10-20 m. From November to April, the usual weather pattern is frequently altered by westerly wind bursts that are forced by tropical cyclones and intraseasonal oscillations. These wind bursts generate a strong eastward surface current and can force mixing as deep as 100 m over a <span class="hlt">period</span> of days. <span class="hlt">Observations</span> from the intensive <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> (IOP) in COARE indicate that mixed-layer deepening is accompanied by strong turbulence dissipation at the mixed layer base. A short westerly wind burst occurred during the first leg of TOGA-COARE, and lasted about 4-5 days. During this <span class="hlt">period</span>, the maximum winds were about 10 m s{sup -1}, and the resulting eastward surface flow was about 0.5 m s{sup -1}. The strength of this event was somewhat weaker than a typical westerly wind burst, but the mixed-layer structure and growth are similar to the more vigorous wind bursts discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Skyllingstad, E.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Sequim, WA (United States); Wijesekera, H.W.; Gregg, M.C. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Applied Physics Lab.] [and others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">127</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001JASTP..63..835L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Extra long <span class="hlt">period</span> (20-40 day) oscillations in the mesospheric and lower thermospheric winds: <span class="hlt">observations</span> in Canada, Europe and Japan, and considerations of possible solar influences</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An extra long <span class="hlt">period</span> (20-40 day) oscillation has been identified in the mesospheric and lower thermospheric (60-100 km) winds <span class="hlt">observed</span> simultaneously by radars (MF, LF) at four sites from /70°N to /30°N in the northern hemisphere during the winter of 1995//1996. A long-term (1980-1999) investigation of this oscillation at Saskatoon and Collm is also carried out to obtain climatological and statistical characteristics. Spectral analysis has shown that this oscillation is a common feature of the winter (November-March) atmosphere, having strong amplitudes throughout the mesosphere (~10m/s) and lower thermosphere (~5m/s), and being much stronger at mid-low latitudes. Although the oscillation has a climatology similar to the long <span class="hlt">period</span> normal mode planetary waves (10-16 day), the phases at the various sites are very similar, and not consistent with a freely propagating wave. Comparisons with geomagnetic//solar wind parameters and solar UV radiation <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the oscillation could be related to the short-term solar rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> (ca. 27 days) in some way. However the range of <span class="hlt">observed</span> wind <span class="hlt">periods</span> is very broad and this raises questions about this interpretation. Nevertheless the inter-annual variations of this 20-40 day oscillation indicate a weak 11-year solar cycle correlation in the mesosphere (positive) and the lower thermosphere (negative). Also, the cross-correlation between the winds and solar radiation shows significant quasi 27-day correlation and the wind lags behind the solar radiation a few days in the mesosphere. In general it is implied that the atmosphere could react to the solar activity in an indirect way due to certain dynamical mechanisms.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Luo, Y.; Manson, A. H.; Meek, C. E.; Igarashi, K.; Jacobi, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">128</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ACP....14.3623I"> <span id="translatedtitle">Regional modeling of tropospheric NO2 vertical column density over East Asia during the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2000-2010: comparison with multisatellite <span class="hlt">observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Satellite <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the tropospheric NO2 vertical column density (VCD) are closely correlated to, and thus can be used to estimate, surface NOx emissions. In this study, the NO2 VCD simulated by a regional chemical transport model with emissions data from the updated Regional Emission inventory in ASia (REAS) version 2.1 were validated through comparison with multisatellite <span class="hlt">observations</span> during the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2000-2010. Rapid growth in NO2 VCD (~11% year-1) driven by the expansion of anthropogenic NOx emissions was identified above the central eastern China (CEC) region, except for the <span class="hlt">period</span> during the economic downturn. In contrast, slightly decreasing trends (~2% year-1) were identified above Japan accompanied by a decline in anthropogenic emissions. To systematically compare the modeled NO2 VCD, we estimated sampling bias and the effect of applying the averaging kernel information, with particular focus on the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) data. Using the updated REAS, the modeled NO2 VCD reasonably reproduced annual trends <span class="hlt">observed</span> by multisatellites, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the rate of increase of NOx emissions estimated by the updated REAS inventory would be robust. Province-scale revision of emissions above CEC is needed to further refine emission inventories. Based on the close linear relationship between modeled and <span class="hlt">observed</span> NO2 VCD and anthropogenic NOx emissions, NOx emissions in 2009 and 2010, which were not covered by the updated REAS inventory, were estimated. NOx emissions from anthropogenic sources in China in 2009 and 2010 were determined to be 26.4 and 28.5 Tg year-1, respectively, indicating that NOx emissions increased more than twofold between 2000 and 2010. This increase reflected the strong growth of anthropogenic emissions in China following the rapid recovery from the economic downturn from late 2008 until mid-2009. Our method consists of simple estimations from satellite <span class="hlt">observations</span> and provides results that are consistent with the most recent inventory of emissions data for China.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Itahashi, S.; Uno, I.; Irie, H.; Kurokawa, J.-I.; Ohara, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">129</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010cosp...38.2214C"> <span id="translatedtitle">FASTSAT-HSV01 synergistic <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the magnetospheric response during active <span class="hlt">periods</span>: MINI-ME, PISA and TTI</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Understanding the complex processes within the inner magnetosphere of Earth particularly during storm <span class="hlt">periods</span> requires coordinated <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the particle and field environment using both in-situ and remote sensing techniques. In fact in order to gain a better understand-ing of our Heliophysics and potentially improve our space weather forecasting capabilities, new <span class="hlt">observation</span> mission approaches and new instrument technologies which can provide both cost effective and robust regular <span class="hlt">observations</span> of magnetospheric activity and other space weather related phenomenon are necessary. As part of the effort to demonstrate new instrument tech-niques and achieve necessary coordinated <span class="hlt">observation</span> missions, NASA's Fast Affordable Sci-ence and Technology Satellite Huntsville 01 mission (FASTSAT-HSV01) scheduled for launch in 2010 will afford a highly synergistic solution which satisfies payload mission opportunities and launch requirements as well as contributing in the near term to our improved understanding of Heliophysics. NASA's FASTSAT-HSV01 spacecraft on the DoD Space Test Program-S26 (STP-S26) Mission is a multi-payload mission executed by the DoD Space Test Program (STP) at the Space Development and Test Wing (SDTW), Kirtland AFB, NM. and is an example of a responsive and economical breakthrough in providing new possibilities for small space technology-driven and research missions. FASTSAT-HSV is a unique spacecraft platform that can carry multiple small instruments or experiments to low-Earth orbit on a wide range of expendable launch vehicles for a fraction of the cost traditionally required for such missions. The FASTSAT-HSV01 mission allows NASA to mature and transition a technical capability to industry while increasing low-cost access to space for small science and technology (ST) payloads. The FASTSAT-HSV01 payload includes three NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) new technology built instruments that will study the terrestrial space environment and potentially contribute to space weather research in a synergistic manner. MINI-ME, a neutral atom imager, will <span class="hlt">observe</span> the neutral atom inputs to ionospheric heating which can be important during high levels of magnetospheric activity. PISA, a plasma impedance spec-trometer, will measure simultaneously the local electron densities and temperatures as well as measure small scale density structure (500 m spatial scale) during these active <span class="hlt">periods</span>. TTI, a thermospheric imager, will remotely determine the thermospheric temperature response to this magnetospheric activity. Together, these <span class="hlt">observations</span> will contribute significantly to a comprehensive understanding of the flow of energy through and the response of the storm-time terrestrial magnetosphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Casas, Joseph; Collier, Michael; Rowland, Douglas; Sigwarth, John; Boudreaux, Mark</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">130</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20100021383&hterms=FASTSAT&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DFASTSAT"> <span id="translatedtitle">FASTSAT-HSV01 Synergistic <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of the Magnetospheric Response During Active <span class="hlt">Periods</span>: MINI-ME, PISA and TTI</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Understanding the complex processes within the inner magnetosphere of Earth particularly during storm <span class="hlt">periods</span> requires coordinated <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the particle and field environment using both in-situ and remote sensing techniques. In fact in order to gain a better understanding of our Heliophysics and potentially improve our space weather forecasting capabilities, new <span class="hlt">observation</span> mission approaches and new instrument technologies which can provide both cost effective and robust regular <span class="hlt">observations</span> of magnetospheric activity and other space weather related phenomenon are necessary. As part of the effort to demonstrate new instrument techniques and achieve necessary coordinated <span class="hlt">observation</span> missions, NASA's Fast Affordable Science and Technology Satellite Huntsville 01 mission (FASTSAT-HSVOI) scheduled for launch in 2010 will afford a highly synergistic solution which satisfies payload mission opportunities and launch requirements as well as contributing iri the near term to our improved understanding of Heliophysics. NASA's FASTSAT-HSV01 spacecraft on the DoD Space Test Program-S26 (STP-S26) Mission is a multi-payload mission executed by the DoD Space Test Program (STP) at the Space Development and Test Wing (SDTW), Kirtland AFB, NM. and is an example of a responsive and economical breakthrough in providing new possibilities for small space technology-driven and research missions. FASTSAT-HSV is a unique spacecraft platform that can carry multiple small instruments or experiments to low-Earth orbit on a wide range of expendable launch vehicles for a fraction of the cost traditionally required for such missions. The FASTSAT-HSV01 mission allows NASA to mature and transition a technical capability to industry while increasing low-cost access to space for small science and technology (ST) payloads. The FASTSAT-HSV01 payload includes three NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) new technology built instruments that will study the terrestrial space environment and potentially contribute to space weather research in a synergistic manner. MINI-ME, a neutral atom imager, will <span class="hlt">observe</span> the neutral atom inputs to ionospheric heating which can be important during high levels of magnetospheric activity. PISA, a plasma impedance spectrometer, will measure simultaneously the local electron densities and temperatures as well as measure small scale density structure (500 m spatial scale) during these active <span class="hlt">periods</span>. TTI, a thermospheric imager, will remotely determine the thermospheric temperature response to this magnetospheric activity. Together, these <span class="hlt">observations</span> will contribute significantly to a comprehensive understanding of the flow of energy through and the response of the storm-time terrestrial magnetosphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Casas, Joseph C.; Collier, Michael R.; Rowland, Douglas E.; Sigwarth, John B.; Boudreaux, Mark E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">131</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JAHH...16..312M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Eclipses in the Middle East from the Late Medieval Islamic <span class="hlt">Period</span> to the Early Modern <span class="hlt">Period</span>. Part 1: The <span class="hlt">observation</span> of six lunar eclipses from the Late Medieval Islamic <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper deals with the analysis of data obtained from <span class="hlt">observations</span> of two sets of three lunar eclipses in the Late Medieval Islamic <span class="hlt">Period</span>. The first trio consists of the lunar eclipses of 7 March 1262, 7 April 1270 and 24 January 1274, <span class="hlt">observed</span> by Muḥy? al-D?n al-Maghrib?; from the Maragha Observatory (in north-western Iran), and the second includes those of 2 June and 26 November 1406, and 22 May 1407, <span class="hlt">observed</span> by Jamsh?d Ghiy?th al-D?n al-K?sh? from K?sh?n (in central Iran). The results are that al-Maghrib?'s values for the magnitudes of these eclipses agree excellently with modern data, and his values for the times when the maximum phases occurred agree to within five minutes with modern values. Al-K?sh?'s values for the times of the maximum phases show a rather larger divergence from modern data, varying from about ten minutes to about one hour. The errors in all six values both astronomers computed from their own solar parameters for the longitude of the Sun at the instant of the opposition of the Moon to the Sun in these eclipses remain below ten minutes of arc. The motivation for doing these <span class="hlt">observations</span> was to measure the lunar epicycle radius r in the Ptolemaic model. Al-Maghrib? achieved r = 5;12 and al-K?sh? r ? 5;17,1 in terms of the radius of an orbit of R = 60 arbitrary units. It is argued that comparing with modern theory, neither of these two medieval values can be considered an improvement on Ptolemy's value of r = 5;15.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mozaffari, S. Mohammad</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">132</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..1110327G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Black Sea thermo-haline characteristics during the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2002-2008: State estimates based on modelling and <span class="hlt">observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present an investigation of the thermo-haline characteristics in the Black Sea during the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2002-2008 using analysis and intercomparison of data from ocean modelling and <span class="hlt">observations</span> like satellite altimetry, Argo floats and AVHRR. The ocean model set-up is based on the Nucleus of European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO) framework. It reproduces reasonably well most important features of the Black Sea processes such as the seasonal variability of the rim current, cold intermediate water formation and evolution of the seasonal pycnocline. The main novelty of the employed model setup is its capability to estimate the transport through the Bosporus Straits from the water conservation equation constrained by altimeter data, which can be understand as an assimilation of the altimetric mean sea level signal (MSL) in the model. Main attention in the analysis of simulations is been paid to the dominating characteristics of physical fields at seasonal and inter-annual time scales. Therefore we use empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis of temperature, salinity and steric heights from ocean model and investigate their consistence with the modelled and <span class="hlt">observed</span> sea surface anomaly (SLA), the later is an indicator of the propagation of thermo-haline signals. Results from the EOF analysis show that the major part of SLA variability during the examined <span class="hlt">period</span> can be express through the first two EOF modes which explain approximately 83.5% of total variance and are well know to be connected to the general evolution of MSL (1-st mode) and the seasonal cycle of rim current intensification (2-nd mode). Higher degree EOF modes show more complex processes which are very interesting because these processes could not be found in older versions of altimeter <span class="hlt">observations</span> and are mainly controlled by the distribution of water fluxes, in particular from rivers and transport through the Bosporus Strait.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grayek, S.; Stanev, E. V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">133</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AMTD....7.8013D"> <span id="translatedtitle">An overview of the lightning and atmospheric electricity <span class="hlt">observations</span> collected in Southern France during the HYdrological cycle in Mediterranean EXperiment (HyMeX), Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> 1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The PEACH (Projet en Electricité Atmosphérique pour la Campagne HyMeX - the Atmospheric Electricity Project of HyMeX Program) project is the Atmospheric Electricity component of the HyMeX (Hydrology cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment) experiment and is dedicated to the <span class="hlt">observation</span> of both lightning activity and electrical state of continental and maritime thunderstorms in the area of the Mediterranean Sea. During the HyMeX SOP1 (Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span>; 5 September-6 November 2012), four European Operational Lightning Locating Systems (OLLSs) (ATDNET, EUCLID, LINET, ZEUS) and the HyMeX Lightning Mapping Array network (HyLMA) were used to locate and characterize the lightning activity over the Southeastern Mediterranean at flash, storm and regional scales. Additional research instruments like slow antennas, video cameras, micro-barometer and microphone arrays were also operated. All these <span class="hlt">observations</span> in conjunction with operational/research ground-based and airborne radars, rain gauges and in situ microphysical records aimed at characterizing and understanding electrically active and highly precipitating events over Southeastern France that often lead to severe flash floods. Simulations performed with Cloud Resolving Models like Meso-NH and WRF are used to interpret the results and to investigate further the links between dynamics, microphysics, electrification and lightning occurrence. A description of the different instruments deployed during the field campaign as well as the available datasets is given first. Examples of concurrent <span class="hlt">observations</span> from radio frequency to acoustic for regular and atypical lightning flashes are then presented showing a rather comprehensive description of lightning flashes available from the SOP1 records. Then examples of storms recorded during HyMeX SOP1 over Southeastern France are briefly described to highlight the unique and rich dataset collected. Finally the next steps of the work required for the delivery of reliable lightning-derived products to the HyMeX community are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Defer, E.; Pinty, J.-P.; Coquillat, S.; Martin, J.-M.; Prieur, S.; Soula, S.; Richard, E.; Rison, W.; Krehbiel, P.; Thomas, R.; Rodeheffer, D.; Vergeiner, C.; Malaterre, F.; Pedeboy, S.; Schulz, W.; Farges, T.; Gallin, L.-J.; Ortéga, P.; Ribaud, J.-F.; Anderson, G.; Betz, H.-D.; Meneux, B.; Kotroni, V.; Lagouvardos, K.; Roos, S.; Ducrocq, V.; Roussot, O.; Labatut, L.; Molinié, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">134</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.A53K0293Y"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of Sub-3 nm Particles and Sulfuric acid Concentrations during Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> 2011 in Long Island, New York</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is an important source of aerosol particles. But the NPF processes are not well understood, in part because of our limited understanding of the formation of atmospheric sub-3 nm size aerosols and the limited number of simultaneous <span class="hlt">observations</span> of particle size distributions and the aerosol nucleation precursors. During Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> (July-August 2011) in Long Island, New York, we deployed a particle size magnifier (Airmodus A09) running at different working fluid saturation ratios and a TSI CPC3776 to extract the information of sub-3 nm particles formation. A scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS), a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS), and a number of atmospheric trace gas analyzers were used to simultaneously measure aerosol size distributions, sulfuric acid, and other possible aerosol precursors, respectively. Our <span class="hlt">observation</span> results show that sub-3 nm particles existed during both NPF and non-NPF events, indicating the formation of sub-3nm particle didn't always lead to NPF characterized by typical banana shaped aerosol size distributions measured by SMPS. However, sub-3 nm particles were much higher during NPF events. Sub-3 nm particles were well-correlated with sulfuric acid showing the same diurnal variations and noontime peaks, especially for NPF days. These results are consistent with laboratory studies showing that formation of sub-3 nm particles is very sensitive to sulfuric acid (than amines and ammonia) [Yu et al. GRL 2012]. HYSPLIT back trajectory analysis indicates that air masses from Great Lakes, containing more SO2, VOCs and secondary organics, may contribute to growth of sub-3 nm particles and NPF.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yu, H.; Kanawade, V. P.; You, Y.; Hallar, A. G.; Mccubbin, I. B.; Chirokova, G.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Kuang, C.; Lee, Y.; McGraw, R. L.; Mikkila, J.; Lee, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">135</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015OcDyn..65..173C"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observed</span> year-to-year sea surface salinity variability in the Bay of Bengal during the 2009-2014 <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present study describes the <span class="hlt">observed</span> sea surface salinity (SSS) interannual variability in the Bay of Bengal over the 2009-2014 <span class="hlt">period</span>. It is based on an original compilation of all available in situ SSS <span class="hlt">observations</span> in that region, assembled in a 2°-resolution trimonthly gridded field. We find that year-to-year SSS variability is particularly strong in the north-eastern part of the bay. Over recent years, this variability takes the form of two successive and opposite phases: a saltening phase from mid-2009 to late 2010, immediately followed by a freshening phase from late 2010 to late 2011. The typical magnitude of each anomalous spell is about one in the practical salinity scale, making this area one of the most variable of the tropical oceans at interannual timescales. A simple mixed-layer salt budget indicates that year-to-year large-scale SSS variability in the Northern Bay of Bengal is primarily driven by freshwater flux variability with a correlation of 0.68, with rather independent contributions from precipitation and river run-off. The oceanic surface circulation variability contributes less systematically to the large-scale SSS evolution in the Northern Bay of Bengal over the entire record with a correlation of 0.13, despite a strong contribution at times, in particular, during the 2011 positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) freshening.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chaitanya, Akurathi Venkata Sai; Durand, Fabien; Mathew, Simi; Gopalakrishna, Vissa Venkata; Papa, Fabrice; Lengaigne, Matthieu; Vialard, Jerome; Kranthikumar, Chanda; Venkatesan, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">136</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JGeod..78..462M"> <span id="translatedtitle">ITG-CHAMP01: a CHAMP gravity field model from short kinematic arcs over a one-year <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Global gravity field models have been determined based on kinematic orbits covering an <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> of one year beginning from March 2002. Three different models have been derived up to a maximum degree of n=90 of a spherical harmonic expansion of the gravitational potential. One version, ITG-CHAMP01E, has been regularized beginning from degree n=40 upwards, based on the potential coefficients of the gravity field model EGM96. A second model, ITG-CHAMP01K, has been determined based on Kaula's rule of thumb, also beginning from degree n=40. A third version, ITG-CHAMP01S, has been determined without any regularization. The physical model of the gravity field recovery technique is based on Newton's equation of motion, formulated as a boundary value problem in the form of a Fredholm-type integral equation. The <span class="hlt">observation</span> equations are formulated in the space domain by dividing the one-year orbit into short sections of approximately 30-minute arcs. For every short arc, a variance factor has been determined by an iterative computation procedure. The three gravity field models have been validated based on various criteria, and demonstrate the quality of not only the gravity field recovery technique but also the kinematically determined orbits.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mayer-Gürr, T.; Ilk, K. H.; Eicker, A.; Feuchtinger, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">137</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3890821"> <span id="translatedtitle">Direct <span class="hlt">observation</span> of single stationary-phase bacteria reveals a surprisingly long <span class="hlt">period</span> of constant protein production activity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Exponentially growing bacteria are rarely found in the wild, as microorganisms tend to spend most of their lifetime at stationary phase. Despite this general prevalence of stationary-phase bacteria, they are as yet poorly characterized. Our goal was to quantitatively study this phase by direct <span class="hlt">observation</span> of single bacteria as they enter into stationary phase and by monitoring their activity over several days during growth arrest. For this purpose, we devised an experimental procedure for starving single Escherichia coli bacteria in microfluidic devices and measured their activity by monitoring the production rate of fluorescent proteins. When amino acids were the sole carbon source, the production rate decreased by an order of magnitude upon entry into stationary phase. We found that, even while growth-arrested, bacteria continued to produce proteins at a surprisingly constant rate over several days. Our identification of this newly <span class="hlt">observed</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> of constant activity in nongrowing cells, designated as constant activity stationary phase, makes possible the conduction of assays that require constant protein expression over time, and are therefore difficult to perform under exponential growth conditions. Moreover, we show that exogenous protein expression bears no fitness cost on the regrowth of the population when starvation ends. Further characterization of constant activity stationary phase—a phase where nongrowing bacteria can be quantitatively studied over several days in a reproducible manner—should contribute to a better understanding of this ubiquitous but overlooked physiological state of bacteria in nature. PMID:24344288</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gefen, Orit; Fridman, Ofer; Ronin, Irine; Balaban, Nathalie Q.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">138</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ACP....12.2567K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparisons of <span class="hlt">observed</span> and modeled OH and HO2 concentrations during the ambient measurement <span class="hlt">period</span> of the HOxComp field campaign</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A photochemical box model constrained by ancillary <span class="hlt">observations</span> was used to simulate OH and HO2 concentrations for three days of ambient <span class="hlt">observations</span> during the HOxComp field campaign held in Jülich, Germany in July 2005. Daytime OH levels <span class="hlt">observed</span> by four instruments were fairly well reproduced to within 33% by a base model run (Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism with updated isoprene chemistry adapted from Master Chemical Mechanism ver. 3.1) with high R2 values (0.72-0.97) over a range of isoprene (0.3-2 ppb) and NO (0.1-10 ppb) mixing ratios. Daytime HO2(*) levels, reconstructed from the base model results taking into account the sensitivity toward speciated RO2 (organic peroxy) radicals, as recently reported from one of the participating instruments in the HO2 measurement mode, were 93% higher than the <span class="hlt">observations</span> made by the single instrument. This also indicates an overprediction of the HO2 to OH recycling. Together with the good model-measurement agreement for OH, it implies a missing OH source in the model. Modeled OH and HO2(*) could only be matched to the <span class="hlt">observations</span> by addition of a strong unknown loss process for HO2(*) that recycles OH at a high yield. Adding to the base model, instead, the recently proposed isomerization mechanism of isoprene peroxy radicals (Peeters and Müller, 2010) increased OH and HO2(*) by 28% and 13% on average. Although these were still only 4% higher than the OH <span class="hlt">observations</span> made by one of the instruments, larger overestimations (42-70%) occurred with respect to the OH <span class="hlt">observations</span> made by the other three instruments. The overestimation in OH could be diminished only when reactive alkanes (HC8) were solely introduced to the model to explain the missing fraction of <span class="hlt">observed</span> OH reactivity. Moreover, the overprediction of HO2(*) became even larger than in the base case. These analyses imply that the rates of the isomerization are not readily supported by the ensemble of radical <span class="hlt">observations</span>. One of the measurement days was characterized by low isoprene concentrations (∼0.5 ppb) and OH reactivity that was well explained by the <span class="hlt">observed</span> species, especially before noon. For this selected <span class="hlt">period</span>, as opposed to the general behavior, the model tended to underestimate HO2(*). We found that this tendency is associated with high NOx concentrations, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that some HO2 production or regeneration processes under high NOx conditions were being overlooked; this might require revision of ozone production regimes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kanaya, Y.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Dorn, H.-P.; Brauers, T.; Fuchs, H.; Holland, F.; Rohrer, F.; Bohn, B.; Tillmann, R.; Wegener, R.; Wahner, A.; Kajii, Y.; Miyamoto, K.; Nishida, S.; Watanabe, K.; Yoshino, A.; Kubistin, D.; Martinez, M.; Rudolf, M.; Harder, H.; Berresheim, H.; Elste, T.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Stange, G.; Kleffmann, J.; Elshorbany, Y.; Schurath, U.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">139</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22047913"> <span id="translatedtitle">TIME DELAYS IN QUASI-<span class="hlt">PERIODIC</span> PULSATIONS <span class="hlt">OBSERVED</span> DURING THE X2.2 SOLAR FLARE ON 2011 FEBRUARY 15</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report <span class="hlt">observations</span> of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> pulsations (QPPs) during the X2.2 flare of 2011 February 15, <span class="hlt">observed</span> simultaneously in several wavebands. We focus on fluctuations on timescale 1-30 s and find different time lags between different wavebands. During the impulsive phase, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager channels in the range 25-100 keV lead all the other channels. They are followed by the Nobeyama RadioPolarimeters at 9 and 17 GHz and the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) channels of the Euv SpectroPhotometer (ESP) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The zirconium and aluminum filter channels of the Large Yield Radiometer on board the Project for On-Board Autonomy satellite and the soft X-ray (SXR) channel of ESP follow. The largest lags occur in <span class="hlt">observations</span> from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, where the channel at 1-8 A leads the 0.5-4 A channel by several seconds. The time lags between the first and last channels is up to Almost-Equal-To 9 s. We identified at least two distinct time intervals during the flare impulsive phase, during which the QPPs were associated with two different sources in the Nobeyama RadioHeliograph at 17 GHz. The radio as well as the hard X-ray channels showed different lags during these two intervals. To our knowledge, this is the first time that time lags are reported between EUV and SXR fluctuations on these timescales. We discuss possible emission mechanisms and interpretations, including flare electron trapping.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dolla, L.; Marque, C.; Seaton, D. B.; Dominique, M.; Berghmans, D.; Cabanas, C.; De Groof, A.; Verdini, A.; West, M. J.; Zhukov, A. N. [Solar-Terrestrial Center of Excellence, Royal Observatory of Belgium, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centrum voor Plasma-Astrofysica, Department of Mathematics, KULeuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Schmutz, W. [Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, World Radiation Center, Davos Dorf (Switzerland); Zender, J., E-mail: dolla@sidc.be [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">140</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ACP....10.7997V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Optical extinction by upper tropospheric/stratospheric aerosols and clouds: GOMOS <span class="hlt">observations</span> for the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2002-2008</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Although the retrieval of aerosol extinction coefficients from satellite remote measurements is notoriously difficult (in comparison with gaseous species) due to the lack of typical spectral signatures, important information can be obtained. In this paper we present an overview of the current operational nighttime UV/Vis aerosol extinction profile results for the GOMOS star occultation instrument, spanning the <span class="hlt">period</span> from August 2002 to May 2008. Some problems still remain, such as the ones associated with incomplete scintillation correction and the aerosol spectral law implementation, but good quality extinction values are obtained at a wavelength of 500 nm. Typical phenomena associated with atmospheric particulate matter in the Upper Troposphere/Lower Stratosphere (UTLS) are easily identified: Polar Stratospheric Clouds, tropical subvisual cirrus clouds, background stratospheric aerosols, and post-eruption volcanic aerosols (with their subsequent dispersion around the globe). For the first time, we show comparisons of GOMOS 500 nm particle extinction profiles with the ones of other satellite occultation instruments (SAGE II, SAGE III and POAM III), of which the good agreement lends credibility to the GOMOS data set. Yearly zonal statistics are presented for the entire <span class="hlt">period</span> considered. Time series furthermore convincingly show an important new finding: the sensitivity of GOMOS to the sulfate input by moderate volcanic eruptions such as Manam (2005) and Soufrière Hills (2006). Finally, PSCs are well <span class="hlt">observed</span> by GOMOS and a first qualitative analysis of the data agrees well with the theoretical PSC formation temperature. Therefore, the importance of the GOMOS aerosol/cloud extinction profile data set is clear: a long-term data record of PSCs, subvisual cirrus, and background and volcanic aerosols in the UTLS region, consisting of hundreds of thousands of altitude profiles with near-global coverage, with the potential to fill the aerosol/cloud extinction data gap left behind after the discontinuation of occultation instruments such as SAGE II, SAGE III and POAM III.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vanhellemont, F.; Fussen, D.; Mateshvili, N.; Tétard, C.; Bingen, C.; Dekemper, E.; Loodts, N.; Kyrölä, E.; Sofieva, V.; Tamminen, J.; Hauchecorne, A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Dalaudier, F.; Blanot, L.; Fanton D'Andon, O.; Barrot, G.; Guirlet, M.; Fehr, T.; Saavedra, L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_7 div --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">141</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EnMan..44..542Z"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of Atmospheric Nitrogen and Phosphorus Deposition During the <span class="hlt">Period</span> of Algal Bloom Formation in Northern Lake Taihu, China</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cyanobacterial blooms in Lake Taihu occurred at the end of April 2007 and had crucial impacts on the livelihood of millions of people living there. Excessive nutrients may promote bloom formation. Atmospheric nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) deposition appears to play an important role in algal bloom formation. Bulk deposition and rain water samples were collected respectively from May 1 to November 30, 2007, the <span class="hlt">period</span> of optimal algal growth, to measure the bulk atmospheric deposition rate, wet deposition rate, and dry deposition rate for total nitrogen (TN; i.e., all species of nitrogen), and total phosphorus (TP; i.e., all species of phosphorus), in northern Lake Taihu, China. The trends of the bulk atmospheric deposition rate for TN and the wet deposition rate for TN showed double peaks during the <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> and distinct influence with plum rains and typhoons. Meanwhile, monthly bulk atmospheric deposition rates for TP showed little influence of annual precipitation. However, excessive rain may lead to high atmospheric N and P deposition rates. In bulk deposition samples, the average percentage of total dissolved nitrogen accounting for TN was 91.2% and changed little with time. However, the average percentage of total dissolved phosphorus accounting for TP was 65.6% and changed substantially with time. Annual bulk atmospheric deposition rates of TN and TP during 2007 in Lake Taihu were estimated to be 2,976 and 84 kg km-2 a-1, respectively. The results showed decreases of 34.4% and 78.7%, respectively, compared to 2002-2003. Annual bulk deposition load of TN for Lake Taihu was estimated at 6,958 t a-1 in 2007 including 4,642 t a-1 of wet deposition, lower than the values obtained in 2002-2003. This may be due to measures taken to save energy and emission control regulations in the Yangtze River Delta. Nevertheless, high atmospheric N and P deposition loads helped support cyanobacterial blooms in northern Lake Taihu during summer and autumn, the <span class="hlt">period</span> of favorable algal growth.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhai, Shuijing; Yang, Longyuan; Hu, Weiping</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">142</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhDT.......134D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Results from two studies in seismology: I. Seismic <span class="hlt">observations</span> and modeling in the Santa Clara Valley, California. II. <span class="hlt">Observations</span> and removal of the long-<span class="hlt">period</span> noise at the Monterey ocean bottom broadband station (MOBB)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results from two projects are presented in this work. Following brief introductory Chapter 1 that provides general background, Chapter 2 describes the influence of the Santa Clara Valley (SCV) basin structure on the propagation of teleseismic waves. Teleseismic P-waves recorded during the 1998 deployment of the 41-station seismic array are used in the analysis. <span class="hlt">Observations</span> are compared to synthetics computed by 3D finite-difference simulations using the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D velocity models. Chapter 3 includes further study of the ground-motion amplification in the SCV using microseisms recorded by the SCV seismic array in 1998. The obtained results are compared to the local earthquake amplification. Chapter 4 presents results of the 3D simulations using the most recent version of the USGS velocity model for the greater San Francisco Bay Area. Results are compared to 1998 SCV seismic array <span class="hlt">observations</span> and to simulations presented in Chapter 2. Results presented in Chapters 2 to 4 all show strong correlations between basin depth reported in the USGS 3D seismic velocity model and different relative measures of ground motion parameters. The teleseismic, local earthquake and microseism <span class="hlt">observations</span> are also found to be strongly correlated with one another. Since the results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that all three datasets are sensitive to the basin structure, they can be used to improve the 3D velocity model. I started to develop a simultaneous inversion of the teleseismic, local, and microseism <span class="hlt">observations</span> to refine the seismic velocity model. Chapter 5 presents preliminary results and future plans. Results from the second project are included in Chapters 6 to 9. Chapter 6 provides information about the Monterey ocean bottom broadband seismic station (MOBB). It explains why seismology is moving into the oceans, describes the MOBB location, provides details about the instruments that comprise the MOBB, and describes the deployment. Examples of data and preliminary analysis are also included. Chapter 7 presents <span class="hlt">observations</span> of infragravity waves at MOBB. Combined with the information from the ocean buoys, the MOBB data show that the infragravity waves in the longer than 20 s <span class="hlt">period</span> band are mainly locally generated from shorter-<span class="hlt">period</span> ocean waves. Two types of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> infragravity band signal modulation are presented and possible mechanisms for the modulation are discussed. Also included is the analysis of the ocean bottom seismic data from the temporary Oregon ULF/VLF deployment that also indicates that the infragravity waves are primarily locally generated. Chapter 8 describes analysis of data from another ocean bottom station. KEBB is located offshore Washington, in deeper water and further offshore than MOBB. Results <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that in this case the infragravity waves are generated from shorter <span class="hlt">period</span> ocean waves in the coastal region and not locally at KEBB. Chapter 9 focuses on the removal of the long-<span class="hlt">period</span> background as well as signal-generated noise from the MOBB data. Methods used to improve signal-to-noise ratio for the ocean bottom seismic data are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dolenc, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">143</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AJ....149...25Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pulsations and <span class="hlt">Period</span> Changes of the Non-Blazhko RR Lyrae Variable Y Oct <span class="hlt">Observed</span> from Dome A, Antarctica</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the operation of the Chinese Small Telescope Array (CSTAR) in Dome A of Antarctica in the years 2008, 2009, and 2010, large amounts of photometric data have been obtained for variable stars in the CSTAR field. We present here the study of one of six RR Lyrae variables, Y Oct, <span class="hlt">observed</span> with CSTAR in Dome A, Antarctica. Photometric data in the i band were obtained in 2008 and 2010, with a duty cycle (defined as the fraction of time representing scientifically available data to CSTAR <span class="hlt">observation</span> time) of about 44% and 52%, respectively. In 2009, photometric data in the g and r bands were gathered for this star, with a duty cycle of 65% and 60%, respectively. Fourier analysis of the data in the three bands only shows the fundamental frequency and its harmonics, which is characteristic of the non-Blazhko RR Lyrae variables. Values of the fundamental frequency and the amplitudes, as well as the total pulsation amplitude, are obtained from the data in the three bands separately. The amplitude of the fundamental frequency and the total pulsation amplitude in the g band are the largest, and those in the i band the smallest. Two-hundred fifty-one times of maximum are obtained from the three seasons of data, which are analyzed together with 38 maximum times provided in the GEOS RR Lyrae database. A <span class="hlt">period</span> change rate of ?0.96 ± 0.07 days Myr?1 is then obtained, which is a surprisingly large negative value. Based on relations available in the literature, the following physical parameters are derived: [Fe/H] = ?1.41 ± 0.14, MV = 0.696 ± 0.014 mag, V-K = 1.182 ± 0.028 mag, log {{T}eff} = 3.802 ± 0.003 K, log g = 2.705 ± 0.004, log L/{{L}? } = 1.625 ± 0.013, and log M/{{M}? } = ?0.240 ± 0.019.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhihua, Huang; Jianning, Fu; Weikai, Zong; Lingzhi, Wang; M, Macri Lucas; Lifan, Wang; Ashley Michael C., B.; Xiangqun, Cui; Long-Long, Feng; Xuefei, Gong; S, Lawrence Jon; Qiang, Liu; Daniel, Luong-Van; R, Pennypacker Carl; Huigen, Yang; Xiangyan, Yuan; G, York Donald; Xu, Zhou; Zhenxi, Zhu; Zonghong, Zhu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">144</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AJ....149...25H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pulsations and <span class="hlt">Period</span> Changes of the Non-Blazhko RR Lyrae Variable Y Oct <span class="hlt">Observed</span> from Dome A, Antarctica</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the operation of the Chinese Small Telescope Array (CSTAR) in Dome A of Antarctica in the years 2008, 2009, and 2010, large amounts of photometric data have been obtained for variable stars in the CSTAR field. We present here the study of one of six RR Lyrae variables, Y Oct, <span class="hlt">observed</span> with CSTAR in Dome A, Antarctica. Photometric data in the i band were obtained in 2008 and 2010, with a duty cycle (defined as the fraction of time representing scientifically available data to CSTAR <span class="hlt">observation</span> time) of about 44% and 52%, respectively. In 2009, photometric data in the g and r bands were gathered for this star, with a duty cycle of 65% and 60%, respectively. Fourier analysis of the data in the three bands only shows the fundamental frequency and its harmonics, which is characteristic of the non-Blazhko RR Lyrae variables. Values of the fundamental frequency and the amplitudes, as well as the total pulsation amplitude, are obtained from the data in the three bands separately. The amplitude of the fundamental frequency and the total pulsation amplitude in the g band are the largest, and those in the i band the smallest. Two-hundred fifty-one times of maximum are obtained from the three seasons of data, which are analyzed together with 38 maximum times provided in the GEOS RR Lyrae database. A <span class="hlt">period</span> change rate of -0.96 ± 0.07 days Myr-1 is then obtained, which is a surprisingly large negative value. Based on relations available in the literature, the following physical parameters are derived: [Fe/H] = -1.41 ± 0.14, MV = 0.696 ± 0.014 mag, V-K = 1.182 ± 0.028 mag, log {{T}eff} = 3.802 ± 0.003 K, log g = 2.705 ± 0.004, log L/{{L}? } = 1.625 ± 0.013, and log M/{{M}? } = -0.240 ± 0.019.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huang, Zhihua; Fu, Jianning; Zong, Weikai; Wang, Lingzhi; Macri, Lucas M.; Wang, Lifan; Ashley, Michael C. B.; Cui, Xiangqun; Feng, Long-Long; Gong, Xuefei; Lawrence, Jon S.; Liu, Qiang; Luong-Van, Daniel; Pennypacker, Carl R.; Yang, Huigen; Yuan, Xiangyan; York, Donald; Xu, Zhou; Zhu, Zhenxi; Zhu, Zonghong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">145</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=NEW+AND+SCENARIOS&id=EJ903423"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Life of <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using the notion of a <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>, or rather charting the life of <span class="hlt">suggestions</span>, this article considers the happenings of chance and embodiment as the "problems that got away." The life of <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> helps us to ask how connectivities are made, how desire functions, and how "immanence" rather than "transcendence" can open up the politics and ethics…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pearce, Cathie</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">146</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JGeod..81..179D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Determination of the free core nutation <span class="hlt">period</span> from tidal gravity <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the GGP superconducting gravimeter network</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study is based on 25 long time-series of tidal gravity <span class="hlt">observations</span> recorded with superconducting gravimeters at 20 stations belonging to the Global Geodynamic Project (GGP). We investigate the diurnal waves around the liquid core resonance, i.e., K 1, ?1 and ?1, to determine the free core nutation (FCN) <span class="hlt">period</span>, and compare these experimental results with models of the Earth response to the tidal forces. For this purpose, it is necessary to compute corrected amplitude factors and phase differences by subtracting the ocean tide loading (OTL) effect. To determine this loading effect for each wave, it was thus necessary to interpolate the contribution of the smaller oceanic constituents from the four well determined diurnal waves, i.e., Q 1, O 1, P 1, K 1. It was done for 11 different ocean tide models: SCW80, CSR3.0, CSR4.0, FES95.2, FES99, FES02, TPXO2, ORI96, AG95, NAO99 and GOT00. The numerical results show that no model is decisively better than the others and that a mean tidal loading vector gives the most stable solution for a study of the liquid core resonance. We compared solutions based on the mean of the 11 ocean models to subsets of six models used in a previous study and five more recent ones. The calibration errors put a limit on the accuracy of our global results at the level of ± 0.1%, although the tidal factors of O 1 and K 1 are determined with an internal precision of close to 0.05%. The results for O 1 more closely fit the DDW99 non-hydrostatic anelastic model than the elastic one. However, the <span class="hlt">observed</span> tidal factors of K 1 and ?1 correspond to a shift of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> resonance with respect to this model. The MAT01 model better fits this resonance shape. From our tidal gravity data set, we computed the FCN eigenperiod. Our best estimation is 429.7 sidereal days (SD), with a 95% confidence interval of (427.3, 432.1).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ducarme, Bernard; Sun, He-Ping; Xu, Jian-Qiao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">147</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.8375S"> <span id="translatedtitle">The HyMeX Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> in Central Italy: precipitation measurements, retrieval techniques and preliminary results</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Mediterranean area concentrates the major natural risks related to the water cycle, including heavy precipitation and flash-flooding during the fall season. The capability to predict such high-impact events remains weak because of the contribution of very fine-scale processes and their non-linear interactions with the larger scale processes. These societal and science issues motivate the HyMeX (Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment, http://www.hymex.org/) experimental programme. HyMeX aims at a better quantification and understanding of the water cycle in the Mediterranean with emphasis on intense events. The <span class="hlt">observation</span> strategy of HyMEX is organized in a long-term (4 years) Enhanced <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Periods</span> (EOP) and short-term (2 months) Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Periods</span> (SOP). HyMEX has identified 3 main Mediterranean target areas: North-West (NW), Adriatic (A) and South-East (SE). Within each target area several hydrometeorological sites for heavy rainfall and flash flooding have been set up. The hydrometeorological site in Central Italy (CI) is interested by both western and eastern fronts coming from the Atlantic Ocean and Siberia, respectively. Orographic precipitations play an important role due to the central Apennine range, which reaches nearly 3000 m (Gran Sasso peak). Moreover, convective systems commonly develop in CI during late summer and beginning of autumn, often causing localized hailstorms with cluster organized cells. Western fronts may heavily hit the Tiber basin crossing large urban areas (Rome), whereas eastern fronts can cause flash floods along the Adriatic coastline. Two major basins are involved within CI region: Tiber basin (1000 km long) and its tributary Aniene and the Aterno-Pescara basin (300 km long). The first HyMeX SOP1.1 was carried out from Sept. till Nov. 2012 in the NW target area. The Italian SOP1.1 was coordinated by the Centre of Excellence CETEMPS, University of L'Aquila, a city located in the CI heart. The CI area was covered by a uniquely dense meteorological instrumentation thanks to a synergy between Italian institutions and NASA-GSFC. The following RADARs were operated: a Doppler single-polarization C-band radar located at Mt. Midia; the Polar 55C Doppler dual-polarization C-band radar located in Rome; a Doppler C-band polarimetric radar located at Il Monte (Abruzzo); a polarimetric X-band mini-radar in L'Aquila; a polarimetric X-band portable mini-radar in Rome; a single-polarization X-band mini-radar in Rome. DISDROMETERs were also deployed: 4 Parsivel optical disdrometers in Rome (at Sapienza, CNR-ISAC and CNR-INSEAN); 1 2D-video disdrometer in Rome; 3 Parsivels optical disdrometer respectively in L'Aquila (Abruzzo), Avezzano (Abruzzo) and Pescara (Abruzzo). Other INSTRUMENTS were available: 1 K-band vertically-pointing micro rain-radar (MRR), 2 Pludix X-band disdrometers, 1 VLF lightining sensor, 1 microwave radiometer at 23-31 GHz in Rome (at Sapienza); the raingauge network with more than 200 stations in Central Italy. Three overpasses in CI were also performed by the Falcon 20 aircraft equipped with the 95GHz cloud radar RASTA. Analysis of the SOP1.1 main events in CI will be described by focusing on the raindrop size distribution statistics and its geographical variability. Intercomparison of rainfall estimates from disdrometers, raingauges and radars will be illustrated with the aim to provide a quality-controlled and physically consistent rainfall dataset for meteorological modeling validation and assimilation purposes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Silvio Marzano, Frank; Baldini, Luca; Picciotti, Errico; Colantonio, Matteo; Barbieri, Stefano; Di Fabio, Saverio; Montopoli, Mario; Vulpiani, Gianfranco; Roberto, Nicoletta; Adirosi, Elisa; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Anagnostou, Marios N.; Kalogiros, John; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Ferretti, Rossella; Gatlin, Patrick.; Wingo, Matt; Petersen, Walt</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">148</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3933256"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stable time patterns of railway suicides in Germany: comparative analysis of 7,187 cases across two <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">periods</span> (1995–1998; 2005–2008)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background The majority of fatalities on the European Union (EU) railways are suicides, representing about 60% of all railway fatalities. The aim of this study was to compare time patterns of suicidal behaviour on railway tracks in Germany between two <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">periods</span> (1995–1998 and 2005–2008) in order to investigate their stability and value in railway suicide prevention. Methods Cases were derived from the National Central Registry of person accidents on the German railway network (STABAG). The association of daytime, weekday and month with the mean number of suicides was analysed applying linear regression. Potential differences by <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> were assessed by adding <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> and the respective interaction terms into the linear regression. A 95% confidence interval for the mean number of suicides was computed using the t distribution. Results A total of 7,187 railway suicides were recorded within both <span class="hlt">periods</span>: 4,102 (57%) in the first <span class="hlt">period</span> (1995–1998) and 3,085 (43%) in the second (2005–2008). The number of railway suicides was highest on Mondays and Tuesdays in the first <span class="hlt">period</span> with an average of 3.2 and 3.5 events and of 2.6 events on both days in the second <span class="hlt">period</span>. In both <span class="hlt">periods</span>, railway suicides were more common between 6:00 am and noon, and between 6:00 pm and midnight. Seasonality was only prominent in the <span class="hlt">period</span> 1995–1998. Conclusions Over the course of two <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">periods</span>, the weekday and circadian patterns of railway suicides remained stable. Therefore, these patterns should be an integral part of railway suicide preventive measures, e.g. gatekeeper training courses. PMID:24498876</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">149</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ACP....14.5807Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimating Asian terrestrial carbon fluxes from CONTRAIL aircraft and surface CO2 <span class="hlt">observations</span> for the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2006-2010</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Current estimates of the terrestrial carbon fluxes in Asia show large uncertainties particularly in the boreal and mid-latitudes and in China. In this paper, we present an updated carbon flux estimate for Asia ("Asia" refers to lands as far west as the Urals and is divided into boreal Eurasia, temperate Eurasia and tropical Asia based on TransCom regions) by introducing aircraft CO2 measurements from the CONTRAIL (Comprehensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> Network for Trace gases by Airline) program into an inversion modeling system based on the CarbonTracker framework. We estimated the averaged annual total Asian terrestrial land CO2 sink was about -1.56 Pg C yr-1 over the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2006-2010, which offsets about one-third of the fossil fuel emission from Asia (+4.15 Pg C yr-1). The uncertainty of the terrestrial uptake estimate was derived from a set of sensitivity tests and ranged from -1.07 to -1.80 Pg C yr-1, comparable to the formal Gaussian error of ±1.18 Pg C yr-1 (1-sigma). The largest sink was found in forests, predominantly in coniferous forests (-0.64 ± 0.70 Pg C yr-1) and mixed forests (-0.14 ± 0.27 Pg C yr-1); and the second and third large carbon sinks were found in grass/shrub lands and croplands, accounting for -0.44 ± 0.48 Pg C yr-1 and -0.20 ± 0.48 Pg C yr-1, respectively. The carbon fluxes per ecosystem type have large a priori Gaussian uncertainties, and the reduction of uncertainty based on assimilation of sparse <span class="hlt">observations</span> over Asia is modest (8.7-25.5%) for most individual ecosystems. The ecosystem flux adjustments follow the detailed a priori spatial patterns by design, which further increases the reliance on the a priori biosphere exchange model. The peak-to-peak amplitude of inter-annual variability (IAV) was 0.57 Pg C yr-1 ranging from -1.71 Pg C yr-1 to -2.28 Pg C yr-1. The IAV analysis reveals that the Asian CO2 sink was sensitive to climate variations, with the lowest uptake in 2010 concurrent with a summer flood and autumn drought and the largest CO2 sink in 2009 owing to favorable temperature and plentiful precipitation conditions. We also found the inclusion of the CONTRAIL data in the inversion modeling system reduced the uncertainty by 11% over the whole Asian region, with a large reduction in the southeast of boreal Eurasia, southeast of temperate Eurasia and most tropical Asian areas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, H. F.; Chen, B. Z.; Machida, T.; Matsueda, H.; Sawa, Y.; Fukuyama, Y.; Langenfelds, R.; van der Schoot, M.; Xu, G.; Yan, J. W.; Cheng, M. L.; Zhou, L. X.; Tans, P. P.; Peters, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">150</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NHESS..15....1M"> <span id="translatedtitle">A new high-resolution BOLAM-MOLOCH suite for the SIMM forecasting system: assessment over two HyMeX intense <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High-resolution numerical models can be effective in monitoring and predicting natural hazards, especially when dealing with Mediterranean atmospheric and marine intense/severe events characterised by a wide range of interacting scales. The understanding of the key factors associated to these Mediterranean phenomena, and the usefulness of adopting high-resolution numerical models in their simulation, are among the aims of the international initiative HyMeX - HYdrological cycle in Mediterranean EXperiment. At the turn of 2013, two monitoring campaigns (SOPs - Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Periods</span>) were devoted to these issues. For this purpose, a new high-resolution BOlogna Limited Area Model-MOdello LOCale (BOLAM-MOLOCH) suite was implemented in the Institute for Environmental Protection and Research (ISPRA) hydro-meteo-marine forecasting system (SIMM - Sistema Idro-Meteo-Mare) as a possible alternative to the operational meteorological component based on the BOLAM model self-nested over two lower-resolution domains. The present paper provides an assessment of this new configuration of SIMM with respect to the operational one that was also used during the two SOPs. More in details, it investigates the forecast performance of these SIMM configurations during two of the Intense <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Periods</span> (IOPs) declared in the first SOP campaign. These IOPs were characterised by high precipitations and very intense and exceptional high waters over the northern Adriatic Sea (acqua alta). Concerning the meteorological component, the high-resolution BOLAM-MOLOCH forecasts are compared against the lower-resolution BOLAM forecasts over three areas - mostly corresponding to the Italian HyMeX hydrometeorological sites - using the rainfall <span class="hlt">observations</span> collected in the HyMeX database. Three-month categorical scores are also calculated for the MOLOCH model. Despite the presence of a slight positive bias of the MOLOCH model, the results show that the precipitation forecast turns out to improve with increasing resolution. In both SIMM configurations, the sea storm surge component is based on the same version of the Shallow water HYdrodynamic Finite Element Model (SHYFEM). Hence, it is evaluated the impact of the meteorological forcing provided by the two adopted BOLAM configurations on the SHYFEM forecasts for six tide-gauge stations. A benchmark for this part of the study is given by the performance of the SHYFEM model forced by the ECMWF IFS forecast fields. For this component, both BOLAM-SHYFEM configurations clearly outperform the benchmark. The results are, however, strongly affected by the predictability of the weather systems associated to the IOPs, thus <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> the opportunity to develop and test a time-lagged multi-model ensemble for the prediction of high storm surge events.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mariani, S.; Casaioli, M.; Coraci, E.; Malguzzi, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">151</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ACPD...1327597Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimating Asian terrestrial carbon fluxes from CONTRAIL aircraft and surface CO2 <span class="hlt">observations</span> for the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2006 to 2010</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Current estimates of the terrestrial carbon fluxes in Asia ("Asia" refers to lands as far west as the Urals and is divided into Boreal Eurasia, Temperate Eurasia and tropical Asia based on TransCom regions) show large uncertainties particularly in the boreal and mid-latitudes and in China. In this paper, we present an updated carbon flux estimate for Asia by introducing aircraft CO2 measurements from the CONTRAIL (Comprehensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> Network for Trace gases by Airline) program into an inversion modeling system based on the CarbonTracker framework. We estimated the averaged annual total Asian terrestrial land CO2 sink was about -1.56 Pg C yr-1 over the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2006-2010, which offsets about one-third of the fossil fuel emission from Asia (+4.15 Pg C yr-1). The uncertainty of the terrestrial uptake estimate was derived from a set of sensitivity tests and ranged from -1.07 to -1.80 Pg C yr-1, comparable to the formal Gaussian error of ±1.18 Pg C yr-1 (1-sigma). The largest sink was found in forests, predominantly in coniferous forests (-0.64 Pg C yr-1) and mixed forests (-0.14 Pg C yr-1); and the second and third large carbon sinks were found in grass/shrub lands and crop lands, accounting for -0.44 Pg C yr-1 and -0.20 Pg C yr-1, respectively. The peak-to-peak amplitude of inter-annual variability (IAV) was 0.57 Pg C yr-1 ranging from -1.71 Pg C yr-1 to -2.28 Pg C yr-1. The IAV analysis reveals that the Asian CO2 sink was sensitive to climate variations, with the lowest uptake in 2010 concurrent with summer flood/autumn drought and the largest CO2 sink in 2009 owing to favorable temperature and plentiful precipitation conditions. We also found the inclusion of the CONTRAIL data in the inversion modeling system reduced the uncertainty by 11% over the whole Asian region, with a large reduction in the southeast of Boreal Eurasia, southeast of Temperate Eurasia and most Tropical Asian areas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, H. F.; Chen, B. Z.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; Machida, T.; Matsueda, H.; Sawa, Y.; Fukuyama, Y.; Labuschagne, C.; Langenfelds, R.; van der Schoot, M.; Xu, G.; Yan, J. W.; Zhou, L. X.; Tans, P. P.; Peters, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">152</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sandel&id=EJ377359"> <span id="translatedtitle">Open To <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Suggests</span> class activities in three short articles including: (1) "Students Evaluate Reading," by Lenore Sandel; (2) "Solving Verbal Analogies," by Edward J. Dwyer; and (3) "Becoming Testwise," by Dean Schoen. (RS)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Journal of Reading, 1988</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">153</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.rain.hyarc.nagoya-u.ac.jp/%7Etsuboki/src/pdf_papers/LiZ_etal_JMSJ2007_85_25.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nocturnal Evolution of Cloud Clusters over Eastern China during the Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Periods</span> of GAME\\/HUBEX in 1998 and 1999</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Global Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX)-Asian Monsoon Experiment (GAME)\\/Huaihe River Basin Energy Water Cycle Experiments (GAME\\/HUBEX) were conducted during the Meiyu <span class="hlt">period</span> in 1998 and 1999. Using infrared brightness temperature ðTBBÞ data of the Geostationary Meteorological Satel- lite (GMS)-5, we investigated the diurnal variation of 61 long-lasting cloud clusters that developed dur- ing GAME\\/HUBEX Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Periods</span> (IOPs). More than two-thirds</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhuxiao LI; Takao TAKEDA; Kazuhisa TSUBOKI; Kuranoshin KATO; Masayuki KAWASHIMA; Yasushi FUJIYOSHI</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">154</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Ap%26SS.352..353E"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observation</span> of the <span class="hlt">period</span> ratio P 1/ P 2 of transversal oscillations in solar macro-spicules</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze the time series of oxygen line profiles (O vi 1031.93 Å and O vi 1037.61 Å) obtained from SUMER/SOHO on the solar south limb. We calculated Doppler shifts and consequently Doppler velocities in three heights 4?, 14?, and 24? from the limb on a coronal hole region. Then, we performed wavelet analysis with Morlet wavelet transform to determine the <span class="hlt">periods</span> of fundamental mode and its first harmonic mode. The calculated <span class="hlt">period</span> ratios have departures from its canonical value of 2. The density stratification and magnetic twist are two main factors which may cause these departures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ebadi, H.; Khoshrangbaf, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">155</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AtmRe..89..233E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rainfall yield characteristics of electrical storm <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the Spanish Basque Country area during the <span class="hlt">period</span> 1992 1996</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper is focused on the study of rainfall yield characteristics of electrical storms <span class="hlt">observed</span> over the Northern Iberian Peninsula during 1992-1996. To this aim Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Self-Organizing Maps (SOM) method have been used. The SOM method is a group of artificial neural networks based on the topological properties of the human brain. Results clearly <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that there exist three different meteorological patterns that are linked to the characteristics of electrical events found in the study area. In winter, most of the electrical events are formed under oceanic advection (NW air fluxes). On these cases, mean rainfall yield estimates reach values of 700 10 4 m 3 per cloud to ground lightning flash (CG flash). During summer most frequent electrical storms are associated to local instability shooting by surface heating with advection of humidity coming from the Iberian Peninsula. Under these meteorological situations, rain is scarcer if compared with oceanic events but lightning CG counts reach the maximum values found in the area (about 10 CG counts per 20 × 20 km 2 and day) giving this way the smallest rainfall yield with a mean value of 15 10 4 m 3 per CG flash. Iberian air fluxes associated with cold air in upper parts of the atmosphere represent the third meteorological pattern found. This pattern is most common in spring and autumn but is not unusual in the rest of the seasons. In those cases mean rainfall yield in the area is about 150 10 4 m 3 per CG flash. In all electrical episodes K instability index is greater than 15 °C but in the most lightning producing events, this index reaches in the area values greater than 24 °C. PCA results pointed out that there exists a relationship between rain and CG counts expressed by the first principal component computed from standardized data. However, we must notice that no event is solely linked to this axis, since a seasonal influence which decreases lightning production when rain increases is always present. Results found are of great interest for short term forecasting of flashfloods in mountainous areas like the Spanish Basque Country region.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ezcurra, A.; Saenz, J.; Ibarra-Berastegi, G.; Areitio, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">156</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/129106"> <span id="translatedtitle">Soybean Insect Control <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Protecting Bees and Other Pollinators from Insecticides .............................. 10 Policy Statement for Making Chemical Control Recommendations ....................... 11 Soybean Insect Control <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> (chart) ... 12 Conversion Table... and maximum coverage. When making any insecticide applications, follow label directions. Refer to the ((Protecting Bees and other Pollinators from Insecticides" section of this bulletin to avoid bee losses. Biological Insecticides ':,.,.dcillus...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Drees, B.M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">157</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50120546"> <span id="translatedtitle">AERI downwelling infrared radiance <span class="hlt">observations</span> and calculations: case studies from the 1997 DOE ARM CART Water Vapor Intensive Operations <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The 1997 Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Water Vapor Intensive Operations <span class="hlt">Period</span> (WVIOP) was conducted September 15-October 5, 1997 at the ARM Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (SGP-CART) site near Lamont, Oklahoma. The goals of the WVIOP were to optimize the capabilities of CART instrumentation for characterizing atmospheric water vapor and construction of an</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. F. W. van Delst; D. C. Tobin; H. E. Revercomb; R. O. Knuteson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">158</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006ApJ...649..862C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Testing the Disk Regulation Paradigm with Spitzer <span class="hlt">Observations</span>. I. Rotation <span class="hlt">Periods</span> of Pre-Main-Sequence Stars in the IC 348 Cluster</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present 105 stellar rotation <span class="hlt">periods</span> in the young cluster IC 348, 75 of which are new detections, increasing the total number of known <span class="hlt">periods</span> in this cluster to 143. The <span class="hlt">period</span> distribution resembles that seen in the heart of the Orion Nebula cluster by Herbst and colleagues. Stars estimated to be less massive than 0.25 Msolar show a unimodal distribution of fast rotators (P~1-2 days) and a tail of slower rotators, while stars estimated to be more massive than 0.25 Msolar show a bimodal distribution with peaks at ~2 and ~8 days. We combine all published rotation <span class="hlt">periods</span> in IC 348 with Spitzer mid-IR (3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 ?m) photometry, an unprecedentedly efficient and reliable disk indicator, in order to test the disk-braking paradigm. We find no evidence that the tail of slow rotators in low-mass stars or the long-<span class="hlt">period</span> peak in high-mass stars are preferentially populated by objects with disks as might be expected based on the current disk-braking model. We find some indication that the disk fraction decreases significantly for stars with very short <span class="hlt">periods</span> (P<~1.5 days), which is the only feature of our sample that could potentially be interpreted as evidence for disk braking. It has been proposed that the <span class="hlt">observational</span> signatures of disk braking might be significantly masked by the intrinsic breadth of the initial <span class="hlt">period</span> distribution. We argue that more rigorous modeling of angular momentum evolution and a quantitative analysis of the <span class="hlt">observational</span> data are required before the disk-braking model can be regarded as inconsistent with <span class="hlt">observations</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cieza, Lucas; Baliber, Nairn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">159</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60568893"> <span id="translatedtitle">Twenty-Four-Hour Raman Lidar Water Vapor Measurements During the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's 1996 and 1997 Water Vapor Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Prior to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's first water vapor intensive <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> (WVIOP) at the Cloud and Radiation Testbed site near Lamont, Oklahoma, an automated 24-h Raman lidar was delivered to the site. This instrument, which makes high-resolution measurements of water vapor both spatially and temporally, is capable of making these measurements with no operator interaction (other than initial</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David D. Turner; JE M. Goldsmith</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">160</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ucm.es/info/Astrof/users/dmg/papers/p_cs13_icc.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Program Stars and Stellar Parameters Table. 1: Stellar parameters of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> stars: spectral type (SpT), vsin(i) and photometric <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">for spectroscopic binaries (singled lined (1) and double lined (2)) and T for triple star systems. The numberProgram Stars and Stellar Parameters Table. 1: Stellar parameters of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> stars: spectral type (SpT), vsin(i) and photometric <span class="hlt">period</span> (Pphot). The remark is -- for single stars, SB</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Complutense de Madrid, Universidad</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_8 div --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">161</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006epsc.conf..125K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Saturn's variable radio <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Temporal modulations in radio emissions are often used to determine the rotation rate of the emitting body. The rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> (presumably) of Jupiter's interior was established in this way [Burke et al., 1962] and has recently been refined by Higgins et al. [1997]. Rotation <span class="hlt">periods</span> for the remainder of the outer planet gas giants were determined from Voyager planetary radio astronomy <span class="hlt">observations</span>. Similar techniques have been applied to astrophysical objects, including pulsars, for which the radio <span class="hlt">period</span> is assumed to be the rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> of the neutron star. In 2001, however, this simple relation between the radio <span class="hlt">period</span> and rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> became suspect, at least for the case of Saturn. Galopeau and Lecacheux [2001] reported that the radio <span class="hlt">period</span> of Saturn had changed by as much as 1% from that determined by Voyager and, further, exhibited variations on time scales of years. More recently, Cassini <span class="hlt">observations</span> indicate that the Saturn kilometric radiation is modulated with a <span class="hlt">period</span> longer than that <span class="hlt">observed</span> by Voyager and that this <span class="hlt">period</span> is variable on a time scale of a year or less. The recent Higgins et al. result <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that Jupiter's <span class="hlt">period</span> is steady, within measurement accuracy. There are no additional measurements from Uranus or Neptune with which to look for time variations in their radio <span class="hlt">periods</span>. For conservation of energy and angular momentum reasons, true variations of the rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> of Saturn's deep interior are not believed to be a viable explanation for the variation in radio <span class="hlt">period</span>, hence, it would appear that there is some disconnection of the radio <span class="hlt">period</span> from the rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> in the case of Saturn. One possible contributing factor may be that since Saturn's magnetic field is very accurately aligned with its rotational axis, there is no first-order beaming effect caused by the wobbling of the magnetic field, contrary to the situation at the other magnetized planets. Another explanation <span class="hlt">suggested</span> by Galopeau and Lecacheux [2001] and more recently by Cecconi and Zarka [2005] is that variations in the solar wind may affect the <span class="hlt">period</span> of the radio emissions. Very recently, Giampieri et al. [2006] reported a <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> in the magnetic field measured by Cassini over a 14-month <span class="hlt">period</span> that appears to be steady over this time interval. However, the <span class="hlt">period</span> is consistent, within the ± 40-s error, with that measured for the radio emissions over the same interval. It appears, then, that the <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> in the magnetic field is the same as that which has been measured by radio methods for several decades. Since both the radio emission and the magnetic field measurements are based on the field external to the planet, some slippage between the external field and the interior field is <span class="hlt">suggested</span>. The understanding of the variable <span class="hlt">period</span> of Saturn's 1 external magnetic field and its relation to the deep interior of the planet is perhaps one of the most fundamental and profound mysteries confronting the Cassini mission at this time. 2</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kurth, W. S.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Gurnett, D. A.; Cecconi, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">162</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1424468"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table of ion charge-state distributions <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the transition region between vacuum sparks and vacuum arcs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ion charge-state distributions have been measured with high time resolution for short (20 ?s) and long (250 ?s) vacuum discharges of 300 A. Charge-state data for 3 ?s after discharge ignition and quasi-steady-state values are given for most conductive elements in a <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table, including data for a few elements (rhodium, europium, and terbium) that were never before reported in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">André Anders</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">163</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.jolr.org/journal/documents/Volume_3_2007-24-jlr-2007-38mmkulkarni.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Satellite based <span class="hlt">observations</span> of LIS and OTD: A comparative study of flash count during the overlapping <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The optical measurements of lightning activity recorded by the sensors viz. LIS and OTD, in the form of flash count, during overlapping <span class="hlt">period</span> (1998 and 99) have been analysed over the Indian landmass (8°-33° N and 73°- 86° E). The spatial resolution is 0.5° X 0.5° grid (~55km X 55km). Along with this, their diurnal and annual variation is also</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. S. KandalgaonkarA; A. Indian; Homi Bhabha; M. K. Kulkarni</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">164</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4318590"> <span id="translatedtitle">Trends in Epithelial Cell Abnormalities <span class="hlt">Observed</span> on Cervical Smears over a 21-Year <span class="hlt">Period</span> in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Kuwait</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objectives: This study aimed to analyse trends in epithelial cell abnormalities (ECAs) in cervical cytology at a tertiary care hospital in Kuwait. Methods: ECAs in 135,766 reports were compared over three seven-year <span class="hlt">periods</span> between 1992 and 2012. Conventional Papanicolaou (Pap) smear tests were used in the first two <span class="hlt">periods</span> and ThinPrep (Hologic Corp., Bedford, Massachusetts, USA) tests were used in the third. Results: Significant increases in satisfactory smears, atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) and atypical glandular cells of undetermined significance/atypical glandular cells (AGUS/AGCs) were seen in the second and third <span class="hlt">periods</span> (P <0.001). No significant increases were <span class="hlt">observed</span> among low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs) or high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) (P >0.05). An increase was noted in carcinomas between the first and second <span class="hlt">periods</span> although a significant decline was seen in the third (P <0.014). Conclusion: Satisfactory smears, ASCUS and AGUS/AGC increased during the study <span class="hlt">period</span> although no significant increases in LSILs, HSILs or carcinomas were <span class="hlt">observed</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kapila, Kusum; Sharma, Prem N.; George, Sara S.; Al-Shaheen, Azza; Al-Juwaiser, Ahlam; Al-Awadhi, Rana</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">165</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001JCrGr.231...82A"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observation</span> of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> thermocapillary flow in a molten silicon bridge by using non-contact temperature measurements</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thermocapillary flow in a bridge of molten silicon under measured oxygen partial pressure in the ambient atmosphere was investigated in terms of fluctuations in the brightness of pixels of CCD images. The fluctuations in the brightness of the CCD images at the silicon surface agree with the temperature fluctuations measured in the bridge by using thermocouples in a mono-ellipsoidal mirror furnace. Moreover, a mode with <span class="hlt">periodic</span> fluctuations in pixel brightness was found when the temperature difference between the upper and lower interfaces of the bridge decreased from 24.5 to 7.5 K. The Marangoni number corresponding to this temperature difference was estimated to be 700-1700.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Azami, Takeshi; Nakamura, Shin; Hibiya, Taketoshi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">166</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AIPC.1203..133T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Type III Radio Bursts <span class="hlt">Observed</span> with Radio Spectrograph ARTEMIS IV within the Intense Active <span class="hlt">Period</span> of October-November 2003</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the relationship of metric type III radio bursts obtained with radio spectrograph ARTEMIS IV (20-650 MHz) in Thermopylae, to GOES SXR/Ha and SOHO/LASCO CMEs within the <span class="hlt">period</span> of intense activity 20 October to 5 November 2003. Our sample consists of 123 type III radio bursts, 115 SXR Flares (mostly C-type) and 12 CMEs. 69% of type III bursts are coincident in time with SXR Flares, while the rest 31% were detected between successive SXR flux maxima and though not always in the same active region as the SXR Flare, thereby labeled as SXR Less. The lack of SXR enhancement in SXR less type III bursts was probably the result of increased SXR background which prevented detection. It is found also, that 62% of the Flares are associated with type III radio bursts. Furthermore, we study the characteristic type III parameters i.e. start frequency, frequency band and duration as well as the SXR Flare parameters i.e. Flux, Duration, Apparent Area, rise time, decay time and their ratio. Finally, we tried to investigate any characteristic variation occurred because of the different morphology of the three major active regions, 484, 486 and 488 of that <span class="hlt">period</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thanasa, M.; Preka-Papadima, P.; Moussas, X.; Tsitsipis, P.; Kontogeorgos, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">167</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010093230&hterms=dark+current&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Ddark%2Bcurrent"> <span id="translatedtitle">Earth <span class="hlt">Observing</span>-1 Advanced Imager Flight Performance Assessment: Investigating Dark Current Stability Over One-Half Orbit <span class="hlt">Period</span> during the First 60 Days</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The stability of the EO-1 Advanced Land Imager dark current levels over the <span class="hlt">period</span> of one-half orbit is investigated. A series of two-second dark current collections, over the course of 40 minutes, was performed during the first sixty days the instrument was in orbit. Analysis of this data indicates only two dark current reference <span class="hlt">periods</span>, obtained entering and exiting eclipse, are required to remove ALI dark current offsets for 99.9% of the focal plane to within 1.5 digital numbers for any <span class="hlt">observation</span> on the solar illuminated portion of the orbit.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mendenhall, J. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">168</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1963-THESIS-M698"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of radiation patterns in the 8-12 micron range as <span class="hlt">observed</span> by Tiros III over the Caribbean Sea during the <span class="hlt">period</span> 20-21 July 1961</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">INVESTIGATION OF RADIATION PATTERNS IN THE 8-12 MICRON RANGE AS <span class="hlt">OBSERVED</span> BY TIROS III OVER THE CARIBBEAN SEA DURING THE <span class="hlt">PERIOD</span> 20-21 JULY 1961 A Thesis By PAUL IRVIN MOHLER Captain, United States Air Force Submitted to the Graduate School... THE CARIBBEAN SEA DURING THE <span class="hlt">PERIOD</span> 20-21 JULY 1961 A Thesis By PAUL IRVIN MOHLER Captain, United States Air Force Approved as to style and content by: rman o Comm tt ea o Department August 1963 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The writer 's graduate program was made...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mohler, Paul Irvin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1963-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">169</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009LNCS.5823..424M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Learning Semantic Query <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An important application of semantic web technology is recognizing human-defined concepts in text. Query transformation is a strategy often used in search engines to derive queries that are able to return more useful search results than the original query and most popular search engines provide facilities that let users complete, specify, or reformulate their queries. We study the problem of semantic query <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>, a special type of query transformation based on identifying semantic concepts contained in user queries. We use a feature-based approach in conjunction with supervised machine learning, augmenting term-based features with search history-based and concept-specific features. We apply our method to the task of linking queries from real-world query logs (the transaction logs of the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision) to the DBpedia knowledge base. We evaluate the utility of different machine learning algorithms, features, and feature types in identifying semantic concepts using a manually developed test bed and show significant improvements over an already high baseline. The resources developed for this paper, i.e., queries, human assessments, and extracted features, are available for download.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Meij, Edgar; Bron, Marc; Hollink, Laura; Huurnink, Bouke; de Rijke, Maarten</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">170</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jc/v086/iC10/JC086iC10p09698/JC086iC10p09698.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inertio-Gravity Wave Induced Accelerations of Mean Flow Having an Imposed <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Component: Implications for Tidal <span class="hlt">Observations</span> in the Meteor Region</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The semidiurnal harmonic exhibits great day-to-day variability in amplitude and phase. In addition, the variability appears to be substantially local and random, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a connection with gravity wave activity. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that a significant contribution to the <span class="hlt">observed</span> semidiurnal harmonic at meteor heights might result from inertio-gravity wave induced accelerations of the mean flow. The rate of wave forcing of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. L. Walterscheid</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">171</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53773899"> <span id="translatedtitle">Testing the No-hair Theorem with <span class="hlt">Observations</span> in the Electromagnetic Spectrum. III. Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> Variability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">According to the no-hair theorem, astrophysical black holes are uniquely described by their masses and spins. An <span class="hlt">observational</span> test of the no-hair theorem can be performed by measuring at least three different multipole moments of the spacetime of a black hole and verifying whether their values are consistent with the unique combinations of the Kerr solution. In this paper, we</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tim Johannsen; Dimitrios Psaltis</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">172</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://earth.esa.int/goce04/goce_proceedings/08_drange.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intercomparison of dynamic height in the Nordic Seas from <span class="hlt">observations</span> and climate model simulations for the <span class="hlt">period</span> 1950 to 2000</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The dynamic height D, defined as the product of the depth difference between two surfaces of constant pressure and gravity, is used for estimation of the ocean circulation at both regional and global scales. The dynamic height can be readily derived from 3-dimensional <span class="hlt">observations</span> of temperature and salinity (i.e., from hydrography), or from Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCMs). It can</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Helge Drange; Alexander Korablev; Johnny A. Johannessen; Yongqi Gao; Ola M. Johannessen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">173</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMAE33B0343A"> <span id="translatedtitle">How well does WWLLN reproduce the satellite-<span class="hlt">observed</span> distribution of flashes during the 2007-2012 time <span class="hlt">period</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lightning is the dominant source of nitrogen oxides (NOx) involved in the production of ozone in the middle and upper troposphere in the tropics and in summer in the midlatitudes. Therefore it is imperative that the lightning NOx (LNOx) source strength per flash be better constrained. This process requires accurate information on the location and timing of lightning flashes. In the past fifteen years satellite-based lightning monitoring by the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) has greatly increased our understanding of the global distribution of lightning as a function of season and time-of-day. However, detailed information at higher temporal resolutions is only available for limited regions where ground-based networks such as the United States National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) exist. In 2004, the ground-based World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) was formed with the goal of providing continuous flash rate information over the entire globe. It detects very low frequency (VLF) radio waves emitted by lightning with a detection efficiency (DE) that varies with stroke energy, time-of-day, surface type, and network coverage. This study evaluated the DE of WWLLN strokes relative to climatological OTD/LIS flashes using data from the 2007 to 2012 time <span class="hlt">period</span>, a <span class="hlt">period</span> during which the mean number of working sensors increased from 28 to 53. The analysis revealed that the mean global DE increased from 5% in 2007 to 13% in 2012. Regional variations were substantial with mean 2012 DEs of 5-10% over much of Argentina, Africa, and Asia and 15-30% over much of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, the United States and the Maritime Continent. Detection-efficiency adjusted WWLLN flash rates were then compared to NLDN-based flash rates. Spatial correlations for individual summer months ranged from 0.66 to 0.93. Temporal correlations are currently being examined for regions of the U.S. and will also be shown.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Allen, D. J.; Pickering, K. E.; Ring, A.; Holzworth, R. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">174</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24824766"> <span id="translatedtitle">Difference in production routes of water-soluble organic carbon in PM2.5 <span class="hlt">observed</span> during non-biomass and biomass burning <span class="hlt">periods</span> in Gwangju, Korea.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">4 h integrated PM2.5 samples were collected from an urban site of Gwangju, Korea, for five days and analyzed for organic carbon and elemental carbon (OC and EC), total water-soluble OC (WSOC), hydrophilic and hydrophobic WSOC fractions (WSOCHPI and WSOCHPO), oxalate, and inorganic ionic species (sodium (Na(+)), ammonium (NH4(+)), potassium (K(+)), calcium (Ca(2+)), magnesium (Mg(2+)), chloride (Cl(-)), nitrate (NO3(-)), and sulfate (SO4(2-))) to investigate the possible sources of water-soluble organic aerosols. Two types of sampling <span class="hlt">periods</span> were classified according to the regression relationship between black carbon (BC) concentrations measured at wavelengths of 370 nm (BC370nm) and 880 nm (BC880nm) using an aethalometer; the first <span class="hlt">period</span> was traffic emission influence ("non-biomass burning (BB) <span class="hlt">period</span>") and the second was biomass burning influence ("BB <span class="hlt">period</span>"). The slope of the regression equation (BC370nm/BC880nm) was 0.95 for the non-BB <span class="hlt">period</span> and 1.29 for the BB <span class="hlt">period</span>. However, no noticeable difference in the WSOC/OC ratio, which can be used to infer the extent of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, was found between the non-BB (0.61, range = 0.43-0.75) and BB (0.61, range = 0.52-0.68) <span class="hlt">periods</span>, due to significant contribution of primary BB emissions to the WSOC. The concentrations of OC, WSOC and K(+), which were used as the BB emission markers, were 15.7 ?g C m(-3) (11.5-24.3), 9.4 ?g C m(-3) (7.0-12.7), and 1.2 ?g m(-3) (0.6-2.7), respectively, during the BB <span class="hlt">period</span>, and these results were approximately 1.7, 1.7, and 3.9 times higher than those during the non-BB <span class="hlt">period</span>. During the non-BB <span class="hlt">period</span>, good correlations among WSOC, SO4(2-) and oxalate, and poor correlations among WSOC, EC, and K(+) <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that SOA is probably an important source of WSOC (and WSOCHPI) concentration. For the WSOC fractions, better correlations among WSOCHPI, oxalate (R(2) = 0.52), and SO4(2-) (R(2) = 0.57) were found than among WSOCHPO, oxalate (R(2) = 0.23), and SO4(2-) (R(2) = 0.20), <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that a significant proportion of the WSOCHPI fraction of OC could be produced through processes (gas-phase and heterogeneous oxidations) such as SOA formation. However, during the BB <span class="hlt">period</span>, the BB emission source accounted for the high correlations between total WSOC (and WSOC fractions) and other relevant atmospheric parameters (EC, Na(+), Cl(-), K(+), and oxalate), with higher correlations in WSOCHPI than in WSOCHPO. These results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a significant contribution of BB emissions to WSOC. PMID:24824766</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yu, Geun-Hye; Cho, Sung-Yong; Bae, Min-Suk; Park, Seung-Shik</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">175</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFMSA51B1129L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coherent Scatter Imaging Radar <span class="hlt">Observations</span>: Insights Provided By a New Tool for Studies of Midlatitude Sporadic E and Quasi-<span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Echo Structures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The development of the coherent scatter radar imaging technique has provided a unique new tool for studying the structure of plasma irregularities in the ionosphere. This in-beam or aperture synthesis technique was applied extensively in an experiment carried out in June and July 2002 on the island of St. Croix in the Caribbean in which the coherent scatter looked westward toward the island of Puerto Rico. In particular, the imaging radar instrumentation was used in conjunction with the Arecibo Observatory incoherent scatter radar to study the horizontal and vertical spatial structure in quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> echoes associated with sporadic E layers located over Puerto Rico. The imaging technique has provided new measurements with unprecedented resolution that show both the spatial structure and movement of the irregularities. The St. Croix <span class="hlt">observations</span> show that the quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> structures are localized in the vertical and horizontal directions. Although there is a slight preference for propagation along the northeast to southwest direction, other propagation directions also occur. Especially when viewed in the context of recent rocket and radar experiments, such as the SEEK 2 experiment that was carried out in Japan, the St. Croix data provide an important new perspective on the dynamics associated with the quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> echo structures. The types of measurements that can be provided by the imaging technique will be presented, and the <span class="hlt">observations</span> of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> echo structures will be analyzed in the context of other recent rocket and radar experiments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Larsen, M. F.; Hysell, D. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">176</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014A%26A...572A..79K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Super-spinning compact objects and models of high-frequency quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations <span class="hlt">observed</span> in Galactic microquasars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have previously applied several models of high-frequency quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations (HF QPOs) to estimate the spin of the central Kerr black hole in the three Galactic microquasars, GRS 1915+105, GRO J1655-40, and XTE J1550-564. Here we explore the alternative possibility that the central compact body is a super-spinning object (or a naked singularity) with the external space-time described by Kerr geometry with a dimensionless spin parameter a ? cJ/GM2> 1. We calculate the relevant spin intervals for a subset of HF QPO models considered in the previous study. Our analysis indicates that for all but one of the considered models there exists at least one interval of a> 1 that is compatible with constraints given by the ranges of the central compact object mass independently estimated for the three sources. For most of the models, the inferred values of a are several times higher than the extreme Kerr black hole value a = 1. These values may be too high since the spin of superspinars is often assumed to rapidly decrease due to accretion when a ? 1. In this context, we conclude that only the epicyclic and the Keplerian resonance model provides estimates that are compatible with the expectation of just a small deviation from a = 1.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kotrlová, Andrea; Török, Gabriel; Šrámková, Eva; Stuchlík, Zden?k</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">177</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1963-THESIS-C889"> <span id="translatedtitle">An investigation of time changes in clouds <span class="hlt">observed</span> over the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea during the <span class="hlt">period</span> 18 - 23 July 1961</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">networks by the National Weather Analysis Center showed little significant change, according to Winston, except that the remains of an easterly wave apparently had moved into the Gulf. However, a profound change in cloud cover occurred over the Gulf...AN INVESTIGATION OF TIME CHANGES IN CLOUDS <span class="hlt">OBSERVED</span> OVER THE GULF OF MEXICO AND CARIBBEAN SEA DURING THE <span class="hlt">PERIOD</span> 18-23 JULY 1961 A Thesis By WILLIAM PAUL CRAMER Captain, United States Air Force Submitted to the Graduate School...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cramer, William Paul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1963-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/20008975"> <span id="translatedtitle">Development of One <span class="hlt">Period</span> of a Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystal in the 5 10 µm Wavelength Region by Wafer Fusion and Laser Beam Diffraction Pattern <span class="hlt">Observation</span> Techniques</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">One <span class="hlt">period</span> of a three-dimensional photonic crystal operating in the 5˜10-µm-wavelength region is developed,where four layers having a striped pattern are stacked using a wafer fusionand the alignment method based on a laser beam diffraction pattern <span class="hlt">observation</span> technique.By measuring the transmission spectrum, considerable attenuation (of about 16 dB) is successfully achieved and is in good agreement with the theoretical calculation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Noritsugu Yamamoto; Susumu Noda; Alongkarn Chutinan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRD..119.2990A"> <span id="translatedtitle">The low-level jet dust emission mechanism in the central Sahara: <span class="hlt">Observations</span> from Bordj-Badji Mokhtar during the June 2011 Fennec Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">paper presents the first detailed analysis of low-level jets (LLJs) in the central Sahara from ground-based <span class="hlt">observations</span> at Bordj-Badji Mokhtar, Algeria, and addresses their operation as a dust emission mechanism. On LLJ mornings, composite wind speeds in the core (300 m aboveground level) reach 13.5 m s-1 at 0400. Surface temperatures increase from 0545 (30 min after sunrise), and jet decay begins around 0600. Ten meter winds lag those in the core by 5 h; peak 10 m wind speed, 7.5 m s-1, occurs at 0900. Only the deepest and strongest LLJs lead to dust emission. At 0600, these five LLJs have core wind speeds ?16 m s-1, below-core wind shear ? 0.6 m s-1/30 m, and wind shear between the core and 500 m above the core ?-1.8 m s-1. On these occasions, momentum mixes down from the LLJ after surface heating, leading to emission. On nondusty LLJ mornings, the convective boundary layer is 100 m shallower, and the LLJ is too weak to provide enough momentum to be mixed down for emission. LLJs are most frequently embedded in the monsoon flow or in the Harmattan; there is a clear association with the Saharan Heat Low. ERA-Interim reanalysis underestimates both Harmattan and monsoon LLJ core winds (by 4 m s-1 and 6 m s-1, respectively). The Met Office Africa Limited Area Model underestimates Harmattan LLJ core winds by only 0.2 m s-1. Monsoon LLJ core winds, however, are underestimated by 8.5 m s-1. Surface winds at 0900 are underestimated in both cases by up to 6 m s-1.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Allen, Christopher J. T.; Washington, Richard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2576305"> <span id="translatedtitle">Blood culture collection technique and pneumococcal surveillance in Malawi during the four year <span class="hlt">period</span> 2003–2006: an <span class="hlt">observational</span> study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Blood culture surveillance will be used for assessing the public health effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in Africa. Between 2003 and 2006 we assessed blood culture outcome and performance in adult patients in the central public hospital in Blantyre, Malawi, before and after the introduction of a dedicated nurse led blood culture team. Methods A prospective <span class="hlt">observational</span> study. Results Following the introduction of a specialised blood culture team in 2005, the proportion of contaminated cultures decreased (19.6% in 2003 to 5.0% in 2006), blood volume cultured increased and pneumococcal recovery increased significantly from 2.8% of all blood cultures to 6.1%. With each extra 1 ml of blood cultured the odds of recovering a pneumococcus increased by 18%. Conclusion Standardisation and assessment of blood culture performance (blood volume and contamination rate) should be incorporated into pneumococcal disease surveillance activities where routine blood culture practice is constrained by limited resources. PMID:18854024</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mtunthama, Neema; Gordon, Stephen B; Kusimbwe, Temwa; Zijlstra, Eduard E; Molyneux, Malcolm E; French, Neil</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_9 div --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...793...78S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> and Modeling of the Companions of Short <span class="hlt">Period</span> Binary Millisecond Pulsars: Evidence for High-mass Neutron Stars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present <span class="hlt">observations</span> of fields containing eight recently discovered binary millisecond pulsars using the telescopes at MDM Observatory. Optical counterparts to four of these systems are detected, one of which, PSR J2214+3000, is a novel detection. Additionally, we present the fully phase-resolved B, V, and R light curves of the optical counterparts to two objects, PSR J1810+1744 and PSR J2215+5135 for which we employ model fitting using the eclipsing light curve (ELC) model of Orosz & Hauschildt to measure the unknown system parameters. For PSR J1810+1744, we find that the system parameters cannot be fit even assuming that 100% of the spin-down luminosity of the pulsar is irradiating the secondary, and so radial velocity measurements of this object will be required for the complete solution. However, PSR J2215+5135 exhibits light curves that are extremely well constrained using the ELC model and we find that the mass of the neutron star is constrained by these and the radio <span class="hlt">observations</span> to be M NS > 1.75 M ? at the 3? level. We also find a discrepancy between the model temperature and the measured colors of this object, which we interpret as possible evidence for an additional high-temperature source such as a quiescent disk. Given this and the fact that PSR J2215+5135 contains a relatively high mass companion (M c > 0.1 M ?), we propose that similar to the binary pulsar systems PSR J1023+0038 and IGR J18245-2452, the pulsar may transition between accretion- and rotation-powered modes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schroeder, Joshua; Halpern, Jules</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040182332&hterms=Periodic+table&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3D%2528Periodic%2Btable%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectral Index and Quasi-<span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole Sources: <span class="hlt">Observational</span> Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in Black Holes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are <span class="hlt">observed</span> between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several black hole (BH) candidate sources, in low (hard) states, steep power law (soft) states, and transitions between these states. The <span class="hlt">observations</span> indicate that the X-ray spectra of such state (phases) show the presence of a power-law component and are sometimes related to simultaneous radio emission, indicating the probable presence of a jet. Strong QPOs (>20% rms) are present in the power density spectrum in the spectral range where the power-law component is dominant (i.e., 60%90%). This evidence contradicts the dominant, long-standing interpretation of QPOs as a signature of the thermal accretion disk. We present the data from the literature and our own data to illustrate the dominance of power-law index-QPO frequency correlations. We provide a model that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of the power-law flux component. We argue for the existence of a bounded compact coronal region that is a natural consequence of the adjustment of the Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) a hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT approximately greater than 50 keV), producing photon upscattering via thermal Comptonization (the photon spectrum index Gamma approximates 1.7 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius), and (2) a soft state that is optically thick and relatively cold (kT approximately less than 5 keV the index for this state, Gamma approximates 2.8, is determined by soft-photon upscattering and photon trapping in a converging flow into the BH). In the TL model for the corona, the QPO frequency V(sub high) is related to the gravitational (close to Keplerian) frequency V(sub K) at the outer (adjustment) radius and v(sub low) is related to the TL's normal mode (magnetoacoustic) oscillation frequency v(sub MA) . The <span class="hlt">observed</span> correlations between index and low and high QPO frequencies are readily explained in terms of this model. We also <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a new method for evaluation of the BH mass using the index-frequency correlation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Titarchuk, Lev; Fiorito, Ralph</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3958923"> <span id="translatedtitle">Prognostic Factors for Long-Term Survival in Patients with Ampullary Carcinoma: The Results of a 15-Year <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> after Pancreaticoduodenectomy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Introduction. Although ampullary carcinoma has the best prognosis among all periampullary carcinomas, its long-term survival remains low. Prognostic factors are only available for a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 10 years after pancreaticoduodenectomy. The aim of this retrospective study was to identify factors that influence the long-term patient survival over a 15-year <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span>. Methods. From 1992 to 2007, 143 patients with ampullary carcinoma underwent pancreatic resection. 86 patients underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (60%) and 57 patients underwent standard Kausch-Whipple pancreaticoduodenectomy (40%). Results. The overall 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year survival rates were 79%, 40%, 24%, and 10%, respectively. Within a mean <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> of 30 (0–205) months, 100 (69%) patients died. Survival analysis showed that positive lymph node involvement (P = 0.001), lymphatic vessel invasion (P = 0.0001), intraoperative administration of packed red blood cells (P = 0.03), an elevated CA 19-9 (P = 0.03), jaundice (P = 0.04), and an impaired patient condition (P = 0.01) are strong negative predictors for a reduced patient survival. Conclusions. Patients with ampullary carcinoma have distinctly better long-term survival than patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Long-term survival depends strongly on lymphatic nodal and vessel involvement. Moreover, a preoperative elevated CA 19-9 proved to be a significant prognostic factor. Adjuvant therapy may be essential in patients with this risk constellation. PMID:24723741</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jacob, Dietmar; Bahra, Marcus; Puhl, Gero; Krannich, Alexander; Andreou, Andreas; Gül, Safak; Guckelberger, Olaf</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986ApJ...310..773R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hard X-ray pulse profile and <span class="hlt">period</span> evolution of AO535 + 26 and GX 1 + 4 as <span class="hlt">observed</span> by the Franco-Soviet Signe satellite experiments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The source GX 1 + 4 and an outburst from the recurrent X-ray transient A0535+26 were <span class="hlt">observed</span> in 1977 December by collimated detectors aboard the Prognoz 6 satellite (Signe 2MP experiment) in the energy range 28-308 keV and aboard the Signe 3 satellite between 27 and 108 keV. The temporal evolution of the pulsation <span class="hlt">period</span> of these sources (107.22 s and 103.89 s respectively), the variations of the pulsed and total fluxes, and the light curves are given. A temporary disk model for A0535+26 is proposed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Refloch, A.; Chambon, G.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Rakhmaninov, Ch. Iu.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4130246"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sensitive <span class="hlt">Periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This chapter reviews sensitive <span class="hlt">periods</span> in human brain development based on the literature on children raised in institutions. Sensitive experiences occur when experiences are uniquely influential for the development of neural circuitry. Because in humans, we make inferences about sensitive <span class="hlt">periods</span> from evaluations of complex behaviors, we underestimate the occurrence of sensitive <span class="hlt">periods</span> at the level of neural circuitry. Although we are most interested in complex behaviors, such as IQ or attachment or externalizing problems, many different sensitive <span class="hlt">periods</span> at the level of circuits probably underlie these complex behaviors. Results from a number of studies <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that across most, but not all, domains of development, institutional rearing limited to the first 4–6 months of life is associated with no significant increase risk for long-term adverse effects relative to non-institutionalized children. Beyond that, evidence for sensitive <span class="hlt">periods</span> is less compelling, meaning that “the earlier the better” rule for enhanced caregiving is a reasonable conclusion at the current state of the science. PMID:25125708</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zeanah, Charles H.; Gunnar, Megan R.; McCall, Robert B.; Kreppner, Jana M.; Fox, Nathan A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.S53D..02H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characteristics of Long-<span class="hlt">Period</span> (3 to 10 s) Strong Ground Motions <span class="hlt">Observed</span> in and around the Los Angeles Basin during the Mw7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake of April 4, 2010</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examined the characteristics of long-<span class="hlt">period</span> strong ground motions within a <span class="hlt">period</span> range of 3 to 10 s in and around the Los Angeles (LA) basin during the Mw7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake. The contour map of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> peak ground velocity (PGV) values clearly shows that the LA basin significantly amplifies the long-<span class="hlt">period</span> motions. The largest PGV values <span class="hlt">observed</span> within the LA basin range from 0.1 to 0.12 m/s, though the basin is around 350 km away from the epicenter. These largest PGV values were recorded at seven stations in the central part, and one station in the western part of the basin. The Fourier acceleration spectra of records from these eight stations are predominant at the <span class="hlt">periods</span> of 6 to 8 s with the corresponding peak values of 1 to 1.4 m/s. The ratio of Fourier amplitudes with respect to a reference site (STG station of the Southern California Seismic Network, located on hard rock in the southeast edge of the LA basin) show that the spectral amplitudes at these eight stations are 5 to 13 times larger than those at the reference site within a wide <span class="hlt">period</span> range, 5.5 to 9 s. To understand how the spatial variation of amplification for the long-<span class="hlt">period</span> motions is related to the basin underground structure, we plotted contours of the amplification factors at 3, 5, 7 and 10 s spectral <span class="hlt">periods</span> with respect to the reference site (i.e. STG station) onto several different maps, where depths to different S-wave velocities (Vs) are also depicted using the latest SCEC Community Velocity Model (CVM-H 6.2). Comparison of amplification contours with the basin model indicates that for the 10 s spectral <span class="hlt">period</span>, the largest amplification occurs in the central part of the LA basin where the depth to the Vs of 3.2 km/s reaches to the maximum, 9.5 km. For the 3, 5 and 7 s spectral <span class="hlt">periods</span>, the amplification becomes larger in almost the same area as the 10 s case (the central part of the LA basin) and also in the San Gabriel valley, where the depth to the Vs of 1.5 km/s reaches to the maximum, 3.7 km. Although the depth to bedrock (Vs > 3.2 km/s) is shallower (3.6 to 4 km) in the San Gabriel valley than the LA basin, the large amplification is due to the thick soft sediments (Vs < 1.5 km/s). This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> importance of precise seismic velocity profiles at both shallow- and deep-part of sedimentary basins for a more accurate prediction of long-<span class="hlt">period</span> strong ground motions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hatayama, K.; Kalkan, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JGRD..113.0C01M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aerosol direct radiative forcing over Djougou (northern Benin) during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis dry season experiment (Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span>-0)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of this work is to investigate the direct radiative forcing of aerosols over the supersite of Djougou (northern Benin) during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses dry season experiment. We focus our simulations on the top of atmosphere, bottom of atmosphere, and atmosphere radiative forcings. During the dry season <span class="hlt">period</span>, Sun photometer measurements indicate a rather turbid atmosphere with a mean aerosol optical depth for the overall <span class="hlt">period</span> of 0.78 ± 0.24 (at 440 nm). The aerosol absorption coefficient estimated at the surface ranged between 2.3 and 37.3 Mm-1 (mean value 15.2 ± 10.6 Mm-1 at 520 nm) and the scattering coefficient between 44.5 and 232.3 Mm-1 (mean 145 ± 59 Mm-1 at 520 nm). This leads to a single scattering albedo of between 0.81 and 0.98 (at 520 nm) with a mean (and standard deviation) value of 0.91 ± 0.05, indicating moderately absorbing aerosols. In parallel, micropulse lidar measurements indicate the presence of two distinct aerosol layers, with a first one located between the surface and 1 km and a second one located above 1.5-4.0 km. On the basis of surface and aircraft <span class="hlt">observations</span>, sunphotometer measurements, lidar profiles, and Moderate Resolution Imagaing Spectroradiometer sensor an estimation of the daily clear sky direct radiative forcing has been estimated for the 17-24 January 2006 <span class="hlt">period</span>. Simulations indicate that aerosols reduce significantly the solar energy reaching the surface (mean ?FBOA = -61.5 W/m2) by reflection to space (mean ?FTOA = -18.4 W/m2) but predominantly by absorption of the solar radiation into the atmosphere (mean ?FATM = +43.1 W/m2). The mean heating rate at the surface and within the elevated biomass burning layer is considerably enhanced by 1.50 and 1.90 K day-1, respectively.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mallet, M.; Pont, V.; Liousse, C.; Gomes, L.; Pelon, J.; Osborne, S.; Haywood, J.; Roger, J. C.; Dubuisson, P.; Mariscal, A.; Thouret, V.; Goloub, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.P23C..06L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Saturn's Variable Radio <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Latest SKR measurements by Cassini/RPWS confirm the <span class="hlt">observed</span>, slow and regular increase of its rotational modulation <span class="hlt">period</span> (~10.9 hr), at the scale of about 0.5 percent over the last three years. In the meantime, similar drifts could also be find in some other <span class="hlt">observed</span> magnetospheric phenomena (e.g. magnetic field, UV auroras, etc...), indicating that the inner magnetosphere of Saturn is globally changing at the 30-year scale of its revolution around the Sun. Refined analyses of individual SKR radio components (Kurth et al. (2007), Gurnett et al. (this session)) <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that different regions of the inner magnetosphere might correspond to different apparent <span class="hlt">periods</span>, all of them being substantially larger than the internal rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> of 10.543 hr, determined from the measured planetary gravity field (Anderson and Schubert (2007)). We further discuss the constraints brought by SKR <span class="hlt">observations</span> on spin modulated phenomena in Saturn's environment and, more particularly, address the question of the nature of the SKR rotational modulation, i.e. a pulsing source of radio emission (blinking light) versus a rotating disturbance (searchlight).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lecacheux, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/15010671"> <span id="translatedtitle">Twenty-Four-Hour Raman Lidar Water Vapor Measurements During the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's 1996 and 1997 Water Vapor Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Prior to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's first water vapor intensive <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> (WVIOP) at the Cloud and Radiation Testbed site near Lamont, Oklahoma, an automated 24-h Raman lidar was delivered to the site. This instrument, which makes high-resolution measurements of water vapor both spatially and temporally, is capable of making these measurements with no operator interaction (other than initial startup) for days at a time. Water vapor measurements collected during the 1996 and 1997 WVIOPs are discussed here, illustrating both the nighttime and daytime capabilities of this system. System characteristics, calibration issues, and techniques are presented. Finally, detailed intercomparisons of the lidar's data with those from a microwave radiometer, radiosondes, an instrumented tower, a chilled mirror flown on both a tethersonde and a kite, and measurements from aircraft are shown and discussed, highlighting the accuracy and stability of this system for both nighttime and daytime measurements.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Turner, David D.; Goldsmith, JE M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999JGR...104.7771S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Response of the Mediterranean Sea thermohaline circulation to <span class="hlt">observed</span> changes in the winter wind stress field in the <span class="hlt">period</span> 1980-1993</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper seeks to model changes in deep water production in the eastern Mediterranean induced by changes in winter wind stress. An analysis of individual monthly wind stress fields over the Mediterranean for 1980-1993 from the SOC flux data set shows that an intensification of the winter mean (mainly January) wind stress over the Aegean Sea and Levantine basin occurred in the latter half of this <span class="hlt">period</span>. A weakening of the Mistral occurred at the same time. Two monthly wind stress climatologies were created using the 1980-1987 and 1988-1993 <span class="hlt">periods</span>, and these were used to force an ocean general circulation model of the Mediterranean, with climatological surface T, S relaxation. The Levantine intermediate water (LIW) dispersal path in the Ionian is altered in the 1988-1993 experiment with no pathway to the Adriatic and, consequently, greatly reduced exchange at Otranto and a collapse in Adriatic deep water formation. In contrast, there is an increased exchange of LIW at the Cretan arc straits and enhanced Aegean deep water production in the 1988-1993 experiment. Much more Aegean water exits into the Levantine and Ionian basins as is shown by an east-west cross section south of Crete, along a similar path to the Meteor cruise in 1995. Changes in air-sea fluxes are diagnosed from the model showing a small increase in wintertime cooling over the Aegean and reduced cooling over the Adriatic after 1987. While the changes in air-sea fluxes are probably underrepresented by this simulation, the large changes induced by the wind forcing <span class="hlt">suggest</span> this could be a mechanism in the altered thermohaline state of the eastern Mediterranean since 1987.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Samuel, Sarah; Haines, Keith; Josey, Simon; Myers, Paul G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013P%26SS...84...28A"> <span id="translatedtitle">The ~10 hour modulation of the relativistic electron spectrum as a result of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> motion of the Jovian outer magnetosphere layer: Ulysses <span class="hlt">observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze relativistic (E>3 MeV) electron <span class="hlt">observations</span> during the dayside inbound trajectory of Ulysses (day 33 to day 38, 1992) in the Jovian magnetosphere and we demonstrate that the continuous presence of a relativistic electron layer at higher north latitudes (Ulysses reached ~40° lat. during closest approach the planet). In particular, we evaluated the cross-B field anisotropy of relativistic (E>3 MeV) electrons intensity by the COSPIN/HET detector onboard Ulysses, and we found that between the times of plasma sheet crossings/approaches, when Ulysses was found far from the magnetodisc, at higher north latitudes, local increases in the relativistic electron intensity and intensity gradient in the northward direction were persistently <span class="hlt">observed</span>. We also found that (1) the well known ~10 h separated relativistic electron spectral index peaks (spectral softening) and (2) the detection of relativistic electron intensity gradient in the northward direction are related phenomena. We infer that phenomenon 1 and 2 are explained by the ~10 h <span class="hlt">periodic</span> upward-downward motion of the Jovian magnetosphere, and consequently of the outer magnetosphere relativistic electron layer. ?he above results extends earlier results for low energy electrons and energetic protons (Anagnostopoulos et al., 1998, 2001b) to relativistic electron phenomena, and provide strong evidence, for the first time, that the well known ~10 h rocking of the relativistic electron spectrum in the outer magnetosphere (the so called "clock phenomenon") is a spatial and not a temporal effect, as was earlier hypothesized (Simpson et al.,1992).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anagnostopoulos, G. C.; Karanikola, I.; Marhavilas, P. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19960021096&hterms=Web+invisible&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DWeb%2Binvisible"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cloud Properties Derived From GOES-7 for Spring 1994 ARM Intensive <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> Using Version 1.0.0 of ARM Satellite Data Analysis Program</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document describes the initial formulation (Version 1.0.0) of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program satellite data analysis procedures. Techniques are presented for calibrating geostationary satellite data with Sun synchronous satellite radiances and for converting narrowband radiances to top-of-the-atmosphere fluxes and albedos. A methodology is documented for combining geostationary visible and infrared radiances with surface-based temperature <span class="hlt">observations</span> to derive cloud amount, optical depth, height, thickness, temperature, and albedo. The analysis is limited to two grids centered over the ARM Southern Great Plains central facility in north-central Oklahoma. Daytime data taken during 5 Apr. - 1 May 1994, were analyzed on the 0.3 deg and 0.5 deg latitude-longitude grids that cover areas of 0.9 deg x 0.9 deg and 10 deg x 14 deg, respectively. Conditions ranging from scattered low cumulus to thin cirrus and thick cumulonimbus occurred during the study <span class="hlt">period</span>. Detailed comparisons with hourly surface <span class="hlt">observations</span> indicate that the mean cloudiness is within a few percent of the surface-derived sky cover. Formats of the results are also provided. The data can be accessed through the World Wide Web computer network.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Minnis, Patrick; Smith, William L., Jr.; Garber, Donald P.; Ayers, J. Kirk; Doelling, David R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008ApJ...681..693O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Drift Effects and the Cosmic Ray Density Gradient in a Solar Rotation <span class="hlt">Period</span>: First <span class="hlt">Observation</span> with the Global Muon Detector Network (GMDN)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present for the first time hourly variations of the spatial density gradient of 50 GeV cosmic rays within a sample solar rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> in 2006. By inversely solving the diffusive flux equation, including the drift, we deduce the gradient from the anisotropy that is derived from the <span class="hlt">observation</span> made by the Global Muon Detector Network (GMDN). The anisotropy obtained by applying a new analysis method to the GMDN data is precise and free from atmospheric temperature effects on the muon count rate recorded by ground-based detectors. We find the derived north-south gradient perpendicular to the ecliptic plane is oriented toward the heliospheric current sheet (HCS; i.e., southward in the toward sector of the interplanetary magnetic field [IMF] and northward in the away sector). The orientation of the gradient component parallel to the ecliptic plane remains similar in both sectors, with an enhancement of its magnitude seen after the Earth crosses the HCS. These temporal features are interpreted in terms of a local maximum of the cosmic ray density at the HCS. This is consistent with the prediction of the drift model for the A<0 epoch. By comparing the <span class="hlt">observed</span> gradient with the numerical prediction of a simple drift model, we conclude that particle drifts in the large-scale magnetic field play an important role in organizing the density gradient, at least in the present A<0 epoch. We also found that corotating interaction regions did not have such a notable effect. <span class="hlt">Observations</span> with the GMDN provide us with a new tool for investigating cosmic-ray transport in the IMF.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Okazaki, Y.; Fushishita, A.; Narumi, T.; Kato, C.; Yasue, S.; Kuwabara, T.; Bieber, J. W.; Evenson, P.; Da Silva, M. R.; Dal Lago, A.; Schuch, N. J.; Fujii, Z.; Duldig, M. L.; Humble, J. E.; Sabbah, I.; Kóta, J.; Munakata, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ACP....14.7909K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-term MAX-DOAS network <span class="hlt">observations</span> of NO2 in Russia and Asia (MADRAS) during the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2007-2012: instrumentation, elucidation of climatology, and comparisons with OMI satellite <span class="hlt">observations</span> and global model simulations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We conducted long-term network <span class="hlt">observations</span> using standardized Multi-Axis Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) instruments in Russia and ASia (MADRAS) from 2007 onwards and made the first synthetic data analysis. At seven locations (Cape Hedo, Fukue and Yokosuka in Japan, Hefei in China, Gwangju in Korea, and Tomsk and Zvenigorod in Russia) with different levels of pollution, we obtained 80 927 retrievals of tropospheric NO2 vertical column density (TropoNO2VCD) and aerosol optical depth (AOD). In the technique, the optimal estimation of the TropoNO2VCD and its profile was performed using aerosol information derived from O4 absorbances simultaneously <span class="hlt">observed</span> at 460-490 nm. This large data set was used to analyze NO2 climatology systematically, including temporal variations from the seasonal to the diurnal scale. The results were compared with Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite <span class="hlt">observations</span> and global model simulations. Two NO2 retrievals of OMI satellite data (NASA ver. 2.1 and Dutch OMI NO2 (DOMINO) ver. 2.0) generally showed close correlations with those derived from MAX-DOAS <span class="hlt">observations</span>, but had low biases of up to ~50%. The bias was distinct when NO2 was abundantly present near the surface and when the AOD was high, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a possibility of incomplete accounting of NO2 near the surface under relatively high aerosol conditions for the satellite <span class="hlt">observations</span>. Except for constant biases, the satellite <span class="hlt">observations</span> showed nearly perfect seasonal agreement with MAX-DOAS <span class="hlt">observations</span>, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the analysis of seasonal features of the satellite data were robust. Weekend reduction in the TropoNO2VCD found at Yokosuka and Gwangju was absent at Hefei, implying that the major sources had different weekly variation patterns. While the TropoNO2VCD generally decreased during the midday hours, it increased exceptionally at urban/suburban locations (Yokosuka, Gwangju, and Hefei) during winter. A global chemical transport model, MIROC-ESM-CHEM (Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate-Earth System Model-Chemistry), was validated for the first time with respect to background NO2 column densities during summer at Cape Hedo and Fukue in the clean marine atmosphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kanaya, Y.; Irie, H.; Takashima, H.; Iwabuchi, H.; Akimoto, H.; Sudo, K.; Gu, M.; Chong, J.; Kim, Y. J.; Lee, H.; Li, A.; Si, F.; Xu, J.; Xie, P.-H.; Liu, W.-Q.; Dzhola, A.; Postylyakov, O.; Ivanov, V.; Grechko, E.; Terpugova, S.; Panchenko, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007A%26A...472..587G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multiwavelength optical <span class="hlt">observations</span> of chromospherically active binary systems. V. FF UMa (2RE J0933+624): a system with orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> variation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Context: This is the fifth paper in a series aimed at studying the chromospheres of active binary systems using several optical spectroscopic indicators to obtain or improve orbital solution and fundamental stellar parameters. Aims: We present here the study of FF UMa (2RE J0933+624), a recently discovered, X-ray/EUV selected, active binary with strong H? emission. The objectives of this work are, to find orbital solutions and define stellar parameters from precise radial velocities and carry out an extensive study of the optical indicators of chromospheric activity. Methods: We obtained high resolution echelle spectroscopic <span class="hlt">observations</span> during five <span class="hlt">observing</span> runs from 1998 to 2004. We found radial velocities by cross correlation with radial velocity standard stars to achieve the best orbital solution. We also measured rotational velocity by cross-correlation techniques and have studied the kinematic by galactic space-velocity components (U, V, W) and Eggen criteria. Finally, we have determined the chromospheric contribution in optical spectroscopic indicators, from Ca ii H & K to Ca ii IRT lines, using the spectral subtraction technique. Results: We have found that this system presents an orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> variation, higher than previously detected in other RS CVn systems. We determined an improved orbital solution, finding a circular orbit with a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 3.274 days. We derived the stellar parameters, confirming the subgiant nature of the primary component (MP = 1.67 M? and R sin{i}_P=2.17 R?) and obtained rotational velocities (v sin{i}), of 33.57 ± 0.45 km s-1 and 32.38 ± 0.75 km s-1 for the primary and secondary components respectively. From our kinematic study, we can deduce its membership to the Castor moving group. Finally, the activity study has given us a better understanding of the possible mechanisms that produce the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> variation. Based on <span class="hlt">observations</span> collected with the 2.2 m telescope at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto (Almería, Spain), operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC); with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias; with the 2.1 m Otto Struve Telescope at McDonald Observatory of the University of Texas at Austin (USA) and with Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen. Tables 7 and 8 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gálvez, M. C.; Montes, D.; Fernández-Figueroa, M. J.; de Castro, E.; Cornide, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JGRD..113.0C10C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Size distribution, shape, and composition of mineral dust aerosols collected during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> 0: Dust and Biomass-Burning Experiment field campaign in Niger, January 2006</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dust samples were collected onboard the UK community BAe-146 research aircraft of the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) operated over Niger during the winter Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis project (AMMA SOP0/DABEX). Particle size, morphology, and composition were assessed using single-particle analysis by analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The aerosol was found to be composed of externally mixed mineral dust and biomass burning particles. Mineral dust consists mainly of aluminosilicates in the form of illite and kaolinite and quartz, accounting for up to 80% of the aerosol number. Fe-rich particles (iron oxides) represented 4% of the particle number in the submicron fraction. Diatoms were found on all the samples, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that emissions from the Bodélé depression were also contributing to the aerosol load. Satellite images confirm that the Bodélé source was active during the <span class="hlt">period</span> of investigation. Biomass burning aerosols accounted for about 15% of the particle number of 0.1-0.6 ?m diameter and were composed almost exclusively of particles containing potassium and sulfur. Soot particles were very rare. The aspect ratio AR is a measure of particle elongation. The upper limit of the AR value distribution is 5 and the median is 1.7, which <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that mineral dust particles could be described as ellipsoids whose major axis never exceeds 1.9 × Dp (the spherical geometric diameter). This is consistent with other published values for mineral dust, including the recent Aerosol Robotic Network retrieval results of Dubovik et al. (2006).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chou, CéDric; Formenti, Paola; Maille, Michel; Ausset, Patrick; Helas, Günter; Harrison, Mark; Osborne, Simon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ascl.soft04001M"> <span id="translatedtitle">PEC: <span class="hlt">Period</span> Error Calculator</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The PEC (<span class="hlt">Period</span> Error Calculator) algorithm estimates the <span class="hlt">period</span> error for eclipsing binaries <span class="hlt">observed</span> by the Kepler Mission. The algorithm is based on propagation of error theory and assumes that <span class="hlt">observation</span> of every light curve peak/minimum in a long time-series <span class="hlt">observation</span> can be unambiguously identified. A simple C implementation of the PEC algorithm is available.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mighell, Kenneth J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990sbrt.rept.....M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Summary of sonic boom rise times <span class="hlt">observed</span> during FAA community response studies over a 6-month <span class="hlt">period</span> in the Oklahoma City area</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The sonic boom signature data acquired from about 1225 supersonic flights, over a 6-month <span class="hlt">period</span> in 1964 in the Oklahoma City area, was enhanced with the addition of data relating to rise times and total signature duration. These later parameters, not available at the time of publication of the original report on the Oklahoma City sonic boom exposures, are listed in tabular form along with overpressure, positive impulse, positive duration, and waveform category. Airplane operating information along with the surface weather <span class="hlt">observations</span> are also included. Sonic boom rise times include readings to the 1/2, 3/4, and maximum overpressure values. Rise time relative probabilities for various lateral locations from the ground track of 0, 5, and 10 miles are presented along with the variation of rise times with flight altitude. The tabulated signature data, along with corresponding airplane operating conditions and surface and upper level atmospheric information, are also available on electronic files to provide it in the format for more efficient and effective utilization.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maglieri, Domenic J.; Sothcott, Victor E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900015536&hterms=local+government+area&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dlocal%2Bgovernment%2Barea"> <span id="translatedtitle">Summary of Sonic Boom Rise Times <span class="hlt">Observed</span> During FAA Community Response Studies over a 6-Month <span class="hlt">Period</span> in the Oklahoma City Area</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The sonic boom signature data acquired from about 1225 supersonic flights, over a 6-month <span class="hlt">period</span> in 1964 in the Oklahoma City area, was enhanced with the addition of data relating to rise times and total signature duration. These later parameters, not available at the time of publication of the original report on the Oklahoma City sonic boom exposures, are listed in tabular form along with overpressure, positive impulse, positive duration, and waveform category. Airplane operating information along with the surface weather <span class="hlt">observations</span> are also included. Sonic boom rise times include readings to the 1/2, 3/4, and maximum overpressure values. Rise time relative probabilities for various lateral locations from the ground track of 0, 5, and 10 miles are presented along with the variation of rise times with flight altitude. The tabulated signature data, along with corresponding airplane operating conditions and surface and upper level atmospheric information, are also available on electronic files to provide it in the format for more efficient and effective utilization.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maglieri, Domenic J.; Sothcott, Victor E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ApJ...722..343D"> <span id="translatedtitle">X-ray, FUV, and UV <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of ? Centauri B: Determination of Long-term Magnetic Activity Cycle and Rotation <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Over the last couple of decades we have been carrying out a study of stellar magnetic activity, dynamos, atmospheric physics, and spectral irradiances from a sample of solar-type G0-5 V stars with different ages. One of the major goals of this program is to study the evolution of the Sun's X-ray through NUV spectral irradiances with age. Of particular interest is the determination of the young Sun's elevated levels of high-energy fluxes because of the critical roles that X-ray (coronal) through FUV (transition region (TR), chromospheric) emissions play on the photochemical and photoionization evolution (and possible erosion) of early, young planetary atmospheres and ionospheres. Motivated by the current exoplanetary search missions (such as Kepler and CoRoT, along with the planned Space Interferometry Mission and Darwin/Terrestrial Planet Finder missions) that are hunting for Earth-size planets in the habitable zones (liquid water) of nearby main-sequence G-M stars, we are expanding our program to cooler, less luminous, but very importantly, much more numerous main-sequence K-type stars, such as ? Centauri B. The long life (2-3× longer than the Sun) and slow evolution of K stars provide nearly constant energy sources for possible hosted planets. This program parallels our "Sun in Time" program, but extends the study to stars with deeper convective zone depths. Presented here are X-ray (coronal; ROSAT, Chandra, XMM-Newton), UV (TR; International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE)), NUV (chromospheric; IUE), and recently acquired FUV (TR/chromospheric; FUSE Cycles 7/8) <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the K1 V star ? Cen B (HD 128621; V = 1.33; (B - V) = +0.88; ? = 5.6 ± 0.6 Gyr). These combined high-energy measures provide a more complete look into the nature of ? Cen B's magnetic activity and X-ray-UV radiances. We find that ? Cen B has exhibited significant long-term variability in X-ray through NUV emission fluxes, indicating a solar-like long-term activity cycle of P cycle = 8.84 ± 0.4 years. In addition, analysis of the short-term rotational modulation of mean light due to the effects of magnetically active regions has yielded a well-determined rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> of P rotation = 36.2 ± 1.4 days. ? Cen B is the only old main-sequence K star with a reliably determined age and rotation <span class="hlt">period</span>, and for early K stars, as in the case of the Sun for G2 V stars, is an important calibrator for stellar age/rotation/activity relations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">DeWarf, L. E.; Datin, K. M.; Guinan, E. F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_10 div --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15..705G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inter-annual variability of aerosol optical depth over the tropical Atlantic Ocean based on MODIS-Aqua <span class="hlt">observations</span> over the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2002-2012</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The tropical Atlantic Ocean is affected by dust and biomass burning aerosol loads transported from the western parts of the Saharan desert and the sub-Sahel regions, respectively. The spatial and temporal patterns of this transport are determined by the aerosol emission rates, their deposition (wet and dry), by the latitudinal shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and the prevailing wind fields. More specifically, in summer, Saharan dust aerosols are transported towards the Atlantic Ocean, even reaching the Gulf of Mexico, while in winter the Atlantic Ocean transport takes place in more southern latitudes, near the equator, sometimes reaching the northern parts of South America. In the later case, dust is mixed with biomass burning aerosols originating from agricultural activities in the sub-Sahel, associated with prevailing north-easterly airflow (Harmattan winds). Satellite <span class="hlt">observations</span> are the appropriate tool for describing this African aerosol export, which is important to atmospheric, oceanic and climate processes, offering the advantage of complete spatial coverage. In the present study, we use satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth at 550nm (AOD550nm), on a daily and monthly basis, derived from MODIS-Aqua platform, at 1ox1o spatial resolution (Level 3), for the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2002-2012. The primary objective is to determine the pixel-level and regional mean anomalies of AOD550nm over the entire study <span class="hlt">period</span>. The regime of the anomalies of African export is interpreted in relation to the aerosol source areas, precipitation, wind patterns and temporal variability of the North Atlantic Oscillation Index (NAOI). In order to ensure availability of AOD over the Sahara desert, MODIS-Aqua Deep Blue products are also used. As for precipitation, Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) data at 2.5ox2.5o are used. The wind fields are taken from the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). Apart from the regime of African aerosol export in the northern tropical Atlantic Ocean, it is also attempted to examine possible relationships between African dust export and NAO, with emphasis on identifying possible effects of the former to the later. This might be possible since aerosols through their radiative effects are known to affect atmospheric dynamics, for example modifying precipitation or the tracks and intensity of cyclones. Of course, such aerosol feedbacks on atmospheric dynamics and teleconnections are certainly complex and difficult to study, requiring the use of climate models, which is planned in a next step of the study.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gkikas, Antonis; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://learningcenter.nsta.org/product_detail.aspx?id=10.2505/4/ss09_032_09_38"> <span id="translatedtitle">Current Research: Summer Reading <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To supplement your summer reading, NSTA's affiliates would like to <span class="hlt">suggest</span> some recent articles on education research. These articles cover a variety of topics that include diversity, technology, and science teacher retention. The abstracts of these impor</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040079819&hterms=Periodic+table&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3D%2528Periodic%2Btable%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectral Index and Quasi-<span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole (BH) Sources: <span class="hlt">Observational</span> Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in BHs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are <span class="hlt">observed</span> between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several Black Hole (BH) candidate sources, in low hard states, steep power-law (soft) states and in transition between these states. The <span class="hlt">observations</span> indicate that the X-ray spectrum of such state (phases) show the presence of a power-law component and are sometimes related to simultaneous radio emission indicated the probable presence of a jet. Strong QPOs (less than 20% rms) are present in the power density spectrum in the spectral range where the power-law component is dominant ( i.e. 60-90% ). This evidence contradicts the dominant long standing interpretation of QPOs as a signature of the thermal accretion disk. We present the data from the literature and our own data to illustrate the dominance of power-law index-QPO frequency correlations. We provide a model, that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of power-law flux component. We argue the existence of a bounded compact coronal region which is a natural consequence of the adjustment of Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT approx. greater than 50 keV) producing photon upscattering via thermal Componization; the photon spectrum index Gamma appprox.1.5 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius; (2) a soft state which is optically thick and relatively cold (approx. less than 5 keV); the index for this state, Gamma approx. 2.8 is determined by soft-photon upscattering and photon trapping in converging flow into BH. In the TL model for corona the QPO frequency vnu(sub high) is related to the gravitational (close to Keplerian) frequency nu(sub K) at the outer (adjustment) radius and nu(sub low) is related to the TL s normal mode (magnetoacoustic) oscillation frequency nu(sub MA). The <span class="hlt">observed</span> correlations between index and low and high QPO frequencies are readily explained in terms of this model. We also <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a new method for evaluation of the BH mass using the index-frequency correlation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Titarchuk, Lev; Fiorito, Ralph</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30523309"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> <span class="hlt">Suggesting</span> Allelism of the Achondroplasia and Hypochondroplasia Genes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is argued that there are at least two alleles at the achondroplasia locus: one responsible for classic achondroplasia and one responsible for hypochondroplasia. Homozygosity for the achondroplasia gene produces a lethal skeletal dysplasia; homozygosity for hypochondroplasia has not been described. We report here a child considered to be a genetic compound for the achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia alleles.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Victor A. McKusick; Thaddeus E. Kelly; John P. Dorst</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu/handle/1808/13613"> <span id="translatedtitle">Boolean Search <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> in Primo</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Poster presented at Ex Libris Users of North America (ELUNA) 2014 Meeting in Montreal, Canada April 29 - May 2, 2014. Discusses the development and assessment of a JavaScript add-on to Primo that provides Boolean search <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> based on search...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hanrath, Scott</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ceur-ws.org/Vol-314/40.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Towards Social Semantic <span class="hlt">Suggestive</span> Tagging</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The organization of the knowledge on the web is increasingly becoming a social task performed by online communities whose members share a common interest in classifying different types of information for a later retrieval. Collaborative tagging systems allow people to organize a set of resources of interest through unconstrained annotations based on free keywords commonly named tags. <span class="hlt">Suggestive</span> tagging techniques</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fabio Calefato; Domenico Gendarmi; Filippo Lanubile</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.si.edu/Encyclopedia_SI/nmnh/ARCHAEOLOGY2007-ReadingList.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">ARCHAEOLOGY <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Readings in Archaeology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">ARCHAEOLOGY <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Readings in Archaeology The following is a list of some of the major by those wishing more detailed information. Educators' Resources Archaeology in the Classroom. A Resource. Archaeological Institute of America. Archaeologists at Work: A Teacher's Guide to Classroom Archaeology. 2nd ed</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mathis, Wayne N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=producer+AND+services+AND+planning&id=EJ250119"> <span id="translatedtitle">Online Training Sessions: <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Guidelines.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">These planning and evaluative guidelines for online trainers utilize a sliding scale--from minimal to <span class="hlt">suggested</span> to optimal--for five types of training sessions: (1) Search Service--Beginning; (2) Search Service--Advanced; (3) Search Service--Subject; (4) Database Producer; and (5) Independent Introductory Workshop. (RAA)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cabonell, Martha; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://lubbock.tamu.edu/files/2011/10/weedcontrolinforages_13.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">SUGGESTIONS</span> FOR WEED CONTROL IN</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">and mechanical weed control include: 1. Remove light or spotty infestations of weeds by hand hoeing or spot for continued infestation. 5. Consider the economics of using mechanical cultivation alone for weed controlB-5038 10-98 <span class="hlt">SUGGESTIONS</span> FOR WEED CONTROL IN PASTURES AND FORAGES Texas Agricultural Extension</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mukhtar, Saqib</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21464704"> <span id="translatedtitle">X-RAY, FUV, AND UV <span class="hlt">OBSERVATIONS</span> OF {alpha} CENTAURI B: DETERMINATION OF LONG-TERM MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLE AND ROTATION <span class="hlt">PERIOD</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Over the last couple of decades we have been carrying out a study of stellar magnetic activity, dynamos, atmospheric physics, and spectral irradiances from a sample of solar-type G0-5 V stars with different ages. One of the major goals of this program is to study the evolution of the Sun's X-ray through NUV spectral irradiances with age. Of particular interest is the determination of the young Sun's elevated levels of high-energy fluxes because of the critical roles that X-ray (coronal) through FUV (transition region (TR), chromospheric) emissions play on the photochemical and photoionization evolution (and possible erosion) of early, young planetary atmospheres and ionospheres. Motivated by the current exoplanetary search missions (such as Kepler and CoRoT, along with the planned Space Interferometry Mission and Darwin/Terrestrial Planet Finder missions) that are hunting for Earth-size planets in the habitable zones (liquid water) of nearby main-sequence G-M stars, we are expanding our program to cooler, less luminous, but very importantly, much more numerous main-sequence K-type stars, such as {alpha} Centauri B. The long life (2-3x longer than the Sun) and slow evolution of K stars provide nearly constant energy sources for possible hosted planets. This program parallels our 'Sun in Time' program, but extends the study to stars with deeper convective zone depths. Presented here are X-ray (coronal; ROSAT, Chandra, XMM-Newton), UV (TR; International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE)), NUV (chromospheric; IUE), and recently acquired FUV (TR/chromospheric; FUSE Cycles 7/8) <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the K1 V star {alpha} Cen B (HD 128621; V = 1.33; (B - V) = +0.88; {tau} = 5.6 {+-} 0.6 Gyr). These combined high-energy measures provide a more complete look into the nature of {alpha} Cen B's magnetic activity and X-ray-UV radiances. We find that {alpha} Cen B has exhibited significant long-term variability in X-ray through NUV emission fluxes, indicating a solar-like long-term activity cycle of P{sub cycle} = 8.84 {+-} 0.4 years. In addition, analysis of the short-term rotational modulation of mean light due to the effects of magnetically active regions has yielded a well-determined rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> of P{sub rotation} = 36.2 {+-} 1.4 days. {alpha} Cen B is the only old main-sequence K star with a reliably determined age and rotation <span class="hlt">period</span>, and for early K stars, as in the case of the Sun for G2 V stars, is an important calibrator for stellar age/rotation/activity relations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">DeWarf, L. E.; Guinan, E. F.; Datin, K. M., E-mail: Laurence.DeWarf@Villanova.ed [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GGG....14.4153A"> <span id="translatedtitle">First <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the fumarolic gas output from a restless caldera: Implications for the current <span class="hlt">period</span> of unrest (2005-2013) at Campi Flegrei</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The fumarolic gas output has not been quantified for any of the currently deforming calderas worldwide, due to the lack of suitable gas flux sensing techniques. In view of resumption of ground uplift (since 2005) and the associated variations in gas chemistry, Campi Flegrei, in southern Italy, is one of the restless calderas where gas flux <span class="hlt">observations</span> are especially necessary. Here we report the first ever obtained estimate of the Campi Flegrei fumarolic gas output, based on a set of MultiGAS surveys (performed in 2012 and 2013) with an ad-hoc-designed measurement setup. We estimate that the current Campi Flegrei fumarolic sulphur (S) flux is low, on the order of 1.5-2.2 tons/day, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> substantial scrubbing of magmatic S by the hydrothermal system. However, the fumarolic carbon dioxide (CO2) output is ˜460±160 tons/day (mean±SD), which is surprisingly high for a dormant volcano in the hydrothermal stage of activity, and results in a combined (fumaroles + soil) CO2 output of ˜1560 tons/day. Assuming magma to be the predominant source, we propose that the current CO2 output can be supplied by either (i) a large (0.6-4.6 km3), deeply stored (>7 km) magmatic source with low CO2 contents (0.05-0.1 wt%) or (ii) by a small to medium-sized (˜0.01-0.1 km3) but CO2-rich (2 wt%) magma, possibly stored at pressures of ˜100 to 120 MPa. Independent geophysical evidence (e.g., inferred from geodetic and gravity data) is needed to distinguish between these two possibilities.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aiuppa, A.; Tamburello, G.; Napoli, R.; Cardellini, C.; Chiodini, G.; Giudice, G.; Grassa, F.; Pedone, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PASJ...66S..18P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hinode 7: Conference summary and future <span class="hlt">suggestions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This conclusion to the seventh Hinode science meeting (2013 November in Takayama, Japan) attempts to summarise what we have learnt during the conference (mainly from the review talks) about new <span class="hlt">observations</span> from Hinode and about theories stimulated by them. <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for future study are also offered.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Priest, Eric</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://elibrary.unm.edu/sora/Wilson/v087n04/p0456-p0466.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">SUGGESTIONS</span> FOR CALCULATING NEST SUCCESS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Reports of nesting success that do not take into account the time span of <span class="hlt">observation</span> for each nest usually understate losses, and sometimes the error can be very large. More than a decade ago I pointed out this problem and proposed a way of dealing with it (Mayfield 1960:192-204; 1961). Since that time many field students have used the method,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">HAROLD F. MAYFIELD</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://kidshealth.org/teen/sexual_health/girls/irregular_periods.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Irregular <span class="hlt">Periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... Date reviewed: October 2013 Back 1 ? 2 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Coping With Common <span class="hlt">Period</span> Problems I'm 14 and I Don't Have My <span class="hlt">Period</span> Yet. Is This Normal? Can a Girl Get Pregnant if She Has Sex During Her <span class="hlt">Period</span>? Birth Control Pill Gyn Checkups ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20090015031&hterms=sports+promotions&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3D%2528sports%2Bpromotions%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Popularizing Civil Aviation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The public generally is taking very little interest in the progress of Civil Aviation, and the time has come to educate the public in aeronautics and to make them realize the far-reaching importance of air transport. Briefly, the whole problem resolves itself into discovering and applying means for bringing some of the many aspects and effects of civil aviation into the everyday lives of the public. The report <span class="hlt">suggests</span> three principal groups of methods: (1) Bring aviation into daily contact with the public. (2) Bring the public into daily contact with aviation. (3) General publicity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1926-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53592841"> <span id="translatedtitle">Summary of sonic boom rise times <span class="hlt">observed</span> during FAA community response studies over a 6-month <span class="hlt">period</span> in the Oklahoma City area</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The sonic boom signature data acquired from about 1225 supersonic flights, over a 6-month <span class="hlt">period</span> in 1964 in the Oklahoma City area, was enhanced with the addition of data relating to rise times and total signature duration. These later parameters, not available at the time of publication of the original report on the Oklahoma City sonic boom exposures, are listed</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Domenic J. Maglieri; Victor E. Sothcott</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850014024&hterms=tea+spectral+signature&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dtea%2Bspectral%2Bsignature"> <span id="translatedtitle">NIMBUS-7 SBUV (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet) <span class="hlt">observations</span> of solar UV spectral irradiance variations caused by solar rotation and active-region evolution for the <span class="hlt">period</span> November 7, 1978 - November 1, 1980</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of temporal variations of the solar UV spectral irradiance over several days to a few weeks in the 160-400 nm wavelength range are presented. Larger 28-day variations and a second episode of 13-day variations occurred during the second year of measurements. The thirteen day <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> is not a harmonic of the 28-day <span class="hlt">periodicity</span>. The 13-day <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> dominates certain episodes of solar activity while others are dominated by 28-day <span class="hlt">periods</span> accompanied by a week 14-day harmonic. Techniques for removing noise and long-term trends are described. Time series analysis results are presented for the Si II lines near 182 nm, the Al I continuum in the 190 nm to 205 nm range, the Mg I continuum in the 210 nm to 250 nm range, the MgII H & K lines at 280 nm, the Mg I line at 285 nm, and the Ca II K & H lines at 393 and 397 nm.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heath, D. F.; Repoff, T. P.; Donnelly, R. F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4318233"> <span id="translatedtitle">Features <span class="hlt">Suggestive</span> of Gallbladder Malignancy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objectives Gallbladder cancer carries an extremely high mortality rate, with a 5-year survival rate as low as 12%. Survival is dependent on the diagnosis of these tumors in their earliest stages. This study sought to describe the clinical and imaging features of stages T1, T2, and T3 gallbladder tumors and to illustrate features that may allow radiologists to make an early diagnosis. Materials and Methods After approval from the institutional review board, a search of the pathology department database yielded 18 patients with surgically proven T1, T2, and T3 gallbladder cancers with available preoperative computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging. The imaging was reviewed for lesional morphology (focal polyploid mass, focal wall thickening, circumferential wall thickening), enhancement characteristics, liver invasion, locoregional lymph-adenopathy, and distant metastatic disease. The electronic medical record was also searched for demographic information and clinical presentation. Results There were 10 women and 8 men with a mean age of 69 years. Virtually all patients were symptomatic, with most patients demonstrating symptoms <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of underlying malignancy (including jaundice, weight loss, and chronic abdominal pain). Tumors on CT and MRI included 6 polyploid masses, 9 tumors with focal wall thickening, and 3 with circumferential wall thickening. The mean attenuation of those tumors imaged with CT was 59.4 Hounsfield units (HUs) on the arterial phase and 86.5 HUs on the venous phase, with a mean increase in Hounsfield attenuation between the arterial and venous phases of 28.2 HUs. Twelve of the 18 patients were correctly diagnosed prospectively on CT. Conclusions The imaging findings of gallbladder cancer can be subtle, regardless of whether the tumor presents as a discrete mass, focal wall thickening, or circumferential diffuse wall thickening, and radio-logists should be aware of the wide range of different possible appearances. Moreover, the vast majority of these patients had clinical symptoms <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of an underlying malignancy, and this should precipitate a careful evaluation of the gallbladder in all such cases. PMID:24625606</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mitchell, Charles H.; Johnson, Pamela T.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Raman, Siva P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://acswebcontent.acs.org/games/pt.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using the Macromedia Shockwave Player, this American Chemical Society website offers three interactive <span class="hlt">periodic</span> tables. Students can find the basic data on each element including its atomic radius, stable isotopes, melting point, and density in the first <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table tab. The website identifies different elemental groups by color. Users can view the electron configuration by selecting elements on the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table in the second tab. The last tab offers plots of the elements' electronegativity, ionization energy, and other properties.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-05-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17589014"> <span id="translatedtitle">A study of 875 cases of thyroid cancer <span class="hlt">observed</span> over a fifteen-year <span class="hlt">period</span> (1975-1989) at the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thyroid cancer (TC) is a common malignancy encountered at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFSH&RC). Of 19,885 different malignant tumors seen during the <span class="hlt">period</span> fro 1975 to 1989, there were 875 cases (4.4%) of TC. Of 1374 tumors of endocrine glands seen during the same <span class="hlt">period</span>, 67% were thyroid neoplasms. TC represented 7.5% (618 cases) of all neoplasms in the females, second only to breast cancer. All types of TC were seen, with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PC) being the most common (79%). Anaplastic, medullary, follicular (FC), malignant lymphoma and Hürthle cell cancer accounted for 5.4%, 5.3%, 4.3%, 3.6% and 0.9% respectively. The frequency of PC was very similar (16%) in each of the third, fourth and fifth decades. The relative frequency (RF) of different types of TC was highest for PC with a ration of 18:1 between PC and FC, which could be the highest ever reported. There was a clearly progressive increase in the number of thyroid tumors referred between 1975 and 1989. Although this increase was evident for both sexes, it was more apparent for females. There was also a distinct increase (P<0.01) in the RF of PC from 76% (1975 to 1980) to 85% (1986 to 1989) with a decrease in FC from 9% to 2.5% over the same <span class="hlt">periods</span>. PMID:17589014</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ahmed, M; Al-Saihati, B; Greer, W; Al-Nuaim, A; Bakheet, S; Abdulkareem, A M; Ingemansson, S; Akhtar, M; Ali, M A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_11 div --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22251885"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pressure-driven reconnection and quasi <span class="hlt">periodical</span> oscillations in plasmas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents a model for an ohmically heated plasma in which a feedback exists between thermal conduction and transport, on one side, and the magneto-hydro-dynamical stability of the system, on the other side. In presence of a reconnection threshold for the magnetic field, a variety of <span class="hlt">periodical</span> or quasi <span class="hlt">periodical</span> oscillations for the physical quantities describing the system are evidenced. The model is employed to interpret the <span class="hlt">observed</span> quasi <span class="hlt">periodical</span> oscillations of electron temperature and perturbed magnetic field around the so called “Single Helical” state in the reversed field pinch, but its relevance for other <span class="hlt">periodical</span> phenomena <span class="hlt">observed</span> in magnetic confinement systems, especially in tokamaks, is <span class="hlt">suggested</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paccagnella, R., E-mail: roberto.paccagnella@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX and Istituto Gas Ionizzati del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Padova (Italy)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.girlshealth.gov/body/period/problems.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Problem <span class="hlt">Periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... when you talk to your doctor. What can affect your <span class="hlt">period</span> top Stress. If you are under a lot of stress, your <span class="hlt">periods</span> might stop for a bit, but they usually begin again when your stress goes down. Exercise. Too much physical activity can cause your body fat to be very low, which can cause ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54197828"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relationship between dominant <span class="hlt">periods</span> of H\\/V of coda waves <span class="hlt">observed</span> by MeSO-net and underground velocity structures in the Tokyo metropolitan area</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recently, the high-density seismic <span class="hlt">observation</span> network installed at more than 200 stations, called MeSO-net (Sakai and Hirata, 2009), have been being installed at an interval distance of about 5 km in the Tokyo metropolitan area. By comparing numerical predictions with earthquake ground motions <span class="hlt">observed</span> by MeSO-net, we found that the previous 3-D underground velocity structural model in the Tokyo metropolitan</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Tsuno; H. Yamanaka; S. Sakai; N. Hirata; K. Kasahara; H. Kimura; T. Aketagawa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17625717"> <span id="translatedtitle">Causes of hospitalization among extra-European Union children in a large hospital of Northern Italy, in a five-year <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The hospitalizations of 1,239 patients aged 14 years or less and immigrated from extra-European Union countries in Italy were assessed in the 6-year <span class="hlt">period</span>, from 1999 to 2004. The main demographic and clinical features were analyzed according to several variables, also distiguishing patients aged less than one year, from those aged 1-14 years. The introduction of a deed of indemnity law in 2001 profoundly changed the pattern of admissions and health care needs and exploitation during subsequent years, leading to a massive regularization of clandestine immigrants. PMID:17625717</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sabbatani, Sergio; Baldi, Elena; Manfredi, Roberto</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/759848"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-<span class="hlt">Period</span> Solar Variability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Terrestrial climate records and historical <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the Sun <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the Sun undergoes aperiodic oscillations in radiative output and size over time <span class="hlt">periods</span> of centuries and millenia. Such behavior can be explained by the solar convective zone acting as a nonlinear oscillator, forced at the sunspot-cycle frequency by variations in heliomagnetic field strength. A forced variant of the Lorenz equations can generate a time series with the same characteristics as the solar and climate records. The timescales and magnitudes of oscillations that could be caused by this mechanism are consistent with what is known about the Sun and terrestrial climate.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">GAUTHIER,JOHN H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-07-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014CosRe..52..421K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Specific features of daytime long-<span class="hlt">period</span> pulsations <span class="hlt">observed</span> during the solar wind impulse against a background of the substorm of August 1, 1998</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Long-<span class="hlt">period</span> geomagnetic pulsations in the (1.7-6.7) mHz frequency range at 18.25-18.48 UT on August 1, 1998, caused by several successive sudden changes in the solar wind (SW) dynamic pressure, are studied against a background of substorm intensification. The data of the ground stations, which were near local noon (the CANOPUS Canadian network) and on the nightside (the auroral stations in Yakutia and at the IMAGE network), and the INTERBALL-1, ACE, WIND, and GOES 8, extramagnetospheric satellites are used. The effect of the SW plasma and IMF parameters, SW inhomogeneity front inclination, and geomagnetic activity on the pulsation propagation and polarization direction and amplitude is discussed. The properties of pulsations, recorded before the substorm, correspond to the pulsation excitation by the inhomogeneity front incident on the magnetopause during the magnetically quiet <span class="hlt">period</span>: pulsations propagate from the contact point onto the nightside when the amplitude increases and the polarization sense of rotation is opposite on the dawn and dusk sides. Substorm intensification results in the propagation direction reversal and in a more complex behavior of the pulsation amplitude and polarization on the dayside.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Klibanova, Yu. Yu.; Mishin, V. V.; Tsegmed, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JGRD..11021108R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Three-field photometer <span class="hlt">observations</span> of short-<span class="hlt">period</span> gravity wave intrinsic parameters in the 80 to 100 km height region</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A three-field photometer (3FP) for making <span class="hlt">observations</span> of airglow in the Mesosphere Lower Thermosphere (MLT) region has been operated at the center of the large MF aerial array located near Adelaide (138°E, 35°S) since 1993. <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of the 557.7 nm airglow intensity emitted by atomic oxygen (OI) at heights near 97 km and the 730.0 nm airglow intensity emitted by hydroxyl (OH) near 87 km have been made simultaneously with MF spaced antenna <span class="hlt">observations</span> of wind velocities in the 80-100 km height region. The 3FP measures the intensity of the 557.7 nm airglow in three fields separated by about 13 km at heights near 97 km, and then the intensity of the 730 nm airglow in three fields separated by about 12 km at heights near 87 km, on a 60 s cycle. These data have been analyzed to yield gravity wave <span class="hlt">observed</span> phase speeds and horizontal wavelengths. Simultaneous MF radar data have been analyzed to yield measurements of the neutral wind velocity in 2 km height steps in the 80-100 km height interval every 2 min, and these have been used together with the <span class="hlt">observed</span> wave parameters to calculate intrinsic gravity wave parameters. This paper presents a very brief overview of the system, the motivation for the work, and preliminary analysis of the data from 1995 until 2000.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reid, I. M.; Woithe, J. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21567675"> <span id="translatedtitle">STUDYING FREQUENCY RELATIONSHIPS OF KILOHERTZ QUASI-<span class="hlt">PERIODIC</span> OSCILLATIONS FOR 4U 1636-53 AND Sco X-1: <span class="hlt">OBSERVATIONS</span> CONFRONT THEORIES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">By fitting the frequencies of simultaneous lower and upper kilohertz quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations (kHz QPOs) in two prototype neutron star (NS) QPO sources (4U 1636-53 and Sco X-1), we test the predictive power of all currently proposed QPO models. Models predict a linear, power law, or other relationship between the two frequencies. We found that for plausible NS parameters (mass and angular momentum), no model can satisfactorily reproduce the data, leading to very large chi-square values in our fittings. For both 4U 1636-53 and Sco X-1, this is largely due to the fact that the data significantly differ from a linear relationship. Some models perform relatively better but still have their own problems. Such a detailed comparison of data from models enables identification of routes for improving those models further.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lin Yongfeng [Physics Department and Center for Astrophysics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Boutelier, Martin; Barret, Didier [Universite de Toulouse (UPS), 118 Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Zhang Shuangnan, E-mail: zhangsn@ihep.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918-3, Beijing 100049 (China)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57633496"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> on water potential and drought resistance of trees and shrubs after a <span class="hlt">period</span> of summer drought around Dunedin, New Zealand</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An exceptional summer drought allowed <span class="hlt">observations</span> of plant responses in April 1985. Some species avoided drought and maintained a high water potential even though adjacent species were wilted (e.g., native trees such as Sophora microphylla, Hoheria angusfifolia, and the introduced shrub, Ribes sanguineurn); others tolerated low water potentials without showing obvious signs of stress (e.g., the native Leptosperinurn ericoides and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peter Bannister</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AtmEn..67..448C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-term <span class="hlt">observations</span> of saccharides in remote marine aerosols from the western North Pacific: A comparison between 1990-1993 and 2006-2009 <span class="hlt">periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anhydrosugars (galactosan, mannosan and levoglucosan), sugars (xylose, fructose, glucose, sucrose and trehalose) and sugar alcohols (erythritol, arabitol, mannitol and inositol) were measured in the aerosol samples collected in a remote island (Chichi-Jima, Japan) in the western North Pacific from 1990 to 1993 and from 2006 to 2009. Total concentrations of anhydrosugars, the biomass burning tracers, were 0.01-5.57 ng m-3 (average 0.76 ng m-3) during 1990-1993 versus 0.01-7.19 ng m-3 (0.64 ng m-3) during 2006-2009. Their seasonal variations were characterized by winter/spring maxima and summer/fall minima. Such a seasonal pattern should be caused by the enhanced long-range atmospheric transport of biomass burning products and terrestrial organic matter (such as higher plant detritus and soil dust) from the Asian continent in winter/spring seasons, when the westerly or winter monsoon system prevails over the western North Pacific. Sugars and sugar alcohols showed different seasonal patterns. The monthly mean concentrations of erythritol, arabitol, mannitol, inositol, fructose, glucose and trehalose were found to be higher in spring/summer and lower in fall/winter during both 1990-1993 and 2006-2009 <span class="hlt">periods</span>, indicating an enhanced biogenic emission of aerosols in warm seasons. Interestingly, saccharides showed a gradual decrease in their concentrations from 1991 to 1993 and an increase from 2006 to 2009. In addition, the monthly averaged concentrations of sugars and sugar alcohols showed maxima in early summer during 1990-1993, which occurred about 1-2 months earlier than those during 2006-2009. Such a clear seasonal shift may be attributable to the changes in the strength of westerly and trade wind systems during two <span class="hlt">periods</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, Jing; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Liu, Cong-Qiang; Fu, Pingqing</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=344626"> <span id="translatedtitle">The hydrophobic moment detects <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> in protein hydrophobicity.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodicities</span> in the polar/apolar character of the amino acid sequence of a protein can be examined by assigning to each residue a numerical hydrophobicity and searching for <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> in the resulting one-dimensional function. The strength of each <span class="hlt">periodic</span> component is the quantity that has been termed the hydrophobic moment. When proteins of known three-dimensional structure are examined, it is found that sequences that form alpha helices tend to have, on average, a strong <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> in the hydrophobicity of 3.6 residues, the <span class="hlt">period</span> of the alpha helix. Similarly, many sequences that form strands of beta sheets tend to have a <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> in their hydrophobicity of about 2.3 residues, the <span class="hlt">period</span> typical of beta structure. Also, the few sequences known to form 3(10) helices display a <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of about 2.5 residues, not far from the <span class="hlt">period</span> of 3 for an ideal 3(10) helix. This means that many protein sequences tend to form the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> structure that maximizes their amphiphilicity. This <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of the hydrophobicity of the protein primary structure is a factor in the formation of secondary structures. Moreover, the <span class="hlt">observation</span> that many protein sequences tend to form segments of maximum amphiphilicity <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that segments of secondary structure fold at a hydrophobic surface, probably formed from other parts of the folding protein. PMID:6582470</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eisenberg, D; Weiss, R M; Terwilliger, T C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000JGR...10512105S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Continuous high-frequency <span class="hlt">observations</span> of hydrogen at the Mace Head baseline atmospheric monitoring station over the 1994-1998 <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Continuous high-frequency (every 40-min) automatic measurements of hydrogen have been made at the Mace Head atmospheric research station on the Atlantic Ocean coast of Ireland throughout 1994-1998. These <span class="hlt">observations</span> represent one the most comprehensive in situ records of a trace gas that has received comparatively little attention. Individual measurements have been sorted by four independent methods to separate clean, maritime air masses from regionally polluted European air masses. Hydrogen concentrations in midlatitude Northern Hemisphere baseline air show a distinct seasonal cycle with highest concentrations during spring and lowest concentrations during late autumn, with a peak-to-trough amplitude of 38±6 ppb, averaged over the <span class="hlt">observed</span> seasonal cycles from 1994 to 1998. The mean hydrogen concentration in midlatitude Northern Hemisphere baseline air on January 1, 1995, was estimated as 496.5 ppb with an upward trend of 1.2±0.8 ppb yr-1. Evidence has also been obtained for European pollution sources with source strength of about 0.8 Tg yr-1 and for deposition of hydrogen to soils. The <span class="hlt">observation</span> of slightly elevated hydrogen concentrations relative to baseline levels in tropical maritime air masses points to a latitudinal gradient in hydrogen with higher concentrations in lower latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere and in the Southern Hemisphere. This is confirmed by comparable hydrogen <span class="hlt">observations</span> at Cape Grim, Tasmania, which are consistently higher than measurements recorded at Mace Head. Mean hemispheric concentrations of 504 and 520 ppb have been estimated for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, respectively, for January 1, 1996, corresponding to a total atmospheric hydrogen burden of 182 Tg.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Simmonds, P. G.; Derwent, R. G.; O'Doherty, S.; Ryall, D. B.; Steele, L. P.; Langenfelds, R. L.; Salameh, P.; Wang, H. J.; Dimmer, C. H.; Hudson, L. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5337865"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periods</span> found in heat measurements obtained by calorimetry</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During a span of 640 days, a <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of 1.5158 +- 0.0008 days was discovered in successive heater equilibria on Calorimeter No. 127. Measurements were taken at 12-h intervals, with occasional changes of exactly 3 or 6 h in the schedule of measurements. This schedule eliminated all other possible <span class="hlt">periods</span> except a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 0.150156 days. <span class="hlt">Periods</span> of 1.519125 and 1.511283 days were discovered in data on the excess length of day as obtained by the US Naval Observatory over a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 24 y. These two <span class="hlt">periods</span> could equally well represent <span class="hlt">periods</span> of 0.150189 and 0.150112 days, since measurements were obtained only once every 24 h. It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that <span class="hlt">periods</span> <span class="hlt">observed</span> in sensitive calorimeters and in length of day data may be related. 1 reference, 6 figures, 5 tables.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jordan, K.C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-02-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/j22u124226642p34.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Syndromes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a  \\u000a \\u000a Hereditary <span class="hlt">periodic</span> fever syndromes are autoinflammatory diseases characterized by episodes of fever with serosal, synovial,\\u000a and\\/or skin inflammation.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a  \\u000a \\u000a Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and hyperimmunoglobulinemia D with <span class="hlt">periodic</span> fever syndrome (HIDS) are inherited in an autosomal\\u000a recessive manner and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated <span class="hlt">periodic</span> syndrome (TRAPS), familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome\\u000a (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John G. Ryan; Daniel L. Kastner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.rsc.org/chemsoc/visualelements/pages/pertable_fla.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This unique <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table presents the elements in an interesting visual display. Select an element, and find an image of the element, a description, history, and even an animation. Other chemical data is linked as a PDF file (requires Acrobat Reader).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48187878"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Syndromes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">\\u000a Several forms of arthritis may present with patterns of exacerbation and remission that may be considered <span class="hlt">periodic</span>. This chapter\\u000a focuses on six clinically distinct illnesses in which underlying genes have been identified, and in addition a group of disorders\\u000a of unclear etiology.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John G. Ryan; Daniel L. Kastner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0405360v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectral Index and Quasi-<span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole (BH) Sources: <span class="hlt">Observational</span> Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in BHs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are <span class="hlt">observed</span> between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several Black Hole (BH) candidate sources, in low hard state, steep power-law (soft) state and in transition between these states. We provide a model, that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of power-law flux component. We argue the existence of a bounded compact coronal region which is a natural consequence of the adjustment of Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT ~ 50 keV) producing photon upscattering via thermal Componization; the photon spectrum index Gamma~1.7 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius; (2) a soft state which is optically thick and relatively cold (kT~5 keV); the index for this state, Gamma~2.8 is determined by soft-photon upscattering and photon trapping in converging flow into BH.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lev Titarchuk; Ralph Fiorito</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-05-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48371756"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Fever</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 4-year-old adopted boy of mixed African American and Caucasian race was referred for consultation because of recurring fever.\\u000a Before the age of 1 year, he had begun to have monthly febrile illnesses without diagnoses. By 2 years of age, febrile episodes\\u000a were <span class="hlt">periodic</span>, occurring approximately once in a month and had a characteristic pattern of sudden rise in temperature</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sarah S. Long</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED044989.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for the Classical Shelves of a School Library.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This bibliography is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> for use by students and teachers of Latin, Greek and ancient civilizations. Entries are compiled under the headings of: (1) bibliographies and journals including booklists, <span class="hlt">periodicals</span>, and books for teachers; (2) reference works in literature, mythology, history and antiquities, and language; (3) texts and…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Colebourn, R., Comp.; Cleeve, Marigold, Comp.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=animal+AND+rights&pg=3&id=EJ401067"> <span id="translatedtitle">Animal Rights: Selected Resources and <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Further Study.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Presents an annotated list of selected resources intended to serve as a guide to the growing amount of material on animal rights. <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> to aid in additional research include subject headings used to find books, indexes used to locate <span class="hlt">periodical</span> articles, sources for locating organizations, and a selected list of animal rights organizations.…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Davidoff, Donald J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_12 div --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S51F..02C"> <span id="translatedtitle">California foreshock sequences <span class="hlt">suggest</span> underlying aseismic process</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Foreshocks are the clearest precursors to mainshocks, and understanding their characteristics is of great interest. In this study, we analyze immediate foreshock sequences (within 2 days and 5 km) for mainshocks in California using precisely relocated catalogs and find that 27 out of 61 mainshocks of M ? 5 have at least one immediate foreshock. Among the 27 foreshock sequences, 9 consist of just one event, 3 are aftershocks of a previous event, and 13 are swarm-like sequences (more than 4 events, not starting with the largest foreshock). For 5 swarm-like foreshock sequences (Landers, Hector Mine, El Mayor-Cucapah, Chalfant, Mt-Lewis earthquakes), there are enough events to determine that they exhibit significant spatial migration, with migration velocities comparable to swarms in southern California (e.g., Chen et al., 2011). To study if there are systematic changes between foreshocks and aftershocks, we apply an iterative deconvolution approach [Shearer et al., 2006] to obtain earthquake source spectra. We then estimate earthquake stress drops using a multi-event empirical Green's function (EGF) method. These 5 foreshock sequences have much lower median stress drops than aftershocks from the same region. To confirm this difference, we shift the source spectra along an f^-3 curve to facilitate a direct comparison of the frequency content of the source spectra for different sized events. The foreshocks have a stronger fall off at high frequencies compared to the aftershocks. We are currently studying, using a source-specific EGF approach, whether attenuation changes could explain some of these frequency differences. These <span class="hlt">observations</span> of spatially migrating foreshock sequences and their apparently low stress drops indicate that there is likely an underlying aseismic process, such as fluid flow or slow slip, that triggers both the foreshocks and the mainshocks. Such aseismic processes are thought to drive many swarms and some <span class="hlt">observations</span> have <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that aseismic slip may occur prior to large earthquakes [e.g., Roeloffs, 2006].</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, X.; Shearer, P. M.; Hauksson, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009APS..MARV40002W"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> reversals allow bacteria to swarm</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many bacteria can rapidly traverse surfaces from which they are extracting nutrient for growth. They generate flat, spreading colonies, called swarms because they resemble swarms of insects. We seek to understand how members of any dense swarm track their neighbors while interfering minimally with the motion of others'. We choose myxobacteria as our model system. Individual myxobacteria cells regularly reverse their gliding directions. With a cell- and behavior-based computational model, we show that reversals of gliding direction are essential for swarming and that reversals increase the outflow of cells across the edge of the swarm. We also find that the reversal <span class="hlt">period</span> predicted to maximize the outflow of cells is the same (within the errors of measurement) as the <span class="hlt">period</span> <span class="hlt">observed</span> in experiments with normal myxobacteria cells. This coincidence <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the circuit regulating reversals evolved to its current sensitivity under selection for growth achieved by swarming. Our work <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a crucial componentin the general behavioral algorithm governing bacterial swarming.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wu, Yilin; Kaiser, Dale; Jiang, Yi; Alber, Mark</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=brocks&pg=7&id=EJ260096"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodical</span> Vandalism: A Chronic Condition?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A statistical analysis of the losses due to theft and mutilation in the <span class="hlt">periodicals</span> collection at Brock University indicates that security needs to be tightened. Nine <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for improving security are offered, and six references are cited. (CHC)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sleep, Esther L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=aydin&pg=7&id=EJ858560"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evidentiality and <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span>: A New Research Venue</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent research <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that acquisition of mental-state language may influence conceptual development. We examine this possibility by investigating the conceptual links between evidentiality in language and <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>. Young children are disproportionately <span class="hlt">suggestible</span> and tend to change their reports or memories when questioned. The authors…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aydin, Cagla; Ceci, Stephen J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/chao-dyn/9712002v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Beyond the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> orbit theory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The global constraints on chaotic dynamics induced by the analyticity of smooth flows are used to dispense with individual <span class="hlt">periodic</span> orbits and derive infinite families of exact sum rules for several simple dynamical systems. The associated Fredholm determinants are of particularly simple polynomial form. The theory developed <span class="hlt">suggests</span> an alternative to the conventional <span class="hlt">periodic</span> orbit theory approach to determining eigenspectra of transfer operators.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Predrag Cvitanovic; Kim Hansen; Juri Rolf; Gabor Vattay</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-12-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21144772"> <span id="translatedtitle">The influence of <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> on memory.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We provide a translation of Binet and Henri's pioneering 1894 paper on the influence of <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> on memory. Alfred Binet (1857-1911) is famous as the author who created the IQ test that bears his name, but he is almost unknown as the psychological investigator who generated numerous original experiments and fascinating results in the study of memory. His experiments published in 1894 manipulated <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> in several ways to determine effects on remembering. Three particular modes of <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> were employed to induce false recognitions: (1) indirect <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> by a preconceived idea; (2) direct <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>; and (3) collective <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>. In the commentary we <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that Binet and Henri's (1894) paper written over 115 years ago is still highly relevant even today. In particular, Binet's legacy lives on in modern research on misinformation effects in memory, in studies of conformity, and in experiments on the social contagion of memory. PMID:21144772</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nicolas, Serge; Collins, Thérèse; Gounden, Yannick; Roediger, Henry L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://people.wm.edu/~cadeln/Del_Negro_Lab_Homepage/Publications_files/2002%20BJ-Del%20Negro%20et%20al.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodicity</span>, Mixed-Mode Oscillations, and Quasiperiodicity in a Rhythm-Generating Neural Network</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">* *Cellular and Systems Neurobiology Section, Laboratory of Neural Control, National Institute of Neurological) to aperiodic chaos-like behavior. We also <span class="hlt">observed</span> <span class="hlt">periodic</span>, mixed-mode <span class="hlt">periodic</span>, and quasiperiodic breathing patterns in neonatal rodents and human infants in vivo, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that breathing patterns generated</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Del Negro, Christopher A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25365130"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hypnotizability, not <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>, influences false memory development.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hypnotizability influences the development of false memories. In Experiment 1, participants heard a positive or negative <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> regarding hypnosis and then listened to 8 Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) false memory paradigm lists in a hypnotic state. Neither hypnosis nor prehypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> affected memory. Highly hypnotizable participants were more accurate in recall and recognition. In Experiment 2, <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> were delivered in the form of feedback. Participants heard a positive or negative <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> about their performance prior to either the encoding or retrieval of 8 DRM lists. Neither accurate nor false memories were affected by the <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>. Highly hypnotizable individuals recognized fewer critical lures if they received a negative <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> about their performance. These results highlight the unusual role of hypnotizability in the creation of false memories. PMID:25365130</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dasse, Michelle N; Elkins, Gary R; Weaver, Charles A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997MNRAS.290...25S"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Noah Project: detection of the spin-orbit beat <span class="hlt">period</span> of BYCamelopardalis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">BY Camelopardalis is one of only three known asynchronous AM Herculis-type cataclysmic variables (CVs). The slightly different spin and orbital <span class="hlt">periods</span> lead to a predicted beat <span class="hlt">period</span> of about two weeks. We collected at least one orbit worth of <span class="hlt">observations</span> of BY Cam on each of 46 nights over a <span class="hlt">period</span> of four months to detect and study the beat phenomena. We detected a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 7.26 d both in the O-C values of the photometric variation and in the amplitude of a sine wave fit to individual orbits of data. This <span class="hlt">period</span> most likely represents half of the true beat <span class="hlt">period</span> of 14.52 d. We also measured a photometric <span class="hlt">period</span> of 0.137111 d, shorter than the previously <span class="hlt">suggested</span> spin <span class="hlt">periods</span>, from our large data set. Smaller sections of data showed a <span class="hlt">period</span> closer to the previously published spin <span class="hlt">period</span>. The photometric variation is caused by the white dwarf spin, but the accretion spot slips on the white dwarf surface over the course of a beat <span class="hlt">period</span>, causing the shorter photometric <span class="hlt">period</span>. Given the <span class="hlt">observed</span> beat and photometric <span class="hlt">periods</span>, we obtain a white dwarf spin <span class="hlt">period</span> of 0.1384339+/-0.000003 d, consistent with previous measurements. A search of a subset of the data for <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> from 6 to 40 min showed significant power in this range consistent with shot noise, flickering and broad peaks around 10 and 15 min.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Silber, Andrew D.; Szkody, Paula; Hoard, D. W.; Hammergren, M.; Morgan, J.; Fierce, E.; Olsen, K.; Mason, Paul A.; Rolleston, Robert; Ruotsalainen, Robert; Pavlenko, Elena P.; Shakhovskoy, Nickolay M.; Shugarov, Sergey; Andronov, Ivan L.; Kolesnikov, Sergey V.; Naylor, Tim; Schmidt, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0506757v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Origin of long-<span class="hlt">period</span> Alfv{é}n waves in the solar wind</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the <span class="hlt">observed</span> long-<span class="hlt">period</span> Alfv{\\'e}n waves in the solar wind may be generated in the solar interior due to the pulsation of the Sun in the fundamental radial mode. The <span class="hlt">period</span> of this pulsation is about 1 hour. The pulsation causes a <span class="hlt">periodical</span> variation of density and large-scale magnetic field, this affecting the Alfv{\\'e}n speed in the solar interior. Consequently the Alfv{\\'e}n waves with the half frequency of pulsation (i.e. with the double <span class="hlt">period</span>) can be parametrically amplified in the interior below the convection zone due to the recently <span class="hlt">suggested</span> swing wave-wave interaction. Therefore the amplified Alfv{\\'e}n waves have <span class="hlt">periods</span> of several hours. The waves can propagate upwards through the convection zone to the solar atmosphere and cause the <span class="hlt">observed</span> long-<span class="hlt">period</span> Alfv{\\'e}n oscillations in the solar wind.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. V. Zaqarashvili; G. Belvedere</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-06-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/2820534"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cerebral Mechanisms of Hypnotic Induction and <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The neural mechanisms underlying hypnotic states and responses to hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> remain largely unknown and, to date, have been studied only with indirect methods. Here, the effects of hypnosis and <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> to alter pain perception were investigated in hypnotizable subjects by using positron emission tomography (PET) measures of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and electroencephalographic (EEG) measures of brain electrical</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pierre Rainville; Robert K. Hofbauer; Tomáš Paus; Gary H. Duncan; M. Catherine Bushnell; Donald D. Price</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED117532.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Learnings: Consumer and Homemaking Education.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The guide presents <span class="hlt">suggested</span> learning concepts, experiences, and references for home economics educators in the planning and organization of secondary level consumer and homemaking programs. The <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> are based on questionnaires and interviews with teachers and administrators involved in this program. The guide's main focus is on the process…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Edmondson, Dorothy Jean; Swanson, Bettye B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://fishbull.noaa.gov/933/worthington.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Covariation between growth and morphology <span class="hlt">suggests</span> alternative</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Covariation between growth and morphology <span class="hlt">suggests</span> alternative size limits for the blacklip abalone in width are less variable than growth in length <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that a mini- mum legal width limit may be more minimum size limits have traditionally been estimated by considering average rates of growth, mortality</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/pp175018"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radar interferometry <span class="hlt">observations</span> of surface displacements during pre- and coeruptive <span class="hlt">periods</span> at Mount St. Helens, Washington, 1992-2005: Chapter 18 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyzed hundreds of interferograms of Mount St. Helens produced from radar images acquired by the ERS-1/2, ENVISAT, and RADARSAT satellites during the 1992-2004 preeruptive and 2004-2005 coeruptive <span class="hlt">periods</span> for signs of deformation associated with magmatic activity at depth. Individual interferograms were often contaminated by atmospheric delay anomalies; therefore, we employed stacking to amplify any deformation patterns that might exist while minimizing random noise. Preeruptive interferograms show no signs of volcanowide deformation between 1992 and the onset of eruptive activity in 2004. Several patches of subsidence in the 1980 debris-avalanche deposit were identified, however, and are thought to be caused by viscoelastic relaxation of loosely consolidated substrate, consolidation of water-saturated sediment, or melting of buried ice. Coeruptive interferometric stacks are dominated by atmospheric noise, probably because individual interferograms span only short time intervals in 2004 and 2005. Nevertheless, we are confident that at least one of the seven coeruptive stacks we constructed is reliable at about the 1-cm level. This stack <span class="hlt">suggests</span> deflation of Mount St. Helens driven by contraction of a source beneath the volcano.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Poland, Michael; Lu, Zhong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pserc.wisc.edu/documents/publications/papers/1999_general_publications/TRM13.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">SUGGESTED</span> ANALYTIC APPROACH TO TRANSMISSION RELIABILITY MARGIN</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">SUGGESTED</span> ANALYTIC APPROACH TO TRANSMISSION RELIABILITY MARGIN DRAFT REPORT JUNE 22 1999 Jianfeng Zhang Ian Dobson Fernando L. Alvarado POWER SYSTEMS ENGINEERING RESEARCH CENTER Electrical & Computer Engineering Dept. University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA Abstract Transmission Reliability Margin (TRM</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/128859"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Organizing an Extension Homemakers Club.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">)C l245.7 13 14ID __ '<span class="hlt">SUGGESTIONS</span> rr FOR ORGANIZING AN EXTENSION HOMEMAKERS CLUB LIB P.AR Y APR 20 1987 B?" h Texas Agricultural Extension Service ? The Texas A&M University System :~ Zerle L. Carpenter, Director ? College Station, Texas... <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Organizing ~ an Extension Homemakers Club June Cline* Extension Homemakers Clubs provide homemakers an opportunity for continuous informal education in a variety of areas relating to the home, family, community and country. An Extension...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cline, June</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014A%26A...563L...4N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Convection, granulation, and <span class="hlt">period</span> jitter in classical Cepheids</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Analyses of recent <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the sole classical Cepheid in the Kepler field, V1154 Cygni, found random changes of about 30 min in the pulsation <span class="hlt">period</span>. These <span class="hlt">period</span> changes challenge standard theories of pulsation and evolution because the <span class="hlt">period</span> change is non-secular, and explaining this <span class="hlt">period</span> jitter is necessary for understanding stellar evolution and the role of Cepheids as precise standard candles. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that convection and convective hot spots can explain the <span class="hlt">observed</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> jitter. Convective hot spots alter the timing of flux maximum and minimum in the Cepheid light curve, hence change the measured pulsation <span class="hlt">period</span>. We present a model of random hot spots that generate a localized flux excess that perturbs the Cepheid light curve and consequently the pulsation <span class="hlt">period</span>, which is consistent with the <span class="hlt">observed</span> jitter. This result demonstrates how important understanding convection is for modeling Cepheid stellar structure and evolution, how convection determines the red edge of the instability strip, and just how sensitive Cepheid light curves are to atmospheric physics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Neilson, Hilding R.; Ignace, Richard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140010436&hterms=zarka&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dzarka"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Bursts of Jovian Non-Io Decametric Radio Emission</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the years 2000-2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have Recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian <span class="hlt">periodic</span> radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong <span class="hlt">periodic</span> reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a <span class="hlt">period</span> approx. = 1:5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically <span class="hlt">observed</span> between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300 deg. and 60 deg. (via 360 deg.). The stereoscopic multispacecraft <span class="hlt">observations</span> have shown that the radio sources of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every approx. 25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that <span class="hlt">periodic</span> non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H O.; Farrell, W. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3622029"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> bursts of Jovian non-Io decametric radio emission</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the years 2000–2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian <span class="hlt">periodic</span> radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong <span class="hlt">periodic</span> reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a <span class="hlt">period</span> ?1.5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically <span class="hlt">observed</span> between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300° and 60° (via 360°). The stereoscopic multispacecraft <span class="hlt">observations</span> have shown that the radio sources of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every ?25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that <span class="hlt">periodic</span> non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind. PMID:23585696</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H.O.; Farrell, W.M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.webelements.com/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Tables: a compendium</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This is a compendium of resources related to the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> chart. From this site, one can surf a wide variety of presentations of the <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Chart of the Chemical Elements. Categories include: <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Tables with Basic nformation ; <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table Tests; <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table Link Lists; <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table Games; <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table Projects;<span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table News; <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table Books; Software Downloads and much, much more. This site was last updated 11/02/2003.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_13 div --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.A43D0333F"> <span id="translatedtitle">SEM Microanalysis of Particles: Concerns and <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is well suited to examine and characterize small (i.e. <10 micron) particles. Particles can be imaged and sizes and shapes determined. With energy dispersive x-ray spectrometers (EDS), chemical compositions can be determined quickly. Despite the ease in acquiring x-ray spectra and chemical compositions, there are potentially major sources of error to be recognized. Problems with EDS analyses of small particles: Qualitive estimates of composition (e.g. stating that Si>Al>Ca>Fe plus O) are easy. However, to be able to have confidence that a chemical composition is accurate, several issues should be examined. (1) Particle Mass Effect: Is the accelerating voltage appropriate for the specimen size? Are all the incident electrons remaining inside the particle, and not traveling out of the sample side or bottom? (2) Particle Absorption Effect: What is the geometric relationship of the beam impact point to the x-ray detector? The x-ray intensity will vary by significant amounts for the same material if the grains are irregular and the path out of the sample in the direction of the detector is longer or shorter. (3) Particle Fluorescence Effect: This is generally a smaller error, but should be considered: for small particles, using large standards, there will be a few % less x-rays generated in a small particle relative to one of the same composition and 50-100 times larger. Also, if the sample sits on a grid of a particular composition (e.g. Si wafer) potentially several % of Si could appear in the analysis. (4) In a increasing number of laboratories, with environmental or variable pressure SEMs, the Gas Skirt Effect is operating against you: here the incident electron beam scatters in the gas in the chamber, with less electrons impacting the target spot and some others hitting grains 100s of microns away, producing spectra that could be faulty. (5) Inclusion of measured oxygen: if the measured oxygen x-ray counts are utilized, significant errors can be introduced by differential absorption of this low energy x-ray. (6) Standardless Analysis: This typical method of doing EDS analysis has a major pitfall: the printed analysis is normalized to 100 wt%, thereby eliminating an important clue to analytical error. <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span>: (1) Use lower voltage, e.g. 10 kV, reducing effects 1,2,3 above. (2) Use standards--traditional flat polished ones--and don't initially normalize totals. Discrepancies can be <span class="hlt">observed</span> and addressed, not ignored. (3) Alway include oxygen by stoichometry, not measured. (4) Experimental simulation. Using material of constant composition (e.g. NIST glass K-411, or other homogeneous multi-element material with the elements of interest), grind into fragments of similar size to your unknowns, and see what is the analytical error for measurements of these known particles. Analyses of your unknown material will be no better, and probably worse than that, particularly if the grains are smaller. The results of this experiment should be reported whenever discussing measurements on the unknown materials. (5) Monte Carlo simulation. Programs such PENEPMA allows creation of complex geometry samples (and samples on substrates) and resulting EDS spectra can be generated. This allows estimation of errors for representative cases. It is slow, however; other simulations such as DTSA-II promise faster simulations with some limitations. (6) EBSD: this is a perfectly suited for some problems with SEM identification of small particles, e.g. distinguishing magnetite (Fe3O4) from hematite (Fe2O3), which is virtually impossible to do by EDS. With the appropriate hardware and software, electron diffraction patterns on particles can be gathered and the crystal type determined.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fournelle, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008cosp...37.1734L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Saturn's variable radio <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Latest SKR measurements by Cassini/RPWS confirm the <span class="hlt">observed</span>, slow and regular increase of its rotational modulation <span class="hlt">period</span> ( 10.9 hr), at the scale of about 0.5 percent over the last three years. In the meantime, similar drifts could also be found in some other <span class="hlt">observed</span> magnetospheric phenomena (e.g. magnetic field, UV auroras, etc. . . ), indicating that the inner magnetosphere of Saturn is globally changing at the 30-year scale of its revolution around the Sun. In order to better assess the possible causes of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> variation, the whole Cassini radio astronomy data set is reexamined, and compared to the long lasting (1991-2007) Saturn's SKR monitoring by the Ulysses/URAP radio astronomy instrument.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lecacheux, Alain</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24657632"> <span id="translatedtitle">Using <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> to model different types of automatic writing.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Our sense of self includes awareness of our thoughts and movements, and our control over them. This feeling can be altered or lost in neuropsychiatric disorders as well as in phenomena such as "automatic writing" whereby writing is attributed to an external source. Here, we employed <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> in highly hypnotically <span class="hlt">suggestible</span> participants to model various experiences of automatic writing during a sentence completion task. Results showed that the induction of hypnosis, without additional <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>, was associated with a small but significant reduction of control, ownership, and awareness for writing. Targeted <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> produced a double dissociation between thought and movement components of writing, for both feelings of control and ownership, and additionally, reduced awareness of writing. Overall, <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> produced selective alterations in the control, ownership, and awareness of thought and motor components of writing, thus enabling key aspects of automatic writing, <span class="hlt">observed</span> across different clinical and cultural settings, to be modelled. PMID:24657632</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Walsh, E; Mehta, M A; Oakley, D A; Guilmette, D N; Gabay, A; Halligan, P W; Deeley, Q</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/37029524"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the mechanism of <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> and hypnosis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The nature of hypnosis is not adequately explained by conditioned responses or conditioned attitudes. The writer agrees with R. W. White that the hypnotized subject must be motivated, but not necessarily to behave like a hypnotized person. She postulates, rather, that <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> are effective only if the subject actively strives to imagine himself in the situation described by the operator.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. B. Arnold</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1946-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://watermanagement.ucdavis.edu/files/4813/9244/1481/CWVT_Materials.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">CALIFORNIA WATER VIRTUAL TOUR <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Further Reading</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">. Regional Reports Volume 3. California Water Plan Update. Bulletin 16009 State of California, DepartmentCALIFORNIA WATER VIRTUAL TOUR <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Further Reading Water Law ­ Virginia Cahill Norris Hundley, Jr., The Great Thirst, Californians and Water: A History, University of California Press</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pasternack, Gregory B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=burnout+AND+nursing&id=EJ698356"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seven Salutary <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Counselor Stamina</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Counselor stamina is deemed essential in the midst of a consistently challenging, complex, and changing mental health care environment. Rather than perpetuating conversations about "burnout" and "burnout prevention," this article provides a salutary or health-promoting perspective. Seven <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for counselor stamina are presented and…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Osborn, Cynthia J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=conservation+AND+genetics&pg=7&id=EJ1018315"> <span id="translatedtitle">Current Research: 2013 Summer Reading <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To supplement the summer reading of National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) members, the NSTA Committee on Research in Science Education <span class="hlt">suggested</span> a list of science education research articles that were published in the journals of NSTA's affiliates in 2012. These articles covered a variety of topics that include learning about…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Journal of College Science Teaching, 2013</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=qualitative+AND+research&pg=6&id=EJ845945"> <span id="translatedtitle">Qualitative Research Articles: Guidelines, <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> and Needs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to give ideas and <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> to avoid some typical problems of qualitative articles. The aim is not to debate quality in qualitative research but to indicate some practical solutions. Design/methodology/approach: The paper discusses the design of qualitative research and the structure of a qualitative article…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Crescentini, Alberto; Mainardi, Giuditta</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42476903"> <span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of Achievement Motives: Comments and <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nygård, R. & Gjesme, T. 1973. Assessment of Achievement Motives: Comments and <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span>. Scand. J. educ. Res. 17, 39?46. Measuring instruments usually employed in achievement motivation research are reviewed and appraised. The following conclusions are drawn; (a) the validity of the need for achievement tests, especially when used among females, is questionable; (b) the objective tests assumed to indicate the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roald Nygård; Torgrim Gjesme</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22Black+Holes%22&id=EJ879604"> <span id="translatedtitle">Technology Is Power: <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Beginning Teachers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Shanklin knows it can be hard for new teachers to incorporate all they know about technology with the realities of a classroom. She <span class="hlt">suggests</span> setting incremental, monthly technology goals; investing in equipment; assessing students' grasp of the technology at their disposal and their use of it in classroom projects; searching purposefully for…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shanklin, Nancy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22Black+Holes%22&pg=4&id=EJ068448"> <span id="translatedtitle">Physics Courses--Some <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Case Studies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To communicate the relevance and excitement of science activity to students, the use of more imaginative, and even openly speculative, case studies in physics courses is <span class="hlt">suggested</span>. Some useful examples are Magnetic Monopoles, Constants, Black Holes, Antimatter, Zero Mass Particles, Tachyons, and the Bootstrap Hypothesis. (DF)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Swetman, T. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ibiologia.unam.mx/pdf/links/neo/rev9/vol9_1/orni_9_1_23-30.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">SUGGESTIONS</span> FOR MEASURING EXTERNAL CHARACTERS OF BIRDS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is noted that there are no modern references thoroughly describing methods for mea- suring the external characteristics of birds. Perhaps this explains an all too frequent use of meth- ods that vary from suboptimal to inappropriate. Several common problems are addressed and functional solutions and methods are <span class="hlt">suggested</span> for measuring external body components and body mass in birds. Some</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kevin Winker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED043001.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Universals in the Ontogenesis of Grammar.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper represents a preliminary attempt to determine universals of grammatical development in children. On the basis of language acquisition data, a limited number of findings are presented in the form of <span class="hlt">suggested</span> developmental universals. These universals are grouped according to the psychological variables which may determine them, in the…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Slobin, Dan I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=theories+AND+leadership&pg=2&id=EJ867955"> <span id="translatedtitle">Leadership Theories--Managing Practices, Challenges, <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A shortage of community college executives due to the number of retirements occurring among current leaders is predicted. An examination of three leadership theories--servant-leadership, business leadership and transformational leadership--<span class="hlt">suggests</span> techniques for potential community college leaders. Servant-leaders focus on the needs of their…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hawkins, Cheryl</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24462776"> <span id="translatedtitle">Metabolic brain activity <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of persistent pain in a rat model of neuropathic pain.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Persistent pain is a central characteristic of neuropathic pain conditions in humans. Knowing whether rodent models of neuropathic pain produce persistent pain is therefore crucial to their translational applicability. We investigated the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain and the formalin pain model in rats using positron emission tomography (PET) with the metabolic tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to determine if there is ongoing brain activity <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of persistent pain. For the formalin model, under brief anesthesia we injected one hindpaw with 5% formalin and the FDG tracer into a tail vein. We then allowed the animals to awaken and <span class="hlt">observed</span> pain behavior for 30min during the FDG uptake <span class="hlt">period</span>. The rat was then anesthetized and placed in the scanner for static image acquisition, which took place between minutes 45 and 75 post-tracer injection. A single reference rat brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) was used to align the PET images with the Paxinos and Watson rat brain atlas. Increased glucose metabolism was <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the somatosensory region associated with the injection site (S1 hindlimb contralateral), S1 jaw/upper lip and cingulate cortex. Decreases were <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the prelimbic cortex and hippocampus. Second, SNI rats were scanned 3weeks post-surgery using the same scanning paradigm, and region-of-interest analyses revealed increased metabolic activity in the contralateral S1 hindlimb. Finally, a second cohort of SNI rats was scanned while anesthetized during the tracer uptake <span class="hlt">period</span>, and the S1 hindlimb increase was not <span class="hlt">observed</span>. Increased brain activity in the somatosensory cortex of SNI rats resembled the activity produced with the injection of formalin, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the SNI model may produce persistent pain. The lack of increased activity in S1 hindlimb with general anesthetic demonstrates that this effect can be blocked, as well as highlights the importance of investigating brain activity in awake and behaving rodents. PMID:24462776</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thompson, Scott J; Millecamps, Magali; Aliaga, Antonio; Seminowicz, David A; Low, Lucie A; Bedell, Barry J; Stone, Laura S; Schweinhardt, Petra; Bushnell, M Catherine</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21452814"> <span id="translatedtitle">AN INTERPRETATION OF THE ORBITAL <span class="hlt">PERIOD</span> DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HOT JUPITERS AND GIANT PLANETS ON LONG-<span class="hlt">PERIOD</span> ORBITS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is believed that a hot Jupiter (giant planet with a short <span class="hlt">period</span> less than 10 days) forms in the outer region of a protoplanetary disk, then migrates inward to an orbit with a short <span class="hlt">period</span> around 3 days, and stops there by a final stopping mechanism. The prominent problem is why hot Jupiters migrate inward to short-<span class="hlt">period</span> orbits, while other extrasolar giant planets and Jovian planets in our solar system exist on long-<span class="hlt">period</span> orbits. Here we show that this difference in orbital <span class="hlt">periods</span> is caused by two populations of protoplanetary disks. One population experiences gravitational instability during some <span class="hlt">periods</span> of their lifetime (GI disks), while the other does not (No-GI disks). In GI disks, planets can quickly migrate inward to short-<span class="hlt">period</span> orbits to become hot Jupiters. In No-GI disks, the migration is so slow that planets can exist on long-<span class="hlt">period</span> orbits. Protoplanetary disks are classified into the two populations because of the differences in properties of molecular cloud cores, from which disks from. We specifically compare our theory with <span class="hlt">observations</span>. Our theory is supported by <span class="hlt">observations</span> of extrasolar planets. We analyze the current status of our solar system and find that our solar nebula belongs to the population with a low migration rate. This is consistent with the <span class="hlt">observation</span> that Jupiter and Saturn are indeed on long-<span class="hlt">period</span> orbits. Our results further <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that, in the future <span class="hlt">observations</span>, a hot Jupiter cannot be found around a star with mass below a critical mass (0.14-0.28 M {sub sun}).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jin Liping, E-mail: jinlp@jlu.edu.c [College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998A%26A...335..605L"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periods</span>, <span class="hlt">period</span> changes and the nature of the microvariations of Luminous Blue Variables</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present <span class="hlt">period</span> determinations of the microvariability of the six luminous blue variables AG Car, HR Car, 164 G Sco, S Dor, R 127, and R 71. In total, we were able to determine 22 <span class="hlt">periods</span> in these stars, ranging from 18 days up to 195 days. All stars have <span class="hlt">period</span> changes by up to a factor 4 within time scales of a few hundred days. For all stars the amplitude of the pulsations in V increases with increasing <span class="hlt">periods</span>. The slope of the correlation between the amplitude and the <span class="hlt">period</span> decreases with increasing luminosity. The values of the pulsation constant Q were determined. HR Car, 164 G Sco, R 71 and R 127 have Q-values in the range of 0.07 to 0.18 days. This is about a factor two larger than those of most other B-type supergiants, possibly because the LBVs have a higher L/M ratio as they have lost more mass. The most common value for the pulsational constant of LBVs is Q=0.07 +/- 0.01 days, but Q can increase temporarily by as much as a factor four. This is not related to a particular phase in the light curve. The long <span class="hlt">periods</span> might be due to a beat of two frequencies. For the two stars R 71 and R 127, which showed significant changes in M_V, and hence in radius during the course of the <span class="hlt">observations</span>, the pulsational <span class="hlt">period</span> increased with increasing radius. The Q-values of R 71 and R 127 increase when the stars get brighter and their radii increase. This is probably due the changes in the density structure of the stars as their outer envelope expands. We compare the <span class="hlt">observed</span> variations with those predicted for strange modes by Kiriakidis et al. (1993). The <span class="hlt">periods</span> of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> microvariations are orders of magnitudes longer than predicted for strange modes. A comparison with the variations of slowly pulsating B-stars (SPBs) <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the microvarions of LBVs are due to g-mode pulsations. A first attempt for mode identification, based on a simple linear pulsation model by means of the multicolour Stroemgren data, shows that none of the variations can be explained by means of a radial pulsation. The amplitude-wavelength relations <span class="hlt">suggest</span> g-modes of low l.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.; Bastiaanse, M. V.; Aerts, C.; Spoon, H. W. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25054188"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enhancing business intelligence by means of <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> reviews.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Appropriate identification and classification of online reviews to satisfy the needs of current and potential users pose a critical challenge for the business environment. This paper focuses on a specific kind of reviews: the <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> type. <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> have a significant influence on both consumers' choices and designers' understanding and, hence, they are key for tasks such as brand positioning and social media marketing. The proposed approach consists of three main steps: (1) classify comparative and <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> sentences; (2) categorize <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> sentences into different types, either explicit or implicit locutions; (3) perform sentiment analysis on the classified reviews. A range of supervised machine learning approaches and feature sets are evaluated to tackle the problem of <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> opinion mining. Experimental results for all three tasks are obtained on a dataset of mobile phone reviews and demonstrate that extending a bag-of-words representation with <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> and comparative patterns is ideal for distinguishing <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> sentences. In particular, it is <span class="hlt">observed</span> that classifying <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> sentences into implicit and explicit locutions works best when using a mixed sequential rule feature representation. Sentiment analysis achieves maximum performance when employing additional preprocessing in the form of negation handling and target masking, combined with sentiment lexicons. PMID:25054188</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Qazi, Atika; Raj, Ram Gopal; Tahir, Muhammad; Cambria, Erik; Syed, Karim Bux Shah</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4099162"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enhancing Business Intelligence by Means of <span class="hlt">Suggestive</span> Reviews</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Appropriate identification and classification of online reviews to satisfy the needs of current and potential users pose a critical challenge for the business environment. This paper focuses on a specific kind of reviews: the <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> type. <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> have a significant influence on both consumers' choices and designers' understanding and, hence, they are key for tasks such as brand positioning and social media marketing. The proposed approach consists of three main steps: (1) classify comparative and <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> sentences; (2) categorize <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> sentences into different types, either explicit or implicit locutions; (3) perform sentiment analysis on the classified reviews. A range of supervised machine learning approaches and feature sets are evaluated to tackle the problem of <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> opinion mining. Experimental results for all three tasks are obtained on a dataset of mobile phone reviews and demonstrate that extending a bag-of-words representation with <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> and comparative patterns is ideal for distinguishing <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> sentences. In particular, it is <span class="hlt">observed</span> that classifying <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> sentences into implicit and explicit locutions works best when using a mixed sequential rule feature representation. Sentiment analysis achieves maximum performance when employing additional preprocessing in the form of negation handling and target masking, combined with sentiment lexicons. PMID:25054188</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Qazi, Atika</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25246673"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrodynamics of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> breathers.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the first experimental <span class="hlt">observation</span> of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> breathers in water waves. One of them is Kuznetsov-Ma soliton and another one is Akhmediev breather. Each of them is a localized solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) on a constant background. The difference is in localization which is either in time or in space. The experiments conducted in a water wave flume show results that are in good agreement with the NLS theory. Basic features of the breathers that include the maximal amplitudes and spectra are consistent with the theoretical predictions. PMID:25246673</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chabchoub, A; Kibler, B; Dudley, J M; Akhmediev, N</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_14 div --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3476373"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mentoring in biostatistics: some <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for reform</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mentoring is routinely used as a tool to facilitate acquisition of skills by new professionals in fields like medicine, nursing, surgery, and business. While mentoring has been proposed as an effective strategy for knowledge and skills transfer in biostatistics and related fields, there is still much to be done to facilitate adoption by stakeholders, including academia and employers of biostatisticians. This is especially troubling given that biostatisticians play a key role in the success or otherwise of clinical research conducted for evidence-based decisions. In this paper, we offer <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> on how mentoring can be applied in practice to advance the statistical training of future biostatisticians. In particular, we propose steps that academic statistics departments, professional statistical societies, and statistics organizations can take to advance the mentoring of young biostatisticians. Our <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> also cover what mentors and mentees can do to facilitate a successful mentoring relationship. PMID:23093907</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Odueyungbo, Adefowope; Thabane, Lehana</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1328915"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span> for a Fast Multiplier</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the economics of present large-scale scientific computers could benefit from a greater investment in hardware to mechanize multiplication and division than is now common. As a move in this direction, a design is developed for a multiplier which generates the product of two numbers using purely combinational logic, i.e., in one gating step. Using straightforward diode-transistor</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. S. Wallace</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1964-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://math.ucsb.edu/ugrad/pdf/UpdatedSuggestedPlanofStudyBSMath.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Plan of Study BS Mathematics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">: Math 118A Math 118B 118C or elective UD elective 147A or elective *Computer Science 8 or 16<span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Plan of Study BS Mathematics 10/21/14 Fall Winter Spring Summer? Frosh year: Math 3A Math 3B Math 4A CMPSC* Physics 1, 6A or 21 Soph. year: Math 4B Math 6A Math 6B Math 8** Math 108A*** Math</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Akhmedov, Azer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://math.ucsb.edu/ugrad/pdf/UpdatedSuggestedPlanofStudyMTHSC.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Plan of Study BS Mathematical Sciences</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">elective Sr. year: Math 118A Math 118B 118C or UD elective UD elective 122A *Computer Science 8 or 16<span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Plan of Study BS Mathematical Sciences 10/21/14 Fall Winter Spring Summer? Frosh year: Math 3A Math 3B Math 4A CMPSC* Physics 1, 6A or 21 Soph. year: Math 4B Math 6B Math 108A*** Math 6A</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Akhmedov, Azer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25472881"> <span id="translatedtitle">Anxiety disorders and physical comorbidity: increased prevalence but reduced relevance of specific risk factors for hospital-based mortality during a 12.5-year <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> in general hospital admissions.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anxiety disorders (AD) are associated with an increase in physical comorbidities, but the effects of these diseases on hospital-based mortality are unclear. Consequently, we investigated whether the burden of physical comorbidity and its relevance on hospital-based mortality differed between individuals with and without AD during a 12.5-year <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> in general hospital admissions. During 1 January 2000 and 30 June 2012, 11,481 AD individuals were admitted to seven General Manchester Hospitals. All comorbidities with a prevalence ?1 % were compared with those of 114,810 randomly selected and group-matched hospital controls of the same age and gender, regardless of priority of diagnoses or specialized treatments. Comorbidities that increased the risk of hospital-based mortality (but not mortality outside of the hospital) were identified using multivariate logistic regression analyses. AD individuals compared to controls had a substantial excess comorbidity, but a reduced hospital-based mortality rate. Twenty-two physical comorbidities were increased in AD individuals compared with controls, which included cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors. The most frequent physical comorbidities in AD individuals were hypertension, asthma, cataract, and ischaemic heart disease. Risk factors for hospital-based mortality in AD individuals were lung cancer, alcoholic liver disease, respiratory failure, heart failure, pneumonia, bronchitis, non-specific dementia, breast cancer, COPD, gallbladder calculus, atrial fibrillation, and angina. The impact of atrial fibrillation, angina, and gallbladder calculus on hospital-based mortality was higher in AD individuals than in controls. In contrast, other mortality risk factors had an equal or lower impact on hospital-based mortality in sample comparisons. Therefore AD individuals have a higher burden of physical comorbidity that is associated with a reduced risk of general hospital-based mortality. Atrial fibrillation, angina, and gallbladder calculus are major risk factors for general hospital-based mortality in AD individuals. PMID:25472881</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schoepf, Dieter; Heun, Reinhard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/ja/v081/i013/JA081i013p02397/JA081i013p02397.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of Jovian Electrons at 1 AU</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It has recently been <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that electrons of Jovian origin are responsible for the 'quiet time increases' in the > 3-MeV electron intensity <span class="hlt">observed</span> at I AU. Using data from the California Institute of Technology electron\\/isotope spectrometers on Imp 7 and 8, we have studied the temporal behavior of quiet time electrons at I AU over the <span class="hlt">period</span> October 1972</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. A. Mewaldt; E. C. Stone; R. E. Vogt</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvE..83d1919K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ergodicity convergence test <span class="hlt">suggests</span> telomere motion obeys fractional dynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anomalous diffusion, <span class="hlt">observed</span> in many biological processes, is a generalized description of a wide variety of processes, all obeying the same law of mean-square displacement. Identifying the basic mechanisms of these <span class="hlt">observations</span> is important for deducing the nature of the biophysical systems measured. We implement a previously <span class="hlt">suggested</span> method for distinguishing between fractional Langevin dynamics, fractional Brownian motion, and continuous time random walk based on the ergodic nature of the data. We apply the method together with the recently <span class="hlt">suggested</span> P-variation test and the displacement correlation to the lately measured dynamics of telomeres in the nucleus of mammalian cells and find strong evidence that the telomeres motion obeys fractional dynamics. The ergodic dynamics are <span class="hlt">observed</span> experimentally to fit fractional Brownian or Langevin dynamics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kepten, E.; Bronshtein, I.; Garini, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/43092041"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">period</span> study of V502 Ophiuchus</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present examination of all extant minima of the W-type contact binary V502 Oph revises ten times of minima from original <span class="hlt">observations</span> and derives five new times of minima from new <span class="hlt">observations</span>. The <span class="hlt">period</span> study, covering 53 yrs of <span class="hlt">observations</span> and 84 timings of minima light, indicates an orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> oscillation of about 35 +\\/- 2 yrs, while undergoing a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ethem Derman; Osman Demircan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3110760"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dinosaur Peptides <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> Mechanisms of Protein Survival</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a ‘preservation motif’, and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a chemical mechanism for survival. PMID:21687667</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P. R. O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1021193"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dinosaur Peptides <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> Mechanisms of Protein Survival</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a 'preservation motif', and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a chemical mechanism for survival.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O. (Harvard-Med); (IIT); (NCSU); (UPENN); (Manchester); (Orthovita)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6769616"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Comet Machholz and its idiosyncrasies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The dynamics and physical characteristics of Comet P/Machholz are analyzed. The discovery of the comet (Machholz, 1986) is discussed, including the <span class="hlt">observational</span> conditions and the theory that the comet is inactive over extensive <span class="hlt">periods</span> of time. Consideration is given to <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the two tails of Comet P/Machholz (Emerson, 1986), the brightness variations and light curve of the comet, and nuclear photometry of the comet (Green, 1987). It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the increase in activity beginning one day after perihelion was triggered by a discrete source within 15 deg of the rotation pole that became sunlit after perihelion. Also, the possibility that Comet P/Machholz is associated with a meteor stream is examined. 45 refs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sekanina, Z. (JPL, Pasadena, CA (USA))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990AJ.....99.1268S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Comet Machholz and its idiosyncrasies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The dynamics and physical characteristics of Comet P/Machholz are analyzed. The discovery of the comet (Machholz, 1986) is discussed, including the <span class="hlt">observational</span> conditions and the theory that the comet is inactive over extensive <span class="hlt">periods</span> of time. Consideration is given to <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the two tails of Comet P/Machholz (Emerson, 1986), the brightness variations and light curve of the comet, and nuclear photometry of the comet (Green, 1987). It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the increase in activity beginning one day after perihelion was triggered by a discrete source within 15 deg of the rotation pole that became sunlit after perihelion. Also, the possibility that Comet P/Machholz is associated with a meteor stream is examined.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sekanina, Z.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20736607"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere, or POPS, is a novel fusion concept first proposed by D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel [Fusion Technol. 38, 28 (1998)]. POPS utilizes the self-similar collapse of an oscillating ion cloud in a spherical harmonic oscillator potential well formed by electron injection. Once the ions have been phase-locked, their coherent motion simultaneously produces very high densities and temperatures during the collapse phase of the oscillation. A requirement for POPS is that the electron injection produces a stable harmonic oscillator potential. This has been demonstrated in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device and verified by particle simulation. Also, the POPS oscillation has been confirmed experimentally through <span class="hlt">observation</span> that the ions in the potential well exhibit resonance behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the <span class="hlt">observed</span> POPS frequencies and the theoretical predictions has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> for a wide range of potential well depths and three different ion species. Practical applications of POPS require large plasma compressions. These large compressions have been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in particle simulations, although space charge neutralization remains a major issue.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, J.; Nebel, R.A.; Stange, S.; Murali, S. Krupakar [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-05-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ASPC..490...63M"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Multiple <span class="hlt">Periods</span> and the Magnetic Nature of CP Puppis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fast cadence time resolved spectra taken at the CTIO-4 m telescope with the RC-spectrograph during 2 consecutive nights revealed a long term modulation of the binary radial velocity. Chandra hard X-ray spectra taken with the HETGS instrument showed features typically <span class="hlt">observed</span> in magnetic white dwarfs. Here, we present the new data and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that CP Pup is possibly a long orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> intermediate polar.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mason, E.; Bianchini, A.; Orio, M.; Williams, R. E.; Mukai, K.; de Marino, D.; Abbot, T. M. C.; di Mille, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17087580"> <span id="translatedtitle">Proactive and retroactive effects of negative <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The negative effects of false information presented either prior to (proactive interference; PI) or following (retroactive interference; RI) true information was examined with word definitions (Experiment 1) and trivia facts (Experiment 2). Participants were explicitly aware of which information was true and false when shown, and true-false discrimination was evaluated via multiple-choice tests. Negative <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>, defined as poorer performance on interference items than noninterference (control) items, consistently occurred when the wrong information followed the correct information (RI) but not when it preceded the correct information (PI). These effects did not change as a function of retention interval (immediate, 1 week, or 3 weeks) or number of incorrect alternatives (1 or 3). Implications of this outcome for experiencing incorrect information in both academic and nonacademic situations are considered. PMID:17087580</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brown, Alan S; Brown, Christine M; Mosbacher, Joy L; Dryden, W Erich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25160215"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pediatrics prescriptions with ontologies and treatment <span class="hlt">suggestions</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Diagnosis and treatment for children healthcare are very sensitive activities. The present work presents an ontology based model for a future information system to support these activities. The input data contains children health status, and drug characteristics. During clinical practice a database with what specialists mark as successful treatments is created. This database is gradually growing bigger and is built by physicians based on their good results related to a treatment for a certain health condition. The new ontology system proposed in this paper is supporting the e-prescription process. The relations are managed using the open source application Protégé and for <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> treatments, using the database with successful treatments, we developed a special module that offers to physicians a selection from which they can chose the best treatment for their current case. PMID:25160215</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lup?e, Oana-Sorina; Stoicu-Tivadar, L?cr?mioara</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/periodic_paralysis/periodic_paralysis.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle">Familial <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Paralyses</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">NINDS Familial <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Paralyses Information Page Synonym(s): <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Paralyses Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What are Familial <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Paralyses? Is there any treatment? What is the prognosis? What research is ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ia.usu.edu/viewproject.php?project=ia:5338"> <span id="translatedtitle">So Many <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Tables!</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> tables come in a variety of shapes and formats. Some <span class="hlt">periodic</span> tables have a flair of creativity! Take a look at these different versions of <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Tables at the following websites. You will be asked to reflect on the theme of <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> after exploring these websites. 1. Some <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Tables provide a wealth of information about each element. Compare 2 different elements on the following <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Tables. <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table Alive WebElements 2. <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Tables can be organized in unique and unusual 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional formats. Analyse the organization of <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> in some of the following <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Tables. Presentation Forms of the <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table Universal <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table 3. Sometimes the designer ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Suggs, Mrs.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-11-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910018813&hterms=audrey&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Daudrey"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggested</span> criteria for evaluating systems engineering methodologies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Systems engineering is the application of mathematical and scientific principles to practical ends in the life-cycle of a system. A methodology for systems engineering is a carefully developed, relatively complex procedure or process for applying these mathematical and scientific principles. There are many systems engineering methodologies (or possibly many versions of a few methodologies) currently in use in government and industry. These methodologies are usually designed to meet the needs of a particular organization. It has been <span class="hlt">observed</span>, however, that many technical and non-technical problems arise when inadequate systems engineering methodologies are applied by organizations to their systems development projects. Various criteria for evaluating systems engineering methodologies are discussed. Such criteria are developed to assist methodology-users in identifying and selecting methodologies that best fit the needs of the organization.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gates, Audrey; Paul, Arthur S.; Gill, Tepper L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MNRAS.434..186C"> <span id="translatedtitle">The orbital <span class="hlt">periods</span> of subdwarf B binaries produced by the first stable Roche Lobe overflow channel</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Long-orbital-<span class="hlt">period</span> subdwarf B (sdB) stars with main-sequence companions are believed to be the product of stable Roche Lobe overflow (RLOF), a scenario challenged by recent <span class="hlt">observations</span>. Here, we represent the results of a systematic study of the orbital-<span class="hlt">period</span> distribution of sdB binaries in this channel using detailed binary evolution calculations. We show that the <span class="hlt">observed</span> orbital-<span class="hlt">period</span> distribution of long-<span class="hlt">period</span> sdB binaries can be well explained by this scenario. Furthermore, we find that, if the progenitors of the sdB stars have initial masses below the helium flash mass, the sdB binaries produced from stable RLOF follow a unique mass-orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> relation for a given metallicity Z; increasing the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> from ˜400 to ˜1100 d corresponds to increasing the mass of the sdB star from ˜0.40 to ˜0.49 M? for Z = 0.02. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the longest sdB binaries (with orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> >1100 d) could be the result of atmospheric RLOF. The mass-orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> relation can be tested <span class="hlt">observationally</span> if the mass of the sdB star can be determined precisely, e.g. from asteroseismology. Using this relation, we revise the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> distribution of sdB binaries produced by the first stable RLOF channel for the best-fitting model of Han et al (2003), and show that the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> has a peak around 830 d.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, Xuefei; Han, Zhanwen; Deca, Jan; Podsiadlowski, Philipp</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_15 div --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22163279"> <span id="translatedtitle">6-year <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> and variable synchronicity in a mass-flowering plant.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodical</span> organisms, such as bamboos and <span class="hlt">periodical</span> cicadas, are very famous for their synchronous reproduction. In bamboos and other <span class="hlt">periodical</span> plants, the synchronicity of mass-flowering and withering has been often reported indicating these species are monocarpic (semelparous) species. Therefore, synchronicity and <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> are often suspected to be fairly tightly coupled traits in these <span class="hlt">periodical</span> plants. We investigate the <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> and synchronicity of Strobilanthes flexicaulis, and a closely related species S. tashiroi on Okinawa Island, Japan. The genus Strobilanthes is known for several <span class="hlt">periodical</span> species. Based on 32-year <span class="hlt">observational</span> data, we confirmed that S. flexicaulis is 6-year <span class="hlt">periodical</span> mass-flowering monocarpic plant. All the flowering plants had died after flowering. In contrast, we found that S. tashiroi is a polycarpic perennial with no mass-flowering from three-year individual tracking. We also surveyed six local populations of S. flexicaulis and found variation in the synchronicity from four highly synchronized populations (>98% of plants flowering in the mass year) to two less synchronized one with 11-47% of plants flowering before and after the mass year. This result might imply that synchrony may be selected for when <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> is established in monocarpic species. We found the selective advantages for mass-flowering in pollinator activities and predator satiation. The current results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the <span class="hlt">periodical</span> S. flexicaulis might have evolved <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> from a non-<span class="hlt">periodical</span> close relative. The current report should become a key finding for understanding the evolution of <span class="hlt">periodical</span> plants. PMID:22163279</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kakishima, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Jin; Murata, Hiroko; Murata, Jin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://truth.boisestate.edu/jcaawp/2005_1_19/2005_1_19R.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Role of Interviewer Behavior in Eyewitness <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thirty-six participants in the age group 18-22 participated in a simulated experiment designed to examine whether social factors, more specifically the interviewer behaviour, play a significant role in the level of <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> <span class="hlt">observed</span>. The study had a single factor between-subjects design. The independent variable was interviewer behaviour, which was varied such that there were three conditions: friendly, abrupt and neutral</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vanita Sondhi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://bbs.utdallas.edu/staff_faculty/faculty/docs/JCogDevThierrySpence.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Before Misinformation is Encountered: Source Monitoring Decreases Child Witness <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This research examines whether young children are less <span class="hlt">suggestible</span> if they monitor the source of acquired information. Events from 2 sources—live and videotaped sci- ence demonstrations—were <span class="hlt">observed</span> by 3- to 4-year-olds (n = 39) and 5- to 6-year- olds (n = 36) in Experiment 1. One half of the children in each age group were admin- istered a source-monitoring (SM)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Karen L. Thierry; Melanie J. Spence; Amina Memon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25197879"> <span id="translatedtitle">Procalcitonin elevation <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a septic source.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Procalcitonin is used as a marker for sepsis but there is little known about the correlation of the procalcitonin elevation with the causative organism in sepsis. All patients aged 18 to 80 years who were admitted to the surgery service from June 2010 to May 2012 and who had a procalcitonin drawn were evaluated. Culture data were reviewed to determine the causative organism. Infections analyzed included pneumonia, urinary tract infection (UTI), bloodstream infection, and Clostridium difficile. Other parameters assessed included reason for admission, body mass index, pressor use, antibiotic duration, and disposition. Two hundred thirty-two patient records were reviewed. Patients without a known infection/source of sepsis had a mean procalcitonin of 3.95. Those with pneumonia had a procalcitonin of 20.59 (P = 0.03). Those with a UTI had a mean procalcitonin of 66.84 (P = 0.0005). Patients with a bloodstream infection had a mean procalcitonin of 33.30 (P = 0.003). Those with C. difficile had a procalcitonin of 47.20 (P = 0.004). When broken down by causative organisms, those with Gram-positive sepsis had a procalcitonin of 23.10 (P = 0.02) compared with those with Gram-negative sepsis at 32.75 (P = 0.02). Those with fungal infections had a procalcitonin of 42.90 (P = 0.001). These data <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that procalcitonin elevation can help guide treatment by indicating likely causative organism and infection type. These data may provide a good marker for initiation of antifungal therapy. PMID:25197879</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Friend, Kara E; Burgess, Jessica N; Britt, Rebecca C; Collins, Jay N; Weireter, Leonard N; Novosel, Timothy J; Britt, L D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/133892"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evidence <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> possible SCA1 gene involvement in schizophrenia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Several findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a possible role for the SCA1 gene on chromosome 6p in some cases of schizophrenia. First, linkage analyses in Irish pedigrees provided LOD scores up to 3.0 for one model tested using microsatellites closely linked to SCA1. Reanalysis of these data using affected sibpair methods yielded a significant result (p = 0.01) for one marker. An attempt to replicate this linkage finding was made using 44 NIMH families (206 individuals, 80 affected) and 12 Utah families (120 individuals, 49 affected). LOD scores were negative in these new families, even allowing for heterogeneity, as were results using affected sibpair methods. However, one Utah family provided a LOD score of 1.3. We also screened the SCA1 trinucleotide repeat to search for expansions characteristic of this disorder in these families and in 38 additional unrelated schizophrenics. We found 1 schizophrenic with 41 repeats, which is substantially larger than the maximum size of 36 repeats <span class="hlt">observed</span> in previous studies of several hundred controls. We are now assessing whether the distribution of SCA1 repeats differs significantly in schizophrenia versus controls. Recent reports <span class="hlt">suggest</span> possible anticipation in schizophrenia (also characteristic of SCA1) and a few cases of psychiatric symptoms <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> schizophrenia have been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the highly related disorder DRPLA (SCA2), which is also based on trinucleotide repeat expansion. These findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that further investigations of this gene and chromosome region may be a priority.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Diehl, S.R.; Wange, S.; Sun, C. [NIDR, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950025912&hterms=Relativity+theory&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DRelativity%2Btheory"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relativistic timescale analysis <span class="hlt">suggests</span> lunar theory revision</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The SI second of the atomic clock was calibrated to match the Ephemeris Time (ET) second in a mutual four year effort between the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the United States Naval Observatory (USNO). The ephemeris time is 'clocked' by <span class="hlt">observing</span> the elapsed time it takes the Moon to cross two positions (usually occultation of stars relative to a position on Earth) and dividing that time span into the predicted seconds according to the lunar equations of motion. The last revision of the equations of motion was the Improved Lunar Ephemeris (ILE), which was based on E. W. Brown's lunar theory. Brown classically derived the lunar equations from a purely Newtonian gravity with no relativistic compensations. However, ET is very theory dependent and is affected by relativity, which was not included in the ILE. To investigate the relativistic effects, a new, noninertial metric for a gravitated, translationally accelerated and rotating reference frame has three sets of contributions, namely (1) Earth's velocity, (2) the static solar gravity field and (3) the centripetal acceleration from Earth's orbit. This last term can be characterized as a pseudogravitational acceleration. This metric predicts a time dilation calculated to be -0.787481 seconds in one year. The effect of this dilation would make the ET timescale run slower than had been originally determined. Interestingly, this value is within 2 percent of the average leap second insertion rate, which is the result of the divergence between International Atomic Time (TAI) and Earth's rotational time called Universal Time (UT or UTI). Because the predictions themselves are significant, regardless of the comparison to TAI and UT, the authors will be rederiving the lunar ephemeris model in the manner of Brown with the relativistic time dilation effects from the new metric to determine a revised, relativistic ephemeris timescale that could be used to determine UT free of leap second adjustments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Deines, Steven D.; Williams, Carol A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3627117"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enhanced entrainability of genetic oscillators by <span class="hlt">period</span> mismatch</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Biological oscillators coordinate individual cellular components so that they function coherently and collectively. They are typically composed of multiple feedback loops, and <span class="hlt">period</span> mismatch is unavoidable in biological implementations. We investigated the advantageous effect of this <span class="hlt">period</span> mismatch in terms of a synchronization response to external stimuli. Specifically, we considered two fundamental models of genetic circuits: smooth and relaxation oscillators. Using phase reduction and Floquet multipliers, we numerically analysed their entrainability under different coupling strengths and <span class="hlt">period</span> ratios. We found that a <span class="hlt">period</span> mismatch induces better entrainment in both types of oscillator; the enhancement occurs in the vicinity of the bifurcation on their limit cycles. In the smooth oscillator, the optimal <span class="hlt">period</span> ratio for the enhancement coincides with the experimentally <span class="hlt">observed</span> ratio, which <span class="hlt">suggests</span> biological exploitation of the <span class="hlt">period</span> mismatch. Although the origin of multiple feedback loops is often explained as a passive mechanism to ensure robustness against perturbation, we study the active benefits of the <span class="hlt">period</span> mismatch, which include increasing the efficiency of the genetic oscillators. Our findings show a qualitatively different perspective for both the inherent advantages of multiple loops and their essentiality. PMID:23389900</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hasegawa, Yoshihiko; Arita, Masanori</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1206.6238v3"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enhanced entrainability of genetic oscillators by <span class="hlt">period</span> mismatch</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Biological oscillators coordinate individual cellular components so that they function coherently and collectively. They are typically composed of multiple feedback loops, and <span class="hlt">period</span> mismatch is unavoidable in biological implementations. We investigated the advantageous effect of this <span class="hlt">period</span> mismatch in terms of a synchronization response to external stimuli. Specifically, we considered two fundamental models of genetic circuits: smooth- and relaxation oscillators. Using phase reduction and Floquet multipliers, we numerically analyzed their entrainability under different coupling strengths and <span class="hlt">period</span> ratios. We found that a <span class="hlt">period</span> mismatch induces better entrainment in both types of oscillator; the enhancement occurs in the vicinity of the bifurcation on their limit cycles. In the smooth oscillator, the optimal <span class="hlt">period</span> ratio for the enhancement coincides with the experimentally <span class="hlt">observed</span> ratio, which <span class="hlt">suggests</span> biological exploitation of the <span class="hlt">period</span> mismatch. Although the origin of multiple feedback loops is often explained as a passive mechanism to ensure robustness against perturbation, we study the active benefits of the <span class="hlt">period</span> mismatch, which include increasing the efficiency of the genetic oscillators. Our findings show a qualitatively different perspective for both the inherent advantages of multiple loops and their essentiality.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yoshihiko Hasegawa; Masanori Arita</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25554800"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> breathing in healthy humans at exercise in hypoxia.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> breathing is frequent in heart failure or ventilatory disorders during sleep, and common during sleep at high altitude, but has been rarely studied in wakefulness and during exercise. A retrospective analysis of ventilation from hypoxia exercise tests was realized in 82 healthy subjects separated into two groups with either high or low ventilatory response to hypoxia at exercise (HVRe). A fast Fourier transform spectral analysis of the breath-by-breath ventilation (V?e) signal, O2 saturation, and end-tidal PCO2 evidenced a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> pattern with a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 11.1 to 12.0 s. The peak power of the V?e spectrum was higher in the high HVRe group (P < 0.001). A prospective study (25 subjects) was performed to evaluate the influence of cardiorespiratory factors on the amplitude and <span class="hlt">period</span> of oscillations in various conditions of exercise (20 to 40% maximal aerobic power) and hypoxia (0 to 4,000 m altitude). The <span class="hlt">period</span> of V?e was shorter at exercise (vs. rest, P < 0.001) and hypoxia (vs. normoxia, P < 0.001), and inversely related with cardiac output and V?e (P < 0.001). V?e peak power was higher at exercise (P < 0.001) and hypoxia (P < 0.001), and was positively related with cardiac output and V?e (P < 0.001). V?e peak power in hypoxia was positively related with the ventilatory response to CO2 (HCVR). This novel <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that healthy subjects demonstrate a spontaneous <span class="hlt">periodic</span> breathing, not clearly <span class="hlt">observable</span> at rest and in normoxia, but triggered by hypoxic exercise. The <span class="hlt">periodic</span> pattern is enhanced in subjects with high HVRe and high HCVR, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that oxygen and CO2 play synergistic roles in the modulation of these oscillations. PMID:25554800</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hermand, Eric; Pichon, Aurélien; Lhuissier, François J; Richalet, Jean-Paul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23045690"> <span id="translatedtitle">Critical <span class="hlt">period</span> for acoustic preference in mice.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Preference behaviors are often established during early life, but the underlying neural circuit mechanisms remain unknown. Adapting a unique nesting behavior assay, we confirmed a "critical <span class="hlt">period</span>" for developing music preference in C57BL/6 mice. Early music exposure between postnatal days 15 and 24 reversed their innate bias for silent shelter, which typically could not be altered in adulthood. Instead, exposing adult mice treated acutely with valproic acid or carrying a targeted deletion of the Nogo receptor (NgR(-/-)) unmasked a strong plasticity of preference consistent with a reopening of the critical <span class="hlt">period</span> as seen in other systems. Imaging of cFos expression revealed a prominent neuronal activation in response to the exposed music in the prelimbic and infralimbic medial prefrontal cortex only under conditions of open plasticity. Neither behavioral changes nor selective medial prefrontal cortex activation was <span class="hlt">observed</span> in response to pure tone exposure, indicating a music-specific effect. Open-field center crossings were increased concomitant with shifts in music preference, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a potential anxiolytic effect. Thus, music may offer both a unique window into the emotional state of mice and a potentially efficient assay for molecular "brakes" on critical <span class="hlt">period</span> plasticity common to sensory and higher order brain areas. PMID:23045690</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang, Eun-Jin; Lin, Eric W; Hensch, Takao K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3477391"> <span id="translatedtitle">Critical <span class="hlt">period</span> for acoustic preference in mice</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Preference behaviors are often established during early life, but the underlying neural circuit mechanisms remain unknown. Adapting a unique nesting behavior assay, we confirmed a “critical <span class="hlt">period</span>” for developing music preference in C57BL/6 mice. Early music exposure between postnatal days 15 and 24 reversed their innate bias for silent shelter, which typically could not be altered in adulthood. Instead, exposing adult mice treated acutely with valproic acid or carrying a targeted deletion of the Nogo receptor (NgR?/?) unmasked a strong plasticity of preference consistent with a reopening of the critical <span class="hlt">period</span> as seen in other systems. Imaging of cFos expression revealed a prominent neuronal activation in response to the exposed music in the prelimbic and infralimbic medial prefrontal cortex only under conditions of open plasticity. Neither behavioral changes nor selective medial prefrontal cortex activation was <span class="hlt">observed</span> in response to pure tone exposure, indicating a music-specific effect. Open-field center crossings were increased concomitant with shifts in music preference, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a potential anxiolytic effect. Thus, music may offer both a unique window into the emotional state of mice and a potentially efficient assay for molecular “brakes” on critical <span class="hlt">period</span> plasticity common to sensory and higher order brain areas. PMID:23045690</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang, Eun-Jin; Lin, Eric W.; Hensch, Takao K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.hsps.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/subjects/pdfs/HSPSSUGGESTEDREADINGFOR2015ENTRY.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">HSPS <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Reading for 2015 Entry HSPS <span class="hlt">SUGGESTED</span> READING FOR 2015 ENTRY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">, and Charles Stafford (editors), 2007, Questions of Anthropology; Oxford Sharon E. Hutchinson 1996. Nuer Dilemmas: Coping with Money, War, and the State; Uni. of California #12;HSPS <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Reading for 2015</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cambridge, University of</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MPBu...42...20W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rotational <span class="hlt">Period</span> of 1938 Lausanna</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report photometric <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the main-belt asteroid 1938 Lausanna obtained on five nights in 2014 March and April. We determined a synodic rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> 2.748 ± 0.001 h and an amplitude of 0.12 ± 0.02 mag.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Warell, Johan; Pappini, Riccardo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MPBu...42....4C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rotation <span class="hlt">Period</span> of 584 Semiramis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Photometric <span class="hlt">observations</span> of main-belt asteroid 584 Semiramis were made at the Mark Evans Observatory (MPC W04) between 2014 July 29 and August 4. The measured <span class="hlt">period</span> of 5.0689 ± 0.0001 is in good agreement with previous values.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Connour, Kyle; Wright, Tyler; French, Linda M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010GeoRL..3714103M"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> spacing between consecutive equatorial plasma bubbles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze three-years of data collected by a field-aligned airglow imaging system located at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory near La Serena, Chile to determine the occurrence of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs). On 317 of the 552 predominately clear nights of <span class="hlt">observations</span>, structure indicative of EPBs is present. On 123 of these nights, multiple EPBs with <span class="hlt">periodic</span> spacings were recorded with 88 nights showing 3 or more consecutive bubbles. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> spacing of EPBs could be related to the properties of an underlying seed mechanism, namely gravity waves (GWs). The distribution of spacings compares favorably to the spectrum of GW induced traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) measured by Vadas and Crowley (2010) from a similar geographic latitude in the northern hemisphere. Furthermore, the distribution of spacings decreases from 2006 through 2009, tracking the corresponding decrease in the thermospheric neutral temperature, Tn. As Tn decreases, GWs with larger horizontal wavelengths have smaller initial amplitudes and cannot propagate as easily to EPB seeding altitudes. Thus, our <span class="hlt">observations</span> are consistent with GW theory.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Makela, J. J.; Vadas, S. L.; Muryanto, R.; Duly, T.; Crowley, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5464170"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">period</span> of HR 1362</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Photoelectric UBV <span class="hlt">observations</span>, made in 1981 and 1982, of the active star HR 1362, are presented. A <span class="hlt">period</span> analysis reveals many (all greater than 100 days) probable <span class="hlt">periods</span> because of the large gaps in the data. If the most probable <span class="hlt">period</span> around 330 d is true and represents the rotation <span class="hlt">period</span>, as it does in all other active stars, then HR 1362 would be an extreme case of slow rotation. 11 refs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Derman, E.; Demircan, O.; Ozeren, F.F. (Ankara Univ. (Turkey))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984PNAS...81.3249M"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Structures in Lipid Monolayer Phase Transitions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> patterns are <span class="hlt">observed</span> when supported lipid monolayers doped with low concentrations of fluorescent lipid probes are <span class="hlt">observed</span> with epi-fluorescence microscopy. Monolayers of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine were examined on air--water interfaces and also on alkylated glass coverslips. The patterns are formed by <span class="hlt">periodic</span> arrays of solid-phase lipid domains in equilibrium with fluid-phase lipid under specified conditions of temperature and two-dimensional lipid pressure. Electrostatic forces may stabilize the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> ordering of the solid domains.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McConnell, Harden M.; Tamm, Lukas K.; Weis, Robert M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910016743&hterms=Conglomerate&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DConglomerate"> <span id="translatedtitle">Short-<span class="hlt">period</span> comets</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The spacecraft flybys of Comet Halley in 1986 confirmed Whipple's icy conglomerate hypothesis for cometary nuclei and showed that comets are far richer in volatiles than any other class of solar system bodies. Water is the most abundant volatile, comprising roughly 80 percent of the gas flowing out from the nucleus. Carbon monoxide is next with a content of 15 percent relative to water, though with approximately half of that coming from an extended source in the cometary coma, i.e., hydrocarbon dust grains. The detection of large numbers of hydrocarbon CHON grains was one of the more significant discoveries of the Halley flybys, as was the ground-based <span class="hlt">observation</span> that CN occurs in jets, again indicating an extended source. Evidence was also found for more complex hydrocarbons. Estimates of the total dust-to-gas ratio for Halley range as high as 2:1, indicating that a substantial fraction of the volatile material may be tied up in solid hydrocarbons rather than ices. The role of clathrates in trapping more volatile ices is not yet understood. If Halley can be taken to be representative of all short-<span class="hlt">period</span> comets, then the short-<span class="hlt">period</span> comets may provide a significant source of volatiles in near-earth space. This resource is more difficult to reach dynamically than the near-earth asteriods, but the high volatile content may justify the additional effort necessary. In addition, there is considerable evidence that at least some fraction of the near-earth asteriods are extinct cometary nuclei which have evolved into asteroid orbits, and which may contain significant volatiles buried beneath an insulating lag-deposit crust of nonvolatiles. Knowledge of comets will be greatly enhanced in the near future by the Comet Rendezvous Flyby mission now under development by NASA, and by the proposed Rosetta mission.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Weissman, Paul R.; Campins, Humberto</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://prevention.cancer.gov/programs-resources/groups/b/software/screening"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Screening Evaluation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Statistical Software <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Screening Evaluation (Written by Stuart G. Baker) New Approach (Simplified Approximation): See Baker SG. Evaluating <span class="hlt">periodic</span> cancer screening without a randomized control group: a simplified design and analysis. In: Duffy</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31022020"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Fever Syndromes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodic</span> syndromes represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that can be very difficult for practicing physicians to\\u000a diagnosis and treat. This article presents an orderly approach to hyperimmunoglobulin D syndrome; tumor necrosis factor receptor-1\\u000a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> syndrome; familial Mediterranean fever; <span class="hlt">periodic</span> fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis syndrome;\\u000a and cryopyrin-associated <span class="hlt">periodic</span> syndromes by highlighting the disease presentation, diagnosis, pathogenesis,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zachary Jacobs; Christina E. Ciaccio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_16 div --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0809.0046v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Time-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> universes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this letter we construct a new time-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> solution of the vacuum Einstein's field equations whose Riemann curvature norm takes the infinity at some points. We show that this solution is intrinsically time-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> and describes a time-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> universe with the "black hole". New physical phenomena are investigated and new singularities are analyzed for this universal model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">De-Xing Kong; Kefeng Liu; Ming Shen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-08-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Periodic+AND+table&pg=2&id=EJ1028694"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Pyramid</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The chemical elements present in the modern <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table are arranged in terms of atomic numbers and chemical <span class="hlt">periodicity</span>. <span class="hlt">Periodicity</span> arises from quantum mechanical limitations on how many electrons can occupy various shells and subshells of an atom. The shell model of the atom predicts that a maximum of 2, 8, 18, and 32 electrons can occupy…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hennigan, Jennifer N.; Grubbs, W. Tandy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0611482v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of the eclipsing binaries in the LMC discovered by OGLE: <span class="hlt">Period</span> distribution and frequency of the short-<span class="hlt">period</span> binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We review the results of our analysis of the OGLE LMC eclipsing binaries (Mazeh, Tamuz & North 2006), using EBAS -- Eclipsing Binary Automated Solver, an automated algorithm to fit lightcurves of eclipsing binaries (Tamuz, Mazeh & North 2006). After being corrected for <span class="hlt">observational</span> selection effects, the set of detected eclipsing binaries yielded the <span class="hlt">period</span> distribution and the frequency of all LMC short-<span class="hlt">period</span> binaries, and not just the eclipsing systems. Somewhat surprisingly, the <span class="hlt">period</span> distribution is consistent with a flat distribution in log P between 2 and 10 days. The total number of binaries with <span class="hlt">periods</span> shorter than 10 days in the LMC was estimated to be about 5000. This figure led us to <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that (0.7 +- 0.4)% of the main-sequence A- and B-type stars are found in binaries with <span class="hlt">periods</span> shorter than 10 days. This frequency is substantially smaller than the fraction of binaries found by small Galactic radial-velocity surveys of B stars.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tsevi Mazeh; Omer Tamuz; Pierre North</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-11-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Periodic+AND+table+AND+elements&pg=5&id=EJ401425"> <span id="translatedtitle">Let Us Make the Table <span class="hlt">Periodic</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An approach to teaching the properties of the elements and their arrangement in the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table is <span class="hlt">suggested</span>. Discussed are symbols for the elements, format of the table, and coding the properties of the elements on the table. (CW)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Campbell, J. Arthur</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780013080&hterms=carbon+star+hm&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dcarbon%2Bstar%2Bhm"> <span id="translatedtitle">Infrared <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of Late Type Stars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Substantive mass loss resulting in appreciable circumstellar dust envelopes is common in late-type stars. The evolutionary history and physical state of a cool star determine the chemistry within the outer stellar atmosphere mirrored by the molecular and particulate material present in the envelope. The <span class="hlt">observational</span> consequences of this debris determined by moderate spectral resolution infrared spectrophotometry are reviewed. Significant information is provided by <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the emergent energy flux of both the cool stellar photosphere and of the circumstellar dust envelope. The <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that mass-loss occurs to some degree throughout late stellar evolutionary phases and that occasional <span class="hlt">periods</span> of high mass loss are not uncommon.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Merrill, K. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000rxte.prop50090C"> <span id="translatedtitle">a 1.4 Day <span class="hlt">Period</span> in RX J0050.7-7316 - AN Unusual HMXB in the SMC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cook et al. identified a 0.7 day <span class="hlt">period</span> in the Be star optical counterpart of the SMC X-ray pulsar RX J0050.7-7316. Further <span class="hlt">observations</span> and analysis by Coe & Orosz <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> may in fact be twice this at 1.4 days. Either of these <span class="hlt">periods</span> would be extremely short for a Be/neutron star system, while the 323 s pulse <span class="hlt">period</span> is rather long. We propose here to investigate this mystery by performing RXTE <span class="hlt">observations</span> which cover a complete binary <span class="hlt">period</span> and so undertake a study of orbital Doppler shifts. The <span class="hlt">observations</span> should reveal the mass function of the object and may enable the detection of an eclipse, key parameters in understanding the astrophysics of the system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Corbet, Robin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70010737"> <span id="translatedtitle">Composition and evolution of the continental crust as <span class="hlt">suggested</span> by seismic <span class="hlt">observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The average composition of the continental crust is more mafic than hitherto supposed. The conterminous United States can be divided, on the basis of seismic structure, into ten regions. The seven western and the three eastern regions can be termed western and eastern superprovinces. Seismic studies show that the crust is thinner and more silicic in tectonically active regions (western superprovince - average crustal thickness 34 km), than in stable regions (eastern superprovince - average crustal thickness 44 km). Mafic rocks are estimated to average 55% of the continental crust: 45% in the western and 59% in the eastern superprovince. These results express quantitatively the ideas expressed qualitatively by Pakiser and Zietz (1965). The computations of percentages of major oxides in the crust associate seismic velocities with rock compositions. ?? 1956.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pakiser, L.C.; Robinson, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1966-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.apsarchive.org/resource.cfm?submissionID=6589&BEN=1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> by a University Anatomy Teacher and a <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span> for Curricular Change: Integrative anatomy for undergraduates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article describes the need, purpose, and establishment of an undergraduate integrative anatomy course. The article also explains a survey conducted to evaluate the number of anatomy programs in undergraduate institutes in Washington.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David Darda (Central Washington University Biological Sciences)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011CorRe..30...23S"> <span id="translatedtitle">The use (and misuse) of sediment traps in coral reef environments: theory, <span class="hlt">observations</span>, and <span class="hlt">suggested</span> protocols</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sediment traps are commonly used as standard tools for monitoring "sedimentation" in coral reef environments. In much of the literature where sediment traps were used to measure the effects of "sedimentation" on corals, it is clear from deployment descriptions and interpretations of the resulting data that information derived from sediment traps has frequently been misinterpreted or misapplied. Despite their widespread use in this setting, sediment traps do not provide quantitative information about "sedimentation" on coral surfaces. Traps can provide useful information about the relative magnitude of sediment dynamics if trap deployment standards are used. This conclusion is based first on a brief review of the state of knowledge of sediment trap dynamics, which has primarily focused on traps deployed high above the seabed in relatively deep water, followed by our understanding of near-bed sediment dynamics in shallow-water environments that characterize coral reefs. This overview is followed by the first synthesis of near-bed sediment trap data collected with concurrent hydrodynamic information in coral reef environments. This collective information is utilized to develop nine protocols for using sediment traps in coral reef environments, which focus on trap parameters that researchers can control such as trap height ( H), trap mouth diameter ( D), the height of the trap mouth above the substrate ( z o ), and the spacing between traps. The hydrodynamic behavior of sediment traps and the limitations of data derived from these traps should be forefront when interpreting sediment trap data to infer sediment transport processes in coral reef environments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Storlazzi, C. D.; Field, M. E.; Bothner, M. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996JGR...10126681E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics in the thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model comparisons with global ionospheric and thermospheric <span class="hlt">observations</span> during the GEM/SUNDIAL <span class="hlt">period</span> of March 28-29, 1992</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Satellite and ground-based <span class="hlt">observations</span> from March 28 to 29, 1992, were combined in the assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure to derive realistic global distributions of the auroral precipitation and ionospheric convection which were used as inputs to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model (TIGCM). Comparisons of neutral model winds were made with Fabry-Perot measurements and meridional winds derived from ionosondes. The peak equatorward winds occurred 1-2 hours later in the model. Gravity waves launched from high-latitude Joule heating sources reached the equator in about 2 hours and agreed with <span class="hlt">observed</span> variations in the height of the maximum electron density (hmF2) and in the meridional winds. Joule heating events produced minima in the O/N2 ratio that moved equatorward and usually westward in longitudinal strips which lasted about a day. Changes in the O/N2 ratio and in the peak electron density (NmF2) were strongly correlated so the <span class="hlt">observed</span> daytime NmF2 values for stations near 50° magnetic latitude were generally reproduced by AMIE-TIGCM on the second day of the simulation. The AMIE-TIGCM underestimated the electron density after midnight by up to a factor of 2 in midlatitudes, while the modeled F2 layer was about 35 km lower than the <span class="hlt">observations</span> at midnight. Shifting the model winds 2 hours earlier at night could double the NmF2 at 0400 LT and increase hmF2 by 20 km. NmF2 could also be increased at night by realistically increasing the TIGCM nighttime downward fluxes of O+ at the upper boundary.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Emery, B. A.; Lu, G.; Szuszczewicz, E. P.; Richmond, A. D.; Roble, R. G.; Richards, P. G.; Miller, K. L.; Niciejewski, R.; Evans, D. S.; Rich, F. J.; Denig, W. F.; Chenette, D. L.; Wilkinson, P.; Pulinets, S.; O'Loughlin, K. F.; Hanbaba, R.; Abdu, M.; Jiao, P.; Igarashi, K.; Reddy, B. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/ja/v101/iA12/96JA01285/96JA01285.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics in the thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model comparisons with global ionospheric and thermospheric <span class="hlt">observations</span> during the GEM\\/SUNDIAL <span class="hlt">period</span> of March 28-29, 1992</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Satellite and ground-based <span class="hlt">observations</span> from March 28 to 29, 1992, were combined in the assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure to derive realistic global distributions of the auroral precipitation and ionospheric convection which were used as inputs to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model (TIGCM). Comparisons of neutral model winds were made with Fabry-Perot</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. A. Emery; G. Lu; E. P. Szuszczewicz; R. G. Roble; P. G. Richards; K. L. Miller; R. Niciejewski; D. S. Evans; F. J. Rich; W. F. Denig; D. L. Chenette; P. Wilkinson; S. Pulinets; K. F. O'Loughlin; R. Hanbaba; M. Abdu; P. Jiao; K. Igarashi; B. M. Reddy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ia.usu.edu/viewproject.php?project=ia:15529"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The following will provide you with a brief overview of the <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table of Elements, as well as some interesting facts about the elements. There are also some games which will help you practice the names and symbols of the elements. A worksheet may be provided for you to record your newfound knowledge. Please follow the directions and links below to enlighten yourself on the wonders of the <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table. If provided, don't forget to fill in your worksheet as you go... Part A: Who, what, where and when? Read a brief History of the <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table:History of the PT2. Part B: Interactive <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Tables: Find physical ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cutting, Mrs.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-05</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApPhA.117...49G"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> nanostructures self-formed on silicon and silicon carbide by femtosecond laser irradiation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Laser-induced <span class="hlt">periodic</span> surface structures (LIPSS) were formed on Si and SiC surfaces by irradiations with femtosecond laser pulses in air. Different kinds of self-organized structures appeared on Si and SiC at laser fluences slightly higher than the damage threshold, which was measured by confocal laser scanning microscope. The characteristic spatial <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of every <span class="hlt">observed</span> structure was estimated reading the peak values of the 2D Fourier transform power spectra obtained from SEM images. The evolution of the spatial <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> was finally studied with respect to both the laser fluence and the number of laser pulses. As already <span class="hlt">observed</span> for metals, the behavior of the spatial <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> on laser fluence can be related to the parametric decay of laser light into surface plasma waves. Our results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a wide applicability of the parametric decay model on different materials, making the model a useful tool in view of different applications of LIPSS.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gemini, Laura; Hashida, Masaki; Shimizu, Masahiro; Miyasaka, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Shunsuke; Tokita, Shigeki; Limpouch, Jiri; Mocek, Tomas; Sakabe, Shuji</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/46473911"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table: An Eight <span class="hlt">Period</span> Table For The 21 st Centrury</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Throughout most of the 20th century, an eight-<span class="hlt">period</span> <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table (also known as an electron-configuration table) was offered as an improvement over the ubiquitous seven-<span class="hlt">period</span> format of wall charts and textbooks. The eight-<span class="hlt">period</span> version has never achieved wide acceptance although it has significant advantages. Many <span class="hlt">observers</span> have questioned the way helium is displayed in this format. Now, a reinterpretation of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gary Katz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013RCD....18..380J"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stability of underwater <span class="hlt">periodic</span> locomotion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Most aquatic vertebrates swim by lateral flapping of their bodies and caudal fins. While much effort has been devoted to understanding the flapping kinematics and its influence on the swimming efficiency, little is known about the stability (or lack of) of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> swimming. It is believed that stability limits maneuverability and body designs/flapping motions that are adapted for stable swimming are not suitable for high maneuverability and vice versa. In this paper, we consider a simplified model of a planar elliptic body undergoing prescribed <span class="hlt">periodic</span> heaving and pitching in potential flow. We show that <span class="hlt">periodic</span> locomotion can be achieved due to the resulting hydrodynamic forces, and its value depends on several parameters including the aspect ratio of the body, the amplitudes and phases of the prescribed flapping.We obtain closedform solutions for the locomotion and efficiency for small flapping amplitudes, and numerical results for finite flapping amplitudes. This efficiency analysis results in optimal parameter values that are in agreement with values reported for some carangiform fish. We then study the stability of the (finite amplitude flapping) <span class="hlt">periodic</span> locomotion using Floquet theory. We find that stability depends nonlinearly on all parameters. Interesting trends of switching between stable and unstable motions emerge and evolve as we continuously vary the parameter values. This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that, for live organisms that control their flapping motion, maneuverability and stability need not be thought of as disjoint properties, rather the organism may manipulate its motion in favor of one or the other depending on the task at hand.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jing, Fangxu; Kanso, Eva</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://learningcenter.nsta.org/product_detail.aspx?id=10.2505/4/ss04_027_04_32"> <span id="translatedtitle">Science Sampler: <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Teaching the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table can be a mundane task filled with repetition and rote memorization. The techniques for engaging activities outlined in this article will help students become familiar with the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table in fun and exciting ways through mediums such as games, silly stories, jokes, puzzles, and songs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Galus, Pamela</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Periodic+AND+table&id=EJ721572"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Living <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To help make the abstract world of chemistry more concrete eighth-grade students, the author has them create a living <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table that can be displayed in the classroom or hallway. This display includes information about the elements arranged in the traditional <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table format, but also includes visual real-world representations of the…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nahlik, Mary Schrodt</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=public+AND+library+AND+reference+AND+service&pg=5&id=EJ330153"> <span id="translatedtitle">Automated <span class="hlt">Periodical</span> Reference Service.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Describes public library reference service which allows patrons to type out search instructions on a computer terminal, review and select references, and receive, by high-speed printer, facsimile copy of selected <span class="hlt">periodical</span> articles. Development of <span class="hlt">periodicals</span> center at main county library and use of self-coaching SEARCH HELPER system are…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ellefsen, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dwb.unl.edu/Teacher/NSF/C04/C04Links/chemlab.pc.maricopa.edu/periodic/periodic.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Pictorial <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This online <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table of the elements is a fabulous find for students of chemistry. On the main page, a clickable <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table allows users to choose an element and then view a page listing that element's electron configuration, atomic weight and number, isotopes and product elements, and a number of other physical properties such as ionization potential and boiling and melting points. Each entry is extremely thorough and contains links to related elements. The Pictorial <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table is also easily searchable by atomic and covalent radius, density, boiling and melting point, electronegativity, ionization potential, heat properties, and atomic weight or number. In addition, users can perform keyword searches. Graphs and tables of element properties, alternative styles of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table (e.g., spiral, pyramid), a special page on isotopic properties, a printable table, and links to other <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table pages are among the wealth of information provided. The site is provided by the Chemlab server of Phoenix College, AZ.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heilman, Chris.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AAS...22440202V"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Density Structures and the Source of the Slow Solar Wind</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> density structures with length-scales of hundreds to several thousands of megameters, and frequencies of tens to hundreds of minutes, are <span class="hlt">observed</span> regularly in the solar wind at 1 AU. These structures coexist with, but are not due to, fluctuations in the plasma resulting from the turbulent cascade. Two lines of evidence <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that <span class="hlt">periodic</span> density structures are formed in the solar corona as part of the slow solar wind release and/or acceleration processes. The first is the identification of corresponding changes in compositional data in situ, and the other is the identification of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> density structures in the inner Heliospheric Imaging data onboard the STEREO/SECCHI suite. In this presentation, we show the results of tracking <span class="hlt">periodic</span> structures identified in the SECCHI/Hi1 images down through the corresponding SECCHI/Cor2 images. We demonstrate that the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> density structures are formed around or below 2.5 Rs - the inner edge of the Cor2 field of view. Further, we compute the occurrence rate of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> density structures in 10 days of Cor2 images as a function of location in the solar corona. We find that <span class="hlt">periodic</span> density structures do not occur throughout the entire space-filling volume of the solar wind; rather, there are particular places where they occur preferentially, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> source locations for <span class="hlt">periodic</span> density structures in the slow solar wind.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Viall, Nicholeen; Vourlidas, Angelos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_17 div --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23332863"> <span id="translatedtitle">MR spectroscopy in 18q(-) syndrome <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> other than hypomyelination.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We reported a 5-year-old boy with 18q(-) syndrome who showed typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of high signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging, and a slightly high but lower than normal signal on T1-weighted imaging of the white matter. MR spectroscopy (MRS) revealed increased concentrations of creatine, myoinositol and choline with a normal N-acetylaspartate one. The cerebral white matter lesions <span class="hlt">observed</span> on MRI in patients with 18q(-) syndrome have been considered to reflect hypomyelination due to a decrease in myelin basic protein so far, however, MRS <span class="hlt">suggested</span> reactive astrocytic gliosis and accelerated myelin turnover, which are compatible with recent pathological reports of 18q(-) syndrome. PMID:23332863</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tada, Hiroko; Takanashi, Jun-ichi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/944534"> <span id="translatedtitle">Membrane proteomics of phagosomes <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a connection to autophagy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Phagocytosis is the central process by which macrophage cellsinternalize and eliminate infectious microbes as well as apoptoticcells. During maturation, phagosomes containing engulfed particlesfuse with various endosomal compartments through theaction of regulatory molecules on the phagosomal membrane. Inthis study, we performed a proteomic analysis of the membranefraction from latex bead-containing (LBC) phagosomes isolatedfrom macrophages. The profile, which comprised 546 proteins,<span class="hlt">suggests</span> diverse functions of the phagosome and potential connectionsto secretory processes, toll-like receptor signaling, andautophagy. Many identified proteins were not previously knownto reside in the phagosome. We characterized several proteins inLBC phagosomes that change in abundance on induction of autophagy,a process that has been previously implicated in the hostdefense against microbial pathogens. These <span class="hlt">observations</span> suggestcrosstalk between autophagy and phagocytosis that may be relevantto the innate immune response of macrophages.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shui, Wenqing; Sheu, Leslie; Liu, Jun; Smart, Brian; Petzold, Christopher J.; Hsieh, Tsung-yen; Pitcher, Austin; Keasling*, Jay D.; Bertozzi*, Carolyn R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-11-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Precalculus&pg=2&id=EJ788802"> <span id="translatedtitle">David's Understanding of Functions and <span class="hlt">Periodicity</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This is a study of David, a senior enrolled in a high school precalculus course. David's understandings of functions and <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> was explored, through clinical interviews and contextualized through classroom <span class="hlt">observations</span>. Although David's precalculus class was traditional his understanding of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> functions was unconventional David engaged…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gerson, Hope</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.geo.utexas.edu/climate/Research/Reprints/Chen2010.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recent La Plata basin drought conditions <span class="hlt">observed</span> by satellite gravimetry</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent La Plata basin drought conditions <span class="hlt">observed</span> by satellite gravimetry J. L. Chen,1 C. R. Wilson over the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2002­2009, consistent with recognized drought conditions in the region. GRACE data reveal a detailed picture of temporal and spatial evolution of this severe drought event, which <span class="hlt">suggests</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang, Zong-Liang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16024395"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mitochondrial genomes <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that hexapods and crustaceans are mutually paraphyletic.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For over a century the relationships between the four major groups of the phylum Arthropoda (Chelicerata, Crustacea, Hexapoda and Myriapoda) have been debated. Recent molecular evidence has confirmed a close relationship between the Crustacea and the Hexapoda, and has included the <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> of a paraphyletic Hexapoda. To test this hypothesis we have sequenced the complete or near-complete mitochondrial genomes of three crustaceans (Parhyale hawaiensis, Squilla mantis and Triops longicaudatus), two collembolans (Onychiurus orientalis and Podura aquatica) and the insect Thermobia domestica. We <span class="hlt">observed</span> rearrangement of transfer RNA genes only in O. orientalis, P. aquatica and P. hawaiensis. Of these, only the rearrangement in O. orientalis, an apparent autapomorphy for the collembolan family Onychiuridae, was phylogenetically informative.We aligned the nuclear and amino acid sequences from the mitochondrial protein-encoding genes of these taxa with their homologues from other arthropod taxa for phylogenetic analysis. Our dataset contains many more Crustacea than previous molecular phylogenetic analyses of the arthropods. Neighbour-joining, maximum-likelihood and Bayesian posterior probabilities all <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that crustaceans and hexapods are mutually paraphyletic. A crustacean clade of Malacostraca and Branchiopoda emerges as sister to the Insecta sensu stricto and the Collembola group with the maxillopod crustaceans. Some, but not all, analyses strongly support this mutual paraphyly but statistical tests do not reject the null hypotheses of a monophyletic Hexapoda or a monophyletic Crustacea. The dual monophyly of the Hexapoda and Crustacea has rarely been questioned in recent years but the idea of both groups' paraphyly dates back to the nineteenth century. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the mutual paraphyly of both groups should seriously be considered. PMID:16024395</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cook, Charles E; Yue, Qiaoyun; Akam, Michael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-06-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1564108"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mitochondrial genomes <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that hexapods and crustaceans are mutually paraphyletic</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For over a century the relationships between the four major groups of the phylum Arthropoda (Chelicerata, Crustacea, Hexapoda and Myriapoda) have been debated. Recent molecular evidence has confirmed a close relationship between the Crustacea and the Hexapoda, and has included the <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> of a paraphyletic Hexapoda. To test this hypothesis we have sequenced the complete or near-complete mitochondrial genomes of three crustaceans (Parhyale hawaiensis, Squilla mantis and Triops longicaudatus), two collembolans (Onychiurus orientalis and Podura aquatica) and the insect Thermobia domestica. We <span class="hlt">observed</span> rearrangement of transfer RNA genes only in O. orientalis, P. aquatica and P. hawaiensis. Of these, only the rearrangement in O. orientalis, an apparent autapomorphy for the collembolan family Onychiuridae, was phylogenetically informative. We aligned the nuclear and amino acid sequences from the mitochondrial protein-encoding genes of these taxa with their homologues from other arthropod taxa for phylogenetic analysis. Our dataset contains many more Crustacea than previous molecular phylogenetic analyses of the arthropods. Neighbour-joining, maximum-likelihood and Bayesian posterior probabilities all <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that crustaceans and hexapods are mutually paraphyletic. A crustacean clade of Malacostraca and Branchiopoda emerges as sister to the Insecta sensu stricto and the Collembola group with the maxillopod crustaceans. Some, but not all, analyses strongly support this mutual paraphyly but statistical tests do not reject the null hypotheses of a monophyletic Hexapoda or a monophyletic Crustacea. The dual monophyly of the Hexapoda and Crustacea has rarely been questioned in recent years but the idea of both groups' paraphyly dates back to the nineteenth century. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the mutual paraphyly of both groups should seriously be considered. PMID:16024395</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cook, Charles E; Yue, Qiaoyun; Akam, Michael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24074301"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of HIV quasispecies <span class="hlt">suggests</span> compartmentalization in the liver.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Liver disease is now a major cause of morbidity and mortality among persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). An increasing body of evidence <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that HIV infection is associated with exacerbated liver fibrosis and that HIV has the ability to infect several hepatic cell types. Despite the recognized existence of genetically distinct subpopulations of HIV in the central nervous system and genital tract, viral diversity and compartmentalization in the liver have not been explored extensively. Therefore, phylogenetic analysis was performed on full-length env and nef sequences for four patients. Distinct clustering of viral variants was <span class="hlt">observed</span> for all patients in both areas of the genome. Statistical evidence of HIV compartmentalization in the liver was demonstrated in 85.4% of comparisons. Signature sequence analysis identified several liver-specific amino acids in all patients. Thus, the current study demonstrates statistically significant evidence for HIV compartmentalization in the liver. Additionally, these data <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the hepatic microenvironment harbors unique selective pressures that drive viral adaptation. PMID:24074301</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Penton, Patricia K; Blackard, Jason T</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003PThPh.110....9T"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Model for <span class="hlt">Period</span> Clustering of Long-<span class="hlt">Period</span> Pulsars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We explore the possibility that the P - dotP distribution of <span class="hlt">observed</span> pulsars can be understood in terms of a model of a rotating neutron star that possesses two types of magnetic fields, a fossil magnetic field of O (1010-13) G at the stellar surface, and the field due to the ferromagnetic core of a neutron star, which is assumed to be of O (1014-15) G. This model, when combined with the assumption of an appropriate mass distribution, together with the <span class="hlt">observational</span> selection effect on an assumed magnetic dipole pulse luminosity proportional to P -4, is shown to be consistent with the `<span class="hlt">period</span> clustering' of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> SGRs and AXPs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Takahashi, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998MNRAS.296..893L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> modulation and magnetic cycles in close binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We discuss the <span class="hlt">observed</span> orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> modulations in close binaries, and focus on the mechanism proposed by Applegate relating the changes of the stellar internal rotation associated with a magnetic activity cycle with the variation of the gravitational quadrupole moment of the active component; the variation of this quadrupole moment in turn forces the orbital motion of the binary stars to follow the activity level of the active star. We generalize this approach by considering the details of this interaction, and develop some illustrative examples in which the problem can be easily solved in analytical form. Starting from such results, we consider the interplay between rotation and magnetic field generation in the framework of different types of dynamo models, which have been proposed to explain solar and stellar activity. We show how the <span class="hlt">observed</span> orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> modulation in active binaries may provide new constraints for discriminating between such models. In particular, we study the case of the prototype active binary RS Canum Venaticorum, and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that torsional oscillations - driven by a stellar magnetic dynamo - may account for the <span class="hlt">observed</span> behaviour of this star. Further possible applications of the relationship between magnetic activity and orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> modulation, related to the recent discovery of binary systems containing a radio pulsar and a convecting upper main-sequence or a late-type low-mass companion, are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lanza, A. F.; Rodono, M.; Rosner, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21583274"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">PERIOD</span> CHANGE SIMILARITIES AMONG THE RR LYRAE VARIABLES IN OOSTERHOFF I AND OOSTERHOFF II GLOBULAR SYSTEMS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present <span class="hlt">period</span> change rates (dP/dt) for 42 RR Lyrae variables in the globular cluster IC 4499. Despite clear evidence of these <span class="hlt">period</span> increases or decreases, the <span class="hlt">observed</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> change rates are an order of magnitude larger than predicted from theoretical models of this cluster. We find that there is a preference for increasing <span class="hlt">periods</span>, a phenomenon <span class="hlt">observed</span> in most RR Lyrae stars in Milky Way globular clusters. The <span class="hlt">period</span> change rates as a function of position in the <span class="hlt">period</span>-amplitude plane are used to examine possible evolutionary effects in OoI clusters, OoII clusters, field RR Lyrae stars, and the mixed-population cluster {omega} Centauri. It is found that there is no correlation between the <span class="hlt">period</span> change rate and the typical definition of Oosterhoff groups. If the RR Lyrae <span class="hlt">period</span> changes correspond with evolutionary effects, this would be in contrast to the hypothesis that RR Lyrae variables in OoII systems are evolved horizontal-branch stars that spent their zero-age horizontal-branch phase on the blue side of the instability strip. This may <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that age may not be the primary explanation for the Oosterhoff types.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kunder, Andrea; Walker, Alistair; De Propris, Roberto [NOAO-Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Stetson, Peter B. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Bono, Giuseppe; Di Cecco, Alessandra [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita' di Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Nemec, James M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Camosun College, Victoria, BC (Canada); Monelli, Matteo [IAC, Calle Via Lactea, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Cassisi, Santi [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, via M. Maggini, I-64100 Teramo (Italy); Andreuzzi, Gloria [Fundacion Galileo Galilei-INAF, Brena Baja, Tenerife (Spain); Dall'Ora, Massimo [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, via Moiarello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Zoccali, Manuela, E-mail: akunder@ctio.noao.edu [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, P. Universidad Catolica, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title29-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title29-vol3-sec778-333.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">29 CFR 778.333 - <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span> system awards.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2010-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span> system awards. 778.333 Section...778.333 <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span> system awards. The question has been raised whether awards made to employees for...submitted under a <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> system plan are to be...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760052156&hterms=watershed&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dwatershed"> <span id="translatedtitle">Remote sensing requirements as <span class="hlt">suggested</span> by watershed model sensitivity analyses</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A continuous simulation watershed model has been used to perform sensitivity analyses that provide guidance in defining remote sensing requirements for the monitoring of watershed features and processes. The results show that out of 26 input parameters having meaningful effects on simulated runoff, 6 appear to be obtainable with existing remote sensing techniques. Of these six parameters, 3 require the measurement of the areal extent of surface features (impervious areas, water bodies, and the extent of forested area), two require the descrimination of land use that can be related to overland flow roughness coefficient or the density of vegetation so as to estimate the magnitude of precipitation interception, and one parameter requires the measurement of distance to get the length over which overland flow typically occurs. <span class="hlt">Observational</span> goals are also <span class="hlt">suggested</span> for monitoring such fundamental watershed processes as precipitation, soil moisture, and evapotranspiration. A case study on the Patuxent River in Maryland shows that runoff simulation is improved if recent satellite land use <span class="hlt">observations</span> are used as model inputs as opposed to less timely topographic map information.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Salomonson, V. V.; Rango, A.; Ormsby, J. P.; Ambaruch, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23531608"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clinico-pathological investigations of Rasmussen encephalitis <span class="hlt">suggest</span> multifocal disease progression and associated focal cortical dysplasia.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Rasmussen encephalitis is a devastating neurological disorder characterised by seizures, brain inflammation, and progressive hemispheric atrophy. The objective of the current study was to systematically characterise patterns of structural lesions in children with Rasmussen encephalitis, referred for modified anatomical hemispherectomy at the Tsinghua University Epilepsy Center in Beijing. Seven consecutive patients were investigated with a mean age at operation of 4.5 years, who suffered from medically intractable seizures for a mean of 1.6 years. Foci of abnormally increased T2 signal intensity were <span class="hlt">observed</span> in all patients. With the exception of one child, all patients presented with progressive unilateral cerebral atrophy. FDG-PET imaging revealed extensive regions of hypometabolism within the affected cerebral hemisphere in 3 of 4 patients. Diagnosis of Rasmussen encephalitis was confirmed histologically, demonstrating CD68 positive microglial nodules, as well as CD3 and CD8 positive T lymphocytes invading the cerebral parenchyma. An intriguing <span class="hlt">observation</span> was the heterogenous distribution of patterns of lesions throughout the affected hemisphere, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> multifocal manifestation and distinct sequences of disease progression, from discrete foci of inflammatory infiltrates (stage 1) to extensive cortical destruction (stage 4). Atypical hippocampal sclerosis (HS), with neuronal cell loss affecting most prominently the CA4 region (HS type 3 or end folium sclerosis), was evident in 5 of 7 cases. Four hippocampi also showed chronic inflammation. In addition, we <span class="hlt">observed</span> associated focal cortical dysplasia (FCD; ILAE type IIId) in 4 of 7 children, supporting the concept of acquired and postmigratory FCD pathomechanisms. Postsurgical seizure freedom was achieved in all children with a mean follow-up <span class="hlt">period</span> of 2.7 years and continuous antiepileptic medication. PMID:23531608</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, Dandan; Blümcke, Ingmar; Gui, Qiuping; Zhou, Wenjing; Zuo, Huancong; Lin, Jiuluan; Luo, Yang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25260162"> <span id="translatedtitle">A combined whelk watch <span class="hlt">suggests</span> repeated TBT desorption pulses.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Environmental quality in coastal Europe has improved since the complete 2003 ban on the use of tributyltin (TBT) in antifouling paints. However, there is evidence that TBT is entering the water column, presumably from illegal practices. We determined the concentration of butyltins (BTs: TBT and derivatives) in populations of two gastropods, the rock snail Nucella lapillus (n=17) and the mud snail Nassarius reticulatus (n=18) at regular intervals from pre-ban times until 2009 and 2011, respectively, in NW Spain. Although a substantial decline in TBT occurred shortly after the ban, no significant changes were <span class="hlt">observed</span> in either species over the last 3-year <span class="hlt">period</span> of study. In addition, the proportion of TBT relative to the sum of BTs (a marker of recent pollution) in the most recent rock snail samples unexpectedly increased; this proportion therefore showed a generally decreasing but oscillatory trend over time. The results are consistent with the theoretical expectation of BT desorption from sediments; however, this natural phenomenon is now interpreted as a recurrent episode rather than a unique, transient event. Evidence of this subtle input improves our understanding of TBT persistence in the environment in Europe and worldwide. PMID:25260162</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ruiz, J M; Albaina, N; Carro, B; Barreiro, R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/mesozoic/cretaceous/cretaceous.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Cretaceous <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This resource discusses notable facts about the Cretaceous <span class="hlt">Period</span>, the last portion of the "Age of Dinosaurs". The site covers Ceratopsians, such as the Tricerotops. It includes sections on stratigraphy, ancient life, localities and tectonics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Periodic+AND+table&pg=6&id=EJ321490"> <span id="translatedtitle">Setting the <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Examines problems resulting from different forms of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table, indicating that New York State schools use a form reflecting the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry's 1984 recommendations. Other formats used and reasons for standardization are discussed. (DH)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saturnelli, Annette</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/lsps07.sci.phys.matter.graphperiodic/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Graphing the <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This interactive activity from the American Chemical Society presents the properties and electron configurations for all the elements in the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table. Discover patterns by plotting the elements' properties according to their place in the table.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Foundation, Wgbh E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-08-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.thundercloudconsulting.com/default.html?periodictable"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interactive <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This interactive <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table (application/applet) has been designed as a learning tool to help the beginning high school or undergraduate chemistry student gain insight. It could be used either as a lecture aid or distributed to students.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Periodic+AND+table&pg=6&id=EJ534805"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table CD.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Describes the characteristics of the digitized version of The <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table Videodisc. Provides details about the organization of information and access to the data via Macintosh and Windows computers. (DDR)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Banks, Alton J.; Holmes, Jon L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010007150&hterms=Cretaceous+Period&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3D%2528Cretaceous%2BPeriod%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Comet Showers, Mass Extinctions, and the Galaxy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Geologic data on mass extinctions of life and evidence of large impacts on the Earth are thus far consistent with a quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> modulation of the flux of Oort cloud comets. Impacts of large comets and asteroids are capable of causing mass extinction of species, and the records of large impact craters and mass show a correlation. Impacts and extinctions display <span class="hlt">periods</span> in the range of approximately 31 +/- 5 m.y., depending on dating methods, published time scales, length of record, and number of events analyzed. Statistical studies show that <span class="hlt">observed</span> differences in the formal <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of extinctions and craters are to be expected, taking into consideration problems in dating and the likelihood that both records would be mixtures of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> and random events. These results could be explained by quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> showers of Oort Cloud comets with a similar cycle. The best candidate for a pacemaker for comet showers is the Sun's vertical oscillation through the plane of the Galaxy, with a half-<span class="hlt">period</span> over the last 250 million years in the same range. We originally <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the probability of encounters with molecular clouds that could perturb the Oort comet cloud and cause comet showers is modulated by the Sun's vertical motion through the galactic disk. Tidal forces produced by the overall gravitational field of the Galaxy can also cause perturbations of cometary orbits. Since these forces vary with the changing position of the solar system in the Galaxy, they provide a mechanism for the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> variation in the flux of Oort cloud comets into the inner solar system. The cycle time and degree of modulation depend critically on the mass distribution in the galactic disk. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rampino, M. R.; Stothers, R. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_18 div --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://insects.ummz.lsa.umich.edu/fauna/michigan_cicadas/Periodical/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodical</span> Cicada Page</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This site, from the University of Michigan's Museum of Zoology, provides a variety of short information entries about <span class="hlt">periodical</span> cicadas including photos, and song clips. Information about cicada life cycles, broods and distribution, behavior, various species, and diseases and deformities can also be found here. For you "on the go types" who need basic information right now, there link to the "Quick <span class="hlt">periodical</span> cicada FAQ."</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cooley, John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790013421&hterms=Periodic+table&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3D%2528Periodic%2Btable%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> discharges</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> capacity checks are assessed as well as the effects of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> discharges on the cycle life and the performance of cells during the cycle life. Topics discussed include the effect of the amount of electrolyte on cell capacity at 35 C; battery design for spacecraft; electrolyte starvation theory; battery separator degradation; negative electrode stability; voltage regulation; operating temperatures; and integration of reconditioning systems using microprocessors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ford, F. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17756510"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photoelectric and Spectroscopic <span class="hlt">Observations</span> Related to a Possible Optical Counterpart for Pulsar CP 1919+21.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spectroscopic <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the two stars near the pulsar CP 1919+21 are not sufficiently conclusive to permit an identification of either object with the source of the radio pulses. However, our most extensive series of photometric <span class="hlt">observations</span> of a region of sky near the radio source position, which region includes the brighter of the two stars, <span class="hlt">suggests</span> an approximately sinusoidal variation. It is significant that the <span class="hlt">period</span> of the variation is double the <span class="hlt">period</span> of the radio pulsations. PMID:17756510</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lynds, R; Maran, S P; Trumbo, D E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1968-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24952567"> <span id="translatedtitle">Driven polymer transport through a <span class="hlt">periodically</span> patterned channel.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the driven transport of polymers in a <span class="hlt">periodically</span> patterned channel using Langevin dynamics simulations in two dimensions. The channel walls are patterned with <span class="hlt">periodically</span> alternating patches of attractive and non-attractive particles that act as trapping sites for the polymer. We find that the system shows rich dynamical behavior, <span class="hlt">observing</span> giant diffusion, negative differential mobility, and several different transition mechanisms between the attractive patches. We also show that the channel can act as an efficient high-pass filter for polymers longer than a threshold length Nthr, which can be tuned by adjusting the length of the attractive patches and the driving force. Our findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the possibility of fabricating polymer filtration devices based on patterned nanochannels. PMID:24952567</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ikonen, Timo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860033338&hterms=rock+projectile&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Drock%2Bprojectile"> <span id="translatedtitle">A perspective on the evidence for <span class="hlt">periodic</span> cometary impacts on earth</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> cometary showers coincident with mass extinctions have prompted a review of the terrestrial cratering record. From the point of view of completeness of search and crater retention, the record used to argue for statistical <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> is incomplete and may not be representative. Estimates of crater ages are of variable accuracy and precision and, in some cases, different dating methods yield discordant results. It is possible to define through time-series analysis a number of <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> of different magnitude (about 29, 21, 18.5, and 13.5 m.y.) and phase, depending on which craters are considered the most representative sample of the record. Arguing against <span class="hlt">periodic</span> cometary showers is the <span class="hlt">observation</span> that estimates of the average cratering rate in recent time and <span class="hlt">observations</span> on Apollo bodies are equivalent. In addition, siderophile element data from impact melt rocks <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a variety of projectile types were responsible for relatively large terrestrial craters. Given these <span class="hlt">observations</span>, it is concluded that statements regarding <span class="hlt">periodic</span> cometray showers are not categorical and require evidence beyond arguments based on time-series analyses of an incomplete cratering record.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grieve, R. A. F.; Sharpton, V. L.; Goodacre, A. K.; Garvin, J. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/3816872"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> or Hypnosis: What do our Scales Really Measure?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Conceptually, hypnotizability has always been defined as the increase in <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> produced by hypnosis. In practice, hypnotizability is measured as <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> following a hypnotic induction. The data indicate that these are different constructs. Although the induction of hypnosis inmases <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> to a substantial degree, the correlation between hypnotic and nonhypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> approximates the reliability coefficients of so-called hypnotizability scales. This</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Irving Kirsch</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3052373"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cross Fostering Experiments <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> That Mice Songs Are Innate</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Vocal learning is a central functional constituent of human speech, and recent studies showing that adult male mice emit ultrasonic sound sequences characterized as “songs” have <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the ultrasonic courtship sounds of mice provide a mammalian model of vocal learning. Objectives We tested whether mouse songs are learned, by examining the relative role of rearing environment in a cross-fostering experiment. Methods and Findings We found that C57BL/6 and BALB/c males emit a clearly different pattern of songs with different frequency and syllable compositions; C57BL/6 males showed a higher peak frequency of syllables, shorter intervals between syllables, and more upward frequency modulations with jumps, whereas BALB/c males produced more “chevron” and “harmonics” syllables. To establish the degree of environmental influences in mouse song development, sons of these two strains were cross-fostered to another strain of parents. Songs were recorded when these cross-fostered pups were fully developed and their songs were compared with those of male mice reared by the genetic parents. The cross-fostered animals sang songs with acoustic characteristics - including syllable interval, peak frequency, and modulation patterns - similar to those of their genetic parents. In addition their song elements retained sequential characteristics similar to those of their genetic parents' songs. Conclusion These results do not support the hypothesis that mouse “song” is learned; we found no evidence for vocal learning of any sort under the conditions of this experiment. Our <span class="hlt">observation</span> that the strain-specific character of the song profile persisted even after changing the developmental auditory environment <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the structure of these courtship sound sequences is under strong genetic control. Thus, the usefulness of mouse “song” as a model of mammalian vocal learning is limited, but mouse song has the potential to be an indispensable model to study genetic mechanisms for vocal patterning and behavioral sequences. PMID:21408017</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kikusui, Takefumi; Nakanishi, Kaori; Nakagawa, Ryoko; Nagasawa, Miho; Mogi, Kazutaka; Okanoya, Kazuo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3044851"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interactome mapping <span class="hlt">suggests</span> new mechanistic details underlying Alzheimer's disease</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent advances toward the characterization of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have permitted the identification of a dozen of genetic risk factors, although many more remain undiscovered. In parallel, works in the field of network biology have shown a strong link between protein connectivity and disease. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that AD-related genes are indeed highly interconnected and, based on this <span class="hlt">observation</span>, we set up an interaction discovery strategy to unveil novel AD causative and susceptibility genes. In total, we report 200 high-confidence protein–protein interactions between eight confirmed AD-related genes and 66 candidates. Of these, 31 are located in chromosomal regions containing susceptibility loci related to the etiology of late-onset AD, and 17 show dysregulated expression patterns in AD patients, which makes them very good candidates for further functional studies. Interestingly, we also identified four novel direct interactions among well-characterized AD causative/susceptibility genes (i.e., APP, A2M, APOE, PSEN1, and PSEN2), which support the <span class="hlt">suggested</span> link between plaque formation and inflammatory processes and provide insights into the intracellular regulation of APP cleavage. Finally, we contextualize the discovered relationships, integrating them with all the interaction data reported in the literature, building the most complete interactome associated to AD. This general view facilitates the analyses of global properties of the network, such as its functional modularity, and triggers many hypotheses on the molecular mechanisms implicated in AD. For instance, our analyses <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a putative role for PDCD4 as a neuronal death regulator and ECSIT as a molecular link between oxidative stress, inflammation, and mitochondrial dysfunction in AD. PMID:21163940</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Soler-López, Montserrat; Zanzoni, Andreas; Lluís, Ricart; Stelzl, Ulrich; Aloy, Patrick</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED112056.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Veterinary Science Technology: A <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Two-Year Post High School Curriculum.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Designed to aid States in planning and developing two-year post-high school programs in veterinary science technology, the curriculum guide presents a <span class="hlt">suggested</span> curriculum for a training program in veterinary science technology, with an option in meat inspection and regulatory technology effective in the fourth semester of the training <span class="hlt">period</span>.…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">State Univ. of New York, Delhi. Agricultural and Technical Coll.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12311397"> <span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Periodic</span> abstinence: its possibilities].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Experience with family planning mehods requiring <span class="hlt">periodic</span> sexual abstinence has been varied. During the last decade interest has centered on 2 methods, the cervical mucus and the sympto-thermal, which are based on identifying the onset of the fertile <span class="hlt">period</span>. During the 1970s, the Australian physicians John and Evelyn Billings developed the cervical mucus method, in which changes in the quanitity and characteristics of cervical mucus are used to determine the moment of ovulation. The sympto-thermal method depends on identification of the slight rise in basal body temperature that occurs in the latter part of the menstrual cycle as well as cervical mucus changes and sometimes the calendar to determine the fertile <span class="hlt">period</span>. The Catholic Church has been the main proponent of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> abstinence methods, but since 1973 the World Health Organization has invested US$3.3 million on research in such methods. The Billings method requires differentiating between dry, wet, and very wet mucus in the vagina and between different consistencies of mucus. The method ususally requires 1-3 months for instruction and sexual abstinence is usually recommended for the 1st month. The average number of days of required abstinence was 9 in a study of 66 women and 15-18 in a study of 870 women. Many women with short menstrual cycles do not experience postmenstrual dry days, in which case abstinence may be required as many as 13 days out of 23. 18.8% of users of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> abstinence methods in 1 North American study became pregnant in the 1st year, but most were using the calendar method. Women who desired to terminate childbearing had only about 1/2 as many failures with <span class="hlt">periodic</span> abstinence methods as did women wishing to postpone a birth. PMID:12311397</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/periodictable.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">ACS <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This Web site from the American Chemical Society features an interactive <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table with the use of Shockwave. The information presented is divided into three sections. In the first, <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table, students will find attributes such as melting point and molar heat capacity for the elements. The second part illustrates the electron configurations of each of the elements, helping students to better understand the concept. The last section allows users to plot data based on the elements' attributes including atomic radius and electro negativity. Working with this site, high school and college students are able to improve their chemical knowledge.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.chemeddl.org/collections/ptl/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table Live!</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table Live!, produced by the Division of Chemical Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, allows users "to explore a broad range of information about the elements, their reactions, their properties, their structures and their histories." After selecting an element from the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table, users can access a myriad of information divided into three sections: Description, Physical, and Atomic. Students can view short videos of many of the elements' reactions with air, water, acids, and bases. The website is equipped with a helpful glossary and images of the elements, scientists, and other related items.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25446711"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modelling of Arabidopsis LAX3 expression <span class="hlt">suggests</span> auxin homeostasis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Emergence of new lateral roots from within the primary root in Arabidopsis has been shown to be regulated by the phytohormone auxin, via the expression of the auxin influx carrier LAX3, mediated by the ARF7/19 IAA14 signalling module (Swarup et al., 2008). A single cell model of the LAX3 and IAA14 auxin response was formulated and used to demonstrate that hysteresis and bistability may explain the experimentally <span class="hlt">observed</span> 'all-or-nothing' LAX3 spatial expression pattern in cortical cells containing a gradient of auxin concentrations. The model was tested further by using a parameter fitting algorithm to match model output with qRT-PCR mRNA expression data following exogenous auxin treatment. It was found that the model is able to show good agreement with the data, but only when the exogenous auxin signal is degraded over time, at a rate higher than that measured in the experimental medium, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> the triggering of an endogenous auxin homeostasis mechanism. Testing the model over a more physiologically relevant range of extracellular auxin shows bistability and hysteresis still occur when using the optimised parameters, providing the rate of LAX3 active auxin transport is sufficiently high relative to passive diffusion. PMID:25446711</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mellor, Nathan; Péret, Benjamin; Porco, Silvana; Sairanen, Ilkka; Ljung, Karin; Bennett, Malcolm; King, John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=203167"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of the acclimation <span class="hlt">period</span> before anaerobic dehalogenation of halobenzoates.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The acclimation <span class="hlt">periods</span> prior to detectable dehalogenation of halogenated benzoates in anaerobic lake sediments ranged from 3 weeks to 6 months. These acclimation <span class="hlt">periods</span> were reproducible over time and among sampling sites and were characteristic of the chemical tested. The lengthy acclimation <span class="hlt">period</span> appears to represent an induction phase in which little or no aryl dehalogenation is <span class="hlt">observed</span>, followed by an exponential increase in activity typical of an enrichment response. Continuous growth from the time of the first exposure to the chemical is inconsistent with the extremely low per-cell activities estimated for the early days of the acclimation <span class="hlt">period</span> and the fact that the dehalogenation yields no carbon to support microbial growth. The finding of a characteristic acclimation time for each chemical argues against nutritional deficiency, inhibition, or predation as an explanation for this phase of metabolism, while the reproducibility of the findings with time and space and among replicates argues against genetic changes as the explanation. The acclimation times did correlate with the eventual dehalogenation rates. This may reflect the general energy limitations in the anaerobic communities and <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that those chemicals with faster dehalogenation rates provide more energy for the induction and growth phases of the active population. PMID:2624458</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Linkfield, T G; Suflita, J M; Tiedje, J M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012IJMPS..16...61O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Power Laws in Real Estate Prices during Bubble <span class="hlt">Periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">How can we detect real estate bubbles? In this paper, we propose making use of information on the cross-sectional dispersion of real estate prices. During bubble <span class="hlt">periods</span>, prices tend to go up considerably for some properties, but less so for others, so that price inequality across properties increases. In other words, a key characteristic of real estate bubbles is not the rapid price hike itself but a rise in price dispersion. Given this, the purpose of this paper is to examine whether developments in the dispersion in real estate prices can be used to detect bubbles in property markets as they arise, using data from Japan and the U.S. First, we show that the land price distribution in Tokyo had a power-law tail during the bubble <span class="hlt">period</span> in the late 1980s, while it was very close to a lognormal before and after the bubble <span class="hlt">period</span>. Second, in the U.S. data we find that the tail of the house price distribution tends to be heavier in those states which experienced a housing bubble. We also provide evidence <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the power-law tail <span class="hlt">observed</span> during bubble <span class="hlt">periods</span> arises due to the lack of price arbitrage across regions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ohnishi, Takaaki; Mizuno, Takayuki; Shimizu, Chihiro; Watanabe, Tsutomu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NewA...34....1H"> <span id="translatedtitle">An orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> analysis of the dwarf novae OY Carinae</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">By using our twelve new CCD times of light minimum of OY Carinae (OY Car) together with those collected from the literature, it is found that the O-C curve of OY Car shows a downward parabola with an amplitude of 27.8 s and a cyclic change of a <span class="hlt">period</span> 14.0 yr. The <span class="hlt">period</span> decrease is opposite to the hypothesis of mass transfer, and it cannot be explained by angular momentum loss via gravitational radiation. The Rappaport et al. (1983)’s magnetic braking (MB) prescription is adopted to explain the <span class="hlt">observed</span> orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> decrease. The cyclic change of <span class="hlt">period</span> is analyzed with the light travel-time effect that originates from gravitational influence of a third body. The mass of the third star is determined to be M3sini?=0.008097(±0.000014) M?=8.48(±0.02) MJup, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that it may be a critical substellar object between brown dwarf and giant planet. If the orbital inclination of the third body equals 90°, the distance between the third body and the mass centre of the whole system is about 6.18(±0.45) AU.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Han, Z.-T.; Qian, S.-B.; Fernández Lajús, E.; Liao, W.-P.; Zhang, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6862970"> <span id="translatedtitle">The origin of short-<span class="hlt">period</span> comets</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">If the <span class="hlt">observed</span> number of short-<span class="hlt">period</span> comets can be accounted for by a spherically symmetric model of the Oort cloud, in conjunction with an inner core of merely moderate central concentration, then the <span class="hlt">observed</span> correlation between the ecliptic plane and the inclinations of Jupiter-family short-<span class="hlt">period</span> comets may be seen as partly due to the calculated decrease in capture probability with inclination, and partly to the effects of cometary decay and <span class="hlt">observational</span> selection. The implied constraint on the inner core becomes even more severe, if a hypothetical comet disk in the Uranus-Neptune zone either makes a significant contribution to the <span class="hlt">observed</span> short-<span class="hlt">period</span> comets or if these comets' mean lifetime is greater than 3000 years. 32 refs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bailey, M.E.; Stagg, C.R. (Manchester Victoria Univ. (England) Calgary Univ. (Canada))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25057147"> <span id="translatedtitle">Vocal motor changes beyond the sensitive <span class="hlt">period</span> for song plasticity.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Behavior is critically shaped during sensitive <span class="hlt">periods</span> in development. Birdsong is a learned vocal behavior that undergoes dramatic plasticity during a sensitive <span class="hlt">period</span> of sensorimotor learning. During this <span class="hlt">period</span>, juvenile songbirds engage in vocal practice to shape their vocalizations into relatively stereotyped songs. By the time songbirds reach adulthood, their songs are relatively stable and thought to be "crystallized." Recent studies, however, highlight the potential for adult song plasticity and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that adult song could naturally change over time. As such, we investigated the degree to which temporal and spectral features of song changed over time in adult Bengalese finches. We <span class="hlt">observed</span> that the sequencing and timing of song syllables became more stereotyped over time. Increases in the stereotypy of syllable sequencing were due to the pruning of infrequently produced transitions and, to a lesser extent, increases in the prevalence of frequently produced transitions. Changes in song tempo were driven by decreases in the duration and variability of intersyllable gaps. In contrast to significant changes to temporal song features, we found little evidence that the spectral structure of adult song syllables changed over time. These data highlight differences in the degree to which temporal and spectral features of adult song change over time and support evidence for distinct mechanisms underlying the control of syllable sequencing, timing, and structure. Furthermore, the <span class="hlt">observed</span> changes to temporal song features are consistent with a Hebbian framework of behavioral plasticity and support the notion that adult song should be considered a form of vocal practice. PMID:25057147</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">James, Logan S; Sakata, Jon T</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014psce.conf..270M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ap stars with variable <span class="hlt">periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The majority of magnetic chemically peculiar (mCP) stars exhibit <span class="hlt">periodic</span> light, magnetic, radio, and spectroscopic variations that can be modelled adequately as a rigidly-rotating main-sequence star with persistent surface structures. Nevertheless, there is a small sample of diverse mCP stars whose rotation <span class="hlt">periods</span> vary on timescales of decades while the shapes of their phase curves remain unchanged. Alternating <span class="hlt">period</span> increases and decreases have been suspected in the hot CP stars CU Vir and V901 Ori, while rotation in the moderately cool star BS Cir has been decelerating. These examples bring new insight into this theoretically unpredicted phenomenon. We discuss possible causes of such behaviour, and propose that dynamic interactions between a thin, outer, magnetically-confined envelope braked by the stellar wind, and an inner faster-rotating stellar body, are able to explain the <span class="hlt">observed</span> rotational variability. The article is dedicated to one of its co-authors - Dr. Jozef Žiž?ovský who passed away on 15 June 2013.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mikulášek, Z.; Krti?ka, J.; Janík, J.; Zejda, M.; Henry, G. W.; Paunzen, E.; Žiž?ovský, J.; Zverko, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title32-vol6/pdf/CFR-2010-title32-vol6-sec1901-04.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">32 CFR 1901.04 - <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> and complaints.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...<span class="hlt">suggestions</span> or complaints with regard to its administration of the Privacy Act. Many requesters will receive pre-paid, customer satisfaction survey cards. Letters of <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> or complaint should identify the specific purpose and the issues for...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_19 div --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title32-vol6/pdf/CFR-2011-title32-vol6-sec1901-04.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">32 CFR 1901.04 - <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> and complaints.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...<span class="hlt">suggestions</span> or complaints with regard to its administration of the Privacy Act. Many requesters will receive pre-paid, customer satisfaction survey cards. Letters of <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> or complaint should identify the specific purpose and the issues for...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title32-vol6/pdf/CFR-2014-title32-vol6-sec1901-04.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">32 CFR 1901.04 - <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> and complaints.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">...<span class="hlt">suggestions</span> or complaints with regard to its administration of the Privacy Act. Many requesters will receive pre-paid, customer satisfaction survey cards. Letters of <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> or complaint should identify the specific purpose and the issues for...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title32-vol6/pdf/CFR-2012-title32-vol6-sec1901-04.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">32 CFR 1901.04 - <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> and complaints.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...<span class="hlt">suggestions</span> or complaints with regard to its administration of the Privacy Act. Many requesters will receive pre-paid, customer satisfaction survey cards. Letters of <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> or complaint should identify the specific purpose and the issues for...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title32-vol6/pdf/CFR-2013-title32-vol6-sec1901-04.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">32 CFR 1901.04 - <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> and complaints.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...<span class="hlt">suggestions</span> or complaints with regard to its administration of the Privacy Act. Many requesters will receive pre-paid, customer satisfaction survey cards. Letters of <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> or complaint should identify the specific purpose and the issues for...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1174993"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> reduces conflict in the human brain</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many studies have <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that conflict monitoring involves the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). We previously showed that a specific hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> reduces involuntary conflict and alters information processing in highly hypnotizable individuals. Hypothesizing that such conflict reduction would be associated with decreased ACC activation, we combined neuroimaging methods to provide high temporal and spatial resolution and studied highly and less-hypnotizable participants both with and without a <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> to interpret visual words as nonsense strings. Functional MRI data revealed that under posthypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>, both ACC and visual areas presented reduced activity in highly hypnotizable persons compared with either no-<span class="hlt">suggestion</span> or less-hypnotizable controls. Scalp electrode recordings in highly hypnotizable subjects also showed reductions in posterior activation under <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>, indicating visual system alterations. Our findings illuminate how <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> affects cognitive control by modulating activity in specific brain areas, including early visual modules, and provide a more scientific account relating the neural effects of <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> to placebo. PMID:15994228</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Raz, Amir; Fan, Jin; Posner, Michael I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55330666"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Cretaceous <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A QUARTER of a century ago, when first I began to study geology, it appeared to me that a predominance was given to the more recent rocks, such as the Pleistocene, Miocene, Eocene, Cretaceous, and the like, to which they were not entitled, when ranked as <span class="hlt">periods</span> alongside such great groups as the Carboniferous the Silurian, the Cambro-silurian, and the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. Henry Kinahan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1871-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890011990&hterms=Cretaceous+Period&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3D%2528Cretaceous%2BPeriod%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Astrophysical implications of <span class="hlt">periodicity</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two remarkable discoveries of the last decade have profound implications for astrophysics and for geophysics. These are the discovery by Alvarez et al., that certain mass extinctions are caused by the impact on the earth of a large asteroid or comet, and the discovery by Raup and Sepkoski that such extinctions are <span class="hlt">periodic</span>, with a cycle time of 26 to 30 million years. The validity of both of these discoveries is assumed and the implications are examined. Most of the phenomena described depend not on <span class="hlt">periodicity</span>, but just on the weaker assumption that the impacts on the earth take place primarily in showers. Proposed explanations for the <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> include galactic oscillations, the Planet X model, and the possibility of Nemesis, a solar companion star. These hypotheses are critically examined. Results of the search for the solar companion are reported. The Deccan flood basalts of India have been proposed as the impact site for the Cretaceous impact, but this hypotheisis is in contradiction with the conclusion of Courtillot et al., that the magma flow began during a <span class="hlt">period</span> of normal magnetic field. A possible resolution of this contradiction is proposed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Muller, Richard A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22History+of+Science+and+Technology%22&pg=2&id=EJ420594"> <span id="translatedtitle">Current <span class="hlt">Periodical</span> Literature.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Presented is a bibliography of <span class="hlt">periodical</span> literature on the following topics: the impact of science and technology, art and architecture, biography, computers, international science and technology, and development and modernization. Also presented is an annotated bibliography of children's books, books on economics, the environment, and the…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Haberer, Joseph, Ed.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Periodic+AND+table&pg=3&id=EJ572486"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table of Students.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Presents an exercise in which an eighth-grade science teacher decorated the classroom with a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table of students. Student photographs were arranged according to similarities into vertical columns. Students were each assigned an atomic number according to their placement in the table. The table is then used to teach students about…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Johnson, Mike</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Periodic+AND+table&pg=5&id=EJ549769"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Modern <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Presents a modern <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table based on the electron distribution in the outermost shell and the order of filling of the sublevels within the shells. Enables a student to read off directly the electronic configuration of the element and the order in which filling occurs. (JRH)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Herrenden-Harker, B. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.girlshealth.gov/body/period/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Getting Your <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... for a woman to have a baby. During sexual intercourse, the egg can get fertilized by a male’s sperm and then attach to the lining of the uterus ( endometrium ) and grow into a baby. ( Read more about reproduction. ) Does your <span class="hlt">period</span> come each month? top Menstrual ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12578013"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ayurveda during Abbasid's <span class="hlt">period</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This is a historical paper which deals with a brief account of Abbasid's <span class="hlt">period</span>. In this article the existence of Ayurveda in Arab countries, arrival of Ayurvedic physicians to Baghdad, their eminence, authenticity and literary additions in medical field has been studied and presented. PMID:12578013</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Husain, S A; Subhaktha, P K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.sciencegeek.net/tables/tables.shtml"> <span id="translatedtitle">Printable <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Tables</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This collection of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> tables features a variety of styles, color or black and white versions, and several levels of information, from basic symbols, atomic number, and mass, to advanced versions that include melting point, boiling point, density, electronegativity, and electron configurations. The tables are provided in downloadable, printable format (PDF). Some versions feature links to additional information on the elements.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.optimization-online.org/DB_FILE/2009/07/2351.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">MADS for <span class="hlt">periodic</span> variables</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">May 19, 2009 ... We show that the natural strategy of mapping trial points into the interval defined by the <span class="hlt">period</span> in the Mesh Adaptive Direct ... mooth classification problem and on a bi-objective portfolio selection problem for which MADS is.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sébastien Le Digabel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21665201"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sensitive <span class="hlt">periods</span> in human development: evidence from musical training.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">One of the primary goals of cognitive neuroscience is to understand the interaction between genes, development and specific experience. A particularly fascinating example of this interaction is a sensitive <span class="hlt">period</span> - a time during development when experience has a differential effect on behavior and the brain. Behavioral and brain imaging studies in musicians have provided <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> evidence for a possible sensitive <span class="hlt">period</span> for musical training; showing that musicians who began training early show better task performance and greater changes in auditory and motor regions of the brain. However, these studies have not controlled for likely differences between early- (ET) and late-trained (LT) musicians in the number of years of musical experience. This review presents behavioral work from our laboratory comparing the performance of ET (before age seven) and LT musicians who were matched for years of experience on the ability to tap in synchrony with auditory and visual rhythms. The results demonstrate the existence of a possible sensitive <span class="hlt">period</span> for musical training that has its greatest impact on measures of sensorimotor integration. Work on motor learning in children and how this might relate to the <span class="hlt">observed</span> sensitive <span class="hlt">period</span> effect is also reviewed. These studies are described in the context of what is currently known about sensitive <span class="hlt">periods</span> in animals and humans; drawing on evidence from anatomy and physiology, studies of deafness, as well as structural and functional neuroimaging studies in trained musicians. The possible mechanisms underlying sensitive <span class="hlt">periods</span> for musical training are discussed based on current theories describing the influence of both low-level features of sensory experience and higher-level cognitive processing. PMID:21665201</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Penhune, Virginia B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://bioinformatics.bio.uu.nl/nobuto/prebiotic/AlifeXI-talk.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Background Model Results Conclusions <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> Evolution of complexity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Model Results Conclusions <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> Evolution of complexity in RNA-like replicator;Background Model Results Conclusions <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> Evolution of Complexity in replicators Xj + Xk - 2Xj #12;Background Model Results Conclusions <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> Hypercycle Xi+1 Xi - 2Xi+1 [Eigen & Schuster '79</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Utrecht, Universiteit</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=manipulation+AND+people&pg=5&id=EJ788392"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clarification of the Memory Artefact in the Assessment of <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aim: The Gudjonsson <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> Scale (GSS) assesses <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> by asking respondents to recall a short story, followed by exposure to leading questions and pressure to change their responses. <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span>, as assessed by the GSS, appears to be elevated in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). This has been shown to reflect to some…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Willner, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0704.0307v2"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> accretion from a circumbinary disk in the young binary UZ Tau E</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Close pre-main-sequence binary stars are expected to clear central holes in their protoplanetary disks, but the extent to which material can flow from the circumbinary disk across the gap onto the individual circumstellar disks has been unclear. In binaries with eccentric orbits, <span class="hlt">periodic</span> perturbation of the outer disk is predicted to induce mass flow across the gap, resulting in accretion that varies with the binary <span class="hlt">period</span>. This accretion may manifest itself <span class="hlt">observationally</span> as <span class="hlt">periodic</span> changes in luminosity. Here we present a search for such <span class="hlt">periodic</span> accretion in the pre-main-sequence spectroscopic binary UZ Tau E. We present BVRI photometry spanning three years; we find that the brightness of UZ Tau E is clearly <span class="hlt">periodic</span>, with a best-fit <span class="hlt">period</span> of 19.16 +/- 0.04 days. This is consistent with the spectroscopic binary <span class="hlt">period</span> of 19.13 days, refined here from analysis of new and existing radial velocity data. The brightness of UZ Tau E shows significant random variability, but the overall <span class="hlt">periodic</span> pattern is a broad peak in enhanced brightness, spanning more than half the binary orbital <span class="hlt">period</span>. The variability of the H-alpha line is not as clearly <span class="hlt">periodic</span>, but given the sparseness of the data, some <span class="hlt">periodic</span> component is not ruled out. The photometric variations are in good agreement with predictions from simulations of binaries with orbital parameters similar to those of UZ Tau E, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that <span class="hlt">periodic</span> accretion does occur from circumbinary disks, replenishing the inner disks and possibly extending the timescale over which they might form planets.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eric L. N. Jensen; Saurav Dhital; Keivan G. Stassun; Jenny Patience; William Herbst; Frederick M. Walter; Michal Simon; Gibor Basri; ;</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-05-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JHyd..521..100G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measuring well hydraulic connectivity in fractured bedrock using <span class="hlt">periodic</span> slug tests</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> hydraulic experiments were conducted in a five-spot well cluster completed in a single bedding plane fracture. Tests were performed by using a winch-operated slug (submerged solid cylinder) to create a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> head disturbance in one well and <span class="hlt">observing</span> the phase shift and attenuation of the head response in the remaining wells. Transmissivity (T) and storativity (S) were inverted independently from head response. Inverted T decreased and S increased with oscillation <span class="hlt">period</span>. Estimated S was more variable among well pairs than T, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> S may be a better estimator of hydraulic connectivity among closely spaced wells. These estimates highlighted a zone of poor hydraulic connection that was not identified by a constant rate test conducted in the same wells. <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> slug tests appear to be a practical and effective technique for establishing local scale spatial variability in hydraulic parameters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Guiltinan, Eric; Becker, Matthew W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22167132"> <span id="translatedtitle">SEMIREGULAR VARIABLES WITH <span class="hlt">PERIODS</span> LYING BETWEEN THE <span class="hlt">PERIOD</span>-LUMINOSITY SEQUENCES C', C, AND D</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze the distribution of semiregular variables and Mira stars in the <span class="hlt">period</span>-luminosity plane. Our sample consists of 6169 oxygen-rich long-<span class="hlt">period</span> variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud included in the OGLE-III Catalog of Variable Stars. There are many stars with <span class="hlt">periods</span> that lie between the well-known sequences C and C'. Most of these stars are multi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> and the <span class="hlt">period</span> ratios <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that these stars oscillate in the same mode as the sequence C stars. Models <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that this mode is the fundamental radial pulsation mode. The stars with primary <span class="hlt">periods</span> between sequences C and C' preferentially lie on an additional sequence (named F), and a large fraction of these stars also have long secondary <span class="hlt">periods</span> (LSPs) that lie between sequences C and D. There are also a small number of stars with primary <span class="hlt">periods</span> lying between sequences C and D. The origin of this long-<span class="hlt">period</span> variability is unknown, as is the cause of sequence D variability. In addition, the origin of sequence F is unknown but we speculate that sequence F variability may be excited by the same phenomenon that causes the LSPs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Soszynski, I. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland)] [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Wood, P. R., E-mail: soszynsk@astrouw.edu.pl, E-mail: wood@mso.anu.edu.au [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_20 div --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790034954&hterms=ventilation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dventilation"> <span id="translatedtitle">Distribution of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion during short <span class="hlt">periods</span> of weightlessness</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Airborne experiments were conducted on four trained normal male subjects (28-40 yr) to study pulmonary function during short <span class="hlt">periods</span> (22-27 sec) of zero gravity obtained by flying a jet aircraft through appropriate parabolic trajectories. The cabin was always pressurized to a sea-level altitude. The discussion is limited to pulmonary ventilation and perfusion. The results clearly demonstrate that gravity is the major factor causing nonuniformity in the topographical distribution of pulmonary ventilation. More importantly, the results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that virtually all the topographical nonuniformity of ventilation, blood flow, and lung volume <span class="hlt">observed</span> under 1-G conditions are eliminated during short <span class="hlt">periods</span> of zero gravity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michels, D. B.; West, J. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820014996&hterms=peromyscus&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dperomyscus"> <span id="translatedtitle">Behavioral study of ultradian activity <span class="hlt">periods</span> of mice enclosed in experimental cages of different dimensions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Male mice are enclosed in cages of different dimensions (cage A - 23x8x8 cm., cage B - 36x27x17 cm.), in an alternating light/dark regimen, at an ambient temperature of 22 to 23 C. The successions of the behavioral sequences of ultradian activity <span class="hlt">periods</span> are noticed by direct <span class="hlt">observation</span> during 11 consecutive hours in light. The experimental situation modifies the mean duration time and the behavioral organization of each activity <span class="hlt">period</span>. However, the comparison of the overall activity time lengths and the comparison of the overall behavioral frequencies <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the energy spent per mouse is constant.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Guillot, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22217937"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pump-probe imaging of laser-induced <span class="hlt">periodic</span> surface structures after ultrafast irradiation of Si</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ultrafast pump-probe microscopy has been used to investigate laser-induced <span class="hlt">periodic</span> surface structure (LIPSS) formation on polished Si surfaces. A crater forms on the surface after irradiation by a 150 fs laser pulse, and a second, subsequent pulse forms LIPSS within the crater. Sequentially delayed images show that LIPSS with a <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> slightly less than the fundamental laser wavelength of 780 nm appear on Si surfaces ?50 ps after arrival of the second pump laser pulse, well after the onset of melting. LIPSS are <span class="hlt">observed</span> on the same timescale as material removal, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that their formation involves material ejection.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Murphy, Ryan D. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, Ben [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Adams, David P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Yalisove, Steven M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MPBu...42...30A"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Period</span> Determination for 457 Alleghenia: Low Numbered Asteroid with No Previously Known <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lightcurve analysis for 457 Alleghenia was performed using <span class="hlt">observations</span> during its 2014 opposition. The synodic rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> was found to be 21.953 ± 0.001 h and the lightcurve amplitude was 0.20 ± 0.02 mag.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alvarez, Eduardo Manuel; Pilcher, Frederick</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/243490"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> mesoporous silica gels</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have synthesized monolithic particulate gels of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> mesoporous silica by adding tetramethoxysilane to a homogeneous alkaline micellar precursor solution. The gels exhibit 5 characteristic length scales over 4 orders of magnitude: fractal domains larger than the particle size (>500 nm), particles that are {approximately}150 to 500 nm in diameter, interparticle pores that are on the order of the particle size, a feature in the gas adsorption measurements that indicates pores {approximately}10-50 nm, and <span class="hlt">periodic</span> hexagonal arrays of {approximately}3 nm channels within each particle. The wet gel monoliths exhibit calculated densities as low as {approximately}0.02 g/cc; the dried and calcined gels have bulk densities that range from {approximately}0.3-0.5 g/cc. The materials possess large interparticle ({approximately}1.0-2.3 cc/g) and intraparticle ({approximately}0.6 cc/g) porosities.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anderson, M.T.; Martin, J.E.; Odinek, J.G. [and others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009APS..MAR.Y5001N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cells anticipate <span class="hlt">periodic</span> events</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We show that an amoeboid organism can anticipate the timing of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> events. The plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum moves rapidly under favourable conditions, but stops moving when transferred to less-favourable conditions. Plasmodia exposed to unfavourable conditions, presented in three consecutive pulses at constant intervals, reduced their locomotive speed in response to each episode. When subsequently subjected to favourable conditions, the plasmodia spontaneously reduced their locomotive speed at the time point when the next unfavourable episode would have occurred. This implied anticipation of impending environmental change. After this behaviour had been evoked several times, the locomotion of the plasmodia returned to normal; however, the anticipatory response could subsequently be induced by a single unfavourable pulse, implying recall of the memorized <span class="hlt">periodicity</span>. We explored the mechanisms underlying these behaviours from a dynamical systems perspective. Our results hint at the cellular origins of primitive intelligence and imply that simple dynamics might be sufficient to explain its emergence.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nakagaki, Toshiyuki</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.periodicals.net/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodicals</span>.net</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Produced by Library Technology Alliance, Ltd., <span class="hlt">Periodicals</span>.net indexes 97,000 publications whose content is available through online vendors or that are published online. The search page allows keyword queries by title, subject, or ISSN, and users can further specify coverage type (full, abstract, index) and vendor. Initial returns include titles and ISSN. Full entries list vendors that offer content from the <span class="hlt">periodical</span>, dates of coverage, and a link to their homepage. Users who would like to access content from these vendors must, of course, belong to an institution with a subscription or subscribe themselves. The site also offers a Search E-Journals interface, which indexes many free resources available online. Search returns in this category link to the publications's homepages.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3697242"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Reversals in Paenibacillus dendritiformis Swarming</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bacterial swarming is a type of motility characterized by a rapid and collective migration of bacteria on surfaces. Most swarming species form densely packed dynamic clusters in the form of whirls and jets, in which hundreds of rod-shaped rigid cells move in circular and straight patterns, respectively. Recent studies have <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that short-range steric interactions may dominate hydrodynamic interactions and that geometrical factors, such as a cell's aspect ratio, play an important role in bacterial swarming. Typically, the aspect ratio for most swarming species is only up to 5, and a detailed understanding of the role of much larger aspect ratios remains an open challenge. Here we study the dynamics of Paenibacillus dendritiformis C morphotype, a very long, hyperflagellated, straight (rigid), rod-shaped bacterium with an aspect ratio of ?20. We find that instead of swarming in whirls and jets as <span class="hlt">observed</span> in most species, including the shorter T morphotype of P. dendritiformis, the C morphotype moves in densely packed straight but thin long lines. Within these lines, all bacteria show <span class="hlt">periodic</span> reversals, with a typical reversal time of 20 s, which is independent of their neighbors, the initial nutrient level, agar rigidity, surfactant addition, humidity level, temperature, nutrient chemotaxis, oxygen level, illumination intensity or gradient, and cell length. The evolutionary advantage of this unique back-and-forth surface translocation remains unclear. PMID:23603739</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Strain, Shinji K.; Hernández, Roberto A.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Florin, E.-L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.saltthesandbox.org/cicada_hunt/SeventeenYearLocust.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hunting for <span class="hlt">Periodical</span> Cicadas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This site, from Salt in the Sandbox, is a neat inquiry-based educational cicada site for children. Visitors will find a link to the project's blog, photo stories about cicadas, resources to help your children not be afraid of bugs, and cicada exhibits in the Chicago area. There are also a number of bibliographies of cicada-related resources in print and online. Be sure to check out the article about the mysterious emergence of <span class="hlt">periodical</span> cicadas in 2004 - four years early!</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gyllenhaal, Eric Davis, 1950-</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.chemicool.com/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chemicool <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Chemicool <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table is a simple yet elegant site that allows users to click on their element of choice, or type in its name or symbol. Element names are color coded (solid, liquid, gas, as well as synthetic or naturally occurring) and information is provided in ten categories including general (atomic number and weight), states, energies, appearance, reactions, and abundance, to name a few. Also available is a unit conversion calculator.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ia.usu.edu/viewproject.php?project=ia:8492"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table review</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">See the videos we watched in class (or review for your next exam) here To play the game for lab PT Game To do some practice multiple choice questions, click below. (your user name is \\"slw- WHATEVER YOU USE AT SCHOOL\\" School Island To play the review game we will do in class, click below then click on <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table Review Eureeka home To watch videos Sodium Video Element song Element song Alkali metal video Brainiac metals ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ms. Huntress</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985Natur.314..604M"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> minimal surfaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A minimal surface is one for which, like a soap film with the same pressure on each side, the mean curvature is zero and, thus, is one where the two principal curvatures are equal and opposite at every point. For every closed circuit in the surface, the area is a minimum. Schwarz1 and Neovius2 showed that elements of such surfaces could be put together to give surfaces <span class="hlt">periodic</span> in three dimensions. These <span class="hlt">periodic</span> minimal surfaces are geometrical invariants, as are the regular polyhedra, but the former are curved. Minimal surfaces are appropriate for the description of various structures where internal surfaces are prominent and seek to adopt a minimum area or a zero mean curvature subject to their topology; thus they merit more complete numerical characterization. There seem to be at least 18 such surfaces3, with various symmetries and topologies, related to the crystallographic space groups. Recently, glyceryl mono-oleate (GMO) was shown by Longley and McIntosh4 to take the shape of the F-surface. The structure postulated is shown here to be in good agreement with an analysis of the fundamental geometry of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> minimal surfaces.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mackay, Alan L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003MPBu...30...20B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lightcurves and <span class="hlt">period</span> determination for 817 Annika</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Minor planet 817 Annika was <span class="hlt">observed</span> from several sites across Australia over a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 14 days (29 rotations) during Oct. and Nov., 2002. Lightcurves obtained on 9 nights with unfiltered CCDs have yielded a rotational (synodic) <span class="hlt">period</span> of 10.560 ± 0.004 hrs. The complete lightcurve exhibits two maxima and two minima, with a total amplitude range of 0.29 ± 0.02 magnitudes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bembrick, Colin; Bolt, Greg; Richards, Tom</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0807.3746v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">T-Lyr1-17236: A Long-<span class="hlt">Period</span> Low-Mass Eclipsing Binary</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We describe the discovery of a 0.68+0.52 solar mass eclipsing binary (EB) with an 8.4-day orbital <span class="hlt">period</span>, found through a systematic search of ten fields of the Trans-atlantic Exoplanet Survey (TrES). Such long-<span class="hlt">period</span> low-mass EBs constitute critical test cases for resolving the long standing discrepancy between the theoretical and <span class="hlt">observational</span> mass-radius relations at the bottom of the main sequence. It has been <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that this discrepancy may be related to strong stellar magnetic fields, which are not properly accounted for in current theoretical models. All previously well-characterized low-mass main sequence EBs have <span class="hlt">periods</span> of a few days or less, and their components are therefore expected to be rotating rapidly as a result of tidal synchronization, thus generating strong magnetic fields. In contrast, the binary system described here has a <span class="hlt">period</span> that is over three times longer than previously characterized low-mass main sequence EBs, and its components rotate relatively slowly. It is therefore expected to have a weaker magnetic field and to better match the assumptions of theoretical stellar models. Our follow-up <span class="hlt">observations</span> of this EB yield preliminary stellar properties that <span class="hlt">suggest</span> it is indeed consistent with current models. If further <span class="hlt">observations</span> confirm a low level of activity in this system, these determinations would provide support for the hypothesis that the mass-radius discrepancy is at least partly due to magnetic activity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jonathan Devor; David Charbonneau; Guillermo Torres; Cullen H. Blake; Russel J. White; Markus Rabus; Francis T. O'Donovan; Georgi Mandushev; Gaspar Bakos; Gabor Furesz; Andrew Szentgyorgyi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-07-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PASJ..tmp..134N"> <span id="translatedtitle">OT J075418.7+381225 and OT J230425.8+062546: Promising candidates for the <span class="hlt">period</span> bouncer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on photometric <span class="hlt">observations</span> of two dwarf novae, OT J075418.7+381225 and OT J230425.8+062546, which showed superoutbursts in 2013 (OT J075418) and in 2011 (OT J230425). Their mean <span class="hlt">periods</span> of the superhump were 0.0722403(26) d (OT J075418) and 0.067317(35) d (OT J230425). These objects showed a very long growth stage of the superhump (stage A) and a large <span class="hlt">period</span> decrease in the stage A-B transition. The long stage A <span class="hlt">suggests</span> slow evolution of the superhump due to the very small mass ratio of these objects. The declining rates during the plateau phase in the superoutburst of these objects were lower than those of SU UMa-type dwarf novae (DNe) with a similar superhump <span class="hlt">period</span>. These properties were similar to those of SSS J122221.7-311523, the most likely candidate for the <span class="hlt">period</span> bouncer. Therefore, these two DNe are regarded as likely candidates for the <span class="hlt">period</span> bouncer. We estimated the number density of <span class="hlt">period</span> bouncers roughly from our <span class="hlt">observations</span> for the last five years. There is a possibility that these WZ Sge-type DNe with unusual outburst properties might account for the missing population of the <span class="hlt">period</span> bouncer <span class="hlt">suggested</span> by the evolutionary scenario.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nakata, Chikako; Kato, Taichi; Nogami, Daisaku; Pavlenko, Elena P.; Ohshima, Tomohito; de Miguel, Enrique; Stein, William; Siokawa, Kazuhiko; Morelle, Etienne; Itoh, Hiroshi; Dubovsky, Pavol A.; Kudzej, Igor; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Henden, Arne; Goff, William N.; Dvorak, Shawn; Antonyuk, Oksana I.; Muyllaert, Eddy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57537976"> <span id="translatedtitle">The quiet <span class="hlt">period</span> has something to say</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent studies <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that analyst ratings have become less biased following the Global Settlement and National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD) and New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) Rules implemented in 2002. Assuming analyst ratings are more reliable due to the decline in positive bias, we investigate the existence of ex