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1

Suggestion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reviews the following literature on suggestion (1912-1913): (1) Bernheim distinguishes between auto- and hetero-suggestion (2) Lotz conceives of suggestion as the transmission of a conviction from one person to another or to others, and has written a paper for teachers or parents, which emphasizes precautions that must be followed if suggestion is to be effectively employed in education (3) Chatley

Walter Dill Scott

1913-01-01

2

Collider shot setup for Run 2 observations and suggestions  

SciTech Connect

This note is intended to provoke discussion on Collider Run II shot setup. We hope this is a start of activities that will converge on a functional description of what is needed for shot setups in Collider Run II. We will draw on observations of the present shot setup to raise questions and make suggestions for the next Collider run. It is assumed that the reader has some familiarity with the Collider operational issues. Shot setup is defined to be the time between the end of a store and the time the Main Control Room declares colliding beams. This is the time between Tevatron clock events SCE and SCB. This definition does not consider the time experiments use to turn on their detectors. This analysis was suggested by David Finley. The operational scenarios for Run II will require higher levels of reliability and speed for shot setup. See Appendix I and II. For example, we estimate that a loss of 3 pb{sup {minus}1}/week (with 8 hour stores) will occur if shot setups take 90 minutes instead of 30 minutes. In other words: If you do 12 shots for one week and accept an added delay of one minute in each shot, you will loose more than 60 nb{sup {minus}1} for that week alone (based on a normal shot setup of 30 minutes). These demands should lead us to be much more pedantic about all the factors that affect shot setups. Shot setup will be viewed as a distinct process that is composed of several inter- dependent `components`: procedures, hardware, controls, and sociology. These components don`t directly align with the different Accelerator Division departments, but are topical groupings of the needed accelerator functions. Defining these components, and categorizing our suggestions within them, are part of the goal of this document. Of course, some suggestions span several of these components.

Annala, J.; Joshel, B.

1996-01-31

3

OBSERVED POLARIZATION OF BROWN DWARFS SUGGESTS LOW SURFACE GRAVITY  

SciTech Connect

Light scattering by atmospheric dust particles is responsible for the polarization observed in some L dwarfs. Whether this polarization arises from an inhomogeneous distribution of dust across the disk or an oblate shape induced by rotation remains unclear. Here, we argue that the latter case is plausible and, for many L dwarfs, the more likely one. Furthermore, evolutionary models of mature field L dwarfs predict surface gravities ranging from about 200 to 2500 m s{sup -2} (corresponding to masses of {approx}15-70 M {sub Jupiter}). Yet comparison of observed spectra to available synthetic spectra often does not permit more precise determination of the surface gravity of individual field L dwarfs, leading to important uncertainties in their properties. Since rotationally induced non-sphericity, which gives rise to non-zero disk-integrated polarization, is more pronounced at lower gravities, polarization is a promising low gravity indicator. Here, we combine a rigorous multiple scattering analysis with a self-consistent cloudy atmospheric model and observationally inferred rotational velocities and find that the observed optical polarization can be explained if the surface gravity of the polarized objects is about 300 m s{sup -2} or less, potentially providing a new method for constraining L dwarf masses.

Sengupta, Sujan [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala 2nd Block, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Marley, Mark S., E-mail: sujan@iiap.res.i, E-mail: Mark.S.Marley@NASA.go [NASA Ames Research Center, MS-245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

2010-10-20

4

Periodic Properties and Inquiry: Student Mental Models Observed during a Periodic Table Puzzle Activity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The mental models of both novice and advanced chemistry students were observed while the students performed a periodic table activity. The mental model framework seems to be an effective way of analyzing student behavior during learning activities. The analysis suggests that students do not recognize periodic trends through the examination of…

Larson, Kathleen G.; Long, George R.; Briggs, Michael W.

2012-01-01

5

Multispacecraft observations of quasi-periodic emissions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quasi-periodic (QP) emissions are VLF electromagnetic waves in the frequency range of about 0.5-5 kHz which exhibit a periodic time modulation of the wave intensity. The modulation period is usually on the order of a few tens of seconds. The generation mechanism of these emissions is still not understood, but at least in some cases it appears to be related to ULF magnetic field pulsations which result in periodic modifications of the resonant conditions in the source region. We use multipoint measurements of QP emissions by the 4 Cluster spacecraft. The observations are obtained close to the equatorial region at radial distances of about 4 Earth radii, i.e. close to a possible generation region. A combined analysis of the high resolution data obtained by the WBD instruments and the ULF magnetic field data obtained by the FGM instruments allows for a detailed case-study analysis of these unique emissions. The presented analysis benefits from the recent close-separation configuration of three of the Cluster spacecraft (?20-100 km) and a related timing analysis, which would be impossible otherwise.

Nemec, Frantisek; Picket, Jolene S.; Santolik, Ondrej

2014-05-01

6

Cassini and Galileo Observations of Quasi-periodic Radio Bursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Simultaneous measurements of many Jovian plasma and radio emissions were ob- tained by the Cassini and Galileo spacecraft during the Cassini flyby of Jupiter (clos- est approach was on December 30, 2000). Jovian type III radio emissions, also known as quasi-periodic (QP) emissions, were often detected by both spacecraft. This type of emission has been detected by Voyager, Ulysses, Galileo, and Cassini, with pe- riodicities ranging from about a minute to many tens of minutes (often around 40 minutes). Other quasi-periodic events have been detected in the energetic particle data of Ulysses, Galileo and Cassini and in the x-ray spectrum obtained by the Chandra spacecraft, usually with periodicities around 40 minutes. The multiple observations of similar quasi-periodic events suggests that there may be a common source for these phenomena. Many examples of simultaneous detection of the QP radio emissions were obtained by the Cassini and Galileo plasma wave and radio instruments. The charac- teristics of the QP emissions observed by each spacecraft are very similar, and when the difference in the travel time of a radio emission from Jupiter to each spacecraft is taken into account, the QP bursts are observed to occur simultaneously at each space- craft. These similar characteristics of the emissions, even when the two spacecraft are separated by many hours in local time and many degrees of system III longitude, sug- gest a broadly beamed 'strobe light' source for the emission, and not a narrow beam which rotates with the planet. The implications of these simultaneous observations will be discussed.

Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kaiser, M. L.; Zarka, P.; Krupp, N.; Waite, J. H.

7

Cumulative dose on fractional delivery of tomotherapy to periodically moving organ: A phantom QA suggestion  

SciTech Connect

This study was conducted to evaluate the cumulative dosimetric error that occurs in both target and surrounding normal tissues when treating a moving target in multifractional treatment with tomotherapy. An experiment was devised to measure cumulative error in multifractional treatments delivered to a horseshoe-shaped clinical target volume (CTV) surrounding a cylinder shape of organ at risk (OAR). Treatments differed in jaw size (1.05 vs 2.5 cm), pitch (0.287 vs 0.660), and modulation factor (1.5 vs 2.5), and tumor motion characteristics differing in amplitude (1 to 3 cm), period (3 to 5 second), and regularity (sinusoidal vs irregular) were tested. Treatment plans were delivered to a moving phantom up to 5-times exposure. Dose distribution on central coronal plane from 1 to 5 times exposure was measured with GAFCHROMIC EBT film. Dose differences occurring across 1 to 5 times exposure of treatment and between treatment plans were evaluated by analyzing measurements of gamma index, gamma index histogram, histogram changes, and dose at the center of the OAR. The experiment showed dose distortion due to organ motion increased between multiexposure 1 to 3 times but plateaued and remained constant after 3-times exposure. In addition, although larger motion amplitude and a longer period of motion both increased dosimetric error, the dose at the OAR was more significantly affected by motion amplitude rather than motion period. Irregularity of motion did not contribute significantly to dosimetric error when compared with other motion parameters. Restriction of organ motion to have small amplitude and short motion period together with larger jaw size and small modulation factor (with small pitch) is effective in reducing dosimetric error. Pretreatment measurements for 3-times exposure of treatment to a moving phantom with patient-specific tumor motion would provide a good estimation of the delivered dose distribution.

Shin, Eunhyuk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Youngyih, E-mail: youngyih@skku.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee-Chul, E-mail: hee.ro.Park@samsung.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung Kim, Jin; Hwan Ahn, Sung; Suk Shin, Jung; Gyu Ju, Sang; Ho Choi, Doo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaiki [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2013-01-01

8

Fremsprachliche Unterrichtsstunde. Ein Vorschlag zu ihrer Analyse (The Foreign Language Class Period. A Suggestion for an Analysis).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the possibilities and limitations of a procedure devised at the University of Marburg for objectively evaluating foreign language class instruction. Ten criteria used in observing are explained in detail. By means of an example, procedure is demonstrated for observing a 45-minute class period. (IFS/WGA)

Freudenstein, Reinhold; Puerschel, Heiner

1978-01-01

9

Quasi-periodic emissions observed by Cluster and DEMETER spacecraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quasi-periodic (QP) emissions are electromagnetic emissions in the frequency range of about 0.5-4 kHz that are characterized by a periodic modulation of wave intensity. Typical periods of this modulation are on the order of minutes. Although there are many observations of these events by ground-based instruments, satellite observations are still rather sparse. Nevertheless, these are of great importance, as they allow us to analyze wave properties in situ, close to the probable generation region, and, moreover, they are not affected by the wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. We present a survey of QP events observed by the WBD instruments on board the four Cluster spacecraft during their perigee passes at radial distances of about 4 RE. Moreover, a conjugate observation of a QP event by Cluster spacecraft and by the low-altitude DEMETER spacecraft has been identified. Simultaneous observations of the same event by several different spacecraft enable us to distinguish between spatial and temporal variations of the phenomenon. It is shown that during a QP event, the same modulation is observed at the same time at very different locations of the inner magnetosphere. The results of a detailed wave analysis based on multi-component measurements by the STAFF-SA instruments indicate that the emissions propagate unducted, with oblique wave normal angles at larger geomagnetic latitudes. Finally, ULF magnetic field data are inspected for the presence of magnetic field fluctuations with a period corresponding to the period of modulation and a possible generation mechanism of the events is discussed.

Nemec, F.; Santolik, O.; Parrot, M.; Hayosh, M.; Pickett, J. S.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

2012-12-01

10

Long-period classical Cepheids - Theory versus observation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New full amplitude models of classical Cepheids having periods longer than 13 days have been calculated, allowing the complete systematics of the observed light and velocity curves of classical Cepheids to be discussed in detail. Assuming that a normal evolutionary mass-luminosity relation is obeyed, the models reproduce such empirical phenomena as the full Hertzsprung progression of light and velocity curves and the gradual shift in phase of the Hertzsprung bump, together with the persistence in phase of the postmaximum shoulder on the light curve. Also reproduced are the retardation of maximum expansion velocity after maximum light, the correlation of light and velocity amplitudes, and the period-amplitude scatter diagram for both the light and the velocity amplitude. The average period predicted for a Cepheid light curve type is noted to be about 40 percent longer than that actually observed.

Carson, T. R.; Stothers, R. B.

1984-01-01

11

Observations of long period earthquakes accompanying hydraulic fracturing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Waveforms of most seismic events accompanying hydraulic fracturing have been reported to contain clear P and S waves and have fault plane solutions consistent with shear displacement across a fault. This observation is surprising since classical hydraulic fracturing theory predicts the creation of a tensile opening of a cavity in response to fluid pressure. Very small long period events, similar

Dorthe Bame; Michael Fehler

1986-01-01

12

Highly periodic activations observed by THEMIS prior to substorm onset  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On March 24, 2007, the THEMIS spacecraft observed near the dusk flank several 10 minute quasi-periodic flow and magnetic field oscillations followed by the onset of a strong substorm. The IMF was strongly southward during the event, although the start of the oscillations appeared to be associated with a brief but significant northward turning. Each of the oscillations was accompanied by an auroral intensification, an energetic particle injection, and ground Pi2 pulsations. We first characterize the timing of the events observed by the 5 THEMIS spacecraft, ground imagers and magnetometers, and geosynchronous spacecraft. We then examine whether the quasi-periodic activations were manifestations of an instability that lead to the onset of a global substorm.

Kepko, L.; Raeder, J.; Angelopoulos, V.; Carlson, C.; Frey, H.; Larson, D.; McFadden, J.; Mende, S.; Parks, G.; Glassmeier, K.; Auster, U.; Donovan, E.; Russell, C.; Ge, Y.; Mann, I.; Henderson, M.; Yumoto, K.; Singer, H.

2007-12-01

13

Highly periodic stormtime activations observed by THEMIS prior to substorm onset  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On March 24, 2007 THEMIS observed near the dusk flank several 10 minute quasi-periodic flow and magnetic field oscillations followed by the onset of a strong substorm (AL ~ -1000 nT). The substorm occurred during an interval of strongly southward IMF, near the start of the recovery phase of a small storm (SYM-H near -80 nT). Each magnetic oscillation was accompanied by a rapid flow variation, auroral intensification, energetic particle injection, and Pi2 pulsations. For several hours both prior to and following the substorm THEMIS observed highly periodic flow oscillations, with the same 10 minute periodicity. The average of these flow oscillations was non-zero and positive, indicating net sunward transport. We suggest that the long interval of oscillatory flow constituted a periodic convective mode of the magnetosphere, and further suggest that the quasi-periodic activations were associated with reconnection near the THEMIS location.

Kepko, L.; Raeder, J.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J.; Larson, D.; Auster, H. U.; Magnes, W.; Frey, H. U.; Carlson, C.; Henderson, M.; Mende, S. B.; Yumoto, K.; Singer, H. J.; Parks, G.; Mann, I.; Russell, C. T.; Donovan, E.; McPherron, R.

2008-06-01

14

ISO spectroscopic observations of short-period comets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two Infrared Space Observatory programmes (guaranteed time and open time) were devoted to high-resolution spectroscopic observations of short-period comets. 22P/Kopff was observed on October-December 1996 with SWS and LWS. Due to the weakness of the object, only the ?3 ro-vibrational lines of water were detected, with SWS. Comet 103P/Hartley 2 was observed close to its perihelion (at 1.04 AU from Sun and 0.82 AU from Earth) on January 1998 with SWS, LWS and CAM. The bands of H2O and CO2 at 2.7 and 4.3 ?m are detected, with [CO2]/[H2O] = 10 %. The 2.7 ?m band of H2O is observed with a high signal-to-noise ratio with SWS, which permits to evaluate the rotational temperature of water to 16-20 K and its ortho-to-para ratio to ~ 2.7, corresponding to a spin temperature of ~ 35 K. The 5-17 ?m spectrum of comet Hartley 2 observed with CAM-CVF shows the 9-12 ?m signature of silicates. Silicate emission around 10 ?m is present at a level of about 20 % of the continuum, with a peak at 11.3 ?m indicative of crystalline silicates. This is the first time crystalline silicates are found in a short-period comet. The ISO observations of the Jupiter-family comet P/Hartley 2, presumably originating from the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt, are compared to those of comet Hale-Bopp which came from the Oort cloud.

Crovisier, J.; Encrenaz, Th.; Lellouch, E.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Altieri, B.; Leech, K.; Salama, A.; Griffin, M. J.; de Graauw, Th.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Knacke, R.; Brooke, T. Y.

1999-03-01

15

The Changing Surface of Saturn's Titan: Cassini Observations Suggest Active Cryovolcanism  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

R. M. Nelson(1), L. Kamp(1), R. M. C. Lopes(1), D. L. Matson(1), S. D. Wall(1), R. L. Kirk(2), K. L Mitchell(1), G. Mitri(1), B. W. Hapke(3), M. D. Boryta(4), F. E. Leader(1) , W. D. Smythe(1), K. H. Baines(1), R. Jauman(5), C. Sotin(1), R. N. Clark(6), D. P. Cruikshank(7) , P. Drossart(9), B. J. Buratti(1) , J.Lunine(8), M. Combes(9), G. Bellucci(10), J.-P. Bibring(11), F. Capaccioni(10), P. Cerroni(10), A. Coradini(10), V. Formisano(10), G Filacchione(10), R. Y. Langevin(11), T. B. McCord(12), V. Mennella(13), P. D. Nicholson(14) , B. Sicardy(8) 1-JPL, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena CA 91109, 2-USGS, Flagstaff, 3-U Pittsburgh, 4-Mt. Sac Col, 5- DLR, Berlin, 6-USGS Denver, 7-NASA AMES, 8-U Paris-Meudon, 9-Obs de Paris, 10-ISFI-CNR Rome, 11-U Paris -Sud. Orsay, 12-Bear Flt Cntr Winthrop WA, 13-Obs Capodimonte Naples, 14-Cornell U. Several Instruments on the Cassini Saturn Orbiter have been observing the surface of Saturn's moon Titan since mid 2004. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) reports that regions near 26oS, 78oW (region 1) and 7oS, 138oW (region 2) exhibit photometric changes consistent with on-going surface activity. These regions are photometrically variable with time(1). Cassini Synthetic Aperture Rader (SAR) has investigated these regions and reports that both of these regions exhibit morphologies consistent with cryovolcanism (2). VIMS observed region 1 eight times and reported that on two occasions the region brightened two-fold and then decreased again on timescales of several weeks. Region 2 was observed on four occasions (Tb-Dec13/2004 ,T8-Oct27/2005, T10-Jan15/2006, T12-Mar18/2006) and exhibited a pronounced change in I/F betweenT8 and T10. Our photometric analysis finds that both regions do not exhibit photometric properties consistent with atmospheric phenomena such as tropospheric clouds. These changes must be at or very near the surface. Radar images of these regions reveal morphology that is consistent with cryovolcanoes. We conclude that the VIMS instrument has found two instances in which selected regions on Titan's surface became unusually reflective and remained reflective on time scales of days to months. In both cases the area of reflectance variability is large (~100000 sq km), larger than either Loki or the Big Island of Hawaii. This is a strong evidence for currently active surface processes on Titan. Pre-Cassini, Titan was thought of as a pre-biotic earth that was frozen in time. Cassini VIMS and SAR observations combined suggest that Titan is the present day is not frozen solid, and is instead an episodically changing or evolving world. References: [1] Nelson R. M. et al, LPSC 2007 , Europlanets 2007, AGU 2007, EGU 2008, Accepted in Icarus 2008. [2] Lopes et al (this meeting), Stofan et al. Icarus 185, 443-456, 2007. Lopes et al. Icarus 186, 395- 412, 2007. Kirk et al., DPS 2007. Acknowledgement: This work done at JPL under contract with NASA

Nelson, R. M.

2008-12-01

16

Characterizing Long-Period Transiting Planets Observed by Kepler  

E-print Network

Kepler will monitor a sufficient number of stars that it is likely to detect single transits of planets with periods longer than the mission lifetime. We show that by combining the exquisite Kepler photometry of such transits with precise radial velocity observations taken over a reasonable timescale (~ 6 months) after the transits, and assuming circular orbits, it is possible to estimate the periods of these transiting planets to better than 20%, for planets with radii greater than that of Neptune, and the masses to within a factor of 2, for planets with masses larger than or about equal to the mass of Jupiter. Using a Fisher matrix analysis, we derive analytic estimates for the uncertainties in the velocity of the planet and the acceleration of the star at the time of transit, which we then use to derive the uncertainties for the planet mass, radius, period, semimajor axis, and orbital inclination. Finally, we explore the impact of orbital eccentricity on the estimates of these quantities.

Jennifer C. Yee; B. Scott Gaudi

2008-05-14

17

Countergradient heat flux observations during the evening transition period  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gradient-based turbulence models generally assume that the buoyancy flux ceases to introduce heat into the surface layer of the atmospheric boundary layer in temporal consonance with the gradient of the local virtual potential temperature. Here, we hypothesize that during the evening transition a delay exists between the instant when the buoyancy flux goes to zero and the time when the local gradient of the virtual potential temperature indicates a sign change. This phenomenon is studied using a range of data collected over several intensive observational periods (IOPs) during the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence field campaign conducted in Lannemezan, France. The focus is mainly on the lower part of the surface layer using a tower instrumented with high-speed temperature and velocity sensors. The results from this work confirm and quantify a flux-gradient delay. Specifically, the observed values of the delay are ~ 30-80 min. The existence of the delay and its duration can be explained by considering the convective timescale and the competition of forces associated with the classical Rayleigh-Bénard problem. This combined theory predicts that the last eddy formed while the sensible heat flux changes sign during the evening transition should produce a delay. It appears that this last eddy is decelerated through the action of turbulent momentum and thermal diffusivities, and that the delay is related to the convective turnover timescale. Observations indicate that as horizontal shear becomes more important, the delay time apparently increases to values greater than the convective turnover timescale.

Blay-Carreras, E.; Pardyjak, E. R.; Pino, D.; Alexander, D. C.; Lohou, F.; Lothon, M.

2014-09-01

18

EVLA observations suggest that M15 X-2 is the currently flaring source in M15  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Following the detection of an X-ray flare in the globular cluster M15 (ATel #3356) and its subsequent Swift XRT localization to the cluster core (ATel #3363), we undertook EVLA observations to determine the source of the flaring event. The 1-hour observation on 2011 May 22 (12:11-13:11 UT) comprises of two 1024-MHz bands centred at 5.0 and 7.0 GHz. The array was in its BnA configuration, providing an angular resolution of 1.25 x 0.63 srq arcsec at 5 GHz and 0.92 x 0.50 sqr arcsec at 7 GHz.

Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Heinke, C. O.; Altamirano, D.; Kuulkers, E.; Morii, M.

2011-05-01

19

Observations by a University Anatomy Teacher and a Suggestion for Curricular Change: Integrative Anatomy for Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The observation that anatomical course offerings have decreased in undergraduate biology curricula is supported by a survey of undergraduate institutions in the state of Washington. This reduction, due partially to increased emphasis in other areas of the biology curriculum, along with the lack of anatomy prerequisites for admission to most…

Darda, David M.

2010-01-01

20

Cybersemiotics: A suggestion for a transdisciplinary framework for description of observing, anticipatory and meaning producing systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability of systems to be anticipatory seems to be intricate connected with the ability to observe and to cognate by reducing complexity through signification. The semantic capacity of living systems, the cognitive ability to assign meaning to differences perturbating the system's self-organization, seems to be the prerequisite for the phenomenon of communication, language and consciousness. In cybernetics Bateson developed

Soren Brier

1998-01-01

21

Evidence suggesting fluid flow beneath Japan due to periodic seismic triggering from the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake  

Microsoft Academic Search

We show that very large surface waves from the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (M9.2) triggered deep low-frequency (DLF) seismic tremors beneath Japan over a 500 km wide region. The triggered seismicity was periodically excited, synchronized with the amplitudes and phases of the oscillatory surface waves incident on the region. Periodic excitation implies that the specific phase of the surface waves plays

Masatoshi Miyazawa; Jim Mori

2006-01-01

22

Observational diagnostics for two-fluid turbulence in molecular clouds as suggested by simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present high-resolution simulations of two-fluid (ion-neutral) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence with resolutions as large as 5123. All of the simulations are supersonic. We explore simulations that range from mildly sub-Alfvénic to super-Alfvénic. Such turbulence is thought to influence star formation processes in molecular clouds because typical cores form on length scales that are comparable to the dissipation scales of this turbulence in the ions. The simulations are motivated by the fact that recent studies of isophotologue lines in molecular clouds have found significant differences in the linewidth-size relationship for neutral and ion species. Our first goal in this paper is to explain those observations using simulations and analytic theory. Our second goal in this paper is to present a new set of density-based diagnostics by drawing on similar diagnostics that have been obtained by studying single-fluid turbulence. We further show that our two-fluid simulations play a vital role in reconciling alternative models of star formation. The velocity-dependent diagnostics display a very interesting complementarity with the density-dependent diagnostics. We find that the linewidth-size relationship should show a prominent difference between ions and neutrals when the line of sight is orthogonal to the mean field. We also find that the density probability distribution functions and their derived diagnostics should show prominent differences between the ions and neutrals when the line of sight is parallel to the mean field.

Meyer, Chad D.; Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, Alex

2014-04-01

23

CCD observations and period determination of six minor planets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I report new period determinations for five minor planets and a revised period for a sixth. The new results are: 1528 Conrada, 6.321 ± 0.001h; 1816 Liberia, 3.0861 ± 0.0001h; 2653 Principia, 5.5228 ± 0.0007h; 3455 Kristensen, 8.111 ± 0.002; and (5599) 1991 SG1, 3.620 ± 0.005. 206 Hersilia had a previously published period of 7.33 hours which was inconsistent with my data, showing a revised period of 11.11 ± 0.05 hours.

Willis, Sarah

2004-12-01

24

Cybersemiotics: A suggestion for a transdisciplinary framework for description of observing, anticipatory and meaning producing systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ability of systems to be anticipatory seems to be intricate connected with the ability to observe and to cognate by reducing complexity through signification. The semantic capacity of living systems, the cognitive ability to assign meaning to differences perturbating the system's self-organization, seems to be the prerequisite for the phenomenon of communication, language and consciousness. In cybernetics Bateson developed the idea that information is a difference that makes a difference and second order cybernetics developed the concept of organisms as self-organized and self-produced systems (autopoietic) as the prerequisite of life and cognition. The cognitive ability seems to be qualitative different from what so far is computable on any known machine although parts of different aspects of the process can be partly simulated in AI, neutral network and AL. In semiotics the fundamental process of cognition and communication is called semiosis or signification and C. S. Peirce created a special triadic, objective idealistic, pragmatic and evolutionary philosophy to be able to give a fruitful description of the process and its relation to logic and the concept of natural law. Both second order cybernetics and semiotics sees information and meaning as something produced by individual organisms through structural couplings to the environments or other individuals through historical drift and further developed in social communication. Luhmann points out that social communication also only functions through structural couplings which he calls generalized media such as science, art, power, love and money. Peirce talks of the semiotic net as a triadic view of meanings developing through history and in animals through evolution. In accordance with this Wittgenstein points out that signification is created in language games developed in specific life forms. Life forms are the things we do in society such as seducing, commanding and explaining. As animals do not have language in the true sense I have extended his concept into ethology and bio-semiotics by talking of sign games related to specific motivations and innate response mechanisms. Life as such seems to be an anticipatory function generating expectations through evolution through open genetic programs as Konrad Lorenz pointed out. The phenomenon of imprinting in ducks for instance is a standard example of programmed anticipation. Expectations are expectations of meaning and order (information) related to the semiosphere the organism constructs as its individual world view and live in. (The Umwelt of von Uexküll). On this basis events that perpetuates the semiosphere are reduced to meaning, i.e. something related to the survival and procreation of the individual living system, it conatus, to use one of Spinoza's terms. The framework of cybersemiotics, uniting second order cybernetics, semiotics and language game theory, is created to make transdisciplinary concepts and models that can handle the process of cognition, information and communication across the domains of the sciences, the arts and social sciences in a non-reductionistic way. It is seen as an alternative based on biological and semiotic thinking (biosemiotics) to the functionalistic information processing paradigm of cognitive science that is build on the computer as paradigm and based on classical logic and mechanistic physics—and therefore has severe problems of dealing with semantics and signification.

Brier, Soren

1998-07-01

25

Periodic correlations in DNA sequences and evidence suggesting their evolutionary origin in a comma-less genetic code  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Strong rhythms with a period of three bases have been seen while correlating the relative positions of purines and pyrimidines and of the four individual bases in the complete DNA sequence of the viruses øX174, G4 and fd. Generally weaker variations of the same type have been found in the DNA virus SV40, the plasmid pBR322, the RNA virus

John C. W. Shepherd

1981-01-01

26

Period and amplitude variations in post-common-envelope eclipsing binaries observed with SuperWASP  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Period or amplitude variations in eclipsing binaries may reveal the presence of additional massive bodies in the system, such as circumbinary planets. Here, we have studied twelve previously-known eclipsing post-common-envelope binaries for evidence of such light curve variations, on the basis of multi-year observations in the SuperWASP archive. The results for HW Vir provided strong evidence for period changes consistent with those measured by previous studies, and help support a two-planet model for the system. ASAS J102322-3737.0 exhibited plausible evidence for a period increase not previously suggested; while NY Vir, QS Vir and NSVS 14256825 afforded less significant support for period change, providing some confirmation to earlier claims. In other cases, period change was not convincingly observed; for AA Dor and NSVS 07826147, previous findings of constant period were confirmed. This study allows us to present hundreds of new primary eclipse timings for these systems, and further demonstrates the value of wide-field high-cadence surveys like SuperWASP for the investigation of variable stars. Appendix A is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/566/A128

Lohr, M. E.; Norton, A. J.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Faedi, F.; Haswell, C. A.; Hellier, C.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Horne, K.; Kolb, U. C.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Pollacco, D.; Skillen, I.; Smalley, B.; West, R. G.; Wheatley, P. J.

2014-06-01

27

Cassini and Galileo Observations of Quasi-periodic Radio Bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Simultaneous measurements of many Jovian plasma and radio emissions were ob- tained by the Cassini and Galileo spacecraft during the Cassini flyby of Jupiter (clos- est approach was on December 30, 2000). Jovian type III radio emissions, also known as quasi-periodic (QP) emissions, were often detected by both spacecraft. This type of emission has been detected by Voyager, Ulysses, Galileo,

G. B. Hospodarsky; W. S. Kurth; D. A. Gurnett; M. L. Kaiser; P. Zarka; N. Krupp; J. H. Waite

2002-01-01

28

A suggested periodic table up to Z? 172, based on Dirac-Fock calculations on atoms and ions.  

PubMed

Extended Average Level (EAL) Dirac-Fock calculations on atoms and ions agree with earlier work in that a rough shell-filling order for the elements 119-172 is 8s < 5g? 8p(1/2) < 6f < 7d < 9s < 9p(1/2) < 8p(3/2). The present Periodic Table develops further that of Fricke, Greiner and Waber [Theor. Chim. Acta 1971, 21, 235] by formally assigning the elements 121-164 to (nlj) slots on the basis of the electron configurations of their ions. Simple estimates are made for likely maximum oxidation states, i, of these elements M in their MX(i) compounds, such as i = 6 for UF(6). Particularly high i are predicted for the 6f elements. PMID:20967377

Pyykkö, Pekka

2011-01-01

29

Observed dispersion curves of long period atmospheric acoustic waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently some groups reported Earth's background free oscillations even on seismically quiet days [e.g. Nawa et al., 1998]. Statistical features of them and annual variations of their amplitudes with a peak in July suggest that atmospheric disturbance is the most probable excitation source [Nishida and Kobayashi, 1999; Nishida et al., 2000]. If the atmospheric excitation mechanism is effective, atmospheric acoustic

K. Nishida; Y. Fukao; S. Watada; N. Kobayashi; M. Tahira; N. Suda; K. Nawa

2003-01-01

30

Large-Scale periodic solar velocities: An observational study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observations of large-scale solar velocities were made using the mean field telescope and Babcock magnetograph of the Stanford Solar Observatory. Observations were made in the magnetically insensitive ion line at 5124 A, with light from the center (limb) of the disk right (left) circularly polarized, so that the magnetograph measures the difference in wavelength between center and limb. Computer calculations are made of the wavelength difference produced by global pulsations for spherical harmonics up to second order and of the signal produced by displacing the solar image relative to polarizing optics or diffraction grating.

Dittmer, P. H.

1977-01-01

31

Conjugate observations of quasi-periodic emissions by Cluster and DEMETER spacecraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract<p label="1">Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> (QP) emissions are electromagnetic emissions at frequencies of about 0.5-4 kHz that are characterized by a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> time modulation of the wave intensity. Typical <span class="hlt">periods</span> of this modulation are on the order of minutes. We present a case study of a large-scale long-lasting QP event <span class="hlt">observed</span> simultaneously on board the DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions) and the Cluster spacecraft. The measurements by the Wide-Band Data instrument on board the Cluster spacecraft enabled us to obtain high-resolution frequency-time spectrograms of the event close to the equatorial region over a large range of radial distances, while the measurements by the STAFF-SA instrument allowed us to perform a detailed wave analysis. Conjugate <span class="hlt">observations</span> by the DEMETER spacecraft have been used to estimate the spatial and temporal extent of the emissions. The analyzed QP event lasted as long as 5 h and it spanned over the L-shells from about 1.5 to 5.5. Simultaneous <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the same event by DEMETER and Cluster show that the same QP modulation of the wave intensity is <span class="hlt">observed</span> at the same time at very different locations in the inner magnetosphere. ULF magnetic field fluctuations with a <span class="hlt">period</span> roughly comparable to, but somewhat larger than the <span class="hlt">period</span> of the QP modulation were detected by the fluxgate magnetometers instrument on board the Cluster spacecraft near the equatorial region, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> these are likely to be related to the QP generation. Results of a detailed wave analysis show that the QP emissions detected by Cluster propagate unducted, with oblique wave normal angles at higher geomagnetic latitudes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N?Mec, F.; SantolíK, O.; Parrot, M.; Pickett, J. S.; Hayosh, M.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">32</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApJ...755..113S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Imaging <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> Pulsations in Solar Flare Loops with SDO/AIA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> pulsations (QPPs) of flaring emission with <span class="hlt">periods</span> from a few seconds to tens of minutes have been widely detected from radio bands to ?-ray emissions. However, in the past the spatial information of pulsations could not be utilized well due to the instrument limits. We report here imaging <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the QPPs in three loop sections during a C1.7 flare with <span class="hlt">periods</span> of P = 24 s-3 minutes by means of the extreme-ultraviolet 171 Å channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We confirm that the QPPs with the shortest <span class="hlt">period</span> of 24 s were not of an artifact produced by the Nyquist frequency of the AIA 12 s cadence. The QPPs in the three loop sections were interconnected and closely associated with the flare. The detected perturbations propagated along the loops at speeds of 65-200 km s-1, close to those of acoustic waves in them. The loops were made up of many bright blobs arranged in alternating bright and dark changes in intensity (spatial <span class="hlt">periodical</span> distribution) with the wavelengths 2.4-5 Mm (as if they were magnetohydrodynamic waves). Furthermore, in the time-distance diagrams, the detected perturbation wavelengths of the QPPs are estimated to be ~10 Mm, which evidently do not fit the above ones of the spatial <span class="hlt">periodic</span> distributions and produce a difference of a factor of 2-4 with them. It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the short QPPs with <span class="hlt">periods</span> P < 60 s were possibly sausage-mode oscillations and the long QPPs with <span class="hlt">periods</span> P > 60 s were the higher (e.g., >2nd) harmonics of slow magnetoacoustic waves.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Su, J. T.; Shen, Y. D.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y.; Mao, X. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">33</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21578297"> <span id="translatedtitle">SPITZER <span class="hlt">OBSERVATIONS</span> OF GX17+2: CONFIRMATION OF A <span class="hlt">PERIODIC</span> SYNCHROTRON SOURCE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">GX17+2 is a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) that is also a member of a small family of LMXBs known as 'Z-sources' that are believed to have persistent X-ray luminosities that are very close to the Eddington limit. GX17+2 is highly variable at both radio and X-ray frequencies, a feature common to Z-sources. What sets GX17+2 apart is its dramatic variability in the near-infrared, where it changes by {Delta}K {approx} 3 mag. Previous investigations have shown that these brightenings are <span class="hlt">periodic</span>, recurring every 3.01 days. Given its high extinction (A{sub V} {>=} 9 mag), it has not been possible to ascertain the nature of these events with ground-based <span class="hlt">observations</span>. We report mid-infrared Spitzer <span class="hlt">observations</span> of GX17+2 which indicate a synchrotron spectrum for the infrared brightenings. In addition, GX17+2 is highly variable in the mid-infrared during these events. The combination of the large-scale outbursts, the presence of a synchrotron spectrum, and the dramatic variability in the mid-infrared <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the infrared brightening events are due to the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> transit of a synchrotron jet across our line of sight. An analysis of both new, and archival, infrared <span class="hlt">observations</span> has led us to revise the <span class="hlt">period</span> for these events to 3.0367 days. We also present new Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data for GX17+2 obtained during two predicted infrared brightening events. Analysis of these new data, and data from the RXTE archive, indicates that there is no correlation between the X-ray behavior of this source and the <span class="hlt">observed</span> infrared brightenings. We examine various scenarios that might produce <span class="hlt">periodic</span> jet emission.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harrison, Thomas E.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Bornak, Jillian [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States); Gelino, Dawn M. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wachter, Stefanie [Spitzer Science Center, Caltech M/S 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rupen, Michael P. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Gelino, Christopher R., E-mail: tharriso@nmsu.edu, E-mail: bmcnamar@nmsu.edu, E-mail: jbornak@nmsu.edu, E-mail: dawn@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: wachter@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: mrupen@aoc.nrao.edu, E-mail: cgelino@ipac.caltech.edu [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Caltech M/S 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">34</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22047777"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">OBSERVABLE</span> QUASI-<span class="hlt">PERIODIC</span> OSCILLATIONS PRODUCED BY STEEP PULSE PROFILES IN MAGNETAR FLARES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Strong quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) in the tails of the giant gamma-ray flares seen in SGR 1806-20 and SGR 1900+14 are thought to be produced by starquakes in the flaring magnetar. However, the large fractional amplitudes (up to {approx}20%) <span class="hlt">observed</span> are difficult to reconcile with predicted amplitudes of starquakes. Here, we demonstrate that the steeply pulsed emission profile in the tail of the giant flare can enhance the <span class="hlt">observed</span> amplitude of the underlying oscillation, analogous to a beam of light oscillating in and out of the line of sight. This mechanism will also broaden the feature in the power spectrum and introduce power at harmonics of the oscillation. The <span class="hlt">observed</span> strength of the oscillation depends on the amplitude of the underlying starquake, the orientation and location of the emission on the surface of the star, and the gradient of the light curve profile. While the amplification of the signal can be significant, we demonstrate that, even with uncertainties in the emission geometry, this effect is not sufficient to produce the <span class="hlt">observed</span> QPOs. This result excludes the direct <span class="hlt">observation</span> of a starquake and <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the <span class="hlt">observed</span> variations come from modulations in the intensity of the emission.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D'Angelo, C. R.; Watts, A. L., E-mail: c.r.dangelo@uva.nl [Instituut Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam 1098 XH (Netherlands)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">35</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~gaudi/longper.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">CHARACTERIZING LONG-<span class="hlt">PERIOD</span> TRANSITING PLANETS <span class="hlt">OBSERVED</span> BY KEPLER Jennifer C. Yee and B. Scott Gaudi</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">and assuming circular orbits, it is possible to estimate the <span class="hlt">periods</span> of these transiting planets to better thanCHARACTERIZING LONG-<span class="hlt">PERIOD</span> TRANSITING PLANETS <span class="hlt">OBSERVED</span> BY KEPLER Jennifer C. Yee and B. Scott Gaudi a sufficient number of stars that it is likely to detect single transits of planets with <span class="hlt">periods</span> longer than</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gaudi, B. Scott</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">36</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998A%26A...332..904D"> <span id="translatedtitle">BeppoSAX <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the long <span class="hlt">period</span> polar system V1309Ori</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present BeppoSAX <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the peculiar long <span class="hlt">period</span> polar system V1309Ori (RXJ0515.6+0105). The source was detected simultaneously at soft and, for the first time, at hard X-rays with the LECS and the MECS detectors. Both, the LECS and the MECS light curves are irregular with a bursting/flaring type behaviour indicating inhomogeneous accretion onto the white dwarf. This peculiar variability, together with an extreme high soft-to-hard X-ray luminosity ratio, indicates that in V1309Ori accretion occurs predominantly in highly compressed chunks or ``blobs'' of matter. From coordinated ESO optical spectroscopy, we find indications that the magnetic field strength of the white dwarf is < 70MG, not expected either from the 8hr orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> synchronism or from the strong soft-to-hard X-ray ratio <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> alternative solutions for sustaining synchronism in this system. Also based on <span class="hlt">observations</span> collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">de Martino, D.; Barcaroli, R.; Matt, G.; Mouchet, M.; Belloni, T.; Beuermann, K.; Chiappetti, L.; Done, C.; Gänsicke, B. T.; La Franca, F.; Mukai, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">37</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013TCD.....7.4379H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Empirical sea ice thickness retrieval during the freeze up <span class="hlt">period</span> from SMOS high incident angle <span class="hlt">observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sea ice thickness information is needed for climate modeling and ship operations. Here a method to detect the thickness of sea ice up to 50 cm during the freezeup season based on high incidence angle <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite working at 1.4 GHz is <span class="hlt">suggested</span>. By comparison of thermodynamic ice growth data with SMOS brightness temperatures, a high correlation to intensity and an anti correlation to the difference between vertically and horizontally polarised brightness temperatures at incidence angles between 40 and 50 ° are found and used to develop an empirical retrieval sensitive to thin sea ice up to 50 cm thickness. It shows high correlations with ice thickness data from airborne measurements and reasonable ice thickness patterns for the Arctic freeze up <span class="hlt">period</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huntemann, M.; Heygster, G.; Kaleschke, L.; Krumpen, T.; Mäkynen, M.; Drusch, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">38</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3438871"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodization</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Clinicians are constantly faced with the challenge of designing training programs for injured and noninjured athletes that maximize healing and optimize performance. <span class="hlt">Periodization</span> is a concept of systematic progression—that is, resistance training programs that follow predictable patterns of change in training variables. The strength training literature is abundant with studies comparing <span class="hlt">periodization</span> schemes on uninjured, trained, and untrained athletes. The rehabilitation literature, however, is scarce with information about how to optimally design resistance training programs based on <span class="hlt">periodization</span> principles for injured athletes. The purpose of this review is to discuss relevant training variables and methods of <span class="hlt">periodization</span>, as well as <span class="hlt">periodization</span> program outcomes. A secondary purpose is to provide an anecdotal framework regarding implementation of <span class="hlt">periodization</span> principles into rehabilitation programs. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search from 1979 to 2009 was implemented with the keywords <span class="hlt">periodization</span>, strength training, rehabilitation, endurance, power, hypertrophy, and resistance training with the Boolean term AND in all possible combinations in the English language. Each author also undertook independent hand searching of article references used in this review. Results: Based on the studies researched, <span class="hlt">periodized</span> strength training regimens demonstrate improved outcomes as compared to nonperiodized programs. Conclusions: Despite the evidence in the strength training literature supporting <span class="hlt">periodization</span> programs, there is a considerable lack of data in the rehabilitation literature about program design and successful implementation of <span class="hlt">periodization</span> into rehabilitation programs. PMID:23015982</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lorenz, Daniel S.; Reiman, Michael P.; Walker, John C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">39</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://aurora2.troja.mff.cuni.cz/~santolik/papers/k03_Nemec_JGR.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Conjugate <span class="hlt">observations</span> of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> emissions by Cluster and DEMETER spacecraft</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">comparable to, but somewhat larger than the <span class="hlt">period</span> of the QP modulation were detected by the fluxgate magnetometers instrument on board the Cluster spacecraft near the equatorial region, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> these are likely</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Santolik, Ondrej</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">40</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://learningcenter.nsta.org/product_detail.aspx?id=10.2505/9780873552394.3"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodicity</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In thinking about a title for this chapter, the word <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> came to mind. I was sure this had some kind of pop culture reference. After discussing this with my wife, we figured I was thinking of synchronicity, which is a reference to music by the band, The Police. Looking the word <span class="hlt">Periodicity</span> up on the internet, I found that I was, in fact, a science geek and had not made a hip reference. <span class="hlt">Periodicity</span> refers mainly to the <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table, which is a focus of this chapter. No music, just science.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robertson, William C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">2</a> <a onClick='return 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onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">41</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20825819"> <span id="translatedtitle">Validation of a 6-hour <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> for cocaine body stuffers.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Often, patients are brought in to the emergency department after ingesting large amounts of cocaine in an attempt to conceal it. This act is known as body stuffing. The <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> required to recognize potential toxic adverse effects in these patients is not well described in the literature. We sought to validate a treatment algorithm for asymptomatic cocaine body stuffers using a 6-hour <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> by <span class="hlt">observing</span> the clinical course of cocaine body stuffers over a 24-hour <span class="hlt">period</span>. A retrospective chart review was performed on all patients evaluated for witnessed or suspected stuffing over 2 years using a standardized protocol. One hundred six patients met final inclusion criteria as adult cocaine stuffers. No patients developed life-threatening symptoms, and no patients died during <span class="hlt">observation</span>. In our medical setting, stuffers could be discharged after a 6-hour <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> if there was either complete resolution or absence of clinical symptoms. PMID:20825819</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Moreira, Maria; Buchanan, Jennie; Heard, Kennon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">42</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JGRA..118.4523H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous <span class="hlt">observations</span> of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> ELF/VLF wave emissions and electron precipitation by DEMETER satellite: A case study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present results of case studies of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> (QP) ELF/VLF hiss emissions detected onboard the DEMETER satellite. Three events with simultaneous <span class="hlt">periodic</span> modulation in VLF wave intensity and energetic electron precipitation are found. In each event we <span class="hlt">observe</span> exact coincidence of one or two busts of VLF wave intensity with energetic electron precipitation peaks. To our knowledge, such <span class="hlt">observations</span> made onboard satellites have not been reported earlier. All events are <span class="hlt">observed</span> at fairly quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp <3). The dynamic spectrum of the VLF waves in these QP events was characterized by a regular frequency increase in each burst, and the repetition <span class="hlt">period</span> was less than or about 20 s. These features allow us to <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the <span class="hlt">observed</span> events belong to the QP2-class, i.e., events which are not associated with geomagnetic pulsations. We also analyze energetic electron data from NOAA-17 spacecraft which has helio-synchronous circular orbit similar to DEMETER spacecraft and measured in the same region of the magnetosphere within 30 min for the analyzed events. NOAA-17 data confirm that the QP emissions were detected by DEMETER in the region of isotropization of energetic electrons, which is typically associated with the development of the cyclotron instability. Modulation of electron flux with a <span class="hlt">period</span> close to the QP emission <span class="hlt">period</span> is <span class="hlt">observed</span> in two events. Based on the <span class="hlt">observed</span> correlation between bursts of wave intensity and energetic particle flux, we estimate the location and spatial extent of the source region for QP emissions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hayosh, M.; Pasmanik, D. L.; Demekhov, A. G.; Santolik, O.; Parrot, M.; Titova, E. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">43</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19229771"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental <span class="hlt">Observation</span> of a <span class="hlt">Periodically</span> Oscillating Plasma Sphere in a Gridded Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Device</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere (POPS) [D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel, Phys. Plasmas 5, 2498 (1998).] oscillation has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device. In these experiments, ions in the virtual cathode exhibit resonant behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the <span class="hlt">observed</span> POPS resonance frequency and theoretical predictions has been <span class="hlt">observed</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. A. Nebel; S. Stange; S. Krupakar Murali</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">44</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860013037&hterms=bouma&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dbouma"> <span id="translatedtitle">Archive of <span class="hlt">observations</span> of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> comet Crommelin made during its 1983-84 apparition</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This is an archive of 680 reduced <span class="hlt">observations</span> of <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Comet Crommelin made during its 1984 apparition. The archive integrates reports by members of the eight networks of the International Halley Watch (IHW) and presents the results of a trial run designed to test the preparedness of the IHW organization for the current apparition of <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Comet Halley.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sekanina, Z. (editor); Aronsson, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">45</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2004.07.005"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of deep long-<span class="hlt">period</span> (DLP) seismic events beneath Aleutian arc volcanoes; 1989-2002</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Between October 12, 1989 and December 31, 2002, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 162 deep long-<span class="hlt">period</span> (DLP) events beneath 11 volcanic centers in the Aleutian arc. These events generally occur at mid- to lower-crustal depths (10-45 km) and are characterized by emergent phases, extended codas, and a strong spectral peak between 1.0 and 3.0 Hz. <span class="hlt">Observed</span> wave velocities and particle motions indicate that the dominant phases are P- and S-waves. DLP epicenters often extend over broad areas (5-20 km) surrounding the active volcanoes. The average reduced displacement of Aleutian DLPs is 26.5 cm2 and the largest event has a reduced displacement of 589 cm2 (or ML 2.5). Aleutian DLP events occur both as solitary events and as sequences of events with several occurring over a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 1-30 min. Within the sequences, individual DLPs are often separated by lower-amplitude volcanic tremor with a similar spectral character. Occasionally, volcano-tectonic earthquakes that locate at similar depths are contained within the DLP sequences. At most, Aleutian volcanoes DLPs appear to loosely surround the main volcanic vent and occur as part of background seismicity. A likely explanation is that they reflect a relatively steady-state process of magma ascent over broad areas in the lower and middle portions of the crust. At Mount Spurr, DLP seismicity was initiated by the 1992 eruptions and then slowly declined until 1997. At Shishaldin Volcano, a short-lived increase in DLP seismicity occurred about 10 months prior to the April 19, 1999 eruption. These <span class="hlt">observations</span> <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a link between eruptive activity and magma flux in the mid- to lower-crust and uppermost mantle.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Power, J. A.; Stihler, S. D.; White, R. A.; Moran, S. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">46</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ACPD...1128013S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observed</span> temporal evolution of global mean age of stratospheric air for the 2002 to 2010 <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An extensive <span class="hlt">observational</span> data set, consisting of more than 106 SF6 vertical profiles distributed globally from MIPAS measurements has been condensed into monthly zonal means of mean age of air for the <span class="hlt">period</span> September 2002 to January 2010, binned at 10° latitude and 1-2 km altitude. The data were analysed with respect to their temporal variation by fitting a regression model consisting of a constant and a linear increase term, 2 proxies for the QBO variation, sinusoidal terms for the seasonal and semi-annual variation and overtones for the correction of the shapes to the <span class="hlt">observed</span> data set. The impact of subsidence of mesospheric SF6-depleted air and in-mixing into non-polar latitudes on mid-latitudinal absolute age of air and its linear increase was assessed and found to be small. The linear increase of mean age of stratospheric air was found to be positive and partly larger than the trend derived by Engel et al. (2009) for most of the Northern mid-latitudes, the middle stratosphere in the tropics, and parts of the Southern mid-latitudes, as well as for the Southern polar upper stratosphere. Multi-year decrease of age of air was found for the lowermost and the upper stratospheric tropics, for parts of Southern mid-latitudes, and for the Northern polar regions. Analysis of the amplitudes and phases of the seasonal variation shed light on the coupling of stratospheric regions to each other. In particular, the Northern mid-latitude stratosphere is well coupled to the tropics, while the Northern lowermost mid-latitudinal stratosphere is decoupled, confirming the separation of the shallow branch of the Brewer-Dobson circulation from the deep branch. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> an overall increased tropical upwelling, together with weakening of mixing barriers, especially in the Northern Hemisphere, as a hypothetical model to explain the <span class="hlt">observed</span> pattern of linear multi-year increase/decrease, and amplitudes and phase shifts of the seasonal variation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stiller, G. P.; von Clarmann, T.; Haenel, F.; Funke, B.; Glatthor, N.; Grabowski, U.; Kellmann, S.; Kiefer, M.; Linden, A.; Lossow, S.; López-Puertas, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">47</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0512141v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Time-resolved <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the short <span class="hlt">period</span> CV SDSS J123813.73-033933.0</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We <span class="hlt">observed</span> a new and poorly studied cataclysmic variable (CV) SDSS J123813.73-033933.0 to determine its classification and binary parameters. Simultaneous time-resolved photometric and spectroscopic <span class="hlt">observations</span> were carried out to conduct <span class="hlt">period</span> analysis and Doppler tomography mapping. From radial velocity measurements of the Ha line we determined its orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> to be 0.05592+/-0.00035$ days (80.53min). This <span class="hlt">period</span> is longer than the first estimate of 76 min by Szkody et al. (2003), but still at the very edge of the <span class="hlt">period</span> limit for hydrogen-rich CVs. The spectrum shows double-peaked Balmer emission lines flanked by strong broad Balmer absorption, indicating a dominant contribution by the white dwarf primary star, and is similar to the spectra of short-<span class="hlt">period</span> low-mass transfer WZ Sge-like systems. The photometric light curve shows complex variability. The system undergoes cyclic brightening up to 0.4 mags, which are of semi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> nature with <span class="hlt">periods</span> of the order of 8-12 hours. We also detect a 40.25 min variability of ~0.15 mag corresponding to half of the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span>. Amplitude of the latter increases with the cyclic brightening of the system. We discuss the variable accretion rate and its impact on the hot spot as the most probable reason for both <span class="hlt">observed</span> processes. SDSS J123813.73-033933.0 is preliminary classified as a WZ Sge-like short <span class="hlt">period</span> system with low and unstable accretion rate.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. V. Zharikov; G. H. Tovmassian; R. Napiwotzki; R. Michel; V. Neustroev</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-06</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">48</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910001192&hterms=Land+intensive&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DLand%2Bintensive"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cloud parameters derived from GOES during the 1987 marine stratocumulus FIRE Intensive Field <span class="hlt">Observation</span> (IFO) <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) is well suited for <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the variations of clouds over many temporal and spatial scales. For this reason, GOES data taken during the Marine Stratocumulus Intensive Field <span class="hlt">Observations</span> (IFO) (June 29 to July 19, 1987, Kloessel et al.) serve several purposes. One facet of the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) is improvement of the understanding of cloud parameter retrievals from satellite-<span class="hlt">observed</span> radiances. This involves comparisons of coincident satellite cloud parameters and high resolution data taken by various instruments on other platforms during the IFO <span class="hlt">periods</span>. Another aspect of FIRE is the improvement of both large- and small-scale models of stratocumulus used in general circulation models (GCMs). This may involve, among other studies, linking the small-scale processes <span class="hlt">observed</span> during the IFO to the variations in large-scale cloud fields <span class="hlt">observed</span> with the satellites during the IFO and Extended Time <span class="hlt">Observation</span> (ETO) <span class="hlt">periods</span>. Preliminary results are presented of an analysis of GOES data covering most of the IFO <span class="hlt">period</span>. The large scale cloud-field characteristics are derived, then related to a longer <span class="hlt">period</span> of measurements. Finally, some point measurements taken from the surface are compared to regional scale cloud parameters derived from satellite radiances.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Young, David F.; Minnis, Patrick; Harrison, Edwin F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">49</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.G53C..08G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimating the <span class="hlt">Period</span> and Q of the Chandler Wobble from <span class="hlt">Observations</span> and Models of its Excitation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Any irregularly shaped solid body rotating about some axis that is not aligned with its figure axis will freely wobble as it rotates. For the Earth, this free wobble is known as the Chandler wobble in honor of S. C. Chandler, Jr. who first <span class="hlt">observed</span> it in 1891. Unlike the forced wobbles of the Earth, such as the annual wobble, whose <span class="hlt">periods</span> are the same as the <span class="hlt">periods</span> of the forcing mechanisms, the <span class="hlt">period</span> of the free Chandler wobble is a function of the internal structure and rheology of the Earth, and its decay time constant, or quality factor Q, is a function of the dissipation mechanism(s), like mantle anelasticity, that are acting to dampen it. Improved estimates of the <span class="hlt">period</span> and Q of the Chandler wobble can therefore be used to improve our understanding of these properties of the Earth. Here, estimates of the <span class="hlt">period</span> and Q of the Chandler wobble are obtained by finding those values that minimize the power within the Chandler band of the difference between <span class="hlt">observed</span> and modeled polar motion excitation spanning 1962-2010. Atmosphere, ocean, and hydrology models are used to model the excitation caused by both mass and motion variations within these global geophysical fluids. Direct <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the excitation caused by mass variations as determined from GRACE time varying gravitational field measurements are also used. The resulting estimates of the <span class="hlt">period</span> and Q of the Chandler wobble will be presented along with a discussion of the robustness of the estimates.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gross, R. S.; Nastula, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">50</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JASTP.105..253V"> <span id="translatedtitle">High latitude artificial <span class="hlt">periodic</span> irregularity <span class="hlt">observations</span> with the upgraded EISCAT heating facility</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a recently developed ionospheric modification experiment that produces artificial <span class="hlt">periodic</span> irregularities in the ionosphere and uses them to make <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the spatiotemporal behaviour of the irregularities. In addition, the method can be used to measure Faraday rotation and vertical velocities. We also introduce a novel experiment that allows monitoring the formation of the irregularities during heating, in addition to <span class="hlt">observing</span> their decay after heating. The first measurements indicate, contrary to existing theory, that the amplitude of the radar echoes from the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> irregularities grows faster than they decay. We focus on the API effects in the D- and E-region of the ionosphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vierinen, Juha; Kero, Antti; Rietveld, Michael T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">51</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JGRD..118.4069M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Meteorology and dust in the central Sahara: <span class="hlt">Observations</span> from Fennec supersite-1 during the June 2011 Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We describe <span class="hlt">observations</span> from the Fennec supersite at Bordj Badji Mokhtar (BBM) made during the June 2011 Fennec Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span>. These are the first detailed in situ <span class="hlt">observations</span> of meteorology and dust from the central Sahara, close to the center of the Saharan heat low and the summertime dust maximum. Historically, a shortage of such Saharan <span class="hlt">observations</span> has created problems for evaluating processes, models, and remote sensing. There was a monsoon influence at BBM before 8 June and after 12 June, with dry Harmattan winds in between. A split boundary layer, generated by ventilation from the Atlantic, persisted during the drier phase. Extensive cold pools (haboobs) and microburst-type events were regularly <span class="hlt">observed</span>. Moisture reached BBM at night from the monsoon and the embedded haboobs. As well as the regularly occurring nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ), a Saharan upper boundary layer (650 hPa) jet was <span class="hlt">observed</span>, where winds feel drag from dry convection in the afternoon. This jet is linked to the diurnal cycles of moisture and cloud. Most dust was <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the cloudier monsoon-affected <span class="hlt">periods</span>, and covarying dust and cloud amounts explain most of the variations in shortwave radiation that control the surface sensible flux. Dustiness is related to a standard parameterization of uplift using 10 m winds ("uplift potential"), and this is used to estimate uplift. Around 50% of uplift is nocturnal. Around 30% is from the LLJ, and 50% is from haboobs, which are mainly nocturnal. This demonstrates, for the first time from <span class="hlt">observations</span>, the key role of haboobs, which are problematic for models.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marsham, J. H.; Hobby, M.; Allen, C. J. T.; Banks, J. R.; Bart, M.; Brooks, B. J.; Cavazos-Guerra, C.; Engelstaedter, S.; Gascoyne, M.; Lima, A. R.; Martins, J. V.; McQuaid, J. B.; O'Leary, A.; Ouchene, B.; Ouladichir, A.; Parker, D. J.; Saci, A.; Salah-Ferroudj, M.; Todd, M. C.; Washington, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">52</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52200273"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental <span class="hlt">Observation</span> of a <span class="hlt">Periodically</span> Oscillating Plasma Sphere in a Gridded Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Device</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere (POPS) [D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel, Phys. Plasmas 5, 2498 (1998)., PHPAEN, 1070-664X, 10.1063\\/1.872933] oscillation has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device. In these experiments, ions in the virtual cathode exhibit resonant behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the <span class="hlt">observed</span> POPS resonance frequency and theoretical predictions</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. A. Nebel; S. Stange; S. Krupakar Murali</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">53</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUSMSH23C..02K"> <span id="translatedtitle">On Quasi-<span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Variations of Cosmic Rays <span class="hlt">Observed</span> at Earth: Direct Measurements</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Important role in space weather related studies play cosmic rays (CR). Their temporal variability, both of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> character as well as of irregular one, is studied on the ground from direct measurements as well as from cosmogenic nuclides, over long time. We attempt to describe the current knowledge on selected quasi-<span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in CR flux, especially in energy range above the atmospheric threshold, from direct measurement. Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in relativistic electron flux near Earth is discussed shortly too. The power spectrum density (PSD) of the CR time series at a single station has rather complicated character. Along with the shape (slope) of PSD the knowledge of contribution of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> variations to the CR signal is of importance for the modulation as well as for the checking the links of CR to space weather and/or space climate effects. Rotation of the Earth and solar rotation cause two types of mechanisms behind the certain quasi-<span class="hlt">periodicities</span> <span class="hlt">observed</span> in secondary CR on the Earth's surface. Solar activity and solar magnetic field cyclicities contribute to the quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> signals in CR if studied over longer time <span class="hlt">periods</span>. The complexity of spatial structure of IMF and its evolution within the heliosphere as well as the changes in the geomagnetic field cause variability in contributions of the quasi-<span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in CR. Wavelet spectra are useful tool for checking the fine strucure of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodicities</span> and their temporal behaviour. Over long time the neutron monitors and muon telescopes provide the informations about quasi-<span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in CR. In addition to that, in recent years there are new installations on the ground from which the unique information about CR variability can be deduced (higher statistical accuracy, different response function to primaries). The unsolved questions and few tasks for the future studies are listed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kudela, K.; Perez-Peraza, J. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">54</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.earth.northwestern.edu/people/seth/Texts/pepi.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of ultra-long <span class="hlt">period</span> normal modes from the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of ultra-long <span class="hlt">period</span> normal modes from the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake Emile A December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake was the first "giant" or "extreme" (moment magnitude Mw 9 Okal & Stein: Sumatra earthquake 2 strainmeters and gravimeters had been developed that could record</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stein, Seth</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">55</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.4375S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observed</span> temporal evolution of global mean age of stratospheric air for the 2002 to 2010 <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An extensive <span class="hlt">observational</span> data set from MIPAS measurements, consisting of more than one million SF6 vertical profiles distributed globally has been condensed into monthly zonal means of mean age of air for the <span class="hlt">period</span> September 2002 to January 2010, binned at 10° latitude and 1-2 km altitude. The data were analysed with respect to their temporal variation by fitting a regression model consisting of: a constant and a linear increase term, 2 proxies for the QBO variation, sinusoidal terms for the seasonal and semi-annual variation and overtones for the correction of the shapes to the <span class="hlt">observed</span> data set. The impact of subsidence of mesospheric SF6-depleted air and in-mixing into non-polar latitudes on mid-latitudinal age of air and its linear increase was assessed and found to be small. The linear increase of mean age of stratospheric air was found to be positive and partly larger than the trend derived by Engel et al. (2009) for most of the Northern mid-latitudes, the middle stratosphere in the tropics, and parts of the Southern mid-latitudes, as well as for the Southern polar upper stratosphere. Multi-year decrease of age of air was found for the lowermost and the upper stratospheric tropics, for parts of Southern mid-latitudes, and for the Northern polar regions. Analyses of the amplitudes and phases of the seasonal variation shed light on the coupling between different stratospheric regions. In particular, the Northern mid-latitude stratosphere is well coupled to the tropics, while the Northern lowermost mid-latitudinal stratosphere is decoupled, confirming the separation of the shallow branch of the Brewer-Dobson circulation from the deep branch. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> an overall increased tropical upwelling, together with a weakening of mixing barriers, especially in the Northern hemisphere, as possible explanations for the <span class="hlt">observed</span> patterns. Reference: Engel, A., Möbius, T., Bönisch, H., Schmidt, U., Heinz, R., Levin, I., Atlas, E., Aoki, S., Nakazawa, T., Sugawara, S., Moore, F., Hurst, D., Elkins, J., Schauffler, S., Andrews, A., and Boering, K.: Age of stratospheric air unchanged within uncertainties over the past 30 years, Nature Geosci., 2, 28-31, doi:10.1038/ngeo388, 2009.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stiller, G. P.; von Clarmann, T.; Haenel, F.; Funke, B.; Glatthor, N.; Grabowski, U.; Kellmann, S.; Kiefer, M.; Linden, A.; Lossow, S.; López-Puertas, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">56</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ACP....12.3311S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observed</span> temporal evolution of global mean age of stratospheric air for the 2002 to 2010 <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An extensive <span class="hlt">observational</span> data set, consisting of more than 106 SF6 vertical profiles from MIPAS measurements distributed over the whole globe has been condensed into monthly zonal means of mean age of air for the <span class="hlt">period</span> September 2002 to January 2010, binned at 10° latitude and 1-2 km altitude. The data were analysed with respect to their temporal variation by fitting a regression model consisting of a constant and a linear increase term, 2 proxies for the QBO variation, sinusoidal terms for the seasonal and semi-annual variation and overtones for the correction of the shapes to the <span class="hlt">observed</span> data set. The impact of subsidence of mesospheric SF6-depleted air and in-mixing into non-polar latitudes on mid-latitudinal absolute age of air and its linear increase was assessed and found to be small. The linear increase of mean age of stratospheric air was found to be positive and partly larger than the trend derived by Engel et al. (2009) for most of the Northern mid-latitudes, the middle stratosphere in the tropics, and parts of the Southern mid-latitudes, as well as for the Southern polar upper stratosphere. Multi-year decrease of age of air was found for the lowermost and the upper stratospheric tropics, for parts of Southern mid-latitudes, and for the Northern polar regions. Analysis of the amplitudes and phases of the seasonal variation shed light on the coupling of stratospheric regions to each other. In particular, the Northern mid-latitude stratosphere is well coupled to the tropics, while the Northern lowermost mid-latitudinal stratosphere is decoupled, confirming the separation of the shallow branch of the Brewer-Dobson circulation from the deep branch. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> an overall increased tropical upwelling, together with weakening of mixing barriers, especially in the Northern Hemisphere, as a hypothetical model to explain the <span class="hlt">observed</span> pattern of linear multi-year increase/decrease, and amplitudes and phase shifts of the seasonal variation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stiller, G. P.; von Clarmann, T.; Haenel, F.; Funke, B.; Glatthor, N.; Grabowski, U.; Kellmann, S.; Kiefer, M.; Linden, A.; Lossow, S.; López-Puertas, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">57</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16090625"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental <span class="hlt">observation</span> of a <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere (POPS) [D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel, Phys. Plasmas 5, 2498 (1998).] oscillation has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device. In these experiments, ions in the virtual cathode exhibit resonant behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the <span class="hlt">observed</span> POPS resonance frequency and theoretical predictions has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> for a wide range of potential well depths and for three different ion species. The results provide the first experimental validation of the POPS concept proposed by Barnes and Nebel [R. A. Nebel and D. C. Barnes, Fusion Technol. 34, 28 (1998).]. PMID:16090625</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, J; Nebel, R A; Stange, S; Murali, S Krupakar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">58</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20696429"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental <span class="hlt">Observation</span> of a <span class="hlt">Periodically</span> Oscillating Plasma Sphere in a Gridded Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Device</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere (POPS) [D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel, Phys. Plasmas 5, 2498 (1998).] oscillation has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device. In these experiments, ions in the virtual cathode exhibit resonant behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the <span class="hlt">observed</span> POPS resonance frequency and theoretical predictions has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> for a wide range of potential well depths and for three different ion species. The results provide the first experimental validation of the POPS concept proposed by Barnes and Nebel [R. A. Nebel and D. C. Barnes, Fusion Technol. 34, 28 (1998).].</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, J.; Nebel, R.A.; Stange, S.; Murali, S. Krupakar [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">59</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014HESS...18.1953F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Overview of the first HyMeX Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> over Italy: <span class="hlt">observations</span> and model results</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> (SOP1), part of the HyMeX campaign (Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean Experiments, 5 September-6 November 2012), was dedicated to heavy precipitation events and flash floods in the western Mediterranean, and three Italian hydro-meteorological monitoring sites were identified: Liguria-Tuscany, northeastern Italy and central Italy. The extraordinary deployment of advanced instrumentation, including instrumented aircrafts, and the use of several different operational weather forecast models, including hydrological models and marine models, allowed an unprecedented monitoring and analysis of high-impact weather events around the Italian hydro-meteorological sites. This activity has seen strong collaboration between the Italian scientific and operational communities. In this paper an overview of the Italian organization during SOP1 is provided, and selected Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Periods</span> (IOPs) are described. A significant event for each Italian target area is chosen for this analysis: IOP2 (12-13 September 2012) in northeastern Italy, IOP13 (15-16 October 2012) in central Italy and IOP19 (3-5 November 2012) in Liguria and Tuscany. For each IOP the meteorological characteristics, together with special <span class="hlt">observations</span> and weather forecasts, are analyzed with the aim of highlighting strengths and weaknesses of the forecast modeling systems, including the hydrological impacts. The usefulness of having different weather forecast operational chains characterized by different numerical weather prediction models and/or different model set up or initial conditions is finally shown for one of the events (IOP19).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ferretti, R.; Pichelli, E.; Gentile, S.; Maiello, I.; Cimini, D.; Davolio, S.; Miglietta, M. M.; Panegrossi, G.; Baldini, L.; Pasi, F.; Marzano, F. S.; Zinzi, A.; Mariani, S.; Casaioli, M.; Bartolini, G.; Loglisci, N.; Montani, A.; Marsigli, C.; Manzato, A.; Pucillo, A.; Ferrario, M. E.; Colaiuda, V.; Rotunno, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">60</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040171658&hterms=Land+intensive&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DLand%2Bintensive"> <span id="translatedtitle">Local Scale Radiobrightness Modelling during Intensive <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span>-4 of the Cold Land Processes Experiment-1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX-1) was designed to provide microwave remote sensing <span class="hlt">observations</span> and ground truth for studies of snow and frozen ground remote sensing, particularly issues related to scaling. CLPX-1 was conducted in the spring of 2003 in Colorado, USA. Initial forward model validation work is concentrating on the Local-Scale <span class="hlt">Observation</span> Site (LSOS), a 0.8 ha study site consisting of open meadows separated by trees where the most detailed measurements were made of snow depth and temperature, density, and grain size profiles. This paper will focus on the ability of forward Dense Medium Radiative Transfer (DMRT) modelling, combined with snowpack measurements to reproduce the radiobrightness signatures <span class="hlt">observed</span> by the University of Michigan s Truck-Mounted Radiometer System at 19 and 37 GHz during the 4th Intensive <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> (IOP4) in March, 2003. Unlike the earlier IOP3, conditions during IOP4 include both wet and dry <span class="hlt">periods</span>, providing a valuable test of DMRT model performance. <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of upwelling and downwelling tree radiobrightness will be used to formulate a simple model for the effect of trees within the field of view. In addition, a comparison will be made for the one day of coincident <span class="hlt">observations</span> by the University of Tokyo s Ground- Based Microwave Radiometer-7 (GBMR-7). These analyses will help guide the choice of future snow retrieval algorithms and the design of future Cold Lands <span class="hlt">observing</span> systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Edward J.; Tedesco, Marco; deRoo, Roger; England, Anthony W.; Gu, Haoyu; Pham, Hanh; Boprie, David; Graf, Tobias; Koike, Toshio; Armstrong, Richard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" 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showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">61</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22086236"> <span id="translatedtitle">EVOLUTIONARY TRACKS OF TRAPPED, ACCRETING PROTOPLANETS: THE ORIGIN OF THE <span class="hlt">OBSERVED</span> MASS-<span class="hlt">PERIOD</span> RELATION</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The large number of <span class="hlt">observed</span> exoplanets ({approx}>700) provides important constraints on their origin as deduced from the mass-<span class="hlt">period</span> diagram of planets. The most surprising features in the diagram are (1) the (apparent) pileup of gas giants at a <span class="hlt">period</span> of {approx}500 days ({approx}1 AU) and (2) the so-called mass-<span class="hlt">period</span> relation, which indicates that planetary mass is an increasing function of orbital <span class="hlt">period</span>. We construct the evolutionary tracks of growing planets at planet traps in evolving protoplanetary disks and show that they provide a good physical understanding of how these <span class="hlt">observational</span> properties arise. The fundamental feature of our model is that inhomogeneities in protoplanetary disks give rise to multiple (up to 3) trapping sites for rapid (type I) planetary migration of planetary cores. The viscous evolution of disks results in the slow radial movement of the traps and their cores from large to small orbital <span class="hlt">periods</span>. In our model, the slow inward motion of planet traps is coupled with the standard core accretion scenario for planetary growth. As planets grow, type II migration takes over. Planet growth and radial movement are ultimately stalled by the dispersal of gas disks via photoevaporation. Our model makes a number of important predictions: that distinct sub-populations of planets that reflect the properties of planet traps where they have grown result in the mass-<span class="hlt">period</span> relation, that the presence of these sub-populations naturally explains a pileup of planets at {approx}1 AU, and that evolutionary tracks from the ice line do put planets at short <span class="hlt">periods</span> and fill an earlier claimed {sup p}lanet desert{sup -}a sparse population of planets in the mass-semimajor axis diagram.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hasegawa, Yasuhiro [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Pudritz, Ralph E., E-mail: hasegay@physics.mcmaster.ca, E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca [Origins Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">62</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AAS...22315412G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Optical <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of the Cataclysmic Variable FL Ceti, Evidence for a Decrease in Orbital <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">FL Ceti is a short <span class="hlt">period</span> cataclysmic variable star belonging to the highly magnetic subclass of polars. Our one second time resolution light curves show dramatic eclipses, as well as a well defined ingress and egress features. We collected 35 hours of broad band optical photometry on FL Ceti at the 82" reflector in the McDonald Observatory. We <span class="hlt">observed</span> 23 eclipses of the system in 2011. Combining timings of these eclipses with previously publish data we obtain preliminary evidence which indicate that the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> of the system is decreasing. We discuss the implications for the derived <span class="hlt">period</span> derivative and mass transfer rate. This research is supported in part by NSF grant 0958783.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gomez, Sebastian; Mason, P. A.; Robinson, E. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">63</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140010418&hterms=solar&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dsolar"> <span id="translatedtitle">Elemental GCR <span class="hlt">Observations</span> during the 2009-2010 Solar Minimum <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using <span class="hlt">observations</span> from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), we present new measurements of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) elemental composition and energy spectra for the species B through Ni in the energy range approx. 50-550 MeV/nucleon during the record setting 2009-2010 solar minimum <span class="hlt">period</span>. These data are compared with our <span class="hlt">observations</span> from the 1997-1998 solar minimum <span class="hlt">period</span>, when solar modulation in the heliosphere was somewhat higher. For these species, we find that the intensities during the 2009-2010 solar minimum were approx. 20% higher than those in the previous solar minimum, and in fact were the highest GCR intensities recorded during the space age. Relative abundances for these species during the two solar minimum <span class="hlt">periods</span> differed by small but statistically significant amounts, which are attributed to the combination of spectral shape differences between primary and secondary GCRs in the interstellar medium and differences between the levels of solar modulation in the two solar minima. We also present the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe for both solar minimum <span class="hlt">periods</span>, and demonstrate that these ratios are reasonably well fit by a simple "leaky-box" galactic transport model that is combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lave, K. A.; Israel, M. H.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; deNolfo, G. A.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">64</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0605196v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">periodic</span> variations of a white-light flare <span class="hlt">observed</span> with ULTRACAM</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High time resolution <span class="hlt">observations</span> of a white--light flare on the active star EQ PegB show evidence of intensity variations with a <span class="hlt">period</span> of approximately 10 s. The <span class="hlt">period</span> drifts to longer values during the decay phase of the flare. If the oscillation is interpreted as an impulsively--excited, standing--acoustic wave in a flare loop, the <span class="hlt">period</span> implies a loop length of 1.7 Mm and 3.4 Mm for the case of the fundamental mode and the second harmonic, respectively. However, the small loop lengths imply a very high modulation depth making the acoustic interpretation unlikely. A more realistic interpretation may be that of a fast--MHD wave, with the modulation of the emission being due to the magnetic field. Alternatively, the variations could be due to a series of reconnection events. The <span class="hlt">periodic</span> signature may then arise as a result of the lateral separation of individual flare loops or current sheets with oscillatory dynamics (i.e. <span class="hlt">periodic</span> reconnection).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Mathioudakis; D. S. Bloomfield; D. B. Jess; V. S. Dhillon; T. R. Marsh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-05-08</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">65</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050137669&hterms=Land+intensive&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DLand%2Bintensive"> <span id="translatedtitle">Local Scale Radiobrightness Modeling During the Intensive <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span>-4 of the Cold Land Processes Experiment-1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX-1) was designed to provide microwave remote sensing <span class="hlt">observations</span> and ground truth for studies of snow and frozen ground remote sensing, particularly issues related to scaling. CLPX-1 was conducted in 2002 and 2003 in Colorado, USA. One of the goals of the experiment was to test the capabilities of microwave emission models at different scales. Initial forward model validation work has concentrated on the Local-Scale <span class="hlt">Observation</span> Site (LSOS), a 0.8 ha study site consisting of open meadows separated by trees where the most detailed measurements were made of snow depth and temperature, density, and grain size profiles. Results obtained in the case of the 3& Intensive <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> (IOP3) <span class="hlt">period</span> (Feb., 2003, dry snow) <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that a model based on Dense Medium Radiative Transfer (DMRT) theory is able to model the recorded brightness temperatures using snow parameters derived from field measurements. This paper focuses on the ability of forward DMRT modelling, combined with snowpack measurements, to reproduce the radiobrightness signatures <span class="hlt">observed</span> by the University of Michigan s Truck-Mounted Radiometer System (TMRS) at 19 and 37 GHz during the 4th IOP (IOP4) in March, 2003. Unlike IOP3, conditions during IOP4 include both wet and dry <span class="hlt">periods</span>, providing a valuable test of DMRT model performance. In addition, a comparison will be made for the one day of coincident <span class="hlt">observations</span> by the University of Tokyo's Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer-7 (GBMR-7) and the TMRS. The plot-scale study in this paper establishes a baseline of DMRT performance for later studies at successively larger scales. And these scaling studies will help guide the choice of future snow retrieval algorithms and the design of future Cold Lands <span class="hlt">observing</span> systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Edward J.; Tedesco, Marco; deRoo, Roger; England, Anthony W.; Gu, Hao-Yu; Pham, Hanh; Boprie, David; Graf, Tobias; Koike, Toshio; Armstrong, Richard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">66</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.tlc-networks.polito.it/mellia/corsi/01-02/protocolli_per_trasmissione_dati/rfc2328.ps"> <span id="translatedtitle">Communications, <span class="hlt">suggestions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the Internet community, and requests discussion and <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for improvements. Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mellia, Marco</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">67</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20110020642&hterms=Tidal+Power&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DTidal%2BPower"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observing</span> and Modeling Long-<span class="hlt">Period</span> Tidal Variations in Polar Motion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">By exchanging angular momentum with the solid Earth, ocean tides cause the Earth's rotation to change. While hydrodynamic tide models have been used to study the effect of ocean tides on polar motion, it is shown here that none of the published models can fully account for the <span class="hlt">observed</span> variations. An empirical ocean tide model is therefore determined by fitting <span class="hlt">periodic</span> terms at the tidal frequencies to polar motion excitation <span class="hlt">observations</span>, from which atmospheric and non-tidal oceanic effects were removed. While the empirical ocean tide model does fully account for allof the <span class="hlt">observed</span> tidal power, tests indicate that the model may not have completely converged. So better models of the effects of ocean tides on polar motion are still needed, both dynamical and empirical.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gross, Richard S.; Dickman, S. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">68</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005PhRvL..95a5003P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental <span class="hlt">Observation</span> of a <span class="hlt">Periodically</span> Oscillating Plasma Sphere in a Gridded Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Device</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere (POPS) [D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel, Phys. Plasmas 5, 2498 (1998)., PHPAEN, 1070-664X, 10.1063/1.872933] oscillation has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device. In these experiments, ions in the virtual cathode exhibit resonant behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the <span class="hlt">observed</span> POPS resonance frequency and theoretical predictions has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> for a wide range of potential well depths and for three different ion species. The results provide the first experimental validation of the POPS concept proposed by Barnes and Nebel [R. A. Nebel and D. C. Barnes, Fusion Technol. 34, 28 (1998)., FUSTE8, 0748-1896].</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, J.; Nebel, R. A.; Stange, S.; Murali, S. Krupakar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">69</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780063473&hterms=sclera&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dsclera"> <span id="translatedtitle">An <span class="hlt">observational</span> search for solar pulsations at <span class="hlt">periods</span> from 7 to 70 minutes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results are reported for measurements of the large-scale solar velocity field performed by comparing Doppler shifts from the disk center and limb with the aid of the magnetically insensitive Fe I line at 5123.730 A. Average power spectra are plotted, but no statistically significant <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> are found at <span class="hlt">periods</span> between 7 and 70 min. The sensitivities of the present <span class="hlt">observations</span> and those of Hill et al. (1976) are compared, and the temperature change for an oscillation in the sun's atmosphere is calculated using the HSRA. It is concluded that the statistical significance and solar origin of the peaks in the SCLERA power spectrum are not well established and that the reality of the solar pulsations reported by Hill et al. is questionable.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dittmer, P. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">70</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SoPh..285..141C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Results of IPS <span class="hlt">Observations</span> in the <span class="hlt">Period</span> Near Solar Activity Minimum</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">IPS <span class="hlt">observations</span> with the Big Scanning Array of Lebedev Physical Institute (BSA LPI) radio telescope at the frequency 111 MHz have been monitored since 2006. All the sources, about several hundred daily, with a scintillating flux greater than 0.2 Jy are recorded for 24 hours in the 16 beams of the radio telescope covering a sky strip of 8? declination width. We present some results of IPS <span class="hlt">observations</span> for the recent <span class="hlt">period</span> of low solar activity considering a statistical ensemble of scintillating radio sources. The dependences of the averaged over ensemble scintillation index on heliocentric distance are considerably weaker than the dependence expected for a spherically symmetric geometry. The difference is especially pronounced in the year 2008 during the very deep solar activity minimum <span class="hlt">period</span>. These features are explained by the influence of the heliospheric current sheet that is seen as a strong concentration of turbulent solar wind plasma aligned with the solar equatorial plane. A local maximum of the scintillation index is found in the anti-solar direction. Future prospects of IPS <span class="hlt">observations</span> using BSA LPI are briefly discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chashei, I. V.; Shishov, V. I.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Subaev, I. A.; Oreshko, V. V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">71</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMSA41B1863M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Time <span class="hlt">Periods</span> of Unusual Density Behavior <span class="hlt">Observed</span> by GRACE and CHAMP</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Time <span class="hlt">periods</span> of low cross correlation between precision orbit ephemeris (POE) derived density and accelerometer density for CHAMP and GRACE are examined. In particular, the cross correlation for GRACE dropped from typical values near 0.9 to much lower values and then returned to typical over the time <span class="hlt">period</span> of late October to late December of 2005. This time <span class="hlt">period</span> includes a maneuver where GRACE-A and GRACE-B swapped positions. However, the drop in cross correlation begins and reaches its low point before the maneuvers begin. In addition, the densities were found using GRACE-A, but GRACE-B did most of the maneuvering. The time <span class="hlt">period</span> is characterized by high frequency variations in accelerometer density of the same magnitude as the daylight to eclipse variations over the course of an orbit. However, the daylight to eclipse variations are particularly small during this time <span class="hlt">period</span> because the orbit plane is near the terminator. Additionally, the difference between the accelerometer and POE derived densities are not unusually large during this time <span class="hlt">period</span>. This implies the variations are not unusual, just more significant when the orbit plane is near terminator. Cyclical variations in correlation of the POE derived densities with accelerometer derived densities are seen for both GRACE and CHAMP, but the magnitude of the variations are much larger for GRACE, possibly because of the higher altitude of GRACE. The cycles seem to be phased so that low correlations occur with low beta angle when the orbit plane is near the terminator. The low correlation is possibly caused by the lower amplitude of the daylight to eclipse signal making higher frequency variations relatively more important. However, another possible explanation is terminator waves in density that propagate to the thermosphere from lower in the atmosphere. These waves have been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in CHAMP accelerometer data and global circulation model simulations. Further investigation is needed to see if the variations correspond to terminator waves or if they represent typical high frequency signal from another source that is more apparent when the orbit plane is near the terminator. 1. C. A. McLaughlin, E. Fattig, D. Mysore Krishna, and P. M. Mehta, "Time <span class="hlt">Periods</span> of Anomalous Density for GRACE and CHAMP," AAS/AIAA Astrodynamics Specialists Conference, AAS 11-613, Girdwood, AK, August 2011. 2. C. A. McLaughlin, A. Hiatt, and T. Lechtenberg, "Calibrating Precision Orbit Derived Total Density," Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, Vol. 48, No. 1, January-February 2011, pp. 166-174.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McLaughlin, C. A.; Fattig, E.; Mysore Krishna, D.; Locke, T.; Mehta, P. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">72</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060009467&hterms=current+events&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dcurrent%2Bevents"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cluster <span class="hlt">observations</span> of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> impulsive signatures in the dayside northern lobe: High-latitude flux transfer events?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on a series of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> reversals in GSM B(sub Z) <span class="hlt">observed</span> by the four Cluster spacecraft in the northern dayside lobe poleward of the cusp on 23 February 2001. During an interval of about 35 min, multiple reversals (negative to positive) in B(sub Z) of approximately 1-min duration with an approximate 8-min recurrence time were <span class="hlt">observed</span>. The individual structures do not resemble low-latitude flux transfer events (FTE) [Russell and Elphic, 1979] but the 8-min recurrence frequency <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that intermittent reconnection may be occurring .Measurements (appropriately lagged) of the solar wind at ACE show that the IMF was southward-oriented with a strong B(sub X) and that a modest dynamic pressure increased as the events started. The multi-point <span class="hlt">observations</span> afforded by the Cluster spacecraft were used to infer the motion (direction and speed) of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> magnetic field reversals. The associated currents were also calculated and they are consistent with the spatial confinement of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> magnetic field reversals. We propose that the <span class="hlt">observed</span> reversals are due to flux tubes reconnecting with closed field lines on the dayside. Ancillary data from the Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) and Plasma Electron And Current Experiment (PEACE) instruments were used to develop a physical picture of the reversals.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thompson, S. M.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K. K.; Balogh, A.; Reme, H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Kistler, L. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">73</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900037856&hterms=Inoue&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DInoue"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ginga <span class="hlt">observations</span> of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations in type II bursts from the Rapid Burster</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During Ginga <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the 'Rapid Burster' in August 1988, strong quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) were detected in its X-ray intensity. The QPOs had centroid frequencies of 5 and 2 Hz during type II X-ray bursts which lasted for 10 and 30 s, respectively. The presence of the QPOs is correlated with the time scale-invariant burst profile. They are very strong during the initial peak in the burst, absent in the second peak, and strong again at the onset of the third peak. From an analysis of the X-ray spectrum as <span class="hlt">observed</span> during the maxima and minima of the oscillations, it is found that the oscillations can be described by changes of the temperature of a blackbody emitter of constant apparent area.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dotani, T.; Mitsuda, K.; Inoue, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Kawai, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">74</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985iue..prop.2211R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coordinated <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of Rotational Modulation in Long <span class="hlt">Period</span> RS CVn Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This proposal requests IUE time to obtain SWP low dispersion spectra during 10 US2 shifts during the Fall of 1985. The targets are all late G or early K giants in long <span class="hlt">period</span> active chromosphere RS Canum Venaticorum binary systems. The research goal is to discern the spatial relationship and extent of the surface active regions in both the horizontal and vertical directions. Ground based <span class="hlt">observations</span> will be obtained contemporaneously over the fall season. We will use the C IV line as the primary activity indicator in the stellar transition region, whereas ground based <span class="hlt">observations</span> will supply information on the chromosphere and photosphere. We will particularly be seeking information on the relative shape and phase lead or lag of the transition region emission relative to the chromospheric and photospheric rotational phase behavior.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ramsey, Lawrence</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">75</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2905856"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonparametric Inference and Uniqueness for <span class="hlt">Periodically-Observed</span> Progressive Disease Models</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In many studies examining the progression of HIV and other chronic diseases, subjects are <span class="hlt">periodically</span> monitored to assess their progression through disease states. This gives rise to a specific type of panel data which have been termed “chain-of-events data”; e.g. data that result from <span class="hlt">periodic</span> <span class="hlt">observation</span> of a progressive disease process whose states occur in a prescribed order and where state transitions are not <span class="hlt">observable</span>. Using a discrete time semi-Markov model, we develop an algorithm for nonparametric estimation of the distribution functions of sojourn times in a J state progressive disease model. Issues of uniqueness for chain-of-events data are not well-understood. Thus, a main goal of this paper is to determine the uniqueness of the nonparametric estimators of the distribution functions of sojourn times within states. We develop sufficient conditions for uniqueness of the nonparametric maximum likelihood estimator, including situations where some but not all of its components are unique. We illustrate the methods with three examples. PMID:19629683</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Griffin, Beth Ann; Lagakos, Stephen W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">76</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.8306F"> <span id="translatedtitle">The French component of the FENNEC Saharan Climate project 2011 Special <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The central Sahara has one of the most extreme climates on Earth. During the northern summer months, a large low pressure system caused by intense solar heating develops over a huge, largely uninhabited expanse of northern Mali, southern Algeria and eastern Mauritania. This Saharan heat low plays a pivotal role in the West African Monsoon. Based on this, the interested French, British and German communities have decided to propose the FENNEC project which aims at (i) characterizing the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer, (ii) evaluating its representation in regional and global models, and (iii) improving "aerosol" products issued from space-borne <span class="hlt">observations</span>. A key element of this programme was the organization of an international field campaign in June 2011 over the Saharan heat low region, which will include both ground-based and airborne detachments. The Special <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> component of FENNEC-France included the implementation of the SAFIRE Falcon 20 to conduct research on the atmospheric boundary layer and the dust cycle of the Sahara, the installation of a remote sensing station in southern Spain, equipped with a backscatter lidar and a sunphotometer, to study the transport of desert dust to Europe, as well as a couple of GPS stations installed in southern Morocco to investigate the moisture inflow from the Atlantic Ocean into the Sahara. For the first time, the ALADIN and AROME models (5 and 24 km grid spacing, respectively) have been implemented operationally to provide forecasts of dust events over the Sahara and parts of the Sahel in June 2011 to assist in planning for airborne operations. This effort was complemented by the forecasts made with the Meso-NH model (5 and 20 km resolution). During the SOP <span class="hlt">period</span>, the ground-based, airborne and space-borne <span class="hlt">observations</span> have documented the evolution of dynamic properties of thermodynamic and the atmospheric boundary layer Saharan Africa (Mauritania and Mali) during the installation phase of the Saharan heat low west of the continent as well as the increase in aerosol loading associated with the phase shift of the heat low from east to west. During this <span class="hlt">period</span>, episodes of intense uplift of desert aerosols associated with various dynamic phenomena (fronts, "Mediterannean surges", "Atlantic inflow" of low-level jets, etc ...) have also been documented as well as the export of dust over the Atlantic Ocean. An overview of implementation plan and of the first <span class="hlt">observational</span> and modelling results acquired during the time of the SOP will be presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Flamant, C.; Chaboureau, J.-P.; Kocha, C.; Lavaysse, C.; Schepanski, K.; Chazette, P.; Bock, O.; Marticorena, B.; Tulet, P.; Pelon, J.; Marnas, F.; Mokhtari, M.; Lafore, J.-P.; Roehrig, R.; Koulali Idrissi, A.; Tsamalis, C.; Chedin, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">77</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3770703"> <span id="translatedtitle">mtDNA from the Early Bronze Age to the Roman <span class="hlt">Period</span> <span class="hlt">Suggests</span> a Genetic Link between the Indian Subcontinent and Mesopotamian Cradle of Civilization</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ancient DNA methodology was applied to analyse sequences extracted from freshly unearthed remains (teeth) of 4 individuals deeply deposited in slightly alkaline soil of the Tell Ashara (ancient Terqa) and Tell Masaikh (ancient Kar-Assurnasirpal) Syrian archaeological sites, both in the middle Euphrates valley. Dated to the <span class="hlt">period</span> between 2.5 Kyrs BC and 0.5 Kyrs AD the studied individuals carried mtDNA haplotypes corresponding to the M4b1, M49 and/or M61 haplogroups, which are believed to have arisen in the area of the Indian subcontinent during the Upper Paleolithic and are absent in people living today in Syria. However, they are present in people inhabiting today’s Tibet, Himalayas, India and Pakistan. We anticipate that the analysed remains from Mesopotamia belonged to people with genetic affinity to the Indian subcontinent since the distribution of identified ancient haplotypes indicates solid link with populations from the region of South Asia-Tibet (Trans-Himalaya). They may have been descendants of migrants from much earlier times, spreading the clades of the macrohaplogroup M throughout Eurasia and founding regional Mesopotamian groups like that of Terqa or just merchants moving along trade routes passing near or through the region. None of the successfully identified nuclear alleles turned out to be ?F508 CFTR, LCT-13910T or ?32 CCR5. PMID:24040024</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Witas, Henryk W.; Tomczyk, Jacek; Jedrychowska-Danska, Krystyna; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Ploszaj, Tomasz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">78</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24040024"> <span id="translatedtitle">mtDNA from the early Bronze Age to the Roman <span class="hlt">period</span> <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a genetic link between the Indian subcontinent and Mesopotamian cradle of civilization.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ancient DNA methodology was applied to analyse sequences extracted from freshly unearthed remains (teeth) of 4 individuals deeply deposited in slightly alkaline soil of the Tell Ashara (ancient Terqa) and Tell Masaikh (ancient Kar-Assurnasirpal) Syrian archaeological sites, both in the middle Euphrates valley. Dated to the <span class="hlt">period</span> between 2.5 Kyrs BC and 0.5 Kyrs AD the studied individuals carried mtDNA haplotypes corresponding to the M4b1, M49 and/or M61 haplogroups, which are believed to have arisen in the area of the Indian subcontinent during the Upper Paleolithic and are absent in people living today in Syria. However, they are present in people inhabiting today's Tibet, Himalayas, India and Pakistan. We anticipate that the analysed remains from Mesopotamia belonged to people with genetic affinity to the Indian subcontinent since the distribution of identified ancient haplotypes indicates solid link with populations from the region of South Asia-Tibet (Trans-Himalaya). They may have been descendants of migrants from much earlier times, spreading the clades of the macrohaplogroup M throughout Eurasia and founding regional Mesopotamian groups like that of Terqa or just merchants moving along trade routes passing near or through the region. None of the successfully identified nuclear alleles turned out to be ?F508 CFTR, LCT-13910T or ?32 CCR5. PMID:24040024</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Witas, Henryk W; Tomczyk, Jacek; J?drychowska-Da?ska, Krystyna; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; P?oszaj, Tomasz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">79</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060036692&hterms=long+wave&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dlong%2Bwave"> <span id="translatedtitle">(abstract) Role of Long Equatorial Wave Reflection in the Low-Frequency Variability <span class="hlt">Observed</span> During the TOPEX/POSEIDON <span class="hlt">Period</span>: Data Analysis and Coupled Model Study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The analysis of TOPEX/POSEIDON sea level and ERS-1 zonal wind stress data gives evidence that first mode meridonal long Rossby waves fully reflected into Kelvin waves at the equatorial western Pacific boundary at different <span class="hlt">periods</span> including the January-June 1994 <span class="hlt">period</span>. The evolution of the conditions (zonal wind stress, sea surface temperature and sea level anomalies) in the central Pacific <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that this reflection may have played a role in the reversal of cold to warm anomalies <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the central Pacific in June-July 1994. To investigate the actual role of reflected Kelvin waves <span class="hlt">observed</span> by TOPEX/POSEIDON, a simple ocean-atmosphere coupled model is designed. Starting from these initial conditions, several simulations are run for testing the role western bundary reflection evidenced in TOPEX/POSEIDON data. Coupled mechanisms are <span class="hlt">suggested</span> to explain the low-frequency variability <span class="hlt">observed</span> during this <span class="hlt">period</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boulanger, J. P.; Perigaud, C.; Fu, L. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">80</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013OAP....26..123U"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multiphase Spectroscopic <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of the Long-<span class="hlt">Period</span> Cepheids l Carinae</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thirty three spectra (one spectrum for the each of 33 <span class="hlt">observational</span> nights) have been performed to coverall pulsational <span class="hlt">period</span> of the 35.5-days Cepheid l Car. Due to these data we have obtained for the first time the detailed curves of effective temperature, gravity and turbulent velocity. Curves of gravity and turbulent velocity show complicated changes, connected probably with dynamics of extensive Cepheid's atmosphere. The mean atmosphere parameters of l Car are: Teff =4984±15K; log g = 1.13; Vt =6.67kms-1. Having a solar metallicity[Fe/H]=+0.02dex, this Cepheid demonstrate sudden results for the "key" elements abundances of yellow supergiants evolution, - all they are close to the solar ones. In this case l Car resembles to SV Vul, - Cepheid with 45-days pulsational <span class="hlt">period</span> and nearly like spectral type. It is possible that l Car is an object crossing the Cepheids instability strip for the first time. The content of other elements is close to solar one too.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Usenko, I. A.; Kravtsov, V. V.; Kovtyukh, V. V.; Berdnikov, L. N.; Knyazev, A. Yu.; Chini, R.; Fokin, A. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">4</a> <a onClick='return 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">81</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920045459&hterms=Average+class&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DAverage%2Bclass"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of a new class of upstream waves with <span class="hlt">periods</span> near 3 seconds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new class of ULF waves with <span class="hlt">periods</span> near 3 s in the earth's upstream region is found by examining the high time resolution magnetic field data from the ISEE spacecraft. These waves are <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the part of the upstream region which is magnetically connected to the bow shock, but only when the solar wind plasma beta is high (greater than 1). The waves are always right-handed, nearly circularly polarized in the spacecraft frame. The directions of the wave vectors are in the general direction of the average magnetic field, and the waves are convected downstream in the spacecraft frame. This study of these waves has shown that they appear to be intrinsically left-handed ion cyclotron waves in the plasma rest frame.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Le, G.; Russell, C. T.; Thomsen, M. F.; Gosling, J. T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">82</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890024840&hterms=energy+evaporation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Denergy%2Bevaporation"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaporation over land surfaces - First results from HAPEX-MOBILHY Special <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Preliminary results are presented from the May 7-July 15, 1986 Special <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> (SOP) of the HAPEX-MOBILHY program, which examines the hydrological budget and evaporation flux at the scale of a 10,000 sq km GCM grid square to determine soil moisture, surface-energy budgets, and surface hydrology. The SOP used two highly instrumented remote sensing aircraft to obtain detailed measurements of atmospheric fluxes and surface properties. It is noted that the measurements are reliable at spatially local and short time scales, as well as on the monthly time scale. The data base obtained may be used in parametrization schemes against which land-surface water budgets can be tested.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andre, Jean-Claude; Goutorbe, Jean-Paul; Bessemoulin, Pierre; Perrier, Alain; Becker, Francois</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">83</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013CSR....65...73G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Changes in ENACW <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the Bay of Biscay over the <span class="hlt">period</span> 1975-2010</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Trends in Eastern North Atlantic Central Water (ENACW) were calculated in the Bay of Biscay over the <span class="hlt">period</span> 1975-2010 using the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) package. This approach, which reanalyzes data from different sources, allows obtaining information beneath the sea surface on a fine 0.5°×0.5° grid with 40 vertical layers, providing a complete view of the different hydrographic processes in the area. ENACW, which was associated to salinity and temperature values corresponding to the density interval 27.0-27.2 kg m-3, was <span class="hlt">observed</span> to warm and salinificate in most of the area at a maximum rate of 0.11 °C per decade and 0.03 psu per decade, respectively. Trends are more intense in the middle part of the Bay and near the northeastern boundary. The origin of the changes in ENACW <span class="hlt">observed</span> inside the Bay of Biscay is not due to local effects. Actually, trends seem to be related to changes in the subpolar mode of ENACW (ENACWsp), affecting a wider North Atlantic area. The highest trends (0.3 °C per decade in temperature and 0.05 psu per decade in salinity) were <span class="hlt">observed</span> north of the bay, especially at the shallow area that stretches from Brest to Ireland, which is characterized by deep winter mixing. The dependence of changes in ENACW on the two main modes of variability over the North Atlantic (NAO and EA) was also analyzed. Trends in salinity and temperature showed to be consistent with changes <span class="hlt">observed</span> in EA. In addition, air temperature and precipitation minus evaporation (P-E) balance showed to contribute to warming and salinification of ENACW.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gómez-Gesteira, M.; deCastro, M.; Santos, F.; Álvarez, I.; Costoya, X.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">84</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.2205D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Constraining lowermost mantle structure using seismic <span class="hlt">observations</span> of Earth's long <span class="hlt">period</span> free oscillations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Earth's lowermost mantle (also called D") is bounded by a thermal boundary layer forming a discontinuous interface with the core. The range of seismic structures found in this region, including ultra low velocity zones, anisotropy, discontinuities and anti-correlations between shear and bulk sound velocity, rival the structures found in the lithosphere, the mantle's top thermal boundary layer. The majority of these structures have been found using body wave <span class="hlt">observations</span>, but normal mode <span class="hlt">observations</span> have been lacking. Even though seismic body wave studies of the core mantle boundary region have revealed a range of structures, many fundamental questions remain unanswered, including: Is there partial melting or compositional heterogeneity? What causes ultra low velocity layers? Which is the importance of post-perovskite? Here, we will use long <span class="hlt">period</span> whole Earth oscillations to study structures that have only been studied using short <span class="hlt">period</span> body waves before. The splitting of Earth's free-oscillation spectra is especially interesting, because they place important constraints not only on the wave speed but also on the density structure of the Earth's mantle. We present a new set of splitting functions for mantle sensitive modes, of which almost half had not been measured before. In particular, we have made measurements of Stoneley modes which are uniquely sensitive to the core mantle boundary region, and have also added over 30 new modes which are predominantly sensitive to compressional velocity. Our <span class="hlt">observations</span> are derived from modal spectra up to 10 mHz for 91 events with Mw × 7.4 from the last 34 years (1976-2010). Our data include the 23 June 2001 Peru event (Mw=8.4), the Sumatra events of 2004 (Mw=9.0) and 2005 (Mw=8.6), the 2008 Wenchuan, China event (Mw=7.9) and the 2010 Chile event (Mw=8.8). The new events provide significant improvement of data coverage particularly in continental areas. We are using our new measurements in a tomographic inversion for mantle shear and compressional velocity, especially focussing on the lower most mantle region and D". The addition of compressional sensitive modes provides improved constraints on the large scale compressional structure, and on the scaling ratio between ?vs-vs and ?vp-vp, allowing us to estimate the amount of compositional heterogeneity in the lowermost mantle.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Deuss, Arwen; Koelemeijer, Paula; Ritsema, Jeroen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">85</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1017111"> <span id="translatedtitle">Weekly <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> of aerosol properties <span class="hlt">observed</span> at an urban location in India</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Multi-year (~7 years) <span class="hlt">observations</span> of aerosol optical and microphysical properties were conducted at a tropical urban location in Bangalore, India. As a consequence of rapid urbanization, Bangalore presents high local atmospheric emissions, which makes it an interesting site to study the effect of anthropogenic activities on aerosol properties. It has been found that both column (aerosol optical depth, AOD) and ground-level measurements (black carbon (BC) and composite aerosol mass) exhibit a weekly cycle with low aerosol concentrations on weekends. In comparison to the weekdays, the weekend reductions of aerosol optical depth, black carbon and composite aerosol mass concentrations were ~15%, 25% and 24%, respectively. The magnitude of weekend reduction of black carbon is as much as ~1 ?g m?3. The similarity in the weekly cycle between the column and surface measurements <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the aerosol column loading at this location is governed by local anthropogenic emissions. The strongest weekly cycle in composite aerosol mass concentration was <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the super micron mass range (N1 ?m). The weekly cycle of composite aerosol mass in the sub micron mass range (b1 ?m) was weak in comparison to the super micron aerosol mass.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Satheesh, S. K.; Vinoj, V.; Moorthy, K. Krishna</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">86</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApPhL.105d1602W"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observation</span> of atomic ordering of triple-<span class="hlt">period</span>-A and -B type in GaAsBi</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the <span class="hlt">observation</span> of atomic ordering of triple-<span class="hlt">period</span> (TP)-A and -B type in low temperature (LT) grown GaAsBi alloy using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In addition to previous reports, where only TP-A ordering was identified in III-V alloys, here, we confirm by electron diffraction, high-resolution (HR) TEM, and HR Z-contrast scanning TEM that two ordering variants coexists for LT-GaAsBi. We find that the TP-A ordering variant dominates over the TP-B variant. TP-A domains extend over 50-100 nm (projected lateral width) and are of higher perfection compared to TP-B domains. HR Z-contrast scanning TEM on different domains reveals a variation in the Bi occupancy in the {111} planes with triple <span class="hlt">period</span> sequence. Since the formation of ordered phases has been directly linked to the occurrence of specific surface reconstructions, our results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a correlation between the TP-A and B type domains and the multiple stability of n × 3 and 3 × n reconstructions on the (001) surface of GaAsBi under low temperature growth.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wu, Mingjian; Luna, Esperanza; Puustinen, Janne; Guina, Mircea; Trampert, Achim</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">87</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008GeoJI.172..187T"> <span id="translatedtitle">The ZH ratio method for long-<span class="hlt">period</span> seismic data: sensitivity kernels and <span class="hlt">observational</span> techniques</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Amplitude ratio between vertical and horizontal components of Rayleigh waves is controlled by structure beneath a seismic station. This ratio, measured as a function of frequency, has been extensively analysed for shallow crustal structure study in earthquake engineering and applied seismology. This quantity, termed the ZH ratio in this paper, may be useful for deep earth structure study and its feasibility for the frequency range between 0.004 and 0.05 Hz (<span class="hlt">period</span> 20-250 s) is explored in this paper. For depth sensitivity kernels, we demonstrate that a numerical approach is practical and provides sufficient accuracy for structural inversion. Depth extent of sensitivity kernels are about half of depth extent in phase velocity kernels, indicating that the ZH ratio is useful for studying the lithospheric structure. Two <span class="hlt">observational</span> approaches for measurement of the ZH ratio are presented; the first approach uses simple envelope amplitude ratio and the second approach uses waveform correlation technique between vertical and horizontal components. The ZH ratio data alone only constrains structure beneath seismic stations but recent densification of seismic networks may make it possible to extend the analysis to regional scale structure. A greater opportunity may exist in combination of the ZH ratio method and the phase and group velocity measurements.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tanimoto, T.; Rivera, L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">88</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24000923"> <span id="translatedtitle">Familial Alzheimer's disease Osaka mutant (?E22) ?-barrels <span class="hlt">suggest</span> an explanation for the different A?1-40/42 preferred conformational states <span class="hlt">observed</span> by experiment.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An unusual ?E693 mutation in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) producing a ?-amyloid (A?) peptide lacking glutamic acid at position 22 (Glu22) was recently discovered, and dabbed the Osaka mutant (?E22). Previously, several point mutations in the A? peptide involving Glu22 substitutions were identified and implicated in the early onset of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). Despite the absence of Glu22, the Osaka mutant is also associated with FAD, showing a recessive inheritance in families affected by the disease. To see whether this aggregation-prone A? mutant could directly relate to the A? ion channel-mediated mechanism as <span class="hlt">observed</span> for the wild type (WT) A? peptide in AD pathology, we modeled Osaka mutant ?-barrels in a lipid bilayer. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, two conformer ?E22 barrels with the U-shaped monomer conformation derived from NMR-based WT A? fibrils were simulated in explicit lipid environment. Here, we show that the ?E22 barrels obtain the lipid-relaxed ?-sheet channel topology, indistinguishable from the WT A?1-42 barrels, as do the outer and pore dimensions of octadecameric (18-mer) ?E22 barrels. Although the ?E22 barrels lose the cationic binding site in the pore which is normally provided by the negatively charged Glu22 side chains, the mutant pores gain a new cationic binding site by Glu11 at the lower bilayer leaflet, and exhibit ion fluctuations similar to the WT barrels. Of particular interest, this deletion mutant <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that toxic WT A?1-42 would preferentially adopt a less C-terminal turn similar to that <span class="hlt">observed</span> for A?17-42, and explains why the solid state NMR data for A?1-40 point to a more C-terminal turn conformation. The <span class="hlt">observed</span> ?E22 barrels conformational preferences also <span class="hlt">suggest</span> an explanation for the lower neurotoxicity in rat primary neurons as compared to WT A?1-42. PMID:24000923</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jang, Hyunbum; Arce, Fernando Teran; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Kagan, Bruce L; Lal, Ratnesh; Nussinov, Ruth</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">89</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/43131525"> <span id="translatedtitle">Whole earth telescope <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the white dwarf G29-38 - Phase variations of the 615 second <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An extensive set of high-speed photometric <span class="hlt">observations</span> obtained with the Whole Earth Telescope network is used to show that the complex light curve of the ZZ Zeti (DAV) star G29-38 is dominated by a single, constant amplitude <span class="hlt">period</span> of 615 s during the time span of these <span class="hlt">observations</span>. The pulse arrival times for this <span class="hlt">period</span> exhibit a systematic variation in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. E. Winget; R. E. Nather; J. C. Clemens; J. Provencal; S. J. Kleinman; P. A. Bradley; M. A. Wood; C. F. Claver; E. L. Robinson; A. D. Grauer; B. P. Hine; G. Fontaine; N. Achilleos; T. M. K. Marar; S. Seetha; B. N. Ashoka; D. O'Donoghue; B. Warner; D. W. Kurtz; P. Martinez; G. Vauclair; M. Chevreton; A. Kanaan; S. O. Kepler; T. Augusteijn; J. van Paradijs; C. J. Hansen; James Liebert</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">90</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014cosp...40E1176H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous <span class="hlt">observations</span> of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> (QP) VLF wave emissions and related ULF fluctuations of the geomagnetic field</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present case studies of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> (QP) VLF emissions detected onboard the DEMETER satellite. The analyzed events with modulation <span class="hlt">periods</span> from 40 s to 80 s were <span class="hlt">observed</span> at geomagnetic latitudes larger than 40 degrees. The magnetometers of the CARISMA network along the same geomagnetic longitude (within 5 degrees) were used for monitoring simultaneous fluctuations of the geomagnetic field. Correlated ULF magnetic field pulsations with <span class="hlt">periods</span> corresponding to the modulation <span class="hlt">periods</span> of QP emissions are detected. These ULF pulsations in the Pc3 - Pc5 range are likely related to the generation mechanism of the QP emissions. We attempt to define the spatial extent of the disturbed area.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Santolik, Ondrej; Parrot, Michel; Nemec, Frantisek</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">91</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.V23D2140B"> <span id="translatedtitle">First <span class="hlt">observations</span> of intermittent, non-eruptive gas emissions of Cotopaxi volcano (Ecuador) during a <span class="hlt">period</span> of heightened seismicity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cotopaxi is an active ice-capped stratovolcano (5898 m a.s.l.) located in the central part of the Northern Volcanic Zone of the Andes, 60 km SE from Quito. Its Holocene magmatism has presented a bi-modal andesitic-rhyolitic character, but only andesitic eruptions have occurred during the last ~2100 years. The last explosive events occurred in 1877 and produced a widespread ash fallout, pyroclastic flows and enormous mud flows which traveled several hundred kilometers affecting areas that are now highly populated. A growing and diverse monitoring network has been deployed around Cotopaxi since the installation of the first seismic station in 1977. Some signals of unrest have been <span class="hlt">observed</span> since then, notably swarms of high and low frequency seismic events recorded during the last months of 2001 and in August 2005, which are thought to represent the response of the volcano to a shallow magmatic intrusion. This hypothesis is indeed supported by the <span class="hlt">observation</span> of sporadic very long <span class="hlt">period</span> (VLP) seismic signals after the installation of broadband seismometers in 2006-2007. In April 2008, a semi-continuous scanning DOAS system was installed in the western flank of the volcano within the NOVAC project, with the aim of detecting evidences of magmatic SO2 gas emissions, which were never conspicuous by previous short-term COSPEC and DOAS measurement campaigns. Recent <span class="hlt">periods</span> of increased seismicity occurred in January and since July 2009. Concurrent gas monitoring by the permanent station allowed the first detection of SO2 in this volcano as early as December 2008. Subsequent traverses with better control on the measurement conditions also corroborate this finding. The <span class="hlt">observations</span> <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that Cotopaxi’s emissions are currently intermittent and passive, with gas flow rates typically lower than 500 td-1. As a consequence, the emissions are easily dispersed by the winds and do not contribute to the formation of a well-defined plume, making the interpretation of the scanning measurements more difficult and the correlation with seismicity mostly on qualitative terms. However, this study emphasizes the importance of the new gas monitoring tool to confirm the presence of a shallow magmatic body, to establish a confident background level of activity, and to track a potential increase of emissions to better assess a future volcanic emergence.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bourquin, J.; Hidalgo, S.; Arellano, S.; Troncoso, L.; Galle, B.; Arrais, S.; Vásconez, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">92</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040088493&hterms=fat+wang&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dfat%2Bwang"> <span id="translatedtitle">Entrainment in solution of an oscillating NADH oxidase activity from the bovine milk fat globule membrane with a temperature-compensated <span class="hlt">period</span> length <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> of an ultradian time-keeping (clock) function</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Entrainment in solution of an oscillating activity with a temperature compensated <span class="hlt">period</span> of 24 min is described for a NADH oxidase (NOX) activity of the bovine milk fat globule membrane, a derivative of the mammary epithelial cell plasma membrane. The <span class="hlt">period</span> of 24 min remained unchanged at 17 degrees C, 27 degrees C and 37 degrees C whereas the amplitude approximately doubled with each 10 degree C rise in temperature (Q(10)congruent with 2). The <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> was <span class="hlt">observed</span> with both intact milk fat globule membranes and with detergent-solubilized membranes, demonstrating that the oscillations did not require an association with membranes. The <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> was not the result of instrument variation or of chemical interactions among reactants in solution. Preparations with different <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> entrained (autosynchronized) when mixed. Upon mixing, the preparations exhibited two oscillatory patterns but eventually a single pattern representing the mean of the farthest separated maxima of the two preparations analyzed separately emerged. The cell surface NOX protein is the first reported example of an entrainable biochemical entity with a temperature-compensated <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> potentially capable of functioning as an ultradian or circadian clock driver.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morre, D. James; Lawler, Juliana; Wang, Sui; Keenan, Thomas W.; Morre, Dorothy M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">93</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42159988"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> variation in the water production of comet C\\/2001 Q4 (NEAT) <span class="hlt">observed</span> with the Odin satellite</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Context: Comet C\\/2001 Q4 (NEAT) was extensively studied with the 1.1-m submillimetre telescope of the Odin satellite. The H2O line at 557 GHz was regularly <span class="hlt">observed</span> from 6 March to 16 May 2004 and nearly continuously monitored during 3 <span class="hlt">periods</span> between 26 April and 2 May 2004. Aims: This last set of data shows <span class="hlt">periodic</span> variations in the line intensity,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. Biver; D. Bockelée-Morvan; P. Colom; J. Crovisier; A. Lecacheux; U. Frisk; Å. Hjalmarson; M. Olberg; Aa. Sandqvist</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">94</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014A%26A...569A..12N"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observation</span> of a high-quality quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> rapidly propagating wave train using SDO/AIA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Context. We present a new event of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> wave trains <span class="hlt">observed</span> in EUV wavebands that rapidly propagate away from an active region after a flare. Aims: We measured the parameters of a wave train <span class="hlt">observed</span> on 7 December 2013 after an M1.2 flare, such as the phase speeds, <span class="hlt">periods</span> and wavelengths, in relationship to the local coronal environment and the energy sources. Methods: We compared our <span class="hlt">observations</span> with a numerical simulation of fast magnetoacoustic waves that undergo dispersive evolution and leakage in a coronal loop embedded in a potential magnetic field. Results: The wave train is <span class="hlt">observed</span> to propagate as several arc-shaped intensity disturbances for almost half an hour, with a speed greater than 1000 km s-1 and a <span class="hlt">period</span> of about 1 min. The wave train followed two different patterns of propagation, in accordance with the magnetic structure of the active region. The oscillatory signal is found to be of high-quality, i.e. there is a large number (10 or more) of subsequent wave fronts <span class="hlt">observed</span>. The <span class="hlt">observations</span> are found to be consistent with the numerical simulation of a fast wave train generated by a localised impulsive energy release. Conclusions: Transverse structuring in the corona can efficiently create and guide high-quality quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> propagating fast wave trains. The movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nisticò, G.; Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">95</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.earth.northwestern.edu/individ/emile/PDF/EAO196.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of ultra-long <span class="hlt">period</span> normal modes from the 2004 Sumatra–Andaman earthquake</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The great December 2004 Sumatra–Andaman earthquake was the first “giant” or “extreme” (moment magnitude Mw?9) earthquake recorded by broadband digital seismometers whose data were rapidly available to investigators worldwide. As a result, analysis of the earth's longest <span class="hlt">period</span> normal modes became a primary tool for studying the earthquake, rather than an elegant afterthought. The mode data provided the first evidence</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Emile A. Okal; Seth Stein</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">96</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19990103101&hterms=quiescence&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dquiescence"> <span id="translatedtitle">BeppoSAX <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of the SGR 1900+14 in Quiescence and During an Active <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present results from two Beppo SAX Narrow Field Instrument (NFI) <span class="hlt">observations</span> of SGR-1900+14 made during a quiescent and an active <span class="hlt">period</span> of the source. We detect pulsations in the 1997 May 12-13 <span class="hlt">observation</span> (quiescence) at 5.157190(7) sec and the 1998 September 15-16 <span class="hlt">observation</span> (active <span class="hlt">period</span>) at 5.16026](12) sec. Using results reported by Hurley et al. (1999a), we establish a long-term spin down rate during quiescence of 5.82(2)-approx. times 10(exp -11) s/s which implies a dipole magnetic field of sim 5.5 approx. times 10(exp 14) G. We confirm deviations from a constant spin down rate during the active <span class="hlt">period</span>. We also find spectral similarities between SGR-1900+14 in quiescence and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Woods, Peter; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; vanParadijs, Jan; Finger, Mark H.; Thompson, Christopher</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">97</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990ApJ...357..630W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Whole earth telescope <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the white dwarf G29-38 - Phase variations of the 615 second <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An extensive set of high-speed photometric <span class="hlt">observations</span> obtained with the Whole Earth Telescope network is used to show that the complex light curve of the ZZ Zeti (DAV) star G29-38 is dominated by a single, constant amplitude <span class="hlt">period</span> of 615 s during the time span of these <span class="hlt">observations</span>. The pulse arrival times for this <span class="hlt">period</span> exhibit a systematic variation in phase readily explained by light-travel time effects produced by reflex orbital motion about an unseen companion. The best-fit model to the <span class="hlt">observations</span> indicates a highly eccentric orbit, a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 109 + or - 13 days and a minimum mass of 0.5 solar mass for the companion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Winget, D. E.; Nather, R. E.; Clemens, J. C.; Provencal, J.; Kleinman, S. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Wood, M. A.; Claver, C. F.; Robinson, E. L.; Grauer, A. D.; Hine, B. P.; Fontaine, G.; Achilleos, N.; Marar, T. M. K.; Seetha, S.; Ashoka, B. N.; O'Donoghue, D.; Warner, B.; Kurtz, D. W.; Martinez, P.; Vauclair, G.; Chevreton, M.; Kanaan, A.; Kepler, S. O.; Augusteijn, T.; van Paradijs, J.; Hansen, C. J.; Liebert, James</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">98</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930009964&hterms=periodic+table&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dperiodic%2Btable"> <span id="translatedtitle">IUE <span class="hlt">observations</span> of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> comets Tempel-2, Kopff, and Tempel-1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We summarize the results of <span class="hlt">observations</span> made between 10 Jun. - 18 Dec. 1988 with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUS) of comet P/Tempel-2 during its 1988 appearance. The derived water production rate and relative gas/dust ratio are compared with those of P/Halley, <span class="hlt">observed</span> with IUE in 1985-86, and other potential Comet Rendezvous/Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) target comets, P/Kopff and P/Tempel-1, both <span class="hlt">observed</span> with IUE in 1983.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Feldman, Paul D.; Festou, Michel C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">99</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3194388"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energy metabolism of the untrained muscle of elite runners as <span class="hlt">observed</span> by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy: evidence <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a genetic endowment for endurance exercise.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of this study was to investigate whether genetically determined properties of muscle metabolism contribute to the exceptional physical endurance of world-class distance runners. ATP, phosphocreatine, inorganic phosphate, and pH were quantitatively determined by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the wrist flexor muscles of elite long-distance runners and sedentary control subjects. These muscles had not been exposed to any specific program of exercise training in either group of subjects. The "untrained" muscles were examined at rest, during two cycles of three grades of exercise, and in recovery. The flexor muscles of the athletes had higher concentrations of phosphocreatine and ATP than did those of the control subjects at rest and during exercise. The athletes' muscles possessed a higher capacity for generation of ATP by oxidative metabolism than did control subjects' muscles according to the following criteria: (i) high force output, 60% of maximum voluntary contraction, was more easily reached and better maintained in both exercise cycles; (ii) the ratio of inorganic phosphate to phosphocreatine rose less during exercise and recovered faster in the postexercise <span class="hlt">period</span>; (iii) there was no loss of adenine nucleotides or total phosphate from the athletes' muscles but significant losses from the control subjects' muscles; and (iv) the pH decreased no more than 0.1 unit in the athletes' muscles during exercise, attesting to a relatively slow glycolysis and/or a rapid oxidation of lactate. In the muscles of the control subjects, on the other hand, the pH decreased nearly 0.4 unit early in the first exercise cycle, indicating a relatively fast glycolysis and/or slower oxidation of lactate. In the second exercise cycle, the pH returned to near normal in the control subjects' muscles, reflecting diminished lactate formation because of glycogen depletion and lactate washout by the high blood flow induced by exercise. By the end of the exercise program, the maximum voluntary contractile force for the control subjects had declined to less than 60% of the initial value. This decline could be explained best by exhaustion of the glycolytic contribution to muscle contraction. Therefore, the residual maximum strength provided a measure of the oxidative capacity to support contraction, as is discussed. In conclusion, we <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that a greater oxidative capacity relative to glycolytic capacity for support of contraction in untrained muscle of world-class runners reflects a genetic endowment for physical endurance. Additional systemic effects of training cannot be completely excluded. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides a noninvasive method for assessing this endowment. PMID:3194388</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, J H; Brown, R L; Park, C R; Cohn, M; Chance, B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">100</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12403751"> <span id="translatedtitle">Direct <span class="hlt">observation</span> of a localization transition in quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> photonic lattices</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The localization of waves in non-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> media is a universal phenomenon,\\u000aoccurring in a variety of different quantum and classical systems, including\\u000acondensed-matter, Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices, quantum\\u000achaotic systems, sound waves and light. A localization phase transition is\\u000aexpected to occur in three dimensional disordered systems as the strength of\\u000adisorder crosses a critical value. Recently, a crossover</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Y. Lahini; R. Pugatch; F. Pozzi; M. Sorel; R. Morandotti; N. Davidson; Y. Silberberg</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">101</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.A21E0286F"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observed</span> and Modeled Changes in the South Asian Summer Monsoon over the Historical <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Behavior in the South Asian Summer Monsoon (SASM) was analyzed in the CMIP3 multimodel historical ('20c3m') simulations and in modern <span class="hlt">observational</span> and reanalysis data. The CMIP3 simulations capture the <span class="hlt">observed</span> trend of weakening of the SASM circulation over the past half century, but are unable to reproduce the magnitude of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> weakening trend. While the <span class="hlt">observations</span> indicate a slight decrease in SASM-related precipitation, the CMIP3 simulations indicate on average a very slight increase, albeit with very large inter-model and intra-model variability. The CMIP3 simulations reproduce the <span class="hlt">observed</span> negative relationship between the SASM and ENSO. The <span class="hlt">observed</span> weakening trend in this relationship in recent decades, which has been attributed in some studies to anthropogenic forcing, appears to be well within the variability of the CMIP3 multi-model ensemble. For some models, distinct realizations indicate both strengthening and weakening trends that are larger in magnitude than the <span class="hlt">observed</span> weakening trend.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fan, F.; Mann, M. E.; Lee, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">102</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3417418"> <span id="translatedtitle">Small molecule chemokine mimetics <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a molecular basis for the <span class="hlt">observation</span> that CXCL10 and CXCL11 are allosteric ligands of CXCR3</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The chemokine receptor CXCR3 directs migration of T-cells in response to the ligands CXCL9/Mig, CXCL10/IP-10 and CXCL11/I-TAC. Both ligands and receptors are implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders, including atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we describe the molecular mechanism by which two synthetic small molecule agonists activate CXCR3. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH As both small molecules are basic, we hypothesized that they formed electrostatic interactions with acidic residues within CXCR3. Nine point mutants of CXCR3 were generated in which an acidic residue was mutated to its amide counterpart. Following transient expression, the ability of the constructs to bind and signal in response to natural and synthetic ligands was examined. KEY RESULTS The CXCR3 mutants D112N, D195N and E196Q were efficiently expressed and responsive in chemotaxis assays to CXCL11 but not to CXCL10 or to either of the synthetic agonists, confirmed with radioligand binding assays. Molecular modelling of both CXCL10 and CXCR3 <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the small molecule agonists mimic a region of the ‘30s loop’ (residues 30–40 of CXCL10) which interacts with the intrahelical CXCR3 residue D112, leading to receptor activation. D195 and E196 are located in the second extracellular loop and form putative intramolecular salt bridges required for a CXCR3 conformation that recognizes CXCL10. In contrast, CXCL11 recognition by CXCR3 is largely independent of these residues. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS We provide here a molecular basis for the <span class="hlt">observation</span> that CXCL10 and CXCL11 are allosteric ligands of CXCR3. Such findings may have implications for the design of CXCR3 antagonists. LINKED ARTICLE This article is commented on by O'Boyle, pp. 895–897 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01759.x PMID:21895630</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nedjai, Belinda; Li, Hubert; Stroke, Ilana L; Wise, Emma L; Webb, Maria L; Merritt, J Robert; Henderson, Ian; Klon, Anthony E; Cole, Andrew G; Horuk, Richard; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Pease, James E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">103</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.classzone.com/books/earth_science/terc/content/visualizations/es3006/es3006page01.cfm?chapter_no=visualization"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observe</span> an animation of an asteroid impact at the end of the Cretaceous <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This Earth science animation shows middle and high school students how an asteroid that struck the Earth at the end of the Cretaceous <span class="hlt">period</span> may have caused a mass extinction that killed the dinosaurs. The introduction explains the basis of the asteroid theory of extinction. The animation depicts an artist's conception, presented from space, of an asteroid hitting the Gulf of Mexico and releasing a cloud that prevented sunlight from reaching the Earth. Movie controls allow students to repeat, pause, or step through the animation, which can give students more time to analyze the images. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Education, Terc. C.; Littell, Mcdougal</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">104</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvE..86f1125A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spatial log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations of first-passage <span class="hlt">observables</span> in fractals</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For transport processes in geometrically restricted domains, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) admits a general scaling dependence on space parameters for diffusion, anomalous diffusion, and diffusion in disordered or fractal media. For transport in self-similar fractal structures, we obtain an expression for the source-target distance dependence of the MFPT that exhibits both the leading power-law behavior, depending on the Hausdorff and spectral dimension of the fractal, as well as small log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations that are a clear and definitive signal of the underlying fractal structure. We also present refined numerical results for the Sierpinski gasket that confirm this oscillatory behavior.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Akkermans, Eric; Benichou, Olivier; Dunne, Gerald V.; Teplyaev, Alexander; Voituriez, Raphael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">105</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23367911"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spatial log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations of first-passage <span class="hlt">observables</span> in fractals.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For transport processes in geometrically restricted domains, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) admits a general scaling dependence on space parameters for diffusion, anomalous diffusion, and diffusion in disordered or fractal media. For transport in self-similar fractal structures, we obtain an expression for the source-target distance dependence of the MFPT that exhibits both the leading power-law behavior, depending on the Hausdorff and spectral dimension of the fractal, as well as small log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations that are a clear and definitive signal of the underlying fractal structure. We also present refined numerical results for the Sierpinski gasket that confirm this oscillatory behavior. PMID:23367911</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Akkermans, Eric; Benichou, Olivier; Dunne, Gerald V; Teplyaev, Alexander; Voituriez, Raphael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">106</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8696E..0JM"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aerosol disturbances of the stratosphere over Tomsk according to data of lidar <span class="hlt">observations</span> in volcanic activity <span class="hlt">period</span> 2006-2011</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We summarize and analyze the lidar measurements (Tomsk: 56.5°N; 85.0°E) of the optical characteristics of the stratospheric aerosol layer (SAL) in the volcanic activity <span class="hlt">period</span> 2006-2011. The background SAL state with minimal aerosol content, which was <span class="hlt">observed</span> since 1997 under the conditions of long-term volcanically quiescent <span class="hlt">period</span>, was interrupted in October 2006 by a series of explosive eruptions of volcanoes of the Pacific Ring of Fire: Rabaul (October 2006, New Guinea); Okmok and Kasatochi (July-August 2008, Aleutian Islands); Redoubt (March-April 2009, Alaska); Sarychev Peak (June 2009, Kuril Islands), and Grimsvötn (May 2011, Iceland). A short-term and minor disturbance of the lower stratosphere was also <span class="hlt">observed</span> in April 2010 after eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajokull. The developed regional empirical model of the vertical distribution of background SAL optical characteristics was used to identify the <span class="hlt">periods</span> of elevated stratospheric aerosol content after each of the volcanic eruptions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Makeev, Andrey P.; Burlakov, Vladimir D.; Dolgii, Sergey I.; Nevzorov, Aleksey V.; Trifonov, Dimitar A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">107</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/ja/v086/iA12/JA086iA12p09989/JA086iA12p09989.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">ISEE 1 <span class="hlt">observations</span> of thermal plasma in the vicinity of the plasmasphere during <span class="hlt">periods</span> of quieting magnetic activity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thermal (< or approx. =100 electron volts) ion <span class="hlt">observations</span> made with the plasma composition experiment on ISEE 1 are combined with plasma density profiles obtained from plasma frequency measurements made with the plasma wave experiment to conduct an investigation of thermal plasma behavior in the vicinity of the plasmasphere during <span class="hlt">periods</span> of quieting magnetic activity. Normally, the principal thermal ion</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. L. Horwitz; C. R. Baugher; C. R. Chappell; E. G. Shelley; D. T. Young; R. R. Anderson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">108</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jd/jd0614/2005JD006341/2005JD006341.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shortwave radiative closure studies for clear skies during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement 2003 Aerosol Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program sponsored a large aerosol intensive <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> (AIOP) to study aerosol during the month of May 2003 around the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF) in north central Oklahoma. Redundant measurements of aerosol optical properties were made using different techniques at the surface as well as in vertical profile</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. J. Michalsky; G. P. Anderson; J. Barnard; J. Delamere; C. Gueymard; S. Kato; P. Kiedron; A. McComiskey; P. Ricchiazzi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">109</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4903431"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observation</span> of <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Fine Structure in Reflectance from Biological Tissue: A New Technique for Measuring Nuclear Size Distribution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report <span class="hlt">observation</span> of a fine structure component in backscattered light from mucosal tissue which is <span class="hlt">periodic</span> in wavelength. This structure is ordinarily masked by a diffusive background. We have identified the origin of this component as being due to light which is Mie scattered by surface epithelial cell nuclei. By analyzing the amplitude and frequency of the fine structure,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. T. Perelman; V. Backman; M. Wallace; G. Zonios; R. Manoharan; A. Nusrat; S. Shields; M. Seiler; C. Lima; T. Hamano; I. Itzkan; J. Van Dam; J. M. Crawford; M. S. Feld</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">110</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/88/81/41/PDF/hal-00888141.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Selecting broilers for low or high abdominal fat : <span class="hlt">observations</span> on the hens during the breeding <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Selecting broilers for low or high abdominal fat : <span class="hlt">observations</span> on the hens during the breeding feed energy for lipid synthesis of yolk or adipose tissue. Introduction Modern strains of broilers and expensive compo- nent in broiler production. A divergent selection programme was undertaken to reduce</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">111</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22079320"> <span id="translatedtitle">A single administration of methamphetamine to mice early in the light <span class="hlt">period</span> decreases running wheel activity <span class="hlt">observed</span> during the dark <span class="hlt">period</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Repeated intermittent administration of amphetamines acutely increases appetitive and consummatory aspects of motivated behaviors as well as general activity and exploratory behavior, including voluntary running wheel activity. Subsequently, if the drug is withdrawn, the frequency of these behaviors decreases, which is thought to be indicative of dysphoric symptoms associated with amphetamine withdrawal. Such decreases may be <span class="hlt">observed</span> after chronic treatment or even after single drug administrations. In the present study, the effect of acute methamphetamine (METH) on running wheel activity, horizontal locomotion, appetitive behavior (food access), and consummatory behavior (food and water intake) was investigated in mice. A multi-configuration behavior apparatus designed to monitor the five behaviors was developed, where combined measures were recorded simultaneously. In the first experiment, naïve male ICR mice showed gradually increasing running wheel activity over three consecutive days after exposure to a running wheel, while mice without a running wheel showed gradually decreasing horizontal locomotion, consistent with running wheel activity being a positively motivated form of natural motor activity. In experiment 2, increased horizontal locomotion and food access, and decreased food intake, were <span class="hlt">observed</span> for the initial 3h after acute METH challenge. Subsequently, during the dark phase <span class="hlt">period</span> decreased running wheel activity and horizontal locomotion were <span class="hlt">observed</span>. The reductions in running wheel activity and horizontal locomotion may be indicative of reduced dopaminergic function, although it remains to be seen if these changes may be more pronounced after more prolonged METH treatments. PMID:22079320</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kitanaka, Nobue; Kitanaka, Junichi; Hall, F Scott; Uhl, George R; Watabe, Kaname; Kubo, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Tatsuta, Tomohiro; Morita, Yoshio; Takemura, Motohiko</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">112</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27731574"> <span id="translatedtitle">Suzaku and Multi-Wavelength <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of OJ 287 during the <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Optical Outburst in 2007</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Suzaku <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the blazar OJ 287 were performed in 2007 April 10-13 and November 7-9. They correspond to a quiescent and a flaring state, respectively. The X-ray spectra of the source can be well-described with single power-law models in both exposures. The derived X-ray photon index and the flux density at 1 keV were found to be Gamma =</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hiromi Seta; Naoki Isobe; Makoto S. Tashiro; Yuichi Yaji; Akira Arai; Masayuki Fukuhara; Kotaro Kohno; Kouichiro Nakanishi; Mahito Sasada; Yoshito Shimajiri; Tomoka Tosaki; Makoto Uemura; Hans Anderhub; Lucio Angelo Antonelli; Pedro Antoranz; Michael Backes; Carmen Baixeras; Silvia Balestra; Juan Abel Barrio; Denis Bastieri; Josefa Becerra González; Julia K. Becker; Wodzimierz Bednarek; Karsten Berger; Elisa Bernardini; Adrian Biland; Rudolf K. Bock; Giacomo Bonnoli; Pol Bordas; Daniela Borla Tridon; Valenti Bosch-Ramon; Debanjan Bose; Isabel Braun; Thomas Bretz; Ilia Britvitch; Miguel Camara; Emiliano Carmona; Sebastian Commichau; José Luis Contreras; Juan Cortina; Ma Teresa Costado Dios; Stefano Covino; Valentin Curtef; Francesco Dazzi; Alessandro de Angelis; Elsa de Cea Del Pozo; Raquel de Los Reyes; Barbara de Lotto; Michela de Maria; Francesco de Sabata; Carlos Delgado Méndez; Alberto Domínguez; Daniela Dorner; Michele Doro; Dominik Elsaesser; Manel Errando; Daniela Ferenc; Enrique Fernández; Roger Firpo; Maria Victoria Fonseca; Nicola Galante; Ramon J. García López; Markus Garczarczyk; Markus Gaug; Florian Goebel; Daniela Hadasch; Masaaki Hayashida; Artemio Herrero; Dorothée Hildebrand; Daniel Höhne-Mönch; Jürgen Hose; Ching Cheng Hsu; Tobias Jogler; Daniel Kranich; Antonio La Barbera; Alvin Laille; Elvira Leonardo; Elina Lindfors; Saverio Lombardi; Francesco Longo; Donatella López; Eckart Lorenz; Pratik Majumdar; Galina Maneva; Nijil Mankuzhiyil; Karl Mannheim; Laura Maraschi; Mosé Mariotti; Manel Martínez; Daniel Mazin; Mario Meucci; Markus Meyer; Jose Miguel Miranda; Razmick Mirzoyan; Hiroko Miyamoto; Javier Moldón; Mariano Moles; Abelardo Moralejo; Daniel Nieto; Kari Nilsson; Jelena Ninkovic; Nepomuk Otte; Igor Oya; Riccardo Paoletti; Josep M. Paredes; Mikko Pasanen; Donatella Pascoli; Felicitas Pauss; Raffaello G. Pegna; Miguel A. Perez-Torres; Massimo Persic; Luigi Peruzzo; Francisco Prada; Elisa Prandini; Neus Puchades; Ignasi Reichardt; Wolfgang Rhode; Marc Ribó; Javier Rico; Michael Rissi; Arnau Robert; Stefan Rügamer; Antonio Saggion; Takayuki Y. Saito; Marco Salvati; Miguel Sánchez-Conde; Konstancja Satalecka; Villi Scalzotto; Valeria Scapin; Thomas Schweizer; Maxim Shayduk; Steve N. Shore; Nuria Sidro; Agnieszka Sierpowska-Bartosik; Aimo Sillanpää; Julian Sitarek; Dorota Sobczynska; Felix Spanier; Antonio Stamerra; Luisa Sabrina Stark Schneebeli; Leo Takalo; Fabrizio Tavecchio; Petar Temnikov; Diego Tescaro; Masahiro Teshima; Martin Tluczykont; Diego F. Torres; Nicola Turini; Hristofor Vankov; Robert M. Wagner; Wolfgang Wittek; Victor Zabalza; Fabio Zandanel; Roberta Zanin; Jordi Zapatero</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">113</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/36837051"> <span id="translatedtitle">Parental Reports of Coparenting and <span class="hlt">Observed</span> Coparenting Behavior During the Toddler <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fifty-two married partners played with their 30-month-olds in both dyadic (parent–child) and whole family contexts and reported on their own coparenting activities (family integrity-promoting behavior, conflict, disparagement, and reprimand). Coparenting behavior <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the whole family context was evaluated for antagonism, warmth and cooperation, child–adult centeredness, balance of positive involvement, and management of toddler behavior. Parallel balance and management scores</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">James P. McHale; Regina Kuersten-Hogan; Allison Lauretti; Jeffrey L. Rasmussen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">114</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1006.0688v1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observation</span> of Log-<span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Oscillations in the Quantum Dynamics of Electrons on the One-Dimensional Fibonacci Quasicrystal</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We revisit the question of quantum dynamics of electrons on the off-diagonal Fibonacci tight-binding model. We find that typical dynamical quantities, such as the probability of an electron to remain in its original position as a function of time, display log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations on top of the leading-order power-law decay. These <span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations with the logarithm of time are similar to the oscillations that are known to exist with the logarithm of temperature in the specific heat of Fibonacci electrons, yet they offer new possibilities for the experimental <span class="hlt">observation</span> of this unique phenomenon.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ron Lifshitz; Shahar Even-Dar Mandel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-06-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">115</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMSM42C..04B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cassini <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of Saturn's Nightside UV Auroral Oval: In Situ Evidence of its <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Motion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In recent years we have benefitted greatly from the first in-orbit multi-wavelength images of Saturn's polar atmosphere from the Cassini spacecraft. Specifically, images obtained from the UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) on board the Cassini spacecraft provide an excellent view of the planet's auroral emissions, which in turn give an account of the large-scale magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and dynamics within the system. However, obtaining a simultaneous view of the auroral regions with measurements of the magnetic field and plasma populations at high-latitudes is more difficult to routinely achieve. Here we present an unusual example, during Revolution 99 in 2009, where UVIS images the entire northern UV auroral oval while Cassini traverses the magnetic flux tubes connecting to the auroral oval on the nightside sampling the related magnetic field and particle signatures present. We will discuss the relationship of the field-aligned currents (derived from the magnetic field), radio waves, and associated plasma electron and ion signatures to the properties of the auroral oval. The motion of the auroral oval evident in the UVIS images will be discussed in the context of the "planetary <span class="hlt">period</span> oscillations" and previous field-aligned current studies.Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Colorado/ESA/University of Liege/University of Leicester</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bunce, E. J.; Grodent, D. C.; Provan, G.; Jinks, S.; Cowley, S. W.; Andrews, D. J.; Arridge, C. S.; Badman, S. V.; Dougherty, M. K.; Kurth, W. S.; Mitchell, D. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">116</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ATel.4803....1H"> <span id="translatedtitle">BVRI time series <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the 7.1 hour <span class="hlt">period</span> in Nova Mon 2012</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report differential time series optical photometry in the BVRI-bands of Nova Mon 2012 on 2013 February 4, 5 and 7 UT with two 35 cm telescopes (Celestron 14) at the private Astrokolkhoz Observatory in Mayhill, New Mexico using SBIG ST8 and ST9 CCD cameras with fields of view of 31 x 21 and 16 x 16 sq. arcmin, respectively. On each of these nights more than 520 images were taken in I and V band covering nearly 7h of <span class="hlt">observing</span> time per night.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hambsch, F.-J.; Krajci, T.; Banerjee, D. P. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">117</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1030530"> <span id="translatedtitle">Suzaku And Multi-Wavelength <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of OJ 287 During the <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Optical Outburst in 2007</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Suzaku <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the blazar OJ 287 were performed in 2007 April 10-13 and November 7-9. They correspond to a quiescent and a flaring state, respectively. The X-ray spectra of the source can be well described with single power-law models in both exposures. The derived X-ray photon index and the flux density at 1 keV were found to be {Lambda} = 1.65 {+-} 0.02 and S{sub 1keV} = 215 {+-} 5 nJy, in the quiescent state. In the flaring state, the source exhibited a harder X-ray spectrum ({Lambda} = 1.50 {+-} 0.01) with a nearly doubled X-ray flux density S{sub 1keV} = 404{sub -5}{sup +6} nJy. Moreover, significant hard X-ray signals were detected up to {approx} 27 keV. In cooperation with the Suzaku, simultaneous radio, optical, and very-high-energy {gamma}-ray <span class="hlt">observations</span> of OJ 287 were performed with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array, the KANATA telescope, and the MAGIC telescope, respectively. The radio and optical fluxes in the flaring state (3.04 {+-} 0.46 Jy and 8.93 {+-} 0.05 mJy at 86.75 Hz and in the V-band, respectively) were found to be higher by a factor of 2-3 than those in the quiescent state (1.73 {+-} 0.26 Jy and 3.03 {+-} 0.01 mJy at 86.75 Hz and in the V-band, respectively). No notable {gamma}-ray events were detected in either <span class="hlt">observation</span>. The spectral energy distribution of OJ 287 indicated that the X-ray spectrum was dominated by inverse Compton radiation in both <span class="hlt">observations</span>, while synchrotron radiation exhibited a spectral cutoff around the optical frequency. Furthermore, no significant difference in the synchrotron cutoff frequency was found between the quiescent and flaring states. According to a simple synchrotron self-Compton model, the change of the spectral energy distribution is due to an increase in the energy density of electrons with small changes of both the magnetic field strength and the maximum Lorentz factor of electrons.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Seta, Hiromi; /Saitama U.; Isobe, N.; /Kyoto U.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; /Saitama U.; Yaji, Yuichi; /Saitama U.; Arai, Akira; /Hiroshima U.; Fukuhara, Masayuki; /Tokyo U. /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Kohno, Kotaro; /Tokyo U.; Nakanishi, Koichiro; /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Sasada, Mahito; /Hiroshima U.; Shimajiri, Yoshito; /Tokyo U. /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Tosaki, Tomoka; /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Uemura, Makoto; /Hiroshima U.; Anderhub, Hans; /Zurich, ETH; Antonelli, L.A.; /INFN, Rome; Antoranz, Pedro; /Madrid U.; Backes, Michael; /Dortmund U.; Baixeras, Carmen; /Barcelona, Autonoma U.; Balestra, Silvia; /Madrid U.; Barrio, Juan Abel; /Madrid U.; Bastieri, Denis; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua; Becerra Gonzalez, Josefa; /IAC, La Laguna /Dortmund U. /Lodz U. /Lodz U. /DESY /Zurich, ETH /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Barcelona, IEEC /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Madrid U. /Zurich, ETH /Wurzburg U. /Zurich, ETH /Madrid U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Zurich, ETH /Madrid U. /Barcelona, IFAE /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /INFN, Rome /Dortmund U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Barcelona, IEEC /Madrid U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /IAC, La Laguna /Madrid, CIEMAT /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Zurich, ETH /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Wurzburg U. /Barcelona, IFAE /UC, Davis /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Madrid U. /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /Barcelona, IFAE /IAC, La Laguna /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /SLAC /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /Zurich, ETH /Wurzburg U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Zurich, ETH /INFN, Rome /UC, Davis /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Turku U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Zurich, ETH /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /DESY /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Wurzburg U. /INFN, Rome /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Wurzburg U. /Madrid U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Barcelona, IFAE /Madrid U. /Turku U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /UC, Santa Cruz /Madrid U. /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Barcelona, IEEC /Turku U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Zurich, ETH /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /INFN, Trieste /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Dortmund U. /Barcelona, IEEC /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IFAE /Zurich, ETH /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Wurzburg U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /INFN, Rome /Sierra Nevada Observ. /DESY /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IEEC /Turku U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Lodz U. /Lodz U. /Wurzburg U. /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Zurich, ETH /Turku U. /INFN, Rome /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Barcelona, IFAE /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /DESY /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IEEC /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, Autonoma U.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">118</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009A%26A...504..959K"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observational</span> studies of Cepheid amplitudes. I. <span class="hlt">Period</span>-amplitude relationships for Galactic Cepheids and interrelation of amplitudes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Context: The dependence of amplitude on the pulsation <span class="hlt">period</span> differs from other Cepheid-related relationships. Aims: We attempt to revise the <span class="hlt">period</span>-amplitude (P-A) relationship of Galactic Cepheids based on multi-colour photometric and radial velocity data. Reliable P-A graphs for Galactic Cepheids constructed for the U, B, V, R_C, and IC photometric bands and pulsational radial velocity variations facilitate investigations of previously poorly studied interrelations between <span class="hlt">observable</span> amplitudes. The effects of both binarity and metallicity on the <span class="hlt">observed</span> amplitude, and the dichotomy between short- and long-<span class="hlt">period</span> Cepheids can both be studied. Methods: A homogeneous data set was created that contains basic physical and phenomenological properties of 369 Galactic Cepheids. Pulsation <span class="hlt">periods</span> were revised and amplitudes were determined by the Fourier method. P-A graphs were constructed and an upper envelope to the data points was determined in each graph. Correlations between various amplitudes and amplitude-related parameters were searched for, using Cepheids without known companions. Results: Large amplitude Cepheids with companions exhibit smaller photometric amplitudes on average than solitary ones, as expected, while s-Cepheids pulsate with an arbitrary (although small) amplitude. The ratio of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> radial velocity to blue photometric amplitudes, AV_RAD/A_B, is not as good an indicator of the pulsation mode as predicted theoretically. This may be caused by an incorrect mode assignment to a number of small amplitude Cepheids, which are not necessarily first overtone pulsators. The dependence of the pulsation amplitudes on wavelength is used to identify duplicity of Cepheids. More than twenty stars previously classified as solitary Cepheids are now suspected to have a companion. The ratio of photometric amplitudes <span class="hlt">observed</span> in various bands confirms the existence of a dichotomy among normal amplitude Cepheids. The limiting <span class="hlt">period</span> separating short- and long-<span class="hlt">period</span> Cepheids is 10.47 days. Conclusions: Interdependences of pulsational amplitudes, the <span class="hlt">period</span> dependence of the amplitude parameters, and the dichotomy have to be taken into account as constraints in modelling the structure and pulsation of Cepheids. Studies of the P-L relationship must comply with the break at 10.47° instead of the currently used “convenient” value of 10 days. Table 1 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/504/959</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Klagyivik, P.; Szabados, L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">119</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820029721&hterms=thermal+plasma&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dthermal%2Bplasma"> <span id="translatedtitle">ISEE 1 <span class="hlt">observations</span> of thermal plasma in the vicinity of the plasmasphere during <span class="hlt">periods</span> of quieting magnetic activity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An investigation of thermal plasma behavior in the vicinity of the plasmasphere during <span class="hlt">periods</span> of quieting magnetic activity was conducted by combining thermal ion <span class="hlt">observations</span> made with the plasma composition experiment on ISEE 1 with plasma density profiles obtained from plasma frequency measurements made with the same satellite's plasma wave experiment. During <span class="hlt">periods</span> in which the magnetic activity quiets, the two regions characterized by H(+):He(+):O(+) (isotropic) and H(+):O(+):He(+) (field-aligned) ion species distributions (in order of dominance) are separated by a new region in which low-energy H(+) and He(+) are found flowing along the magnetic field lines. At other times, following quieting magnetic activity, distributions having peak fluxes at 90 deg pitch angle are <span class="hlt">observed</span> in this region.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Horwitz, J. L.; Baugher, C. R.; Chappell, C. R.; Shelley, E. G.; Young, D. T.; Anderson, R. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">120</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MNRAS.432.1319P"> <span id="translatedtitle">VLBI <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the shortest orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> black hole binary, MAXI J1659-152</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The X-ray transient MAXI J1659-152 was discovered by Swift/Burst Alert Telescope and it was initially identified as a gamma-ray burst. Soon its Galactic origin and binary nature were established. There exists a wealth of multiwavelength monitoring data for this source, providing a great coverage of the full X-ray transition in this candidate black hole binary system. We obtained two epochs of European very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) Network (EVN) electronic-VLBI and four epochs of Very Long Baseline Array data of MAXI J1659-152 which show evidence for outflow in the early phases. The overall source properties (polarization, milliarcsecond-scale radio structure, flat radio spectrum) are described well with the presence of a compact jet in the system through the transition from the hard-intermediate to the soft X-ray spectral state. The apparent dependence of source size and the radio core position on the <span class="hlt">observed</span> flux density (luminosity-dependent core shift) supports this interpretation as well. We see no evidence for major discrete ejecta during the outburst. For the source proper motion we derive 2? upper limits of 115 ?as d-1 in right ascension, and 37 ?as d-1 in declination, over a time baseline of 12 d. These correspond to velocities of 1400 and 440 km s-1, respectively, assuming a source distance of ˜7 kpc.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paragi, Z.; van der Horst, A. J.; Belloni, T.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Linford, J.; Taylor, G.; Yang, J.; Garrett, M. A.; Granot, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuulkers, E.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">121</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009A%26A...501..359B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> variation in the water production of comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) <span class="hlt">observed</span> with the Odin satellite</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Context: Comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) was extensively studied with the 1.1-m submillimetre telescope of the Odin satellite. The H2O line at 557 GHz was regularly <span class="hlt">observed</span> from 6 March to 16 May 2004 and nearly continuously monitored during 3 <span class="hlt">periods</span> between 26 April and 2 May 2004. Aims: This last set of data shows <span class="hlt">periodic</span> variations in the line intensity, and we looked for characterising the long- and short-term behaviour of this comet. Methods: We used the variance ratio method and ?2 minimization to find the <span class="hlt">period</span> of variation in the water production rate and simulations to infer its amplitude at the nucleus surface. Results: A 40% <span class="hlt">periodic</span> variation in the water production rate is measured with a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 0.816±0.004 day (19.58±0.1 h). The comet also exhibits a seasonal effect with a mean peak of outgassing around 2.7×1029 molec. s-1 taking place about 18 days before perihelion. Odin is a Swedish-led satellite project funded jointly by the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB), the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the National Technology Agency of Finland (Tekes) and the Centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES, France). The Swedish Space Corporation is the prime contractor, also responsible for Odin operations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Biver, N.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Colom, P.; Crovisier, J.; Lecacheux, A.; Frisk, U.; Hjalmarson, Å.; Olberg, M.; Sandqvist, Aa.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">122</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48904028"> <span id="translatedtitle">Overview of the Dust and Biomass-burning Experiment and African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis Special <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span>0</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) is a major international campaign investigating far-reaching aspects of the African monsoon, climate and the hydrological cycle. A special <span class="hlt">observing</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> was established for the dry season (SOP0) with a focus on aerosol and radiation measurements. SOP0 took place during January and February 2006 and involved several ground-based measurement sites across west Africa. These</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. M. Haywood; J. Pelon; P. Formenti; N. Bharmal; M. Brooks; G. Capes; P. Chazette; C. Chou; S. Christopher; H. Coe; J. Cuesta; Y. Derimian; K. Desboeufs; G. Greed; M. Harrison; B. Heese; E. J. Highwood; B. Johnson; M. Mallet; B. Marticorena; J. Marsham; S. Milton; G. Myhre; S. R. Osborne; D. J. Parker; J.-L. Rajot; M. Schulz; A. Slingo; D. Tanré; P. Tulet</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">123</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1010.1000v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Testing the No-Hair Theorem with <span class="hlt">Observations</span> in the Electromagnetic Spectrum. III. Quasi-<span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Variability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">According to the no-hair theorem, astrophysical black holes are uniquely described by their masses and spins. An <span class="hlt">observational</span> test of the no-hair theorem can be performed by measuring at least three different multipole moments of the spacetime of a black hole and verifying whether their values are consistent with the unique combinations of the Kerr solution. In this paper, we study quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> variability <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the emission from black holes across the electromagnetic spectrum as a test of the no-hair theorem. We derive expressions for the Keplerian and epicyclic frequencies in a quasi-Kerr spacetime, in which the quadrupole moment is a free parameter in addition to mass and spin. We show that, for moderate spins, the Keplerian frequency is practically independent of small deviations of the quadrupole moment from the Kerr value, while the epicyclic frequencies exhibit significant variations. We apply this framework to quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations in black-hole X-ray binaries in two different scenarios. In the case that a pair of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations can be identified as the fundamental g- and c-modes in the accretion disk, we show that the no-hair theorem can be tested in conjunction with an independent mass measurement. If, on the other hand, the pairs of oscillations are identified with non-parametric resonance of dynamical frequencies in the accretion disk, then testing the no-hair theorem also requires an independent measurement of the black-hole spin. In addition, we argue that VLBI <span class="hlt">observations</span> of Sgr A* may test the no-hair theorem through a combination of imaging <span class="hlt">observations</span> and the detection of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> variability.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tim Johannsen; Dimitrios Psaltis</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-05</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">124</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42157343"> <span id="translatedtitle">XMM-Newton <span class="hlt">observation</span> of the long-<span class="hlt">period</span> polar V1309 Orionis: the case for pure blobby accretion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using XMM-Newton we have obtained the first continuous X-ray <span class="hlt">observation</span> covering a complete orbit of the longest <span class="hlt">period</span> polar, V1309 Ori. The X-ray light curve is dominated by a short, bright phase interval with EPIC pn count rates reaching up to 15 cts s-1 per 30 s resolution bin. The bright phase emission is well described by a single blackbody</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Schwarz; K. Reinsch; K. Beuermann; V. Burwitz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">125</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27692196"> <span id="translatedtitle">XMM-Newton <span class="hlt">observation</span> of the long-<span class="hlt">period</span> polar V1309 Ori: The case for pure blobby accretion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using XMM-Newton we have obtained the first X-ray <span class="hlt">observation</span> covering a\\u000acomplete orbit of the longest <span class="hlt">period</span> polar, V1309 Ori. The X-ray light curve is\\u000adominated by a short, bright phase interval with EPIC pn count rates reaching\\u000aup to 15 cts\\/sec per 30 sec resolution bin. The bright phase emission is well\\u000adescribed by a single blackbody component with</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Schwarz; K. Reinsch; K. Beuermann; V. Burwitz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">126</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JGRB..118.6311B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Change of apparent segmentation of the San Andreas fault around Parkfield from space geodetic <span class="hlt">observations</span> across multiple <span class="hlt">periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sequences of earthquakes are commonly represented as a succession of <span class="hlt">periods</span> of interseismic stress accumulation followed by coseismic and postseismic phases of stress release. Because the recurrence time of large earthquakes is often greater than the available span of space geodetic data, it has been challenging to monitor the evolution of interseismic loading in its entire duration. Here we analyze large data sets of surface deformation at different key episodes around the Cholame, Parkfield and creeping segments of the San Andreas Fault that show evidence of significant deceleration of fault slip during the interseismic <span class="hlt">period</span>. We compare the average fault slip rates before and after the 2004 Mw6 Parkfield earthquake, in the 1986-2004 and 2006-2012 <span class="hlt">periods</span>, respectively, avoiding 2 years of postseismic deformation after 2004. Using a combination of GPS data from the Plate Boundary Observatory, the Southern California Earthquake Center Crustal Motion Map and the Bay Area Velocity Unification networks and interferometric synthetic aperture radar from the Advanced Land <span class="hlt">Observing</span> Satellite (ALOS) and Envisat satellites, we show that the area of coupling at the transition between the Parkfield and Cholame segments appears larger later in the interseismic <span class="hlt">period</span> than it does earlier on. While strong plate coupling is uniform across the Parkfield and Cholame segments in the 1986-2004 <span class="hlt">period</span>, creep occurs south of the 2004 epicenter after 2006, making segmentation of the San Andreas Fault south of Parkfield more clearly apparent. These <span class="hlt">observations</span> indicate that analyses of surface deformation late in the earthquake cycle may overestimate the area of plate coupling. A fault surface creeping much below plate rate may in some case be a region that does not promote earthquake nucleation but rather just be at a slower stage of its evolution. Our analysis also shows signs of large variation of slip velocity above and below plate rate in the creeping segment indicating that cycles of weakening and hardening can also be at play in dominantly aseismic areas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barbot, Sylvain; Agram, Piyush; De Michele, Marcello</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">127</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.S13A1737R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Potential of tsunami <span class="hlt">observations</span> in ultra long <span class="hlt">period</span> seismic data and in infrasound data for early warning</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tsunamis waves caused by the great Andaman earthquake have been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in seismic data at Ocean Island or coastal stations up to 80 km inland. They are visible on the horizontal components in the <span class="hlt">period</span> greater than 1000 sec. They are thought to be caused by tilts of the surface due to the tsunami loading. The displacement of the water column above the epicenter also generated infrasound waves in the <span class="hlt">period</span> range of 300 to 600 sec which have been <span class="hlt">observed</span> at a number of infrasound arrays around the Indian Ocean. We have also succeeded in <span class="hlt">observing</span> these infrasound signal on the horizontal components of seismic stations. The speed of the tsunami wave in deep water is near 260 m/s whereas the speed of the infrasound wave is near 330 m/sec. We discuss the potential of using this difference for tsunami early warning. Our results open the possibility to use the existing global seismic network for direct <span class="hlt">observations</span> of tsunamis and of infrasound signals caused by tsunamis. This is a new promising option in tsunami early warning.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Raveloson, A.; Kind, R.; Yuan, X.; Ceranna, L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">128</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.G21B0760P"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> signals are <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the GRACE SMB time series over Greenland and Antarctica by the IMF analysis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets are vulnerable to ongoing climate change. The Gravity Recovery and Climate experiment (GRACE) satellite mission allows for the estimation of ice mass variations at a near monthly timescales. Changes in Stokes coefficients from month to month allow computation of maps of spatial SMB variations. The limited range of Stokes coefficients (typically to degree of order 60) fundamentally limits spatial resolution. Furthermore, noise contamination generally increases with increasing degree and order. As the time <span class="hlt">period</span> of GRACE <span class="hlt">observations</span> is short, natural <span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations influence the calculation of the long-term trends. The GRACE monthly SMB over Antarctica and Greenland are used to investigate the dominant oscillations such as semi-annual oscillation (SAO), annual oscillation (AO), Quasi-biennial Oscillation (QBO), El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and 11-year solar cycle using novel method called empirical mode decomposition (EMD). The EMD is an interesting approach to decompose signals into locally <span class="hlt">periodic</span> components, the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), and will easily identify the embedded structures, even those with small amplitudes. Our analysis will help identify the prevailing <span class="hlt">periodic</span> mass signals in the Greenland and Antarctica regions and help constrain the long-term trends.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pangaluru, K.; Velicogna, I.; Sutterley, T. C.; van den Broeke, M. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">129</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950037368&hterms=hours+study&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dhours%2Bstudy"> <span id="translatedtitle">ROSAT/optical <span class="hlt">observations</span> of 2S 0114 + 65: A study of the 2.8 hour <span class="hlt">periodic</span> outbursts</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of the massive X-ray binary 2S 0114 + 65 acquired in 1992 July with the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) in the 0.1-2.4 keV X-ray band and in 1992 September with the 0.9 m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) in the optical V band are reported. The X-ray data confirm the presence of persistent 2.78 hr outbursts as previously deduced from archival data. The X-ray source displays apparent orbital effects consistent with noncircularity. Variable intrinsic absorption and intrinsic spectral variations are excluded as the cause of the X-ray modulation. The optical V-band photometic data do not reveal any <span class="hlt">periodic</span> modulation. The possibilty that the 2.78 hr <span class="hlt">period</span> is the rotation of the neutron star component is entertained.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Finley, John P.; Taylor, Maryjane; Belloni, Tomaso</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">130</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22224072"> <span id="translatedtitle">SWIFT <span class="hlt">OBSERVATIONS</span> OF THE HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARY IGR J16283-4838 UNVEIL A 288 DAY ORBITAL <span class="hlt">PERIOD</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on the temporal and spectral properties of the high-mass X-ray binary IGR J16283-4838 in the hard X-ray band. We searched the first 88 months of Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey data for long-term <span class="hlt">periodic</span> modulations. We also investigated the broad band (0.2-150 keV) spectral properties of IGR J16283-4838 complementing the BAT dataset with soft X-ray data from the available Swift-XRT pointed <span class="hlt">observations</span>. The BAT light curve of IGR J16283-4838 revealed a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> modulation at P{sub o} = 287.6 ± 1.7 days (with a significance higher than 4 standard deviations). The profile of the light curve folded at P{sub o} shows a sharp peak lasting ?12 days over a flat plateau. The long-term light curve also shows a ?300 day interval of prolonged enhanced emission. The <span class="hlt">observed</span> phenomenology <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that IGR J16283-4838 has a Be nature, where the narrow <span class="hlt">periodic</span> peaks and the ?300 day outburst can be interpreted as Type I and Type II outbursts, respectively. The broad band 0.2-150 keV spectrum can be described with an absorbed power-law and a steepening in the BAT energy range.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cusumano, G.; Segreto, A.; La Parola, V. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Palermo, Via U. La Malfa 153, I-90146, Palermo (Italy)] [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Palermo, Via U. La Malfa 153, I-90146, Palermo (Italy); D'Aì, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Palermo, via Archirafi 36, I-90123, Palermo (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Palermo, via Archirafi 36, I-90123, Palermo (Italy); Masetti, N. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129, Bologna (Italy)] [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129, Bologna (Italy); Tagliaferri, G., E-mail: cusumano@ifc.inaf.it [INAF-Brera Astronomical Observatory, via Bianchi 46, I-23807, Merate (Italy)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">131</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/135027"> <span id="translatedtitle">The growth of the oceanic boundary layer during the COARE intensive <span class="hlt">observational</span> <span class="hlt">period</span>: Large Eddy simulation results</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A principal goal of the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) is to gain an understanding of the processes that control mixing in the upper 100 m of the western tropical Pacific warm pool. The warm pool is an important heat reservoir for the global ocean and is responsible for many of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> climatic changes associated with El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events. This water mass is highly sensitive to mixed-layer processes that are controlled by surface heat, salinity, and momentum fluxes. During most of the year, these fluxes are dominated by solar heating and occasional squalls that freshen the top of the mixed layer and force shallow mixing of about 10-20 m. From November to April, the usual weather pattern is frequently altered by westerly wind bursts that are forced by tropical cyclones and intraseasonal oscillations. These wind bursts generate a strong eastward surface current and can force mixing as deep as 100 m over a <span class="hlt">period</span> of days. <span class="hlt">Observations</span> from the intensive <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> (IOP) in COARE indicate that mixed-layer deepening is accompanied by strong turbulence dissipation at the mixed layer base. A short westerly wind burst occurred during the first leg of TOGA-COARE, and lasted about 4-5 days. During this <span class="hlt">period</span>, the maximum winds were about 10 m s{sup -1}, and the resulting eastward surface flow was about 0.5 m s{sup -1}. The strength of this event was somewhat weaker than a typical westerly wind burst, but the mixed-layer structure and growth are similar to the more vigorous wind bursts discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Skyllingstad, E.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Sequim, WA (United States); Wijesekera, H.W.; Gregg, M.C. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Applied Physics Lab.] [and others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">132</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ACPD...13.2641B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variability of aerosol properties over Eastern Europe <span class="hlt">observed</span> from ground and satellites in the <span class="hlt">period</span> from 2003 to 2011</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The paper presents the study of aerosol variability in the <span class="hlt">period</span> from 2003 to 2011 over Eastern Europe region with latitude ranging from 40° N to 60° N and longitude from 20° E to 50° E. The analysis was based on the POLDER/PARASOL and POLDER-2/ADEOS satellites and AERONET ground-based sunphotometer <span class="hlt">observations</span>. The aerosol optical thickness (AOT) of the studied area is characterized by the values (referenced to 870 nm wavelength) ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 except the <span class="hlt">period</span> of July-August 2010 with strong forest and peat wildfires when the AOT typical values range from 0.3 to 0.5. The analysis of seasonal dynamics of aerosol loading has revealed two AOT high value peaks. The first peak <span class="hlt">observed</span> in April-May is the result of solitary transportation of Sahara dust in the atmosphere over Eastern Europe, infrequent agricultural fires, transportation of sea salt aerosols by southern winds to Ukraine and Moldova from the Black and Azov Seas. The second peak in August-September is associated with forest and peat wildfires, considerable transportation of Sahara dust and presence of soil dust aerosols due to harvesting activity. The maximum values of AOT are <span class="hlt">observed</span> in May 2006 (0.1-0.15), April 2009 (0.07-0.15) and August 2010 (0.2-0.5). Furthermore, the study has identified a distinct pattern of anthropogenic aerosols over the industrial areas, especially in the central Ukraine, eastern Belarus, as well as Moscow, Nizhny Novgorod and Stavropol regions in Russia. The comparison of the fine mode AOT (particle radius < 0.3 ?m) derived by standard algorithm POLDER/PARASOL from reflected polarized radiances with those recomputed from AERONET inversions was performed over a number of AERONET sites: over Kyiv and Sevastopol sites for the <span class="hlt">period</span> of 2008-2009 and over Moscow, Minsk, Belsk, and Moldova sites for the <span class="hlt">period</span> of 2005-2009. The correlation coefficients are 0.78 for Moscow, 0.76 - Minsk, 0.86 - Belsk, 0.93 - Kyiv, 0.81 - Moldova and 0.63 for Sevastopol sites. The deviations are explained by the spatial inhomogeneity of the surface polarization that has stronger effect on aerosol retrieval for clear atmospheric conditions with low aerosol loading when surface impact on satellite <span class="hlt">observations</span> is more pronounced. In addition, the preliminary analysis of the detailed aerosol properties derived by new generation PARASOL algorithm was accomplished. The AOT and single scattering albedo retrieved by the algorithm over Kyiv were compared with the closest AERONET retrievals within two hour of satellite overpass time and the stable atmospheric conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bovchaliuk, A.; Milinevsky, G.; Danylevsky, V.; Goloub, P.; Dubovik, O.; Holdak, A.; Ducos, F.; Sosonkin, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">133</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMSM43A2247K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Van Allen Probes <span class="hlt">observations</span> and test particle simulations of radiation belt wave-particle interactions during <span class="hlt">periods</span> of intense wave activity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent <span class="hlt">observations</span> of trapped radiation belt electrons <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that increased fluxes of high energy electrons during geomagnetically active <span class="hlt">periods</span> can be attributed to local acceleration and scattering through wave-particle interactions. We present case studies of Van Allen Probes EFW high time resolution electric and magnetic field waveforms and filterbank (wave packet counting) data during geomagnetically active <span class="hlt">periods</span> to assess the nature of the wave-particle interactions responsible for the rapid heating of trapped particle populations. We present these <span class="hlt">observations</span> with large scale test particle simulations of oblique whistler-mode wave-particle interactions. These simulations resolve the gyro- and bounce-motion of large distributions of test particles through multiple resonant interactions with large amplitude oblique waves, and are used to predict the evolution of trapped particle distributions through interaction with large amplitude wave fields. We will discuss the results and limitations of these simulations in the context of the waves and particle distributions <span class="hlt">observed</span> by the twin Van Allen Probes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kersten, K.; Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C. A.; Breneman, A. W.; Dai, L.; Zhang, S.; Bonnell, J. W.; Tao, J.; Roth, I.; Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Spence, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">134</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008cosp...37..652D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Probing the birth <span class="hlt">periods</span> and pair production multiplicities of neutron stars through multiwavelength <span class="hlt">observations</span> of their wind nebulae.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A pulsar wind nebula (PWN) contain leptons and possibly ions injected since the birth of its parent pulsar. X-ray synchrotron emitting electrons have a relatively short lifetime and would therefore reflect only the current spindown power. The latter then partly explains the ? well-known LX vs E relationhip for pulsars and their wind nebulae. Lower energy electrons radiating synchrotron emission in the radio to unseen UV domain, having lifetimes as long as, or longer than the age of the pulsar, give us a measure of the conditions since birth. The inverse Compton counterpart of the latter can however be probed by gamma-ray telesopes such as GLAST and ground-based telescopes. Such multiwavelength <span class="hlt">observations</span> are expected to give a measure of the birth <span class="hlt">period</span> since the injection spectrum is expected to be proportional to the change in rotational kinetic energy of the pulsar. Radiation losses towards higher energies would however hide the effect of the birth <span class="hlt">period</span>, in which case a time dependent transport equation with losses must be solved to calculate the multiwavelength spectrum. This allows us to set constraints on the birth <span class="hlt">periods</span> of neutron stars. The abovementioned procdure also allows us to determine the average pair production multiplicity in neutron stars: The particle acceleration process in neutron star magnetospheres, combined with the magnetic field line structure and target photon fields produce electrons and positrons through magnetic pair production and photon-photon pair production. A self consistent calculation of the pair production multiplicity M is usually difficult, although attempts have been made in the past to assess the value of M . Gamma-ray <span class="hlt">observations</span> of associated pulsar wind nebulae in the high energy and VHE domain, combined with multiwavelength synchrotron <span class="hlt">observations</span> in the radio through X-ray domain, allow us to probe the total amount of leptons injected since pulsar birth, which in turn gives us a measurement of M . A reliable measurement of M should constrain models for broad band magnetospheric pulsed emission. We will apply this to the composite SNR Kes 75 of which the spectrum is known from radio to TeV ?-rays. The known pulsar braking index also makes birth <span class="hlt">period</span> estimates more reliable.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">de Jager, Ocker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">135</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AdWR...55...53V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Occurrence of blowing snow events at an alpine site over a 10-year <span class="hlt">period</span>: <span class="hlt">Observations</span> and modelling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Blowing snow events control the evolution of the snow pack in mountainous areas and cause inhomogeneous snow distribution. The goal of this study is to identify the main features of blowing snow events at an alpine site and assess the ability of the detailed snowpack model Crocus to reproduce the occurrence of these events in a 1D configuration. We created a database of blowing snow events <span class="hlt">observed</span> over 10 years at our experimental site. Occurrences of blowing snow events were divided into cases with and without concurrent falling snow. Overall, snow transport is <span class="hlt">observed</span> during 10.5% of the time in winter and occurs with concurrent falling snow 37.3% of the time. Wind speed and snow age control the frequency of occurrence. Model results illustrate the necessity of taking the wind-dependence of falling snow grain characteristics into account to simulate <span class="hlt">periods</span> of snow transport and mass fluxes satisfactorily during those <span class="hlt">periods</span>. The high rate of false alarms produced by the model is investigated in detail for winter 2010/2011 using measurements from snow particle counters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vionnet, V.; Guyomarc'h, G.; Naaim Bouvet, F.; Martin, E.; Durand, Y.; Bellot, H.; Bel, C.; Puglièse, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">136</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988RpScT...3...23T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Determining earth's rotation from laser <span class="hlt">observations</span> of LAGEOS artificial earth satellite (during <span class="hlt">period</span> of main merit campaign)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An additional contribution is made to determine the parameters of the earth's rotation by laser determinations of the LAGEOS artificial earth satellite as <span class="hlt">observed</span> during the main campaign of the MERIT program. Ways to solve the many problems involved were outlined in the MERIT standards. However, the traditional algorithm to determine the parameters of the earth's rotation do not take into account the erroneousness or neglecting of parameters of the earth's rotation arising in the numerical integration of the equations of motion of a satellite, although this influence may be significant when making highly precise <span class="hlt">observations</span>. This article gives the results of a series of determinations of parameters of the earth's rotation obtained during the <span class="hlt">period</span> 1 September 1983 to 31 October 1984 using a new algorithm which takes this influence into account. A table gives the parameters of the earth's rotation for 89 arcs. Four solutions were obtained by the processing of 49,506 normal points of laser <span class="hlt">observations</span> distributed in a 14-month interval. An improved method is proposed for more precise determination of sidereal time on the basis of laser <span class="hlt">observations</span> of artificial earth satellites.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tsyupak, I. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">137</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1511197F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preliminary analysis of the Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> events occurred in Italy during the HyMeX campaign</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">HyMeX (Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean eXperiment) is a project aimed at a better understanding and quantification of the hydrological cycle and related processes in the Mediterranean. As a part of HyMeX, Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Periods</span> (SOPs) are dedicated to provide detailed and specific <span class="hlt">observations</span> to study key processes leading to orographic precipitation (ORP), heavy precipitation events (HPEs), and flash flood events (FFEs) in certain Target Areas (TAs). Informed by numerical weather forecasts and standard <span class="hlt">observations</span>, Intensive Operation <span class="hlt">Periods</span> (IOPs) are declared during the SOPs. Specific <span class="hlt">observations</span> in the TAs are provided by operational measurements (ground meteorological networks, soundings, and remote-sensing instruments), coupled with specific measurements during IOPs from several instruments, such as disdrometers, sodars, lidars, research radars, extra soundings, etc. In this paper an overview is presented of the HyMeX IOPs in Italy during SOP1 (5 September - 6 November, 2012). The Hydro-Meteorological sites of interest were: Liguria-Tuscany (LT), northeastern Italy (NEI) and central Italy (CI). Typical situations encountered for HPEs in LT involved upper-level southwesterly flow with low-level moist southerly or southeasterly flow over the Tyrrhenian and the Ligurian Sea. Highlights include a measurement of 300 mm/24h of rain at the border between Liguria and Emilia on Sept. 26, 2012 during IOP7b. For NEI region, HPEs mainly occurred with upper level southwesterly flow ahead of advancing troughs with low-level moist southerly or southeasterly flow over the Adriatic Sea. Highlights include 120 mm/24h of rain in Friuli Venezia Giulia on Sept. 12, 2012 during IOP2. For CI region, HPEs and FFEs, a slowly propagating cut-off low centered over southern Italy was <span class="hlt">observed</span>; the associated easterly flow on the north side of the cut-off low would frequently bring moisture into east central Italy from the Adriatic Sea. Highlights include an event with very intense convective cells producing more than 150 mm of rain in several hours in Abruzzo on Sept. 14, 2012 in IOP4; extensive flood occurred in this case. The ongoing analyses of these cases will shed light on the complex chain of events that determines the timing, location and intensity of HPEs over complex orography in the vicinity of maritime air masses and on the forecasting ability of the different meteorological models implemented for the campaign.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ferretti, Rossella</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">138</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1006.2792v1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> functions with variable <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The examples of rhythmical signals with variable <span class="hlt">period</span> are considered. The definition of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> function with the variable <span class="hlt">period</span> is given as a model of such signals. The examples of such functions are given and their variable <span class="hlt">periods</span> are written in the explicit form. The system of trigonometric functions with the variable <span class="hlt">period</span> is considered and its orthogonality is proved. The generalized system of trigonometric functions with the variable <span class="hlt">period</span> is also <span class="hlt">suggested</span>; some conditions of its existence are considered.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. V Pryjmak</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-06-08</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">139</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ACP....13.6587B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variability of aerosol properties over Eastern Europe <span class="hlt">observed</span> from ground and satellites in the <span class="hlt">period</span> from 2003 to 2011</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The paper presents some results of the study on aerosol variability in the <span class="hlt">period</span> from 2003 to 2011 over the Eastern Europe region, with latitude ranging from 40° N to 60° N and longitude from 20° E to 50° E. The analysis was based on the POLDER/PARASOL and POLDER-2/ADEOS satellites and AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based sun photometer <span class="hlt">observations</span>. The aerosol optical thickness (AOT) of the studied area is characterized by values (referenced to 870 nm wavelength) ranging from 0.05 to 0.2, except for in the <span class="hlt">period</span> of July-August 2010 with strong forest and peat wildfires when the AOT typical values range from 0.3 to 0.5 according to both retrievals. The analysis of seasonal dynamics of aerosol loading has revealed two AOT high value peaks. The spring peak <span class="hlt">observed</span> in April-May is the result of solitary transportation of Saharan dust in the atmosphere over Eastern Europe, infrequent agricultural fires, transportation of sea salt aerosols by southern winds to Ukraine and Moldova from the Black and Azov seas. The autumn peak in August-September is associated with forest and peat wildfires, considerable transportation of Saharan dust and the presence of soil dust aerosols due to harvesting activity. The maximum values of AOT are <span class="hlt">observed</span> in May 2006 (0.1-0.15), April 2009 (0.07-0.15) and August 2010 (0.2-0.5). Furthermore, the study has identified a distinct pattern of anthropogenic aerosols over the industrial areas, especially in central Ukraine and eastern Belarus as well as Moscow region in Russia. The comparison of the AOT derived by standard algorithm POLDER/PARASOL with those recomputed from AERONET inversions for fine mode particles with radius < 0.3 ?m was performed over several AERONET sites. The correlation coefficients for the POLDER/AERONET AOT retrieval comparisons are equal: 0.78 for Moscow site, 0.76 - Minsk, 0.86 - Belsk, 0.81 - Moldova (<span class="hlt">period</span> 2005-2009), 0.93 - Kyiv and 0.63 for Sevastopol sites (2008-2009). The deviations are explained by the spatial inhomogeneity of the surface polarization that has a stronger effect on aerosol retrieval for clear atmospheric conditions with low aerosol loading when surface impact on satellite <span class="hlt">observations</span> is more pronounced. In addition, the preliminary analysis of the detailed aerosol properties derived by a new generation PARASOL algorithm was evaluated. The comparison of AOT and single scattering albedo retrieved from the POLDER/PARASOL <span class="hlt">observations</span> over Kyiv with the closest AERONET retrievals within 30 min of satellite overpass time and with a cloudless day shows acceptable agreement of the aerosol dynamics. The correspondence of those data is <span class="hlt">observed</span> even for extreme AOT440 value 1.14, which was caused by the forest and peat fires in August 2010.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bovchaliuk, A.; Milinevsky, G.; Danylevsky, V.; Goloub, P.; Dubovik, O.; Holdak, A.; Ducos, F.; Sosonkin, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">140</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AdSpR..54.2151M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variations in Electron Content Ratio and Semi-thickness Ratio during LSA and MSA <span class="hlt">periods</span> and some Cyclone Genesis <span class="hlt">Periods</span> using COSMIC satellite <span class="hlt">observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study for the first time, COSMIC satellite data have been used to deduce values of ionospheric Electron Content Ratio (ECR) and Semi-thickness Ratio (Rtb) for Low Solar Activity (LSA) (2008) and Moderate Solar Activity (MSA) (2012) <span class="hlt">periods</span> over the Indian low-latitude (15-30°N) region with 80-95°E longitude. These two ratios provide sensitive information about bottom and topside ionosphere for different geophysical conditions. Extraction of suspected patterns and discrepancies unfold that the deviations between ECR and Rtb values during LSA <span class="hlt">period</span> are comparatively higher than that of MSA <span class="hlt">period</span> when the diurnal variability in these two parameters is flatter along with the diurnal-dips during pre-noon hours. The correlative relationship of ECR exhibits low association with NmF2 and anti-correlation with HmF2, whereas its correlation with Rtb is extremely high. During Cyclone Genesis <span class="hlt">Period</span> (CGP) strong dips in ECR and Rtb values with respect to pre and post CGP occurred which helps to take decisive conclusion about the ionospheric variations to be dominant through getting relatively higher Ne concentration in the bottom side part of the ionosphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mondal, Gopal; Gupta, Manojit; Sen, Goutam Kumar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" 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showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">141</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/891111"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shortwave Radiative Closure Studies for Clear Skies During the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement 2003 Aerosol Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program sponsored a large aerosol intensive <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> (AIOP) to study aerosol during the month of May 2003 around the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF) in north central Oklahoma. Redundant measurements of aerosol optical properties were made using different techniques at the surface as well as in vertical profile with sensors aboard two aircraft. One of the principal motivations for this experiment was to resolve the disagreement between models and measurements of diffuse horizontal broadband shortwave irradiance at the surface, especially for modest aerosol loading. This paper focuses on using the redundant aerosol and radiation measurements during this AIOP to compare direct beam and diffuse horizontal broadband shortwave irradiance measurements and models at the surface for a wide range of aerosol cases that occurred during 30 clear-sky <span class="hlt">periods</span> on 13 days of May 2003. Models and measurements are compared over a large range of solar-zenith angles. Six different models are used to assess the relative agreement among them and the measurements. Better agreement than previously achieved appears to be the result of better specification of input parameters and better measurements of irradiances than in prior studies. Biases between modeled and measured direct irradiances are in the worst case 1%, and biases between modeled and measured diffuse irradiances are less than 1.9%.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michalsky, Joseph J.; Anderson, Gail; Barnard, James C.; Delamere, Jennifer; Gueymard, C.; Kato, Seiji; Kiedron, P.; McComiskey, A.; Ricchiazzi, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-07-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">142</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.H31H1288S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Water quality <span class="hlt">observations</span> of ice-covered, stagnant, eutrophic water bodies and analysis of influence of ice-covered <span class="hlt">period</span> on water quality</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The water quality characteristics of ice-covered, stagnant, eutrophic water bodies have not been clarified because of insufficient <span class="hlt">observations</span>. It has been pointed out that climate change has been shortening the duration of ice-cover; however, the influence of climate change on water quality has not been clarified. This study clarifies the water quality characteristics of stagnant, eutrophic water bodies that freeze in winter, based on our surveys and simulations, and examines how climate change may influence those characteristics. We made fixed-point <span class="hlt">observation</span> using self-registering equipment and vertical water sampling. Self-registering equipment measured water temperature and dissolved oxygen(DO).vertical water sampling analyzed biological oxygen demand(BOD), total nitrogen(T-N), nitrate nitrogen(NO3-N), nitrite nitrogen(NO2-N), ammonium nitrogen(NH4-N), total phosphorus(TP), orthophosphoric phosphorus(PO4-P) and chlorophyll-a(Chl-a). The survey found that climate-change-related increases in water temperature were suppressed by ice covering the water area, which also blocked oxygen supply. It was also clarified that the bottom sediment consumed oxygen and turned the water layers anaerobic beginning from the bottom layer, and that nutrient salts eluted from the bottom sediment. The eluted nutrient salts were stored in the water body until the ice melted. The ice-covered <span class="hlt">period</span> of water bodies has been shortening, a finding based on the analysis of weather and water quality data from 1998 to 2008. Climate change was surveyed as having caused decreases in nutrient salts concentration because of the shortened ice-covered <span class="hlt">period</span>. However, BOD in spring showed a tendency to increase because of the proliferation of phytoplankton that was promoted by the climate-change-related increase in water temperature. To forecast the water quality by using these findings, particularly the influence of climate change, we constructed a water quality simulation model that incorporates the freezing-over of water bodies. The constructed model shows good temporal and spatial reproducibility and enables water quality to be forecast throughout the year, including during the ice-covered <span class="hlt">period</span>. The forecasts using the model agree well with the survey results of shortened ice <span class="hlt">period</span> and climate-change-related increase in the BOD in spring. From the result of calculations and <span class="hlt">observations</span>, it is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that water quality of spring has been deteriorate because of freezing <span class="hlt">period</span> to be shortened due to temperature rising.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">sugihara, K.; Nakatsugawa, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">143</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JGRD..118.8426T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Meteorological and dust aerosol conditions over the western Saharan region <span class="hlt">observed</span> at Fennec Supersite-2 during the intensive <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> in June 2011</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The climate of the Sahara is relatively poorly <span class="hlt">observed</span> and understood, leading to errors in forecast model simulations. We describe <span class="hlt">observations</span> from the Fennec Supersite-2 (SS2) at Zouerate, Mauritania during the June 2011 Fennec Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span>. These provide an improved basis for understanding and evaluating processes, models, and remote sensing. Conditions during June 2011 show a marked distinction between: (i) a "Maritime phase" during the early part of the month when the western sector of the Sahara experienced cool northwesterly maritime flow throughout the lower troposphere with shallow daytime boundary layers, very little dust uplift/transport or cloud cover. (ii) A subsequent "heat low" phase which coincided with a marked and rapid westward shift in the Saharan heat low towards its mid-summer climatological position and advection of a deep hot, dusty air layer from the central Sahara (the "Saharan residual layer"). This transition affected the entire western-central Sahara. Dust advected over SS2 was primarily from episodic low-level jet (LLJ)-generated emission in the northeasterly flow around surface troughs. Unlike Fennec SS1, SS2 does not often experience cold pools from moist convection and associated dust emissions. The diurnal evolution at SS2 is strongly influenced by the Atlantic inflow (AI), a northwesterly flow of shallow, cool and moist air propagating overnight from coastal West Africa to reach SS2 in the early hours. The AI cools and moistens the western Saharan and weakens the nocturnal LLJ, limiting its dust-raising potential. We quantify the ventilation and moistening of the western flank of the Sahara by (i) the large-scale flow and (ii) the regular nocturnal AI and LLJ mesoscale processes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Todd, M. C.; Allen, C. J. T.; Bart, M.; Bechir, M.; Bentefouet, J.; Brooks, B. J.; Cavazos-Guerra, C.; Clovis, T.; Deyane, S.; Dieh, M.; Engelstaedter, S.; Flamant, C.; Garcia-Carreras, L.; Gandega, A.; Gascoyne, M.; Hobby, M.; Kocha, C.; Lavaysse, C.; Marsham, J. H.; Martins, J. V.; McQuaid, J. B.; Ngamini, J. B.; Parker, D. J.; Podvin, T.; Rocha-Lima, A.; Traore, S.; Wang, Y.; Washington, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">144</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.A22D..06B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of Non-Methane Hydrocarbons Over India During the Asian Summer Monsoon <span class="hlt">Period</span>: Results from CARIBIC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The CARIBIC project (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container, www.caribic-atmospheric.com) involves the monthly deployment of an instrument container equipped to make atmospheric measurements from onboard a long-range commercial airliner. Since December 2004, flights for the second phase of CARIBIC have been aboard a Lufthansa Airbus A340-600 traveling between Frankfurt, Germany and destinations in Asia, North America and South America. The instrument package housed in the container (1.5 ton) is fully automated and during each monthly set of flights carries out a variety of real-time trace gas and aerosol measurements, and also collects 28 air samples, which are analyzed upon return to the laboratory. Routine measurements made from the sampling flasks include non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) analysis, and these measurements provide the basis for the data presented here. Between April and September of 2008, the container was deployed monthly on two sequential roundtrip flights between Frankfurt and Chennai, India. To achieve greater resolution, air samples were collected only on the first of the roundtrip flights, with 14 samples collected on the flight to Chennai and 14 collected on the return. These flights provided the opportunity to study the composition of the upper troposphere in this region during the Asian summer monsoon <span class="hlt">period</span> (typically June-September), which is characterized by anticyclonic circulation in the upper troposphere coupled with deep convection. Samples collected during the monsoon <span class="hlt">period</span> exhibit elevated levels of NMHCs relative to samples collected outside of the monsoon <span class="hlt">period</span>, with enhancements in ethyne and benzene being more substantial than enhancements in the alkanes. Enhanced mixing ratios are <span class="hlt">observed</span> between 15N and 40N, and correspond to enhancements in other trace gases, namely methane and CO. Ethyne in particular is strongly correlated with both methane and CO in this region; while CO and ethyne share a common, combustion, source, methane and ethyne do not, and this relationship indicates convection of a well-mixed air mass that is strongly and recently influenced by both agricultural and anthropogenic/urban sources. Trends in and relationships between NMHCs during the monsoon <span class="hlt">period</span> will be discussed here, as well as their relationships to other trace gases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baker, A. K.; Schuck, T. J.; Slemr, F.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">145</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AGUFM.H12C1008L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Us Contributions to the Coordinated Enhanced <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> (ceop) and Their Benefits to us Water Cycle Research</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The USA is a major contributor to the World Climate Research Programme's Coordinated Enhanced <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> (CEOP). Many US scientists are engaged in the project because they are convinced of the project's value for longer-term climate studies. The facilities of DOE, NASA and NOAA feature in US contributions to CEOP data set development. Through support from NOAA and NASA, UCAR is playing a major role in data processing and data set development. In return for these contributions, US scientists now have access to large international data sets that did not previously exist or were difficult to access. The use of these data sets for Water and Energy Simulations and Predictions and Monsoon system studies are already underway. These efforts will contribute to the Climate Change Science Program's (CCSP) Water Cycle theme, GEWEX Americas Prediction Project and NOAA's emerging Intraseasonal to Interannual Prediction (ISIP) program. The systems being developed through this process will advance some of the goals of the Water Cycle theme within the Integrated Global <span class="hlt">Observing</span> Strategy (IGOS) Partnership. However, there will be many more opportunities for creative use of these data sets. The purpose of this presentation is to increase awareness of the US contributions to CEOP; to provide interested scientists with information on how to access these data sets and to obtain feedback on additional uses of these unique global data sets.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lawford, R. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">146</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16318867"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interannual variability of surface heat fluxes in the Adriatic Sea in the <span class="hlt">period</span> 1998-2001 and comparison with <span class="hlt">observations</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Surface heat fluxes of the Adriatic Sea are estimated for the <span class="hlt">period</span> 1998-2001 through bulk formulae with the goal to assess the uncertainties related to their estimations and to describe their interannual variability. In addition a comparison to <span class="hlt">observations</span> is conducted. We computed the components of the sea surface heat budget by using two different operational meteorological data sets as inputs: the ECMWF operational analysis and the regional limited area model LAMBO operational forecast. Both results are consistent with previous long-term climatology and short-term analyses present in the literature. In both cases we obtained that the Adriatic Sea loses 26 W/m2 on average, that is consistent with the assessments found in the literature. Then we conducted a comparison with <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the radiative components of the heat budget collected on offshore platforms and one coastal station. In the case of shortwave radiation, results show a little overestimation on the annual basis. Values obtained in this case are 172 W/m2 when using ECMWF data and 169 W/m2 when using LAMBO data. The use of either Schiano's or Gilman's and Garrett's corrections help to get even closer values. More difficult is to assess the comparison in the case of longwave radiation, with relative errors of an order of 10-20%. PMID:16318867</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chiggiato, Jacopo; Zavatarelli, Marco; Castellari, Sergio; Deserti, Marco</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">147</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012A%26A...539A.135S"> <span id="translatedtitle">The quasi-biennial <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> (QBP) in velocity and intensity helioseismic <span class="hlt">observations</span>. The seismic QBP over solar cycle 23</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aims: We looked for signatures of quasi-biennial <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> (QBP) over different phases of solar cycle by means of acoustic modes of oscillation. Low-degree p-mode frequencies are shown to be sensitive to changes in magnetic activity due to the global dynamo. Recently there has been reported evidence of two-year variations in p-mode frequencies. Methods: Long high-quality helioseismic data are provided by BiSON (Birmingham Solar Oscillation Network), GONG (Global Oscillation Network Group), GOLF (Global Oscillation at Low Frequency) and VIRGO (Variability of Solar IRradiance and Gravity Oscillation) instruments. We determined the solar cycle changes in p-mode frequencies for spherical degree ? = 0, 1, 2 with their azimuthal components in the frequency range 2.5 mHz ? ? ? 3.5 mHz. Results: We found signatures of QBP at all levels of solar activity in the modes more sensitive to higher latitudes. The signal strength increases with latitude and the equatorial component also seems to be modulated by the 11-year envelope. Conclusions: The persistent nature of the seismic QBP is not <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the surface activity indices, where mid-term variations are found only from time to time and mainly in <span class="hlt">periods</span> of high activity. This feature, together with the latitudinal dependence, provides more evidence of a mechanism that is almost independent and different from the one that brings the active regions up to the surface. Therefore, these findings can be used to provide more constraints on dynamo models that consider a further cyclic component on top of the 11-year cycle.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Simoniello, R.; Finsterle, W.; Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Turck-Chièze, S.; Jiménez, A.; Roth, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">148</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1968209"> <span id="translatedtitle">Echelle diagrams and <span class="hlt">period</span> spacings of g modes in gamma Doradus stars from four years of Kepler <span class="hlt">observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We use photometry from the Kepler Mission to study oscillations in gamma Doradus stars. Some stars show remarkably clear sequences of g modes and we use <span class="hlt">period</span> echelle diagrams to measure <span class="hlt">period</span> spacings and identify rotationally split multiplets with l=1 and l=2. We find small deviations from regular <span class="hlt">period</span> spacings that arise from the gradient in the chemical composition just outside the convective core. We also find stars for which the <span class="hlt">period</span> spacing shows a strong linear trend as a function of <span class="hlt">period</span>, consistent with relatively rapid rotation. Overall, the results indicate it will be possible to apply asteroseismology to a range of gamma Dor stars.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bedding, Timothy R; Colman, Isabel L; Kurtz, Donald W</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">149</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1234135"> <span id="translatedtitle">Source geometry from exceptionally high resolution long <span class="hlt">period</span> event <span class="hlt">observations</span> at Mt Etna during the 2008 eruption</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the second half of June, 2008, 50 broadband seismic stations were deployed on Mt Etna volcano in close proximity to the summit, allowing us to <span class="hlt">observe</span> seismic activity with exceptionally high resolution. 129 long <span class="hlt">period</span> events (LP) with dominant frequencies ranging between 0.3 and 1.2 Hz, were extracted from this dataset. These events form two families of similar waveforms with different temporal distributions. Event locations are performed by cross-correlating signals for all pairs of stations in a two-step scheme. In the first step, the absolute location of the centre of the clusters was found. In the second step, all events are located using this position. The hypocentres are found at shallow depths (20 to 700 m deep) below the summit craters. The very high location resolution allows us to detect the temporal migration of the events along a dike-like structure and 2 pipe shaped bodies, yielding an unprecedented view of some elements of the shallow plumbing system at Mount Etna. These events do not s...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">De Barros, Louis; Lokmer, Ivan; Saccorotti, Gilberto; Zucarello, Luciano; O'Brien, Gareth; Métaxian, Jean-Philippe; Patanè, Domenico; 10.1029/2009GL041273</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">150</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010074719&hterms=gm&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dgm"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of Columnar Water Vapor Measurements During The Fall 1997 ARM Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span>: Solar Transmittance Methods</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the fall of 1997, during an Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> (IOP), the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program conducted a study of water vapor abundance measurement at its Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Among a large number of instruments, four sun-tracking radiometers were present to measure the columnar water vapor (CWV). All four solar radiometers retrieve CWV by measuring total solar transmittance in the 0.94-gm water vapor absorption band and subtracting contributions due to Rayleigh, ozone and aerosol transmittances. The aerosol optical depth comparisons among the same four radiometers has been presented elsewhere (Geophys. Res. Lett., 26, 17, 2725-2728, 1999). We have used three different methods to retrieve CWV. In a first round of comparison no attempt was made to standardize on the same radiative transfer model and its underlying water vapor spectroscopy. In the second round of comparison we used the same line-by-line code (which includes recently corrected H2O spectroscopy) to retrieve CAN from all four suntracking radiometers. This decreased the mean CWV by 8% or 13%. The spread of 8% in the solar radiometer results found when using the same model is an indication of the other-than-model uncertainties involved in determining CWV from solar transmittance measurements with current instrumentation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schmid, B.; Michalsky, J. J.; Slater, D. W.; Barnard, J. C.; Halthore, R. N.; Liljegren, J. C.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Livingston, J. M.; Russell, P. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">151</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005A%26A...442..271S"> <span id="translatedtitle">XMM-Newton <span class="hlt">observation</span> of the long-<span class="hlt">period</span> polar V1309 Orionis: the case for pure blobby accretion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using XMM-Newton we have obtained the first continuous X-ray <span class="hlt">observation</span> covering a complete orbit of the longest <span class="hlt">period</span> polar, V1309 Ori. The X-ray light curve is dominated by a short, bright phase interval with EPIC pn count rates reaching up to 15 cts s-1 per 30 s resolution bin. The bright phase emission is well described by a single blackbody component with kT_bb = (45 ± 3) eV. The absence of a bremsstrahlung component at photon energies above 1 keV yields a flux ratio F_bb/F_br ? 6700. This represents the most extreme case of a soft X-ray excess yet <span class="hlt">observed</span> in an AM Herculis star. The bright, soft X-ray emission is subdivided into a series of individual flare events supporting the hypothesis that the soft X-ray excess in V1309 Ori is caused by accretion of dense blobs carrying the energy into sub-photospheric layers. On average, the flares have rise and fall times of 10 s. In addition to the bright phase emission, a faint, hard X-ray component is visible throughout the binary orbit with an almost constant count rate of 0.01 cts s-1. Spectral modelling indicates that this emission originates from a complex multi-temperature plasma. At least three components of an optically thin plasma with temperatures kT= 0.065, 0.7, and 2.9 keV are required to fit the <span class="hlt">observed</span> flux distribution. The faint phase emission is occulted during the optical eclipse. Eclipse ingress lasts about 15-20 min and is substantially prolonged beyond nominal ingress of the white dwarf. This and the comparatively low plasma temperature provide strong evidence that the faint-phase emission is not thermal bremsstrahlung from a post-shock accretion column above the white dwarf. A large fraction of the faint-phase emission is ascribed to the spectral component with the lowest temperature and could be explained by scattering of photons from the blackbody component in the infalling material above the accretion region. The remaining hard X-ray flux could be produced in the coupling region, so far unseen in other AM Herculis systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schwarz, R.; Reinsch, K.; Beuermann, K.; Burwitz, V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">152</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0510403v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">XMM-Newton <span class="hlt">observation</span> of the long-<span class="hlt">period</span> polar V1309 Ori: The case for pure blobby accretion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using XMM-Newton we have obtained the first X-ray <span class="hlt">observation</span> covering a complete orbit of the longest <span class="hlt">period</span> polar, V1309 Ori. The X-ray light curve is dominated by a short, bright phase interval with EPIC pn count rates reaching up to 15 cts/sec per 30 sec resolution bin. The bright phase emission is well described by a single blackbody component with kT_bb = (45 +- 3) eV. The absence of a bremsstrahlung component at photon energies above 1 keV yields a flux ratio F_bb/F_br > 6700. This represents the most extreme case of a soft X-ray excess yet <span class="hlt">observed</span> in an AM Herculis star. The bright, soft X-ray emission is subdivided into a series of individual flare events supporting the hypothesis that the soft X-ray excess in V1309 is caused by accretion of dense blobs. In addition to the bright phase emission, a faint, hard X-ray component is visible throughout the binary orbit with an almost constant count rate of 0.01 cts/sec. Spectral modelling indicates that this emission originates from a complex multi-temperature plasma. At least three components of an optically thin plasma with temperatures kT= 0.065, 0.7, and 2.9 keV are required to fit the <span class="hlt">observed</span> flux distribution. The faint phase emission is occulted during the optical eclipse. Eclipse ingress lasts about 15--20 min and is substantially prolonged beyond nominal ingress of the white dwarf. This and the comparatively low plasma temperature provide strong evidence that the faint-phase emission is not thermal bremsstrahlung from a post-shock accretion column above the white dwarf. A large fraction of the softer faint-phase emission could be explained by scattering of photons from the blackbody component in the infalling material above the accretion region. The remaining hard X-ray flux could be produced in the coupling region, so far unseen in other polars.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Schwarz; K. Reinsch; K. Beuermann; V. Burwitz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-10-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">153</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.8375S"> <span id="translatedtitle">The HyMeX Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> in Central Italy: precipitation measurements, retrieval techniques and preliminary results</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Mediterranean area concentrates the major natural risks related to the water cycle, including heavy precipitation and flash-flooding during the fall season. The capability to predict such high-impact events remains weak because of the contribution of very fine-scale processes and their non-linear interactions with the larger scale processes. These societal and science issues motivate the HyMeX (Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment, http://www.hymex.org/) experimental programme. HyMeX aims at a better quantification and understanding of the water cycle in the Mediterranean with emphasis on intense events. The <span class="hlt">observation</span> strategy of HyMEX is organized in a long-term (4 years) Enhanced <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Periods</span> (EOP) and short-term (2 months) Special <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Periods</span> (SOP). HyMEX has identified 3 main Mediterranean target areas: North-West (NW), Adriatic (A) and South-East (SE). Within each target area several hydrometeorological sites for heavy rainfall and flash flooding have been set up. The hydrometeorological site in Central Italy (CI) is interested by both western and eastern fronts coming from the Atlantic Ocean and Siberia, respectively. Orographic precipitations play an important role due to the central Apennine range, which reaches nearly 3000 m (Gran Sasso peak). Moreover, convective systems commonly develop in CI during late summer and beginning of autumn, often causing localized hailstorms with cluster organized cells. Western fronts may heavily hit the Tiber basin crossing large urban areas (Rome), whereas eastern fronts can cause flash floods along the Adriatic coastline. Two major basins are involved within CI region: Tiber basin (1000 km long) and its tributary Aniene and the Aterno-Pescara basin (300 km long). The first HyMeX SOP1.1 was carried out from Sept. till Nov. 2012 in the NW target area. The Italian SOP1.1 was coordinated by the Centre of Excellence CETEMPS, University of L'Aquila, a city located in the CI heart. The CI area was covered by a uniquely dense meteorological instrumentation thanks to a synergy between Italian institutions and NASA-GSFC. The following RADARs were operated: a Doppler single-polarization C-band radar located at Mt. Midia; the Polar 55C Doppler dual-polarization C-band radar located in Rome; a Doppler C-band polarimetric radar located at Il Monte (Abruzzo); a polarimetric X-band mini-radar in L'Aquila; a polarimetric X-band portable mini-radar in Rome; a single-polarization X-band mini-radar in Rome. DISDROMETERs were also deployed: 4 Parsivel optical disdrometers in Rome (at Sapienza, CNR-ISAC and CNR-INSEAN); 1 2D-video disdrometer in Rome; 3 Parsivels optical disdrometer respectively in L'Aquila (Abruzzo), Avezzano (Abruzzo) and Pescara (Abruzzo). Other INSTRUMENTS were available: 1 K-band vertically-pointing micro rain-radar (MRR), 2 Pludix X-band disdrometers, 1 VLF lightining sensor, 1 microwave radiometer at 23-31 GHz in Rome (at Sapienza); the raingauge network with more than 200 stations in Central Italy. Three overpasses in CI were also performed by the Falcon 20 aircraft equipped with the 95GHz cloud radar RASTA. Analysis of the SOP1.1 main events in CI will be described by focusing on the raindrop size distribution statistics and its geographical variability. Intercomparison of rainfall estimates from disdrometers, raingauges and radars will be illustrated with the aim to provide a quality-controlled and physically consistent rainfall dataset for meteorological modeling validation and assimilation purposes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Silvio Marzano, Frank; Baldini, Luca; Picciotti, Errico; Colantonio, Matteo; Barbieri, Stefano; Di Fabio, Saverio; Montopoli, Mario; Vulpiani, Gianfranco; Roberto, Nicoletta; Adirosi, Elisa; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Anagnostou, Marios N.; Kalogiros, John; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Ferretti, Rossella; Gatlin, Patrick.; Wingo, Matt; Petersen, Walt</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">154</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=tic+AND+tac+AND+toe&pg=2&id=EJ346869"> <span id="translatedtitle">Open to <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Offers (1) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for improving college students' study skills; (2) a system for keeping track of parent, teacher, and community contacts; (3) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for motivating students using tic tac toe; (4) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for using etymology to improve word retention; (5) a word search grid; and (6) <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for using postcards in remedial reading…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Journal of Reading, 1987</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">155</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhDT.......134D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Results from two studies in seismology: I. Seismic <span class="hlt">observations</span> and modeling in the Santa Clara Valley, California. II. <span class="hlt">Observations</span> and removal of the long-<span class="hlt">period</span> noise at the Monterey ocean bottom broadband station (MOBB)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results from two projects are presented in this work. Following brief introductory Chapter 1 that provides general background, Chapter 2 describes the influence of the Santa Clara Valley (SCV) basin structure on the propagation of teleseismic waves. Teleseismic P-waves recorded during the 1998 deployment of the 41-station seismic array are used in the analysis. <span class="hlt">Observations</span> are compared to synthetics computed by 3D finite-difference simulations using the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D velocity models. Chapter 3 includes further study of the ground-motion amplification in the SCV using microseisms recorded by the SCV seismic array in 1998. The obtained results are compared to the local earthquake amplification. Chapter 4 presents results of the 3D simulations using the most recent version of the USGS velocity model for the greater San Francisco Bay Area. Results are compared to 1998 SCV seismic array <span class="hlt">observations</span> and to simulations presented in Chapter 2. Results presented in Chapters 2 to 4 all show strong correlations between basin depth reported in the USGS 3D seismic velocity model and different relative measures of ground motion parameters. The teleseismic, local earthquake and microseism <span class="hlt">observations</span> are also found to be strongly correlated with one another. Since the results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that all three datasets are sensitive to the basin structure, they can be used to improve the 3D velocity model. I started to develop a simultaneous inversion of the teleseismic, local, and microseism <span class="hlt">observations</span> to refine the seismic velocity model. Chapter 5 presents preliminary results and future plans. Results from the second project are included in Chapters 6 to 9. Chapter 6 provides information about the Monterey ocean bottom broadband seismic station (MOBB). It explains why seismology is moving into the oceans, describes the MOBB location, provides details about the instruments that comprise the MOBB, and describes the deployment. Examples of data and preliminary analysis are also included. Chapter 7 presents <span class="hlt">observations</span> of infragravity waves at MOBB. Combined with the information from the ocean buoys, the MOBB data show that the infragravity waves in the longer than 20 s <span class="hlt">period</span> band are mainly locally generated from shorter-<span class="hlt">period</span> ocean waves. Two types of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> infragravity band signal modulation are presented and possible mechanisms for the modulation are discussed. Also included is the analysis of the ocean bottom seismic data from the temporary Oregon ULF/VLF deployment that also indicates that the infragravity waves are primarily locally generated. Chapter 8 describes analysis of data from another ocean bottom station. KEBB is located offshore Washington, in deeper water and further offshore than MOBB. Results <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that in this case the infragravity waves are generated from shorter <span class="hlt">period</span> ocean waves in the coastal region and not locally at KEBB. Chapter 9 focuses on the removal of the long-<span class="hlt">period</span> background as well as signal-generated noise from the MOBB data. Methods used to improve signal-to-noise ratio for the ocean bottom seismic data are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dolenc, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">156</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/9810315v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">The CV <span class="hlt">Period</span> Minimum</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using improved, up-to-date stellar input physics tested against <span class="hlt">observations</span> of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs we calculate the secular evolution of low-mass donor CVs, including those which form with a brown dwarf donor star. Our models confirm the mismatch between the calculated minimum <span class="hlt">period</span> (P_min ~ 70min) and the <span class="hlt">observed</span> short-<span class="hlt">period</span> cut-off (~80min) in the CV <span class="hlt">period</span> histogram. Theoretical <span class="hlt">period</span> distributions synthesized from our model sequences always show an accumulation of systems at the minimum <span class="hlt">period</span>, a feature absent in the <span class="hlt">observed</span> distribution. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that non-magnetic CVs become unobservable as they are effectively trapped in permanent quiescence before they reach P_min, and that small-number statistics may hide the <span class="hlt">period</span> spike for magnetic CVs. We calculate the minimum <span class="hlt">period</span> for high mass transfer rate sequences and discuss the relevance of these for explaining the location of CV secondaries in the orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> - spectral type diagram. We also show that a recently <span class="hlt">suggested</span> revised mass-radius relation for low-mass main-sequence stars cannot explain the CV <span class="hlt">period</span> gap.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ulrich Kolb; Isabelle Baraffe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-10-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">157</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.U14A..03G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radon <span class="hlt">observations</span> by Gamma Detectors “PM-4 and PM-2” during the seismic <span class="hlt">period</span> (January - April 2009) in L’Aquila Basin. (Invited)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The measures of 222Radon from gamma detectors PM-4 and PM-2 in L’Aquila Basin have been analysed during the whole <span class="hlt">period</span> of major seismic activities in January to April 2009.The primary scope of our <span class="hlt">observations</span> was to study in systematic fashion the Radon variability related to the earthquakes occurrence .One of the outcome is to evaluate the possibility of using the “PM-4 and PM-2” methodology in Rn <span class="hlt">observation</span> to study the cycles in the earthquake occurrences in the L’Aquila region. Three stations have been in operation during the <span class="hlt">period</span> of December 2008 - April 2009: Coppito (Lat. +42° 22’N Long. +13° 20’E); Gran Sasso (Lat. 42° 25’N Long. +13° 30’E); and De Amicis (Lat. +42° 21’N Long. +13° 24’E;). The distance between Coppito and Gran Sasso it’s 20Km; Gran Sasso and De Amicis it’s 15Km; Coppito and De Amicis it’s 8Km. All of the stations are equipped with gamma detectors (PM-4 and PM-2) continuously measure the Radon coming vertically from subsoil. They consists of an NE110 or NE102 Plastic Scintillator of 800/600 cm3 seen by 4 or 2 photomultiplier Photonis xp3462b with a gain of ? 2 * 106, inserted into an airtight container of lead. The lead container is 7 cm thick. All of the detectors are installed 3 metres under the ground surface. At the detector is fixed in a window energy of 351 KeV and 609 KeV, which allows to counts gamma rays of 214Pb and 214Bi. The analogue signal, converted into digital signal, is sent to a counter that returns the value in counting rate, in an acquisition time of 600 sec and 7200 sec (2 hours). We are presenting a comprehensive overview of our <span class="hlt">observations</span> and the statistical trend during the seismic <span class="hlt">period</span> of January - April 2009 in L’Aquila Basin,. Our findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that Rn counts significantly increases in several hours up to two days, in advance to the major earthquakes occurrence in the region. Based on our experimental results, we argue that rapid changes in the concentration of radon, measured from gamma detectors, could be considered as a potential earthquake precursor for the L’Aquila region. We are recommending similar measurements to be performed and in other seismogenetic areas in order to crosscheck and validate our findings and to enable this methodology for the future multi disciplinary early warning systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Giuliani, G. G.; Giuliani, R.; Totani, G.; Eusani, G.; Totani, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">158</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ACP....14.5807Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimating Asian terrestrial carbon fluxes from CONTRAIL aircraft and surface CO2 <span class="hlt">observations</span> for the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2006-2010</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Current estimates of the terrestrial carbon fluxes in Asia show large uncertainties particularly in the boreal and mid-latitudes and in China. In this paper, we present an updated carbon flux estimate for Asia ("Asia" refers to lands as far west as the Urals and is divided into boreal Eurasia, temperate Eurasia and tropical Asia based on TransCom regions) by introducing aircraft CO2 measurements from the CONTRAIL (Comprehensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> Network for Trace gases by Airline) program into an inversion modeling system based on the CarbonTracker framework. We estimated the averaged annual total Asian terrestrial land CO2 sink was about -1.56 Pg C yr-1 over the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2006-2010, which offsets about one-third of the fossil fuel emission from Asia (+4.15 Pg C yr-1). The uncertainty of the terrestrial uptake estimate was derived from a set of sensitivity tests and ranged from -1.07 to -1.80 Pg C yr-1, comparable to the formal Gaussian error of ±1.18 Pg C yr-1 (1-sigma). The largest sink was found in forests, predominantly in coniferous forests (-0.64 ± 0.70 Pg C yr-1) and mixed forests (-0.14 ± 0.27 Pg C yr-1); and the second and third large carbon sinks were found in grass/shrub lands and croplands, accounting for -0.44 ± 0.48 Pg C yr-1 and -0.20 ± 0.48 Pg C yr-1, respectively. The carbon fluxes per ecosystem type have large a priori Gaussian uncertainties, and the reduction of uncertainty based on assimilation of sparse <span class="hlt">observations</span> over Asia is modest (8.7-25.5%) for most individual ecosystems. The ecosystem flux adjustments follow the detailed a priori spatial patterns by design, which further increases the reliance on the a priori biosphere exchange model. The peak-to-peak amplitude of inter-annual variability (IAV) was 0.57 Pg C yr-1 ranging from -1.71 Pg C yr-1 to -2.28 Pg C yr-1. The IAV analysis reveals that the Asian CO2 sink was sensitive to climate variations, with the lowest uptake in 2010 concurrent with a summer flood and autumn drought and the largest CO2 sink in 2009 owing to favorable temperature and plentiful precipitation conditions. We also found the inclusion of the CONTRAIL data in the inversion modeling system reduced the uncertainty by 11% over the whole Asian region, with a large reduction in the southeast of boreal Eurasia, southeast of temperate Eurasia and most tropical Asian areas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, H. F.; Chen, B. Z.; Machida, T.; Matsueda, H.; Sawa, Y.; Fukuyama, Y.; Langenfelds, R.; van der Schoot, M.; Xu, G.; Yan, J. W.; Cheng, M. L.; Zhou, L. X.; Tans, P. P.; Peters, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">159</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3852097"> <span id="translatedtitle">Change in heart rate variability precedes the occurrence of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> leg movements during sleep: an <span class="hlt">observational</span> study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Several reports have described that individual <span class="hlt">periodic</span> leg movements during sleep (PLMS) activities are associated with autonomic nervous system activity occurring shortly before each PLMS activity. Nevertheless, no study has investigated dynamic changes of autonomic nervous system activity before the onset of PLMS. This study detected changes in heart rate variability (HRV) at the onset of the <span class="hlt">period</span> with PLMS using complex demodulation method. Methods This study enrolled 14 patients diagnosed as having idiopathic PLMS disorder (PLMD). In <span class="hlt">periods</span> with and without PLMS during sleep stage 2, HRV-related variables and the spectral power of fluctuation of a high frequency (HF) band (FHFB) were analyzed and compared. The changes of those parameters during transition from the <span class="hlt">period</span> without PLMS to that with PLMS were explored. Results Spectral power in the low frequency (LF) band and very low frequency (VLF) band were higher in the <span class="hlt">period</span> with PLMS. Additionally, the average frequency in FHFB was higher. The frequency in this band fluctuated during the <span class="hlt">period</span> with PLMS with remarkable elevation of FHFB. Moreover, spectral powers in FHFB, LF, and VLF were remarkably elevated shortly before the beginning of the <span class="hlt">period</span> with PLMS (FHFB, -65 s; LF, -53 s; and VLF, -45 s). Conclusions Elevation of sympathetic nervous system activity and mean frequency fluctuation in an HF band can occur several tens of seconds before the <span class="hlt">period</span> with PLMS. Dynamic changes in the autonomic nervous system activity might be related to the vulnerability to PLMS occurrence during the night. PMID:24093585</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">160</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=JPRS65447"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hypnosis and <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The report contains a description of the use of hypnosis and <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> and examines the physiological foundation. It includes a determination of the degree of susceptibility to <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> and hypnosis, the techniques to hypnosis, and the reactions of pat...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. I. Bul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">161</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=soldering+OR+brazed&id=EJ903423"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Life of <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using the notion of a <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>, or rather charting the life of <span class="hlt">suggestions</span>, this article considers the happenings of chance and embodiment as the "problems that got away." The life of <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> helps us to ask how connectivities are made, how desire functions, and how "immanence" rather than "transcendence" can open up the politics and ethics…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pearce, Cathie</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">162</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ACPD...1327597Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimating Asian terrestrial carbon fluxes from CONTRAIL aircraft and surface CO2 <span class="hlt">observations</span> for the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2006 to 2010</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Current estimates of the terrestrial carbon fluxes in Asia ("Asia" refers to lands as far west as the Urals and is divided into Boreal Eurasia, Temperate Eurasia and tropical Asia based on TransCom regions) show large uncertainties particularly in the boreal and mid-latitudes and in China. In this paper, we present an updated carbon flux estimate for Asia by introducing aircraft CO2 measurements from the CONTRAIL (Comprehensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> Network for Trace gases by Airline) program into an inversion modeling system based on the CarbonTracker framework. We estimated the averaged annual total Asian terrestrial land CO2 sink was about -1.56 Pg C yr-1 over the <span class="hlt">period</span> 2006-2010, which offsets about one-third of the fossil fuel emission from Asia (+4.15 Pg C yr-1). The uncertainty of the terrestrial uptake estimate was derived from a set of sensitivity tests and ranged from -1.07 to -1.80 Pg C yr-1, comparable to the formal Gaussian error of ±1.18 Pg C yr-1 (1-sigma). The largest sink was found in forests, predominantly in coniferous forests (-0.64 Pg C yr-1) and mixed forests (-0.14 Pg C yr-1); and the second and third large carbon sinks were found in grass/shrub lands and crop lands, accounting for -0.44 Pg C yr-1 and -0.20 Pg C yr-1, respectively. The peak-to-peak amplitude of inter-annual variability (IAV) was 0.57 Pg C yr-1 ranging from -1.71 Pg C yr-1 to -2.28 Pg C yr-1. The IAV analysis reveals that the Asian CO2 sink was sensitive to climate variations, with the lowest uptake in 2010 concurrent with summer flood/autumn drought and the largest CO2 sink in 2009 owing to favorable temperature and plentiful precipitation conditions. We also found the inclusion of the CONTRAIL data in the inversion modeling system reduced the uncertainty by 11% over the whole Asian region, with a large reduction in the southeast of Boreal Eurasia, southeast of Temperate Eurasia and most Tropical Asian areas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, H. F.; Chen, B. Z.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; Machida, T.; Matsueda, H.; Sawa, Y.; Fukuyama, Y.; Labuschagne, C.; Langenfelds, R.; van der Schoot, M.; Xu, G.; Yan, J. W.; Zhou, L. X.; Tans, P. P.; Peters, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">163</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20030111483&hterms=physical+properties&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dphysical%2Bproperties"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Comet 2P/Encke: Physical Properties of the Nucleus and First Visual-Wavelength Detection of Its Dust Trail</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We are conducting an <span class="hlt">observational</span> program designed to determine the overall distributions of size, shape, rotation <span class="hlt">period</span>, and surface characteristics of cometary nuclei. Here, we present results from a study of the Jupiter- family comet 2P/Encke based on <span class="hlt">observations</span> from Steward Observatory's 2.3m Bok Telescope at Kitt Peak. This comet has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> extensively in the past and was one of the primary flyby targets of the recently failed CONTOUR mission.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lowry, Stephen C.; Weissman, Paul R.; Sykes, Mark V.; Reach, William T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">164</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51293588"> <span id="translatedtitle">Diurnal and semi-diurnal coordinate variations <span class="hlt">observed</span> in EUREF permanent GPS network - a case study for <span class="hlt">period</span> from 2004.0 to 2006.9</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The 2.9-year interval of homogeneous and continuous <span class="hlt">observations</span> at 29 European permanent GPS stations distributed all over the whole continent is analyzed for the short-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> variations of site coordinates. In the literature seasonal terms in GPS coordinate series are well documented; the main objective of this paper is to investigate the existence of variations with shorter <span class="hlt">periods</span>. We used the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ján Hefty; Miroslava Igondová</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">165</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Stockings&pg=6&id=EJ243808"> <span id="translatedtitle">Open to <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Practical <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> from teachers include activities for defining new English words, using free association and writing, stocking the sustained silent reading library, and using the compare/contrast strategy for word recognition. (MKM)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Journal of Reading, 1981</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">166</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18847580"> <span id="translatedtitle">LETTER TO THE EDITOR: <span class="hlt">Observation</span> of a complete band gap for liquid surface waves propagating over a <span class="hlt">periodically</span> drilled bottom</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study both theoretically and experimentally the propagation of liquid surface waves over a <span class="hlt">periodically</span> drilled bottom. A slab of a plate drilled with a triangular array of holes is placed in the middle of a liquid vessel. With the presence of point source waves generated on the one side of the plate, we can obtain propagative information of liquid</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yifeng Shen; Xiaohan Liu; Yunfei Tang; Yanfei Chen; Jian Zi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">167</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1424468"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table of ion charge-state distributions <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the transition region between vacuum sparks and vacuum arcs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ion charge-state distributions have been measured with high time resolution for short (20 ?s) and long (250 ?s) vacuum discharges of 300 A. Charge-state data for 3 ?s after discharge ignition and quasi-steady-state values are given for most conductive elements in a <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table, including data for a few elements (rhodium, europium, and terbium) that were never before reported in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">André Anders</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">168</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/129106"> <span id="translatedtitle">Soybean Insect Control <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">............................ 7 Soybean Stem Borer ....................... 8 Occasional Pests ...................... ..... . 8 Beneficial Arthropods ....................... 8 Insecticide Application Methods ............. 9 Biological Insecticides ....................... 9... Protecting Bees and Other Pollinators from Insecticides .............................. 10 Policy Statement for Making Chemical Control Recommendations ....................... 11 Soybean Insect Control <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> (chart) ... 12 Conversion Table...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Drees, B.M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">169</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1994/0512/report.pdf@noteAPPLICATION+SITE#texthttp://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1994/0512/application.zip"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of the surge-type Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska, during a quiescent <span class="hlt">period</span>, 1970-92</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report presents 23 years (1970 to 1992) of <span class="hlt">observations</span> of Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska. Black Rapids Glacier is a surge-type glacier which most recently surged in 1936-37, and is currently in its quiescent phase. This glacier is of special interest because it is a potential hazard to the trans-Alaska oil pipeline. Ten sites on the glacier were monitored from 1972 to 1987, and three sites were monitored from 1988 to 1992. The measurement program presented here includes <span class="hlt">observations</span> of surface mass balance, ice velocity, and surface altitude made twice each year. Additional one-time data include <span class="hlt">observations</span> of ice thickness, previously unreported <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the 1936-37 surge, establishment of the geodetic control monuments, and a new map of Black Rapids Glacier.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heinrichs, Thomas A.; Mayo, L. R.; Trabant, D. C.; March, R. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">170</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MNRAS.431.1167B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Detecting non-sinusoidal <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in <span class="hlt">observational</span> data: the von Mises periodogram for variable stars and exoplanetary transits</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper introduces an extension of the linear least-squares (or Lomb-Scargle) periodogram for the case when the model of the signal to be detected is non-sinusoidal and depends on unknown parameters in a non-linear manner. The problem of estimating the statistical significance of candidate <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> found using such non-linear periodograms is examined. This problem is related to the task of quantifying the distributions of the maximum values of these periodograms. Based on recent results in the mathematical theory of extreme values of a random field (the generalized Rice method), a general approach is provided to find a useful analytic approximation for these distributions. This approximation has the general form e^{-z} P(?{z}), where P is an algebraic polynomial and z is the periodogram maximum. The general tools developed in this paper can be used in a wide variety of astronomical applications, for instance in the study of variable stars and extra-solar planets. With this in mind, we develop and consider in detail the so-called von Mises periodogram - a specialized non-linear periodogram in which the signal is modelled by the von Mises <span class="hlt">periodic</span> function exp (? cos ?t). This simple function with an additional non-linear parameter ? can model the light curves of many astronomical objects that show various types of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> photometric variability. We prove that our approach can be perfectly applied to this non-linear periodogram. We provide a package of auxiliary C++ programs, attached as online-only material. These programs should facilitate the use of the von Mises periodogram in practice.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baluev, Roman V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">171</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/23192342"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oscillations with a long <span class="hlt">periodical</span> time <span class="hlt">observed</span> in solute transport by diffusion combined with convection through a single hollow-fiber membrane</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Solute transport by diffusion combined with convection through a single hollow-fiber membrane fixed on an axis of a circular tube was studied precisely. Purified water and an aqueous solution of a solute were fed at constant flow rates into the circular tube and the lumen of the membrane, respectively, and oscillations with a long <span class="hlt">periodical</span> time were <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Toshiyuki Kanamori; Takao Ohmori; Tomohiko Yamaguchi; Toshio Shinbo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">172</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ApJ...612..988T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectral Index and Quasi-<span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole Sources: <span class="hlt">Observational</span> Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in Black Holes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are <span class="hlt">observed</span> between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several black hole (BH) candidate sources, in low (hard) states, steep power law (soft) states, and transitions between these states. The <span class="hlt">observations</span> indicate that the X-ray spectra of such state (phases) show the presence of a power-law component and are sometimes related to simultaneous radio emission, indicating the probable presence of a jet. Strong QPOs (>20% rms) are present in the power density spectrum in the spectral range where the power-law component is dominant (i.e., 60%-90%). This evidence contradicts the dominant, long-standing interpretation of QPOs as a signature of the thermal accretion disk. We present the data from the literature and our own data to illustrate the dominance of power-law index-QPO frequency correlations. We provide a model that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of the power-law flux component. We argue for the existence of a bounded compact coronal region that is a natural consequence of the adjustment of the Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) a hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT>~50 keV), producing photon upscattering via thermal Comptonization (the photon spectrum index ?~1.7 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius), and (2) a soft state that is optically thick and relatively cold (kT<~5 keV; the index for this state, ?~2.8, is determined by soft-photon upscattering and photon trapping in a converging flow into the BH). In the TL model for the corona, the QPO frequency ?high is related to the gravitational (close to Keplerian) frequency ?K at the outer (adjustment) radius and ?low is related to the TL's normal mode (magnetoacoustic) oscillation frequency ?MA. The <span class="hlt">observed</span> correlations between index and low and high QPO frequencies are readily explained in terms of this model. We also <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a new method for evaluation of the BH mass using the index-frequency correlation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Titarchuk, Lev; Fiorito, Ralph</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">173</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gb.nrao.edu/epo/RET/ardis.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Research Experience for Teachers at NRAO-Green Bank : Predicting Good <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Periods</span> for High Frequency Radio Astronomy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">frequency <span class="hlt">observations</span> with the NRAO Green Bank Telescope are affected by atmospheric conditions. Water Element of the12 GHz Interferometer (foreground) with GBT and 140' telescopes in the background. Procedure, wind speeds and directions. · 850mb maps: direction of steering winds, cold or warm advection · Water</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Groppi, Christopher</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">174</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53773899"> <span id="translatedtitle">Testing the No-hair Theorem with <span class="hlt">Observations</span> in the Electromagnetic Spectrum. III. Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> Variability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">According to the no-hair theorem, astrophysical black holes are uniquely described by their masses and spins. An <span class="hlt">observational</span> test of the no-hair theorem can be performed by measuring at least three different multipole moments of the spacetime of a black hole and verifying whether their values are consistent with the unique combinations of the Kerr solution. In this paper, we</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tim Johannsen; Dimitrios Psaltis</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">175</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRA..117.9318T"> <span id="translatedtitle">First <span class="hlt">observational</span> evidence for opposite zonal electric fields in equatorial E and F region altitudes during a geomagnetic storm <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The strong westward electrojet and simultaneous upward drift of the equatorial ionospheric peak <span class="hlt">observed</span> over South-East Asia and Indian equatorial regions during the prolonged Dst minimum phase of an intense geomagnetic storm during 14-15 December 2006 are investigated for the altitudinal variation of zonal electric field polarity using ground based and space-borne <span class="hlt">observations</span>. The results show first <span class="hlt">observational</span> evidence for simultaneous existence of daytime westward and eastward zonal electric fields at equatorial E and F region altitudes, respectively, in a wide longitude sector. While the westward electric fields at E region altitudes cause westward electrojet, at the same time, the eastward zonal electric fields at F region altitudes cause the upward drift of the equatorial ionospheric peak and reinforcement of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) even in the topside ionosphere (˜660 km). The reversal of the electric fields is found to occur at ˜280 km height. A clear bifurcation of F region plasma at ˜280 km is evident in the iso-electron density contours due to these oppositely polarized zonal electric fields, which manifests as an unusually deep cusp between F1 and F2 layers on equatorial ionograms.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tulasi Ram, S.; Balan, N.; Veenadhari, B.; Gurubaran, S.; Ravindran, S.; Tsugawa, T.; Liu, H.; Niranjan, K.; Nagatsuma, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">176</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6632401"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> faceting on TaC(110): <span class="hlt">Observations</span> using high-resolution low-energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Unidirectional alternating (100)-(010) faceting has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> for the clean TaC(110) surface using both high-resolution low-energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy. Facets propagate <span class="hlt">periodically</span> along the [1[bar 1]0] direction and form a ridge-and-valley grating, characterized by an average <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of [similar to]6 lattice spacings in the [1[bar 1]0] direction, where (110) terraces are completely absent. This faceted surface is shown to be an energetically favored structure.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zuo, J.; Warmack, R.J.; Zehner, D.M.; Wendelken, J.F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6024 (United States))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-04-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">177</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014A%26A...572A..79K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Super-spinning compact objects and models of high-frequency quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations <span class="hlt">observed</span> in Galactic microquasars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have previously applied several models of high-frequency quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations (HF QPOs) to estimate the spin of the central Kerr black hole in the three Galactic microquasars, GRS 1915+105, GRO J1655-40, and XTE J1550-564. Here we explore the alternative possibility that the central compact body is a super-spinning object (or a naked singularity) with the external space-time described by Kerr geometry with a dimensionless spin parameter a ? cJ/GM2> 1. We calculate the relevant spin intervals for a subset of HF QPO models considered in the previous study. Our analysis indicates that for all but one of the considered models there exists at least one interval of a> 1 that is compatible with constraints given by the ranges of the central compact object mass independently estimated for the three sources. For most of the models, the inferred values of a are several times higher than the extreme Kerr black hole value a = 1. These values may be too high since the spin of superspinars is often assumed to rapidly decrease due to accretion when a ? 1. In this context, we conclude that only the epicyclic and the Keplerian resonance model provides estimates that are compatible with the expectation of just a small deviation from a = 1.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kotrlová, Andrea; Török, Gabriel; Šrámková, Eva; Stuchlík, Zden?k</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRD..119.2990A"> <span id="translatedtitle">The low-level jet dust emission mechanism in the central Sahara: <span class="hlt">Observations</span> from Bordj-Badji Mokhtar during the June 2011 Fennec Intensive <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">paper presents the first detailed analysis of low-level jets (LLJs) in the central Sahara from ground-based <span class="hlt">observations</span> at Bordj-Badji Mokhtar, Algeria, and addresses their operation as a dust emission mechanism. On LLJ mornings, composite wind speeds in the core (300 m aboveground level) reach 13.5 m s-1 at 0400. Surface temperatures increase from 0545 (30 min after sunrise), and jet decay begins around 0600. Ten meter winds lag those in the core by 5 h; peak 10 m wind speed, 7.5 m s-1, occurs at 0900. Only the deepest and strongest LLJs lead to dust emission. At 0600, these five LLJs have core wind speeds ?16 m s-1, below-core wind shear ? 0.6 m s-1/30 m, and wind shear between the core and 500 m above the core ?-1.8 m s-1. On these occasions, momentum mixes down from the LLJ after surface heating, leading to emission. On nondusty LLJ mornings, the convective boundary layer is 100 m shallower, and the LLJ is too weak to provide enough momentum to be mixed down for emission. LLJs are most frequently embedded in the monsoon flow or in the Harmattan; there is a clear association with the Saharan Heat Low. ERA-Interim reanalysis underestimates both Harmattan and monsoon LLJ core winds (by 4 m s-1 and 6 m s-1, respectively). The Met Office Africa Limited Area Model underestimates Harmattan LLJ core winds by only 0.2 m s-1. Monsoon LLJ core winds, however, are underestimated by 8.5 m s-1. Surface winds at 0900 are underestimated in both cases by up to 6 m s-1.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Allen, Christopher J. T.; Washington, Richard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1645733"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> and Modeling of the Companions of Short <span class="hlt">Period</span> Binary Millisecond Pulsars: Evidence for High-Mass Neutron Stars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present <span class="hlt">observations</span> of fields containing eight recently discovered binary millisecond pulsars using the telescopes at MDM Observatory. Optical counterparts to four of these systems are detected, one of which, PSR J2214+3000, is a novel detection. Additionally, we present the fully phase-resolved B, V, and R light curves of the optical counterparts to two objects, PSR J1810+1744 and PSR J2215+5135 for which we employ model fitting using the ELC model of Orosz & Hauschildt (2000) to measure the unknown system parameters. For PSR J1810+1744 we find that the system parameters cannot be fit even assuming that 100% of the spin-down luminosity of the pulsar is irradiating the secondary, and so radial velocity measurements of this object will be required for the complete solution. However, PSR J2215+5135 exhibits light curves that are extremely well constrained using the ELC model and we find that the mass of the neutron star is constrained by these and the radio <span class="hlt">observations</span> to be greater than 1.75 solar mas...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schroeder, Joshua</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA004426"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hypnosuggestive Therapy (Treatment by <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span> in Hypnosis).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Contents: A brief history of hypnosis; The theoretical foundations of hypnosis; The method of hypnotizing and verbal <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> in hypnosis; Indications for treatment by hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>; Clinical <span class="hlt">observations</span>; The role of hypno <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> therapy in e...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. M. Varshavskii</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jc/v086/iC10/JC086iC10p09698/JC086iC10p09698.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inertio-Gravity Wave Induced Accelerations of Mean Flow Having an Imposed <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Component: Implications for Tidal <span class="hlt">Observations</span> in the Meteor Region</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The semidiurnal harmonic exhibits great day-to-day variability in amplitude and phase. In addition, the variability appears to be substantially local and random, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a connection with gravity wave activity. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that a significant contribution to the <span class="hlt">observed</span> semidiurnal harmonic at meteor heights might result from inertio-gravity wave induced accelerations of the mean flow. The rate of wave forcing of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. L. Walterscheid</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...793...78S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> and Modeling of the Companions of Short <span class="hlt">Period</span> Binary Millisecond Pulsars: Evidence for High-mass Neutron Stars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present <span class="hlt">observations</span> of fields containing eight recently discovered binary millisecond pulsars using the telescopes at MDM Observatory. Optical counterparts to four of these systems are detected, one of which, PSR J2214+3000, is a novel detection. Additionally, we present the fully phase-resolved B, V, and R light curves of the optical counterparts to two objects, PSR J1810+1744 and PSR J2215+5135 for which we employ model fitting using the eclipsing light curve (ELC) model of Orosz & Hauschildt to measure the unknown system parameters. For PSR J1810+1744, we find that the system parameters cannot be fit even assuming that 100% of the spin-down luminosity of the pulsar is irradiating the secondary, and so radial velocity measurements of this object will be required for the complete solution. However, PSR J2215+5135 exhibits light curves that are extremely well constrained using the ELC model and we find that the mass of the neutron star is constrained by these and the radio <span class="hlt">observations</span> to be M NS > 1.75 M ? at the 3? level. We also find a discrepancy between the model temperature and the measured colors of this object, which we interpret as possible evidence for an additional high-temperature source such as a quiescent disk. Given this and the fact that PSR J2215+5135 contains a relatively high mass companion (M c > 0.1 M ?), we propose that similar to the binary pulsar systems PSR J1023+0038 and IGR J18245-2452, the pulsar may transition between accretion- and rotation-powered modes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schroeder, Joshua; Halpern, Jules</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SoPh..289.1239N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Imaging <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of X-Ray Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> Oscillations at 3 - 6 keV in the 26 December 2002 Solar Flare</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations in soft X-rays (SXR) are not well known due to the instrument limitations, especially the absence of imaging <span class="hlt">observations</span> of SXR oscillations. We explore the quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations of SXR at 3 - 6 keV in a solar flare <span class="hlt">observed</span> by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) on 26 December 2002. This was a B8.1 class event and showed three X-ray sources (S1, S2, and S3) at 3 - 6 keV and two sources (S1 and S2) at 12 - 25 keV. The light curves of the total fluxes display a two-minute oscillation at 3 - 6 keV, but not in the energy bands above 8 keV. To investigate imaging <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the oscillations, we prepared CLEAN images at seven energy bands between 3 keV and 20 keV with an eight-second integration. The light curves of three sources were analyzed after integrating the flux of each source region. We used the Fourier method to decompose each source light curve into rapidly varying and slowly varying components. The rapidly varying components show seven individual peaks which are well fitted with a sine function. Then we used the wavelet method to analyze the <span class="hlt">periods</span> in the rapidly varying component of each source. The results show that three sources display damped quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations with a similar two-minute <span class="hlt">period</span>. The damped oscillations timescale varies between 2.5 to 6 minutes. Source S1 oscillates with the same phase as S3, but is almost in anti-phase with S2. Analyzing the flaring images in more detail, we found that these oscillation peaks are well consistent with the appearance of S3, which seems to split from or merge with S2 with a <span class="hlt">period</span> of two minutes. The flare images with a high cadence of one second at 3 - 6 keV show that source S3 appears with a rapid <span class="hlt">period</span> of 25 seconds. The two-minute oscillation shows the highest spectral power. Source S3 seems to shift its position along the flare loop with a mean speed of 130 km s-1, which is of the same order as the local sound speed. This connection between the oscillation peaks and emission enhancement appears to be an <span class="hlt">observational</span> constraint on the emission mechanism at 3 - 6 keV.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ning, Zongjun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFMSA51B1129L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coherent Scatter Imaging Radar <span class="hlt">Observations</span>: Insights Provided By a New Tool for Studies of Midlatitude Sporadic E and Quasi-<span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Echo Structures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The development of the coherent scatter radar imaging technique has provided a unique new tool for studying the structure of plasma irregularities in the ionosphere. This in-beam or aperture synthesis technique was applied extensively in an experiment carried out in June and July 2002 on the island of St. Croix in the Caribbean in which the coherent scatter looked westward toward the island of Puerto Rico. In particular, the imaging radar instrumentation was used in conjunction with the Arecibo Observatory incoherent scatter radar to study the horizontal and vertical spatial structure in quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> echoes associated with sporadic E layers located over Puerto Rico. The imaging technique has provided new measurements with unprecedented resolution that show both the spatial structure and movement of the irregularities. The St. Croix <span class="hlt">observations</span> show that the quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> structures are localized in the vertical and horizontal directions. Although there is a slight preference for propagation along the northeast to southwest direction, other propagation directions also occur. Especially when viewed in the context of recent rocket and radar experiments, such as the SEEK 2 experiment that was carried out in Japan, the St. Croix data provide an important new perspective on the dynamics associated with the quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> echo structures. The types of measurements that can be provided by the imaging technique will be presented, and the <span class="hlt">observations</span> of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> echo structures will be analyzed in the context of other recent rocket and radar experiments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Larsen, M. F.; Hysell, D. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/ja/ja0605/2005JA011335/2005JA011335.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characteristics and implications of Doppler spectra of E region quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> echoes <span class="hlt">observed</span> by the multibeam middle and upper atmosphere radar</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present multibeam middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar <span class="hlt">observations</span> of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> (QP) echoes from 3.2-m field-aligned irregularities associated with plasma patches in the nighttime midlatitude sporadic E (Es) layers over Shigaraki, Japan, to give a cohesive view of the QP echo characteristics. Echo regions with zonal scales less than 50 km moved westward at altitudes near 105 km with</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tadahiko Ogawa; Yuichi Otsuka; Mamoru Yamamoto</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820010211&hterms=OSO&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DOSO"> <span id="translatedtitle">High energy X-ray <span class="hlt">observations</span> of CYG X-3 from from OSO-8: Further evidence of a 34.1 day <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The X-ray source Cyg X-3 (=4U2030+40) was <span class="hlt">observed</span> with the high energy X-ray spectrometer on OSO-8 for two weeks in 1975 and in 1976 and for one week in 1977. No change in spectral shape and intensity above 23 keV was <span class="hlt">observed</span> from year to year. No correlation is <span class="hlt">observed</span> between the source's intensity and the phase of the 34.1 day <span class="hlt">period</span> discovered by Molteni, et al. (1980). The pulsed fraction of the 4.8 hour light curve between 23 and 73 keV varies from week to week, however, and the magnitude of the pulsed fraction appears to be correlated with the 34.1 day phase. No immediate explanation of this behavior is apparent in terms of previously proposed models of the source.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dolan, J. F.; Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3958923"> <span id="translatedtitle">Prognostic Factors for Long-Term Survival in Patients with Ampullary Carcinoma: The Results of a 15-Year <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> after Pancreaticoduodenectomy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Introduction. Although ampullary carcinoma has the best prognosis among all periampullary carcinomas, its long-term survival remains low. Prognostic factors are only available for a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 10 years after pancreaticoduodenectomy. The aim of this retrospective study was to identify factors that influence the long-term patient survival over a 15-year <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span>. Methods. From 1992 to 2007, 143 patients with ampullary carcinoma underwent pancreatic resection. 86 patients underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (60%) and 57 patients underwent standard Kausch-Whipple pancreaticoduodenectomy (40%). Results. The overall 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year survival rates were 79%, 40%, 24%, and 10%, respectively. Within a mean <span class="hlt">observation</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> of 30 (0–205) months, 100 (69%) patients died. Survival analysis showed that positive lymph node involvement (P = 0.001), lymphatic vessel invasion (P = 0.0001), intraoperative administration of packed red blood cells (P = 0.03), an elevated CA 19-9 (P = 0.03), jaundice (P = 0.04), and an impaired patient condition (P = 0.01) are strong negative predictors for a reduced patient survival. Conclusions. Patients with ampullary carcinoma have distinctly better long-term survival than patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Long-term survival depends strongly on lymphatic nodal and vessel involvement. Moreover, a preoperative elevated CA 19-9 proved to be a significant prognostic factor. Adjuvant therapy may be essential in patients with this risk constellation. PMID:24723741</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jacob, Dietmar; Bahra, Marcus; Puhl, Gero; Krannich, Alexander; Andreou, Andreas; Gul, Safak; Guckelberger, Olaf</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/41044"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Genetic A.I.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for "Genetic A.I.": an attempt to model the genesis of intelligence in human infants, particularly as described by Piaget's theory of the Sensorimotor <span class="hlt">period</span>. The paper includes a synopsis ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Drescher, Gary L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740014854&hterms=leg+contractions&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dleg%2Bcontractions"> <span id="translatedtitle">Explorer 45 (S 3-A) <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the magnetosphere and magnetopause during the 4-5 August 1972, magnetic storm <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Explorer 45 satellite performed extensive field and particle measurements in the heart of the magnetosphere during the double magnetic storm <span class="hlt">period</span> of August 4-5, 1972. Both ground level magnetic records and the magnetic field deformations measured along the orbit by the satellite indicated the existence of only a moderate ring current. This was confirmed by the measurements of the total proton energy density less than those <span class="hlt">observed</span> during the December 1971 and June 1972 magnetic storms. The plasmapause in the noon quadrant was eroded continuously from the onset of the first storm at the beginning of August 4 to an altitude below L = 2.07 at about 18 hours on August 5. During the orbit containing the second sudden commencement a large amount of low frequency electric and magnetic field noise was encountered throughout the entire orbit. A noteworthy <span class="hlt">observation</span> during this orbit was the contraction of the magnetopause to distances inside the satellite at L = 5.2.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hoffman, R. A.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Anderson, R. R.; Maynard, N. C.; Smith, P. H.; Fritz, T. A.; Williams, D. J.; Konradi, A.; Gurnett, D. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5376390"> <span id="translatedtitle">Operation of a digital seismic network on Mount St. Helens volcano and <span class="hlt">observations</span> of long <span class="hlt">period</span> seismic events that originate under the volcano</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 9 station digital seismic array was operated on Mount St. Helens volcano in Washington State during 1981. One of the stations was placed inside the crater of the volcano, six were located on the flanks of the volcano within two km of the crater and two were approximately ten km from the crater. Four of the instruments recorded three components of motion and the remaining five recorded only the vertical component. A one day experiment was carried out during which the crater monitoring seismometer was complimented by the addition of two ink recording instruments. During the one day experiment six <span class="hlt">observers</span> recorded times of rockfall, felt-earthquake occurrences, and changes in steam emissions from the dome in the crater. Using information obtained during the one day experiment seismic events recorded by the digital instruments were classified as earthquakes, rockfalls, helicopter noise and a type of event that is unique to volcanoes which is called long <span class="hlt">period</span>. Waveforms of these long <span class="hlt">period</span> events have a duration of up to 30 seconds and a spectrum that is peaked at approximately 2 Hz. The frequency at which the peak in the spectrum occurs is nearly the same at all stations which means that the unique waveform of long <span class="hlt">period</span> events is due to a source effect, not a path effect. The peak frequency is fairly insensitive to the amplitude of the signal which means that the size of the source region is constant, independent of the signal amplitude. Long <span class="hlt">period</span> events were not felt and were accompanied by no visible changes inside the crater which lead to the conclusion that they are some sort of seismic disturbance generated inside the Volcano.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fehler, M.; Chouet, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22039312"> <span id="translatedtitle">EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET MULTI-WAVELENGTH <span class="hlt">OBSERVATIONS</span> OF QUASI-<span class="hlt">PERIODIC</span> PULSATIONS IN A SOLAR POST-FLARE CUSP-SHAPE LOOP WITH SDO/AIA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present extreme-ultraviolet multi-wavelength <span class="hlt">observations</span> with the SDO/AIA instruments of quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> pulsations (QPPs) propagating along a cusp-shaped loop formed after an M2.2 flare on the Sun. Our motivation is to detect whether there were slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves propagating along its protruding flux tube. To this end, with fast Fourier transform we extract the short (<3 minutes) and long (>3 minutes) <span class="hlt">period</span> components of the QPPs from time-space diagrams of the tube slices. We find that velocity differences did exist among the short/long-<span class="hlt">period</span> components of different wavelengths, but only one event in the long-<span class="hlt">period</span> ones showed they were greater than the measurement errors (e.g., 65 km s{sup -1}), which were 330 km s{sup -1} detected in 171 A, 590 km s{sup -1} in 211 A, and 180 km s{sup -1} in 304 A. The intensity modulation in all wavelengths is found to be very large, e.g., {approx}60% of the emission trend for an event in the 171 A passband, which would be an order of magnitude higher than the perturbation of the plasma density in the slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves. Moreover, only the QPPs with upward velocities of 50-300 km s{sup -1} are found in the tube, and the downward ones of several tens of kilometers are never unambiguously detected. Therefore, most of the QPP events under study were likely the episodic outflows along the tube, and the one with a supersonic speed of 590 km s{sup -1} may be a kink wave.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Su, J. T. [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Shen, Y. D.; Liu, Y. [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1950732"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quasi-<span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Oscillations in Short Recurring Bursts of the magnetars SGR 1806-20 and SGR 1900+14 <span class="hlt">Observed</span> With RXTE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the giant flares of magnetars are of particular interest due to their potential to open up a window into the neutron star interior via neutron star asteroseismology. However, only three giant flares have been <span class="hlt">observed</span>. We therefore make use of the much larger data set of shorter, less energetic recurrent bursts. Here, we report on a search for QPOs in a large data set of bursts from the two most burst-active magnetars, SGR 1806-20 and SGR 1900+14, <span class="hlt">observed</span> with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). We find a single detection in an averaged periodogram comprising 30 bursts from SGR 1806-20, with a frequency of 57 Hz and a width of 5 Hz, remarkably similar to a giant flare QPO <span class="hlt">observed</span> from SGR 1900+14. This QPO fits naturally within the framework of global magneto-elastic torsional oscillations employed to explain the giant flare QPOs. Additionally, we uncover a limit on the applicability of Fourier analysis for light curves with low background count rates and s...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huppenkothen, D; Watts, A L; Gö?ü?, E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...795..114H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> Oscillations in Short Recurring Bursts of Magnetars SGR 1806–20 and SGR 1900+14 <span class="hlt">Observed</span> with RXTE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations (QPOs) <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the giant flares of magnetars are of particular interest due to their potential to open up a window into the neutron star interior via neutron star asteroseismology. However, only three giant flares have been <span class="hlt">observed</span>. We therefore make use of the much larger data set of shorter, less energetic recurrent bursts. Here, we report on a search for QPOs in a large data set of bursts from the two most burst-active magnetars, SGR 1806-20 and SGR 1900+14, <span class="hlt">observed</span> with Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We find a single detection in an averaged periodogram comprising 30 bursts from SGR 1806–20, with a frequency of 57 Hz and a width of 5 Hz, remarkably similar to a giant flare QPO <span class="hlt">observed</span> from SGR 1900+14. This QPO fits naturally within the framework of global magneto-elastic torsional oscillations employed to explain giant flare QPOs. Additionally, we uncover a limit on the applicability of Fourier analysis for light curves with low background count rates and strong variability on short timescales. In this regime, standard Fourier methodology and more sophisticated Fourier analyses fail in equal parts by yielding an unacceptably large number of false-positive detections. This problem is not straightforward to solve in the Fourier domain. Instead, we show how simulations of light curves can offer a viable solution for QPO searches in these light curves.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huppenkothen, D.; Heil, L. M.; Watts, A. L.; Gö?ü?, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57342859"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestion</span> systems in organizations: what motivates employees to submit <span class="hlt">suggestions</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose – <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span> systems offer the opportunity for organizations to benefit directly from their employees' innovativeness. The purpose of this paper is to investigate processes underlying employees' involvement with <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> systems. It examines the relationship between interactional justice of the <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> system, valence of the <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> system (VSS), employees' wellbeing, and their motivation to submit <span class="hlt">suggestions</span>. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Data were</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Veronika I. D. Buech; Alexandra Michel; Karlheinz Sonntag</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRD..119.1786R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Time evolution of monsoon low-level jet <span class="hlt">observed</span> over an Indian tropical station during the peak monsoon <span class="hlt">period</span> from high-resolution Doppler wind lidar measurements</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">wind lidar measurements of horizontal winds at an Indian tropical station, Mahbubnagar (16.73°N, 77.98°E, 445 m above mean sea level), were used to investigate the time evolution of the monsoon low-level jet (MLLJ) during the southwest monsoon season. Vertical profiles of zonal wind in the altitude range of 100 to 3000 m above surface (at every 50 m height interval and 5 min time averaged) obtained during the <span class="hlt">period</span> 25 July to 23 August 2011 are considered for the analysis. The zonal winds in the altitude up to 3000 m above ground are predominantly westerly throughout the <span class="hlt">period</span> and on almost all the days there is a westerly wind speed maximum around 500 m above ground during nighttime. Soon after local sunrise, the core of this wind speed maximum (jet) gets lifted up and by afternoon, the westerly wind maximum is shifted to a higher altitude of 2000 m-2500 m without much change in its magnitude. Analysis of the high-resolution lidar data strongly indicates that the same nocturnal LLJ seems to be moving up and evolving into a daytime westerly MLLJ reported in several previous studies. Wind speed and direction derived from the wind lidar agree reasonably well with simultaneously <span class="hlt">observed</span> GPS upper air sounding wind measurements. Further analysis shows that the time-height evolution of the jet core is closely associated with daytime convection and boundary layer growth. The presence of clouds over the region seems to inhibit this type of time evolution.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ruchith, R. D.; Raj, P. Ernest; Kalapureddy, M. C. R.; Deshpande, Sachin M.; Dani, K. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940017132&hterms=Land+intensive&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DLand%2Bintensive"> <span id="translatedtitle">A synoptic-scale overview of the TOGA COARE intensive <span class="hlt">observing</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> November 1992 to February 1993 based on analyses from US operational global data assimilation systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The operational global analyses from the two major U.S. numerical weather prediction centers, the Navy's Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center and the National Meteorological Center, are used to describe the synoptic-scale features of the 1 Nov. 1992 to 28 Feb. 1993 TOGA COARE intensive <span class="hlt">observing</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> (IOP). TOGA COARE is an international field experiment in which a large number of research scientists from the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (Code 910) and the Laboratory for Hydrospheres (Code 970) participated. Two high-amplitude intraseasonal (30-60 day) oscillations passed through the TOGA COARE <span class="hlt">observational</span> network located in the equatorial western Pacific. Associated with the oscillations were two 6-10 day <span class="hlt">periods</span> of persistent westerly surface winds at the equator or 'westerly wind bursts.' These events are depicted through time series and time-longitude cross sections of divergence/velocity potential, surface winds, precipitation, ocean mixed-layer depth, and sea surface temperature. The high and low frequency components of the flow in which the intraseasonal oscillations were embedded are shown using seasonal, monthly, and 5-day averages of the surface, 850 and 200 mb winds, precipitation, and sea-level pressure, and a time-longitude cross section of tropical cyclone activity. Independent verification of precipitation comes from near real-time satellite estimates, and a reference climatology is given based on 9 years of ECMWF analyses. Daily 00 UTC analyses of surface winds and sea-level pressure for the entire western Pacific and Indian Ocean are provided to trace the evolution of individual synoptic events.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fiorino, M.; Lord, S. J.; Lau, W. K.-M.; Phoebus, P. A.; Strey, C. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRD..11711304Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal variations of midlatitude mesospheric Na layer and their tidal <span class="hlt">period</span> perturbations based on full diurnal cycle Na lidar <span class="hlt">observations</span> of 2002-2008</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Na lidar facility at Colorado State University (41°N, 105°W) started the full diurnal cycle <span class="hlt">observations</span> of mesopause region temperature and zonal and meridional winds as well as mesospheric Na density in May 2002. In this paper, monthly means and seasonal variations of the density of mesospheric Na based on lidar <span class="hlt">observations</span> from May 2002 to December 2008 are reported along with the amplitude and phase of tidal <span class="hlt">period</span> perturbations. The revealed seasonal behaviors of mesospheric Na layer are generally consistent with published nocturnal climatology, with thick layers and high abundance in winter but thin layers and low abundance near summer. Tidal amplitudes of Na density are large in February-April and August-November with a dominant peak between 85 and 90 km; they are weak in summer months (May-July). The Na density tidal phase profiles, while showing downward progression, show a significant and abrupt phase shift (ideally 180 degrees). The center altitude of this phase shifting (termed switching altitude) is found to coincide with the fractional tidal amplitude (tidal amplitude over diurnal mean) minimum about 2-4 km above the centroid altitude of the associated Na layer. Taking advantage of the established temperature tidal climatology deduced from the same data set, the tidal phase behaviors between temperature and Na density and associated fractional Na density tidal amplitudes are discussed in terms of the theoretical prediction by Gardner and Shelton (1985).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yuan, Tao; She, C.-Y.; Kawahara, Takuya D.; Krueger, D. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760031346&hterms=magnetic+storms&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dmagnetic%2Bstorms"> <span id="translatedtitle">Explorer 45 /S3-A/ <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the magnetosphere and magnetopause during the August 4-6, 1972, magnetic storm <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Explorer 45 (S3-A) satellite performed extensive field and particle measurements in the heart of the magnetosphere during the double magnetic storm <span class="hlt">period</span> of August 4-6, 1972. Both the ground level magnetic records and the magnetic field deformations measured along the orbit by the satellite indicated the existence of only a moderate ring current. This was confirmed by the measurements of the total proton energy density by the on-board particle detectors, which showed a maximum energy density less than the densities <span class="hlt">observed</span> during the December 1971 and June 1972 magnetic storms. The plasmapause in the noon quadrant was eroded continuously from the onset of the first storm at the beginning of August 4 to an altitude below L = 2.07 at about 1800 hours on August 5. Throughout the entire orbit during which the second sudden commencement occurred, a large amount of low-frequency electric and magnetic field noise was encountered. The most remarkable <span class="hlt">observation</span> during this orbit was the contraction of the magnetopause to distances inside the satellite location at L = 5.2.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hoffman, R. A.; Maynard, N. C.; Smith, P. H.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Anderson, R. R.; Gurnett, D. A.; Fritz, T. A.; Williams, D. J.; Konradi, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19960021096&hterms=leaf+thickness+desert&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dleaf%2Bthickness%2Bdesert"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cloud Properties Derived From GOES-7 for Spring 1994 ARM Intensive <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> Using Version 1.0.0 of ARM Satellite Data Analysis Program</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document describes the initial formulation (Version 1.0.0) of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program satellite data analysis procedures. Techniques are presented for calibrating geostationary satellite data with Sun synchronous satellite radiances and for converting narrowband radiances to top-of-the-atmosphere fluxes and albedos. A methodology is documented for combining geostationary visible and infrared radiances with surface-based temperature <span class="hlt">observations</span> to derive cloud amount, optical depth, height, thickness, temperature, and albedo. The analysis is limited to two grids centered over the ARM Southern Great Plains central facility in north-central Oklahoma. Daytime data taken during 5 Apr. - 1 May 1994, were analyzed on the 0.3 deg and 0.5 deg latitude-longitude grids that cover areas of 0.9 deg x 0.9 deg and 10 deg x 14 deg, respectively. Conditions ranging from scattered low cumulus to thin cirrus and thick cumulonimbus occurred during the study <span class="hlt">period</span>. Detailed comparisons with hourly surface <span class="hlt">observations</span> indicate that the mean cloudiness is within a few percent of the surface-derived sky cover. Formats of the results are also provided. The data can be accessed through the World Wide Web computer network.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Minnis, Patrick; Smith, William L., Jr.; Garber, Donald P.; Ayers, J. Kirk; Doelling, David R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0802.2312v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Drift effects and the cosmic ray density gradient in a solar rotation <span class="hlt">period</span>: First <span class="hlt">observation</span> with the Global Muon Detector Network (GMDN)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present for the first time hourly variations of the spatial density gradient of 50 GeV cosmic rays within a sample solar rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> in 2006. By inversely solving the transport equation, including diffusion, we deduce the gradient from the anisotropy that is derived from the <span class="hlt">observation</span> made by the Global Muon Detector Network (GMDN). The anisotropy obtained by applying a new analysis method to the GMDN data is precise and free from atmospheric temperature effects on the muon count rate recorded by ground based detectors. We find the derived north-south gradient perpendicular to the ecliptic plane is oriented toward the Helioshperic Current Sheet (HCS) (i.e. southward in the toward sector of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and northward in the away sector). The orientation of the gradient component parallel to the ecliptic plane remains similar in both sectors with an enhancement of its magnitude seen after the Earth crosses the HCS. These temporal features are interpreted in terms of a local maximum of the cosmic ray density at the HCS. This is consistent with the prediction of the drift model for the $A<0$ epoch. By comparing the <span class="hlt">observed</span> gradient with the numerical prediction of a simple drift model, we conclude that particle drifts in the large-scale magnetic field play an important role in organizing the density gradient, at least in the present $A<0$ epoch. We also found that corotating interaction regions did not have such a notable effect. <span class="hlt">Observations</span> with the GMDN provide us with a new tool for investigating cosmic ray transport in the IMF.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Y. Okazaki; A. Fushishita; T. Narumi; C. Kato; S. Yasue; T. Kuwabara; J. W. Bieber; P. Evenson; M. R. Da Silva; A. Dal Lago; N. J. Schuch; Z. Fujii; M. L. Duldig; J. E. Humble; I. Sabbah; J. Kóta; K. Munakata</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-02-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JASTP..73.1940K"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the spatiotemporal evolution of the ionospheric backscatter during magnetically disturbed <span class="hlt">periods</span> as <span class="hlt">observed</span> by the TIGER Bruny Island HF radar</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Superposed Epoch Analysis (SEA) method is used to examine a 4-year database (2000-2003) of the TIGER Bruny Island radar (MLON=226.78°E, MLAT=55.06°S) measurements to determine typical patterns of the spatiotemporal evolution of ionospheric backscatter during geomagnetically disturbed <span class="hlt">periods</span>. SEA is performed separately for three disturbance categories: short-, medium-, and long-duration magnetic disturbances, based on the Dst index variation. Prior to SEA, the diurnal, seasonal, and solar cycle effects have been accounted for by subtracting the nominal quiet-time values. It is found that the occurrence of ionospheric HF backscatter exhibited strongest enhancements near t=0 h between 65°S and 70°S MLAT (range of 800-2500 km) during short-duration magnetic disturbance. In contrast, a reduction in echo occurrence first occurred near t=0 h at higher ranges (r?2500 km) and expanded equatorwards during the recovery phase of the magnetic disturbances. This reduction in occurrence became progressively stronger and prolonged for medium- and long-duration magnetic disturbances. These categories also showed clear enhancements in the E-region backscatter (r<765 km) commencing from t=0 h. These <span class="hlt">observations</span> can be explained by three main factors: (1) an enhancement in the E-region densities due to high-energy particle precipitation during magnetically disturbed <span class="hlt">periods</span> causing the HF radar waves to refract from smaller altitudes and closer ranges, (2) a variability in the F-region densities associated with magnetic disturbances also affecting the propagation of the HF radar waves, and (3) a short-lived strong enhancement in growth rate of decametre-scale ionospheric irregularities when IMF turned southwards causing the highest echo occurrence near t=0 h during SEA.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kumar, V. V.; Makarevich, R. A.; Kane, T. A.; Ye, H.; Devlin, J. C.; Dyson, P. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ornl.gov/adm/smallbusiness/assets/pdf/Voice_of_the_Customer_Att6.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Attachment 6: Challenges and <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Attachment 6: Challenges and <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> Challenges Examples <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> Concerning Winning not be the #1 selling point. No Prior Experience with ORNL No proven track record with ORNL; Losing contracts and let the Contracts Division know you are on top of things. #12;Challenges Examples <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5947083"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of the effects of tectonic release on short-<span class="hlt">period</span> P waves <span class="hlt">observed</span> from Shagan River explosions. Final report, September 1985-September 1986</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Large samples of teleseismic P-wave amplitude and waveform data recorded from Shagan River underground explosions were collected and systematically analyzed in an attempt to identify any effects which may correlate with the amount of tectonic release accompanying these explosions. Results of these analyses indicate that these teleseismic P-wave data do not provide any unambiguous evidence of effects of tectonic release in the short-<span class="hlt">period</span> range of interest in m/sub b/ determination. However, the results of a preliminary theoretical analysis indicate that such negative evidence is not definitive in that there are plausible models of tectonic release for which no detectable variations in the <span class="hlt">observed</span> teleseismic P waveforms are theoretically expected to result from the superposition of these two sources. At the same time, such models of tectonic release predict significant positive bias in the network-averaged m/sub b/ values for explosions accompanied by the mode of tectonic release traditionally associated with the Shagan River test site. Thus, the currently available seismic data do not exclude the possibility that tectonic release may be introducing a positive bias of as much as several tenths of a magnitude unit into the network-averaged m/sub b/ values computed for some Shagan River explositons.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barker, B.W.; Murphy, J.R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMOS33D1853Y"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observation</span> and modelling of turbulent mixing in the Kuril and Aleutian Straits and impact of its 18.6-year <span class="hlt">period</span> tidal cycle on ocean and climate</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Direct turbulent <span class="hlt">observations</span> in the Kuril Straits and Aleutian Straits reveal that tide-induced strong vertical mixing corresponds to strong shear of combined diurnal tidal and/or mean currents and significantly modifies the water-mass and potential vorticity distribution. Bi-decadal variability synchronized with 18.6-year <span class="hlt">period</span> moon-tidal cycle were found in various parts of the ocean and climate indices: water-mass variability in the subarctic North Pacific, especially near the strong diurnal tide regions as Kuril Straits and Aleutian Islands, and in long-term climate indices as Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and El-Nino and Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in proxy-reconstructed records. In low-frequency part of the PDO and SOI records, negative (positive)-PDO and positive (negative)-SOI tend to occur in the 4-6-th (10-12-th) year after the maximum diurnal tide, which is consistent with the climate model experiments with locally enhanced vertical mixing around Kuril Straits showing that tidal mixing and its variability could generate bi-decadal variability in ocean and climate. Ocean and climate model experiments with parameterized tidal mixing explain some of the water-mass modifications and bi-decadal variability of water-masses and climate.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yasuda, I.; Tanaka, Y.; Itoh, S.; Hasumi, H.; Komatsu, K.; Osafune, S.; Yagi, M.; Tanaka, T.; Kaneko, H.; Ikeya, T.; Konda, S.; Nishioka, J.; Nakatsuka, T.; Katsumata, K.; Tatebe, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Hiroe, Y.; Nakamura, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://lubbock.tamu.edu/files/2011/10/weedcontrolinforages_13.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">SUGGESTIONS</span> FOR WEED CONTROL IN</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">B-5038 10-98 <span class="hlt">SUGGESTIONS</span> FOR WEED CONTROL IN PASTURES AND FORAGES Texas Agricultural Extension;4 <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Weed Control in Pastures and Forages Dr. Paul A. Baumann, Extension Weed Specialist Dr. David as a guide for controlling weeds in pasture and forages. Labeled rates and restrictions change constantly</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mukhtar, Saqib</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006tmgm.meet..483T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectral Index and Quasi-<span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Oscillation Frequency Correlation in Black Hole (bh) Sources:. <span class="hlt">Observational</span> Evidence of Two Phases and Phase Transition in BHs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent studies have shown that strong correlations are <span class="hlt">observed</span> between the low frequencies (1-10 Hz) of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power law index of several Black Hole (BH) candidate sources, in low hard state, steep power-law (soft) state and in transition between these states. The <span class="hlt">observations</span> indicate that the X-ray spectrum of such state (phases) show the presence of a power-law component and are sometimes related to simultaneous radio emission indicated the probable presence of a jet. Strong QPOs (> 20% rms) are present in the power density spectrum in the spectral range where the power-law component is dominant (i.e. 60-90%). This evidence contradicts the dominant long standing interpretation of QPOs as a signature of the thermal accretion disk. We present the data from the literature and our own data to illustrate the dominance of power-law index-QPO frequency correlations. We provide a model, that identifies and explains the origin of the QPOs and how they are imprinted on the properties of power-law flux component. We argue the existence of a bounded compact coronal region which is a natural consequence of the adjustment of Keplerian disk flow to the innermost sub-Keplerian boundary conditions near the central object and that ultimately leads to the formation of a transition layer (TL) between the adjustment radius and the innermost boundary. The model predicts two phases or states dictated by the photon upscattering produced in the TL: (1) hard state, in which the TL is optically thin and very hot (kT ? 50 keV) producing photon upscattering via thermal Componization; the photon spectrum index ? ~ 1.7 for this state is dictated by gravitational energy release and Compton cooling in an optically thin shock near the adjustment radius; (2) a soft state which is optically thick and relatively cold (kT ? 5 keV); the index for this state, ? ~ 2.8 is determined by soft-photon upscattering and photon trapping in converging flow into BH. In the TL model for corona the QPO frequency ?high is related to the gravitational (close to Keplerian) frequency ?K at the outer (adjustment) radius and ?low is related to the TL's normal mode (magnetoacoustic) oscillation frequency ?MA. The <span class="hlt">observed</span> correlations between index and low and high QPO frequencies are readily explained in terms of this model. We also <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a new method for evaluation of the BH mass using the index-frequency correlation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Titarchuck, Lev; Fiorito, Ralph</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6333944"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coping with paradoxes of risk communication: <span class="hlt">Observations</span> and <span class="hlt">suggestions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The maturation of the field of risk communication has resulted in several manuals, a National Research Council review, a Society for Risk Analysis subgroup, and critics. Critics Pieter-Jan Stalen and Rob Coppock, and Harry Otway and Brian Wynne, have pointed out that much risk communication is impractical or paradoxical. In this letter, the author supports many of the criticisms of these critics, but also discusses errors and omissions in their viewpoints that he feels will inhibit progress in effective risk communication. Topics discussed are motivations for risk communication, the practicality of advice, the audience for risk communication, credibility, and whose interests are best served by risk communication. The purpose of this essay is therefore to spur further debate on the issue of risk communication. 13 refs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Johnson, B.B. (New Jersey Dept. of Environmental Protection and Energy, Trenton (United States))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24398260"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestion</span> overrides automatic audiovisual integration.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cognitive scientists routinely distinguish between controlled and automatic mental processes. Through learning, practice, and exposure, controlled processes can become automatic; however, whether automatic processes can become deautomatized - recuperated under the purview of control - remains unclear. Here we show that a <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> derails a deeply ingrained process involving involuntary audiovisual integration. We compared the performance of highly versus less hypnotically <span class="hlt">suggestible</span> individuals (HSIs versus LSIs) in a classic McGurk paradigm - a perceptual illusion task demonstrating the influence of visual facial movements on auditory speech percepts. Following a posthypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> to prioritize auditory input, HSIs but not LSIs manifested fewer illusory auditory perceptions and correctly identified more auditory percepts. Our findings demonstrate that a <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> deautomatized a ballistic audiovisual process in HSIs. In addition to guiding our knowledge regarding theories and mechanisms of automaticity, the present findings pave the road to a more scientific understanding of top-down effects and multisensory integration. PMID:24398260</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Déry, Catherine; Campbell, Natasha K J; Lifshitz, Michael; Raz, Amir</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3899658"> <span id="translatedtitle">Immediate Re-Hydration Post-Exercise is Not Coincident with Raised Mean Arterial Pressure Over A 30-Minute <span class="hlt">Observation</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This investigation assessed the effects of immediate or delayed re-hydration post-exercise, on mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and on blood plasma volume (PV) expansion post-exercise. It was hypothesised that fluid ingestion would raise MAP and attenuate PV expansion. On two occasions separated by seven days, eight males (age 20.4 ± 1.7 years, mass 79 ± 5 kg [means ± SD]; VO2max 48 ± 11 mL·kg-1·minute-1, [mean ± SE]) cycled in the heat (35°C, 50% relative humidity) at a power output associated with 50% VO2max, until 1.0kg body mass was lost. 1L water was given either immediately thereafter, or two hours post-exercise by random assignment. On both occasions, MAP was calculated every five minutes for a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 30-minutes post-exercise, and change in PV was calculated 24-hours post-exercise. Repeated measures ANOVA for MAP results <span class="hlt">suggested</span> a low probability of a treatment effect (p = 0.655), a high probability of a time effect (p = 0.006), and a moderately high probability of a time x treatment interaction (p = 0.076); MAP tended to be lower when fluid had been consumed. PV expansions 24-hours post-exercise were not significant changes with respect to zero, and were not significantly different by treatment condition. In conclusion: (a) The exercise was not sufficient to elicit significant PV expansions; thus, we were unable to determine the effects of the timing of post-exercise re-hydration on PV expansion. (b) The hypothesis regarding MAP in response to drinking was not supported, rather there was a 92% probability that the inverse affect occurs. Key PointsPost exercise hypotension is perhaps the most important mediator of plasma volume expansion post exerciseIt was hypothesised that drinking water immediately post exercise would attenuate post exercise hypotension by rapidly ameliorating dehydrationWe found that not only was our hypothesis incorrect, but rather a 92% probability exists that the inverse is true, i.e. drinking water in fact leads to lowered blood pressure, as compared to not drinking. PMID:24501556</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kay, Bartholomew; O'Brien, Brendan J.; Gill, Nicholas D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21464704"> <span id="translatedtitle">X-RAY, FUV, AND UV <span class="hlt">OBSERVATIONS</span> OF {alpha} CENTAURI B: DETERMINATION OF LONG-TERM MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLE AND ROTATION <span class="hlt">PERIOD</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Over the last couple of decades we have been carrying out a study of stellar magnetic activity, dynamos, atmospheric physics, and spectral irradiances from a sample of solar-type G0-5 V stars with different ages. One of the major goals of this program is to study the evolution of the Sun's X-ray through NUV spectral irradiances with age. Of particular interest is the determination of the young Sun's elevated levels of high-energy fluxes because of the critical roles that X-ray (coronal) through FUV (transition region (TR), chromospheric) emissions play on the photochemical and photoionization evolution (and possible erosion) of early, young planetary atmospheres and ionospheres. Motivated by the current exoplanetary search missions (such as Kepler and CoRoT, along with the planned Space Interferometry Mission and Darwin/Terrestrial Planet Finder missions) that are hunting for Earth-size planets in the habitable zones (liquid water) of nearby main-sequence G-M stars, we are expanding our program to cooler, less luminous, but very importantly, much more numerous main-sequence K-type stars, such as {alpha} Centauri B. The long life (2-3x longer than the Sun) and slow evolution of K stars provide nearly constant energy sources for possible hosted planets. This program parallels our 'Sun in Time' program, but extends the study to stars with deeper convective zone depths. Presented here are X-ray (coronal; ROSAT, Chandra, XMM-Newton), UV (TR; International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE)), NUV (chromospheric; IUE), and recently acquired FUV (TR/chromospheric; FUSE Cycles 7/8) <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the K1 V star {alpha} Cen B (HD 128621; V = 1.33; (B - V) = +0.88; {tau} = 5.6 {+-} 0.6 Gyr). These combined high-energy measures provide a more complete look into the nature of {alpha} Cen B's magnetic activity and X-ray-UV radiances. We find that {alpha} Cen B has exhibited significant long-term variability in X-ray through NUV emission fluxes, indicating a solar-like long-term activity cycle of P{sub cycle} = 8.84 {+-} 0.4 years. In addition, analysis of the short-term rotational modulation of mean light due to the effects of magnetically active regions has yielded a well-determined rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> of P{sub rotation} = 36.2 {+-} 1.4 days. {alpha} Cen B is the only old main-sequence K star with a reliably determined age and rotation <span class="hlt">period</span>, and for early K stars, as in the case of the Sun for G2 V stars, is an important calibrator for stellar age/rotation/activity relations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">DeWarf, L. E.; Guinan, E. F.; Datin, K. M., E-mail: Laurence.DeWarf@Villanova.ed [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ffcd.confE.137S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamics and evolution of tree populations and soil-vegetation relationships in Fogscapes: <span class="hlt">Observations</span> over a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 14 years at the experimental sites of Meija (Peru).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Fogscapes, i.e. fog-dependent landscapes, and the sub mountain drylands of the Pacific Coast from Ecuador to Northern Chile are amongst the most fragile regions of the planet. The so-called "Lomas" (i.e. Hills) ecosystems are characterised by pre-desertic flora and vegetation where the plant phenological pattern coincides with the fog season from June to December every year. The occurance of ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) affects these ecosystems inducing, occasionally, a sudden change in the characteristics of the vegetation. Relics of low-density woodlands dominated by Caesalpinea spinosa and scattered trees of the same species (which during the fog season appear as savannah-like ecosystems) are still present but becoming increasingly rare due to past and present overgrazing In the experimental site of Las Cuchillas, located on the coastal hills close to Meija (Dept. Arequipa, South Peru) trees of native species (Caesalpinaea spinosa and Prosopis pallida) and exotic species (Acacia saligna, Casuarina equisetifolia, Parkinsonia aculeata) were planted in 1996, in order to look at the rehabilitation potential of the degraded "lomas" ecosystems. This paper deals with the results <span class="hlt">observed</span> over a <span class="hlt">period</span> of 14 years’ of tree growth patterns and the related results concerning the soil and habitat dynamics. Among indigenous species Caesalpinea spinosa shows the heighest rate of survival even if the height increment is low and the tree crowns tend to dry out at a height of approximately two metres, followed by the appearance of new shoots produced during the course of the seasons. The exotic Acacia saligna shows the maximum height, diameter and crown volume increments. The habitat conditions, both in term of diversity / frequency of plant and animal populations, and plant cover (LAI estimated by processing fish-eye lens images) have changed substantially over the years. A number of samples from the top mineral soil and random samples from the forest floor were collected both from the reforested test site and from the adjacent control areas were no trees had been planted. The samples were analysed for organic carbon and total nitrogen. Overall, the tree-covered soil retained much more of both elements than the non-forested areas, thus demonstrating the efficiency of the intervention carried out in terms of combatting the greenhouse effect. The various tree species planted, however, showed greatly variable capacity to promote carbon sequestration at soil level. The results referred to above are critical in understanding the plant population dynamics of pre-desertic ecosystems in response to climate change and in assessing the potential of reforestation programmes and landscape conservation strategies for the purposes of carbon sequestration.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Salbitano, F.; Calamini, G.; Certini, G.; Ortega, A.; Pierguidi, A.; Villasante, L.; Caceres, R.; Coaguila, D.; Delgado, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GGG....14.4153A"> <span id="translatedtitle">First <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the fumarolic gas output from a restless caldera: Implications for the current <span class="hlt">period</span> of unrest (2005-2013) at Campi Flegrei</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The fumarolic gas output has not been quantified for any of the currently deforming calderas worldwide, due to the lack of suitable gas flux sensing techniques. In view of resumption of ground uplift (since 2005) and the associated variations in gas chemistry, Campi Flegrei, in southern Italy, is one of the restless calderas where gas flux <span class="hlt">observations</span> are especially necessary. Here we report the first ever obtained estimate of the Campi Flegrei fumarolic gas output, based on a set of MultiGAS surveys (performed in 2012 and 2013) with an ad-hoc-designed measurement setup. We estimate that the current Campi Flegrei fumarolic sulphur (S) flux is low, on the order of 1.5-2.2 tons/day, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> substantial scrubbing of magmatic S by the hydrothermal system. However, the fumarolic carbon dioxide (CO2) output is ˜460±160 tons/day (mean±SD), which is surprisingly high for a dormant volcano in the hydrothermal stage of activity, and results in a combined (fumaroles + soil) CO2 output of ˜1560 tons/day. Assuming magma to be the predominant source, we propose that the current CO2 output can be supplied by either (i) a large (0.6-4.6 km3), deeply stored (>7 km) magmatic source with low CO2 contents (0.05-0.1 wt%) or (ii) by a small to medium-sized (˜0.01-0.1 km3) but CO2-rich (2 wt%) magma, possibly stored at pressures of ˜100 to 120 MPa. Independent geophysical evidence (e.g., inferred from geodetic and gravity data) is needed to distinguish between these two possibilities.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aiuppa, A.; Tamburello, G.; Napoli, R.; Cardellini, C.; Chiodini, G.; Giudice, G.; Grassa, F.; Pedone, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=history+AND+of+AND+intelligence&pg=5&id=EJ891901"> <span id="translatedtitle">10 <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Enhancing Lecturing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Criticism of the lecture method remains a staple of discussion and writing in academia--and most of the time it's deserved! Those interested in improving this aspect of their teaching might wish to consider some or all of the following <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for enhancing lectures. These include: (1) Lectures must start with a "grabber"; (2) Lectures must be…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heitzmann, Ray</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=salton&pg=2&id=EJ203536"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Library Network Design.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Various approaches to the design of automatic library systems are described, <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for the design of rational and effective automated library processes are posed, and an attempt is made to assess the importance and effect of library network systems on library operations and library effectiveness. (Author/CWM)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Salton, Gerald</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.si.edu/Encyclopedia_SI/nmnh/ARCHAEOLOGY2007-ReadingList.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">ARCHAEOLOGY <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Readings in Archaeology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">ARCHAEOLOGY <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Readings in Archaeology The following is a list of some of the major by those wishing more detailed information. Educators' Resources Archaeology in the Classroom. A Resource. Archaeological Institute of America. Archaeologists at Work: A Teacher's Guide to Classroom Archaeology. 2nd ed</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mathis, Wayne N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/Zircon/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ancient Crystals <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> Earlier Ocean</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report describes the findings of two scientists who studied the chemical makeup of crystals of zircon from rocks in Western Australia's Jack Hills. The zircon crystals are thought to be 4.5 billion years old, making them some of the oldest materials yet found on Earth. The ratios of oxygen isotopes found in the crystals <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that conditions during the Hadean Eon, the first 500 million years of Earth's history when the crystals were formed, were cooler and wetter than previously thought. Links to a glossary are embedded in the text.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PASJ..tmp..104P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hinode 7: Conference summary and future <span class="hlt">suggestions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This conclusion to the seventh Hinode science meeting (2013 November in Takayama, Japan) attempts to summarise what we have learnt during the conference (mainly from the review talks) about new <span class="hlt">observations</span> from Hinode and about theories stimulated by them. <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for future study are also offered.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Priest, Eric</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18215686"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ameloblastoma <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> large apical periodontitis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This case report describes the endodontic treatment of a large apical periodontitis with well-defined margins adjacent to teeth #22-24. After the initial endodontic treatment, continued expansion of the mandible cortical bone was <span class="hlt">observed</span>, indicating a need to surgically enucleate the lesion and submit it for histopathologic examination. The microscopic examination indicated a diagnosis of ameloblastoma. Ameloblastoma is a benign epithelial neoplasm of odontogenic origin, and depending on the stage of development, it can mimic a periapical lesion and therefore should be considered in establishing an endodontic differential diagnosis. The definitive diagnosis for some periapical lesions can only be made by a histopathologic examination. PMID:18215686</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Faitaroni, Luiz Augusto; Bueno, Mike Reis; De Carvalhosa, Artur Aburad; Bruehmueller Ale, Karin Astrid; Estrela, Carlos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22774684"> <span id="translatedtitle">Building false memories without <span class="hlt">suggestions</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">People can come to remember doing things they have never done. The question we asked in this study is whether people can systematically come to remember performing actions they never really did, in the absence of any <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> from the experimenter. People built LEGO vehicles, performing some steps but not others. For half the people, all the pieces needed to assemble each vehicle were laid out in order in front of them while they did the building; for the other half, the pieces were hidden from view. The next day, everyone returned for a surprise recognition test. People falsely and confidently remembered having carried out steps they did not; those who saw all the pieces while they built each vehicle were more likely to correctly remember performing steps they did perform but equally likely to falsely remember performing steps they did not. We explain our results using the source monitoring framework: People used the relationships between actions to internally generate the missing, related actions, later mistaking that information for genuine experience. PMID:22774684</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Foster, Jeffrey L; Garry, Maryanne</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6601206"> <span id="translatedtitle">Operation of a digital seismic network on Mount St. Helens volcano and <span class="hlt">observations</span> of long-<span class="hlt">period</span> seismic events that originate under the volcano</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the <span class="hlt">period</span> May through October 1981, a nine station digital seismic array was operated on the flanks of Mount St. Helens volcano in the state of Washington. The purpose was to obtain high quality digital seismic data from a dense seismic array operating near and in the summit crater of the volcano to facilitate study of near field seismic waveforms generated under the volcano. Our goal is to investigate the source mechanism of volcanic tremor and seismic activity associated with magma intrusion, dome growth and steam-ash emissions occurring within the crater of Mount St. Helens.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fehler, M.; Chouet, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23995207"> <span id="translatedtitle">The development of an assessment clinic (ASPA) in South Essex Partnership Trust. <span class="hlt">Observations</span> and outcomes in the <span class="hlt">period</span> December 2011-April 2013.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new Assessment service (ASPA) which has been developed in Bedford within the Community Psychiatric Team has been described. Demography of patients referred to the service as well as their diagnoses are explained. Outcomes of treatment in this assessment service are also assessed. The most common diagnoses were mood disorders. These were generally equally divided between patients with unipolar and bipolar disorder. The next most common diagnosis was obsessive compulsive disorder. Within the <span class="hlt">period</span>, approximately one third of patients were referred back to primary care, one third were still in the assessment process, and one third had been admitted to secondary care community services. PMID:23995207</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matheiken, Shevonne; Jaylath, Sajeeva; Zaman, Rashid; Agius, Mark</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AtmEn..67..448C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-term <span class="hlt">observations</span> of saccharides in remote marine aerosols from the western North Pacific: A comparison between 1990-1993 and 2006-2009 <span class="hlt">periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anhydrosugars (galactosan, mannosan and levoglucosan), sugars (xylose, fructose, glucose, sucrose and trehalose) and sugar alcohols (erythritol, arabitol, mannitol and inositol) were measured in the aerosol samples collected in a remote island (Chichi-Jima, Japan) in the western North Pacific from 1990 to 1993 and from 2006 to 2009. Total concentrations of anhydrosugars, the biomass burning tracers, were 0.01-5.57 ng m-3 (average 0.76 ng m-3) during 1990-1993 versus 0.01-7.19 ng m-3 (0.64 ng m-3) during 2006-2009. Their seasonal variations were characterized by winter/spring maxima and summer/fall minima. Such a seasonal pattern should be caused by the enhanced long-range atmospheric transport of biomass burning products and terrestrial organic matter (such as higher plant detritus and soil dust) from the Asian continent in winter/spring seasons, when the westerly or winter monsoon system prevails over the western North Pacific. Sugars and sugar alcohols showed different seasonal patterns. The monthly mean concentrations of erythritol, arabitol, mannitol, inositol, fructose, glucose and trehalose were found to be higher in spring/summer and lower in fall/winter during both 1990-1993 and 2006-2009 <span class="hlt">periods</span>, indicating an enhanced biogenic emission of aerosols in warm seasons. Interestingly, saccharides showed a gradual decrease in their concentrations from 1991 to 1993 and an increase from 2006 to 2009. In addition, the monthly averaged concentrations of sugars and sugar alcohols showed maxima in early summer during 1990-1993, which occurred about 1-2 months earlier than those during 2006-2009. Such a clear seasonal shift may be attributable to the changes in the strength of westerly and trade wind systems during two <span class="hlt">periods</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, Jing; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Liu, Cong-Qiang; Fu, Pingqing</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25326205"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Nocebo effects and negative <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> in anesthesia].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anesthetists have an impact on patients and healing processes not only through drugs, interventions and therapy but also significantly by their words and personality. A substantial part of <span class="hlt">observed</span> side effects is caused by nocebo effects and negative <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>, i.e. by the doctor and the medical surroundings. Every symptom of an illness, side effect or complication can also be induced by the wrong way of talking about it. Patients perceive medical situations, such as an emergency, anesthesia or intensive care as extreme or even as life-threatening. This can induce a natural trance, an altered state of consciousness characterized by increased <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>. <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> affect mental functions, such as anxiety and pain as well as physical functions. Strong figurative words, ambiguity, misunderstandings, incidental conversations, medical jargon and risk information are prone to generate negative <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>. Not the informed consent per se but the way it is presented should be under scrutiny. Knowledge about nocebo effects and negative <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> can help recognize and avoid these more easily. These negative factors depend on the context, i.e. they are strongly influenced by the individual background history and anxieties of the patient and also by the physician-patient relationship. The best protection against harm from informed consent and negative <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> is a supportive therapeutic relationship. PMID:25326205</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zech, N; Seemann, M; Hansen, E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900036529&hterms=chirality&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dchirality"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> chiral structures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The electromagnetic properties of a structure that is both chiral and <span class="hlt">periodic</span> are investigated using coupled-mode equations. The <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> is described by a sinusoidal perturbation of the permittivity, permeability, and chiral admittance. The coupled-mode equations are derived from physical considerations and used to examine bandgap structure and reflected and transmitted fields. Chirality is <span class="hlt">observed</span> predominantly in transmission, whereas <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> is present in both reflection and transmission.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jaggard, Dwight L.; Engheta, Nader; Pelet, Philippe; Liu, John C.; Kowarz, Marek W.; Kim, Yunjin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/9906448v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Brown Dwarfs and the Cataclysmic Variable <span class="hlt">Period</span> Minimum</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using improved, up-to-date stellar input physics tested against <span class="hlt">observations</span> of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs we calculate the secular evolution of low-mass donor cataclysmic variables (CVs), including those which form with a brown dwarf donor. Our models confirm the mismatch between the calculated minimum <span class="hlt">period</span> (Pmin ~ 70 min) and the <span class="hlt">observed</span> short-<span class="hlt">period</span> cut-off (~ 80 min) in the CV <span class="hlt">period</span> histogram. We find that tidal and rotational corrections applied to the one-dimensional stellar structure equations have no significant effect on the <span class="hlt">period</span> minimum. Theoretical <span class="hlt">period</span> distributions synthesized from our model sequences always show an accumulation of systems at the minimum <span class="hlt">period</span>, a feature absent from the <span class="hlt">observed</span> distribution. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that non-magnetic CVs become unobservable as they are effectively trapped in permanent quiescence before they reach Pmin, and that small-number statistics may hide the <span class="hlt">period</span> spike for magnetic CVs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ulrich Kolb; Isabelle Baraffe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-06-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1646661"> <span id="translatedtitle">Convection, granulation and <span class="hlt">period</span> jitter in classical Cepheids</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Analyses of recent <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the sole classical Cepheid in the Kepler field, V1154 Cygni, found random changes of about 30 minutes in the pulsation <span class="hlt">period</span>. These <span class="hlt">period</span> changes challenge standard theories of pulsation and evolution because the <span class="hlt">period</span> change is non-secular, and explaining this <span class="hlt">period</span> jitter is necessary for understanding stellar evolution and the role of Cepheids as precise standard candles. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that convection and convective hot spots can explain the <span class="hlt">observed</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> jitter. Convective hot spots alter the timing of flux maximum and minimum in the Cepheid light curve, hence change the measured pulsation <span class="hlt">period</span>. We present a model of random hot spots that generate a localized flux excess that perturbs the Cepheid light curve and consequently the pulsation <span class="hlt">period</span> which is consistent with the <span class="hlt">observed</span> jitter. This result demonstrates how important understanding convection is for modeling Cepheid stellar structure and evolution, how convection determines the red edge of the instability...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Neilson, Hilding R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70047665"> <span id="translatedtitle">Annual water-level measurements in <span class="hlt">observation</span> wells, 1951-1955, and atlas of maps showing changes in water levels for various <span class="hlt">periods</span> from beginning of record through 1954, New Mexico</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report tabulates the annual measurements of water level in the <span class="hlt">observation</span> wells in the various irrigated areas, primarily from 1951 through 1955. It summarizes changes in water level by discussion and with an atlas of nearly all the maps of change of water level for the <span class="hlt">period</span> of record to 1955 for each area in which <span class="hlt">observations</span> are being made. Included also are hydrographs for the <span class="hlt">period</span> of record through 1954 of several selected wells in the various areas irrigated from ground-water sources. The annual measurements of water level before 1951, seasonal measurements, and daily records of water levels in wells equipped with recording gages have been published in an annual series of U. S. Geological Survey water-supply papers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reeder, Harold O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1959-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800009695&hterms=plasma+research&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3D%2522plasma%2Bresearch%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">A sunspot <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> and the solar rotation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A least squares power spectrum analysis of daily sunspot numbers for the last 122 years yielded a statistically significant peak at 12.0715 plus or minus .002 days <span class="hlt">period</span>. This feature at 11.685 days (sidereal) of the sunspot spectrum is discussed in relation to the peak at 12.22 days (sidereal) which Dicke found in his oblateness data. The data is attributed to the Sun's core if the core rotates at either 12.0715 days or 24.1430 days <span class="hlt">period</span> (synodic). It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that spacecraft <span class="hlt">observations</span> combined with correlative analysis of solar surface features between eastern and western hemispheres could further reveal a basic core <span class="hlt">periodicity</span>. A Dicke type space oblateness experiment is discussed for providing better photospheric <span class="hlt">observations</span> than a ground instrument to determine the core <span class="hlt">periodicity</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Knight, J. W.; Sturrock, P. A.; Schatten, K. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/759848"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-<span class="hlt">Period</span> Solar Variability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Terrestrial climate records and historical <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the Sun <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the Sun undergoes aperiodic oscillations in radiative output and size over time <span class="hlt">periods</span> of centuries and millenia. Such behavior can be explained by the solar convective zone acting as a nonlinear oscillator, forced at the sunspot-cycle frequency by variations in heliomagnetic field strength. A forced variant of the Lorenz equations can generate a time series with the same characteristics as the solar and climate records. The timescales and magnitudes of oscillations that could be caused by this mechanism are consistent with what is known about the Sun and terrestrial climate.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">GAUTHIER,JOHN H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-07-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.rsc.org/chemsoc/visualelements/pages/pertable_fla.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This unique <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table presents the elements in an interesting visual display. Select an element, and find an image of the element, a description, history, and even an animation. Other chemical data is linked as a PDF file (requires Acrobat Reader).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1233453"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> behaviors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper studies behaviors that are defined on a torus, or equivalently, behaviors defined in spaces of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> functions, and establishes their basic properties analogous to classical results of Malgrange, Palamodov, Oberst et al. for behaviors on R^n. These properties - in particular the Nullstellensatz describing the Willems closure - are closely related to integral and rational points on affine algebraic varieties.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Napp, Diego; Shankar, Shiva</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/hep-th/0505254v3"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Monopoles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper deals with static BPS monopoles in three dimensions which are <span class="hlt">periodic</span> either in one direction (monopole chains) or two directions (monopole sheets). The Nahm construction of the simplest monopole chain is implemented numerically, and the resulting family of solutions described. For monopole sheets, the Nahm transform in the U(1) case is computed explicitly, and this leads to a description of the SU(2) monopole sheet which arises as a deformation of the embedded U(1) solution.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. S. Ward</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-05-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013APS..MARF11005T"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Polymers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> polymers can be made by self assembly, directed self assembly and by photolithography. Such materials provide a versatile platform for 1, 2 and 3D <span class="hlt">periodic</span> nano-micro scale composites with either dielectric or impedance contrast or both, and these can serve for example, as photonic and or phononic crystals for electromagnetic and elastic waves as well as mechanical frames/trusses. Compared to electromagnetic waves, elastic waves are both less complex (longitudinal modes in fluids) and more complex (longitudinal, transverse in-plane and transverse out-of-plane modes in solids). Engineering of the dispersion relation between wave frequency w and wave vector, k enables the opening of band gaps in the density of modes and detailed shaping of w(k). Band gaps can be opened by Bragg scattering, anti-crossing of bands and discrete shape resonances. Current interest is in our group focuses using design - modeling, fabrication and measurement of polymer-based <span class="hlt">periodic</span> materials for applications as tunable optics and control of phonon flow. Several examples will be described including the design of structures for multispectral band gaps for elastic waves to alter the phonon density of states, the creation of block polymer and bicontinuous metal-carbon nanoframes for structures that are robust against ballistic projectiles and quasi-crystalline solid/fluid structures that can steer shock waves.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thomas, Edwin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25072472"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> changes in the distribution of species <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the Ni(2+)-histidine equilibrium coupled to the BrO3(-)-SO3(2-) pH oscillator.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The dynamical behavior of the system comprising of the pH-dependent complex formation between histidine and Ni(II) ions coupled to the BrO3(-)-SO3(2-) pH oscillator was studied. The pH oscillator was demonstrated to be capable of forcing the pH-sensitive nickel ion-histidine equilibrium to alternate <span class="hlt">periodically</span> between the unreacted and the fully complexed states. The <span class="hlt">periodic</span> interconversions gave rise to an oscillatory distribution of the species that participate in the equilibrium and resulted in oscillations in the free [Ni(2+)], [NiHis(+)], and [Ni(His)2]. The preconditions of the successful coupling of metal ion-amino acid complexes to a primary pH oscillator are briefly discussed. Model calculations were performed to simulate the dynamics <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the BrO3(-)-SO3(2-) - Ni(2+)-His CSTR system. PMID:25072472</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Poros, Eszter; Kurin-Csörgei, Krisztina; Szalai, István; Horváth, Viktor; Orbán, Miklós</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998IAUS..191P.201A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multiple <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in long-<span class="hlt">period</span> variables</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The variety of types of variability is reviewed. Special attention is paid to <span class="hlt">observations</span> and mathematical models of one-harmonic, multi-harmonic, multi-frequency, multi-shift and quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> pulsations (cf. Andronov 1994). Methods of local smoothing are discussed and compared: running parabolae (Andronov 1997), running trigonometric polynomials (Chinarova et al., 1994), asymptotic parabolae (Marsakova and Andronov, 1996), splines (Andronov 1995) and ordinary polynomials are compared. The weighted wavelet Z-transform (WWZ) by Foster (1996) is extended to obtain the time-averaged frequency-dependent WWZ periodogram and to make "self-tuning" analysis of the temporal variations of the WWZ best fits. The precise analytic expressions for the accuracy estimates and their simplifications are used to determine their numerical values. The methods are illustrated by application to the photographic and visual <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the semi-regular and Mira-type stars. Among the highlights: switchings of the pulsational <span class="hlt">period</span> from one value to another; biperiodic pulsations; long-term modulation of the pulsational curve (sometimes variations of the amplitude and phase, sometimes reverse of the asymmetry); evolutionary <span class="hlt">period</span> variations and corresponding changes of the photometric characteristics. The detailed description of the methods and their applications to concrete stars are presented in the associated posters (P2-07, P2-16, P2-19).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andronov, I. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006MAP....92..255R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Unstationary aspects of foehn in a large valley part I: operational setup, scientific objectives and analysis of the cases during the special <span class="hlt">observing</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> of the MAP subprogramme FORM</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Rhine valley, which stretches from the main Alpine crest to the Lake of Constance, was chosen as the target area to study unstationary aspects of foehn during the Special <span class="hlt">Observing</span> <span class="hlt">Period</span> (SOP) of the Mesoscale Alpine Programme (MAP). This large valley is up to 10 km wide and has some of the highest foehn frequencies in the European Alps. The MAP subprogram FORM ( FOehn in the Rhine valley during MAP) was designed to investigate various aspects of the foehn including the interaction of foehn flow with the boundary layer and the processes that remove the cold air pool. The subprogram was also focused on improving the understanding and forecasting of foehn-related phenomena such as waves and turbulence. A large number of in-situ and remote sensing <span class="hlt">observing</span> systems were deployed to take measurements during the field phase of MAP. Among them were about 50 surface stations, up to 9 radiosonde stations, 2 wind profilers, 4 Doppler sodars, 2 scintillometers, 1 scanning and 1 backscatter lidar and different research aircraft. This paper gives an overview of the objectives of FORM, describes the target area and its instrumentation, and provides a detailed synoptic description of the 12 foehn cases <span class="hlt">observed</span> during the MAP SOP.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Richner, H.; Baumann-Stanzer, K.; Benech, B.; Berger, H.; Chimani, B.; Dorninger, M.; Drobinski, P.; Furger, M.; Gubser, S.; Gutermann, T.; Häberli, C.; Häller, E.; Lothon, M.; Mitev, V.; Ruffieux, D.; Seiz, G.; Steinacker, R.; Tschannett, S.; Vogt, S.; Werner, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790070474&hterms=emission+probabilities+measurement&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Demission%2Bprobabilities%2Bmeasurement"> <span id="translatedtitle">Decametric radio measurement of Jupiter's rotation <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results of determinations of Jupiter's average decametric-wave rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> are reported. The residual longitude drift of 18, 20 and 22.2 GHz emission <span class="hlt">observed</span> at stations in Florida and Chile was calculated from measurements of the longitudes of source A peak centers for apparitions separated by 12 years; the drift was assumed to be the longitude shift which maximizes the cross correlation of histograms of occurence probability as a function of System III (1957.0) central meridian longitude. The weighted mean rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> <span class="hlt">observed</span> is 9 h 55 min 29.689 sec (standard deviation 0.005 sec), which is 0.022 sec less than the System III (1965) value. It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that, if measurements are continued through the next maximum of Jovicentric earth declination, a secular drift in Jupiter's magnetic field may be <span class="hlt">observable</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">May, J.; Carr, T. D.; Desch, M. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Kaul&pg=2&id=EJ050312"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> and Expectancy in a Counseling Analogue</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The data indicated that (a) subjectively experienced <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> was more closely related to attitude change than was objective <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>, and (b) the generalized expectancy treatments were ineffective in influencing different criterion scores. (Author)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kaul, Theodore J.; Parker, Clyde A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1971-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_149526.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Working Night Shift Slows Metabolism, Study <span class="hlt">Suggests</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... page, please enable JavaScript. Working Night Shift Slows Metabolism, Study <span class="hlt">Suggests</span> Finding means fewer calories burned, and ... sleeping by day may slow down the body's metabolism, a small study <span class="hlt">suggests</span>. Researchers found that when ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=high-low+AND+mode&pg=3&id=EJ321936"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Effects of <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> on Relaxation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Selected undergraduates (N=32) on the basis of Creative Imagination Scale scores and randomly assigned high and low <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> subjects to progressive relaxation (PR) and <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> of relaxation (SR) training modes. Results revealed a significant pre-post relaxation effect, and main efffects for both <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> and training mode. (NRB)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rickard, Henry C.; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890012014&hterms=animal+extinction&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3D%2528animal%2Bextinction%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodicity</span> of extinction: A 1988 update</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The hypothesis that events of mass extinction recur <span class="hlt">periodically</span> at approximately 26 my intervals is an empirical claim based on analysis of data from the fossil record. The hypothesis has become closely linked with catastrophism because several events in the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> series are associated with evidence of extraterrestrial impacts, and terrestrial forcing mechanisms with long, <span class="hlt">periodic</span> recurrences are not easily conceived. Astronomical mechanisms that have been hypothesized include undetected solar companions and solar oscillation about the galactic plane, which induce comet showers and result in impacts on Earth at regular intervals. Because these mechanisms are speculative, they have been the subject of considerable controversy, as has the hypothesis of <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of extinction. In response to criticisms and uncertainties, a data base was developed on times of extinction of marine animal genera. A time series is given and analyzed with 49 sample points for the per-genus extinction rate from the Late Permian to the Recent. An unexpected pattern in the data is the uniformity of magnitude of many of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> extinction events. <span class="hlt">Observations</span> <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the sequence of extinction events might be the result of two sets of mechanisms: a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> forcing that normally induces only moderate amounts of extinction, and independent incidents or catastrophes that, when coincident with the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> forcing, amplify its signal and produce major-mass extinctions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sepkowski, J. John, Jr.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3831809"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestive</span> techniques connected to medical interventions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The paper introduces a series of articles where several detailed clinical examples will be presented on the effectiveness of using <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> techniques in various fields of interventional medicine. The aim of this series is to raise the attention to the patients heightened openness to <span class="hlt">suggestions</span>. By recognizing the unavoidable nature of <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> effects on one hand we can eliminate unfavourable, negative <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> and on the other hand go on and consciously apply positive, helpful variations. Research materials, reviews and case study will describe the way <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> can reduce anxiety and stress connected to medical intervention, improve subjective well-being and cooperation, and increase efficiency by reducing treatment costs. PMID:24265898</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=animal+AND+rights&pg=3&id=EJ401067"> <span id="translatedtitle">Animal Rights: Selected Resources and <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Further Study.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Presents an annotated list of selected resources intended to serve as a guide to the growing amount of material on animal rights. <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> to aid in additional research include subject headings used to find books, indexes used to locate <span class="hlt">periodical</span> articles, sources for locating organizations, and a selected list of animal rights organizations.…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Davidoff, Donald J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED044989.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for the Classical Shelves of a School Library.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This bibliography is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> for use by students and teachers of Latin, Greek and ancient civilizations. Entries are compiled under the headings of: (1) bibliographies and journals including booklists, <span class="hlt">periodicals</span>, and books for teachers; (2) reference works in literature, mythology, history and antiquities, and language; (3) texts and…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Colebourn, R., Comp.; Cleeve, Marigold, Comp.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21144772"> <span id="translatedtitle">The influence of <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> on memory.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We provide a translation of Binet and Henri's pioneering 1894 paper on the influence of <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> on memory. Alfred Binet (1857-1911) is famous as the author who created the IQ test that bears his name, but he is almost unknown as the psychological investigator who generated numerous original experiments and fascinating results in the study of memory. His experiments published in 1894 manipulated <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> in several ways to determine effects on remembering. Three particular modes of <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> were employed to induce false recognitions: (1) indirect <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> by a preconceived idea; (2) direct <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>; and (3) collective <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>. In the commentary we <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that Binet and Henri's (1894) paper written over 115 years ago is still highly relevant even today. In particular, Binet's legacy lives on in modern research on misinformation effects in memory, in studies of conformity, and in experiments on the social contagion of memory. PMID:21144772</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nicolas, Serge; Collins, Thérèse; Gounden, Yannick; Roediger, Henry L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sleep+AND+university&pg=7&id=EJ260096"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodical</span> Vandalism: A Chronic Condition?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A statistical analysis of the losses due to theft and mutilation in the <span class="hlt">periodicals</span> collection at Brock University indicates that security needs to be tightened. Nine <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for improving security are offered, and six references are cited. (CHC)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sleep, Esther L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/pp175018"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radar interferometry <span class="hlt">observations</span> of surface displacements during pre- and coeruptive <span class="hlt">periods</span> at Mount St. Helens, Washington, 1992-2005: Chapter 18 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyzed hundreds of interferograms of Mount St. Helens produced from radar images acquired by the ERS-1/2, ENVISAT, and RADARSAT satellites during the 1992-2004 preeruptive and 2004-2005 coeruptive <span class="hlt">periods</span> for signs of deformation associated with magmatic activity at depth. Individual interferograms were often contaminated by atmospheric delay anomalies; therefore, we employed stacking to amplify any deformation patterns that might exist while minimizing random noise. Preeruptive interferograms show no signs of volcanowide deformation between 1992 and the onset of eruptive activity in 2004. Several patches of subsidence in the 1980 debris-avalanche deposit were identified, however, and are thought to be caused by viscoelastic relaxation of loosely consolidated substrate, consolidation of water-saturated sediment, or melting of buried ice. Coeruptive interferometric stacks are dominated by atmospheric noise, probably because individual interferograms span only short time intervals in 2004 and 2005. Nevertheless, we are confident that at least one of the seven coeruptive stacks we constructed is reliable at about the 1-cm level. This stack <span class="hlt">suggests</span> deflation of Mount St. Helens driven by contraction of a source beneath the volcano.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Poland, Michael; Lu, Zhong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ESL+AND+international+AND+students&pg=6&id=EJ803848"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span>: What Should ESL Students Know?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper describes the linguistic forms used to perform the speech act of <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> in both real language and ESL textbooks. Comparisons between <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> in two authentic settings in a corpus, professor-student interaction during office hours and student-student study groups, and six popular ESL textbooks, three old and three recent, were…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jiang, Xiangying</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED117532.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Learnings: Consumer and Homemaking Education.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The guide presents <span class="hlt">suggested</span> learning concepts, experiences, and references for home economics educators in the planning and organization of secondary level consumer and homemaking programs. The <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> are based on questionnaires and interviews with teachers and administrators involved in this program. The guide's main focus is on the process…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Edmondson, Dorothy Jean; Swanson, Bettye B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/2820534"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cerebral Mechanisms of Hypnotic Induction and <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The neural mechanisms underlying hypnotic states and responses to hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> remain largely unknown and, to date, have been studied only with indirect methods. Here, the effects of hypnosis and <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> to alter pain perception were investigated in hypnotizable subjects by using positron emission tomography (PET) measures of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and electroencephalographic (EEG) measures of brain electrical</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pierre Rainville; Robert K. Hofbauer; Tomáš Paus; Gary H. Duncan; M. Catherine Bushnell; Donald D. Price</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24568326"> <span id="translatedtitle">Attachment and <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>-related phenomena.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study uses a new classification of <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>-related phenomena and investigates the relationship between attachment styles and reaction to <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>. The authors used 3 traditional experimental tasks: a stimulus-misinformation task, an inkblot perception task, and a subjective estimation of a nonexistent difference task. A measure of adult attachment was also taken. Participants with a high attachment insecurity as opposed to those with a low one were less influenced by <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> in the recall phase of the memory task. Results are discussed within the framework of <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> models, the dual models of social behavior, and the adult attachment model. Implications of findings are limited to simple <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> rather than the more complex set of responses related to hypnotizability. PMID:24568326</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rotaru, Tudor-?tefan; Dafinoiu, Ion</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24600653"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clinical evaluation of 860 anterior and posterior lithium disilicate restorations: retrospective study with a mean follow-up of 3 years and a maximum <span class="hlt">observational</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> of 6 years.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study aimed to assess the clinical performance of lithium disilicate restorations supported by natural teeth or implants. Eight hundred sixty lithium disilicate adhesive restorations, including crowns on natural teeth and implant abutments, veneers, and onlays, were made in 312 patients. Parafunctional patients were included, but subjects with uncontrolled periodontitis and gingival inflammation were excluded. Veneers up to 0.5 mm thick were luted with flowable composite resin or light curing cements, while dual-curing composite systems were used with veneers up to 0.8 mm thick. Onlays up to 2 mm in thickness were luted with flowable composite resins or dual-curing composite cements. Crowns up to 1 mm in thickness were cemented with self-adhesive or dual-curing resin cements. The <span class="hlt">observational</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> ranged from 12 to 72 months, with a mean follow-up of 3 years. The mechanical and esthetic outcomes of the restorations were evaluated according to the modified California Dental Association (CDA) criteria. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Twenty-six mechanical complications were <span class="hlt">observed</span>: 17 porcelain chippings, 5 fractures, and 4 losses of retention. Structural drawbacks occurred mainly in posterior segments, and monolithic restorations showed the lowest number of mechanical complications. The clinical ratings of the successful restorations, both monolithic and layered, were satisfactory according to the modified CDA criteria for color match, porcelain surface, and marginal integrity. The cumulative survival rates of lithium disilicate restorations ranged from 95.46% to 100%, while cumulative success rates ranged from 95.39% to 100%. All restorations recorded very high survival and success rates. The use of lithium disilicate restorations in fixed prosthodontics proved to be effective and reliable in the short- and medium-term. PMID:24600653</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fabbri, Giacomo; Zarone, Fernando; Dellificorelli, Gianluca; Cannistraro, Giorgio; De Lorenzi, Marco; Mosca, Alberto; Sorrentino, Roberto</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/87743"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Weed Control in Peanuts</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Complete instructions for controlling weeds in peanuts are included in this publication. Tables <span class="hlt">suggest</span> treatments for specific weeds during preplant and postemergence stages, and list common and chemical names of herbicides. Sprayer calibration...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baumann, Paul A.; Lemon, Robert G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-05-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22537029"> <span id="translatedtitle">Credible <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> affect false autobiographical beliefs.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">False memory implantation studies are characterised by <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> indicating that specific unremembered events occurred, attributing <span class="hlt">suggested</span> events to a knowledgeable source (e.g., parents), and including true events that provide evidence that this source was consulted. These characteristics create a particular retrieval context that influences how individuals come to believe that false events occurred. Two studies used a variant of implantation methods to vary the proportion of events attributed to parents and the presence of true events within the <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>. In Study 1 participants received six false events, and were told that all or some events came from parents. Participants told that all of the events came from parents formed more and stronger false beliefs. In Study 2 participants also received two true events, and a third group was told that half of the events came from their parents. Participants given the specific ratio ("half") endorsed more false beliefs, and beliefs between the other groups no longer differed. Across both studies participants told that some events came from parents reported stronger memory phenomenology. The effect of <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> on false beliefs in implantation studies depends partly on the credibility of <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> derived from providing information about the source of <span class="hlt">suggested</span> events. PMID:22537029</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Scoboria, Alan; Wysman, Lauren; Otgaar, Henry</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900052762&hterms=pandora&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dpandora"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> features in Saturn's F ring - Evidence for nearby moonlets</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Saturn F ring's shepherd satellites, Pandora and Prometheus, have been suspected of causing the <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the ring. To test this idea, a selection of the best available Voyager images of the ring were examined by applying an FFT technique to azimuthal profiles from spacecraft ring images. Only a few distinct <span class="hlt">periodic</span> signals, including one due to the inner shepherd, are visible. It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that these <span class="hlt">periodic</span> signatures provide evidence for so-far-undiscovered satellites next to this puzzling ring.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kolvoord, Robert A.; Burns, Joseph A.; Showalter, Mark R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22112639"> <span id="translatedtitle">Personalized and not general <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> produces false autobiographical memories and <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>-consistent behavior.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Suggesting</span> false childhood events produces false autobiographical beliefs, memories and <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>-consistent behavior. The mechanisms by which <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> affects behavior are not understood, and whether false beliefs and memories are necessary for <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> to impact behavior remains unexplored. We examined the relative effects of providing a personalized <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> (<span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that an event occurred to the person in the past), and/or a general <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> (<span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that an event happened to others in the past). Participants (N=122) received a personalized <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>, a general <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>, both or neither, about childhood illness due to spoiled peach yogurt. The personalized <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> resulted in false beliefs, false memories, and <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>-consistent behavioral intentions immediately after the <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>. One week or one month later participants completed a taste test that involved eating varieties of crackers and yogurts. The personalized <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> led to reduced consumption of only peach yogurt, and those who reported a false memory showed the most eating suppression. This effect on behavior was equally strong after one week and one month, showing a long lived influence of the personalized <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>. The general <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> showed no effects. <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> that convey personal information about a past event produce false autobiographical memories, which in turn impact behavior. PMID:22112639</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Scoboria, Alan; Mazzoni, Giuliana; Jarry, Josée L; Bernstein, Daniel M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=articles&id=EJ1040522"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Structuring a Research Article</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Researchers often experience difficulty as they attempt to prepare journal articles that describe their work. The purpose of this article is to provide researchers in the field of education with a series of <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> as to how to clearly structure each section of a research manuscript that they intend to submit for publication in a scholarly…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Klein, James D.; Reiser, Robert A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/37318697"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cajal's Brief Experimentation with Hypnotic <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spanish histologist Santiago Ramón y Cajal, one of the most notable figures in Neuroscience, and winner, along with Camillo Golgi, of the 1906 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discoveries on the structure of the nervous system, did not escape experimenting with some of the psychiatric techniques available at the time, mainly hypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestion</span>, albeit briefly. While a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maria Stefanidou; Carme Solà; Elias Kouvelas; Manuel del Cerro; Lazaros C. Triarhou</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://fcsagents.tamu.edu/food_and_nutrition/food-preservation/food-preservation-references.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggested</span> References for Home Food Preservation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">, Alltrista) http://www.homecanning.com/ Kraft Foods, Inc. (makers of SureJell) http<span class="hlt">Suggested</span> References for Home Food Preservation USDA and Cooperative Extension So Easy to Preserve Center for Home Food Preservation: http://homefoodpreservation.com USDA Complete Guide to Home Canning</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=shared+AND+reading+AND+technology&pg=3&id=EJ1018315"> <span id="translatedtitle">Current Research: 2013 Summer Reading <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To supplement the summer reading of National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) members, the NSTA Committee on Research in Science Education <span class="hlt">suggested</span> a list of science education research articles that were published in the journals of NSTA's affiliates in 2012. These articles covered a variety of topics that include learning about…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Journal of College Science Teaching, 2013</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/13302541"> <span id="translatedtitle">Social group <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> from user image collections</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Photo-sharing services have attracted millions of people and helped construct massive social networks on the Web. A popular trend is that users share their image collections within social groups, which greatly promotes the interactions between users and expands their social networks. Existing systems have difficulties in generating satisfactory social group <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> because the images are classified independently and their relationship</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jie Yu; Xin Jin; Jiawei Han; Jiebo Luo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED087167.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Outline for Auditory Perception Training.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Presented are <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for speech therapists to use in auditory perception training and screening of language handicapped children in kindergarten through grade 3. Directions are given for using the program, which is based on games. Each component is presented in terms of purpose, materials, a description of the game, and directions for…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kelley, Clare A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED072661.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cable Television Report and <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Ordinance.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Guidelines and <span class="hlt">suggested</span> ordinances for cable television regulation by local governments are comprehensively discussed in this report. The emphasis is placed on franchising the cable operator. Seventeen legal aspects of franchising are reviewed, and an exemplary ordinance is presented. In addition, current statistics about cable franchising in…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">League of California Cities, Sacramento.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/37029524"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the mechanism of <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> and hypnosis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The nature of hypnosis is not adequately explained by conditioned responses or conditioned attitudes. The writer agrees with R. W. White that the hypnotized subject must be motivated, but not necessarily to behave like a hypnotized person. She postulates, rather, that <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> are effective only if the subject actively strives to imagine himself in the situation described by the operator.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. B. Arnold</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1946-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57741738"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Duboisia Genus, Australian Aborigines and <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Plant hallucinogens, such as those of the Duboisia genus called pituri, have been used by tribal elders in Australian aboriginal populations to create managed states of consciousness, to provide their youth with a fast-paced educational experience, and to inculcate values, beliefs and religious tenets. Use of the <span class="hlt">suggestible</span> states created by such substances (particularly in pubertal initiatory rituals marking the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marlene Dobkin de Rios; Ronni Stachalek</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60640320"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for an updated fusion power program</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document contains <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for a revised CTR Program strategy ; which should allow us to achieve equivalent goals while operating within the ; above constraints. The revised program is designed around three major facilities. ; The first is an upgrading of the present TFTR facility which will provide a ; demonstration of the generation of tens of megawatts electric</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/36838292"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> of Children's Memory: Psycholegal Implications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Historically, there has been a bias in the American judicial system against relying on eyewitness accounts of young children. Some of the apprehension about the veracity of children's recollections has arisen from a concern over the testimony provided by children during the Salem Witch Trials and been fueled further by research carried out around the turn of the century <span class="hlt">suggesting</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stephen J. Ceci; David F. Ross; Michael P. Toglia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992ApJ...394..268S"> <span id="translatedtitle">The role of the dwarf nova <span class="hlt">period</span> distribution in understanding the evolution of cataclysmic variables</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The dwarf nova <span class="hlt">period</span> distribution is used to constrain the variation of mass transfer with orbital <span class="hlt">period</span>. For orbital <span class="hlt">periods</span> above the gap, agreement between the <span class="hlt">observed</span> dwarf nova <span class="hlt">period</span> distribution with those constructed from various magnetic braking models is generally poor. The most promising braking law is that of Mestel and Spruit (1987). Under certain conditions this braking law is able to produce a relatively flat M-dot(P) relation, but the braking law is not entirely satisfactory because it offers no explanation for the complete dominance of stable over unstable accretors immediately above the <span class="hlt">period</span> gap. Speculative ideas are presented that may eventually provide a complete and satisfactory explanation for the lack of dwarf novae with <span class="hlt">periods</span> between 3 and about 4 hr. It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the dwarf nova <span class="hlt">period</span> distribution, and not only the overall <span class="hlt">period</span> distribution, should be considered when applying <span class="hlt">observational</span> constraints to theories of mass transfer in cataclysmic variables.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shafter, Allen W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20090001918&hterms=NASA+Astrophysics+Data+System&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3DNASA%2BAstrophysics%2BData%2BSystem"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">Period</span>-Amplitude and Amplitude-<span class="hlt">Period</span> Relationships</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Examined are <span class="hlt">Period</span>-Amplitude and Amplitude-<span class="hlt">Period</span> relationships based on the cyclic behavior of the 12-month moving averages of monthly mean sunspot numbers for cycles 0.23, both in terms of Fisher's exact tests for 2x2 contingency tables and linear regression analyses. Concerning the <span class="hlt">Period</span>-Amplitude relationship (same cycle), because cycle 23's maximum amplitude is known to be 120.8, the inferred regressions (90-percent prediction intervals) <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that its <span class="hlt">period</span> will be 131 +/- 24 months (using all cycles) or 131 +/- 18 months (ignoring cycles 2 and 4, which have the extremes of <span class="hlt">period</span>, 108 and 164 months, respectively). Because cycle 23 has already persisted for 142 months (May 1996 through February 2008), based on the latter prediction, it should end before September 2008. Concerning the Amplitude-<span class="hlt">Period</span> relationship (following cycle maximum amplitude versus preceding cycle <span class="hlt">period</span>), because cycle 23's <span class="hlt">period</span> is known to be at least 142 months, the inferred regressions (90-percent prediction intervals) <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that cycle 24's maximum amplitude will be about less than or equal to 96.1 +/- 55.0 (using all cycle pairs) or less than or equal to 91.0 +/- 36.7 (ignoring statistical outlier cycle pairs). Hence, cycle 24's maximum amplitude is expected to be less than 151, perhaps even less than 128, unless cycle pair 23/24 proves to be a statistical outlier.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996BAMS...77.2889G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Green Thunderstorms <span class="hlt">Observed</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Green thunderstorms have been <span class="hlt">observed</span> from time to time in association with deep convection or severe weather events. Often the green coloration has been attributed to hail or to reflections of light from green foliage on the ground. Some skeptics who have not personally <span class="hlt">observed</span> a green thunderstorm do not believe that green thunderstorms exist. They <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the green storms may be fabrications by excited <span class="hlt">observers</span>. The authors have demonstrated the existence of green thunderstorms objectively using a spectrophotometer. During the spring and summer of 1995 the authors <span class="hlt">observed</span> numerous storms and recorded hundreds of spectra of the light emanating corn these storms. It was found that the subjective judgment of colors can vary somewhat between <span class="hlt">observers</span>, but the variation is usually in the shade of green. The authors recorded spectra of green and nongreen thunderstorms and recorded spectral measurements as a storm changed its appearance from dark blue to a bluish green. The change in color is gradual when <span class="hlt">observed</span> from a stationary position. Also, as the light from a storm becomes greener, the luminance decreases. The authors also <span class="hlt">observed</span> and recorded the spectrum of a thunderstorm during a <span class="hlt">period</span> of several hours as they flew in an aircraft close to a supercell that appeared somewhat green. The authors' <span class="hlt">observations</span> refute the ground reflection hypothesis and raise questions about explanations that require the presence of hail.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gallagher, Frank W., III; Beasley, William H.; Bohren, Craig F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ248844.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Managing Student Traffic during Peak <span class="hlt">Periods</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Some <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> to help financial aid offices develop a rational system for coping with high traffic <span class="hlt">periods</span> are offered. Creating a system to handle peak traffic <span class="hlt">periods</span> involves three related components: planning, resource management, and evaluation. (MLW)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Raphael, Carol; Milks, Linda</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/87483"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Weed Control in Sorghum</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">.......................................... 11 The <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> contained herein are based primarily on herbicide labels, research by the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and demonstrations by the Texas Agricultural Extension Service. The use of product names is not intended... is implied. This publication is no substitute for the herbicide product labels! It is intended to serve only as a guide for controlling weeds in sorghum. Labeled rates and restrictions change constantly, therefore, consult the product label prior to use...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baumann, Paul A.; Coffman, Cloyce G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-05-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/87684"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> For Weed Control In Cotton</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">by David Nace, page 20 photograph by Scott Bauer, both of the U.S. Department of Agriculture <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for in Cotton Tables 1. Winter Weed Control Treatments ...............................................6 2. Preplant... inhibitor 8 lb/gal Syngenta Dual ? II Magnum metolachlor Long chain fatty acid inhibitor 7.8 lb/gal Syngenta DSMA DSMA Unknown 3.6 lb/gal UAP Envoke ? trifloxysulfuron Acetolactate synthase (ALS, AHAS) inhibitor 75 WG Syngenta Fusilade ? DX fluazifop...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baumann, Paul A.; Lemon, Robert G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-07-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.science.unitn.it/~pugliese/statdott/lez1a_14.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Useful material for the course <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> textbooks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Useful material for the course <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> textbooks: ·Mood A.M., Graybill F.A., Boes D. More complex for multivariate data Methods: point estimates, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing.00.10.20.30.4 Standard normal density x density p(x) = 1 p 2 e x2 /2 -4 -2 0 2 4 6 8 0.00.10.20.30.4 Several normal</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pugliese, Andrea</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://yann.lecun.com/exdb/publis/psgz/mirowski-mlsp-08.ps.gz"> <span id="translatedtitle">Abstract---Recent resea rch <span class="hlt">suggests</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">'' before seizures [3]. These clinical <span class="hlt">observations</span> give an incentive to search for premonitory before thea ctua l clinica l onset in foca l epileptic seizures. Seizure prediction isa ma jor field cra nia l Electroencepha logra phic (EEG) recordings of bra ina ctivity. However, no relia ble seizure</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">LeCun, Yann</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988AREPS..16..273A"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> of cometary nuclei</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Attempts to <span class="hlt">observe</span> cometary nuclei and to determine fundamental physical parameters relevant to the relationship between comets and asteroids are reviewed. It has been found that cometary nuclei, at least of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> comets, are bigger and blacker than generally thought as recently as five years ago. Geometric albedos may be typically three percent and typical radii are probably of order 5 km. Nuclei of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> comets are probably highly prolate unless they are both oblate and rotating about one of the major axes. P/Halley images provide convincing evidence of the existence of mantles discussed in many models. Numerous pieces of evidence <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a connection between cometary nuclei and A-A asteroids of types D and C.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A'Hearn, M. F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/87194"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for Weed Control in Corn</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">herbicides for r esidual contr ol ......................................8 The <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> contained her ein ar e based primarily on herbicide labels r esear ched b y the T exas Agricultural E xperiment S tatio n and T exas Cooperativ e E xtension. The use...- tion is intended and no endorsement b y T exas Cooperativ e E xtension is implied. This publication is no substitute for the herbicide pr oduct labels! I t is intended to ser v e only as a guide for contr olling w e e ds in cor n. Labeled rates...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baumann, Paul A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-02-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22652609"> <span id="translatedtitle">Diagnostic inflation: causes and a <span class="hlt">suggested</span> cure.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">There have been a striking diagnostic inflation and a corresponding increase in the use of psychotropic drugs during the past 30 years. DSM-5, scheduled to appear in May 2013, proposes another grand expansion of mental illness. In this article, we will review the causes of diagnostic exuberance and associated medical treatment. We will then <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a method of stepped care combined with stepped diagnosis, which may reduce overdiagnosis without risking undertreatment of those who really need help. The goal is to control diagnostic inflation, to reduce the harms and costs of unnecessary treatment, and to save psychiatry from overdiagnosis and ridicule. PMID:22652609</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Batstra, Laura; Frances, Allen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014A%26A...563L...4N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Convection, granulation, and <span class="hlt">period</span> jitter in classical Cepheids</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Analyses of recent <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the sole classical Cepheid in the Kepler field, V1154 Cygni, found random changes of about 30 min in the pulsation <span class="hlt">period</span>. These <span class="hlt">period</span> changes challenge standard theories of pulsation and evolution because the <span class="hlt">period</span> change is non-secular, and explaining this <span class="hlt">period</span> jitter is necessary for understanding stellar evolution and the role of Cepheids as precise standard candles. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that convection and convective hot spots can explain the <span class="hlt">observed</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> jitter. Convective hot spots alter the timing of flux maximum and minimum in the Cepheid light curve, hence change the measured pulsation <span class="hlt">period</span>. We present a model of random hot spots that generate a localized flux excess that perturbs the Cepheid light curve and consequently the pulsation <span class="hlt">period</span>, which is consistent with the <span class="hlt">observed</span> jitter. This result demonstrates how important understanding convection is for modeling Cepheid stellar structure and evolution, how convection determines the red edge of the instability strip, and just how sensitive Cepheid light curves are to atmospheric physics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Neilson, Hilding R.; Ignace, Richard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24323495"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal variation in the length of the daily activity <span class="hlt">period</span> in buffy-headed marmosets (Callithrix flaviceps): an important consideration for the analysis of foraging strategies in <span class="hlt">observational</span> field studies of primates.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Activity budgets are widely used in primate behavioral studies for the analysis of ecological strategies. In some cases, there is considerable seasonal variation in the length of the daily activity <span class="hlt">period</span>. Here, activity budgets from two field studies of Callithrix flaviceps were compiled first by the traditional approach (proportion of scan sample records) and then by considering the proportion of time dedicated to each activity over the 24-hr cycle (adjusted budget). Both groups were almost invariably active for at least 1-2?hr less than the daylight <span class="hlt">period</span>, with significantly shorter activity <span class="hlt">periods</span> during the austral winter, when the daylight <span class="hlt">period</span> was up to 2:35?hr shorter than in the summer. The adjustment of activity budgets provided a completely different perspective on foraging strategies. Whereas the basic budgets indicated a significant increase in foraging and moving during the resource-poor dry season (winter) months, the time-adjusted data revealed that the primary strategy was a time-minimizing one, with the animals simply spending more time at rest during the longer activity <span class="hlt">periods</span> of summer days. While both groups followed the same pattern of relatively short activity <span class="hlt">periods</span>, there were considerable differences between sites in the mean duration of the <span class="hlt">period</span> in a given month, and in behavior patterns, although the analysis of the determining factors was beyond the scope of the present study. Overall, the results of the study indicate that the manipulation of the duration of the daily activity <span class="hlt">period</span> may be an integral component of primate behavioral strategies, and that this parameter should be taken into account systematically when evaluating activity patterns, especially at sites at relatively high latitudes where day length may vary considerably over the course of the year. PMID:24323495</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ferrari, Stephen F; Hilário, Renato R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/37358992"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> and salience in people with intellectual disabilities: An experimental critique of the Gudjonsson <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> Scale</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aim: The Gudjonsson <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> Scale (GSS) assesses <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> by asking respondents to recall a short story, using leading questions and pressure to change their responses. <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span>, as assessed by the GSS, is elevated in people with intellectual disabilities. Unlike real life incidents, the information presented is of no personal significance to the respondent. The aim of the present study was</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Richard White; Paul Willner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JCoPh.276..468W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hybrid simulation of whistler excitation by electron beams in two-dimensional non-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> domains</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a two-dimensional hybrid fluid-PIC scheme for the simulation of whistler wave excitation by relativistic electron beams. This scheme includes a number of features which are novel to simulations of this type, including non-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> boundary conditions and fresh particle injection. Results from our model <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that non-<span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of the simulation domain results in the development of fundamentally different wave characteristics than are <span class="hlt">observed</span> in <span class="hlt">periodic</span> domains.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Woodroffe, J. R.; Streltsov, A. V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1021193"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dinosaur Peptides <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> Mechanisms of Protein Survival</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a 'preservation motif', and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and <span class="hlt">suggests</span> a chemical mechanism for survival.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O. (Harvard-Med); (IIT); (NCSU); (UPENN); (Manchester); (Orthovita)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3622029"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> bursts of Jovian non-Io decametric radio emission</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the years 2000–2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian <span class="hlt">periodic</span> radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong <span class="hlt">periodic</span> reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a <span class="hlt">period</span> ?1.5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically <span class="hlt">observed</span> between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300° and 60° (via 360°). The stereoscopic multispacecraft <span class="hlt">observations</span> have shown that the radio sources of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every ?25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that <span class="hlt">periodic</span> non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind. PMID:23585696</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H.O.; Farrell, W.M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140010436&hterms=emission+probabilities+measurement&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Demission%2Bprobabilities%2Bmeasurement"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Bursts of Jovian Non-Io Decametric Radio Emission</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the years 2000-2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have Recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian <span class="hlt">periodic</span> radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong <span class="hlt">periodic</span> reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a <span class="hlt">period</span> approx. = 1:5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically <span class="hlt">observed</span> between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300 deg. and 60 deg. (via 360 deg.). The stereoscopic multispacecraft <span class="hlt">observations</span> have shown that the radio sources of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every approx. 25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that <span class="hlt">periodic</span> non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H O.; Farrell, W. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012MPBu...39..147O"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Period</span> Determination for 1660 Wood</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lightcurve analysis for asteroid 1660 Wood was performed in collaboration with <span class="hlt">observers</span> in Australia and Uruguay from <span class="hlt">observations</span> obtained during the asteroid's favorable opposition in 2012. The synodic rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> was found to be 6.8090 ± 0.0002 h and the lightcurve amplitude was 0.14 ± 0.03 mag.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oey, Julian; Alvarez, Eduardo Manuel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25257167"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inverted duplication with deletion: First interstitial case <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a novel undescribed mechanism of formation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Inverted duplications with terminal deletions are a well-defined family of complex rearrangements already <span class="hlt">observed</span> for most of chromosome extremities. Several mechanisms have been <span class="hlt">suggested</span> which could lead to their occurrence, either through non-homologous end joining, non-allelic homologous recombination, or more recently through an intrastrand fold-back mechanism. We describe here a patient with intellectual disability and pharmacoresistant epilepsy, for which array CGH analysis showed the first interstitial case of inverted duplication with deletion on chromosome 1p. Furthermore, SNP array analysis revealed an associated segmental isodisomy for the distal part of 1p, which led us to consider a replicative mechanism to explain this abnormality. This <span class="hlt">observation</span> extends the range of this once telomeric rearrangement. © 2014 Wiley <span class="hlt">Periodicals</span>, Inc. PMID:25257167</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Milosevic, J; El Khattabi, L; Roubergue, A; Coussement, A; Doummar, D; Cuisset, L; Le Tessier, D; Flageul, B; Viot, G; Lebbar, A; Dupont, J M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvE..83d1919K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ergodicity convergence test <span class="hlt">suggests</span> telomere motion obeys fractional dynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anomalous diffusion, <span class="hlt">observed</span> in many biological processes, is a generalized description of a wide variety of processes, all obeying the same law of mean-square displacement. Identifying the basic mechanisms of these <span class="hlt">observations</span> is important for deducing the nature of the biophysical systems measured. We implement a previously <span class="hlt">suggested</span> method for distinguishing between fractional Langevin dynamics, fractional Brownian motion, and continuous time random walk based on the ergodic nature of the data. We apply the method together with the recently <span class="hlt">suggested</span> P-variation test and the displacement correlation to the lately measured dynamics of telomeres in the nucleus of mammalian cells and find strong evidence that the telomeres motion obeys fractional dynamics. The ergodic dynamics are <span class="hlt">observed</span> experimentally to fit fractional Brownian or Langevin dynamics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kepten, E.; Bronshtein, I.; Garini, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/june2000/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recent Images <span class="hlt">Suggesting</span> Liquid Water on Mars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recently, the press reported that the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) had captured compelling images of gullies and slope failures that might be associated with the presence of liquid water on Mars. Now you can see these famous images at Malin Space Science Systems' MOC Website. These sharp, beautiful, color images (.jpeg, .gif) are featured on pages containing descriptions of how such physical features are formed on earth. The images are available in two sizes (small = 360K, large = 690K). Highlights include the "gully landform" compared to channel and apron features on Mount Saint Helens on Earth, a 3-D image (3-D glasses required) of a "weeping" alcove in an impact crater, and clues <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that the suspected liquid water on Mars is relatively young.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20736607"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere, or POPS, is a novel fusion concept first proposed by D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel [Fusion Technol. 38, 28 (1998)]. POPS utilizes the self-similar collapse of an oscillating ion cloud in a spherical harmonic oscillator potential well formed by electron injection. Once the ions have been phase-locked, their coherent motion simultaneously produces very high densities and temperatures during the collapse phase of the oscillation. A requirement for POPS is that the electron injection produces a stable harmonic oscillator potential. This has been demonstrated in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device and verified by particle simulation. Also, the POPS oscillation has been confirmed experimentally through <span class="hlt">observation</span> that the ions in the potential well exhibit resonance behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the <span class="hlt">observed</span> POPS frequencies and the theoretical predictions has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> for a wide range of potential well depths and three different ion species. Practical applications of POPS require large plasma compressions. These large compressions have been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in particle simulations, although space charge neutralization remains a major issue.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, J.; Nebel, R.A.; Stange, S.; Murali, S. Krupakar [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-05-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005PhPl...12e6315P"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodically</span> oscillating plasma spherea)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere, or POPS, is a novel fusion concept first proposed by D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel [Fusion Technol. 38, 28 (1998)]. POPS utilizes the self-similar collapse of an oscillating ion cloud in a spherical harmonic oscillator potential well formed by electron injection. Once the ions have been phase-locked, their coherent motion simultaneously produces very high densities and temperatures during the collapse phase of the oscillation. A requirement for POPS is that the electron injection produces a stable harmonic oscillator potential. This has been demonstrated in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device and verified by particle simulation. Also, the POPS oscillation has been confirmed experimentally through <span class="hlt">observation</span> that the ions in the potential well exhibit resonance behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the <span class="hlt">observed</span> POPS frequencies and the theoretical predictions has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> for a wide range of potential well depths and three different ion species. Practical applications of POPS require large plasma compressions. These large compressions have been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in particle simulations, although space charge neutralization remains a major issue.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, J.; Nebel, R. A.; Stange, S.; Murali, S. Krupakar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3691610"> <span id="translatedtitle">In vitro circadian <span class="hlt">period</span> is associated with circadian/sleep preference</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Evaluation of circadian phenotypes is crucial for understanding the pathophysiology of diseases associated with disturbed biological rhythms such as circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSDs). We measured clock gene expression in fibroblasts from individual subjects and <span class="hlt">observed</span> circadian rhythms in the cells (in vitro rhythms). <span class="hlt">Period</span> length of the in vitro rhythm (in vitro <span class="hlt">period</span>) was compared with the intrinsic circadian <span class="hlt">period</span>, ?, measured under a forced desynchrony protocol (in vivo <span class="hlt">period</span>) and circadian/sleep parameters evaluated by questionnaires, sleep log, and actigraphy. Although no significant correlation was <span class="hlt">observed</span> between the in vitro and in vivo <span class="hlt">periods</span>, the in vitro <span class="hlt">period</span> was correlated with chronotype, habitual sleep time, and preferred sleep time. Our data demonstrate that the in vitro <span class="hlt">period</span> is significantly correlated with circadian/sleep preference. The findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that fibroblasts from individual patients can be utilized for in vitro screening of therapeutic agents to provide personalized therapeutic regimens for CRSD patients. PMID:23797865</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hida, Akiko; Kitamura, Shingo; Ohsawa, Yosuke; Enomoto, Minori; Katayose, Yasuko; Motomura, Yuki; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Nozaki, Kentaro; Watanabe, Makiko; Aritake, Sayaka; Higuchi, Shigekazu; Kato, Mie; Kamei, Yuichi; Yamazaki, Shin; Goto, Yu-ichi; Ikeda, Masaaki; Mishima, Kazuo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998AtmEn..32.2737V"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggested</span> guidelines for deposited ambient dust</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Despite deposited dust being one of the main causes of complaint about air pollution, no international or national (U.K.) standards or guidelines currently exist. Various difficulties in defining nuisance levels for deposited dust have militated against the use of guidelines on anything other than an ad hoc, site-specific basis. However, a need clearly exists for guidelines of wider relevance. A novel method of producing guidelines is proposed for monthly dustfall results based on the background levels normally expected. By adopting the concept of "likelihood of complaint", already used successfully for rating the impact of noise, the various difficulties inherent in defining dust nuisance standards per se are avoided. Monthly data for British Standard deposit gauges from the Warren Spring Laboratory (U.K.) National Survey of Air Pollution (grit and dust) have been re-analysed by the authors for gauges "sited to catch general deposit". Where local background data are limited or absent, it is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that summary statistics from this analysis of national background data could provide an appropriate basis for the proposed guidelines. Although this method is primarily applicable to British Standard and Frisbee-type deposit gauges, it could be adapted for use with other devices used for monitoring deposited dust.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vallack, H. W.; Shillito, D. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3510956"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggested</span> use of vaccines in diabetes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Diabetes has emerged as a disease of major public health importance in India affecting the rich and the poor alike. Conventionally, comprehensive diabetes management is aimed at preventing micro and macro vascular complications. However, morbidity and mortality due to infections are also significant. In developing countries like India, the concept of adult immunization is far from reality. Recently the H1N1 pandemic has triggered the necessity for considering immunization in all age groups for the prevention of vaccine-preventable fatal infectious diseases. Considering the economics of immunization in a developing country, providing free vaccines to all adults may not be a practical solution, although the free universal immunization program for children is in existence for several decades. There is no consensus on the use of vaccines in diabetes subjects in India. However, there are some clinics offering routine pneumococcal, influenza and other vaccinations. Patients with diabetes have a deranged immune system making them more prone for infections. Hospitalization and death due to pneumococcal disease and influenza are higher in diabetes patients. They, like other healthy individuals, have a normal humoral response to vaccination with clinically significant benefits. The American Diabetes Association, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, World Health Organization, United Kingdom Guidelines and a number of other scientific organizations have well defined guidelines for vaccination in diabetes. In this article we make some <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> for clinicians in India, regarding use of vaccines in subjects with diabetes. PMID:23226631</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kesavadev, Jothydev; Misra, Anoop; Das, Ashok Kumar; Saboo, Banshi; Basu, Debasis; Thomas, Nihal; Joshi, Shashank R.; Unnikrishnan, A. G.; Shankar, Arun; Krishnan, Gopika; Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Mohan, Viswanathan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10127910"> <span id="translatedtitle">Employee <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> programs: the rewards of involvement.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Successful ESPs are the products of a great deal of effort by managers, administrators, teams, individuals, and reviewers, who are all striving to achieve the goals of increased profitability and enhanced employee involvement. A review of the literature indicates that there are several prescriptions that will increase the likelihood of a successful ESP (see the box). Today's American business prophets sound ceaseless calls to arms in the name of "world class performance," "global competitiveness," "total quality management," and a variety of other buzz terms. A burgeoning industry has evolved that promises, through speeches, teleconferences, seminars, and consulting contracts, to teach American organizations how to achieve excellence. In the face of a sputtering economy and unrelenting competitive pressure, today's managers must translate these laudatory ideals into hands-on reality without sacrificing the firm's profit margin to experimentation. If any idea can help an organization achieve improvement through a workable program, then that idea and that program deserve real consideration. An ESP represents an opportunity to tap the intelligence and resourcefulness of an organization's employees, and by doing so, reap significant cost savings. Those companies and managers that have an ESP program uniformly list economic advantages first when describing the benefits of their employee <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> programs. But there is another deeper and longer term benefit inherent in an ESP. These programs allow employees to become involved in their organization; they drive deaccession to lower levels, they give employees more responsibility, they foster creative approaches to work, and they encourage creativity in pursuit of company goals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10127910</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mishra, J M; McKendall, M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ia.usu.edu/viewproject.php?project=ia:5338"> <span id="translatedtitle">So Many <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Tables!</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> tables come in a variety of shapes and formats. Some <span class="hlt">periodic</span> tables have a flair of creativity! Take a look at these different versions of <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Tables at the following websites. You will be asked to reflect on the theme of <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> after exploring these websites. 1. Some <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Tables provide a wealth of information about each element. Compare 2 different elements on the following <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Tables. <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table Alive WebElements 2. <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Tables can be organized in unique and unusual 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional formats. Analyse the organization of <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> in some of the following <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Tables. Presentation Forms of the <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table Universal <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table 3. Sometimes the designer ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Suggs, Mrs.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-11-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/35530872"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> under pressure: Theory of mind, executive function, and <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> in preschoolers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Eighty preschoolers, ages 3 to 5 years old, completed a 4-phase study in which they experienced a live event and received a pressured, <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> interview about the event a week later. Children were also administered batteries of theory of mind and executive function tasks, as well as the Video <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> Scale for Children (VSSC), which assesses children's assents to misleading</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aryn C. Karpinski; Matthew H. Scullin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Mind+AND+Numbers&pg=7&id=EJ862631"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> under Pressure: Theory of Mind, Executive Function, and <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> in Preschoolers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Eighty preschoolers, ages 3 to 5 years old, completed a 4-phase study in which they experienced a live event and received a pressured, <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> interview about the event a week later. Children were also administered batteries of theory of mind and executive function tasks, as well as the Video <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> Scale for Children (VSSC), which…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Karpinski, Aryn C.; Scullin, Matthew H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24105926"> <span id="translatedtitle">Testing increases <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> for narrative-based misinformation but reduces <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> for question-based misinformation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A number of recent studies have found that recalling details of an event following its occurrence can increase people's <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> to later presented misinformation. However, several other studies have reported the opposite result, whereby earlier retrieval can reduce subsequent eyewitness <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>. In the present study, we investigated whether differences in the way misinformation is presented can modulate the effects of testing on <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>. Participants watched a video of a robbery and some were questioned about the event immediately afterwards. Later, participants were exposed to misinformation in a narrative (Experiment 1) or in questions (Experiment 2). Consistent with previous studies, we found that testing increased <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> when misinformation was presented via a narrative. Remarkably, when misinformation was presented in questions, testing decreased <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>. PMID:24105926</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">LaPaglia, Jessica A; Chan, Jason C K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950025912&hterms=atomic+theory&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Datomic%2Btheory"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relativistic timescale analysis <span class="hlt">suggests</span> lunar theory revision</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The SI second of the atomic clock was calibrated to match the Ephemeris Time (ET) second in a mutual four year effort between the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the United States Naval Observatory (USNO). The ephemeris time is 'clocked' by <span class="hlt">observing</span> the elapsed time it takes the Moon to cross two positions (usually occultation of stars relative to a position on Earth) and dividing that time span into the predicted seconds according to the lunar equations of motion. The last revision of the equations of motion was the Improved Lunar Ephemeris (ILE), which was based on E. W. Brown's lunar theory. Brown classically derived the lunar equations from a purely Newtonian gravity with no relativistic compensations. However, ET is very theory dependent and is affected by relativity, which was not included in the ILE. To investigate the relativistic effects, a new, noninertial metric for a gravitated, translationally accelerated and rotating reference frame has three sets of contributions, namely (1) Earth's velocity, (2) the static solar gravity field and (3) the centripetal acceleration from Earth's orbit. This last term can be characterized as a pseudogravitational acceleration. This metric predicts a time dilation calculated to be -0.787481 seconds in one year. The effect of this dilation would make the ET timescale run slower than had been originally determined. Interestingly, this value is within 2 percent of the average leap second insertion rate, which is the result of the divergence between International Atomic Time (TAI) and Earth's rotational time called Universal Time (UT or UTI). Because the predictions themselves are significant, regardless of the comparison to TAI and UT, the authors will be rederiving the lunar ephemeris model in the manner of Brown with the relativistic time dilation effects from the new metric to determine a revised, relativistic ephemeris timescale that could be used to determine UT free of leap second adjustments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Deines, Steven D.; Williams, Carol A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return 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onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995ptti.meet..209D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relativistic timescale analysis <span class="hlt">suggests</span> lunar theory revision</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The SI second of the atomic clock was calibrated to match the Ephemeris Time (ET) second in a mutual four year effort between the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the United States Naval Observatory (USNO). The ephemeris time is 'clocked' by <span class="hlt">observing</span> the elapsed time it takes the Moon to cross two positions (usually occultation of stars relative to a position on Earth) and dividing that time span into the predicted seconds according to the lunar equations of motion. The last revision of the equations of motion was the Improved Lunar Ephemeris (ILE), which was based on E. W. Brown's lunar theory. Brown classically derived the lunar equations from a purely Newtonian gravity with no relativistic compensations. However, ET is very theory dependent and is affected by relativity, which was not included in the ILE. To investigate the relativistic effects, a new, noninertial metric for a gravitated, translationally accelerated and rotating reference frame has three sets of contributions, namely (1) Earth's velocity, (2) the static solar gravity field and (3) the centripetal acceleration from Earth's orbit. This last term can be characterized as a pseudogravitational acceleration. This metric predicts a time dilation calculated to be -0.787481 seconds in one year. The effect of this dilation would make the ET timescale run slower than had been originally determined. Interestingly, this value is within 2 percent of the average leap second insertion rate, which is the result of the divergence between International Atomic Time (TAI) and Earth's rotational time called Universal Time (UT or UTI). Because the predictions themselves are significant, regardless of the comparison to TAI and UT, the authors will be rederiving the lunar ephemeris model in the manner of Brown with the relativistic time dilation effects from the new metric to determine a revised, relativistic ephemeris timescale that could be used to determine UT free of leap second adjustments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Deines, Steven D.; Williams, Carol A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2839640"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for graduate education in nursing service administration.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The study was prompted by a long-standing concern about how best to educate nurse administrators for work in complex health service organizations. In the last decade, there has been increasingly widespread agreement in nursing that advanced education for clinical specialization alone may be insufficient. To improve understanding of education for nursing administration (NA), the <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> in 37 publications printed between 1976 and 1985 were analyzed. Inferences were made from these publications about curriculum content, program structure, instructional placement, and practicum experiences. Content <span class="hlt">suggested</span> most often pertained to health systems, nursing practice, research, and policy. Reference was least often made to perspectives in organization theory, ethics, and future studies. <span class="hlt">Suggestions</span> for international NA were made in only one publication. Administration majors with a clinical nursing emphasis in multidisciplinary programs controlled by schools of nursing were widely recommended, as were administrative practicums of variable length. Few <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> were made about the epistemological considerations needed to guide the development of interdisciplinary nursing administration. In the future, consideration of the overlap--from nursing and management science--of concepts, research problems, and modes of inquiry, will be important for the education of nurse administrators. In the 1960s and early 1970s, clinical specialization was the central focus of graduate nursing education. During this <span class="hlt">period</span> of time, emphasis on nursing administration (NA) declined, as did the number of NA programs, resulting in a critical shortage of nurse administrators academically prepared to manage health services (Blair, 1976a-b).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2839640</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wagner, L; Henry, B; Giovinco, G; Blanks, C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910044137&hterms=BAI&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DBAI"> <span id="translatedtitle">The 154-day and related <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> of solar activity as subharmonics of a fundamental <span class="hlt">period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is shown here that <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> of 51, 78, 104, and 129 days in addition to the 154-day <span class="hlt">period</span> found in 1984, can often be detected in flare and sunspot records. These <span class="hlt">periods</span> are close to integral multiples of 25.8 days, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that they are subharmonics of a fundamental <span class="hlt">period</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bai, T.; Sturrock, P. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PASJ...66...86C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Frequency-modulated solar rotational <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of geomagnetic indices</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many attempts have been made to search for various timescales in the power spectrum of geomagnetic indices so that common <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in the solar activity and geomagnetic activity indices are identified. The spectral behavior of geomagnetic activity parameters may also provide invaluable information about physical processes involved. In this study we attempt to demonstrate that the frequency modulation associated with a long-term variation may cause extra sidelobes around the principal peak with a <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of ˜ 27 d in the <span class="hlt">observed</span> power spectrum of geomagnetic activity indices, and/or may even split the peak into two adjacent peaks. We employ a straightforward model of an oscillation frequency-modulated by an arbitrary agent to consider the solar rotational <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of geomagnetic indices. As a result, we have found that the peak with the <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of ˜ 27 d in the <span class="hlt">observed</span> power spectrum of geomagnetic indices seems likely frequency-modulated by the amount of 0.0026 d-1 which corresponds to a ˜ 1 yr <span class="hlt">period</span>. We thus <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the fundamental <span class="hlt">period</span> of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> perturbative agent is much longer than a year according to our analysis. Finally, we conclude by discussing the implications of what we have found.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chang, Heon-Young</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PASJ..tmp...79C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Frequency-modulated solar rotational <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of geomagnetic indices</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many attempts have been made to search for various timescales in the power spectrum of geomagnetic indices so that common <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in the solar activity and geomagnetic activity indices are identified. The spectral behavior of geomagnetic activity parameters may also provide invaluable information about physical processes involved. In this study we attempt to demonstrate that the frequency modulation associated with a long-term variation may cause extra sidelobes around the principal peak with a <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of ˜ 27 d in the <span class="hlt">observed</span> power spectrum of geomagnetic activity indices, and/or may even split the peak into two adjacent peaks. We employ a straightforward model of an oscillation frequency-modulated by an arbitrary agent to consider the solar rotational <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of geomagnetic indices. As a result, we have found that the peak with the <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of ˜ 27 d in the <span class="hlt">observed</span> power spectrum of geomagnetic indices seems likely frequency-modulated by the amount of 0.0026 d-1 which corresponds to a ˜ 1 yr <span class="hlt">period</span>. We thus <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the fundamental <span class="hlt">period</span> of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> perturbative agent is much longer than a year according to our analysis. Finally, we conclude by discussing the implications of what we have found.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chang, Heon-Young</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000IAUJD...6E...1B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Babylonian <span class="hlt">observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Very few cuneiform records survive from Mesopotamia of datable astronomical <span class="hlt">observations</span> made prior to the mid-eighth century BC. Those that do record occasional eclipses, and in one isolated case the dates of the heliacal rising and setting of Venus over a few years sometime in the first half of the second millennium BC. After the mid-eighth century BC the situation changes dramatically. Incomplete records of daily <span class="hlt">observations</span> of astronomical and meteorological events are preserved from c. 747 BC until the Christian <span class="hlt">Period</span>. These records are without accompanying ominous interpretation, although it is highly probable that they were compiled by diviners for astrological purposes. They include numerous <span class="hlt">observations</span> of use to historical astronomers, such as the times of eclipses and occultations, and the dates of comet appearances and meteor showers. The question arises as to why such records do not survive from earlier times; celestial divination was employed as far back as the third millenium BC. It is surely not without importance that the earliest known accurate astronomical predictions accompany the later records, and that the mid-eighth century BC ushered in a <span class="hlt">period</span> of centralised Assyrian control of Mesopotamia and the concomitant employment by the Assyrian ruler of large numbers of professional celestial diviners. The programme of daily <span class="hlt">observations</span> evidently began when a high premium was first set on the accurate astronomical prediction of ominous events. It is in this light that we must approach this valuable source material for historical astronomy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brown, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6769616"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Comet Machholz and its idiosyncrasies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The dynamics and physical characteristics of Comet P/Machholz are analyzed. The discovery of the comet (Machholz, 1986) is discussed, including the <span class="hlt">observational</span> conditions and the theory that the comet is inactive over extensive <span class="hlt">periods</span> of time. Consideration is given to <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the two tails of Comet P/Machholz (Emerson, 1986), the brightness variations and light curve of the comet, and nuclear photometry of the comet (Green, 1987). It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the increase in activity beginning one day after perihelion was triggered by a discrete source within 15 deg of the rotation pole that became sunlit after perihelion. Also, the possibility that Comet P/Machholz is associated with a meteor stream is examined. 45 refs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sekanina, Z. (JPL, Pasadena, CA (USA))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900041490&hterms=EMERSON&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DEMERSON"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Comet Machholz and its idiosyncrasies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The dynamics and physical characteristics of Comet P/Machholz are analyzed. The discovery of the comet (Machholz, 1986) is discussed, including the <span class="hlt">observational</span> conditions and the theory that the comet is inactive over extensive <span class="hlt">periods</span> of time. Consideration is given to <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the two tails of Comet P/Machholz (Emerson, 1986), the brightness variations and light curve of the comet, and nuclear photometry of the comet (Green, 1987). It is <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the increase in activity beginning one day after perihelion was triggered by a discrete source within 15 deg of the rotation pole that became sunlit after perihelion. Also, the possibility that Comet P/Machholz is associated with a meteor stream is examined.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sekanina, Zdenek</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/133892"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evidence <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> possible SCA1 gene involvement in schizophrenia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Several findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a possible role for the SCA1 gene on chromosome 6p in some cases of schizophrenia. First, linkage analyses in Irish pedigrees provided LOD scores up to 3.0 for one model tested using microsatellites closely linked to SCA1. Reanalysis of these data using affected sibpair methods yielded a significant result (p = 0.01) for one marker. An attempt to replicate this linkage finding was made using 44 NIMH families (206 individuals, 80 affected) and 12 Utah families (120 individuals, 49 affected). LOD scores were negative in these new families, even allowing for heterogeneity, as were results using affected sibpair methods. However, one Utah family provided a LOD score of 1.3. We also screened the SCA1 trinucleotide repeat to search for expansions characteristic of this disorder in these families and in 38 additional unrelated schizophrenics. We found 1 schizophrenic with 41 repeats, which is substantially larger than the maximum size of 36 repeats <span class="hlt">observed</span> in previous studies of several hundred controls. We are now assessing whether the distribution of SCA1 repeats differs significantly in schizophrenia versus controls. Recent reports <span class="hlt">suggest</span> possible anticipation in schizophrenia (also characteristic of SCA1) and a few cases of psychiatric symptoms <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> schizophrenia have been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the highly related disorder DRPLA (SCA2), which is also based on trinucleotide repeat expansion. These findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that further investigations of this gene and chromosome region may be a priority.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Diehl, S.R.; Wange, S.; Sun, C. [NIDR, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ece.rochester.edu/research/wcng/papers/conference/yang_issnip09.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Active <span class="hlt">period</span> Sleep <span class="hlt">period</span> Active <span class="hlt">period</span> Sleep <span class="hlt">period</span> Fig. 1. Sleep-awake cycles of SMAC.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A cycle Active <span class="hlt">period</span> Sleep <span class="hlt">period</span> Active <span class="hlt">period</span> Sleep <span class="hlt">period</span> SYNC usage DATA usage time Fig. 1. Sleep-awake cycles of SMAC. Modeling and Throughput Analysis for SMAC with a Finite Queue Capacity Ou extensive simulations, which provide throughput values within 5% of the throughput values obtained through</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heinzelman, Wendi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/9905378v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">New evolutionary scenarios for short orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> CVs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> new evolutionary scenarios for non-magnetic short orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> CVs. The first model is the analogy of the `hibernation scenario' or the `modern hibernation scenario'. The second one is an extension of Mukai and Naylor (1995) ideas. All models imply a tight connection between permanent superhump systems and classical novae. We highlight the significance of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> evolution of V1974 Cyg, which might pose a major problem to Mukai and Naylor concept.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Retter; T. Naylor</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-05-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFMNG72B0933C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Model Valid Prediction <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new concept, valid prediction <span class="hlt">period</span> (VPP), is presented here to evaluate model predictability. VPP is defined as the time <span class="hlt">period</span> when the prediction error first exceeds a pre-determined criterion (i.e., the tolerance level). It depends not only on the instantaneous error growth, but also on the noise level, the initial error, and tolerance level. The model predictability skill is then represented by a single scalar, VPP. The longer the VPP, the higher the model predictability skill is. A theoretical framework on the base of the backward Fokker-Planck equation is developed to determine the probability density function (pdf) of VPP. Verification of a Gulf of Mexico nowcast/forecast model is used as an example to demonstrate the usefulness of VPP. Power law scaling is found in the mean square error of displacement between drifting buoy and model trajectories (both at 50 m depth). The pdf of VPP is asymmetric with a long and broad tail on the higher value side, which <span class="hlt">suggests</span> long-term predictability. The calculations demonstrate that the long-term (extreme long such as 50-60 day) predictability is not an "outlier" and shares the same statistical properties as the short-term predictions. References Chu P. C., L. M. Ivanov, and C.W. Fan, Backward Fokker-Plank equation for determining model predictability with unknown initial error distribution. J. Geophys. Res., in press, 2002. Chu P.C., L.M.Ivanov, T.M. Margolina, and O.V.Melnichenko, 2002b: On probabilistic stability of an atmospheric model to various amplitude perturbations. J. Atmos. Sci., in press Chu P.C., L.M. Ivanov, L. Kantha, O.V. Melnichenko and Y.A. Poberezhny, 2002c: The long-term correlations and power decay law in model prediction skill. Geophys. Res. Let., in press.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chu, P. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23045690"> <span id="translatedtitle">Critical <span class="hlt">period</span> for acoustic preference in mice.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Preference behaviors are often established during early life, but the underlying neural circuit mechanisms remain unknown. Adapting a unique nesting behavior assay, we confirmed a "critical <span class="hlt">period</span>" for developing music preference in C57BL/6 mice. Early music exposure between postnatal days 15 and 24 reversed their innate bias for silent shelter, which typically could not be altered in adulthood. Instead, exposing adult mice treated acutely with valproic acid or carrying a targeted deletion of the Nogo receptor (NgR(-/-)) unmasked a strong plasticity of preference consistent with a reopening of the critical <span class="hlt">period</span> as seen in other systems. Imaging of cFos expression revealed a prominent neuronal activation in response to the exposed music in the prelimbic and infralimbic medial prefrontal cortex only under conditions of open plasticity. Neither behavioral changes nor selective medial prefrontal cortex activation was <span class="hlt">observed</span> in response to pure tone exposure, indicating a music-specific effect. Open-field center crossings were increased concomitant with shifts in music preference, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a potential anxiolytic effect. Thus, music may offer both a unique window into the emotional state of mice and a potentially efficient assay for molecular "brakes" on critical <span class="hlt">period</span> plasticity common to sensory and higher order brain areas. PMID:23045690</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang, Eun-Jin; Lin, Eric W; Hensch, Takao K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3477391"> <span id="translatedtitle">Critical <span class="hlt">period</span> for acoustic preference in mice</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Preference behaviors are often established during early life, but the underlying neural circuit mechanisms remain unknown. Adapting a unique nesting behavior assay, we confirmed a “critical <span class="hlt">period</span>” for developing music preference in C57BL/6 mice. Early music exposure between postnatal days 15 and 24 reversed their innate bias for silent shelter, which typically could not be altered in adulthood. Instead, exposing adult mice treated acutely with valproic acid or carrying a targeted deletion of the Nogo receptor (NgR?/?) unmasked a strong plasticity of preference consistent with a reopening of the critical <span class="hlt">period</span> as seen in other systems. Imaging of cFos expression revealed a prominent neuronal activation in response to the exposed music in the prelimbic and infralimbic medial prefrontal cortex only under conditions of open plasticity. Neither behavioral changes nor selective medial prefrontal cortex activation was <span class="hlt">observed</span> in response to pure tone exposure, indicating a music-specific effect. Open-field center crossings were increased concomitant with shifts in music preference, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> a potential anxiolytic effect. Thus, music may offer both a unique window into the emotional state of mice and a potentially efficient assay for molecular “brakes” on critical <span class="hlt">period</span> plasticity common to sensory and higher order brain areas. PMID:23045690</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang, Eun-Jin; Lin, Eric W.; Hensch, Takao K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://prevention.cancer.gov/programs-resources/groups/b/software/screening"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Screening Evaluation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Statistical Software <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Screening Evaluation (Written by Stuart G. Baker) New Approach (Simplified Approximation): See Baker SG. Evaluating <span class="hlt">periodic</span> cancer screening without a randomized control group: a simplified design and analysis. In: Duffy</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.apsarchive.org/resource.cfm?submissionID=6589&BEN=1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observations</span> by a University Anatomy Teacher and a <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span> for Curricular Change: Integrative anatomy for undergraduates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article describes the need, purpose, and establishment of an undergraduate integrative anatomy course. The article also explains a survey conducted to evaluate the number of anatomy programs in undergraduate institutes in Washington.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David Darda (Central Washington University Biological Sciences)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011CorRe..30...23S"> <span id="translatedtitle">The use (and misuse) of sediment traps in coral reef environments: theory, <span class="hlt">observations</span>, and <span class="hlt">suggested</span> protocols</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sediment traps are commonly used as standard tools for monitoring "sedimentation" in coral reef environments. In much of the literature where sediment traps were used to measure the effects of "sedimentation" on corals, it is clear from deployment descriptions and interpretations of the resulting data that information derived from sediment traps has frequently been misinterpreted or misapplied. Despite their widespread use in this setting, sediment traps do not provide quantitative information about "sedimentation" on coral surfaces. Traps can provide useful information about the relative magnitude of sediment dynamics if trap deployment standards are used. This conclusion is based first on a brief review of the state of knowledge of sediment trap dynamics, which has primarily focused on traps deployed high above the seabed in relatively deep water, followed by our understanding of near-bed sediment dynamics in shallow-water environments that characterize coral reefs. This overview is followed by the first synthesis of near-bed sediment trap data collected with concurrent hydrodynamic information in coral reef environments. This collective information is utilized to develop nine protocols for using sediment traps in coral reef environments, which focus on trap parameters that researchers can control such as trap height ( H), trap mouth diameter ( D), the height of the trap mouth above the substrate ( z o ), and the spacing between traps. The hydrodynamic behavior of sediment traps and the limitations of data derived from these traps should be forefront when interpreting sediment trap data to infer sediment transport processes in coral reef environments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Storlazzi, C. D.; Field, M. E.; Bothner, M. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/34540438"> <span id="translatedtitle">Some <span class="hlt">observations</span> <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> preservation of skilled motor acts despite drug-induced stress</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Measures of skilled motor performances, both of a task-oriented (tests of eye-hand coordination) and incidental (control of facial and ocular muscles) nature were recorded for a sample of 20 healthy young adults before and after single administrations of perphenazine, opipramol, imipramine and placebo at doselevels commonly supposed to produce mood or behavioral effects. It was anticipated that such performances would</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hans Heimann; Charles F. Reed; Peter N. Witt</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1968-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31022020"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Fever Syndromes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodic</span> syndromes represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that can be very difficult for practicing physicians to\\u000a diagnosis and treat. This article presents an orderly approach to hyperimmunoglobulin D syndrome; tumor necrosis factor receptor-1\\u000a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> syndrome; familial Mediterranean fever; <span class="hlt">periodic</span> fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis syndrome;\\u000a and cryopyrin-associated <span class="hlt">periodic</span> syndromes by highlighting the disease presentation, diagnosis, pathogenesis,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zachary Jacobs; Christina E. Ciaccio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE86015444"> <span id="translatedtitle">Genealogy of <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Trajectories.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodic</span> solutions of non-integrable classical Hamiltonian systems with two degrees of freedom are numerically investigated. Curves of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> families are given in plots of energy vs. <span class="hlt">period</span>. Results are presented for this Hamiltonian: H = 1/2(p/sub...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. A. M. de Adguiar, C. P. Maldta, E. J. V. de Passos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0809.0046v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Time-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> universes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this letter we construct a new time-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> solution of the vacuum Einstein's field equations whose Riemann curvature norm takes the infinity at some points. We show that this solution is intrinsically time-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> and describes a time-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> universe with the "black hole". New physical phenomena are investigated and new singularities are analyzed for this universal model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">De-Xing Kong; Kefeng Liu; Ming Shen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-08-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11909200"> <span id="translatedtitle">Log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> route to fractal functions.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations have been found to decorate the usual power-law behavior found to describe the approach to a critical point, when the continuous scale-invariance symmetry is partially broken into a discrete-scale invariance symmetry. For Ising or Potts spins with ferromagnetic interactions on hierarchical systems, the relative magnitude of the log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> corrections are usually very small, of order 10(-5). In growth processes [diffusion limited aggregation (DLA)], rupture, earthquake, and financial crashes, log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> oscillations with amplitudes of the order of 10% have been reported. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a "technical" explanation for this 4 order-of-magnitude difference based on the property of the "regular function" g(x) embodying the effect of the microscopic degrees of freedom summed over in a renormalization group (RG) approach F(x)=g(x)+mu(-1)F(gamma x) of an <span class="hlt">observable</span> F as a function of a control parameter x. For systems for which the RG equation has not been derived, the previous equation can be understood as a Jackson q integral, which is the natural tool for describing discrete-scale invariance. We classify the "Weierstrass-type" solutions of the RG into two classes characterized by the amplitudes A(n) of the power-law series expansion. These two classes are separated by a novel "critical" point. Growth processes (DLA), rupture, earthquake, and financial crashes thus seem to be characterized by oscillatory or bounded regular microscopic functions that lead to a slow power-law decay of A(n), giving strong log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> amplitudes. If in addition, the phases of A(n) are ergodic and mixing, the <span class="hlt">observable</span> presents self-affine nondifferentiable properties. In contrast, the regular function of statistical physics models with "ferromagnetic"-type interactions at equilibrium involves unbound logarithms of polynomials of the control variable that lead to a fast exponential decay of A(n) giving weak log-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> amplitudes and smoothed <span class="hlt">observables</span>. PMID:11909200</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gluzman, S; Sornette, D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRB..119.1498R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-<span class="hlt">period</span> tidal variations in the length of day</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new model of long-<span class="hlt">period</span> tidal variations in length of day is developed. The model comprises 80 spectral lines with <span class="hlt">periods</span> between 18.6 years and 4.7 days, and it consistently includes effects of mantle anelasticity and dynamic ocean tides for all lines. The anelastic properties follow Wahr and Bergen; experimental confirmation for their results now exists at the fortnightly <span class="hlt">period</span>, but there remains uncertainty when extrapolating to the longest <span class="hlt">periods</span>. The ocean modeling builds on recent work with the fortnightly constituent, which <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that oceanic tidal angular momentum can be reliably predicted at these <span class="hlt">periods</span> without data assimilation. This is a critical property when modeling most long-<span class="hlt">period</span> tides, for which little <span class="hlt">observational</span> data exist. Dynamic ocean effects are quite pronounced at shortest <span class="hlt">periods</span> as out-of-phase rotation components become nearly as large as in-phase components. The model is tested against a 20 year time series of space geodetic measurements of length of day. The current international standard model is shown to leave significant residual tidal energy, and the new model is found to mostly eliminate that energy, with especially large variance reduction for constituents Sa, Ssa, Mf, and Mt.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ray, Richard D.; Erofeeva, Svetlana Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007MmSAI..78..247M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stellar flaring <span class="hlt">periodicities</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Long term monitoring of the radio flux density of a sample of cool, rapidly rotating stars in binary systems has revealed <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> in their flaring activity. In one system, V773 Tau A p, the flaring <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> is caused by inter-binary collisions of large magnetic structures like solar helmet streamers. In another system, UX Arietis p, the flaring <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> depends on an intrinsic mechanism originating in the stellar interior, that implies preferred areas for the (<span class="hlt">periodical</span>) emergence of magnetic flux tubes. The <span class="hlt">periodical</span> interaction between old and new flux tubes triggers magnetic reconnection and <span class="hlt">periodical</span> flares. Connecting that behaviour to the Sun, the Rieger <span class="hlt">periodicities</span> (solar cycles with a time scale of months) are reviewed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Massi, Maria</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6596860"> <span id="translatedtitle">Latent <span class="hlt">period</span> in clinical radiation myelopathy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seventy-seven papers containing data on more than 300 cases of radiation myelopathy have been analyzed. The data <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the latent <span class="hlt">periods</span> are similar in the cervical and thoracic levels of the spinal cord and are bimodally distributed. Myelopathy of lumbar cord apparently has a shorter latent <span class="hlt">period</span>. As in controlled animal experiments, the latent <span class="hlt">period</span> decreases with increasing dose. Furthermore, the variation in latent <span class="hlt">periods</span> also decreases with dose. It is also seen that retreated patients and pediatric or adolescent patients have greatly reduced latent <span class="hlt">periods</span>. The implications of these findings as they compare with the animal data are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schultheiss, T.E.; Higgins, E.M.; El-Mahdi, A.M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ATel.5631....1C"> <span id="translatedtitle">17d optical <span class="hlt">period</span> confirmed in X-rays from IGR J00569-7226</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A combination of Swift/XRT and INTEGRAL <span class="hlt">observations</span> over the last 30 days has detected a modulation in the X-ray flux at a <span class="hlt">period</span> around 17d in the newly discovered Small Magellanic Cloud source IGR J00569-7226 (Coe et al ATel #5547, Kennea #5553). Such a <span class="hlt">period</span> was reported by Schmitdke et al (ATel #5557) based upon the first year of OGLE II <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the optical counterpart. On-going INTEGRAL & XMM <span class="hlt">observations</span> of this object <span class="hlt">suggest</span> this source is still undergoing a Type II outburst typical of Be/X-ray binary systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Coe, M. J.; Bird, A. J.; Kennea, J. A.; McBride, V. A.; Bartlett, E. S.; Townsend, L. J.; Haberl, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39175947"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intermittent long-wavelength red light increases the <span class="hlt">period</span> of daily locomotor activity in mice</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">BACKGROUND: We <span class="hlt">observed</span> that a dim, red light-emitting diode (LED) triggered by activity increased the circadian <span class="hlt">periods</span> of lab mice compared to constant darkness. It is known that the circadian <span class="hlt">period</span> of rats increases when vigorous wheel-running triggers full-spectrum lighting; however, spectral sensitivity of photoreceptors in mice <span class="hlt">suggests</span> little or no response to red light. Thus, we decided to test</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John R Hofstetter; Amelia R Hofstetter; Amanda M Hughes; Aimee R Mayeda</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014RAA....14.1055S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Two <span class="hlt">suggested</span> configurations for the Chinese space telescope</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">China will establish a 2-meter space-based astronomical telescope. Its main science goals are performing a sky survey for research about dark matter and dark energy, and high resolution <span class="hlt">observations</span>. Some experts <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that this space telescope should be installed inside the Chinese space station. In accord with this <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> we put forward our first configuration, i.e., to adopt a coudé system for this telescope. This coudé system comes from the Chinese 2.16m telescope's coudé system, which includes a relay mirror so that excellent image quality can be obtained. In our second configuration, we <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the whole space telescope fly freely as an independent satellite outside the space station. When it needs servicing, for example, changing instruments, refilling refrigerant or propellant, etc., this space telescope can fly near or even dock with the core space station. Although some space stations have had accompanying satellites, the one we propose is a space telescope that will be much larger than other accompanying satellites in terms of weight and volume. On the basis of the second configuration, we also put forward the following idea: the space station can be composed of several large independent modules if necessary.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Su, Ding-Qiang; Cui, Xiang-Qun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830029065&hterms=composite+circular+cylindrical&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dcomposite%2Bcircular%2Bcylindrical"> <span id="translatedtitle">On composites with <span class="hlt">periodic</span> structure</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The overall moduli of a composite with an isotropic elastic matrix containing <span class="hlt">periodically</span> distributed (anisotropic) inclusions or voids, can be expressed in terms of several infinite series which only depend on the geometry of the inclusions or voids, and hence can be computed once and for all for given geometries. For solids with <span class="hlt">periodic</span> structures these infinite series play exactly the same role as does Eshelby's tensor for a single inclusion or void in an unbounded elastic medium. For spherical and circular-cylindrical geometries, the required infinite series are calculated and the results are tabulated. These are then used to estimate the overall elastic moduli when either the overall strains or the overall stresses are prescribed, obtaining the same results. These results are compared with other estimates and with experimental data. It is found that the model of composites with <span class="hlt">periodic</span> structure yields estimates in excellent agreement with the experimental <span class="hlt">observations</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nemat-Nasser, S.; Iwakuma, T.; Hejazi, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ia.usu.edu/viewproject.php?project=ia:15529"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The following will provide you with a brief overview of the <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table of Elements, as well as some interesting facts about the elements. There are also some games which will help you practice the names and symbols of the elements. A worksheet may be provided for you to record your newfound knowledge. Please follow the directions and links below to enlighten yourself on the wonders of the <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table. If provided, don't forget to fill in your worksheet as you go... Part A: Who, what, where and when? Read a brief History of the <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table:History of the PT2. Part B: Interactive <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Tables: Find physical ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cutting, Mrs.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-05</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.H11A0782B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Slug Tests in a Sandstone Bedding Plane Fracture</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> aquifer tests are conducted by varying the flow and/or head in a well at repeated intervals. The primary difference between <span class="hlt">periodic</span> tests and traditional slug and pump tests is that the well is kept in a continuously transient state. Increased hydraulic transience leads to unique interpretations of aquifer storage as water is alternately withdrawn from and returned to the formation. We show results from <span class="hlt">period</span> slug tests conducted in a sandstone bedding-plane fracture. A sinusoidal head variation is induced in a well by oscillating a slug with a programmed step motor. Head in four <span class="hlt">observation</span> wells is monitored. All wells are 7 meters from the disturbed well and the fracture is isolated using inflatable packers. In spite of the fact that all wells are isolated in single fracture and are in close proximity, the <span class="hlt">observation</span> wells exhibit a wide variation in both amplitude and phase response to head oscillations. Cross-hole pumping tests in the same well set show similar response in 3 of 4 monitoring wells, indicating that the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> tests may be more sensitive to local changes in hydraulic conductivity and/or storativity. Independent hydraulic, tracer, and GPR experiments in this formation <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> tests may be responding to flow channels that develop in response to hydraulic disturbance in the formation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Becker, M. W.; Guiltinan, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19990034121&hterms=tavani+marco&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dtavani%2Bmarco"> <span id="translatedtitle">CGRO <span class="hlt">Observations</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This final report presents an investigation of the CGRO (Compton Gamma Ray Observatory) <span class="hlt">observations</span>. The investigation includes: Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at High Latitudes; and Echoes in X-Ray Novae; A Localized Excess of Gamma-Radiation; Transient Hard X-Ray Emission from Globular Clusters; and A Search for Be/X-Ray Binaries in Hard X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters; X-Ray Transients in Star-Forming Regions; Gamma-ray Emission from Globular Clusters; Shock High Energy Emission from Be-Star/Pulsar System PSR 1259-63m; Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy of Nearby OB Associations; Long Term Hard X-Ray Monitoring of X-Ray Busters; and <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Hard X-Ray Emission from GRO J1849-03.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kaaret, Philip</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://learningcenter.nsta.org/product_detail.aspx?id=10.2505/4/ss04_027_04_32"> <span id="translatedtitle">Science Sampler: <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Teaching the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table can be a mundane task filled with repetition and rote memorization. The techniques for engaging activities outlined in this article will help students become familiar with the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table in fun and exciting ways through mediums such as games, silly stories, jokes, puzzles, and songs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Galus, Pamela</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53738073"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> orbits and stability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A review is presented of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> orbits which are of interest to dynamical astronomy, and their relation to actual systems is considered. In particular, the paper reviews <span class="hlt">periodic</span> orbits in planetary systems with two or more planets, in the asteroid system, in stellar systems, and in the motion of a star in various types of galaxies. Most systems are close</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John D. Hadjidemetriou</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=periodic+AND+table&id=EJ721572"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Living <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To help make the abstract world of chemistry more concrete eighth-grade students, the author has them create a living <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table that can be displayed in the classroom or hallway. This display includes information about the elements arranged in the traditional <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table format, but also includes visual real-world representations of the…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nahlik, Mary Schrodt</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov/NASADocs/magbook2002.pdf#page=40"> <span id="translatedtitle">What is an Oscillation <span class="hlt">Period</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This is an activity about oscillation. Learners will <span class="hlt">observe</span>, time, and graph the data of the side to side motion of the mirror used in the soda bottle magnetometer activity to determine the mirror's oscillation <span class="hlt">period</span>. This activity requires prior construction and experience in use of a soda bottle magnetometer, which is the eighth activity in the Exploring the Earth's Magnetic Field: An IMAGE Satellite Guide to the Magnetosphere educators guide. This is the ninth activity in the guide.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MPBu...40..190B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Period</span> Determination for 4527 Schoenberg</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The main-belt asteroid 4527 Schoenberg (1982 OK) has been <span class="hlt">observed</span> between June 28 and July 1, 2012 at Maidanak astronomical observatory of the Ulugh Beg Astronomical Institute (UBAI), Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences. On the basis of data analysis it is found a synodic rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> of 2.6928" b0.0384 hour (0.1122±0.0016 day) and lightcurve amplitude of 0.31±0.05 mag.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Burkhonov, O. A.; Ehgamberdiev, Sh. A.; Ergashev, K. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dwb.unl.edu/Teacher/NSF/C04/C04Links/chemlab.pc.maricopa.edu/periodic/periodic.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Pictorial <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This online <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table of the elements is a fabulous find for students of chemistry. On the main page, a clickable <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table allows users to choose an element and then view a page listing that element's electron configuration, atomic weight and number, isotopes and product elements, and a number of other physical properties such as ionization potential and boiling and melting points. Each entry is extremely thorough and contains links to related elements. The Pictorial <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table is also easily searchable by atomic and covalent radius, density, boiling and melting point, electronegativity, ionization potential, heat properties, and atomic weight or number. In addition, users can perform keyword searches. Graphs and tables of element properties, alternative styles of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table (e.g., spiral, pyramid), a special page on isotopic properties, a printable table, and links to other <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table pages are among the wealth of information provided. The site is provided by the Chemlab server of Phoenix College, AZ.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heilman, Chris.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53187708"> <span id="translatedtitle">GMRT <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of Jupiter's Synchrotron Radio Emission at 610 MHz</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The non-thermal decimeteric radio emission from Jupiter is dominated by synchrotron emission originating from high-energy electrons trapped in Jupiter's inner radiation belt (<5 Jovian radii). We <span class="hlt">observed</span> Jupiter during February 24 -- March 3, 2003 with the GMRT to study its day-to-day variability. Each day's <span class="hlt">observations</span> lasted for ˜10 hours (the rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> of Jupiter). These <span class="hlt">observations</span> <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a correlation</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Bhardwaj; C. H. Ishwara-Chandra; N. Udaya Shankar; H. Misawa; K. Imai; Y. Miyoshi; F. Tsuchiya; T. Kondo; A. Morioka</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.isiweb.ee.ethz.ch/papers/docu/chre-aloe-EUSIPCO-2011.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A MODEL FOR QUASI-<span class="hlt">PERIODIC</span> SIGNALS WITH APPLICATION TO RAIN ESTIMATION FROM MICROWAVE LINK GAIN</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A MODEL FOR QUASI-<span class="hlt">PERIODIC</span> SIGNALS WITH APPLICATION TO RAIN ESTIMATION FROM MICROWAVE LINK GAIN from attenuation due to rain [1]. From this <span class="hlt">observation</span>, it has been <span class="hlt">suggested</span> to estimate rain- fall in this way would be a welcome complement to rain gauges and rain radar mea- surements [2,3]. However</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Loeliger, Hans-Andrea</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18824030"> <span id="translatedtitle">Psychiatric vulnerability: <span class="hlt">suggestions</span> from animal models and role of neurotrophins.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are well-studied neurotrophins involved in the neurogenesis, differentiation, growth and maintenance of selected peripheral and central populations of neuronal cells during development and at adulthood. Neurotrophins, in concert to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, play a key role in modulating brain plasticity and behavioral coping, especially during ontogenetic critical <span class="hlt">periods</span>, when developing brain is particularly sensitive to external stimulations. Indeed, early life events, such psychophysical stress, affect NGF and BDNF levels, and induce dysregulation of the HPA axis. Thus, early life experiences can affect brain development, contributing to shape interindividual differences in vulnerability to stress or psychiatric disorders. At adulthood, intermale aggressive interactions in mice, representing a psychosocial stressful condition, has been shown to markedly alter NGF and BDNF levels both in plasma as well as in selected brain areas, including the hypothalamus and hippocampus. These results have been extended to humans, showing that blood NGF levels are enhanced in psychological contexts mainly associated to anxiety and fear, such as first skydiving experience. Recent studies indicate a role for neurotrophins also in vulnerability and resilience to stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders. Overall, these findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a role of neurotrophins as factors mediating both short- and long-term experience effects on brain structure and function. PMID:18824030</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alleva, Enrico; Francia, Nadia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhyA..391.4891M"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">suggested</span> statistical test for measuring bivariate nonlinear dependence</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We devise a new asymptotic statistical test to assess independence in bivariate continuous distributions. Our approach is based on the Cramér-von Mises test, in which the empirical process is viewed as the Kullback-Leibler divergence, that is, as the distance between the data under the independence hypothesis and the data empirically <span class="hlt">observed</span>. We derive the theoretical characteristic function of the limit distribution of the test statistic and find the critical values through computer simulation. A Monte Carlo experiment is considered as assessing the validation and power performance of the test by assuming a bivariate nonlinear dependence structure with fat tails. Two extra examples, respectively, consider stationary and conditionally nonstationary series. Results confirm that our <span class="hlt">suggested</span> test is consistent and powerful in the presence of bivariate nonlinear dependence even if the environment is non-Gaussian. Our case is illustrated with high-frequency data from stocks listed on the NYSE that recently experienced so-called mini-flash crashes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matsushita, Raul; Figueiredo, Annibal; Da Silva, Sergio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41916699"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stable Isotope Analysis of Amphidromous Hawaiian Gobies <span class="hlt">Suggests</span> Their Larvae Spend a Substantial <span class="hlt">Period</span> of Time in Freshwater River Plumes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We employed stable isotope analysis (?13C, ?15N) to evaluate the sources of nutrients used by amphidromous gobiid fishes (Lentipes concolor, Sicyopterus stimpsoni, Awaous guamensis) caught migrating into and living in Hakalau Stream, Hawaii. Although considerable variation amongst the stable isotope values of stream items was noted across all 4 years of our study, the relationships between the fishes were relatively constant.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peter W. Sorensen; Keith A. Hobson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/211651"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodized</span> Daubechies wavelets</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The properties of <span class="hlt">periodized</span> Daubechies wavelets on [0,1] are detailed and counterparts which form a basis for L{sup 2}(R). Numerical examples illustrate the analytical estimates for convergence and demonstrated by comparison with Fourier spectral methods the superiority of wavelet projection methods for approximations. The analytical solution to inner products of <span class="hlt">periodized</span> wavelets and their derivatives, which are known as connection coefficients, is presented, and their use ius illustrated in the approximation of two commonly used differential operators. The <span class="hlt">periodization</span> of the connection coefficients in Galerkin schemes is presented in detail.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Restrepo, J.M.; Leaf, G.K.; Schlossnagle, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5272333"> <span id="translatedtitle">Genealogy of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> trajectories</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodic</span> solutions of non-integrable classical Hamiltonian systems with two degrees of freedom are numerically investigated. Curves of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> families are given in plots of energy vs. <span class="hlt">period</span>. Results are presented for this Hamiltonian: H = 1/2(p/sub x//sup 2/ + p/sub y//sup 2/) + 1/2 x/sup 2/ + 3/2 y/sup 2/ - x/sup 2/y + 1/12 x/sup 4/. Properties of the families of curves are pointed out. (LEW)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">de Adguiar, M.A.M.; Maldta, C.P.; de Passos, E.J.V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-05-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013RCD....18..380J"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stability of underwater <span class="hlt">periodic</span> locomotion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Most aquatic vertebrates swim by lateral flapping of their bodies and caudal fins. While much effort has been devoted to understanding the flapping kinematics and its influence on the swimming efficiency, little is known about the stability (or lack of) of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> swimming. It is believed that stability limits maneuverability and body designs/flapping motions that are adapted for stable swimming are not suitable for high maneuverability and vice versa. In this paper, we consider a simplified model of a planar elliptic body undergoing prescribed <span class="hlt">periodic</span> heaving and pitching in potential flow. We show that <span class="hlt">periodic</span> locomotion can be achieved due to the resulting hydrodynamic forces, and its value depends on several parameters including the aspect ratio of the body, the amplitudes and phases of the prescribed flapping.We obtain closedform solutions for the locomotion and efficiency for small flapping amplitudes, and numerical results for finite flapping amplitudes. This efficiency analysis results in optimal parameter values that are in agreement with values reported for some carangiform fish. We then study the stability of the (finite amplitude flapping) <span class="hlt">periodic</span> locomotion using Floquet theory. We find that stability depends nonlinearly on all parameters. Interesting trends of switching between stable and unstable motions emerge and evolve as we continuously vary the parameter values. This <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that, for live organisms that control their flapping motion, maneuverability and stability need not be thought of as disjoint properties, rather the organism may manipulate its motion in favor of one or the other depending on the task at hand.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jing, Fangxu; Kanso, Eva</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1564108"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mitochondrial genomes <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that hexapods and crustaceans are mutually paraphyletic</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For over a century the relationships between the four major groups of the phylum Arthropoda (Chelicerata, Crustacea, Hexapoda and Myriapoda) have been debated. Recent molecular evidence has confirmed a close relationship between the Crustacea and the Hexapoda, and has included the <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> of a paraphyletic Hexapoda. To test this hypothesis we have sequenced the complete or near-complete mitochondrial genomes of three crustaceans (Parhyale hawaiensis, Squilla mantis and Triops longicaudatus), two collembolans (Onychiurus orientalis and Podura aquatica) and the insect Thermobia domestica. We <span class="hlt">observed</span> rearrangement of transfer RNA genes only in O. orientalis, P. aquatica and P. hawaiensis. Of these, only the rearrangement in O. orientalis, an apparent autapomorphy for the collembolan family Onychiuridae, was phylogenetically informative. We aligned the nuclear and amino acid sequences from the mitochondrial protein-encoding genes of these taxa with their homologues from other arthropod taxa for phylogenetic analysis. Our dataset contains many more Crustacea than previous molecular phylogenetic analyses of the arthropods. Neighbour-joining, maximum-likelihood and Bayesian posterior probabilities all <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that crustaceans and hexapods are mutually paraphyletic. A crustacean clade of Malacostraca and Branchiopoda emerges as sister to the Insecta sensu stricto and the Collembola group with the maxillopod crustaceans. Some, but not all, analyses strongly support this mutual paraphyly but statistical tests do not reject the null hypotheses of a monophyletic Hexapoda or a monophyletic Crustacea. The dual monophyly of the Hexapoda and Crustacea has rarely been questioned in recent years but the idea of both groups' paraphyly dates back to the nineteenth century. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the mutual paraphyly of both groups should seriously be considered. PMID:16024395</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cook, Charles E; Yue, Qiaoyun; Akam, Michael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0511454v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">New Photometric <span class="hlt">Observations</span> of sigma Ori E</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present new UBVRI <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the magnetic Bp star sigma Ori E. The basic features of the star's lightcurve have not changed since the previous monitoring by Hesser et al. (1977), indicating that the star's magnetosphere has remained stable over the past three decades. Interestingly, we find a rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> that is slightly longer than in the Hesser et al. (1977) analysis, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> possible spindown of the star.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mary Oksala; Rich Townsend</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-11-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11689947"> <span id="translatedtitle">In vitro evolution <span class="hlt">suggests</span> multiple origins for the hammerhead ribozyme.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The hammerhead ribozyme was originally discovered in a group of RNAs associated with plant viruses, and has subsequently been identified in the genome of the newt (Notophthalamus viridescens), in schistosomes and in cave crickets (Dolichopoda species). The sporadic occurrence of this self-cleaving RNA motif in highly divergent organisms could be a consequence of the very early evolution of the hammerhead ribozyme, with all extant examples being descended from a single ancestral progenitor. Alternatively, the hammerhead ribozyme may have evolved independently many times. To better understand the <span class="hlt">observed</span> distribution of hammerhead ribozymes, we used in vitro selection to search an unbiased sample of random sequences for comparably active self-cleaving motifs. Here we show that, under near-physiological conditions, the hammerhead ribozyme motif is the most common (and thus the simplest) RNA structure capable of self-cleavage at biologically <span class="hlt">observed</span> rates. Our results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the evolutionary process may have been channelled, in nature as in the laboratory, towards repeated selection of the simplest solution to a biochemical problem. PMID:11689947</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Salehi-Ashtiani, K; Szostak, J W</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17072571"> <span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Periodic</span> fever syndromes].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> fever syndromes comprise a group of disorders characterized by attacks of seemingly unprovoked inflammation. The genetic causes of five hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes have been identified in the last few years: familial Mediterranean fever, the cryopyrinopathies [Muckle-Wells, chronic infantile neurological, cutaneous, articular syndrome (CINCA) and familial autoinflammatory syndromes], TNF-receptor associated <span class="hlt">periodic</span> syndrome, cyclic neutropenia syndrome and <span class="hlt">periodic</span> fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome. The study of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> fever syndromes has progressed from clinical characterization to genetic analysis and to the definition of the functional defects linking genes or domains to apoptotic proteins and signal transduction pathways. This new research opens the way for more specific treatment options with a further improvement in prognosis and outcome. PMID:17072571</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huemer, C; Huemer, M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.acog.org/~/media/For%2520Patients/faq049.ashx"> <span id="translatedtitle">Your First <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... often should I change my tampon? • What are menstrual cups? • Does having a <span class="hlt">period</span> cause pain or discomfort? • ... need to change it more often. What are menstrual cups? Menstrual cups are made of plastic or rubber. ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=periodic+AND+table&pg=6&id=EJ534805"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table CD.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Describes the characteristics of the digitized version of The <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table Videodisc. Provides details about the organization of information and access to the data via Macintosh and Windows computers. (DDR)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Banks, Alton J.; Holmes, Jon L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=periodic+AND+table&pg=6&id=EJ321490"> <span id="translatedtitle">Setting the <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Examines problems resulting from different forms of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table, indicating that New York State schools use a form reflecting the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry's 1984 recommendations. Other formats used and reasons for standardization are discussed. (DH)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saturnelli, Annette</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790013421&hterms=think+yourself+well&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3D%2528%2528think%2Byourself%2529%2Bwell%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> discharges</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> capacity checks are assessed as well as the effects of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> discharges on the cycle life and the performance of cells during the cycle life. Topics discussed include the effect of the amount of electrolyte on cell capacity at 35 C; battery design for spacecraft; electrolyte starvation theory; battery separator degradation; negative electrode stability; voltage regulation; operating temperatures; and integration of reconditioning systems using microprocessors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ford, F. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ist.utl.pt/files/media/clipping/2012/junho/Lusapt16junho.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pas: Portugal <span class="hlt">Period</span>.: Diria</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lusa.pt País: Portugal <span class="hlt">Period</span>.: Diária Ã?mbito: Online Pag.: 1 de 2ID: 42336054 16-06-2012 16 DE". @ Agência Lusa Partilhar: Comentários Critério de publicação de comentários Facebook Twitter Gosto Facebook: Portugal <span class="hlt">Period</span>.: Diária Ã?mbito: Online Pag.: 2 de 2ID: 42336054 16-06-2012 PUBLICIDADE PUBLICIDADE BANCA</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003IBVS.5383....1P"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Revised <span class="hlt">Period</span> For AY Aur</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">period</span> of the Mira variable AY Aur has been determined to be longer than that published in the GCVS 4th Edition. Fourier and CLEANEST analysis of AAVSO data determines the <span class="hlt">period</span> to be 389.8 days. The discrepancy may have been caused by the effects of large gaps in <span class="hlt">observational</span> data magnified by the close proximity of the star's <span class="hlt">period</span> in relation to the length of the solar cycle.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Price, A.; Templeton, M. R.; Mattei, J. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/46473911"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table: An Eight <span class="hlt">Period</span> Table For The 21 st Centrury</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Throughout most of the 20th century, an eight-<span class="hlt">period</span> <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table (also known as an electron-configuration table) was offered as an improvement over the ubiquitous seven-<span class="hlt">period</span> format of wall charts and textbooks. The eight-<span class="hlt">period</span> version has never achieved wide acceptance although it has significant advantages. Many <span class="hlt">observers</span> have questioned the way helium is displayed in this format. Now, a reinterpretation of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gary Katz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://optics.beckman.uiuc.edu/bryn/Papers/Journal_Articles/2007_Cyclic_Coherence_PRA.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Observable</span> coherence theory for statistically <span class="hlt">periodic</span> fields Brynmor J. Davis*</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">or stochastic optical systems-- e.g., propagation-induced spectral changes 7 , white light interference 8 instruments that use the statistical nature of light to make inferences--e.g., stellar speckle interferometry, such as spectral shearing interferometry, can be used to fully characterize the standard two-time correlation</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bhargava, Rohit</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25179685"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hematopoiesis in the equine fetal liver <span class="hlt">suggests</span> immune preparedness.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigated how the equine fetus prepares its pre-immune humoral repertoire for an imminent exposure to pathogens in the neonatal <span class="hlt">period</span>, particularly how the primary hematopoietic organs are equipped to support B cell hematopoiesis and immunoglobulin (Ig) diversity. We demonstrated that the liver and the bone marrow at approximately 100 days of gestation (DG) are active sites of hematopoiesis based on the expression of signature messenger RNA (mRNA) (c-KIT, CD34, IL7R, CXCL12, IRF8, PU.1, PAX5, NOTCH1, GATA1, CEBPA) and protein markers (CD34, CD19, IgM, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD11b, CD172A) of hematopoietic development and leukocyte differentiation molecules, respectively. To verify Ig diversity achieved during the production of B cells, V(D)J segments were sequenced in primary lymphoid organs of the equine fetus and adult horse, revealing that similar heavy chain VDJ segments and CDR3 lengths were most frequently used independent of life stage. In contrast, different lambda light chain segments were predominant in equine fetal compared to adult stage, and surprisingly, the fetus had less restricted use of variable gene segments to construct the lambda chain. Fetal Igs also contained elements of sequence diversity, albeit to a smaller degree than that of the adult horse. Our data <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that the B cells produced in the liver and bone marrow of the equine fetus generate a wide repertoire of pre-immune Igs for protection, and the more diverse use of different lambda variable gene segments in fetal life may provide the neonate an opportunity to respond to a wider range of antigens at birth. PMID:25179685</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Battista, J M; Tallmadge, R L; Stokol, T; Felippe, M J B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008DPS....40.3404N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Saturn's Titan: Cassini Instruments Document Surface Change <span class="hlt">Suggesting</span> Cryovolcanism</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Instruments on the Cassini Saturn Orbiter have been <span class="hlt">observing</span> the surface of the satellite Titan since mid 2004. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) reports that regions near 26oS, 78oW (region 1) and 7oS, 138oW (region 2) exhibit photometric changes consistent with surface activity; they are photometrically variable with time(1). Cassini Synthetic Aperture Rader (SAR) has investigated these regions and reports that both of these regions exhibit morphologies consistent with cryovolcanism (2). VIMS <span class="hlt">observed</span> region 1 eight times and reported that on two occasions the region brightened two-fold and then decreased again on timescales of several weeks. Region 2 was <span class="hlt">observed</span> on four occasions (Tb-Dec13/2004 ,T8-Oct27/2005, T10-Jan15/2006, T12-Mar18/2006) and exhibited a pronounced change in I/F betweenT8 and T10. Our photometric analysis finds that both regions do not exhibit photometric properties consistent with atmospheric phenomenon such as tropospheric clouds. These changes must be at or very near the surface. We conclude that the VIMS instrument has found two instances in which selected regions on Titan's surface become unusually reflective and remained reflective on time scales of days to months. In both cases the size of reflectance variability is large, larger than either Loki or the Big Island of Hawaii. This is a strong case for currently active surface processes on Titan. Pre-Cassini, Titan was thought of as a pre-biotic earth that was frozen in time. Cassini VIMS and SAR <span class="hlt">observations</span> combined <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that Titan is the present day is in no way frozen, and is instead an episodically changing or evolving world. References: [1] Nelson R. M. et al, LPSC 2007 , Europlanets 2007, AGU 2007, EGU 2008,. [2] Lopes et al (this meeting), Stofan et al. Icarus 185, 443-456, 2007. Lopes et al. Icarus 186, 395-412, 2007. Kirk et al., DPS 2007. Acknowledgement: This work done at JPL/NASA</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nelson, Robert M.; Cassini VIMS SAR Titan surface variability Group</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/3816872"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> or Hypnosis: What do our Scales Really Measure?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Conceptually, hypnotizability has always been defined as the increase in <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> produced by hypnosis. In practice, hypnotizability is measured as <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> following a hypnotic induction. The data indicate that these are different constructs. Although the induction of hypnosis inmases <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> to a substantial degree, the correlation between hypnotic and nonhypnotic <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> approximates the reliability coefficients of so-called hypnotizability scales. This</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Irving Kirsch</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001PhRvD..63d5022N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Renormalization of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> potentials</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The renormalization of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> potential is investigated in the framework of the Euclidean one-component scalar field theory by means of the differential RG approach. Some known results about the sine-Gordon model are recovered in an extremely simple manner. There are two phases: an ordered one with asymptotical freedom and a disordered one where the model is nonrenormalizable and trivial. The order parameter of the <span class="hlt">periodicity</span>, the winding number, indicates spontaneous symmetry breaking in the ordered phase where the fundamental group symmetry is broken and the solitons acquire dynamical stability. It is argued that the <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> and the convexity are such strong constraints on the effective potential that it always becomes flat. This flattening is reproduced by integrating out the RG equation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nándori, I.; Polonyi, J.; Sailer, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4176327"> <span id="translatedtitle">An intensity ratio of interlocking loops determines circadian <span class="hlt">period</span> length</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Circadian clocks allow organisms to orchestrate the daily rhythms in physiology and behaviors, and disruption of circadian rhythmicity can profoundly affect fitness. The mammalian circadian oscillator consists of a negative primary feedback loop and is associated with some ‘auxiliary’ loops. This raises the questions of how these interlocking loops coordinate to regulate the <span class="hlt">period</span> and maintain its robustness. Here, we focused on the REV-ERB?/Cry1 auxiliary loop, consisting of Rev-Erb?/ROR-binding elements (RORE) mediated Cry1 transcription, coordinates with the negative primary feedback loop to modulate the mammalian circadian <span class="hlt">period</span>. The silicon simulation revealed an unexpected rule: the intensity ratio of the primary loop to the auxiliary loop is inversely related to the <span class="hlt">period</span> length, even when post-translational feedback is fixed. Then we measured the mRNA levels from two loops in 10-mutant mice and <span class="hlt">observed</span> the similar monotonic relationship. Additionally, our simulation and the experimental results in human osteosarcoma cells <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that a coupling effect between the numerator and denominator of this intensity ratio ensures the robustness of circadian <span class="hlt">period</span> and, therefore, provides an efficient means of correcting circadian disorders. This ratio rule highlights the contribution of the transcriptional architecture to the <span class="hlt">period</span> dynamics and might be helpful in the construction of synthetic oscillators. PMID:25122753</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yan, Jie; Shi, Guangsen; Zhang, Zhihui; Wu, Xi; Liu, Zhiwei; Xing, Lijuan; Qu, Zhipeng; Dong, Zhen; Yang, Ling; Xu, Ying</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19404364"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coaxial <span class="hlt">periodic</span> optical waveguide.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Guided modes in a dielectric waveguide structure with a coaxial <span class="hlt">periodic</span> multi-layer are investigated by using a matrix formula with Bessel functions. We show that guided modes exist in the structure, and that the field is confined in the core which consists of the optically thinner medium. The dispersion curves are discontinuous, so that the modes can exist only in particular wavelength bands corresponding to the stop bands of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> structure of the clad. It is possible that the waveguide structure can be applied to filters or optical fibers to reduce nonlinear effects. PMID:19404364</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kawanishi, T; Izutsu, M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/periodictable.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">ACS <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This Web site from the American Chemical Society features an interactive <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table with the use of Shockwave. The information presented is divided into three sections. In the first, <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table, students will find attributes such as melting point and molar heat capacity for the elements. The second part illustrates the electron configurations of each of the elements, helping students to better understand the concept. The last section allows users to plot data based on the elements' attributes including atomic radius and electro negativity. Working with this site, high school and college students are able to improve their chemical knowledge.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.chemeddl.org/collections/ptl/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table Live!</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table Live!, produced by the Division of Chemical Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, allows users "to explore a broad range of information about the elements, their reactions, their properties, their structures and their histories." After selecting an element from the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table, users can access a myriad of information divided into three sections: Description, Physical, and Atomic. Students can view short videos of many of the elements' reactions with air, water, acids, and bases. The website is equipped with a helpful glossary and images of the elements, scientists, and other related items.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=handling+AND+solution&pg=4&id=EJ138373"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Duplicate <span class="hlt">Periodical</span> Problem in the Academic Library</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An analysis of the problems created by receipt of duplicate <span class="hlt">periodical</span> issues in an academic university library is presented, together with a <span class="hlt">suggested</span> solution designed to improve the economics of handling duplicate <span class="hlt">periodicals</span>. (Author)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lupton, David Walker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19960021479&hterms=build+solar&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dbuild%2Bsolar"> <span id="translatedtitle">On <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of solar wind phenomena</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have investigated the rate of occurrence of solar wind phenomena <span class="hlt">observed</span> between 1972-1984 using power spectrum analysis. The data have been taken from the high speed solar wind (HSSW) streams catalogue published by Mavromichalaki et al. (1988). The power spectrum analysis of HSSW events indicate that HSSW stream events have a <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of 9 days. This <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of HSSW events is 1/3 of the 27 days <span class="hlt">period</span> of coronal holes which are the major source of solar wind events. In our opinion the 9 days <span class="hlt">period</span> may be the energy build up time to produce the HSSW stream events.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Verma, V. K.; Joshi, G. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApPhA.117...49G"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> nanostructures self-formed on silicon and silicon carbide by femtosecond laser irradiation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Laser-induced <span class="hlt">periodic</span> surface structures (LIPSS) were formed on Si and SiC surfaces by irradiations with femtosecond laser pulses in air. Different kinds of self-organized structures appeared on Si and SiC at laser fluences slightly higher than the damage threshold, which was measured by confocal laser scanning microscope. The characteristic spatial <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of every <span class="hlt">observed</span> structure was estimated reading the peak values of the 2D Fourier transform power spectra obtained from SEM images. The evolution of the spatial <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> was finally studied with respect to both the laser fluence and the number of laser pulses. As already <span class="hlt">observed</span> for metals, the behavior of the spatial <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> on laser fluence can be related to the parametric decay of laser light into surface plasma waves. Our results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> a wide applicability of the parametric decay model on different materials, making the model a useful tool in view of different applications of LIPSS.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gemini, Laura; Hashida, Masaki; Shimizu, Masahiro; Miyasaka, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Shunsuke; Tokita, Shigeki; Limpouch, Jiri; Mocek, Tomas; Sakabe, Shuji</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998MNRAS.296..893L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> modulation and magnetic cycles in close binaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We discuss the <span class="hlt">observed</span> orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> modulations in close binaries, and focus on the mechanism proposed by Applegate relating the changes of the stellar internal rotation associated with a magnetic activity cycle with the variation of the gravitational quadrupole moment of the active component; the variation of this quadrupole moment in turn forces the orbital motion of the binary stars to follow the activity level of the active star. We generalize this approach by considering the details of this interaction, and develop some illustrative examples in which the problem can be easily solved in analytical form. Starting from such results, we consider the interplay between rotation and magnetic field generation in the framework of different types of dynamo models, which have been proposed to explain solar and stellar activity. We show how the <span class="hlt">observed</span> orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> modulation in active binaries may provide new constraints for discriminating between such models. In particular, we study the case of the prototype active binary RS Canum Venaticorum, and <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that torsional oscillations - driven by a stellar magnetic dynamo - may account for the <span class="hlt">observed</span> behaviour of this star. Further possible applications of the relationship between magnetic activity and orbital <span class="hlt">period</span> modulation, related to the recent discovery of binary systems containing a radio pulsar and a convecting upper main-sequence or a late-type low-mass companion, are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lanza, A. F.; Rodono, M.; Rosner, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001P%26SS...49..657R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rotational <span class="hlt">periods</span> of asteroids II</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the framework of the photoelectric asteroid <span class="hlt">observational</span> program undertaken at Catania University to collect lightcurves apt to apply the pole computational methods, the V-band lightcurves and the values of the synodic rotational <span class="hlt">period</span> and of the average B- V colour index of 5 Astrea, 6 Hebe, 12 Victoria, 13 Egeria, 26 Proserpina, 34 Circe, 63 Ausonia, 66 Maja, 102 Miriam, 140 Siwa, 176 Iduna, 181 Eucaris, 241 Germania, 250 Bettina, 258 Tyche, 313 Chaldea, 335 Roberta, 352 Gisela, 419 Aurelia, 471 Papagena, 537 Pauly, 639 Latona and 984 Gretia are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Riccioli, D.; Blanco, C.; Cigna, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1564500"> <span id="translatedtitle">Log <span class="hlt">periodic</span> dipole arrays</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new class of coplanar dipole arrays is introduced. The antennas described provide unidirectional radiation patterns of constant beamwidth and nearly constant input impedances over any desired bandwidth. The broad-band properties are achieved by making use of the principles of log <span class="hlt">periodic</span> antenna design. Models are discussed which are capable of providing 8- to 9-db directive gain with an associated</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Isbell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1960-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.optimization-online.org/DB_FILE/2009/07/2351.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">MADS for <span class="hlt">periodic</span> variables</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">May 19, 2009 ... and the internal structure of the black box are not exploitable. Pattern ... where ? is a subset of Rn and the function f is <span class="hlt">periodic</span> with respect to the ..... to differentiate healthy cells from ill cells for the detection of tumors (problem ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sébastien Le Digabel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pdfserv.aip.org/PHPAEN/vol_12/iss_5/056315_1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">periodically</span> oscillating plasma sphere, or POPS, is a novel fusion concept first proposed by D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel [Fusion Technol. 38, 28 (1998)]. POPS utilizes the self-similar collapse of an oscillating ion cloud in a spherical harmonic oscillator potential well formed by electron injection. Once the ions have been phase-locked, their coherent motion simultaneously produces very</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. A. Nebel; S. Stange; S. Krupakar Murali</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://library.jhu.edu/files/MSEL.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodicals</span> Digitization Unit</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Group Study/ Classroom Science Reference NewScience Books ::: ::: Science Reference Eisenberg Room White PT - PO CopierAssigned Carrels Art Reference Assigned Carrels BluePR-PS BluePR-PR Carrels Blue PR Books Copy/ Print Current <span class="hlt">Periodicals</span> Newspapers :: :: Lounge Reference:: :: :: :: :: ::: :: :: : : : GS</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51472439"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Classification of Elements</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">To the three requirements of a modern <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table, as stated by A. A. Clifford1, must be added a fourth, namely, that it should be in as close accord as possible with chemical facts, and above all with the most fundamental of these, valency. It is only in Group IV that there is any strong chemical support for the sub-group</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. P. Thistlethwaite</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1960-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4829568"> <span id="translatedtitle">Doubly <span class="hlt">periodic</span> textile patterns</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Knitted and woven textile structures are examples of doubly <span class="hlt">periodic</span> structures in a thickened plane made out of intertwining strands of yarn. Factoring out the group of translation symmetries of such a structure gives rise to a link diagram in a thickened torus. Such a diagram on a standard torus is converted into a classical link by including two auxiliary</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. R. Morton; S. Grishanov</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://sc.enseeiht.fr/tsi/stages2013/Training_AEF42_SurMar_AIS_Receiver_2013.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">TRAINING <span class="hlt">PERIOD</span> 2013 Telecommunication</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">TRAINING <span class="hlt">PERIOD</span> 2013 Telecommunication Training title: Development and calibration telecommunication surveillance system. The training candidate will be integrated to the project team, in charge. The proposed training is thus focused on the development and calibration of an experimental multi-channel VHF</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dobigeon, Nicolas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890011990&hterms=india+cluster&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dindia%2Bcluster"> <span id="translatedtitle">Astrophysical implications of <span class="hlt">periodicity</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two remarkable discoveries of the last decade have profound implications for astrophysics and for geophysics. These are the discovery by Alvarez et al., that certain mass extinctions are caused by the impact on the earth of a large asteroid or comet, and the discovery by Raup and Sepkoski that such extinctions are <span class="hlt">periodic</span>, with a cycle time of 26 to 30 million years. The validity of both of these discoveries is assumed and the implications are examined. Most of the phenomena described depend not on <span class="hlt">periodicity</span>, but just on the weaker assumption that the impacts on the earth take place primarily in showers. Proposed explanations for the <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> include galactic oscillations, the Planet X model, and the possibility of Nemesis, a solar companion star. These hypotheses are critically examined. Results of the search for the solar companion are reported. The Deccan flood basalts of India have been proposed as the impact site for the Cretaceous impact, but this hypotheisis is in contradiction with the conclusion of Courtillot et al., that the magma flow began during a <span class="hlt">period</span> of normal magnetic field. A possible resolution of this contradiction is proposed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Muller, Richard A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=periodic+AND+table&pg=3&id=EJ572486"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table of Students.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Presents an exercise in which an eighth-grade science teacher decorated the classroom with a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> table of students. Student photographs were arranged according to similarities into vertical columns. Students were each assigned an atomic number according to their placement in the table. The table is then used to teach students about…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Johnson, Mike</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=periodic+AND+table&pg=5&id=EJ549769"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Modern <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Presents a modern <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table based on the electron distribution in the outermost shell and the order of filling of the sublevels within the shells. Enables a student to read off directly the electronic configuration of the element and the order in which filling occurs. (JRH)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Herrenden-Harker, B. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2897355"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparative Analysis of Sequence <span class="hlt">Periodicity</span> among Prokaryotic Genomes Points to Differences in Nucleoid Structure and a Relationship to Gene Expression? †</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Regular spacing of short runs of A or T nucleotides in DNA sequences with a <span class="hlt">period</span> close to the helical <span class="hlt">period</span> of the DNA double helix has been associated with intrinsic DNA bending and nucleosome positioning in eukaryotes. Analogous <span class="hlt">periodic</span> signals were also <span class="hlt">observed</span> in prokaryotic genomes. While the exact role of this <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> in prokaryotes is not known, it has been proposed to facilitate the DNA packaging in the prokaryotic nucleoid and/or to promote negative or positive supercoiling. We developed a methodology for assessments of intragenomic heterogeneity of these <span class="hlt">periodic</span> patterns and applied it in analysis of 1,025 prokaryotic chromosomes. This technique allows more detailed analysis of sequence <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> than previous methods where sequence <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> was assessed in an integral form across the whole chromosome. We found that most genomes have the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> signal confined to several chromosomal segments while most of the chromosome lacks a strong sequence <span class="hlt">periodicity</span>. Moreover, there are significant differences among different prokaryotes in both the intensity and persistency of sequence <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> related to DNA curvature. We proffer that the prokaryotic nucleoid consists of relatively rigid sections stabilized by short intrinsically bent DNA segments and characterized by locally strong <span class="hlt">periodic</span> patterns alternating with regions featuring a weak <span class="hlt">periodic</span> signal, which presumably permits higher structural flexibility. This model applies to most bacteria and archaea. In genomes with an exceptionally persistent <span class="hlt">periodic</span> signal, highly expressed genes tend to concentrate in aperiodic sections, <span class="hlt">suggesting</span> that structural heterogeneity of the nucleoid is related to local differences in transcriptional activity. PMID:20494989</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mrazek, Jan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010007150&hterms=extinction&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dextinction"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Comet Showers, Mass Extinctions, and the Galaxy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Geologic data on mass extinctions of life and evidence of large impacts on the Earth are thus far consistent with a quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> modulation of the flux of Oort cloud comets. Impacts of large comets and asteroids are capable of causing mass extinction of species, and the records of large impact craters and mass show a correlation. Impacts and extinctions display <span class="hlt">periods</span> in the range of approximately 31 +/- 5 m.y., depending on dating methods, published time scales, length of record, and number of events analyzed. Statistical studies show that <span class="hlt">observed</span> differences in the formal <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of extinctions and craters are to be expected, taking into consideration problems in dating and the likelihood that both records would be mixtures of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> and random events. These results could be explained by quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> showers of Oort Cloud comets with a similar cycle. The best candidate for a pacemaker for comet showers is the Sun's vertical oscillation through the plane of the Galaxy, with a half-<span class="hlt">period</span> over the last 250 million years in the same range. We originally <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that the probability of encounters with molecular clouds that could perturb the Oort comet cloud and cause comet showers is modulated by the Sun's vertical motion through the galactic disk. Tidal forces produced by the overall gravitational field of the Galaxy can also cause perturbations of cometary orbits. Since these forces vary with the changing position of the solar system in the Galaxy, they provide a mechanism for the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> variation in the flux of Oort cloud comets into the inner solar system. The cycle time and degree of modulation depend critically on the mass distribution in the galactic disk. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rampino, M. R.; Stothers, R. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nih.gov/news/health/mar2014/nimh-27.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle">Disorganized Cortical Patches <span class="hlt">Suggest</span> Prenatal Origin of Autism</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... EST Disorganized cortical patches <span class="hlt">suggest</span> prenatal origin of autism NIH-funded study shows disrupted cell layering process ... study <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that brain irregularities in children with autism can be traced back to prenatal development. “While ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014psce.conf..270M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ap stars with variable <span class="hlt">periods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The majority of magnetic chemically peculiar (mCP) stars exhibit <span class="hlt">periodic</span> light, magnetic, radio, and spectroscopic variations that can be modelled adequately as a rigidly-rotating main-sequence star with persistent surface structures. Nevertheless, there is a small sample of diverse mCP stars whose rotation <span class="hlt">periods</span> vary on timescales of decades while the shapes of their phase curves remain unchanged. Alternating <span class="hlt">period</span> increases and decreases have been suspected in the hot CP stars CU Vir and V901 Ori, while rotation in the moderately cool star BS Cir has been decelerating. These examples bring new insight into this theoretically unpredicted phenomenon. We discuss possible causes of such behaviour, and propose that dynamic interactions between a thin, outer, magnetically-confined envelope braked by the stellar wind, and an inner faster-rotating stellar body, are able to explain the <span class="hlt">observed</span> rotational variability. The article is dedicated to one of its co-authors - Dr. Jozef Žiž?ovský who passed away on 15 June 2013.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mikulášek, Z.; Krti?ka, J.; Janík, J.; Zejda, M.; Henry, G. W.; Paunzen, E.; Žiž?ovský, J.; Zverko, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/ja/ja0804/2007JA012880/2007JA012880.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> substorms at Jupiter and Earth</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Energetic Particles Detector and magnetometer measurements on Galileo showed that the Jovian magnetosphere undergoes reconfiguration processes which are very similar to the characteristics of a terrestrial substorm. At Jupiter the reconfiguration process occurs quasi-<span class="hlt">periodically</span> with a repetition <span class="hlt">period</span> of several days. In the terrestrial magnetosphere <span class="hlt">periodic</span> substorms have been <span class="hlt">observed</span> during magnetic storms. The comparison of the <span class="hlt">periodic</span> magnetospheric</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. A. Kronberg; J. Woch; N. Krupp; A. Lagg; P. W. Daly; A. Korth</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://homepage.univie.ac.at/andreas.hergovich/php/Field%20dependence.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Field dependence, <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> and belief in paranormal phenomena</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper examines the relationships between field dependence, <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> and belief in paranormal phenomena. In Experiment 1, 91 subjects underwent an hypnosis session to determine their <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span>. They also completed a paranormal belief scale and a computer test of field dependence. It was shown that <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> and field dependence had positive and significant correlations with the belief in paranormal phenomena.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andreas Hergovich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=fast+AND+food&pg=5&id=EJ675083"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Consumer-Driven Approach To Increase <span class="hlt">Suggestive</span> Selling.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Discussion of the effectiveness of behavioral interventions in improving <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> selling behavior of sales staff focuses on a study that examined the efficacy of a consumer-driven approach to improve <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> selling behavior of three employees of a fast food franchise. Reports that consumer-driven intervention increased <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> selling…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rohn, Don; Austin, John; Sanford, Alison</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ass&id=EJ788392"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clarification of the Memory Artefact in the Assessment of <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aim: The Gudjonsson <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> Scale (GSS) assesses <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> by asking respondents to recall a short story, followed by exposure to leading questions and pressure to change their responses. <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span>, as assessed by the GSS, appears to be elevated in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). This has been shown to reflect to some…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Willner, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cs.washington.edu/homes/jfogarty/publications/persuasive2007.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Toward a Systematic Understanding of <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span> Tactics in Persuasive Technologies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">persuasive technologies, particularly <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> technologies. We then explore how this design space of <span class="hlt">suggestion</span> tactics can be used to evaluate, compare, and inform the design of new persuasive technologiesToward a Systematic Understanding of <span class="hlt">Suggestion</span> Tactics in Persuasive Technologies Adrienne Andrew</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anderson, Richard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57945511"> <span id="translatedtitle">Prompts, Goal Setting and Feedback to Increase <span class="hlt">Suggestive</span> Selling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Suggestive</span> selling has been demonstrated to increase sales in comparison designs in a variety of settings. Similarly prompts have increased <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> selling in comparison designs. In the present study, prompts, goal-setting, feedback, and praise were used to increase red and white wine sales in a multiple baseline design. This combination increased <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> selling when applied to each wine. Prompts with</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michael T Ralis; Richard M. OBrien</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57945571"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggestive</span> Selling by Waitstaff in Family-Style Restaurants</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two studies were carried out in family-style restaurants to increase <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> selling by waitstaff and to assess some of the natural contingencies that may influence <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> selling. In the first study a combination of goal setting, feedback, and positive reinforcement was presented to waitstaff for <span class="hlt">suggestive</span> selling of cocktails, appetizers, and desserts. Increases were not uniform across the three categories</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Merle Johnson; Roseann M. Masotti</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/xap-84233.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measurement of individual differences in children's <span class="hlt">suggestibility</span> across situations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The authors attempted to use scores on the Video <span class="hlt">Suggestibility</span> Scale for Children (VSSC, M. H. Scullin & S. J. Ceci, 2001) to predict 50 preschool children's performance during a field study in which they were interviewed <span class="hlt">suggestively</span> 4 times about both a true event and a <span class="hlt">suggested</span> event. Among the 25 children over age 4 years 6 months, tendencies</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matthew H. Scullin; Tomoe Kanaya; Stephen J. Ceci</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21583274"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">PERIOD</span> CHANGE SIMILARITIES AMONG THE RR LYRAE VARIABLES IN OOSTERHOFF I AND OOSTERHOFF II GLOBULAR SYSTEMS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present <span class="hlt">period</span> change rates (dP/dt) for 42 RR Lyrae variables in the globular cluster IC 4499. Despite clear evidence of these <span class="hlt">period</span> increases or decreases, the <span class="hlt">observed</span> <span class="hlt">period</span> change rates are an order of magnitude larger than predicted from theoretical models of this cluster. We find that there is a preference for increasing <span class="hlt">periods</span>, a phenomenon <span class="hlt">observed</span> in most RR Lyrae stars in Milky Way globular clusters. The <span class="hlt">period</span> change rates as a function of position in the <span class="hlt">period</span>-amplitude plane are used to examine possible evolutionary effects in OoI clusters, OoII clusters, field RR Lyrae stars, and the mixed-population cluster {omega} Centauri. It is found that there is no correlation between the <span class="hlt">period</span> change rate and the typical definition of Oosterhoff groups. If the RR Lyrae <span class="hlt">period</span> changes correspond with evolutionary effects, this would be in contrast to the hypothesis that RR Lyrae variables in OoII systems are evolved horizontal-branch stars that spent their zero-age horizontal-branch phase on the blue side of the instability strip. This may <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that age may not be the primary explanation for the Oosterhoff types.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kunder, Andrea; Walker, Alistair; De Propris, Roberto [NOAO-Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Stetson, Peter B. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Bono, Giuseppe; Di Cecco, Alessandra [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita' di Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Nemec, James M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Camosun College, Victoria, BC (Canada); Monelli, Matteo [IAC, Calle Via Lactea, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Cassisi, Santi [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, via M. Maggini, I-64100 Teramo (Italy); Andreuzzi, Gloria [Fundacion Galileo Galilei-INAF, Brena Baja, Tenerife (Spain); Dall'Ora, Massimo [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, via Moiarello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Zoccali, Manuela, E-mail: akunder@ctio.noao.edu [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, P. Universidad Catolica, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24952567"> <span id="translatedtitle">Driven polymer transport through a <span class="hlt">periodically</span> patterned channel.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the driven transport of polymers in a <span class="hlt">periodically</span> patterned channel using Langevin dynamics simulations in two dimensions. The channel walls are patterned with <span class="hlt">periodically</span> alternating patches of attractive and non-attractive particles that act as trapping sites for the polymer. We find that the system shows rich dynamical behavior, <span class="hlt">observing</span> giant diffusion, negative differential mobility, and several different transition mechanisms between the attractive patches. We also show that the channel can act as an efficient high-pass filter for polymers longer than a threshold length Nthr, which can be tuned by adjusting the length of the attractive patches and the driving force. Our findings <span class="hlt">suggest</span> the possibility of fabricating polymer filtration devices based on patterned nanochannels. PMID:24952567</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ikonen, Timo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1211.2498v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Generating Many Majorana Modes via <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Driving: A Superconductor Model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Realizing Majorana modes (MMs) in condensed-matter systems is of vast experimental and theoretical interests, and some signatures of MMs have been measured already. To facilitate future experimental <span class="hlt">observations</span> and to explore further applications of MMs, generating many MMs at ease in an experimentally accessible manner has become one important issue. This task is achieved here in a one-dimensional $p$-wave superconductor system with the nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor interactions. In particular, a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> modulation of some system parameters can induce an effective long-range interaction (as <span class="hlt">suggested</span> by the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula) and may recover time-reversal symmetry already broken in undriven cases. By exploiting these two independent mechanisms at once we have established a general method in generating many Floquet MMs via <span class="hlt">periodic</span> driving.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Qing-Jun Tong; Jun-Hong An; Jiangbin Gong; Hong-Gang Luo; C. H. Oh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0901.4428v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamics of <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Monopoles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">BPS monopoles which are <span class="hlt">periodic</span> in one of the spatial directions correspond, via a generalized Nahm transform, to solutions of the Hitchin equations on a cylinder. A one-parameter family of solutions of these equations, representing a geodesic in the 2-monopole moduli space, is constructed numerically. It corresponds to a slow-motion dynamical evolution, in which two parallel monopole chains collide and scatter at right angles.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Derek Harland; R. S. Ward</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/76mh6d9epr8u1l19.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> patterns in biology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">New physical and computerized techniques for continuous read-out of intra and intercellular signals allow the study of biochemical\\u000a dynamics of both local and spreading modes. A vast amount of new information in the area of <span class="hlt">periodic</span>, quasiperiodic, and chaotic\\u000a reactions is currently being accumulated, some of which is reviewed here to provide typical mechanisms and occurrences on\\u000a the basis of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. Hess</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ce.umn.edu/about_us/building_and_lab_safety_documents/documents/Two%20Week%20Look%20Ahead%2001-08-2014.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Project Name: Construction <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Project Name: Construction <span class="hlt">Period</span> Date 13-Jan 14-Jan 15-Jan 16-Jan 17-Jan 18-Jan 19-Jan 20-Jan 21 Sat Sun Balancing the systems X X X X X X X X X X Carpet 780 offices X X X X X X X X X duct insulation and pipe insulation X X X X X Demo and reinstall plumbing fixtures X X X X X Cabinet reinstall on the walls</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Levinson, David M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.saltthesandbox.org/cicada_hunt/SeventeenYearLocust.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hunting for <span class="hlt">Periodical</span> Cicadas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This site, from Salt in the Sandbox, is a neat inquiry-based educational cicada site for children. Visitors will find a link to the project's blog, photo stories about cicadas, resources to help your children not be afraid of bugs, and cicada exhibits in the Chicago area. There are also a number of bibliographies of cicada-related resources in print and online. Be sure to check out the article about the mysterious emergence of <span class="hlt">periodical</span> cicadas in 2004 - four years early!</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gyllenhaal, Eric Davis, 1950-</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> 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showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ia.usu.edu/viewproject.php?project=ia:8492"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table review</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">See the videos we watched in class (or review for your next exam) here To play the game for lab PT Game To do some practice multiple choice questions, click below. (your user name is \\"slw- WHATEVER YOU USE AT SCHOOL\\" School Island To play the review game we will do in class, click below then click on <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table Review Eureeka home To watch videos Sodium Video Element song Element song Alkali metal video Brainiac metals ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huntress, Ms.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.chemicool.com/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chemicool <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Chemicool <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> Table is a simple yet elegant site that allows users to click on their element of choice, or type in its name or symbol. Element names are color coded (solid, liquid, gas, as well as synthetic or naturally occurring) and information is provided in ten categories including general (atomic number and weight), states, energies, appearance, reactions, and abundance, to name a few. Also available is a unit conversion calculator.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985Natur.314..604M"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> minimal surfaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A minimal surface is one for which, like a soap film with the same pressure on each side, the mean curvature is zero and, thus, is one where the two principal curvatures are equal and opposite at every point. For every closed circuit in the surface, the area is a minimum. Schwarz1 and Neovius2 showed that elements of such surfaces could be put together to give surfaces <span class="hlt">periodic</span> in three dimensions. These <span class="hlt">periodic</span> minimal surfaces are geometrical invariants, as are the regular polyhedra, but the former are curved. Minimal surfaces are appropriate for the description of various structures where internal surfaces are prominent and seek to adopt a minimum area or a zero mean curvature subject to their topology; thus they merit more complete numerical characterization. There seem to be at least 18 such surfaces3, with various symmetries and topologies, related to the crystallographic space groups. Recently, glyceryl mono-oleate (GMO) was shown by Longley and McIntosh4 to take the shape of the F-surface. The structure postulated is shown here to be in good agreement with an analysis of the fundamental geometry of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> minimal surfaces.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mackay, Alan L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49889566"> <span id="translatedtitle">Finite time <span class="hlt">observers</span> and <span class="hlt">observability</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A notion of finite time <span class="hlt">observer</span> for partially <span class="hlt">observed</span> deterministic control systems is introduced. The <span class="hlt">observer</span> dynamics are given by a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, and the <span class="hlt">observer</span> is consistent under a natural <span class="hlt">observability</span> condition. An <span class="hlt">observability</span> grammian for nonlinear systems is introduced, and is used to study the time evolution of sets of indistinguishable points</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matthew R. James</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED318300.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Structure for Meetings of Home-Based ESL Classes for Native Speakers of Spanish.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This guide for volunteer teachers of English as a Second Language to Spanish speakers in a home-based program outlines a <span class="hlt">suggested</span> format for class time and activities. The guide describes how teachers can organize their class <span class="hlt">periods</span> to promote learner-centeredness and participation in the English learning process. The structure, designed to help…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Spener, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=kahn+AND+michael&pg=3&id=EJ249009"> <span id="translatedtitle">Learning Problems of the Secondary and Junior College Learning Disabled Student: <span class="hlt">Suggested</span> Remedies.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To heighten teachers' <span class="hlt">observational</span> awareness, outlines the behavioral characteristics that are symptomatic of learning disabled adolescents and <span class="hlt">suggests</span> for each category of general, visual, and auditory symptoms, classroom methods for circumventing learning problems. (AYC)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kahn, Michael S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMPP13A1868S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> fluctuations in climate due to sea ice</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new mechanism behind the occurrence of Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events is proposed. Paleo-proxy <span class="hlt">observations</span> <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that these quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> fluctuations occurred during the last glacial <span class="hlt">period</span>, and similar fluctuations are also <span class="hlt">observed</span> in the present interglacial (Bond events). The persistent occurrence of a quasi-<span class="hlt">periodic</span> fluctuation under different background climates is explained by the interaction between deep water formation and sea ice in the North Atlantic. A simple ocean circulation model coupled to a thermodynamic sea ice model is shown to exhibit self-sustained oscillations in the overturning circulation strength. The physical mechanism behind the oscillations is the insulating property of sea ice in cutting off ocean-atmosphere heat exchange. During <span class="hlt">periods</span> of extended sea ice, heat builds up in the top layers of the polar ocean which subsequently contributes to the retreat of sea ice and the loss of heat. The dynamics of the system is such that there is a net loss of heat in each cycle of sea ice advance and retreat. Gradually over several cycles, a convective situation results with the top oceanic layers reaching the same density as the bottom layers, and the system abruptly switches to an enhanced circulation mode for a brief <span class="hlt">period</span> of time before returning to its preferred state from where the cycle repeats. The <span class="hlt">periodic</span> relaxation oscillations can be modulated by external freshwater or solar forcing. A pulsed freshwater injection mimicking Heinrich events produces packets of fluctuations with similar characteristics to D-O events. Numerical experiments with the model <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that the volume of the ocean that comes under sea ice is an important parameter in determining the <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> of oscillations. In this respect, the geometry of the ocean basin could be the determinant of the natural oscillation time-scale of the sea ice-circulation system. When subjected to freshwater pulses mimicking Heinrich events, the model produces packets of progressively weaker fluctuations (top). This pattern resembles D-O events between 30 and 50 ky before present (bottom).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saha, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S21B2486A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Response of rate-and-state faults to <span class="hlt">periodic</span> stress variations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> loading has been reported to induce a detectable response on both seismic and aseismic faults. Slow slip events and associated non-volcanic tremors in Cascadia, Japan and Parkfield are sensitive to oscillatory stress perturbations induced by tides or seismic surface waves. On the seismic side, the microseismicity rate in the Nepal Himalaya appears to be modulated by the surface load variations of about 3kPa induced by the hydrological cycle, while no correlation is <span class="hlt">observed</span> with solid Earth tides, although they induce stress variations of comparable amplitude. Such a decrease of sensitivity to <span class="hlt">periodic</span> loads with decreasing <span class="hlt">period</span> has also been <span class="hlt">observed</span> in lab experiments. In the case of non-volcanic tremors, we show through analytical approximations and numerical simulations of the reponse of a 1-degree of freedom spring-slider system that rate strengthening fault areas that are near velocity neutral at steady-state, i.e. ??/?lnV?0, are highly sensitive to <span class="hlt">periodic</span> loading within a certain range of <span class="hlt">periods</span>, which depends on the frictional properties. These aseismic <span class="hlt">periodic</span> transients can in turn induce a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> modulation of the tremor activity. To assess the conditions needed to explain the Himalayan seismicity <span class="hlt">observations</span>, we consider velocity weakening faults. We find that the behavior of a simple 1D spring-slider system cannot explain the lower sensitivity to semi-diurnal than to annual load variations. We <span class="hlt">suggest</span> that, in that case, the finite dimension of faults plays a key role. To support this idea, we simulate the response of a finite size fault obeying rate-and-state friction, using the Boundary Integral CYCLe of Earthquakes (BICYCLE) code. These simulations yield a <span class="hlt">period</span> dependent response to <span class="hlt">periodic</span> stress variations alike that <span class="hlt">observed</span> in Nepal and in lab experiments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ader, T.; Avouac, J.; Ampuero, J. P.; Lapusta, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://research.yale.edu:8084/missionperiodicals/index.jsp"> <span id="translatedtitle">Missionary <span class="hlt">Periodicals</span> Database</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hosted by the Yale Divinity School and created by the Currents in World Christianity Center at the University of Cambridge, this site is an amazing resource for anyone studying British missionary movements, religion, or the British empire. Visitors can browse the database by region or <span class="hlt">periodical</span> title, or conduct a keyword search. Initial returns include title, issuing body, denomination, place, and dates of publication. Full entries include publisher, volume numbers, frequency, circulation, price, region of work, features, and some comments. Scholars who study these materials will undoubtedly make great use of this site.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1401.0675v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energy flow in <span class="hlt">periodic</span> thermodynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A key quantity characterizing a time-<span class="hlt">periodically</span> forced quantum system coupled to a heat bath is the energy flowing in the steady state through the system into the bath, where it is dissipated. We derive a general expression which allows one to compute this energy dissipation rate for a heat bath consisting of a large number of harmonic oscillators, and work out two analytically solvable model examples. In particular, we distinguish between genuine transitions effectuating a change of the systems's Floquet state, and pseudo-transitions preserving that state; the latter are shown to yield an important contribution to the total dissipation rate. Our results <span class="hlt">suggest</span> possible driving-mediated heating and cooling schemes on the quantum level. They also indicate that a driven system does not necessarily occupy only a single Floquet state when being in contact with a zero-temperature bath.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matthias Langemeyer; Martin Holthaus</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52136017"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experiments on bifurcation of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> states into tori for a <span class="hlt">periodically</span> forced chemical oscillator</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study experimentally continuous transitions from quasiperiodic to <span class="hlt">periodic</span> states for a time-<span class="hlt">periodically</span> forced chemical oscillator. The chemical reaction is the hydration of 2,3-epoxy-1-propanol, and is carried out in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> oscillatory states are <span class="hlt">observed</span> to arise in the autonomous system through supercritical Hopf bifurcations as either the total flow rate or the cooling coil</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">William Vance; John Ross</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.uno.edu/coba/documents/SuggestedBusinessElectives.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">SUGGESTED</span> BUSINESS ELECTIVES For College of Business Administration Students</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">SUGGESTED</span> BUSINESS ELECTIVES For College of Business Administration Students Business electives Management 4497 Physician Practice Management Marketing 3505 Consumer Behavior (MKT) 3515 Personal Selling</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kulp, Mark</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2253433"> <span id="translatedtitle">Helix <span class="hlt">periodicity</span>, topology, and dynamics of membrane-associated ?-Synuclein</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The protein ?-Synuclein (aS) is a synaptic vesicle-associated regulator of synaptic strength and dopamine homeostasis with a pathological role in Parkinson’s disease. The normal function of aS depends on a membrane-associated conformation that is adopted upon binding to negatively charged lipid surfaces. Previously we found that the membrane-binding domain of aS is helical and <span class="hlt">suggested</span> that it may exhibit an unusual structural <span class="hlt">periodicity</span>. Here we present a study of the <span class="hlt">periodicity</span>, topology, and dynamics of detergent micelle-bound aS using paramagnetic spin labels embedded in the micelle or attached to the protein. We show that the helical region of aS completes three full turns every 11 residues, demonstrating the proposed 11/3 <span class="hlt">periodicity</span>. We also find that the membrane-binding domain is partially buried in the micelle surface and bends toward the hydrophobic interior, but does not traverse the micelle. Deeper submersion of certain regions within the micelle, including the unique lysine-free sixth 11-residue repeat, is <span class="hlt">observed</span> and may be functionally important. There are no long-range tertiary contacts within this domain, indicating a highly extended configuration. The backbone dynamics of the micelle-bound region are relatively uniform with a slight decrease in flexibility <span class="hlt">observed</span> toward the C-terminal end. These results clarify the topological features of aS bound to membrane-mimicking detergent micelles, with implications for aS function and pathology. PMID:15741347</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bussell, Robert; Ramlall, Trudy Fiona; Eliezer, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18272452"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multifunctional <span class="hlt">periodic</span> cellular metals.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Periodic</span> cellular metals with honeycomb and corrugated topologies are widely used for the cores of light weight sandwich panel structures. Honeycombs have closed cell pores and are well suited for thermal protection while also providing efficient load support. Corrugated core structures provide less efficient and highly anisotropic load support, but enable cross flow heat exchange opportunities because their pores are continuous in one direction. Recent advances in topology design and fabrication have led to the emergence of lattice truss structures with open cell structures. These three classes of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> cellular metals can now be fabricated from a wide variety of structural alloys. Many topologies are found to provide adequate stiffness and strength for structural load support when configured as the cores of sandwich panels. Sandwich panels with core relative densities of 2-10% and cell sizes in the millimetre range are being assessed for use as multifunctional structures. The open, three-dimensional interconnected pore networks of lattice truss topologies provide opportunities for simultaneously supporting high stresses while also enabling cross flow heat exchange. These highly compressible structures also provide opportunities for the mitigation of high intensity dynamic loads created by impacts and shock waves in air or water. By filling the voids with polymers and hard ceramics, these structures have also been found to offer significant resistance to penetration by projectiles. PMID:18272452</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wadley, Haydn N G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006DPS....38.1108S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Is the Number of Jupiter's Anticyclonic Spots <span class="hlt">Periodic</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ad hoc proposals for <span class="hlt">periodicity</span> in Jovian atmospheric activity are not uncommon (Hockey 1991). However, predicted <span class="hlt">periods</span> based on theory or numerical simulation are rare. Here we test one such proposal (Marcus 2004) against historical records using reports of large, high-albedo ovals or "spots" as an indicator of atmospheric activity. These were gleaned from the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (published continually, 1827 - present). Care was taken in reading time, positional, and morphological descriptions so as to tabulate the number of unique spots per apparition, as opposed to multiple <span class="hlt">observations</span> of the same spot. A single spot was counted once each apparition, regardless of its duration. We excluded the Great Red Spot and Great Red Spot Hollow from consideration. While the majority of the tracked spots reside in the southern hemisphere, it was not possible to unambiguously identify storms of the White Ovals' size and latitude in the reports. However, if the 1938 appearance of the White Ovals marks the beginning of a 60 to 70-year <span class="hlt">period</span> in Jovian atmospheric activity, a similar, contiguous minimum in the number of spots should have taken place in the second half of the nineteenth century. We find no statistically significant variation in the number of spots from 1850, when records of them commence, to 1900. Moreover, the flat slope of the resulting curve <span class="hlt">suggests</span> that this survey is not biased by the number of <span class="hlt">observers</span>, the intervals over which they <span class="hlt">observed</span>, or improvements in instrumentation; that is, the historical record examined documents a consistent fraction of all spots visible from Earth, to a certain resolution limit. Hockey, T. (1991) Nineteenth Century Investigations of <span class="hlt">Periodicities</span> in the Jovian Atmosphere. Vistas in Astronomy 34, 409-414. Marcus, P. (2004) Prediction of a global change on Jupiter. Nature 428, 828-831.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Oliphant, M.; Hockey, T. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988JChPh..88.5536V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experiments on bifurcation of <span class="hlt">periodic</span> states into tori for a <span class="hlt">periodically</span> forced chemical oscillator</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study experimentally continuous transitions from quasiperiodic to <span class="hlt">periodic</span> states for a time-<span class="hlt">periodically</span> forced chemical oscillator. The chemical reaction is the hydration of 2,3-epoxy-1-propanol, and is carried out in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). <span class="hlt">Periodic</span> oscillatory states are <span class="hlt">observed</span> to arise in the autonomous system through supercritical Hopf bifurcations as either the total flow rate or the cooling coil temperature is changed. Under conditions of oscillation for the autonomous system, small-amplitude <span class="hlt">periodic</span> variation of the total flow rate generates an attracting two-torus from the stable limit cycle. From the experiments we determine the structure of the toroidal flow, stroboscopic phase portraits, and circle maps as a function of the forcing amplitude and <span class="hlt">period</span>. A continuous transition from the quasiperiodic to a <span class="hlt">periodic</span> state, in which the two-torus contracts to a closed curve (Neimark-Sacker torus bifurcation), is <span class="hlt">observed</span> as the forcing amplitude is increased at a constant forcing <span class="hlt">period</span>, or as the forcing <span class="hlt">period</span> is changed at a constant moderate forcing amplitude. Qualitative theoretical predictions compare well with the experimental <span class="hlt">observations</span>. This paper presents the first experimental <span class="hlt">observation</span> of a Neimark-Sacker torus bifurcation in a forced chemical oscillator system, and relates the bifurcation diagram of the unforced system to that of the forced system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vance, William; Ross, John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013pimo.conf..174K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Television meteor <span class="hlt">observations</span> in INASAN</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The results of TV <span class="hlt">observations</span> of meteors during the <span class="hlt">period</span> 18 July-19 August (activity <span class="hlt">period</span> of the Perseid meteor shower) in 2011 and 2012 are presented. The wide field-of-view cameras "PatrolCa" were used for the <span class="hlt">observations</span>. <span class="hlt">Observations</span> were carried out by the single-station as well as the double-station method. The double-station <span class="hlt">observations</span> were aimed at determining the individual orbits of the <span class="hlt">observed</span> meteors. The principle of Index Meteor Activity (IMA) calculations can be used for all meteor showers active during the <span class="hlt">observing</span> <span class="hlt">period</span>. We can use the IMA parameter to estimate the influx of meteor particles to the Earth per hour, both for shower and sporadic meteors. The distribution of the influx rate (IMA) for the Perseids to the Earth for the <span class="hlt">observing</span> <span class="hlt">periods</span> in 2011 and 2012 is given. Distributions of Perseid meteors by stellar magnitude are also presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kartashova, Anna</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MPBu...41..254A"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Period</span> Determination for 398 Admete: the Lowest Numbered Asteroid with no Previously Known <span class="hlt">Period</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lightcurve analysis for 398 Admete was performed using <span class="hlt">observations</span> during its 2014 opposition. The synodic rotation <span class="hlt">period</span> was found to be 11.208 ± 0.001 h and the lightcurve amplitude was 0.13 ± 0.02 mag.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alvarez, Eduardo Manuel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NatSR...4E4991S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magneto-Plasmons in