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Sample records for observation solar activity

  1. Solar activities observed with the New Vacuum Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuhong

    2015-08-01

    The New Vacuum Solar Telescope is the most important facility of the Fuxian Solar Observatory in China. Based on the high spatial and temporal resolution NVST observations, we investigate the solar activities in the chromosphere and obtain some new results. (1) Observations of a flux rope tracked by filament activation (Yang et al. 2014a). The filament material is initially located at one end of the flux rope and fills in a section of the rope. Then the filament is activated and the material flows along helical threads, tracking the twisted flux rope structure. The flux rope can be detected in both low temperature and high temperature lines, and there exists a striking anti-correlation between the Hα and EUV lines, which could imply some mild heating of cool filament material to coronal temperatures during the filament activation. (2) Fine structures and overlying loops of homologous confined solar flares (Yang et al. 2014b). At the pre-flare stage, there exists a reconnection between small loops. During the flare processes, the overlying loops, some of which are tracked by activated dark materials, do not break out. These direct observations may illustrate the physical mechanism of confined flares, i.e., magnetic reconnection between the emerging loops and the pre-existing loops triggers flares and the overlying loops prevent the flares from being eruptive. (3) Magnetic reconnection between small-scale loops (Yang et al. 2015). We report the solid observational evidence of magnetic reconnection between two sets of small-scale loops. The observed signatures are consistent with the predictions by reconnection models. The thickness and length of the current sheet are determined to be about 420 km and 1.4 Mm, respectively. The reconnection process contains a slow step and a rapid step. We suggest that the successive slow reconnection changes the conditions around the reconnection site and disrupts the instability, thus leading to the rapid approach of the anti

  2. Solar Activity Studies using Microwave Imaging Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the status of solar cycle 24 based on polar prominence eruptions (PEs) and microwave brightness enhancement (MBE) information obtained by the Nobeyama radioheliograph. The north polar region of the Sun had near-zero field strength for more than three years (2012-2015) and ended only in September 2015 as indicated by the presence of polar PEs and the lack of MBE. The zero-polar-field condition in the south started only around 2013, but it ended by June 2014. Thus the asymmetry in the times of polarity reversal switched between cycle 23 and 24. The polar MBE is a good proxy for the polar magnetic field strength as indicated by the high degree of correlation between the two. The cross-correlation between the high- and low-latitude MBEs is significant for a lag of approximately 5.5 to 7.3 years, suggesting that the polar field of one cycle indicates the sunspot number of the next cycle in agreement with the Babcock-Leighton mechanism of solar cycles. The extended period of near-zero field in the north-polar region should result in a weak and delayed sunspot activity in the northern hemisphere in cycle 25.

  3. Radio Imaging Observations of Solar Activity Cycle and Its Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibasaki, K.

    2011-12-01

    The 24th solar activity cycle has started and relative sunspot numbers are increasing. However, their rate of increase is rather slow compared to previous cycles. Active region sizes are small, lifetime is short, and big (X-class) flares are rare so far. We study this anomalous situation using data from Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH). Radio imaging observations have been done by NoRH since 1992. Nearly 20 years of daily radio images of the Sun at 17 GHz are used to synthesize a radio butterfly diagram. Due to stable operation of the instrument and a robust calibration method, uniform datasets are available covering the whole period of observation. The radio butterfly diagram shows bright features corresponding to active region belts and their migration toward low latitude as the solar cycle progresses. In the present solar activity cycle (24), increase of radio brightness is delayed and slow. There are also bright features around both poles (polar brightening). Their brightness show solar cycle dependence but peaks around solar minimum. Comparison between the last minimum and the previous one shows decrease of its brightness. This corresponds to weakening of polar magnetic field activity between them. In the northern pole, polar brightening is already weakened in 2011, which means it is close to solar maximum in the northern hemisphere. Southern pole does not show such feature yet. Slow rise of activity in active region belt, weakening of polar activity during the minimum, and large north-south asymmetry in polar activity imply that global solar activity and its synchronization are weakening.

  4. Multi-wavelength Observations of Solar Active Region NOAA 7154

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M. E.; Nitta, N. V.; Frank. Z. A.; Dame, L.; Suematsu, Y.

    2000-01-01

    We report on observations of a solar active region in May 1992 by the Solar Plasma Diagnostic Experiment (SPDE) in coordination with the Yohkoh satellite (producing soft X-ray images) and ground-based observatories (producing photospheric magnetograms and various filtergrams including those at the CN 3883 A line). The main focus is a study of the physical conditions of hot (T is approximately greater than 3 MK) coronal loops at their foot-points. The coronal part of the loops is fuzzy but what appear to be their footpoints in the transition region down to the photosphere are compact. Despite the morphological similarities, the footpoint emission at 10(exp 5) K is not quantitatively correlated with that at approximately 300 km above the tau (sub 5000) = 1 level, suggesting that the heat transport and therefore magnetic field topology in the intermediate layer is complicated. High resolution imaging observations with continuous temperature coverage are crucially needed.

  5. Magnetic observations during the recent declining phase of solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    Changes in the heliospheric magnetic field during the recent declining phase in solar activity are reviewed and compared with observations during past sunspot cycles. The study is based principally on data obtained by IMP-8 and Ulysses. The field magnitude is found to have increased during the declining phase until it reached a maximum value of 11.5nT in approximately 1991.5, approximately two years after sunspot maximum. The field of the sun's south pole became negative after a reversal in early 1990. The sector structure disappeared at Ulysses in April 1993 when the latitude of the spacecraft was -30 deg revealing a low inclination of the heliospheric current sheet. A large outburst of solar activity in March 1991 caused four Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and numerious shocks at the location of Ulysses. Following a delay of more than a year, a series of recurrent high speed streams and Corotating Interaction Regions commenced in July 1992 which were observed by IMP-8, Ulysses and Voyager 2. In all these respects, the behavior of the magnetic field mimics that seen in the two earlier sunspot cycles. The comprehensive data set suggests a correlation between the absolute value of B and sunspot number. The major solar cycle variations in the radial component (and magnitude) of the field have been successfully reproduced by a recent model consisting of a tilted solar dipole, whose strength and tilt undergo characteristic changes over the sunspot cycle, and the heliospheric current sheet. The large outbursts of activity in mid-1972, mid-1982 and the first quarter of 1991 may represent a characteristic last 'gasp' of solar activity before the sun evolves to a different state. The recurrent high speed streams in 1973, 1984 and 1992 accompany the developemnt of large asymetrical polar coronal holes and the growth in intensity of the polar cap fields. After they endure for about one year, the polar coronal holes recede and the high speed streams are replaced by weaker

  6. Magnetic observations during the recent declining phase of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. J.

    Changes in the heliospheric magnetic field during the recent declining phase in solar activity are reviewed and compared with observations during past sunspot cycles. The study is based principally on data obtained by IMP-8 and Ulysses. The field magnitude is found to have increased during the declining phase until it reached a maximum value of 11.5nT in approximately 1991.5, approximately two years after sunspot maximum. The field of the sun's south pole became negative after a reversal in early 1990. The sector structure disappeared at Ulysses in April 1993 when the latitude of the spacecraft was -30 deg revealing a low inclination of the heliospheric current sheet. A large outburst of solar activity in March 1991 caused four Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and numerious shocks at the location of Ulysses. Following a delay of more than a year, a series of recurrent high speed streams and Corotating Interaction Regions commenced in July 1992 which were observed by IMP-8, Ulysses and Voyager 2. In all these respects, the behavior of the magnetic field mimics that seen in the two earlier sunspot cycles. The comprehensive data set suggests a correlation between the absolute value of B and sunspot number. The major solar cycle variations in the radial component (and magnitude) of the field have been successfully reproduced by a recent model consisting of a tilted solar dipole, whose strength and tilt undergo characteristic changes over the sunspot cycle, and the heliospheric current sheet. The large outbursts of activity in mid-1972, mid-1982 and the first quarter of 1991 may represent a characteristic last 'gasp' of solar activity before the sun evolves to a different state. The recurrent high speed streams in 1973, 1984 and 1992 accompany the developemnt of large asymetrical polar coronal holes and the growth in intensity of the polar cap fields. After they endure for about one year, the polar coronal holes recede and the high speed streams are replaced by weaker

  7. 19th century auroral observations reveal solar activity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Sam

    Growing interest in the aurora in the early part of the eighteenth century, which resulted from the spectacular reappearance of the aurora in 1707 and 1716, followed a relative scarcity of great auroras during the Maunder minimum, a period of prolonged reduced solar activity from about 1645-1715. Observations in the early eighteenth century led to questions about the geographical extent, nature, and temporal variability of the auroras. Typically, such observations were included as part of recorded meteorological notations, though occasionally early astronomers, such as Tycho Brahe in the 1590s, included auroras in their observations. Meteorological observations were important because of the effects of weather and climate on agriculture, and, according to the belief at the time, on disease.

  8. Summary of solar activity observed in the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory, 1980 - 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rock, K.; Fisher, R.; Garcia, C.; Yasukawa, E.

    1983-11-01

    The following technical note summarizes solar activity observed during the first four years operation of the experiment systems of the Coronal Dynamics Project, which are located at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory. This short report has been produced with the general aim of providing users of Mauna Loa observations with a summary of data for specific events. So that this table might be as useful as possible, a comprehensive review of three sources was performed. The plain language logs, identified as the so-called observer's logs, the now-discontinued activity logs, and the prominence monitor quality control logs were the sources from which the information in the following tables was obtained.

  9. Spectroscopic Observations of Fe XVIII in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teriaca, Luca; Warren, Harry P.; Curdt, Werner

    2012-08-01

    The large uncertainties associated with measuring the amount of high temperature emission in solar active regions (ARs) represents a significant impediment to making progress on the coronal heating problem. Most current observations at temperatures of 3 MK and above are taken with broadband soft X-ray instruments. Such measurements have proven difficult to interpret unambiguously. Here, we present the first spectroscopic observations of the Fe XVIII 974.86 Å emission line in an on-disk AR taken with the SUMER instrument on SOHO. Fe XVIII has a peak formation temperature of 7.1 MK and provides important constraints on the amount of impulsive heating in the corona. Detailed evaluation of the spectra and comparison of the SUMER data with soft X-ray images from the X-Ray Telescope on Hinode confirm that this line is unblended. We also compare the spectroscopic data with observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 94 Å channel on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The AIA 94 Å channel also contains Fe XVIII, but is blended with emission formed at lower temperatures. We find that it is possible to remove the contaminating blends and form relatively pure Fe XVIII images that are consistent with the spectroscopic observations from SUMER. The observed spectra also contain the Ca XIV 943.63 Å line that, although a factor 2-6 weaker than the Fe XVIII 974.86 Å line, allows us to probe the plasma around 3.5 MK. The observed ratio between the two lines indicates (isothermal approximation) that most of the plasma in the brighter Fe XVIII AR loops is at temperatures between 3.5 and 4 MK.

  10. Observations of hysteresis in solar cycle variations among seven solar activity indicators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, Kurt T.; White, Oran R.

    1994-01-01

    We show that smoothed time series of 7 indices of solar activity exhibit significant solar cycle dependent differences in their relative variations during the past 20 years. In some cases these observed hysteresis patterns start to repeat over more than one solar cycle, giving evidence that this is a normal feature of solar variability. Among the indices we study, we find that the hysteresis effects are approximately simple phase shifts, and we quantify these phase shifts in terms of lag times behind the leading index, the International Sunspot Number. Our measured lag times range from less than one month to greater than four months and can be much larger than lag times estimated from short-term variations of these same activity indices during the emergence and decay of major active regions. We argue that hysteresis represents a real delay in the onset and decline of solar activity and is an important clue in the search for physical processes responsible for changing solar emission at various wavelengths.

  11. Summary of solar activity observed at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory: 1980-1983. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, K.; Fisher, R.; Garcia, C.; Yasukawa, E.

    1983-11-01

    The following technical note summarizes solar activity observed during the first four years operation of the experiment systems of the Coronal Dynamics Project, which are located at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory. This short report has been produced with the general aim of providing users of Mauna Loa observations with a summary of data for specific events. So that this table might be as useful as possible, a comprehensive review of three sources was performed. The plain language logs, identified as the so-called observer's logs, the now-discontinued activity logs, and the prominence monitor quality control logs were the sources from which the information in the following tables was obtained. It is expected that this review will be of particular use to those investigators who intend to use both the K-coronameter data base and the SMM Coronagraph-Polarimeter data for the study of coronal transient events.

  12. Solar observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    High energy processes that take place in the Sun's atmosphere and the relationship of these phenomena to the basic problems of solar activity are discussed. Gamma ray emission exhibits characteristics of the conditions in regions where accelerated high energy particles interact. A number of gamma ray production mechanisms are considered. These include: the Compton effect, magnetobremsstrahlung, pi meson production by proton-proton interaction or by proton-antiproton annihilation, fission and neutral of charged particle radiative capture on inelastic scatter.

  13. Simultaneous Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and Very Large Array (VLA) observations of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    Very Large Array observations at 20 cm wavelength can detect the hot coronal plasma previously observed at soft x ray wavelengths. Thermal cyclotron line emission was detected at the apex of coronal loops where the magnetic field strength is relatively constant. Detailed comparison of simultaneous Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Satellite and VLA data indicate that physical parameters such as electron temperature, electron density, and magnetic field strength can be obtained, but that some coronal loops remain invisible in either spectral domain. The unprecedent spatial resolution of the VLA at 20 cm wavelength showed that the precursor, impulsive, and post-flare components of solar bursts originate in nearby, but separate loops or systems of loops.. In some cases preburst heating and magnetic changes are observed from loops tens of minutes prior to the impulsive phase. Comparisons with soft x ray images and spectra and with hard x ray data specify the magnetic field strength and emission mechanism of flaring coronal loops. At the longer 91 cm wavelength, the VLA detected extensive emission interpreted as a hot 10(exp 5) K interface between cool, dense H alpha filaments and the surrounding hotter, rarefield corona. Observations at 91 cm also provide evidence for time-correlated bursts in active regions on opposite sides of the solar equator; they are attributed to flare triggering by relativistic particles that move along large-scale, otherwise-invisible, magnetic conduits that link active regions in opposite hemispheres of the Sun.

  14. Helicity from observational solar magnetic fields and the relationship with solar activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongqi

    The helicity is important to present the basic topological configuration of magnetic field trans-ferred form the solar subatmosphere into the interplanetary space. In this talk, the basic configuration of magnetic field and helicity in the solar atmosphere have been discussed in the following: 1) The Hinode high resolution vector magnetograms provide the important infor-mation on the fine features of current helicity density and the possible accumulated process of magnetic helicity in the solar atmosphere. 2) The relationship between the eruption of solar flare-CMEs and helicity transfer from the suntamosphere has be presented based on the analy-sis of photospheric vector magnetograms. 3) The statistical distribution of magnetic field (and helicity) in solar atmosphere and its reversals with solar cycles are presented by means of the observational (vector) magnetograms. As the magnetic fields in the solar surface provides the information on the formation of magnetic field in the solar convection zone, the statistical anal-ysis of the observational magnetic helicity is important for the confirmation of the alpha-effect of the solar dynamo.

  15. High Spatial Resolution Fe XII Observations of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo

    2016-08-01

    We use UV spectral observations of active regions with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the properties of the coronal Fe xii 1349.4 Å emission at unprecedented high spatial resolution (˜0.33″). We find that by using appropriate observational strategies (i.e., long exposures, lossless compression), Fe xii emission can be studied with IRIS at high spatial and spectral resolution, at least for high-density plasma (e.g., post-flare loops and active region moss). We find that upper transition region (TR; moss) Fe xii emission shows very small average Doppler redshifts ({v}{{D}} ˜ 3 km s‑1) as well as modest non-thermal velocities (with an average of ˜24 km s‑1 and the peak of the distribution at ˜15 km s‑1). The observed distribution of Doppler shifts appears to be compatible with advanced three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations in which impulsive heating is concentrated at the TR footpoints of a hot corona. While the non-thermal broadening of Fe xii 1349.4 Å peaks at similar values as lower resolution simultaneous Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) measurements of Fe xii 195 Å, IRIS observations show a previously undetected tail of increased non-thermal broadening that might be suggestive of the presence of subarcsecond heating events. We find that IRIS and EIS non-thermal line broadening measurements are affected by instrumental effects that can only be removed through careful analysis. Our results also reveal an unexplained discrepancy between observed 195.1/1349.4 Å Fe xii intensity ratios and those predicted by the CHIANTI atomic database.

  16. High Spatial Resolution Fe XII Observations of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo

    2016-08-01

    We use UV spectral observations of active regions with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the properties of the coronal Fe xii 1349.4 Å emission at unprecedented high spatial resolution (∼0.33″). We find that by using appropriate observational strategies (i.e., long exposures, lossless compression), Fe xii emission can be studied with IRIS at high spatial and spectral resolution, at least for high-density plasma (e.g., post-flare loops and active region moss). We find that upper transition region (TR; moss) Fe xii emission shows very small average Doppler redshifts ({v}{{D}} ∼ 3 km s‑1) as well as modest non-thermal velocities (with an average of ∼24 km s‑1 and the peak of the distribution at ∼15 km s‑1). The observed distribution of Doppler shifts appears to be compatible with advanced three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations in which impulsive heating is concentrated at the TR footpoints of a hot corona. While the non-thermal broadening of Fe xii 1349.4 Å peaks at similar values as lower resolution simultaneous Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) measurements of Fe xii 195 Å, IRIS observations show a previously undetected tail of increased non-thermal broadening that might be suggestive of the presence of subarcsecond heating events. We find that IRIS and EIS non-thermal line broadening measurements are affected by instrumental effects that can only be removed through careful analysis. Our results also reveal an unexplained discrepancy between observed 195.1/1349.4 Å Fe xii intensity ratios and those predicted by the CHIANTI atomic database.

  17. Determining the solar wind speed above active regions using remote radio-wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique has made it possible to measure the velocity of portions of the solar wind during its flow outward from the sun. This analysis utilizes spacecraft (ISEE-3) observations of radio emission generated in regions of the solar wind associated with solar active regions. By tracking the source of these radio waves over periods of days, it is possible to measure the motion of the emission regions. Evidence of solar wind acceleration during this outward flow, consistent with theoretical models, has also been obtained.

  18. Skylab observations of X-ray loops connecting separate active regions. [solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, R. C.; Krieger, A. S.; Svestka, Z.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1976-01-01

    One hundred loops interconnecting 94 separate active solar regions detectable in soft X-rays were identified during the Skylab mission. While close active regions are commonly interconnected with loops, the number of such interconnections decreases steeply for longer distances; the longest interconnecting loop observed in the Skylab data connected regions separated by 37 deg. Several arguments are presented which support the point of view that this is the actual limit of the size of magnetic interconnections between active regions. No sympathetic flares could be found in the interconnected regions. These results cast doubt on the hypothesis that accelerated particles can be guided in interconnecting loops from one active region to another over distances of 100 deg or more and eventually produce sympathetic flares in them.

  19. Simultaneous Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and very large array observations of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, K. R.

    1986-01-01

    The research deals mainly with Very Large Array and Solar Maximum Mission observations of the ubiquitous coronal loops that dominate the structure of the low corona. As illustrated, the observations of thermal cyclotron lines at microwave wavelengths provide a powerful new method of accurately specifying the coronal magnetic field strength. Processes are delineated that trigger solar eruptions from coronal loops, including preburst heating and the magnetic interaction of coronal loops. Evidence for coherent burst mechanisms is provided for both the Sun and nearby stars, while other observations suggest the presence of currents that may amplify the coronal magnetic field to unexpectedly high levels. The existence is reported of a new class of compact, variable moving sources in regions of apparently weak photospheric field.

  20. Geomagnetic activity during 10 - 11 solar cycles that has been observed by old Russian observatories.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredyn, Tomasz; Wysokinski, Arkadiusz; Kobylinski, Zbigniew; Bialy, Jerzy

    2016-07-01

    A good knowledge of solar-terrestrial relations during past solar activity cycles could give the appropriate tools for a correct space weather forecast. The paper focuses on the analysis of the historical collections of the ground based magnetic observations and their operational indices from the period of two sunspot solar cycles 10 - 11, period 1856 - 1878 (Bartels rotations 324 - 635). We use hourly observations of H and D geomagnetic field components registered at Russian stations: St. Petersburg - Pavlovsk, Barnaul, Ekaterinburg, Nertshinsk, Sitka, and compare them to the data obtained from the Helsinki observatory. We compare directly these records and also calculated from the data of the every above mentioned station IHV indices introduced by Svalgaard (2003), which have been used for further comparisons in epochs of assumed different polarity of the heliospheric magnetic field. We used also local index C9 derived by Zosimovich (1981) from St. Petersburg - Pavlovsk data. Solar activity is represented by sunspot numbers. The correlative and continuous wavelet analyses are applied for estimation of the correctness of records from different magnetic stations. We have specially regard to magnetic storms in the investigated period and the special Carrington event of 1-2 Sep 1859. Generally studied magnetic time series correctly show variability of the geomagnetic activity. Geomagnetic activity presents some delay in relation to solar one as it is seen especially during descending and minimum phase of the even 11-year cycle. This pattern looks similarly in the case of 16 - 17 solar cycles.

  1. COMPTEL solar flare observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Debrunner, H.; Devries, C.; Denherder, J. W.; Eymann, G.; Forrest, D. J.; Diehl, R.; Hermsen, W.

    1992-01-01

    COMPTEL as part of a solar target of opportunity campaign observed the sun during the period of high solar activity from 7-15 Jun. 1991. Major flares were observed on 9 and 11 Jun. Although both flares were large GOES events (greater than or = X10), they were not extraordinary in terms of gamma-ray emission. Only the decay phase of the 15 Jun. flare was observed by COMPTEL. We report the preliminary analysis of data from these flares, including the first spectroscopic measurement of solar flare neutrons. The deuterium formation line at 2.223 MeV was present in both events and for at least the 9 Jun. event, was comparable to the flux in the nuclear line region of 4-8 MeV, consistent with Solar-Maximum Mission (SSM) Observations. A clear neutron signal was present in the flare of 9 Jun. with the spectrum extending up to 80 MeV and consistent in time with the emission of gamma-rays, confirming the utility of COMPTEL in measuring the solar neutron flux at low energies. The neutron flux below 100 MeV appears to be lower than that of the 3 Jun. 1982 flare by more than an order of magnitude. The neutron signal of the 11 Jun. event is under study. Severe dead time effects resulting from the intense thermal x-rays require significant corrections to the measured flux which increase the magnitude of the associated systematic uncertainties.

  2. Activity associated with coronal mass ejections at solar minimum - SMM observations from 1984-1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Cyr, O. C.; Webb, D. F.

    1991-01-01

    Seventy-three coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by the coronagraph aboard SMM between 1984 and 1986 were examined in order to determine the distribution of various forms of solar activity that were spatially and temporally associated with mass ejections during solar minimum phase. For each coronal mass ejection a speed was measured, and the departure time of the transient from the lower corona estimated. Other forms of solar activity that appeared within 45 deg longitude and 30 deg latitude of the mass ejection and within +/-90 min of its extrapolated departure time were explored. The statistical results of the analysis of these 73 CMEs are presented, and it is found that slightly less than half of them were infrequently associated with other forms of solar activity. It is suggested that the distribution of the various forms of activity related to CMEs does not change at different phases of the solar cycle. For those CMEs with associations, it is found that eruptive prominences and soft X-rays were the most likely forms of activity to accompany the appearance of mass ejections.

  3. Results of IPS Observations in the Period Near Solar Activity Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashei, I. V.; Shishov, V. I.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Subaev, I. A.; Oreshko, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    IPS observations with the Big Scanning Array of Lebedev Physical Institute (BSA LPI) radio telescope at the frequency 111 MHz have been monitored since 2006. All the sources, about several hundred daily, with a scintillating flux greater than 0.2 Jy are recorded for 24 hours in the 16 beams of the radio telescope covering a sky strip of 8∘ declination width. We present some results of IPS observations for the recent period of low solar activity considering a statistical ensemble of scintillating radio sources. The dependences of the averaged over ensemble scintillation index on heliocentric distance are considerably weaker than the dependence expected for a spherically symmetric geometry. The difference is especially pronounced in the year 2008 during the very deep solar activity minimum period. These features are explained by the influence of the heliospheric current sheet that is seen as a strong concentration of turbulent solar wind plasma aligned with the solar equatorial plane. A local maximum of the scintillation index is found in the anti-solar direction. Future prospects of IPS observations using BSA LPI are briefly discussed.

  4. Analysis of selected microflares observed by SphinX over the last minimum of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siarkowski, Marek; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara; Gryciuk, Magdalena

    The Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) was designed to observe soft X-ray solar emission in the energy range between 1 keV and 15 keV with the resolution better than 0.5 keV. The instrument operated from February until November 2009 aboard CORONAS-Photon satellite, during the phase of exceptionally low minimum of solar activity. Here we use SphinX data for analysis of selected microflare-class events. We selected events of unusual lightcurves or location. Our study involves determination of temporal characteristics (times of start, maximum and end of flares) and analysis of physical conditions in flaring plasma (temperature, emission measure). Dedicated method has been used in order to remove emission not related to flare. Supplementary information about morphology and evolution of investigated events has been derived from the analysis of XRT/Hinode and SECCHI /STEREO images.

  5. Tragaldabas: a muon ground-based detector for the study of the solar activity; first observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Blanco, Juan

    2016-04-01

    A new RPC-based cosmic ray detector, TRAGALDABAS (acronym of "TRAsGo for the AnaLysis of the nuclear matter Decay, the Atmosphere, the earth's B-field And the Solar activity") has been installed at the Univ. of Santiago de Compostela, Spain (N:42°52'34",W:8°33'37"). The detector, in its present layout, consists of three 1.8 m2 planes of three 1mm-gap glass RPCs. Each plane is readout with 120 pads with grounded guard electrodes between them to minimize the crosstalk noise. The main performances of the detectors are: an arrival time resolution of about ~300 ps, a tracking angular resolution below 3°, a detection efficiency close to 1, and a solid angle acceptance of ~5 srad. TRAGALDABAS will be able to monitor the cosmic ray low energy component strongly modulated by solar activity by mean the observation of secondary muons from the interaction between cosmic rays and atmospheric molecules. Its cadence and its angular resolution will allow to study in detail, small variations in cosmic ray anisotropy. These variations can be a key parameter to understand the effect of solar disturbances on the propagation of cosmic ray in the inner heliosphere and, maybe, provide a new tool for space weather analysis. In this work first TRAGALDABAS observations of solar events are shown

  6. Seismic Study of the Solar Interior: Inferences from SOI/MDI Observations During Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korzennik, Sylvain G.; Wagner, William J. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Work on the structure, asphericity and dynamics of the solar interior from p-mode frequencies and frequency splittings was carried out primarily in collaboration with Dr. Eff-Darwich (University of La Laguna, Tenerife). This ongoing collaboration produced new results for the inversion of the internal solar rotation rate and further development in inversion methodologies. It also resulted in inferences on the solar stratification. Substantial progress towards the characterization of high-degree p-modes has been achieved. In collaboration with Drs. Rabello-Soares and Schou (Stanford University), we have gained a clear conceptual understanding of the various elements that affect the leakage matrix of the SOI/MDI instrument. This work has precise implications on the properties and the characterization of the HMI instrument being developed for the SDO mission.

  7. Elemental abundances and temperatures of quiescent solar active region cores from X-ray observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.

    2014-05-01

    A brief review of studies of elemental abundances and emission measures in quiescent solar active region cores is presented. Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) observations of strong iron spectral lines have shown sharply peaked distributions around 3 MK. EIS observations of lines emitted by a range of elements have allowed good estimates of abundances relative to iron. However, X-ray observations are required to measure the plasma emission above 3 MK and the abundances of oxygen and neon. We revisit, using up-to-date atomic data, older X-ray observations obtained by a sounding rocket and by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Flat Crystal Spectrometer (FCS). We find that the Fe/O and Fe/Ne ratios are normally increased by a factor of 3.2, compared to the photospheric values. Similar results are obtained from FCS observations of six quiescent active region cores. The FCS observations also indicate that the emission measure above 3 MK has a very steep negative slope, with very little plasma observed at 5 MK or above. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Differences of the Solar Magnetic Activity Signature in Velocity and Intensity Helioseismic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Jiménez, A.

    2013-12-01

    The high-quality, full-disk helioseismic observations continuously collected by the spectrophotometer GOLF and the three photometers VIRGO/SPMs onboard the SoHO spacecraft for 17 years now (since April 11, 1996, apart from the SoHO “vacations”) are absolutely unique for the study of the interior of the Sun and its variability with magnetic activity. Here, we look at the differences in the low-degree oscillation p-mode frequencies between radial velocity and intensity measurements taking into account all the known features of the p-mode profiles (e.g., the opposite peak asymmetry), and of the power spectrum (e.g., the presence of the higher degrees ℓ = 4 and 5 in the signal). We show that the intensity frequencies are higher than the velocity frequencies during the solar cycle with a clear temporal dependence. The response between the individual angular degrees is also different. Time delays are observed between the temporal variations in GOLF and VIRGO frequencies. Such analysis is important in order to put new constraints and to better understand the mechanisms responsible for the temporal variations of the oscillation frequencies with the solar magnetic activity as well as their height dependences in the solar atmosphere. It is also important for the study of the stellar magnetic activity using asteroseismic data.

  9. Seismic Study of the Solar Interior: Inferences from SOI/MDI Observations During Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korzennik, Sylvain G.; Wagner, William J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have continued in collaboration with Dr. Eff-Darwich (University of La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain) the study of the structure, asphericity and dynamics of the solar interior from p-mode frequencies and frequency splittings. In March 2001, Dr. Eff-Darwich came for 3 weeks visit to CfA. During this visit we completed our work on the inversion of the internal solar rotation rate, and submitted a paper describing this work to the Astrophysical Journal. This paper has been recently revised in response to the referee comments and I expect that it will be accepted for publication very soon. We also have analyzed helioseismic data looking for temporal variations of the solar stratification near the base of the convection zone. We have expanded on the initial work that was presented at the SOHO-10/GONG-2000 meeting (October 2000, Tenerife), and are in the process of writing this up. Substantial progress towards the characterization of high-degree p-modes has been achieved. Indeed, in collaboration Dr. Rabello-Soares (Stanford University), we have gained a clear conceptual understanding of the various elements that affect the leakage matrix of the SOI/MDI instrument. This was presented in an invited talk at the SOHO-10/GONG-2000 meeting (October 2000, Tenerife). Once we will have successfully migrated from a qualitative to a quantitative assessment of these effects, we should be able to generate high-degree p-modes frequencies so crucial in the diagnostic of the layers just below solar surface.

  10. NEW VACUUM SOLAR TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF A FLUX ROPE TRACKED BY A FILAMENT ACTIVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Zhong; Xiang, Yongyuan E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn

    2014-04-01

    One main goal of the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) which is located at the Fuxian Solar Observatory is to image the Sun at high resolution. Based on the high spatial and temporal resolution NVST Hα data and combined with the simultaneous observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory for the first time, we investigate a flux rope tracked by filament activation. The filament material is initially located at one end of the flux rope and fills in a section of the rope; the filament is then activated by magnetic field cancellation. The activated filament rises and flows along helical threads, tracking the twisted flux rope structure. The length of the flux rope is about 75 Mm, the average width of its individual threads is 1.11 Mm, and the estimated twist is 1π. The flux rope appears as a dark structure in Hα images, a partial dark and partial bright structure in 304 Å, and as a bright structure in 171 Å and 131 Å images. During this process, the overlying coronal loops are quite steady since the filament is confined within the flux rope and does not erupt successfully. It seems that, for the event in this study, the filament is located and confined within the flux rope threads, instead of being suspended in the dips of twisted magnetic flux.

  11. Coronal Magnetography of Solar Active Regions Using Coordinated SOHO/CDS and VLA Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to apply the coronal magnetographic technique to SOHO (Solar Heliospheric Observatory) /CDS (Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer) EUV (Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation) and coordinated VLA microwave observations of solar active regions to derive the strength and structure of the coronal magnetic field. A CDS observing plan was developed for obtaining spectra needed to derive active region differential emission measures (DEMs) required for coronal magnetography. VLA observations were proposed and obtained. SOHO JOP 100 was developed, tested, approved, and implemented to obtain coordinated CDS (Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer)/EIT (Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope)/ VLA (Very Large Array)/ TRACE (Transition Region and Coronal Explorer)/ SXT (Solar X Ray Telescope) observations of active regions on April 12, May 9, May 13, and May 23. Analysis of all four data sets began, with heaviest concentration on COS data. It is found that 200-pixel (14 A in NIS1) wavelength windows are appropriate for extracting broadened Gaussian line profile fit parameters for lines including Fe XIV at 334.2, Fe XVI at 335.4, Fe XVI at 360.8, and Mg IX at 368.1 over the 4 arcmin by 4 arcmin CDS field of view. Extensive efforts were focused on learning and applying were focused on learning and applying CDS software, and including it in new IDL procedures to carry out calculations relating to coronal magnetography. An important step is to extract Gaussian profile fits to all the lines needed to derive the DEM in each spatial pixel of any given active region. The standard CDS absolute intensity calibration software was applied to derived intensity images, revealing that ratios between density-insensitive lines like Fe XVI 360.8/335.4 yield good agreement with theory. However, the resulting absolute intensities of those lines are very high, indicating that revisions to the CDS absolute intensity calibrations remain to be included in the CDS software, an essential step to

  12. EVIDENCE FOR THE IMPACT OF STELLAR ACTIVITY ON THE DETECTABILITY OF SOLAR-LIKE OSCILLATIONS OBSERVED BY KEPLER

    SciTech Connect

    Chaplin, W. J.; Broomhall, A.-M.; Hekker, S.; Elsworth, Y.; Stevens, I. R.; Bedding, T. R.; Huber, D.; Bonanno, A.; GarcIa, R. A.; Basu, S.; Houdek, G.; Mathur, S.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Mosser, B.; New, R.; Appourchaux, T.; Karoff, C.; Molenda-Zakowicz, J.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.

    2011-05-01

    We use photometric observations of solar-type stars, made by the NASA Kepler Mission, to conduct a statistical study of the impact of stellar surface activity on the detectability of solar-like oscillations. We find that the number of stars with detected oscillations falls significantly with increasing levels of activity. The results present strong evidence for the impact of magnetic activity on the properties of near-surface convection in the stars, which appears to inhibit the amplitudes of the stochastically excited, intrinsically damped solar-like oscillations.

  13. Observing large-scale solar surface flows with GONG: Investigation of a key element in solar activity buildup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, John G.; Simon, George W.; Hathaway, David H.

    1996-01-01

    The Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) solar telescope network has begun regular operations, and will provide continuous Doppler images of large-scale nearly-steady motions at the solar surface, primarily those due to supergranulation. Not only the Sun's well-known magnetic network, but also flux diffusion, dispersal, and concentration at the surface appear to be controlled by supergranulation. Through such magnetoconvective interactions, magnetic stresses develop, leading to solar activity. We show a Doppler movie made from a 45.5 hr time series obtained 1995 May 9-10 using data from three of the six GONG sites (Learmonth, Tenerife, Tucson), to demonstrate the capability of this system.

  14. Pc3 activity at low geomagnetic latitudes - A comparison with solar wind observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villante, U.; Lepidi, S.; Vellante, M.; Lazarus, A. J.; Lepping, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    On an hourly time-scale the different roles of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) parameters on ground micropulsation activity can be better investigated than at longer time-scales. A long-term comparison between ground measurements made at L'Aquila and IMP 8 observations confirms the solar wind speed as the key parameter for the onset of pulsations even at low latitudes, although additional control of the energy transfer from the interplanetary medium to the earth's magnetosphere is clearly exerted by the cone angle. Above about 20 mHz the frequency of pulsations is confirmed to be closely related to the IMF magnitude while, in agreement with model predictions, the IMF magnitude is related to the amplitude of the local fundamental resonant mode. We provide an interesting example in which high resolution measurements simultaneously obtained in the foreshock region and on the ground show that external transversal fluctuations do not penetrate deep into the low latitude magnetosphere.

  15. Skylab ATM/S-056 X-ray event analyzer observations versus solar flare activity: An event compilation. [tables (data)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    An event compilation is presented which correlates ATM/S-056 X-ray event analyzer solar observations with solar flare activity. Approximately 1,070 h of pulse height analyzed X-ray proportional counter data were obtained with the X-ray event analyzer during Skylab. During its operation, 449 flares (including 343 flare peaks) were observed. Seventy events of peak X-ray emission or = Cl were simultaneously observed by ground based telescopes, SOLRAD 9 and/or Vela, and the X-ray event analyzer. These events were observed from preflare through flare rise to peak and through flare decline.

  16. Solar Activity and Solar Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2006-01-01

    Our Sun is a dynamic, ever-changing star. In general, its atmosphere displays major variation on an 11-year cycle. Throughout the cycle, the atmosphere occasionally exhibits large, sudden outbursts of energy. These "solar eruptions" manifest themselves in the form of solar flares, filament eruptions, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and energetic particle releases. They are of high interest to scientists both because they represent fundamental processes that occur in various astrophysical context, and because, if directed toward Earth, they can disrupt Earth-based systems and satellites. Research over the last few decades has shown that the source of the eruptions is localized regions of energy-storing magnetic field on the Sun that become destabilized, leading to a release of the stored energy. Solar scientists have (probably) unraveled the basic outline of what happens in these eruptions, but many details are still not understood. In recent years we have been studying what triggers these magnetic eruptions, using ground-based and satellite-based solar observations in combination with predictions from various theoretical models. We will present an overview of solar activity and solar eruptions, give results from some of our own research, and discuss questions that remain to be explored.

  17. Solar Eclipses Observed from Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2013-01-01

    Aspects of the solar corona are still best observed during totality of solar eclipses, and other high-resolution observations of coronal active regions can be observed with radio telescopes by differentiation of occultation observations, as we did with the Jansky Very Large Array for the annular solar eclipse of 2012 May 20 in the US. Totality crossing Antarctica included the eclipse of 2003 November 23, and will next occur on 2021 December 4; annularity crossing Antarctica included the eclipse of 2008 February 7, and will next occur on 2014 April 29. Partial phases as high as 87% coverage were visible and were imaged in Antarctica on 2011 November 25, and in addition to partial phases of the total and annular eclipses listed above, partial phases were visible in Antarctica on 2001 July 2011, 2002 December 4, 2004 April 19, 2006 September 22, 2007 September 11, and 2009 January 26, and will be visible on 2015 September 13, 2016 September 1, 2017 February 26, 2018 February 15, and 2020 December 14. On behalf of the Working Group on Solar Eclipses of the IAU, the poster showed the solar eclipses visible from Antarctica and this article shows a subset (see www.eclipses.info for the full set). A variety of investigations of the Sun and of the response of the terrestrial atmosphere and ionosphere to the abrupt solar cutoff can be carried out at the future eclipses, making the Antarctic observations scientifically useful.

  18. Relation between Intensity Contrast and Magnetic Field for Active and Quiet Regions Observed on the Solar Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Taylor; Criscuoli, Serena; Norton, Aimee Ann

    2016-05-01

    Current solar modeling techniques assume that active and quiet regions can be considered in the same manner. However, recent results from numerical simulations and high-spatial resolution observations indicate that radiative properties of small magnetic elements depend on whether they are located in plages, network, or quiet areas. These studies have been carried out typically at, or close to, disk center. In this study, data from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) are used to investigate the differences between magnetic elements located in Network/Quiet and Active Regions (AR) observed at different positions over the solar disk.

  19. Akebono/Suprathermal Mass Spectrometer observations of low-energy ion outflow: Dependence on magnetic activity and solar wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cully, C. M.; Donovan, E. F.; Yau, A. W.; Arkos, G. G.

    2003-02-01

    We present observations by the Suprathermal Mass Spectrometer (SMS) on Akebono (EXOS-D) of ion outflow in the energy range from <1 to ˜70 eV. These observations cover a unique region of phase space and present an opportunity to "tie together" observations from disparate satellites. Variation of the total hemispheric O+ and H+ outflow rates with solar radio flux (monitored by the Penticton F10.7 index), with geomagnetic activity (monitored by the Kp index), and with solar wind parameters is discussed. Comparisons of F10.7 and Kp trends to results from Polar and Dynamics Explorer-1 (DE-1) lead us to conclude that flows of H+ in this low energy range are entirely sufficient to account for higher-energy flows at higher altitudes. On the other hand, we infer a substantial amount of O+ at energies above 70 eV. Both H+ and O+ outflow rates in this range exhibit a strong correlation with the solar wind kinetic pressure, the solar wind electric field, and the variability in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in the hour preceding. While these factors are also associated with increased geomagnetic activity (Kp), a separate, Kp-independent effect is also found, showing a correlation of ion outflow with solar wind density and an anticorrelation with solar wind velocity.

  20. OBSERVATIONAL ASPECTS OF THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL CORONAL STRUCTURE OVER A SOLAR ACTIVITY CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Huw; Habbal, Shadia Rifai

    2010-02-10

    Solar rotational tomography is applied to almost eleven years of Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph C2/Solar and Heliospheric Observatory data, revealing for the first time the behavior of the large-scale coronal density structures, also known as streamers, over almost a full solar activity cycle. This study gives an overview of the main results of this project. (1) Streamers are most often shaped as extended, narrow plasma sheets. The sheets can be extremely narrow at times (<=0.14 x 10{sup 6} km at 4 R{sub sun}). This is over twice their heliocentric angular thickness at 1 AU. (2) At most times outside the height of solar maximum, there are two separate stable large helmet streamer belts extending from mid-latitudes (in both north and south). At solar minimum, the streamers converge and join near the equator, giving the impression of a single large helmet streamer. Outside of solar minimum, the two streamers do not join, forming separate high-density sheets in the extended corona (one in the north, another in the south). At solar maximum, streamers rise radially from their source regions, while during the ascending and descending activity phases, streamers are skewed toward the equator. (3) For most of the activity cycle, streamers share the same latitudinal extent as filaments on the disk, showing that large-scale stable streamers are closely linked to the same large-scale photospheric magnetic configuration, which give rise to large filaments. (4) The poleward footpoints of the streamers are often above crown polar filaments and the equatorial footpoints are above filaments or active regions (or above the photospheric neutral lines which underlie these structures). The high-density structures arising from the equatorial active regions either rise and form the equatorial footpoints of mid-latitude quiescent streamers, or form unstable streamers at the equator, not connected to the quiescent streamer structure at higher latitude (so there are often three

  1. On geomagnetic storms and associated solar activity phenomena observed during 1996-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Nishant; Verma, V. K.

    2016-04-01

    Here we present study of Geomagnetic storms (GMS) and its relation with solar flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and coronal holes (CHs). The arrival of CMEs in the vicinity of the Earth plays an important role and affects solar terrestrial environment. The space weather prediction about GMS can be only possible if we know the CMEs arrival time at 1 AU. In the present study we have investigated 153 CMEs observed during the time period of 1996-2009 to know the arrival times of CMEs associated with the GMS. In study we found that the strength of GMS didn't depend on the speed and accelerations of CMEs but strength of GMS depend on the importance of solar flares. We also found that the strength of GMS are excellently correlated with southward magnetic field near Earth at 1 AU and support earlier result of investigators. The arrival time of CMEs near Earth at 1 AU, can be calculated using equations for linear and initial speed of CMEs with error ±5 h. We have also discussed the various results obtained in present investigation in view recent scenario of solar helio-physics.

  2. Solar irradiance observed at Summit, Greenland: Possible links to magnetic activity on short timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, John E.

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of ground-level visible sunlight (400-600 nm) from Summit, Greenland over the period August 2004 through October 2014 define the attenuation provided by cloudiness, including its dependence on solar elevation and season. The long-term mean cloud-attenuation increases with increasing solar zenith angle, consistent with radiative transfer calculations which treat a cloud as a plane parallel layer with a strong bias toward forward scattering and an albedo for diffuse radiation near 0.1. The ratio of measured irradiance to clear-sky irradiance for solar zenith angles greater than 66° has a small, but statistically significant, positive correlation with the previous day's magnetic activity as measured by the daily Ap index, but no clear relationship exists between the irradiance ratio and daily changes in the ground-level neutron flux measured at Thule over the time frame considered. A high value of Ap on one day tends to be followed by a day whose ground-level solar irradiance is slightly greater than would occur otherwise. In an average sense, the visible irradiance following a day with Ap>16 exceeds that following a day with Ap≤16 by 1.2-1.3% with a 95% confidence range of approximately ±1.0%. The results are broadly compatible with small changes in atmospheric scattering following magnetic disturbances.

  3. The Short-term Relationship of Ionospheric Electron Density With Solar Irradiance and Geomagnetic Activity in Daily Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Sun, Q.; Eastes, R.; Bailey, S.; Reinisch, B.; Valladares, C.; Woods, T.

    2006-12-01

    The short-term relationship (~ 27-day and less) between equatorial ionospheric electron density, solar irradiance and geomagnetic activity in daily observations has been studied. Hourly averages of the Total Electron Content (TEC) and foF2 are used as measures of electron content at local times of 700-800 LT, 1200- 1300 LT and 1700-1800 LT from 1998 to 1999. Hourly measurements of Dst and daily measurements (6-19 nm) of the solar soft X-ray irradiances from the SNOE satellite provide the geomagnetic activity and solar irradiance information. These data are decomposed into components at ~3-day, ~9-day and ~27-day scales using a 3-band wavelet. This 3-band wavelet allows better isolation of the 27 day variations than the 2-band wavelets available in commercial software packages. At each scale, correlations of ionospheric electron content with solar irradiance and Dst are calculated. The ionosphere has the highest correlation with solar irradiance at the~27-day scales, where the correlation with TEC is 0.8. At ~3-day and ~9-day scales, the ionosphere has a more significant correlation with geomagnetic activity than with solar irradiance. At ~3-day scales, TEC has a correlation of 0.4 with Dst. With both solar irradiances and Dst, and at all three time scales, TEC has higher correlations than foF2. The correlations also change with local time. The correlations with TEC increase from morning to afternoon, when either using solar irradiances or Dst, while the correlations with foF2 do not change significantly or even decrease from morning to afternoon.

  4. AAVSO Solar Observers Worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, R.

    2013-06-01

    (Abstract only) For visual solar observers there has been no biological change in the "detector" (human eye) - at century scales (eye + visual cortex) does not change much over time. Our capacity to "integrate" seeing distortions is not just simple averaging! The visual cortex plays an essential role, and until recently only the SDO-HMI (Solar Dynamics Observatory, Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager) has had the capacity to detect the smallest sunspots, called pores. Prior to this the eye was superior to photography and CCD. Imaged data are not directly comparable or substitutable to counts by eye, as the effects of sensor/optical resolution and seeing will have a different influence on the resulting sunspot counts for images when compared to the human eye. Also contributing to the complex task of counting sunspots is differentiating between a sunspot (which is usually defined as having a darker center (umbra) and lighter outer ring (penumbra)) and a pore, made even more complex by the conflicting definitions of the word "pore" in the solar context: "pore" can mean a small spot without penumbra or "pore" can mean a random intergranular blemish that is not a true sunspot. The overall agreement is that the smallest spot size is near 2,000 km or ~3 arc sec, (Loughhead, R. E. and Bray, R. J. 1961, Australian J. Phys., 14, 347). Sunspot size is dictated by granulation dynamics rather than spot size (cancellation of convective motion), and by the lifetime of the pore, which averages from 10 to 30 minutes. There is no specific aperture required for AAVSO observers contributing sunspot observations. However, the detection of the smallest spots is influenced by the resolution of the telescope. Two factors to consider are the theoretical optical resolution (unobstructed aperture), Rayleigh criterion: theta = 138 / D(mm), and Dawes criterion: theta = 116 / D(mm) (http://www.telescope-optics.net/telescope_resolution.htm). However, seeing is variable with time; daytime range will

  5. Determination of Differential Emission Measure Distribution of Coronal Structures Observed by SphinX During Recent Minimum of Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepa, Anna; Gburek, Szymon; Siarkowski, Marek; Sylwester, Barbara; Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Miroslaw

    SphinX is a high-sensitivity soft X-ray spectrophotometer which measures soft X-ray spectra in the energy range between 0.8 keV and 15 keV. From February to November 2009 the instrument has observed unusually quiet solar coronal emission as well as a number of weak solar flares. Based on SphinX spectra it is possible to study the differential emission measure distributions (DEM) in the temperature range roughly between 1 MK and 10 MK. The aim of the present study is to unveil DEM plasma distributions for selected activity conditions and analyze their variability.

  6. Spacecraft observations of the interaction of active comets with the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M.

    1990-01-01

    Six spacecraft encountered two comets during 1985 and 1986, obtaining a wealth of data relative to the plasma processes at work in the interaction of an active comet with the solar wind. A review of what space plasma scientists have learned from these data and of their interpretations is presented. The interaction process begins millions of kilometers from the nucleus where the solar wind first picks up cometary ions that slow down the wind and causes the interplanetary magnetic field to pile up and drape around the comet's ionosphere. Thus the geometry of a comet's plasma tail is defined by this draped field. At Halley the Giotto spacecraft noted a well-defined boundary separating the mixture of solar wind and cometary plasmas and the interplanetary magnetic field from the free-field, almost pure cometary plasma in the inner coma. Additional unexpected features in the inner coma were a flux of fast 'granddaughter' ions and high densities of negative ions. Further details covering pickup ions and plasma waves, mass loading, bow shock, energetic particles, the cometosheath, the ionopause, the plasma tail, and the field-free region are provided.

  7. Geomagnetic and solar activity dependence of ionospheric upflowing O+: FAST observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, K.; Jiang, Y.; Chen, K. W.; Huang, L. F.

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the dependence of the occurrence frequency of ionospheric upflowing oxygen (O+) ions on the sunspot cycle and geomagnetic activity. We examine the upflows response to the geomagnetic disturbances as well as the influence of the ion energy factor in controlling the magnitude of the occurrence frequency and the net energy flux. We discuss the spatial distribution of the upflow occurrence frequency and construct a regression model as a function of the magnetic latitude. The results show an overall enhancement of the upflow occurrence frequency during magnetically disturbed periods and indicate that the high-occurrence area spreads out from the source regions during magnetically quiet periods. The high-occurrence areas are located at 70° magnetic latitude (mLat) in the dayside auroral oval zone and between 76-80° mLat in the dayside polar cusp region. In the nightside auroral oval zone, these areas are near 60° mLat, penetrating further equatorward to 55° mLat during magnetically disturbed periods. High energy (≥1 keV) upflowing ions are common in the nightside auroral oval zone while low energy (<1 keV) upflowing ions are found escaping from the high latitude dayside cusp region. A Gaussian function is shown to be a good fit to the occurrence frequency over the magnetic latitude. For high energy upflowing O+ ions, the occurrence frequency exhibits a single peak located at about 60° mLat in the nightside auroral oval zone while for low energy upflowing O+ ions, it exhibits two peaks, one near 60° mLat in the auroral oval zone and the other near 78° mLat in the cusp region. We study the solar activity dependence by analyzing the relationship between the upflow occurrence frequency and the sunspot number (RZ). The statistical result shows that the frequency decreases with declining solar activity level, from ˜30 % at solar maximum to ˜5 % at solar minimum. In addition, the correlation coefficient between the occurrence frequency and RZ

  8. FREQUENCY OF MAUNDER MINIMUM EVENTS IN SOLAR-TYPE STARS INFERRED FROM ACTIVITY AND METALLICITY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, Dan; Tytler, David; Kirkman, David

    2012-03-10

    We consider the common proposition that the fraction of chromospherically very inactive stars in a solar-type sample is analogous to the fraction of the Sun's main-sequence lifetime spent in a grand minimum state. In a new approach to this proposition, we examine chromospheric activity log R'{sub HK} in a stellar sample having Hipparcos parallax measurements, and having spectroscopically determined metallicity close to solar (-0.1 {<=} [Fe/H] {<=} 0.1). We evaluate height above the Hipparcos main sequence, and estimate age using isochrones, to identify the most Sun-like stars in this sample. As a threshold below which a star is labeled very inactive, we use the peak of the HK activity distribution mapped over the quiet Sun during the 1968 epoch. We estimate the fraction of Maunder Minimum (MM) analog candidates in our sample at 11.1%. Given the 70 yr duration of the historical MM, this suggests that in any given year there is a 1/630 chance of entering a similar grand minimum. There are three important cautions with this type of estimate. First, recent investigation using actual activity and photometric time series has suggested that very low activity may not be a necessary criterion for identifying a non-cycling MM analog candidate. Second, this type of estimate depends very strongly on the choice of very low activity threshold. Third, in instantaneous measurements of log R'{sub HK}, it is not always clear whether a star is a viable MM analog candidate or merely an older star nearing the end of its main-sequence lifetime.

  9. Field-Aligned Current Dynamics and Its Correlation with Solar Wind Conditions and Geomagnetic Activities From Space Technology 5 Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongli; Boardsen, Scott; Le, Guan; Slavin, James; Strangeway, Robert J.

    Field-aligned currents (FACs) are the currents flowing into and out of the ionosphere which connect to the magnetosphere. They provide an essential linkage between the solar wind - magnetosphere system and the ionosphere, and the understanding of these currents is important for global magnetosphere dynamics and space weather prediction. The three spacecraft ST-5 constellation provides an unprecedented opportunity to study in situ FAC dynamics in time scales (10 sec to 10 min) that can not be achieved previously with single spacecraft studies or large-spaced conjugate spacecraft studies. In this study, we use the magnetic field observations during the whole ST-5 mission to study the dependence of FAC current sheet motion and intensity on solar wind conditions. FAC peak current densities show very good correlations with some solar wind parameters, including IMF Bz, dynamic pressure, Ey, and some IMF angles, but not with other parameters. Instant FAC speeds show generally much weaker dependence on solar wind conditions comparing to FAC peak current densities. This obvious uncorrelation between FAC peak current densities and speeds implies that FAC peak current densities are more consistently controlled by solar wind conditions and geomagnetic activities, while FAC speeds are more oscillatory, sometimes with higher speeds during quieter times and lower speeds during more turbulent times. Detailed examination of FAC current sheet speed during two major storms in the ST-5 mission will also be given to illustrate the temporal evolution of the FAC dynamics with geomagnetic storm.

  10. Constraining hot plasma in a non-flaring solar active region with FOXSI hard X-ray observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Glesener, Lindsay; Christe, Steven; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Brooks, David H.; Williams, David R.; Shimojo, Masumi; Sako, Nobuharu; Krucker, Säm

    2014-12-01

    We present new constraints on the high-temperature emission measure of a non-flaring solar active region using observations from the recently flown Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket payload. FOXSI has performed the first focused hard X-ray (HXR) observation of the Sun in its first successful flight on 2012 November 2. Focusing optics, combined with small strip detectors, enable high-sensitivity observations with respect to previous indirect imagers. This capability, along with the sensitivity of the HXR regime to high-temperature emission, offers the potential to better characterize high-temperature plasma in the corona as predicted by nanoflare heating models. We present a joint analysis of the differential emission measure (DEM) of active region 11602 using coordinated observations by FOXSI, Hinode/XRT, and Hinode/EIS. The Hinode-derived DEM predicts significant emission measure between 1 MK and 3 MK, with a peak in the DEM predicted at 2.0-2.5 MK. The combined XRT and EIS DEM also shows emission from a smaller population of plasma above 8 MK. This is contradicted by FOXSI observations that significantly constrain emission above 8 MK. This suggests that the Hinode DEM analysis has larger uncertainties at higher temperatures and that > 8 MK plasma above an emission measure of 3 × 1044 cm-3 is excluded in this active region.

  11. The development of solar ultraviolet observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan-Ni; Zhang, Chun-Min

    2011-11-01

    Mankind has been eager to know the variation of the atmospheric change processes in which the sun play a most important role, So research the Sun activity is a hot point. Observe and analyze its ultraviolet(UV) spectra is a valid way to know the Sun activity, solar UV radiation flux and upper atmospheric absorption of UV is representative of the sun activity. The solar UV emission lines are generally optically thin, so the detection aroused great attention. This paper provide an overview of the past two decades advances instrumentation for solar UV observation. Emphasis is given to the great mission such as OSO 8(Orbiting Solar Observatory 8), SOHO(Solar and Heliospheric Observatory), TRACE(Transition Region and Coronal Explorer), SDO(Solar Dynamics Observatory) and KuaFu, especially to their UV instrumentation and scientific objective, some outlook is proposed.

  12. Solar Irradiance Observations during Solar Cycles 22 and 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, O. R.; de Toma, G.; Chapman, G. A.; Walton, S. R.; Preminger, D. G.; Cookson, A. M.; Harvey, K. L.; Livingston, W. C.

    2002-05-01

    We present a study of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) variations during solar cycles 22 and 23 from 1986 to the present. We will review the recent measurements of solar magnetism, solar activity, and radiative variability from both ground-based and space observatories and compare TSI observations with empirical models of solar irradiance variability based on facular and sunspot observations. To estimate facular/plage and sunspot contribution to TSI we use the photometric indices derived from the SFO full-disk solar images from 1988 to the present in the CaIIK line at 393.4nm and in the red continuum at 672.3 nm. In these indices, each solar structure is included with its measured contrast and area. We also use the MgII core-to-wing index from space observatories as an alternative index for plages and network. Comparison of the rising and maximum phases of the two solar cycles, shows that cycle 23 is magnetically weaker with sunspot and facular area almost a factor of two lower than in solar cycle 22. However, analysis of multi-wavelength observations indicate that different wavelengths respond differently to the decreased magnetic activity during solar cycle 23.

  13. Comparing Simulations of Rising Flux Tubes Through the Solar Convection Zone with Observations of Solar Active Regions: Constraining the Dynamo Field Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M. A.; Fan, Y.; Miesch, M. S.

    2013-10-01

    We study how active-region-scale flux tubes rise buoyantly from the base of the convection zone to near the solar surface by embedding a thin flux tube model in a rotating spherical shell of solar-like turbulent convection. These toroidal flux tubes that we simulate range in magnetic field strength from 15 kG to 100 kG at initial latitudes of 1∘ to 40∘ in both hemispheres. This article expands upon Weber, Fan, and Miesch ( Astrophys. J. 741, 11, 2011) (Article 1) with the inclusion of tubes with magnetic flux of 1020 Mx and 1021 Mx, and more simulations of the previously investigated case of 1022 Mx, sampling more convective flows than the previous article, greatly improving statistics. Observed properties of active regions are compared to properties of the simulated emerging flux tubes, including: the tilt of active regions in accordance with Joy's Law as in Article 1, and in addition the scatter of tilt angles about the Joy's Law trend, the most commonly occurring tilt angle, the rotation rate of the emerging loops with respect to the surrounding plasma, and the nature of the magnetic field at the flux tube apex. We discuss how these diagnostic properties constrain the initial field strength of the active-region flux tubes at the bottom of the solar convection zone, and suggest that flux tubes of initial magnetic field strengths of ≥ 40 kG are good candidates for the progenitors of large (1021 Mx to 1022 Mx) solar active regions, which agrees with the results from Article 1 for flux tubes of 1022 Mx. With the addition of more magnetic flux values and more simulations, we find that for all magnetic field strengths, the emerging tubes show a positive Joy's Law trend, and that this trend does not show a statistically significant dependence on the magnetic flux.

  14. VLA observations of solar active regions at 6 and 20 cm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alissandrakis, C. E.; Kundu, M. R.; Shevgaonkar, K. R.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution observations are presented of two active regions at 6 and 20 cm over a period of 5 days, together with H-alpha and photospheric magnetic fields. The large-scale emission at 20 cm is associated with the H-alpha plage. In one region the strongest source was over the neutral line, near the tip of an active-region filament, which indicates that the emission probably originated in small-scale coronal loops. In the second region the peak of the emission was near a well-developed sunspot. Neither region showed evidence of large-scale loops joining their preceding and following parts. Several other sources were observed at 20 cm; a source associated with an H-alpha plage region crossed by a filament and one associated with a small bipolar region are briefly discussed. The 6-cm emission from a well-developed spot showed clearly the characteristics expected from gyroresonance model computations.

  15. Parameters of the turbulence of the interplanetary plasma derived from scintillation observations of the quasars 3C 48 and 3C 298 at the solar-activity maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glubokova, S. K.; Glyantsev, A. V.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Chashei, I. V.; Shishov, V. I.

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of temporal spectra of interplanetary scintillations of the radio sources 3C 48 and 3C 298 observed at 111 MHz on the Big Scanning Antenna of the Lebedev Physical Institute at the maximum of the 24th solar-activity cycle is reported. The measured temporal spectra of the scintillations are used to estimate the velocity of the in homogeneities and the index of the spatial spectrum of the turbulence. The dependence of the spectral index of the turbulence on the solar-wind speed persists in periods of high solar activity, when the global spatial structure of the solar wind is strongly modulated by the activity cycle.

  16. Seismic sensitivity to sub-surface solar activity from 18 yr of GOLF/SoHO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Turck-Chièze, S.

    2015-06-01

    Solar activity has significantly changed over the last two Schwabe cycles. After a long and deep minimum at the end of Cycle 23, the weaker activity of Cycle 24 contrasts with the previous cycles. In this work, the response of the solar acoustic oscillations to solar activity is used in order to provide insights into the structural and magnetic changes in the sub-surface layers of the Sun during this on-going unusual period of low activity. We analyze 18 yr of continuous observations of the solar acoustic oscillations collected by the Sun-as-a-star GOLF instrument on board the SoHO spacecraft. From the fitted mode frequencies, the temporal variability of the frequency shifts of the radial, dipolar, and quadrupolar modes are studied for different frequency ranges that are sensitive to different layers in the solar sub-surface interior. The low-frequency modes show nearly unchanged frequency shifts between Cycles 23 and 24, with a time evolving signature of the quasi-biennial oscillation, which is particularly visible for the quadrupole component revealing the presence of a complex magnetic structure. The modes at higher frequencies show frequency shifts that are 30% smaller during Cycle 24, which is in agreement with the decrease observed in the surface activity between Cycles 23 and 24. The analysis of 18 yr of GOLF oscillations indicates that the structural and magnetic changes responsible for the frequency shifts remained comparable between Cycle 23 and Cycle 24 in the deeper sub-surface layers below 1400 km as revealed by the low-frequency modes. The frequency shifts of the higher-frequency modes, sensitive to shallower regions, show that Cycle 24 is magnetically weaker in the upper layers of Sun. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe following 68 GOLF frequency tables are available and Table A.1 is also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  17. Solar Irradiance: Observations, Proxies, and Models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lean, J.

    2013-12-01

    Solar irradiance has been measured from space for more than thirty years. Variations in total (spectrally integrated) solar irradiance associated with the Sun's 11-year activity cycle and 27-day rotation are now well characterized. But the magnitude, and even the sign, of spectral irradiance changes at near ultraviolet, visible and near infrared wavelengths, remain uncertain on time scales longer than a few months. Drifts in the calibration of the instruments that measure solar irradiance and incomplete understanding of the causes of irradiance variations preclude specification of multi-decadal solar irradiance variations with any confidence, including whether, or not, irradiance levels were lower during the 2008-2009 anomalously low solar activity minimum than in prior minima. The ultimate cause of solar irradiance variations is the Sun's changing activity, driven by a sub-surface dynamo that generates magnetic features called sunspots and faculae, which respectively deplete and enhance the net radiative output. Solar activity also alters parameters that have been measured from the ground for longer periods and with greater stability than the solar irradiance datasets. The longest and most stable such record is the Sun's irradiance at 10.7 cm in the radio spectrum, which is used frequently as a proxy indicator of solar irradiance variability. Models have been developed that relate the solar irradiance changes - both total and spectral - evident in extant databases to proxies chosen to best represent the sunspot darkening and facular brightening influences. The proxy models are then used to reconstruct solar irradiance variations at all wavelengths on multi-decadal time scales, for input to climate and atmospheric model simulations that seek to quantity the Sun's contribution to Earth's changing environment. This talk provides an overview of solar total and spectral irradiance observations and their relevant proxies, describes the formulation and construction of

  18. CORONAL HEATING BY THE INTERACTION BETWEEN EMERGING ACTIVE REGIONS AND THE QUIET SUN OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Bin; Li, Ting; Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Yuzong; Li, Leping; Chen, Feng; Peter, Hardi E-mail: liting@nao.cas.cn E-mail: yuzong@nao.cas.cn E-mail: chen@mps.mpg.de

    2015-02-01

    The question of what heats the solar corona remains one of the most important puzzles in solar physics and astrophysics. Here we report Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations of coronal heating by the interaction between emerging active regions (EARs) and the surrounding quiet Sun (QS). The EARs continuously interact with the surrounding QS, resulting in dark ribbons which appear at the boundary of the EARs and the QS. The dark ribbons visible in extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths propagate away from the EARs with speeds of a few km s{sup −1}. The regions swept by the dark ribbons are brightening afterward, with the mean temperature increasing by one quarter. The observational findings demonstrate that uninterrupted magnetic reconnection between EARs and the QS occurs. When the EARs develop, the reconnection continues. The dark ribbons may be the track of the interface between the reconnected magnetic fields and the undisturbed QS’s fields. The propagating speed of the dark ribbons reflects the reconnection rate and is consistent with our numerical simulation. A long-term coronal heating which occurs in turn from nearby the EARs to far away from the EARs is proposed.

  19. Observations of Solar Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paige, Giorla

    2011-05-01

    A low frequency radio telescope has been recently been constructed on the campus of the The College of New Jersey (TCNJ) and has begun conducting observations at 20MHz as part of NASA'a Radio Jove program. This instrument is capable of observations of solar radio emission including strong prompt radio emission associated with solar burst events. We will discuss solar observations conducted with this instrument as well as an effort to conduct coincident observations with the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) and the Long Wavelength Array (LWA).

  20. THE NAKED EMERGENCE OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS OBSERVED WITH SDO/HMI

    SciTech Connect

    Centeno, Rebecca

    2012-11-01

    We take advantage of the HMI/SDO instrument to study the naked emergence of active regions (ARs) from the first imprints of the magnetic field on the solar surface. To this end, we followed the first 24 hr in the life of two rather isolated ARs that appeared on the surface when they were about to cross the central meridian. We analyze the correlations between Doppler velocities and the orientation of the vector magnetic field, consistent finding that the horizontal fields connecting the main polarities are dragged to the surface by relatively strong upflows and are associated with elongated granulation that is, on average, brighter than its surroundings. The main magnetic footpoints, on the other hand, are dominated by vertical fields and downflowing plasma. The appearance of moving dipolar features (MDFs, of opposite polarity to that of the AR) in between the main footpoints is a rather common occurrence once the AR reaches a certain size. The buoyancy of the fields is insufficient to lift up the magnetic arcade as a whole. Instead, weighted by the plasma that it carries, the field is pinned down to the photosphere at several places in between the main footpoints, giving life to the MDFs and enabling channels of downflowing plasma. MDF poles tend to drift toward each other, merge and disappear. This is likely to be the signature of a reconnection process in the dipped field lines, which relieves some of the weight allowing the magnetic arcade to finally rise beyond the detection layer of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager spectral line.

  1. The Naked Emergence of Solar Active Regions Observed with SDO/HMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centeno, Rebecca

    2012-11-01

    We take advantage of the HMI/SDO instrument to study the naked emergence of active regions (ARs) from the first imprints of the magnetic field on the solar surface. To this end, we followed the first 24 hr in the life of two rather isolated ARs that appeared on the surface when they were about to cross the central meridian. We analyze the correlations between Doppler velocities and the orientation of the vector magnetic field, consistent finding that the horizontal fields connecting the main polarities are dragged to the surface by relatively strong upflows and are associated with elongated granulation that is, on average, brighter than its surroundings. The main magnetic footpoints, on the other hand, are dominated by vertical fields and downflowing plasma. The appearance of moving dipolar features (MDFs, of opposite polarity to that of the AR) in between the main footpoints is a rather common occurrence once the AR reaches a certain size. The buoyancy of the fields is insufficient to lift up the magnetic arcade as a whole. Instead, weighted by the plasma that it carries, the field is pinned down to the photosphere at several places in between the main footpoints, giving life to the MDFs and enabling channels of downflowing plasma. MDF poles tend to drift toward each other, merge and disappear. This is likely to be the signature of a reconnection process in the dipped field lines, which relieves some of the weight allowing the magnetic arcade to finally rise beyond the detection layer of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager spectral line.

  2. Pervasive faint Fe XIX emission from a solar active region observed with EUNIS-13: Evidence for nanoflare heating

    SciTech Connect

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Daw, Adrian N.; Rabin, D. M.

    2014-08-01

    We present spatially resolved EUV spectroscopic measurements of pervasive, faint Fe XIX 592.2 Å line emission in an active region observed during the 2013 April 23 flight of the Extreme Ultraviolet Normal Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS-13) sounding rocket instrument. With cooled detectors, high sensitivity, and high spectral resolution, EUNIS-13 resolves the lines of Fe XIX at 592.2 Å (formed at temperature T ≈ 8.9 MK) and Fe XII at 592.6 Å (T ≈ 1.6 MK). The Fe XIX line emission, observed over an area in excess of 4920 arcsec{sup 2} (2.58 × 10{sup 9} km{sup 2}, more than 60% of the active region), provides strong evidence for the nanoflare heating model of the solar corona. No GOES events occurred in the region less than 2 hr before the rocket flight, but a microflare was observed north and east of the region with RHESSI and EUNIS during the flight. The absence of significant upward velocities anywhere in the region, particularly the microflare, indicates that the pervasive Fe XIX emission is not propelled outward from the microflare site, but is most likely attributed to localized heating (not necessarily due to reconnection) consistent with the nanoflare heating model of the solar corona. Assuming ionization equilibrium we estimate Fe XIX/Fe XII emission measure ratios of ∼0.076 just outside the AR core and ∼0.59 in the core.

  3. Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Klimchuk, James A.; Charbonneau, Paul; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hasan, S. Sirajul; Hudson, Hugh S.; Kusano, Kanya; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Peter, Hardi; Vršnak, Bojan; Yan, Yihua

    2012-04-01

    Commission 10 of the International Astronomical Union has more than 650 members who study a wide range of activity phenomena produced by our nearest star, the Sun. Solar activity is intrinsically related to solar magnetic fields and encompasses events from the smallest energy releases (nano- or even picoflares) to the largest eruptions in the Solar System, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which propagate into the Heliosphere reaching the Earth and beyond. Solar activity is manifested in the appearance of sunspot groups or active regions, which are the principal sources of activity phenomena from the emergence of their magnetic flux through their dispersion and decay. The period 2008-2009 saw an unanticipated extended solar cycle minimum and unprecedentedly weak polar-cap and heliospheric field. Associated with that was the 2009 historical maximum in galactic cosmic rays flux since measurements begun in the middle of the 20th Century. Since then Cycle 24 has re-started solar activity producing some spectacular eruptions observed with a fleet of spacecraft and ground-based facilities. In the last triennium major advances in our knowledge and understanding of solar activity were due to continuing success of space missions as SOHO, Hinode, RHESSI and the twin STEREO spacecraft, further enriched by the breathtaking images of the solar atmosphere produced by the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) launched on 11 February 2010 in the framework of NASA's Living with a Star program. In August 2012, at the time of the IAU General Assembly in Beijing when the mandate of this Commission ends, we will be in the unique position to have for the first time a full 3-D view of the Sun and solar activity phenomena provided by the twin STEREO missions about 120 degrees behind and ahead of Earth and other spacecraft around the Earth and ground-based observatories. These new observational insights are continuously posing new questions, inspiring and advancing theoretical analysis and

  4. RECONSTRUCTING THE SUBSURFACE THREE-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETIC STRUCTURE OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION USING SDO/HMI OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chintzoglou, Georgios; Zhang Jie

    2013-02-10

    A solar active region (AR) is a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic structure formed in the convection zone, whose property is fundamentally important for determining the coronal structure and solar activity when emerged. However, our knowledge of the detailed 3D structure prior to its emergence is rather poor, largely limited by the low cadence and sensitivity of previous instruments. Here, using the 45 s high-cadence observations from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we are able for the first time to reconstruct a 3D data cube and infer the detailed subsurface magnetic structure of NOAA AR 11158, and to characterize its magnetic connectivity and topology. This task is accomplished with the aid of the image-stacking method and advanced 3D visualization. We find that the AR consists of two major bipoles or four major polarities. Each polarity in 3D shows interesting tree-like structure, i.e., while the root of the polarity appears as a single tree-trunk-like tube, the top of the polarity has multiple branches consisting of smaller and thinner flux tubes which connect to the branches of the opposite polarity that is similarly fragmented. The roots of the four polarities align well along a straight line, while the top branches are slightly non-coplanar. Our observations suggest that an active region, even appearing highly complicated on the surface, may originate from a simple straight flux tube that undergoes both horizontal and vertical bifurcation processes during its rise through the convection zone.

  5. Coronal magnetic structures observing campaign. I - Simultaneous microwave and soft X-ray observations of active regions at the solar limb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, N.; White, S. M.; Kundu, M. R.; Gopalswamy, N.; Holman, G. D.; Brosius, J. W.; Schmelz, J. T.; Saba, J. L. R.; Strong, K. T.

    1991-06-01

    Using simultaneous microwave and soft X-ray measurements made with the Very Large Array (VLA) at 6 and 20 cm and the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) aboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), we have studied two active regions near the solar limb. These observations were taken as part of the Coronal Magnetic Structures Observing Campaign (CoMStOC), a collaboration designed to study the magnetic field in the solar corona. The images in soft X-rays and at 20 cm wavelength are similar: both show peaks above the active regions and extended bridge of emission 200,000 km long connecting the two regions. The brightness temperature of the 20 cm emission is lower than that predicted from the X-ray emitting material, however; it can be attributed to free-free emission in cooler (<106 K) plasma not visible to XRP, with an optical depth ˜1. The 6 cm emission is concentrated at lower altitudes and in a ˜160,000 km long bundle of loops in the northern active region. Comparison of the 6 cm map with the potential magnetic field lines computed from photospheric magnetic fields (measured 2 days earlier) indicates that the 6 cm emission is associated with fields of less than ˜200 G. Such fields would be too weak to attribute the observed 6 cm emission to gyroresonance radiation. Analysis of the 6 cm loop bundle indicates that it is strongly asymmetric, with the magnetic field in the northern leg ˜2 times stronger than in the southern leg; the 6 cm emission most likely arises from a combination of hot ( ≥ 2 × 106 K) and cool plasmas, while the 20 cm emission becomes optically thick in the cooler (˜9 × 103 K) plasma. We estimate an Alfvén speed ˜7000 km s-1 and ratio of electron gyrofrequency to plasma frequency ˜1.0 in the northern leg of the 6 cm loop.

  6. Ground-based Solar Observations and Plasma Bubbles in Brazilian Sector During a Period of Extreme Low Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardelli-Coelho, F.; Abalde, J. R.; Tardelli, A.; de Abreu, A. J.

    2016-04-01

    Studies presented on the relation of the Sun-Earth system are currently of great importance. Ionospheric irregularities in the F-region, caused by geomagnetic storms have significant and adverse effects on the Earth. The recent advancement in technological techniques for monitoring space weather has facilitated these studies. The focus of this study was to determine whether a geomagnetic storm interfered with the generation, propagation, and durability of plasma bubbles that occurred over a period of solar minimum in two cities in the Brazilian sector, São José dos Campos - SP, designated SJC, (23.21°S, 45.86°W; dip latitude 17.6°S), low-latitude region and near the south crest of the ionospheric equatorial anomaly; and Palmas - TO, called PAL (10.28°S, 48.33°W; dip latitude 6.7°S), near the magnetic equator, located in the geographical South, tropical region and the hemisphere opposite the magnetic equator. This study was conducted with data analysis of five years (2006-2010) for SJC and four years (2007-2010) for PAL, considering the 24th solar cycle, using an all-sky imaging photometer operating with interference filters in OI 630.0 nm emission resulting from dissociative recombination process that occurs at an altitude of 250-300 km (F-region).

  7. Clasp/SJ Observation of Time Variations of Lyman-Alpha Emissions in a Solar Active Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishikawa, S.; Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Kano, R.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Bando, T.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Auchere, F.

    2016-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding rocket experiment launched on September 3, 2015 to investigate the solar chromosphere, and the slit-jaw (SJ) optical system took Lya images with the high time cadence of 0.6 s. By the CLASP/SJ observation, many time variations in the solar chromosphere with the time scale of <1 minute were discovered (see the poster by Kubo et al., Pa-13). We focused on an active region and investigated the short (<30 s) time variations and relation to the coronal structure observed by SDO/AIA. We compared the Ly(alpha) time variations at footpoints of coronal magnetic fields observed by AIA 211 Å (approx.2 MK) and AIA 171 Å (0.6 MK), and non-loop regions. As the result, we found the <30 s Ly(alpha) time variations had more in the footpoint regions. On the other hand, the <30 s time variations had no dependency on the temperature of the loop.

  8. Optical observations of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko with the Nordic Optical Telescope. Comet activity before the solar conjunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaprudin, B.; Lehto, H. J.; Nilsson, K.; Pursimo, T.; Somero, A.; Snodgrass, C.; Schulz, R.

    2015-11-01

    Context. 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P) is a short-period Jupiter-family comet that was chosen as a target for the Rosetta mission by the European Space Agency (ESA). Monitoring of 67P with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT; La Palma, Spain) intends to aid this mission by providing ground-based reference information about the overall activity of the target and its astrometric position before the rendezvous. One motivation for our observations was to monitor sudden major increases in activity because they might have affected the Rosetta mission planning. None were observed. Ground-based photometric observations register the global activity of the comet, while the Rosetta spacecraft mostly measures local events. These data combined can lead to new insights into the comet behavior. Aims: The aim of this work is to perform the photometric and the astrometric monitoring of comet 67P with the NOT and to compare the results with the latest predictions for its position and activity. A new method of fitting extended-source components to the target surface brightness distribution was developed and applied to the data to estimate the size and contribution of the coma to the total brightness of the target. Methods: Comet 67P was monitored by the NOT in service mode during the period between 12.5.2013 and 11.11.2014. The very first observations were performed in the V band alone, but in the latest observations, the R band was used as well to estimate the color and nature of activity of the target. We applied a new method for estimating the coma size by deconvolving the point spread function profile from the image, which used Markov chain Monte Carlo and Bayesian statistics. This method will also be used for coma size estimations in further observations after the solar conjunction of 67P. Results: Photometric magnitudes in two colors were monitored during the period of observations. At the end of April 2014, the beginning of activity was observed. In late September 2014, a

  9. The 27 day solar rotational effect on mesospheric nighttime OH and O3 observations induced by geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fytterer, T.; Santee, M. L.; Sinnhuber, M.; Wang, S.

    2015-09-01

    Observations performed by the Earth Observing System Microwave Limb Sounder instrument on board the Aura satellite from 2004 to 2009 (2004 to 2014) were used to investigate the 27 day solar rotational cycle in mesospheric OH (O3) and the physical connection to geomagnetic activity. Data analysis was focused on nighttime measurements at geomagnetic latitudes connected to the outer radiation belts (55°N/S-75°N/S). The applied superposed epoch analysis reveals a distinct 27 day solar rotational signal in OH and O3 during winter in both hemispheres at altitudes >70 km. The OH response is positive and in-phase with the respective geomagnetic activity signal, lasting for 1-2 days. In contrast, the O3 feedback is negative, delayed by 1 day, and is present up to 4 days afterward. Largest OH (O3) peaks are found at ~75 km, exceeding the 95% significance level and the measurement noise of <2% (<0.5%), while reaching variations of +14% (-7%) with respect to their corresponding background. OH at 75 km is observed to respond to particle precipitation only after a certain threshold of geomagnetic activity is exceeded, depending on the respective OH background. The relation between OH and O3 at 75 km in both hemispheres is found to be nonlinear. In particular, OH has a strong impact on O3 for relatively weak geomagnetic disturbances and accompanying small absolute OH variations (<0.04 ppb). In contrast, catalytic O3 depletion is seen to slow down for stronger geomagnetic variations and OH anomalies (0.04-0.13 ppb), revealing small variations around -0.11 ppm.

  10. Observations of the solar chromosphere in Kunming

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.; Li, Q.

    1986-01-01

    This paper gives an account of the process of the solar total eclipse of February 16, 1980 in the chromospheric layers observed in Kunming, China. It also provides the moments of occultations of various active objects (including sunspots, flocculi, filaments and prominences) by the shadow of the Moon. They are important clues for the analyses of radio-astronomical, ionospheric, and various optical observations of the solar eclipse.

  11. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect are made at the Stanford Solar Observatory. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about 1%. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large-scale magnetic field structures.

  12. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect mode at the Sanford Solar Observatory are presented. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about one percent. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large scale magnetic field structures.

  13. Ionosonde observations of F region parameters over Indian low latitude during different solar activity conditions and comparison with IRI model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peddapati, PavanChaitanya; Patra, Amit

    2016-07-01

    In the equatorial region, the daytime F region exhibits three layers, namely F1, F2 and F3 layers. The detail characteristics of the F2 and F3 layers and their variabilities at different equatorial latitudes, however, have not been well defined. Given the fact that equatorial ionosphere is governed profoundly by dynamical and electro-dynamical forcing, electron density varies remarkably with latitude and altitude. A detailed characterization and study of the equatorial F region, thus, is necessary for improving ionospheric model, such as International Reference Ionosphere (IRI), applicable to the equatorial region. For this purpose, we have analyzed ionosonde observations from the dip equator and low magnetic latitude in the Indian sector to characterize the F2 and F3 layers in different seasons and solar activity conditions. In this paper, we present a detailed comparative analysis on the variabilities of the F2 and F3 layers as a function of local time, season and solar activity conditions. Finally, these results are compared with the IRI model parameters in an effort to evaluate the suitability of the IRI model representing the equatorial ionosphere in the Indian sector.

  14. Effects of the ionosphere and solar activity on radio occultation signals: Application to CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelyev, A. G.; Liou, Y. A.; Wickert, J.; Schmidt, T.; Pavelyev, A. A.; Liu, S. F.

    2007-06-01

    We analyze the ionospheric effect on the phase and amplitude of radio occultation (RO) signal. The introduced theoretical model predicts a correlation between the phase acceleration and intensity variations of RO signal and opens a way to locate layered structures in the propagation medium, in particular, in trans-ionospheric satellite-to-satellite links. For considered CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) RO events, the locations of the inclined plasma layers in the lower ionosphere are estimated, and the electron density distribution is retrieved. By analysis of the CHAMP RO data, we reveal the dependence of the intensity variations of RO signal on sharp changes in the DST index and on the local time. Maps of the seasonal, geographical, and temporal distributions of the CHAMP RO events with amplitude scintillations, having high S4 index values, and observed during the years 2001-2004 indicate dependence on solar activity. As follows from this analysis, the GPS signals in the trans-ionospheric links can be used for investigating the location and parameters of inclined plasma layers and monitoring the influence of solar activity on the ionosphere with global coverage.

  15. Solar ALMA: Observation-Based Simulations of the mm and sub-mm Emissions from Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, G.; Loukitcheva, M.; Nita, G.

    2015-12-01

    We developed an efficient algorithm integrated in our 3D modeling tool, GX Simulator (Nita et al. 2015), allowing quick computation of the synthetic intensity and polarization maps of solar active regions (AR) in the ALMA spectral range.

  16. Solar System Observations with JWST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norwood, James; Hammel, Heidi; Milam, Stefanie; Stansberry, John; Lunine, Jonathan; Chanover, Nancy; Hines, Dean; Sonneborn, George; Tiscareno, Matthew; Brown, Michael; Ferruit, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope will enable a wealth of new scientific investigations in the near- and mid- infrared, with sensitivity and spatial-spectral resolution greatly surpassing its predecessors. In this paper, we focus upon Solar System science facilitated by JWST, discussing the most current information available concerning JWST instrument properties and observing techniques relevant to planetary science. We also present numerous example observing scenarios for a wide variety of Solar System targets to illustrate the potential of JWST science to the Solar System community. This paper updates and supersedes the Solar System white paper published by the JWST Project in 2010 (Lunine et al., 2010). It is based both on that paper and on a workshop held at the annual meeting of the Division for Planetary Sciences in Reno, NV in 2012.

  17. Eunis Observation of Pervasive Faint Fe XIX Line Emission from a Solar Active Region: Evidence for Coronal Heating By Nanoflares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosius, J. W.; Daw, A. N.; Rabin, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present spatially resolved EUV spectroscopic measurements ofpervasive, faint Fe XIX 592.2 A line emission in an active regionobserved during the 2013 April 23 flight of the Extreme UltravioletNormal Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS-13) sounding rocket instrument. With cooled detectors, high sensitivity, and high spectralresolution, EUNIS-13 resolves the lines of Fe XIX at 592.2 A (formedat temperature T around 8.9 MK) and Fe XII at 592.6 A (T around 1.6MK). The Fe XIX line emission, observed over an area in excess of4920 square arcsec (2.58x10^9 square km, more than 60% of the activeregion), provides strong evidence for the nanoflare heating model ofthe solar corona. No GOES events occurred in the region less than 2hours before the rocket flight, but a microflare was observed northand east of the region with RHESSI and EUNIS during the flight. Theabsence of significant upward velocities anywhere in the region,particularly the microflare, indicates that the pervasive Fe XIXemission is not propelled outward from the microflare site, but ismost likely attributed to localized heating (due to reconnection,wave dissipation, or some other mechanism) consistent with thenanoflare heating model of the solar corona. We measure average FeXIX/Fe XII intensity ratios of 0.070 outside the AR core, 0.22 inarea of bright coronal emission (the area in which the Fe XIIintensity exceeds half its maximum observed value), and 0.55 in theregion's hot core. Using the CHIANTI atomic physics database andassuming ionization equilibrium, we estimate corresponding Fe XIX/FeXII emission measure ratios of about 0.076, 0.23 and 0.59. Theemission measure ratios must be viewed with caution in light oflingering uncertainties in the Fe XII contribution functions.EUNIS-13 was supported by the NASA Heliophysics Division through itsLow Cost Access to Space program.

  18. Coronal Magnetic Structures Observing Campaign. II - Magnetic and plasma properties of a solar active region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Holman, G. D.; Brosius, J. W.; Gonzalez, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    Simultaneous soft X-ray, microwave, and photospheric magnetic field observations were taken during the Coronal Magnetic Structures Observing Campaign. The plasma electron temperatures and emission measures determined from the X-ray data are used to predict the intensity and structure of the thermal bremsstrahlung emission at 20 and 6 cm. Comparing these predictions with the microwave observations, it is found that the 20 cm structure is very similar to that expected from the X-rays, but a substantial amount of the 6 cm emission was resolved out. The predicted 20 cm brightness temperatures are higher than the observed, requiring cool absorbing material (not greater than 500,000 K) between the hot X-ray plasma and the observer. The absorption mechanism in the cool plasma at 20 cm is most likely thermal bremsstrahlung, requiring coronal magnetic fields as high as 150 G. 'Coronal Magnetograms', made by extrapolating the photospheric longitudinal field using the Sakurai code, show that appropriate values of the total field are reached at heights of 6000-10,000 km above the photosphere (at many but not all locations).

  19. Multiwavelength observations of a preflare solar active region using the VLA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.; Shevgaonkar, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    A preflare active region was studied using the Very Large Array at 2, 6, and 20 cm. At 2 cm the region is composed of two components located in regions of opposite polarity. Both components are preheated prior to the impulsive onset of a flare. However, one component develops new structures during preburst phase, and the burst occurs in this location. It is believed that the new structures represent emerging flux regions which interact with an overlying loop to produce a neutral sheet, which ultimately is responsible for triggering the flare.

  20. Constraining magnetic-activity modulations in three solar-like stars observed by CoRoT and NARVAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, S.; García, R. A.; Morgenthaler, A.; Salabert, D.; Petit, P.; Ballot, J.; Régulo, C.; Catala, C.

    2013-02-01

    Context. Stellar activity cycles are the manifestation of dynamo process running in the stellar interiors. They have been observed from years to decades thanks to the measurement of stellar magnetic proxies on the surface of the stars, such as the chromospheric and X-ray emissions, and to the measurement of the magnetic field with spectropolarimetry. However, all of these measurements rely on external features that cannot be visible during, for example, a Maunder-type minimum. With the advent of long observations provided by space asteroseismic missions, it has been possible to penetrate the stars and study their properties. Moreover, the acoustic-mode properties are also perturbed by the presence of these dynamos. Aims: We track the temporal variations of the amplitudes and frequencies of acoustic modes allowing us to search for signature of magnetic activity cycles, as has already been done in the Sun and in the CoRoT target HD 49933. Methods: We used asteroseimic tools and more classical spectroscopic measurements performed with the NARVAL spectropolarimeter to check that there are hints of any activity cycle in three solar-like stars observed continuously for more than 117 days by the CoRoT satellite: HD 49385, HD 181420, and HD 52265. To consider that we have found a hint of magnetic activity in a star we require finding a change in the amplitude of the p modes that should be anti-correlated with a change in their frequency shifts, as well as a change in the spectroscopic observations in the same direction as the asteroseismic data. Results: Our analysis gives very small variation in the seismic parameters preventing us from detecting any magnetic modulation. However, we are able to provide a lower limit of any magnetic-activity change in the three stars that should be longer than 120 days, which is the length of the time series. Moreover we computed the upper limit for the line-of-sight magnetic field component being 1, 3, and 0.6 G for HD 49385, HD 181420

  1. Solar activity over different timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obridko, Vladimir; Nagovitsyn, Yuri

    The report deals with the “General History of the Sun” (multi-scale description of the long-term behavior of solar activity): the possibility of reconstruction. Time scales: • 100-150 years - the Solar Service. • 400 - instrumental observations. • 1000-2000 years - indirect data (polar auroras, sunspots seen with the naked eye). • Over-millennial scale (Holocene) -14С (10Be) Overview and comparison of data sets. General approaches to the problem of reconstruction of solar activity indices on a large timescale. North-South asymmetry of the sunspot formation activity. 200-year cycle over the “evolution timescales”.The relative contribution of the large-scale and low-latitude. components of the solar magnetic field to the general geomagnetic activity. “Large-scale” and low-latitude sources of geomagnetic disturbances.

  2. Soft X-ray variability over the present minimum of solar activity as observed by SphinX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Kepa, A.; Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Bakala, J.; Podgorski, P.; Kordylewski, Z.; Plocieniak, S.; Sylwester, B.; Trzebinski, W.; Kuzin, S.

    2011-04-01

    Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) is an instrument designed to observe the Sun in X-rays in the energy range 0.85-15.00 keV. SphinX is incorporated within the Russian TESIS X and EUV telescope complex aboard the CORONAS-Photon satellite which was launched on January 30, 2009 at 13:30 UT from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome, northern Russia. Since February, 2009 SphinX has been measuring solar X-ray radiation nearly continuously. The principle of SphinX operation and the content of the instrument data archives is studied. Issues related to dissemination of SphinX calibration, data, repository mirrors locations, types of data and metadata are discussed. Variability of soft X-ray solar flux is studied using data collected by SphinX over entire mission duration.

  3. PATTERNS OF NANOFLARE STORM HEATING EXHIBITED BY AN ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED WITH SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY/ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect

    Viall, Nicholeen M.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2011-09-01

    It is largely agreed that many coronal loops-those observed at a temperature of about 1 MK-are bundles of unresolved strands that are heated by storms of impulsive nanoflares. The nature of coronal heating in hotter loops and in the very important but largely ignored diffuse component of active regions is much less clear. Are these regions also heated impulsively, or is the heating quasi-steady? The spectacular new data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) telescopes on the Solar Dynamics Observatory offer an excellent opportunity to address this question. We analyze the light curves of coronal loops and the diffuse corona in six different AIA channels and compare them with the predicted light curves from theoretical models. Light curves in the different AIA channels reach their peak intensities with predictable orderings as a function the nanoflare storm properties. We show that while some sets of light curves exhibit clear evidence of cooling after nanoflare storms, other cases are less straightforward to interpret. Complications arise because of line-of-sight integration through many different structures, the broadband nature of the AIA channels, and because physical properties can change substantially depending on the magnitude of the energy release. Nevertheless, the light curves exhibit predictable and understandable patterns consistent with impulsive nanoflare heating.

  4. When and where to look to observe major solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.

    1989-01-01

    When and where to look is an important issue to observers planning to observe major solar flares. Prediction of major flares is also important because they influence the Earth's environment. Techniques for utilizing recently discovered solar hot spots and a solar activity periodicity of about 154 days in determining when and where to look to catch major flares are discussed.

  5. Activities for Teaching Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Jack Lee; Cantrell, Joseph S.

    1980-01-01

    Plans and activities are suggested for teaching elementary children about solar energy. Directions are included for constructing a flat plate collector and a solar oven. Activities for a solar field day are given. (SA)

  6. NIMBUS-7 SBUV (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet) observations of solar UV spectral irradiance variations caused by solar rotation and active-region evolution for the period November 7, 1978 - November 1, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. F.; Repoff, T. P.; Donnelly, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of temporal variations of the solar UV spectral irradiance over several days to a few weeks in the 160-400 nm wavelength range are presented. Larger 28-day variations and a second episode of 13-day variations occurred during the second year of measurements. The thirteen day periodicity is not a harmonic of the 28-day periodicity. The 13-day periodicity dominates certain episodes of solar activity while others are dominated by 28-day periods accompanied by a week 14-day harmonic. Techniques for removing noise and long-term trends are described. Time series analysis results are presented for the Si II lines near 182 nm, the Al I continuum in the 190 nm to 205 nm range, the Mg I continuum in the 210 nm to 250 nm range, the MgII H & K lines at 280 nm, the Mg I line at 285 nm, and the Ca II K & H lines at 393 and 397 nm.

  7. Solar Wind Trends in the Current Solar Cycle (STEREO Observations)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvin, Antoinette; Simunac, Kristin; Farrugia, Charles

    2016-04-01

    We examine solar wind ion characteristics for the current solar cycle, utilizing near-Earth (OMNI) and STEREO data. Sources of the solar wind are known to be linked to the phase of the solar cycle and include coronal holes, coronal mass ejections, and multiple cycle-dependent sources for the so-called "slow" solar wind. This past solar minimum was characterized by weak transients and sustained periods of slow solar wind, and included cases of "slow" and "slower" solar wind stream interactions. In contrast, intervals around solar maximum have included extremely fast interplanetary coronal mass ejections, with one such ICME observed in situ by STEREO A exceeding 2000 km/s at 1 AU. We will look at specific case studies of solar wind observed in situ by STEREO, particularly for solar wind proton and iron ions.

  8. Solar gamma rays and neutron observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Suri, A. N.

    1972-01-01

    The present status of knowledge concerning the impulsive and the continuous emission of solar gamma rays and neutrons is reviewed in the light of the recent solar activity in early August 1972. The gamma ray spectrometer on OSO-7 has observed the sun continuously for most of the activity period except for occultation by the earth. In association with the 2B flare on 4 August 1972 and the 3B flare on 7 August 1972, the monitor provides evidence for solar gamma ray line emission in the energy range from 300 keV to 10 MeV. A summary of all the results available from preliminary analysis of the data will be given. Significant improvements in future experiments can be made with more sensitive instruments and more extensive time coverage of the sun.

  9. Chromospheric magnetic field of an active region filament using the He I triplet and the primary observation of filaments (prominences) using New Vacuum Solar Tower of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhi; Lagg, A.; Solanki, S.; Liu, Z.; New Vacuum Solar Telescope Observers

    2013-07-01

    There are two parts in my presentation. In the first part I present the magnetic field measurement of an active region filament using the full Stokes profiles of He I 10830 and Si I 10827 band when the filament in its stable phase. This observation was fulfilled using German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT). The vector magnetic field and Doppler velocity map both in the photosphere and chromosphere were observed and analyzed co-temporally and co-spatially. The observation findings reveal that we were observing the emergence of a flux rope with a subsequent formation of a filament. In the second part, I would like to exhibit another ground-based observation facility, 1m New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) located in Fu-Xian Lake Solar Observatory of China. After the basic introduction including the location and instrumentations, I give some high lights including granulation, faculae, micro-flares, jets, and filaments or prominence since the first running in 2010, showing our potential ability to do high-resolution solar observation from the ground. Observation proposals from the international solar community are well appreciated in future.

  10. Physics of solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, Peter A.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the research activity was to increase our understanding of solar activity through data analysis, theoretical analysis, and computer modeling. Because the research subjects were diverse and many researchers were supported by this grant, a select few key areas of research are described in detail. Areas of research include: (1) energy storage and force-free magnetic field; (2) energy release and particle acceleration; (3) radiation by nonthermal electrons; (4) coronal loops; (5) flare classification; (6) longitude distributions of flares; (7) periodicities detected in the solar activity; (8) coronal heating and related problems; and (9) plasma processes.

  11. Study of the effects of solar activities on the ionosphere as observed by VLF signals recorded at TNU station, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    A SuperSID monitor installed at Tay Nguyen University (TNU), Vietnam is used to detect the temporal variations of Very Low Frequency (VLF) signals during 2013 and 2014 to understand the responses of the ionosphere to sunset/sunrise transitions and solar flares. Two VLF station signals are tracked, JJI/22.2 kHz in Japan and NWC/19.8 kHz in Australia. Results show that the effects of sunrise, sunset and solar flares on the NWC signal are more significantly different than those on the JJI signal. Sunset and sunrise spikes only occur on the JJI-TNU path because of longitudinal differences between the receiver and transmitter. Two sunset dips and three sunrise dips appear on the NWC signal during summer season. During intense solar flares, the dips occur after the maximum disturbance of the VLF signals for the North-South path. The appearance of these dips is explained by modal interference patterns. Observing temporal variations of sunrise and sunset dips or spikes of VLF signals during different seasons enhances the understanding of the behavior of the ionosphere.

  12. Long-term solar-terrestrial observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The results of an 18-month study of the requirements for long-term monitoring and archiving of solar-terrestrial data is presented. The value of long-term solar-terrestrial observations is discussed together with parameters, associated measurements, and observational problem areas in each of the solar-terrestrial links (the sun, the interplanetary medium, the magnetosphere, and the thermosphere-ionosphere). Some recommendations are offered for coordinated planning for long-term solar-terrestrial observations.

  13. Solar cell activation system

    SciTech Connect

    Apelian, L.

    1983-07-05

    A system for activating solar cells involves the use of phosphorescent paint, the light from which is amplified by a thin magnifying lens and used to activate solar cells. In a typical system, a member painted with phosphorescent paint is mounted adjacent a thin magnifying lens which focuses the light on a predetermined array of sensitive cells such as selenium, cadmium or silicon, mounted on a plastic board. A one-sided mirror is mounted adjacent the cells to reflect the light back onto said cells for purposes of further intensification. The cells may be coupled to rechargeable batteries or used to directly power a small radio or watch.

  14. Semiannual and solar activity variations of daytime plasma observed by DEMETER in the ionosphere-plasmasphere transition region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Yang, J. Y.; Berthelier, J. J.; Lebreton, J.-P.

    2015-12-01

    Using the plasma data of Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) satellite and the NRLMSISE-00 atmospheric model, we examined the semiannual and solar activity variations of the daytime plasma and neutral composition densities in the ionosphere-plasmasphere transition region (~670-710 km). The results demonstrate that the semiannually latitudinal variation of the daytime oxygen ions (O+) is basically controlled by that of neutral atomic oxygen (O), whereas the latitude distributions of the helium and hydrogen ions (He+ and H+) do not fully depend on the neutral atomic helium (He) and hydrogen (H). The summer enhancement of the heavy oxygen ions is consistent with the neutral O enhancement in the summer hemisphere, and the oxygen ion density has significantly the summer-dense and winter-tenuous hemispheric asymmetry with respect to the dip equator. Although the winter enhancements of the lighter He+ and H+ ions are also associated with the neutral He and H enhancements in the winter hemisphere, the high-density light ions (He+ and H+) and electrons (e-) mainly appear at the low and middle magnetic latitudes (|λ| < 50°). The equatorial accumulations of the light plasma species indicate that the light charged particles (He+, H+, and e-) are easily transported by some equatorward forces (e.g., the magnetic mirror force and centrifugal force). The frequent Coulomb collisions between the charged particles probably lead to the particle trappings at different latitudes. Moreover, the neutral composition densities also influence their ion concentrations during different solar activities. From the low-F10.7 year (2007-2008) to the high-F10.7 year (2004-2005), the daytime oxygen ions and electrons increase with the increasing neutral atomic oxygen, whereas the daytime hydrogen ions tend to decrease with the decreasing neutral atomic hydrogen. The helium ion density has no obvious solar activity variation, suggesting that the

  15. Psychological Factors in Solar Observing. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickett, Ronald M.

    The report summarizes the aims of a 3-year program of work concerned with psychological factors in solar observing. Part I identifies several psychological factors which may affect solar observing and outlines a program of research. Part II is a report of a program of studies dealing with the application of visual perceptions in solar flare…

  16. Editorial: solar radiophysics — recent results on observations and theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakariakov, Valery M.; Kashapova, Larisa K.; Yan, Yi-Hua

    2014-07-01

    Solar radiophysics is a rapidly developing branch of solar physics and plasma astrophysics. Solar radiophysics has the goal of analyzing observations of radio emissions from the Sun and understanding basic physical processes operating in quiet and active regions of the solar corona. In the near future, the commissioning of a new generation of solar radio observational facilities, which include the Chinese Spectral Radio Heliograph (CSRH) and the upgrade of the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT), and the beginning of solar observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), is expected to bring us new breakthrough results of a transformative nature. The Marie-Curie International Research Staff Exchange (MC IRSES) “RadioSun” international network aims to create a solid foundation for the successful exploitation of upcoming solar radio observational facilities, as well as intensive use of the existing observational tools, advanced theoretical modeling of relevant physical processes and observables, and training a new generation of solar radio physicists. The RadioSun network links research teams from China, Czech Republic, Poland, Russia and the UK. This mini-volume presents research papers based on invited reviews and contributed talks at the 1st RadioSun workshop in China. These papers cover a broad range of research topics and include recent observational and theoretical advances in solar radiophysics, MHD seismology of the solar corona, physics of solar flares, generation of radio emission, numerical modeling of MHD and plasma physics processes, charged-particle acceleration and novel instrumentation.

  17. A new view of solar wind origin near active regions and in polar coronal holes on the basis of Hinode observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiansen; Marsch, Eckart; Tu, Chuanyi; Tian, Hui; Guo, Lijia; Curdt, Werner; Xia, Lidong; Kamio, Suguru

    The possibility of full-range solar observations from Hinode with high temporal and spatial resolution motivated us to revisit the solar wind origin in the solar atmosphere. For the solar wind origin near active regions, we reveal activity in the chromosphere to be responsible for the coronal outflow at the AR edge; meanwhile we also succeeded in finding the related solar wind stream in the heliosphere. Chromospheric spicule-like jets are found to occur intermittently, and to flow in similar direction than the intermittent coronal outflows. EIS observations reveal that there are blue-shifts at the edge of AR in both chromosphere and corona, and that the blue-shift increases with temperature. Therefore, we suggest that the nascent solar wind may probably originate in the chromosphere at the edge of ARs. The connection between the source regions and their respective solar wind streams is established through magnetic field lines, which are extrapolated to reach the solar ecliptic plane at 2.5 Rs. We find that the AR edge may be the source region of an intermediate-speed (400 km/s) solar wind stream. For the solar wind origin in polar coronal holes (CHs), we extend the blue-shift observations from the transition region up to the corona, investigate the magnetic characteristics in association with the polar coronal jets, and study in details the initial phase of meso-scale loop eruption in polar CHs. We find that the blue-shift becomes more and more dominant with increasing temperature from the transition region to the corona. The polar coronal jets are found to be elongated along the extrapolated open field lines, which appear in fanning-out shape. The cancellation between bipolar magnetic fields, or squeezing of monopolar magnetic fields, may be the driver for a jet launch. The meso-scale loop started its eruption with a sudden brightening at one footpoint, then expanded and moved upwardly with a speed of 20 km/s, causing the mass at the footpoint to flow outwardly

  18. Solar activity secular cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramynin, A. P.; Mordvinov, A. V.

    2013-12-01

    Long-term variations in solar activity secular cycles have been studied using a method for the expansion of reconstructed sunspot number series Sn( t) for 11400 years in terms of natural orthogonal functions. It has been established that three expansion components describe more than 98% of all Sn( t) variations. In this case, the contribution of the first expansion component is about 92%. The averaged form of the 88year secular cycle has been determined based on the form of the first expansion coordinate function. The quasi-periodicities modulating the secular cycle have been revealed based on the time function conjugate to the first function. The quasi-periodicities modulating the secular cycle coincide with those observed in the Sn( t) series spectrum. A change in the secular cycle form and the time variations in this form are described by the second and third expansion components, the contributions of which are about 4 and 2%, respectively. The variations in the steepness of the secular cycle branches are more pronounced in the 200-year cycle, and the secular cycle amplitude varies more evidently in the 2300-year cycle.

  19. Workshop on Solar Activity, Solar Wind, Terrestrial Effects, and Solar Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A summary of the proceedings from the workshop are presented. The areas covered were solar activity, solar wind, terrestrial effects, and solar acceleration. Specific topics addressed include: (1) solar cycle manifestations, both large and small scale, as well as long-term and short-term changes, including transients such as flares; (2) sources of solar wind, as identified by interplanetary observations including coronal mass ejections (CME's) or x-ray bright points, and the theory for and evolution of large-scale and small-scale structures; (3) magnetosphere responses, as observed by spacecraft, to variable solar wind and transient energetic particle emissions; and (4) origin and propagation of solar cosmic rays as related to solar activity and terrestrial effects, and solar wind coronal-hole relationships and dynamics.

  20. X-ray emitting hot plasma in solar active regions observed by the SphinX spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, M.; Reale, F.; Gburek, S.; Terzo, S.; Barbera, M.; Collura, A.; Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Podgorski, P.; Gryciuk, M.

    2012-08-01

    Aims: The detection of very hot plasma in the quiescent corona is important for diagnosing heating mechanisms. The presence and the amount of such hot plasma is currently debated. The SphinX instrument on-board the CORONAS-PHOTON mission is sensitive to X-ray emission of energies well above 1 keV and provides the opportunity to detect the hot plasma component. Methods: We analysed the X-ray spectra of the solar corona collected by the SphinX spectrometer in May 2009 (when two active regions were present). We modelled the spectrum extracted from the whole Sun over a time window of 17 days in the 1.34-7 keV energy band by adopting the latest release of the APED database. Results: The SphinX broadband spectrum cannot be modelled by a single isothermal component of optically thin plasma and two components are necessary. In particular, the high statistical significance of the count rates and the accurate calibration of the spectrometer allowed us to detect a very hot component at ~7 million K with an emission measure of ~2.7 × 1044 cm-3. The X-ray emission from the hot plasma dominates the solar X-ray spectrum above 4 keV. We checked that this hot component is invariably present in both the high and low emission regimes, i.e. even excluding resolvable microflares. We also present and discuss the possibility of a non-thermal origin (which would be compatible with a weak contribution from thick-target bremsstrahlung) for this hard emission component. Conclusions: Our results support the nanoflare scenario and might confirm that a minor flaring activity is ever-present in the quiescent corona, as also inferred for the coronae of other stars.

  1. Space-based Observations of the Solar Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.

    2015-08-01

    Solar photon radiation is the dominant energy input to the Earth system, and this energy determines the temperature, structure, and dynamics of the atmosphere, warms the Earth surface, and sustains life. Observations of true solar variability became possible only after attaining access to space, so the observational record of the solar irradiance for sun-climate studies extends back only about 40 years. The total solar irradiance (TSI) and solar spectral irradiance (SSI) observations will be presented along with the discussion of the solar variability during the past four decades. The solar radiation varies on all time scales ranging from minutes to hours for solar eruptive events (flares), days to months for active region evolution and solar rotation (~27 days), and years to decades over the solar activity cycle (~11 years). The amount of solar variability is highly dependent on wavelength and ranges from orders of magnitude for the X-ray to 10-60% for part of the ultraviolet to only 0.1% for the visible and infrared. The accuracy and precision of the solar irradiance measurements have steadily improved with each new generation of instrumentation and with new laboratory (pre-flight) calibration facilities.

  2. Solar Energy Project, Activities: General Solar Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of activities which introduce students to concepts and issues relating to solar energy. Lessons frequently presented in the context of solar energy as it relates to contemporary energy problems. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; necessary skills and knowledge; materials; method;…

  3. Active Region Soft X-Ray Spectra as Observed Using Sounding Rocket Measurements from the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), - a Modified SDO/EVE Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, S. R.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Woods, T. N.; Jones, A. R.; Caspi, A.; Warren, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of solar active regions (ARs) in the soft x-ray spectral range (0.5 to 3.0 nm) were made on sounding rocket flight NASA 36.290 using a modified Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), a pinhole camera on the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) sounding rocket instrument. The suite of EVE rocket instruments is designed for under-flight calibrations of the orbital EVE on SDO. While the sounding rocket EVE instrument is for the most part a duplicate of the EVE on SDO, the SAM channel on the rocket version was modified in 2012 to include a free-standing transmission grating so that it could provide spectrally resolved images of the solar disk with the best signal to noise ratio for the brightest features on it, such as ARs. Calibrations of the EVE sounding rocket instrument at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (NIST SURF) have provided a measurement of the SAM absolute spectral response function and a mapping of wavelength separation in the grating diffraction pattern. For solar observations, this spectral separation is on a similar scale to the spatial size of the AR on the CCD, so dispersed AR images associated with emission lines of similar wavelength tend to overlap. Furthermore, SAM shares a CCD detector with MEGS-A, a separate EVE spectrometer channel, and artifacts of the MEGS-A signal (a set of bright spectral lines) appear in the SAM images. For these reasons some processing and analysis of the solar images obtained by SAM must be performed in order to determine spectra of the observed ARs. We present a method for determining AR spectra from the SAM rocket images and report initial soft X-ray spectra for two of the major active regions (AR11877 and AR11875) observed on flight 36.290 on 21 October 2013 at about 18:30 UT. We also compare our results with concurrent measurements from other solar soft x-ray instrumentation.

  4. Sources of the solar wind at solar activity maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, M.; Liewer, P. C.; Smith, E. J.; Skoug, R. M.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2002-12-01

    The photospheric sources of solar wind observed by the Ulysses and ACE spacecraft from 1998 to early 2001 are determined through a two-step mapping process. Solar wind speed measured at the spacecraft is used in a ballistic model to determine a foot point on a source surface at a solar distance of 2.5 solar radii. A potential-field source-surface model is then used to trace the field and flow from the source surface to the photosphere. Comparison of the polarity of the measured interplanetary field with the polarity of the photospheric source region shows good agreement for spacecraft latitudes equatorward of 60°. At higher southern latitudes, the mapping predicts that Ulysses should have observed only outward directed magnetic fields, whereas both polarities were observed. A detailed analysis is performed on four of the solar rotations for which the mapped and observed polarities were in generally good agreement. For those rotations, the solar wind mapped to both coronal holes and active regions. These findings for a period of high solar activity differ from the findings of a similar study of the solar wind in 1994-1995 when solar activity was very low. At solar minimum the fastest wind mapped to the interior of large polar coronal holes while slower wind mapped to the boundaries of those holes or to smaller low-latitude coronal holes. For the data examined in the present study, neither spacecraft detected wind from the small polar coronal holes when they existed and the speed was never as high as that observed by Ulysses at solar minimum. The principal difference between the solar wind from coronal holes and from active regions is that the O7+/O6+ ion ratio is lower for the coronal hole flow, but not as low as in the polar coronal hole flow at solar minimum. Furthermore, the active-region flows appear to be organized into several substreams unlike the more monolithic structure of flows from coronal holes. The boundaries between plasma flows from neighboring

  5. Synoptic Observing at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, C.; Naqvi, M.; Deng, N.; Tritschler, A.; Marquette, W. H.

    2007-05-01

    Synoptic solar observations in the chromospheric absorption lines Ca II K and Hα have a long tradition at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The advent of the New Solar Telescope (NST) will shift the focus of BBSO's synoptic observing program toward high-resolution observations. We present an overview of the telescopes and instrumentation and show some of the most recent results. This includes Ca II K data to track solar irradiance variations, Hα full-disk data to monitor eruptive events, Dopplergrams from two-dimensional spectroscopy, as well as image restorations of diffraction-limited quality.

  6. Low Latitude Aurora: Index of Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekli, M. R.; Aissani, D.; Chadou, I.

    2010-10-01

    Observations of aurora borealis at low latitudes are rare, and are clearly associated with high solar activity. In this paper, we analyze some details of the solar activity during the years 1769-1792. Moreover, we describe in detail three low latitude auroras. The first event was reported by ash-Shalati and observed in North Africa (1770 AD). The second and third events were reported by l'Abbé Mann and observed in Europe (1770 and 1777 AD).

  7. Distant Futures of Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas

    1997-07-01

    We will explore possible future fates of solar magnetic activity through high-S/N ultraviolet spectra of the ancient Sun analog, Arcturus {K2 III}. The fundamental mechanisms that drive the hot {T>10^6 K} coronae of cool stars remain elusive. Solving the mystery is a central theme of the ``solar-stellar connection;'' whose importance extends beyond astronomy to areas ranging from basic plasma physics to solar-terrestrial relations. A significant property of the activity is that it subsides with age: G dwarfs in young clusters are intense coronal sources, whereas old low mass K giants are so feable in soft X-rays that most are below current detection limits. For that reason, historical studies of activity have been biased towards the younger stars. Now HST/STIS easily can record faint coronal proxies {like Si IV and C IV} in nearby cool subgiants and giants, thereby mitigating the de facto age discrimination. In the solar neighborhood the brightest single star of advanced age {9-11 Gyr} is Alpha Bootis {K2 III}. Previous studies have placed the archetype red giant firmly in the ``coronal graveyard.'' Our project focuses on understanding the ``basal'' chromosphere; molecular cooling catastrophes and the structure of the passive ``COmosphere;'' the dynamics and energy balance of the residual subcoronal gas; and mass loss mechanisms. {This program is a carryover from a failed Cycle 5 GHRS observation.}

  8. Space observations of comets during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadov, Subhon; Ibodov, Firuz S.

    Problems connected with mechanisms for comet outbursts as well as for gamma-ray bursts remain open. Meantime, calculations show that an irradiation of a certain class of cometary nuclei, having high specific electric resistance, by intense fluxes of energetic protons and posi-tively charged ions with kinetic energies more than 1 MeV/nucleon, ejected from the Sun during strong solar flares, can produce a macroscopic high-voltage electric double layer with positive charge in the subsurface region of the nucleus, during irradiation time of the order of 10-100 hours at heliocentric distances around 1-10 AU. The maximum electric energy accumulated in such layer will be restricted by discharge potential of the layer material. For the comet nuclei with the typical radius of the order of 1-10 km the accumulated energy of such natural electric capacitor is comparable to the energy of large comet outbursts that are estimated on the basis of ground-based optical observations of comets. The impulse X-ray radiation anticipated from the high-voltage electric discharge of the capacitor may serve as an indicator of realization of the processes above considered. Therefore, space observations of comets and pseudo-asteroids of cometary origin, having brightness correlation with solar activity, using space X-ray obser-vatories during strong solar flares are very interesting for the physics of comets as well as for high energy astrophysics.

  9. Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchuk, James A.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Melrose, Donald B.; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk; Harrison, Richard A.; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Peter, Hardi; Tsuneta, Saku; Vršnak, Bojan; Wang, Jing-Xiu

    Commission 10 deals with solar activity in all of its forms, ranging from the smallest nanoflares to the largest coronal mass ejections. This report reviews scientific progress over the roughly two-year period ending in the middle of 2008. This has been an exciting time in solar physics, highlighted by the launches of the Hinode and STEREO missions late in 2006. The report is reasonably comprehensive, though it is far from exhaustive. Limited space prevents the inclusion of many significant results. The report is divided into the following sections: Photosphere and chromosphere; Transition region; Corona and coronal heating; Coronal jets; flares; Coronal mass ejection initiation; Global coronal waves and shocks; Coronal dimming; The link between low coronal CME signatures and magnetic clouds; Coronal mass ejections in the heliosphere; and Coronal mass ejections and space weather. Primary authorship is indicated at the beginning of each section.

  10. Solar irradiance measurements - Minimum through maximum solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. B., III; Gibson, M. A.; Shivakumar, N.; Wilson, R.; Kyle, H. L.; Mecherikunnel, A. T.

    1991-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and the NOAA-9 spacecraft solar monitors were used to measure the total solar irradiance during the period October 1984 to December 1989. Decreasing trends in the irradiance measurements were observed as sunspot activity decreased to minimum levels in 1986; after 1986, increasing trends were observed as sunspot activity increased. The magnitude of the irradiance variability was found to be approximately 0.1 percent between sunspot minimum and maximum (late 1989). When compared with the 1984 to 1989 indices of solar magnetic activity, the irradiance trends appear to be in phase with the 11-year sunspot cycle. Both irradiance series yielded 1,365/sq Wm as the mean value of the solar irradiance, normalized to the mean earth/sun distance. The monitors are electrical substitution, active-cavity radiometers with estimated measurement precisions and accuracies of less than 0.02 and 0.2 percent, respectively.

  11. The Relationship Between Solar Coronal X-Ray Brightness and Active Region Magnetic Fields: A Study Using High-Resolution Hinode Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Soumitra; Nandy, Dibyendu; Ravindra, B.

    2015-03-01

    By using high-resolution observations of nearly co-temporal and co-spatial Solar Optical Telescope spectropolarimeter and X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray data onboard Hinode, we revisit the problematic relationship between global magnetic quantities and coronal X-ray brightness. Co-aligned vector magnetogram and X-ray data were used for this study. The total X-ray brightness over active regions is well correlated with integrated magnetic quantities such as the total unsigned magnetic flux, the total unsigned vertical current, and the area-integrated square of the vertical and horizontal magnetic fields. On accounting for the inter-dependence of the magnetic quantities, we inferred that the total magnetic flux is the primary determinant of the observed integrated X-ray brightness. Our observations indicate that a stronger coronal X-ray flux is not related to a higher non-potentiality of active-region magnetic fields. The data even suggest a slightly negative correlation between X-ray brightness and a proxy of active-region non-potentiality. Although there are small numerical differences in the established correlations, the main conclusions are qualitatively consistent over two different X-ray filters, the Al-poly and Ti-poly filters, which confirms the strength of our conclusions and validate and extend earlier studies that used low-resolution data. We discuss the implications of our results and the constraints they set on theories of solar coronal heating.

  12. Parameters of the turbulence of the interplanetary plasma derived from scintillation observations of the quasar 3C 48 at the solar-activity minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glubokova, S. K.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Chashei, I. V.; Shishov, V. I.

    2013-08-01

    Temporal spectra of interplanetary scintillations of the strong radio source 3C 48 based on 111 MHz observations on the Large Scanning Antenna of the Lebedev Physical Institute obtained near the solar-activity minimum are analyzed. Measurements of the temporal spectrum of the scintillations are used to estimate the angular size of the source, the velocity of inhomogeneities, and the power-law index for the spatial spectrum of the turbulence in the interplanetary plasma. The mean angular size of the source is θ 0 = 0.326″ ± 0.016″, and the mean index for the three-dimensional turbulence spectrum is n = 3.7 ± 0.2. There is some evidence that n decreases in the transition from the fast, high-speed to the slow, low-latitude solar wind.

  13. Roles of Ground-based Solar Observations of Hida Observatory toward the Solar-C Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, S.; Shibata, K.; Ichimoto, K.; Nagata, S.; Dorotovič, I.; Shahamatnia, E.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Fonseca, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    For the realization of the Solar-C satellite, discussions about scientific themes and preliminary observations are internationally carried out now. At Hida Observatory of Kyoto University, we will play the following roles toward the Solar-C era by utilizing the Domeless Solar Telescope (DST) and the international solar chromospherirc full-disk observation network (CHAIN project) that includes the Solar Magnetic Activity Research Telescope (SMART) with international collaborations, for example, such as the development of image-analysis software by UNINOVA (Portugal) and so on.

  14. Activation of solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Cargill, P.J.; Migliuolo, S.; Hood, A.W.

    1984-11-01

    The physics of the activation of two-ribbon solar flares via the MHD instability of coronal arcades is presented. The destabilization of a preflare magnetic field is necessary for a rapid energy release, characteristic of the impulsive phase of the flare, to occur. The stability of a number of configurations are examined, and the physical consequences and relative importance of varying pressure profiles and different sets of boundary conditions (involving field-line tying) are discussed. Instability modes, driven unstable by pressure gradients, are candidates for instability. Shearless vs. sheared equilibria are also discussed. (ESA)

  15. Solar Coronal Jets: Observations, Theory, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raouafi, N. E.; Patsourakos, S.; Pariat, E.; Young, P. R.; Sterling, A. C.; Savcheva, A.; Shimojo, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; DeVore, C. R.; Archontis, V.; Török, T.; Mason, H.; Curdt, W.; Meyer, K.; Dalmasse, K.; Matsui, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Coronal jets represent important manifestations of ubiquitous solar transients, which may be the source of significant mass and energy input to the upper solar atmosphere and the solar wind. While the energy involved in a jet-like event is smaller than that of "nominal" solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), jets share many common properties with these phenomena, in particular, the explosive magnetically driven dynamics. Studies of jets could, therefore, provide critical insight for understanding the larger, more complex drivers of the solar activity. On the other side of the size-spectrum, the study of jets could also supply important clues on the physics of transients close or at the limit of the current spatial resolution such as spicules. Furthermore, jet phenomena may hint to basic process for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind; consequently their study gives us the opportunity to attack a broad range of solar-heliospheric problems.

  16. The Three-Dimenstional Solar Wind at Solar Activity Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M.

    1998-01-01

    In late 1997, the Ulysses spacecraft completed its first orbit around the Sun, observing the properties of the heliosphere at all latitudes between 80 degrees South and 80 degrees North. Because the mission occurred during a period of near-minimum solar activity, the configuration of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field were particularly simple, thus allowing confident comparisons between the properties of the polar corona observed by instruments of the Spartan and SOHO spacecraft and the resulting properties of the solar wind.

  17. DC and Structured Electric Fields Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite and Their Association with Longitude, Plasma Density, and Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, Robert; Freudenreich, H.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of DC electric fields and associated E x B plasma drifts gathered by the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite are presented. We show statistical averages of the vector fields and resulting E x B plasma flows for the first three years of operations as a function of season, longitude, local time, and Fl 0.7 conditions. Magnetic field data from the VEFI science magnetometer are used to compute the plasma flows. Although typically displaying eastward and outward-directed fields during the day and westward and downward-directed fields at night, the data from DC electric field detector often reveal variations from this pattern that depend on longitude, solar activity, and plasma density. Clear "wave-4" tidal effects in both electric field components have been detected and will be presented. Zonal plasma drifts show a marked variation with solar activity and may be used as a proxy for neutral winds at night. Evidence for pre-reversal enhancements in the meridional drifts that depend on solar activity is present for some longitudes, and are corroborated by clear evidence in the plasma density data that the spacecraft journeyed below the F-peak during evenings when the rise in the ionosphere is most pronounced. In addition to DC electric fields, the data reveal considerable electric field structures at large scales (approx 100's of km) that are usually confined to the nightside. Although such electric field structures are typically associated with plasma density depletions and structures, what is surprising is the number of cases in which large amplitude, structured DC electric fields are observed without a significant plasma density counterpart structure, including their appearance at times when the ambient plasma density appears relatively quiescent. We investigate the mapping of structured electric fields along magnetic field lines from distant locations and consider

  18. How active was solar cycle 22?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.; Pesnell, W. D.; Woods, T. N.; Rottman, G. J.

    1993-01-01

    Solar EUV observations from the Langmuir probe on Pioneer Venus Orbiter suggest that at EUV wavelengths solar cycle 22 was more active than solar cycle 21. The Langmuir probe, acting as a photodiode, measured the integrated solar EUV flux over a 13 1/2 year period from January 1979 to June 1992, the longest continuous solar EUV measurement. The Ipe EUV flux correlated very well with the SME measurement of L-alpha during the lifetime of SME and with the UARS SOLSTICE L-alpha from October 1991 to June 1992 when the Ipe measurement ceased. Starting with the peak of solar cycle 21, there was good general agreement of Ipe EUV with the 10.7 cm, Ca K, and He 10830 solar indices, until the onset of solar cycle 22. From 1989 to the start of 1992, the 10.7 cm flux exhibited a broad maximum consisting of two peaks of nearly equal magnitude, whereas Ipe EUV exhibited a strong increase during this time period making the second peak significantly higher than the first. The only solar index that exhibits the same increase in solar activity as Ipe EUV and L-alpha during the cycle 22 peak is the total magnetic flux. The case for high activity during this peak is also supported by the presence of very high solar flare intensity.

  19. Three-dimensional structures of two solar active regions from VLA observations at 2, 6, and 20 centimeter wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevgaonkar, R. K.; Kundu, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Three-dimensional structures of two active region groups are determined from observations with the Very Large Array (VLA) at 2, 6, and 20 cm. One of the groups exhibits a single magnetic loop of length approximately 10 to the 10th cm. The 2 cm radiation is mostly thermal bremsstrahlung and originates from the footprints of the loop. The 6 and 20 cm radiation is dominated by low-harmonic gyroresonance radiation and originates from the upper portion of the legs or the top of the loop. The loop broadens toward the apex. The top of the loop is not found to be the hottest point, but two temperature maxima on either side of the loop apex are observed, which is consistent with the model proposed for long loops. From 2 and 6 cm observations it can be concluded that the electron density and temperature cannot be uniform in a plane perpendicular to the axis of the loop; the density should decrease away from the axis of the loop.

  20. GONG Observations of Solar Surface Flows

    PubMed

    Hathaway; Gilman; Harvey; Hill; Howard; Jones; Kasher; Leibacher; Pintar; Simon

    1996-05-31

    Doppler velocity observations obtained by the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) instruments directly measure the nearly steady flows in the solar photosphere. The sun's differential rotation is accurately determined from single observations. The rotation profile with respect to latitude agrees well with previous measures, but it also shows a slight north-south asymmetry. Rotation profiles averaged over 27-day rotations of the sun reveal the torsional oscillation signal-weak, jetlike features, with amplitudes of 5 meters per second, that are associated with the sunspot latitude activity belts. A meridional circulation with a poleward flow of about 20 meters per second is also evident. Several characteristics of the surface flows suggest the presence of large convection cells. PMID:8662460

  1. Gap between active and passive solar heating

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The gap between active and passive solar could hardly be wider. The reasons for this are discussed and advantages to narrowing the gap are analyzed. Ten years of experience in both active and passive systems are reviewed, including costs, frequent problems, performance prediction, performance modeling, monitoring, and cooling concerns. Trends are analyzed, both for solar space heating and for service water heating. A tendency for the active and passive technologies to be converging is observed. Several recommendations for narrowing the gap are presented.

  2. Future Satellite Observations of Solar Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Rottman, G.; Woods, T.; Lawrence, G.; Harder, J.; McClintock, W.; Kopp, G.

    2003-01-01

    Required solar irradiance measurements for climate studies include those now being made by the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) and the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) onboard the SORCE satellite, part of the Earth Observing System fleet of NASA satellites. Equivalent or better measures of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and Spectral Solar Irradiance (SSI, 200 to 2000 nm) are planned for the post-2010 satellites of the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System ("OESS). The design life of SORCE is 5 years, so a "Solar Irradiance Gap Filler" EOS mission is being planned for launch in the 2007 time frame, to include the same TSI and SSI measurements. Besides avoiding any gap, overlap of the data sources is also necessary for determination of possible multi-decadal trends in solar irradiance. We discuss these requirements and the impacts of data gaps, and data overlaps, that may occur in the monitoring of the critical solar radiative forcing.

  3. Open Surface Solar Irradiance Observations - A Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menard, Lionel; Nüst, Daniel; Jirka, Simon; Maso, Joan; Ranchin, Thierry; Wald, Lucien

    2015-04-01

    The newly started project ConnectinGEO funded by the European Commission aims at improving the understanding on which environmental observations are currently available in Europe and subsequently providing an informational basis to close gaps in diverse observation networks. The project complements supporting actions and networking activities with practical challenges to test and improve the procedures and methods for identifying observation data gaps, and to ensure viability in real world scenarios. We present a challenge on future concepts for building a data sharing portal for the solar energy industry as well as the state of the art in the domain. Decision makers and project developers of solar power plants have identified the Surface Solar Irradiance (SSI) and its components as an important factor for their business development. SSI observations are crucial in the process of selecting suitable locations for building new plants. Since in-situ pyranometric stations form a sparse network, the search for locations starts with global satellite data and is followed by the deployment of in-situ sensors in selected areas for at least one year. To form a convincing picture, answers must be sought in the conjunction of these EO systems, and although companies collecting SSI observations are willing to share this information, the means to exchange in-situ measurements across companies and between stakeholders in the market are still missing. We present a solution for interoperable exchange of SSI data comprising in-situ time-series observations as well as sensor descriptions based on practical experiences from other domains. More concretely, we will apply concepts and implementations of the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) framework of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The work is based on an existing spatial data infrastructure (SDI), which currently comprises metadata, maps and coverage data, but no in-situ observations yet. This catalogue is already registered in the

  4. The European Grid of Solar Observations (EGSO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, R. D.; EGSO Team

    2002-05-01

    A major hurdles in the analysis of solar data is finding what data are available and retrieving those that are needed. Planned space- and ground-based instruments will produce huge volumes of data and even taking into account the continuous technical advances, it is clear that a new approach is needed to the way we use these data. The European Grid of Solar Observations (EGSO) is a Grid test-bed that will change the way users analyze solar data. EGSO will federate solar data archives across Europe and beyond, and will create the tools to select, process and retrieve distributed and heterogeneous solar data. It will provide mechanisms to produce standardized observing catalogues for space and ground-based observations, and the tools to create solar feature catalogues that will facilitate the selection of solar data based on features, events and phenomena. In essence, EGSO will provide the fabric of a virtual observatory. EGSO is funded under the IST (Information Society Technologies) thematic programme of European Commission's Fifth Framework Programme (FP5). The project started in March 2002 and will last for 3 years. The EGSO consortium comprises 10 institutes from Europe and the US, and is led by the Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL) of University College London (UCL). EGSO plans to work closely with groups funded under NASA's Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO) initiative, and with the team at Lockheed-Martin who are doing similar work within the ILWS programme.

  5. Introducing Solar Observation to Elementary Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyck, G. P.

    2013-06-01

    (Abstract only) I will demonstrate the presentation I have developed for introducing solar observation to elementary students in Dartmouth, Massachusetts, and surrounding public schools. Copies of my program will be available for AAVSO members who would like to use it.

  6. Observations of Solar Radio Bursts with NRL LWA Antenna Prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, K. P.; Hicks, B. C.; Crane, P. C.; Kassim, N. E.; MacDowall, R. J.; Bradley, R.; Erickson, W. C.

    2005-12-01

    We present spectra of solar bursts observed with active antenna prototypes. Combining active antenna systems developed for the NLTA (NRL Long-wavelength Test Array) and experience gained from BIRS (Bruny Island Radio Spectrometer) we have developed the GDRT (Goddard Decametric Radio Telescope). The GDRT and Green Bank Solar Radio Burst Spectrometer (GB/SRBS) serve as the northern hemisphere companions to BIRS, which operates in Tasmania. These instruments continuously scan from <12 MHz to >100 MHz while simultaneously applying RFI mitigation algorithms to produce a continuous record of solar activity. This space weather initiative demonstrates one application of hardware developed for the LWA (Long Wavelength Array).

  7. Infrared continuum observations of the solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H.; Levan, P.; Lindsey, C.

    1979-01-01

    The far-infrared wavelengths (10 microns to 1 mm) were used to study the spatial and temporal structure of the solar atmosphere. Observational results were obtained on flares, faculae, sunspots, and on the center-to-limb intensity distribution, as well as on time variability within these regions. A program of precise monitoring of slow variations in the integrated solar luminosity was shown to be feasible, and initial steps to implement observations were completed.

  8. Dynamical Evolution of the Inner Heliosphere Approaching Solar Activity Maximum: Interpreting Ulysses Observations Using a Global MHD Model. Appendix 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Pete; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    In this study we describe a series of MHD simulations covering the time period from 12 January 1999 to 19 September 2001 (Carrington Rotation 1945 to 1980). This interval coincided with: (1) the Sun s approach toward solar maximum; and (2) Ulysses second descent to the southern polar regions, rapid latitude scan, and arrival into the northern polar regions. We focus on the evolution of several key parameters during this time, including the photospheric magnetic field, the computed coronal hole boundaries, the computed velocity profile near the Sun, and the plasma and magnetic field parameters at the location of Ulysses. The model results provide a global context for interpreting the often complex in situ measurements. We also present a heuristic explanation of stream dynamics to describe the morphology of interaction regions at solar maximum and contrast it with the picture that resulted from Ulysses first orbit, which occurred during more quiescent solar conditions. The simulation results described here are available at: http://sun.saic.com.

  9. Solar Energetic Particle Events Observed by MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. O.; Larson, D. E.; Lillis, R. J.; Luhmann, J. G.; Halekas, J. S.; Brain, D.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; Epavier, F.; Thiemann, E.; Zeitlin, C.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    We present observations of solar energetic particle (SEP) events made by the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) SEP instrument, which measures energetic ions and electrons impacting the upper Martian atmosphere. Since the arrival of the MAVEN spacecraft at Mars, a large number of solar flares and a few major coronal mass ejections (CMEs) erupted from the Sun. The SEPs are accelerated by the related shock in the solar corona or by the propagating interplanetary shock ahead of the CME ejecta. Mixed in with these SEPs are particles accelerated by the shocks of corotating streams, some of which have recurred for several solar cycles due to the persistent coronal hole sources. The SEP events are analyzed together with the upstream solar wind observations from the MAVEN Solar Wind Ion Analyzer (SWIA) and magnetometer (MAG). The sources of the SEP events are determined from Earth-based solar imagery and the MAVEN Extreme Ultra-violet Monitor (EUVM) together with numerical simulations of the inner heliospheric conditions. A comparison with the radiation dose rate measurements from the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) reveals a lack of ground signatures during the onset of the highest energy SEPs for the events observed by MAVEN, indicating that the SEPs fully deposit their energies into the Martian atmosphere. Using measurements made from the ensemble of instruments onboard MAVEN, we investigate the consequences of SEPs at Mars for a number of events observed during the primary science mapping phase of the MAVEN mission.

  10. Long-term Solar Irradiance Variability: 1984-1989 Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III

    1990-01-01

    Long-term variability in the total solar irradiance has been observed in the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) solar monitor measurements. The monitors have been used to measure the irradiance from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 spacecraft platforms since October 25, 1984, January 23, 1985, and October 22, 1986, respectively. Before September 1986, the ERBS irradiance values were found to be decreasing -0.03 percent per year. This period was marked by decreasing solar magnetic activity. Between September 1986 and mid-1989, the irradiance values increased approximately 0.1 percent. The latter period was marked by increasing solar activity which was associated with the initiations of the sunspot cycle number 22 and of a new 22-year Hale solar magnetic cycle. Therefore, long-term solar-irradiance variability appears to be correlated directly with solar activity. The maximum smoothed sunspot number occurred during September 1989, according to the Sunspot Index Data Center. Therefore, the recent irradiance increasing trend should disappear during early 1990 and change into a decreasing trend if the observed irradiance variability is correlated more so with the 11-year sunspot cycle than the 22-year Hale cycle. The ERBE irradiance values are presented and compared with sunspot activity for the 1984 to 1989 period. The ERBE values are compared with those available from the Nimbus-7 and Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft experiments.

  11. Observations of small solar flares with BATSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biesecker, D. A.; Ryan, J. M.; Fishman, G. J.

    1994-12-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory is being used to observe solar flares. The Large Area Detectors are sensitive to small solar flares. We are searching the BATSE data for solar flares with an automated algorithm that allows for independent confirmation of the event origin. With this search method, we have detected solar flares almost an order of magnitude smaller than those found in a visual search of the BASTE data. We present results that are consistent with the differential distribution of peak flare rates observed by other researchers. These results show that the rate of occurrence of the smallest flares observed by BATSE can be predicted from the rate of occurrence of larger flares.

  12. Solar and lunar observation planning for Earth-observing sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Xiong, X.

    2011-11-01

    MODIS on-orbit calibration activities include the use of the on-board solar diffuser (SD), SD stability monitor (SDSM) and regularly scheduled lunar observations for the Reflective Solar Bands (RSB) radiometric calibration. Normally, the SD door is closed when there is no SD/SDSM observation to avoid the unnecessary illumination of the sunlight on the SD, which causes the SD degradation. The SD is illuminated over a very short period of time when the spacecraft crosses from the night side to the day side. To implement a SD/SDSM calibration, the SD door needs to be open and the SDSM needs to be turned on during the short period of time when the SD is illuminated. A planning tool is needed to predict the exact times for the opening and closing of SD door and SDSM on/off operations of SDSM for each SD/SDSM calibration. The tool is also needed for MODIS yaw maneuvers implemented for SD bi-direction reflectance factor (BRF) validation and SD screen vignetting function (VF) derivation. MODIS observes the Moon through its space view (SV) port. To increase the opportunity for more lunar observations and to keep the lunar phase angle in a selected narrow range that minimizes the view geometric effect on the observed lunar irradiance, a spacecraft roll maneuver is allowed and implemented for MODIS lunar observations. A lunar observation planning tool is required to predict the time and roll angle needed for each lunar observation in the selected phase angle range. The tool is also needed to determine the phase angle range such that the MODIS can view the Moon in as many months as possible each year with the phase angle in the range. The MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST) is responsible for MODIS instrument operation and calibration. We have developed a set of tools to address these needs and have successfully applied them to both Terra and Aqua MODIS. In this paper, we describe the design methodologies and the implementation of the tools. The tools have also been

  13. Review of observations relevant to solar oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.

    1982-01-01

    Recent solar oscillation observations and methods used are described. Integrated or almost integrated sunlight (Sun as a star observation) was observed. The most certain observations are in the 5 minute range. The p-mode and g-mode oscillations are expected from 3 to more than 300 minutes. The possible period ranges are described into the three intervals: (1) the 5 minute range for which the most dramatic and certain results are reported; (2) the 10 to 20 minute range for which solar diameter oscillations are reported; and (3) the 160 minute oscillation found in velocity and several other quantities.

  14. SOLIS: A Modern Facility for Synoptic Solar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, C. U.

    1998-03-01

    SOLIS (Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun) is a suite of instruments that will modernize and greatly improve synoptic solar observations carried out by the National Solar Observatory. It will provide fundamental data necessary to understand the solar activity cycle, sudden energy releases in the solar atmosphere, and solar spectral irradiance changes. State-of-the-art instrumentation and data collection techniques will be employed to enhance both the quality and quantity of data. A high degree of automation and remote control will provide faster user access to data and flexible interaction with the data-collection process. The instruments include a vector spectromagnetograph that will measure the magnetic field strength and direction over the full solar disk in 15 minutes, a full disk patrol delivering digital images in various spectral lines at a high cadence, and a Sun-as-a-star precision spectrometer to measure changes in many spectral lines.

  15. Solar wind observations at STEREO: 2007 - 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, L. K.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Galvin, A. B.; Simunac, K. D. C.

    2013-06-01

    We have observed the solar wind extensively using the twin STEREO spacecraft in 2007 - 2011, covering the deep solar minimum 23/24 and the rising phase of solar cycle 24. Hundreds of large-scale solar wind structures have been surveyed, including stream interaction regions (SIRs), interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs), and interplanetary shocks. The difference in location can cause one STEREO spacecraft to encounter 1/3 more of the above structures than the other spacecraft in a single year, even of the quasi-steady SIRs. In contrast with the rising phase of cycle 23, SIRs and ICMEs have weaker field and pressure compression in this rising phase, and ICMEs drive fewer shocks. Although the majority of shocks are driven by SIRs and ICMEs, we find ~13% of shocks without clear drivers observed in situ.

  16. Ultraviolet observations of solar fine structure.

    PubMed

    Dere, K P; Bartoe, J D; Brueckner, G E; Cook, J W; Socker, D G

    1987-11-27

    The High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph was flown on the Spacelab-2 shuttle mission to perform extended observations of the solar chromosphere and transition zone at high spatial and temporal resolution. Ultraviolet spectroheliograms show the temporal development of macrospicules at the solar limb. The C IV transition zone emission is produced in discrete emission elements that must be composed of exceedingly fine (less than 70 kilometers) subresolution structures. PMID:17744366

  17. Observational and theoretical investigations in solar seismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noyes, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    This is the final report on a project to develop a theoretical basis for interpreting solar oscillation data in terms of the interior dynamics and structure of the Sun. The topics covered include the following: (1) studies of the helioseismic signatures of differential rotation and convection in the solar interior; (2) wave generation by turbulent convection; and (3) the study of antipodal sunspot imaging of an active region tomography.

  18. Characteristics of solar wind control on Jovian UV auroral activity deciphered by long-term Hisaki EXCEED observations: Evidence of preconditioning of the magnetosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Hajime; Kimura, Tomoki; Tao, Chihiro; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Misawa, Hiroaki; Sakanoi, Takeshi; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Murakami, Go; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Fujimoto, Masaki

    2016-07-01

    While the Jovian magnetosphere is known to have the internal source for its activity, it is reported to be under the influence of the solar wind as well. Here we report the statistical relationship between the total power of the Jovian ultraviolet aurora and the solar wind properties found from long-term monitoring by the spectrometer EXCEED (Extreme Ultraviolet Spectroscope for Exospheric Dynamics) on board the Hisaki satellite. Superposed epoch analysis indicates that auroral total power increases when an enhanced solar wind dynamic pressure hits the magnetosphere. Furthermore, the auroral total power shows a positive correlation with the duration of a quiescent interval of the solar wind that is present before a rise in the dynamic pressure, more than with the amplitude of dynamic pressure increase. These statistical characteristics define the next step to unveil the physical mechanism of the solar wind control on the Jovian magnetospheric dynamics.

  19. Hydrologic Activity of Deciduous Agroforestry Tree : Observed through Monitoring of Stable Isotopes in Stem Water, Solar Radiation Attenuation, and Sapflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceperley, N. C.; Mande, T.; Parlange, M. B.

    2012-12-01

    The net benefit of agroforestry trees for small scale farmers in dryland agricultural systems is debatable because while they provide significant direct and indirect services, they also consume considerable amounts of scare water resources. In this study we monitor the stable isotopes of water to improve a water budget of a Sclerocarya birrea tree in a millet field in South Eastern Burkina Faso. Data obtained from air temperature and humidity, surface temperature, solar radiation, and soil moisture sensors attached to a wireless sensor network uniquely configured around the agroforestry tree provided the initial calculation of the local water balance. Isotopic ratios were determined from water extracted from stems and sub canopy soil, and from nearby ground water, precipitation, and surface water that was sampled weekly. A linear mixing model is used to predict when the tree switched between water sources. The results from the linear mixing model coupled with a tree water balance demonstrate the extreme seasonality of the annual cycle of water use by this deciduous species.

  20. Solar activity and the weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The attempts during the past century to establish a connection between solar activity and the weather are discussed; some critical remarks about the quality of much of the literature in this field are given. Several recent investigations are summarized. Use of the solar/interplanetary magnetic sector structure in future investigations is suggested to add an element of cohesiveness and interaction to these investigations.

  1. Insights on the solar dynamo from stellar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Martens, Petrus C.; Judge, Philip G.

    2014-06-01

    A successful dynamo model should not only explain the broad characteristics of the magnetic field cycle for the Sun (22-year sunspot cycle with polarity reversals, migration of active latitudes toward the poles throughout the cycle, and Joy’s law), but should also be able to explain the cycling behavior observed in Solar-analog stars, which are very close to the Sun in essential characteristics. Our aim is to develop a set of constraints on dynamo models from the observed behavior of solar-analog stars obtained from a number of long-running synoptic surveys of cycling activity (Mount Wilson Observatory HK survey, Lowel Observatory Solar-Stellar Spectrograph, and the Fairborn Observatory Automatic Photoelectric Telescope survey), in conjuncture with stellar rotation and differential rotation data obtained by the Kepler Mission and other sources. By carefully piecing together the best data available today, we will provide an improved understanding of the parameter space in which Solar-like dynamos operate.

  2. Solar activity and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Szczeklik, E; Mergentaler, J; Kotlarek-Haus, S; Kuliszkiewicz-Janus, M; Kucharczyk, J; Janus, W

    1983-01-01

    The correlation between the incidence of myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac death, the solar activity and geomagnetism in the period 1969-1976 was studied, basing on Wrocław hospitals material registered according to WHO standards; sudden death was assumed when a person died within 24 hours after the onset of the disease. The highest number of infarctions and sudden deaths was detected for 1975, which coincided with the lowest solar activity, and the lowest one for the years 1969-1970 coinciding with the highest solar activity. Such an inverse, statistically significant correlation was not found to exist between the studied biological phenomena and geomagnetism. PMID:6851574

  3. An Observational Overview of Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Lyndsay; Battaglia, M.; Dennis, Brian R.; Liu, W.; Milligan, R. O.; Hudson, H. S.; Krucker, S.; Phillips, K.; Bone, L.; Veronig, A.; Caspi, A.; Temmer, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present an overview of solar flares and associated phenomena, drawing upon a wide range of observational data primarily from the RHESSI era. Following an introductory discussion and overview of the status of observational capabilities, the article is split into topical sections which deal with different areas of flare phenomena (footpoints and ribbons, coronal sources, relationship to coronal mass ejections) and their interconnections. We also discuss flare soft X-ray spectroscopy and the energetics of the process. The emphasis is to describe the observations from multiple points of view, while bearing in mind the models that link them to each other and to theory. The present theoretical and observational understanding of solar flares is far from complete, so we conclude with a brief discussion of models, and a list of missing but important observations.

  4. The solar irradiance: observations and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, Gaël; Schmutz, Werner; Shapiro, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The knowledge of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) and its variability is an essential parameter for space weather and space climate studies. Many observations of the SSI have been performed in a recent past, but the level of confidence is rather low when considering long time scales, since space instruments are often suffering from degradation problems. Many SSI models have been also developed, and some of them are excellent inputs for many space climate models. We will then review the different data sets available of the SSI for the short term time-scales as well as for the long term, including both observations and models. We will also emphasize about our new irradiance model, COSIR for Code of Solar Irradiance Reconstruction, which is successful at reproducing the solar rotational modulation as seen in the PREMOS, Virgo and SORCE data.

  5. Is Solar Activity Once More Fainting?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mares Aguilar, C. E.; Schröder, K.-P.; Song, G.

    2013-04-01

    After an anomalously long and deep minimum, will the Sun now once again reach a period of weaker activity cycles, which would affect northern hemisphere winter climate? We here discuss the current state and outlook of solar activity, and we propose to monitor the solar Ca II K line emission “as a star”, as part of the regular observing schedule of the Hamburg robotic telescope, which is bound to move to Guanajuato this year (2012). In fact, the chromospheric Ca II K line emission is a good proxy for the solar far-ultraviolet flux, as both are generated at about the same plasma temperatures (12-15,000 K) and both originate from the same active regions (plages). The solar ultraviolet flux, in turn, warms the stratosphere by photo dissociation of ozone and other molecules and, consequently, affects the strength of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NOA).

  6. Solar observations carried out at the INAF - Catania Astrophysical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccarello, F.; Contarino, L.; Romano, P.

    2011-10-01

    Solar observations at the INAF - Catania Astrophysical Observatory are carried out by means of an equatorial spar, which includes: a Cook refractor, used to make daily drawings of sunspot groups from visual observations; a 150-mm refractor with an Hα Lyot filter for chromospheric observations; a 150-mm refractor feeding an Hα Halle filter for limb observations of the chromosphere. The photospheric and chromospheric data are daily distributed to several international Solar Data Centers. Recently, a program of Flare Warning has been implemented, with the aim of determining the probability that an active region yields a flare on the basis of its characteristics deduced from optical observations. Some science results obtained by means of solar data acquired at the INAF - Catania Astrophysical Observatory, as well as by space-instruments data, are briefly described.

  7. New NSO Solar Surface Activity Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henney, C. J.; Harvey, J. W.

    2001-05-01

    Using NSO-Kitt Peak Vacuum Telescope (KPVT) synoptic data, we present several new solar surface activity maps. The motivation is to test conventional wisdom about conditions that are likely to produce solar activity such as flares, coronal mass ejections and high speed solar wind streams. The ultimate goal is to improve real-time, observation-based models for the purpose of predicting solar activity. A large number of maps will eventually be produced based on the wide range of ideas and models of the conditions thought to lead to solar activity events. When data from the new SOLIS instruments becomes available, the range of possible models that can be tested will be greatly expanded. At present, the daily maps include ones that show magnetic field complexity, emerging flux and high speed solar wind sources. As a proxy for local magnetic potential energy, each element of the magnetic complexity map is the distance-weighted rms of the opposing ambient magnetic field. The flux emergence map is the difference between the two most recent absolute magnetic flux images. The solar wind source map is produced from coronal hole area data. The new maps are available on the NSO-Kitt Peak World Wide Web page. This research was supported in part by the Office of Navel Research Grant N00014-91-J-1040. The NSO-Kitt Peak data used here are produced cooperatively by NSF/AURA, NASA/GSFC, and NOAA/SEC.

  8. The Standard Solar Model versus Experimental Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, O.

    2000-12-01

    The standard solar model (ssm) assumes the that Sun formed as a homogeneous body, its interior consists mostly of hydrogen, and its radiant energy comes from H-fusion in its core. Two sets of measurements indicate the ssm is wrong: 1. Analyses of material in the planetary system show that - (a) Fe, O, Ni, Si, Mg, S and Ca have high nuclear stability and comprise 98+% of ordinary meteorites that formed at the birth of the solar system; (b) the cores of inner planets formed in a central region consisting mostly of heavy elements like Fe, Ni and S; (c) the outer planets formed mostly from elements like H, He and C; and (d) isotopic heterogeneities accompanied these chemical gradients in debris of the supernova that exploded here 5 billion years ago to produce the solar system (See Origin of the Elements at http://www.umr.edu/õm/). 2. Analyses of material coming from the Sun show that - (a) there are not enough neutrinos for H-fusion to be its main source of energy; (b) light-weight isotopes (mass =L) of He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe in the solar wind are enriched relative to heavy isotopes (mass = H) by a factor, f, where log f = 4.56 log [H/L] -- - Eq. (1); (c) solar flares by-pass 3.4 of these 9-stages of diffusion and deplete the light-weight isotopes of He, Ne, Mg and Ar by a factor, f*, where log f* = -1.7 log [H/L] --- Eq. (2); (d) proton-capture on N-14 increased N-15 in the solar wind over geologic time; and (e) solar flares dredge up nitrogen with less N-15 from this H-fusion reaction. Each observation above is unexplained by ssm. After correcting photospheric abundances for diffusion [Observation 2(b)], the most abundant elements in the bulk sun are Fe, Ni, O, Si, S, Mg and Ca, the same elements that comprise ordinary meteorites [Observation 1(a)]. The probability that Eq. (1) would randomly select these elements from the photosphere, i.e., the likelihood for a meaningless agreement between observations 2(b) and 1(a), is < 2.0E(-33). Thus, ssm does not describe the

  9. Deciphering Solar Magnetic Activity: On Grand Minima in Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcintosh, Scott; Leamon, Robert

    2015-07-01

    The Sun provides the energy necessary to sustain our existence. While the Sun provides for us, it is also capable of taking away. The weather and climatic scales of solar evolution and the Sun-Earth connection are not well understood. There has been tremendous progress in the century since the discovery of solar magnetism - magnetism that ultimately drives the electromagnetic, particulate and eruptive forcing of our planetary system. There is contemporary evidence of a decrease in solar magnetism, perhaps even indicators of a significant downward trend, over recent decades. Are we entering a minimum in solar activity that is deeper and longer than a typical solar minimum, a "grand minimum"? How could we tell if we are? What is a grand minimum and how does the Sun recover? These are very pertinent questions for modern civilization. In this paper we present a hypothetical demonstration of entry and exit from grand minimum conditions based on a recent analysis of solar features over the past 20 years and their possible connection to the origins of the 11(-ish) year solar activity cycle.

  10. Solar activity and Perseid meteor heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buček, M.; Porubčan, V.; Zigo, P.

    2012-04-01

    Photographic meteor heights of the Perseid meteoroid stream compiled in the IAU Meteor Data Center catalogue observed in 1939-1992, covering five solar activity cycles, are analyzed and their potential variation within a solar activity cycle is investigated and discussed. Of the 673 Perseids selected from the catalogue, the variations of the heights for three independent sets: 524 Perseids with known information on both heights, 397 with known brightness and 279 with the geocentric velocity within a one sigma limit, were investigated. The observed beginning and endpoint heights of the Perseids, normalized for the geocentric velocity and the absolute photographic magnitude correlated with the solar activity represented by the relative sunspot number R, do not exhibit a variation consistent with the solar activity cycle. The result, confirmed also by the correlation analysis, is derived for the mass ranges of larger meteoroids observed by photographic techniques. However, a possible variation of meteor heights controlled by solar activity for smaller meteoroids detected by television and radio techniques remains still open and has to be verified.

  11. Electron energy transport in the solar wind: Ulysses observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scime, Earl; Gary, S. Peter; Phillips, J. L.; Corniileau-Wehrlin, N.; Solomon, J.

    1995-01-01

    The electron heat flux in the solar wind has been measured by the Ulysses solar wind plasma experiment in the ecliptic from 1 to 5 AU and out of the ecliptic during the recently completed pass over the solar south pole and the ongoing pass over the solar north pole. Although the electron heat flux contains only a fraction of the kinetic energy of the solar wind. the available energy is sufficient to account for the non-adiabatic expansion of the solar wind electrons. The Ulysses measurements indicate that the electron heat flux is actively dissipated in the solar wind. The exact mechanism or mechanisms is unknown. but a model based on the whistler heat flux instability predicts radial gradients for the electron heat flux in good agreement with the data. We will present measurements of the correlation between wave activity measured by the unified radio and plasma experiment (URAP) and the electron heat flux throughout the Ulysses mission. The goal is to determine if whistler waves are a good candidate for the observed electron heat flux dissipation. The latitudinal gradients of the electron heat flux. wave activity. and electron pressure will be discussed in light of the changes in the magnetic field geometry from equator to poles.

  12. Basic results of the CORONAS-F solar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. D.

    2006-08-01

    142190 Troitsk, Moscow Region, Russia V.D. Kuznetsov N.V.Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Troitsk, Russia The report contains a review of the basic results of the CORONAS-F solar observations during the period of orbital operation of the satellite (from July 31, 2001 to December 6, 2005). Basic results are related with helioseismic observations of the Sun, with localization and study of the morphology of numerous active phenomena in the Sun, including the outstanding events in the declining phase of the solar cycle; with spectroscopic diagnostics of the coronal and flare-generated plasma; with the study of the atomic and nuclear processes in solar flares; with detection of the fluxes of solar cosmic rays, gamma-rays, and neutrons from the major flares reaching the Earth's orbit.

  13. 3D-Stereoscopic Analysis of Solar Active Region Loops: I: SoHo/EIT Observations at Temperatures of 1.0-1.5 MK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Newmark, Jeff; Delaboudiniere, Jean-Pierre; Neupert, Werner M.; Portier-Fozzani, Fabrice; Gary, G. Allen; Zucker, Arik

    1998-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) structure of solar active region NOAA 7986 observed on 1996 August 30 with the Extrem-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SoHO) is analyzed. We develop a new method of Dynamic Stereoscopy to reconstruct the 3D geometry of dynamically changing loops, which allows us to determine the orientation of the loop plane with respect to the line-of-sight, a prerequisite to correct properly for projection effects in 3D loop models. With this method and the filter-ratio technique applied to EIT 171 A and 195 A images we determine the 3D coordinates (x(s), y(s), z(s)), the loop width) w(s), the electron density n(sub e)(s), and the electron temperature T(sub e)(s) as function of the loop length s for 30 loop segments. Fitting the loop densities with an exponential density model n(sub e)(h) we find that the so inferred scale height temperatures, T(sub e)(sup lambda) = 1.22 +/- 0.23 MK, match closely the EIT filter-ratio temperatures, T(sub e)(sup FIT) = 1.21 +/- 0.06 MK. We conclude that these rather large-scale loops (with heights of h approx. equals 50 - 200 Mm) that dominate EIT 171 A images are close to thermal equilibrium. Most of the loops show no significant thickness variation w(s), but many exhibit a trend of increasing temperature (dT/ds greater than 0) above the footpoint.

  14. High Energetic Solar Flares in the Solar Minima Activity in Comparative Study with the Solar Maxima Activity from 1954 to 2014 and Their Effects on the Space Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Wael

    Solar 11-year cycle of solar activity is characterized by the rise and fall in the numbers and areas of sunspots. On solar maximum activity, many flares and CMEs can affect the near-earth space environment. But on the solar minimum activity, there are sometimes solar proton events, (e.g. High Energetic Solar Proton Flares on the declining phase of solar cycle 22 for M.A.Mosalam Shaltout, 1995), have the same effect for those on the solar maximum activity or more. So, a study must be made for the ascending and descending phases of solar activity for a set of solar cycles (from 1954 to 2014) to confirm the conclusion of Mosalam Shaltout on the light of the present high quality observations from ground and by artificial satellites.

  15. Solar latitudinal distortions: From observations to theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, S.; Rozelot, J. P.

    2004-06-01

    Solar diameters have been measured from different ground-based instruments on different sites all around the world. There are values dating back to three centuries ago, but the revival of interest began in the 1970s when it was claimed that a temporal periodic modulation had been found. The interest of such measurements, pinpointed from only two decades, may not lie in these temporal variations, but in the fact that a latitudinal heliographic dependence may exist. Such a solar shape distortion has been deduced from the analysis of solar astrolabe data sorted by heliographic latitudes, but observational evidence has also been obtained by means of a scanning heliometer (Pic du Midi Observatory). Latitudinal dependence implies sub-surfacic physical mechanisms and can be explained theoretically. Thus, in spite of the fact that ground-based observations are altered by seeing effects that may amplify or superimpose noise, it can be advanced that the solar shape is not a pure spheroid. We present here a new theory based upon the thermal-wind equation, which explains the observed distorted solar shape. Using the W parameter (called here asphericity-luminosity parameter), we show that large negative values (W ranging from around -0.075 up to -0.6) leading to a prolate Sun, are unlikely. The best range of W lies between around -0.075 and +0.6. Concerning observations, only space missions (or balloon flights) will be able to reach a clear conclusion. A space mission called PICARD is scheduled to be launched by 2008: one of its major aims is to measure these asphericities with astrometric precision.

  16. 11 -year planetary index of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okhlopkov, Victor

    In papers [1,2] introduced me parameter - the average difference between the heliocentric longitudes of planets ( ADL ) , which was used for comparison with solar activity. The best connection of solar activity ( Wolf numbers used ) was obtained for the three planets - Venus, Earth and Jupiter. In [1,2] has been allocated envelope curve of the minimum values ADL which has a main periodicity for 22 years and describes well the alternating series of solar activity , which also has a major periodicity of 22. It was shown that the minimum values of the envelope curve extremes ADL planets Venus, Earth and Jupiter are well matched with the 11- year solar activity cycle In these extremes observed linear configuration of the planets Venus, Earth and Jupiter both in their location on one side of the Sun ( conjunctions ) and at the location on the opposite side of the Sun ( three configurations ) This work is a continuation of the above-mentioned , and here for minimum ADL ( planets are in conjunction ) , as well as on the minimum deviation of the planets from a line drawn through them and Sun at the location of the planets on opposite sides of the Sun , compiled index (denoted for brevity as JEV ) that uniquely describes the 11- year solar cycle A comparison of the index JEV with solar activity during the time interval from 1000 to 2013 conducted. For the period from 1000 to 1699 used the Schove series of solar activity and the number of Wolf (1700 - 2013 ) During the time interval from 1000 to 2013 and the main periodicity of the solar activity and the index ADL is 11.07 years. 1. Okhlopkov V.P. Cycles of Solar Activity and the Configurations of Planets // Moscow University Physics Bulletin, 2012 , Vol. 67 , No. 4 , pp. 377-383 http://www.springerlink.com/openurl.asp?genre=article&id=doi:10.3103/S0027134912040108. 2 Okhlopkov VP, Relationship of Solar Activity Cycles to Planetary Configurations // Bulletin of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Physics, 2013 , Vol. 77 , No. 5

  17. Observations of solar modes in space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, David J.

    During an investigation into a series of communications satellite anomalies around the 1990 solar maximum it became apparent that the timing between the different events was not simple. To resolve this, we were prompted to look at the power spectrum of corotating interaction regions using data from the HISCALE detector on Ulysses. This showed numerous periodic components that were not simply harmonics of solar rotation. We have since found that such periodic components are ubiquitous in space plasmas and that they couple into terrestrial systems. Their frequency range extends from frequencies below solar rotation to many mHz. The only plausible explanation for these periodic components is that they originate as normal modes of the Sun, are modified by both surface effects and numerous geometric factors, and propagate into interplanetary space. Standard theory, as it was interpreted, was taken to imply that turbulence will destroy periodic components in the solar wind before they reach 1 AU let alone Ulysses. More recently, we have shown that modal components persist and are coherent between ACE and Ulysses. Moreover, the ellipticities of modes are preserved, but their orientations rotate, remaining fixed relative to the Parker spiral. These observations contradict the assumption that the solar wind is strongly turbulent.

  18. Solar flare hard X-ray observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.

    1988-01-01

    Recent hard X-ray observations of solar flares are reviewed with emphasis on results obtained with instruments on the solar maximum satellite. Flares with three sets of characteristics, designated as Type A, Type B, and Type C, are discussed and hard X-ray temporal, spatial spectral, and polarization measurements are reviewed in this framework. Coincident observations are reviewed at other wavelengths including the UV, microwaves, and soft X-rays, with discussions of their interpretations. In conclusion, a brief outline is presented of the potential of future hard X-ray observations with sub-second time resolution, arcsecond spatial resolution, and keV energy resolution, and polarization measurements at the few percent level up to 100 keV.

  19. Temporal offsets among solar activity indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, K. B.; Vasantharaju, N.

    2014-04-01

    Temporal offsets between the time series of solar activity indicators provide important clues regarding the physical processes responsible for the cyclic variability in the solar atmosphere. Hysteresis patterns generated between any two indicators were popularly used to study their morphological features and further to understand their inter relationships. We use time series of different solar indicators to understand the possible cause-and-effect criteria between their respective source regions. Sensitivity of the upper atmosphere to the activity underneath might play an important role in introducing different evolutionary patterns in the profiles of solar indicators and in turn cause temporal offsets between them. Limitations in the observations may also cause relative shifts in the time series.

  20. Sources of solar wind over the solar activity cycle.

    PubMed

    Poletto, Giannina

    2013-05-01

    Fast solar wind has been recognized, about 40 years ago, to originate in polar coronal holes (CHs), that, since then, have been identified with sources of recurrent high speed wind streams. As of today, however, there is no general consensus about whether there are, within CHs, preferential locations where the solar wind is accelerated. Knowledge of slow wind sources is far from complete as well. Slow wind observed in situ can be traced back to its solar source by backward extrapolation of magnetic fields whose field lines are streamlines of the outflowing plasma. However, this technique often has not the necessary precision for an indisputable identification of the region where wind originates. As the Sun progresses through its activity cycle, different wind sources prevail and contribute to filling the heliosphere. Our present knowledge of different wind sources is here summarized. Also, a Section addresses the problem of wind acceleration in the low corona, as inferred from an analysis of UV data, and illustrates changes between fast and slow wind profiles and possible signatures of changes along the solar cycle. A brief reference to recent work about the deep roots of solar wind and their changes over different solar cycles concludes the review. PMID:25685421

  1. STEREO Observations of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonRosenvinge, Tycho; Christian, Eric; Cohen, Christina; Leske, Richard; Mewaldt, Richard; Stone, Edward; Wiedenbeck, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We report on observations of Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events as observed by instruments on the STEREO Ahead and Behind spacecraft and on the ACE spacecraft. We will show observations of an electron event observed by the STEREO Ahead spacecraft on June 12, 2010 located at W74 essentially simultaneously with electrons seen at STEREO Behind at E70. Some similar events observed by Helios were ascribed to fast electron propagation in longitude close to the sun. We will look for independent verification of this possibility. We will also show observations of what appears to be a single proton event with very similar time-history profiles at both of the STEREO spacecraft at a similar wide separation. This is unexpected. We will attempt to understand all of these events in terms of corresponding CME and radio burst observations.

  2. Amateur observations of solar eclipses and derivation of scientific data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoev, A. D.; Stoeva, P. V.

    2008-12-01

    This work presents the educational approach of using total solar eclipse occurrences as a scientific process learning aid. The work reviews the basic scientific aims and experiments included in the observational programs "Total solar eclipse 1999 and 2006" (Stoev, A., Kiskinova, N., Muglova, P. et al. Complex observational programme of the Yuri Gagarin Public Astronomical Observatory and STIL, BAS, Stara Zagora Department for the August 11, 1999 total solar eclipse, in: Total Solar Eclipse 1999 - Observational Programmes and Coordination, Proceedings, Recol, Haskovo, pp. 133-137, 1999a (in Bulgarian); Stoeva, P.V., Stoev, A.D., Kostadinov, I.N. et al. Solar Corona and Atmospheric Effects during the March 29, 2006 Total Solar Eclipse, in: 11th International Science Conference SOLAR-Terrestrial Influences, Sofia, November 24-25, pp. 69-72, 2005). Results from teaching and training the students in the procedures, methods and equipment necessary for the observation of a total solar eclipse (TSE) at the Yuri Gagarin Public Astronomical Observatory (PAO) in Stara Zagora, Bulgaria, as well as the selection process used in determining participation in the different observational teams are discussed. The final stages reveal the special methodology used to investigate the level of "pretensions", the levels of ambition displayed by the students in achieving each independent goal, and the setting of goals in context with their problem solving capabilities and information gathering abilities in the scientific observation process. Results obtained from the observational experiments are interpreted mainly in the following themes: Investigation of the structure of the white-light solar corona and evolution of separate coronal elements during the total phase of the eclipse; Photometry of the white-light solar corona and specific emission lines; Meteorological, actinometrical and optical atmospheric investigations; Astrometry of the Moon during the phase evolution of the eclipse and

  3. Solar activity and the mean global temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlykin, A. D.; Sloan, T.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2009-01-01

    The variation with time from 1956 to 2002 of the globally averaged rate of ionization produced by cosmic rays in the atmosphere is deduced and shown to have a cyclic component of period roughly twice the 11 year solar cycle period. Long term variations in the global average surface temperature as a function of time since 1956 are found to have a similar cyclic component. The cyclic variations are also observed in the solar irradiance and in the mean daily sun spot number. The cyclic variation in the cosmic ray rate is observed to be delayed by 2-4 years relative to the temperature, the solar irradiance and daily sun spot variations suggesting that the origin of the correlation is more likely to be direct solar activity than cosmic rays. Assuming that the correlation is caused by such solar activity, we deduce that the maximum recent increase in the mean surface temperature of the Earth which can be ascribed to this activity is {\\lesssim }14% of the observed global warming.

  4. Solar Observations as Educational Tools (P8)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shylaja, B. S.

    2006-11-01

    taralaya89@yahoo.co.in Solar observations are very handy tools to expose the students to the joy of research. In this presentation I briefly discuss the various experiments already done here with a small 6" Coude refractor. These include simple experiments like eclipse observations, rotation measurements, variation in the angular size of the sun through the year as well as sun spot size variations, Doppler measurements, identification of elements from solar spectrum (from published high resolution spectrum), limb darkening measurements, deriving the curve of growth (from published data). I also describe the theoretical implications of the experiments and future plans to develop this as a platform for motivating students towards a career in basic science research.

  5. From Solar Dimming to Solar Brightening: Observations, Modeling, Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, M.; Ohmura, A.; Feichter, J.; Stier, P.; Robock, A.; Li, H.

    2005-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the amount of solar radiation reaching the earth surface is not stable over time but exhibits significant decadal variations. These variations, in addition to the changes in thermal radiation induced by alterations in greenhouse gases, cause changes in radiative forcings which may significantly affect surface climate. Observations from the Global Energy Balanced Archive (GEBA) and Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) databases at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology suggest that surface solar radiation, after decades of dimming, reversed into a brightening since the mid 1980s at widespread locations. These changes are in line with a recovery of atmospheric transparency, possibly related to reduced aerosol loadings due to air pollution control and the breakdown of industry in formerly Communist countries. Not many GCMs currently represent aerosol effects with a degree of sophistication to capture such effects, but we used a special version of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology GCM which includes a detailed aerosol scheme, ECHAM5-HAM, to investigate the observed trends. In addition, we investigate the potential impact of the variations in surface radiation on other elements of the climate system, such as soil moisture, which shows changes in line with the changes in radiation. Reference: Wild, M., Gilgen, H., Roesch, A., Ohmura, A., Long, C., Dutton, E., Forgan, B., Kallis, A., Russak, V., Tsvetkov, A., 2005: From dimming to brightening: Decadal changes in solar radiation at the Earth's surface. Science , 308, 847-850

  6. Impact of solar activity on the relation of vertical ExB drift over equator, low latitude electron density and TEC: Model v/s observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashora, Nirvikar

    2012-07-01

    Ionospheric models are of prime interest for applications like satellite based navigation and a near real time forecasting of grid based ionospheric delays. The physical processes that govern low latitude ionospheric variability are, at large, known, however, there remains a certain degree of uncertainty in many variables that are not measurable in each longitude sector on day-to-day basis like thermospheric neutral winds and drifts, diffusion and conductivity distribution etc. To study the day-to-day and seasonal variation of peak electron density and TEC in low latitude we used a physics based model, SAMI2, for three years 2001, 2005 and 2009 representing respectively the peak, moderate and lowest levels of solar activity in past solar cycle, besides for some geomagnetic storms. The model is run for Indian longitude sector under various controlled conditions like meridional winds and equatorial ExB drifts. The diurnal and seasonal variations of various quantities have been obtained as 2D meridional cross-section of ionosphere. There is a renewed interest in the variable nature of relation between time of maximization of equatorial ionization anomaly in terms of electron density (and TEC) and the time of maximization of ExB drift over equator. A dramatic variation is found in the time-lag between the maximization of ExB drift over equator and peak density occurrence in low latitudes (even in case of zero meridional winds). We found that single linear relation neither exists for any season nor for any year during any epoch of solar cycle. Specifically, equinoctial months exhibit greater day-to-day variability than other seasons, the reasons to be still quantified. Simulations for geomagnetic storms were separately performed. TEC observations show a direct response to penetration electric fields. The model results under disturbed ExB conditions show that the imminent enhancements in low latitude TEC are result of enhanced density due to mechanical up-lifting of F

  7. Solar collector manufacturing activity, 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-11-01

    This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy in cooperation with the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy. The report presents data on producer shipments and end uses obtained from manufacturers and importers of solar thermal collectors and photovoltaic modules. It provides annual data necessary for the Department of Energy to execute its responsibility to: (1) monitor activities and trends in the solar collector manufacturing industry, (2) prepare the national energy strategy, and (3) provide information on the size and status of the industry to interested groups such as the U.S. Congress, government agencies, the Solar Energy Research institute, solar energy specialists, manufacturers, and the general public.

  8. Correlation of Doppler noise during solar conjunctions with fluctuations in solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.; Rockwell, S. T.

    1975-01-01

    Deviations betweeb observed Doppler noise and the noise model during solar conjunction were analyzed. It is tentatively concluded that these deviations are due to short-term fluctuations in solar activity as seen along the signal path, and not to solar/antenna structure effects or system noise temperature.

  9. Faint solar radio structures from decametric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briand, C.; Zaslavsky, A.; Maksimovic, M.; Zarka, P.; Lecacheux, A.; Rucker, H. O.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Abranin, E. P.; Dorovsky, V. V.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Melnik, V. N.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: Decameter radio observations of the solar corona reveal the presence of numerous faint frequency drifting emissions, similar to “solar S bursts” which are reported in the literature. We present a statistical analysis of the characteristics of these emissions and propose a mechanism to excite the Langmuir waves thought to be at the origin of these emissions. Methods: The observations were performed between 1998 and 2002 with the Digital Spectro Polarimeter (DSP) receivers operated at the UTR-2 and Nançay decameter radio telescopes in the frequency range 15-30 MHz. Our theoretical explanation is based on Vlasov-Ampère simulations. Results: Based on the frequency drift rate, three populations of structures can be identified. The largest population presents an average negative frequency drift of -0.9 MHz s-1 and a lifetime up to 11 s (median value of 2.72 s). A second population shows a very small frequency drift of -0.1 MHz s-1 and a short lifetime of about 1 s. The third population presents an average positive frequency drift of +0.95 MHz s-1 and a lifetime of up to 3 s. Also, the frequency drift as a function of frequency is consistent with the former results, which present results in higher frequency range. No specific relationship was found between the occurrence of these emissions and the solar cycle or presence of flares. Assuming that these emissions are produced by “electron clouds” propagating the solar corona, we deduce electron velocities of about 3-5 times the electron thermal velocity. As previously shown, a localized, time-dependent modulation of the electron distribution function (heating) leads to low velocity electron clouds (consistent with observations), which, in turn, can generate Langmuir waves and electromagnetic signals by nonlinear processes.

  10. The magnetic field structure in the active solar corona.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.

    1971-01-01

    The structure of the magnetic field of the active solar corona is discussed with reference to optical and radio observations of the solar atmosphere. Eclipse observations provide evidence of fine scale structures in the solar atmosphere that appear to relate to the coronal magnetic field. The coronal magnetic field used for comparison is calculated from potential theory; the influence of solar activity upon the potential theory field is discussed with reference to observations of the Faraday rotation of a microwave signal from Pioneer 6 as it was occulted by the solar atmosphere. Evidence has been found suggesting the existence of expanding magnetic bottles located at 10 solar radii above flaring active regions. The dynamics of these events is discussed. It is further suggested that these magnetic bottles are an important component in the solar corona.

  11. JWST Planetary Observations Within the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, Jonathan; Hammel, Heidi; Schaller, Emily; Sonneborn, George; Orton, Glenn; Rieke, George; Rieke, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    JWST provides capabilities unmatched by other telescopic facilities in the near to mid infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Its combination of broad wavelength range, high sensitivity and near diffraction-limited imaging around two microns wavelength make it a high value facility for a variety of Solar System targets. Beyond Neptune, a class of cold, large bodies that include Pluto, Triton and Eris exhibits surface deposits of nitrogen, methane, and other molecules that are poorly observed from the ground, but for which JWST might provide spectral mapping at high sensitivity and spatial resolution difficult to match with the current generation of ground-based observatories. The observatory will also provide unique sensitivity in a variety of near and mid infrared windows for observing relatively deep into the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune, searching there for minor species. It will examine the Jovian aurora in a wavelength regime where the background atmosphere is dark. Special provision of a subarray observing strategy may allow observation of Jupiter and Saturn over a larger wavelength range despite their large surface brightnesses, allowing for detailed observation of transient phenomena including large scale storms and impact-generation disturbances. JWST's observations of Saturn's moon Titan will overlap with and go beyond the 2017 end-of-mission for Cassini, providing an important extension to the time-series of meteorological studies for much of northern hemisphere summer. It will overlap with a number of other planetary missions to targets for which JWST can make unique types of observations. JWST provides a platform for linking solar system and extrasolar planet studies through its unique observational capabilities in both arenas.

  12. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of biology experiments. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; skills and knowledge needed; materials; methods; questions; recommendations for further work; and a teacher information sheet. The teacher information…

  13. HEMISPHERIC ASYMMETRIES IN THE POLAR SOLAR WIND OBSERVED BY ULYSSES NEAR THE MINIMA OF SOLAR CYCLES 22 AND 23

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, R. W.; Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M. I.; McComas, D. J.; Pogorelov, N. V.

    2013-05-10

    We examined solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) observations from Ulysses' first and third orbits to study hemispheric differences in the properties of the solar wind and IMF originating from the Sun's large polar coronal holes (PCHs) during the declining and minimum phase of solar cycles 22 and 23. We identified hemispheric asymmetries in several parameters, most notably {approx}15%-30% south-to-north differences in averages for the solar wind density, mass flux, dynamic pressure, and energy flux and the radial and total IMF magnitudes. These differences were driven by relatively larger, more variable solar wind density and radial IMF between {approx}36 Degree-Sign S-60 Degree-Sign S during the declining phase of solar cycles 22 and 23. These observations indicate either a hemispheric asymmetry in the PCH output during the declining and minimum phase of solar cycles 22 and 23 with the southern hemisphere being more active than its northern counterpart, or a solar cycle effect where the PCH output in both hemispheres is enhanced during periods of higher solar activity. We also report a strong linear correlation between these solar wind and IMF parameters, including the periods of enhanced PCH output, that highlight the connection between the solar wind mass and energy output and the Sun's magnetic field. That these enhancements were not matched by similar sized variations in solar wind speed points to the mass and energy responsible for these increases being added to the solar wind while its flow was subsonic.

  14. Electron energy transport in the solar wind: Ulysses observations

    SciTech Connect

    Scime, E.E.; Gary, S.P.; Phillips, J.L.; Balogh, A.; Lengyel-Frey, D.

    1996-07-01

    Previous analysis suggests that the whistler heat flux instability is responsible for the regulation of the electron heat flux of the solar wind. For an interval of quiescent solar wind during the in-ecliptic phase of the Ulysses mission, the plasma wave data in the whistler frequency regime are compared to the predictions of the whistler heat flux instability model. The data is well constrained by the predicted upper bound on the electron heat flux and a clear correlation between wave activity and electron heat flux dissipation is observed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Electron energy transport in the solar wind: Ulysses observations

    SciTech Connect

    Scime, Earl E.; Gary, S. Peter; Phillips, John L.; Balogh, Andre; Lengyel-Frey, Denise

    1996-07-20

    Previous analysis suggests that the whistler heat flux instability is responsible for the regulation of the electron heat flux of the solar wind. For an interval of quiescent solar wind during the in-ecliptic phase of the Ulysses mission, the plasma wave data in the whistler frequency regime are compared to the predictions of the whistler heat flux instability model. The data is well constrained by the predicted upper bound on the electron heat flux and a clear correlation between wave activity and electron heat flux dissipation is observed.

  16. Faraday Rotation Observations of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, S.; Spangler, S. R.

    1998-05-01

    Faraday rotation measures the path integral of the product of electron density and line of sight component of the magnetic field from the observer to a source of linearly polarized radio emission. For our observations, the line of sight passes through the solar corona. These observations were made with the NRAO Very Large Array at frequencies of 1465 and 1635 MHz. Observations at two frequencies can confirm the lambda (2) dependence of position angle rotation characteristic of Faraday rotation. We observed the extended radio source 0036+030 (4C+03.01) on March 28, 1997, when the source was 8.6 Rsun from the center of the Sun. Nearly continuous observations were made over an 11 hour period. Our observations measure an average rotation measure (RM) of about +7 radians/m(2) attributable to the corona. The RM showed slow variations during the observing session, with a total change of about 3 radians/m(2) . This variation is attributed to large scale gradients and static plasma structures in the corona, and is the same for two source components separated by 30 arcseconds (22000 km). We have also detected RM variations on time scales of 15 minutes to one hour, which may be coronal Alfven waves. We measure an rms variation of 0.57 radians/m(2) for such fluctuations, which is comparable to previous reports.

  17. Solar Observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedemeyer, Sven

    2015-08-01

    The interferometric Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has already demonstrated its impressive capabilities by observing a large variety of targets ranging from protoplanetary disks to galactic nuclei. ALMA is also capable of observing the Sun and has been used for five solar test campaigns so far. The technically challenging solar observing modes are currently under development and regular observations are expected to begin in late 2016.ALMA consists of 66 antennas located in the Chilean Andes at an altitude of 5000 m and is a true leap forward in terms of spatial resolution at millimeter wavelengths. The resolution of reconstructed interferometric images of the Sun is anticipated to be close to what current optical solar telescopes can achieve. In combination with the high temporal and spectral resolution, these new capabilities open up new parameter spaces for solar millimeter observations.The solar radiation at wavelengths observed by ALMA originates from the chromosphere, where the height of the sampled layer increases with selected wavelength. The continuum intensity is linearly correlated to the local gas temperature in the probed layer, which makes ALMA essentially a linear thermometer. During flares, ALMA can detect additional non-thermal emission contributions. Measurements of the polarization state facilitate the valuable determination of the chromospheric magnetic field. In addition, spectrally resolved observations of radio recombination and molecular lines may yield great diagnostic potential, which has yet to be investigated and developed.Many different scientific applications for a large range of targets from quiet Sun to active regions and prominences are possible, ranging from ultra-high cadence wave studies to flare observations. ALMA, in particular in combination with other ground-based and space-borne instruments, will certainly lead to fascinating new findings, which will advance our understanding of the atmosphere of our Sun

  18. A new observational solar irradiance composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoell, Micha; Dudok de Wit, Thierry; Haberreiter, Margit; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Misios, Stergios; Tourpali, Klairie; Schmutz, Werner

    2016-04-01

    Variations of the spectral solar irradiance (SSI) are an important driver for the chemistry, temperature and dynamics of the Earth's atmosphere and ultimately the Earth's climate. Due to the sparce and scattered SSI data sets it is important to establish tools to derive a consistent SSI dataset, including realistic uncertainties. We present the a new SSI composite based on the face values of SSI observations and applying a probabilistic method that takes into account the uncertainty of the data set scale-wise. We will present the data set and discuss its effects on the Earth's atmosphere in relation to SSI reconstruction models.

  19. Observational capabilities of solar satellite "Coronas-Photon"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Yu.

    Coronas-Photon mission is the third satellite of the Russian Coronas program on solar activity observation The main goal of the Coronas-Photon is the study of solar hard electromagnetic radiation in the wide energy range from UV up to high energy gamma-radiation sim 2000MeV Scientific payload for solar radiation observation consists of three type of instruments 1 monitors Natalya-2M Konus-RF RT-2 Penguin-M BRM Phoka Sphin-X Sokol for spectral and timing measurements of full solar disk radiation with timing in flare burst mode up to one msec Instruments Natalya-2M Konus-RF RT-2 will cover the wide energy range of hard X-rays and soft Gamma rays 15keV to 2000MeV and will together constitute the largest area detectors ever used for solar observations Detectors of gamma-ray monitors are based on structured inorganic scintillators with energy resolution sim 5 for nuclear gamma-line band to 35 for GeV-band PSD analysis is used for gamma neutron separation for solar neutron registration T 30MeV Penguin-M has capability to measure linear polarization of hard X-rays using azimuth are measured by Compton scattering asymmetry in case of polarization of an incident flux For X-ray and EUV monitors the scintillation phoswich detectors gas proportional counter CZT assembly and Filter-covered Si-diodes are used 2 Telescope-spectrometer TESIS for imaging solar spectroscopy in X-rays with angular resolution up to 1 in three spectral lines and RT-2 CZT assembly of CZT

  20. Observed Properties of the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, Marcia

    2008-11-01

    The earliest measurements of the solar wind fully supported Gene Parker's theory. The wind was persistent and nearly radial, its speed was hundreds of km/s, the density was as predicted, and, on average, the interplanetary magnetic field was consistent with an Archimedian spiral. The fastest wind, with speed >700 km/s, traced back to Bartel's unipolar M regions rather than to the hotter active regions, and the highest densities could be explained by compression where the fast wind plowed into the slower wind in its path. But, even in the early data, there were mysteries, some of which are not yet completely resolved. Understanding the alpha particles has been a challenge. Their abundance is highly variable, in the fast wind their temperature is generally > 4 times the proton temperature, and, despite their greater mass, they flow away from the Sun faster than the protons. To complicate the picture further, the protons, alphas, and electrons all have complex, anisotropic distribution functions, often with double peaks. The expanding wind cools more slowly than adiabatically, suggesting a zoo of wave-particle interactions probably responsible for marginal stabilities of the particle distributions. The study of interplanetary waves and turbulence is an active field of research. Recent decades have also seen the study of ions heavier than alphas, including particles in the wind that did not originate at the Sun. Fifty years after Parker's landmark paper, solar-wind physics is still an active area of research.

  1. Solar irradiance observed from PVO and inferred solar rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Charles L.; Hoegy, Walter R.

    1990-08-01

    Solar irradiance in the extreme ultraviolet flux (EUV) has been monitored for 11 years by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO). Since the experiment moves around the Sun with the orbital rate of Venus rather than that of Earth, the measurement gives us a second viewing location from which to begin unravelling which irradiance variations are intrinsic to the Sun, and which are merely rotational modulations whose periods depend on the motion of the observer. Researchers confirm an earlier detection, made with only 8.6 years of data, that the EUV irradiance is modulated by rotation rates of two families of global oscillation modes. One family is assumed to be r-modes occupying the convective envelope and sharing its rotation, while the other family (g-modes) lies in the radiative interior which as a slower rotation. Measured power in r-modes of low angular harmonic number indicates that the Sun's envelope rotated about 0.7 percent faster near the last solar maximum (1979 thru 1982) than it did during the next rise to maximum (1986 to 1989). No change was seen in the g-mode family of lines, as would be expected from the much greater rotational inertia of the radiative interior.

  2. Forecasts of solar and geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joselyn, Joann

    1987-01-01

    Forecasts of solar and geomagnetic activity are critical since these quantities are such important inputs to the thermospheric density models. At this time in the history of solar science there is no way to make such a forecast from first principles. Physical theory applied to the Sun is developing rapidly, but is still primitive. Techniques used for forecasting depend upon the observations over about 130 years, which is only twelve solar cycles. It has been noted that even-numbered cycles systematically tend to be smaller than the odd-numbered ones by about 20 percent. Another observation is that for the last 12 cycle pairs, an even-numbered sunspot cycle looks rather like the next odd-numbered cycle, but with the top cut off. These observations are examples of approximate periodicities that forecasters try to use to achieve some insight into the nature of an upcoming cycle. Another new and useful forecasting aid is a correlation that has been noted between geomagnetic indices and the size of the next solar cycle. Some best estimates are given concerning both activities.

  3. New model of iron spectra in the extreme ultraviolet and application to SERTS and EUV observations: A solar active region and capella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brickhouse, N. S.; Raymond, J. C.; Smith, B. W.

    1995-04-01

    We report new predictions for the EUV spectral emission of FeIX-FeXXIV, based on data now available from the Solar EUV Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS) and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) spectrometers. The iron spectral emission model is the first result of a larger effort to revise the Raymond & Smith model and to update the atomic rates. We present here predicted emissivities for selected densities and temperatures applicable to various astrophysical plasmas. Comparisons of our predicted spectra with two recent observations provide important tests of the atomic data. They also test to some extent some basic assumptions of coronal emission codes: optically thin spectral lines and ionization equilibrium.

  4. New model of iron spectra in the extreme ultraviolet and application to SERTS and EUV observations: A solar active region and capella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, N. S.; Raymond, J. C.; Smith, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    We report new predictions for the EUV spectral emission of FeIX-FeXXIV, based on data now available from the Solar EUV Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS) and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) spectrometers. The iron spectral emission model is the first result of a larger effort to revise the Raymond & Smith model and to update the atomic rates. We present here predicted emissivities for selected densities and temperatures applicable to various astrophysical plasmas. Comparisons of our predicted spectra with two recent observations provide important tests of the atomic data. They also test to some extent some basic assumptions of coronal emission codes: optically thin spectral lines and ionization equilibrium.

  5. Millisecond solar radio spikes observed at 1420 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, B. P.; Kus, A. J.

    We present results from observations of narrowband solar millisecond radio spikes at 1420 MHz. Observing data were collected between February 2000 and December 2001 with the 15-m radio telescope at the Centre for Astronomy Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun, Poland, equipped with a radio spectrograph that covered the 1352-1490 MHz frequency band. The radio spectrograph has 3 MHz frequency resolution and 80 microsecond time resolution. We analyzed the individual radio spike duration, bandwidth and rate of frequency drift. A part of the observed spikes showed well-outlined subtle structures. On dynamic radio spectrograms of the investigated events we notice complex structures formed by numerous individual spikes known as chains of spikes and distinctly different structure of columns. Positions of active regions connected with radio spikes emission were investigated. It turns out that most of them are located near the center of the solar disk, suggesting strong beaming of the spikes emission.

  6. Radius of the sun from observations of the total solar eclipse of July 31, 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, L. A.; Belkina, I. L.; Dyatel, N. P.; Marchenko, G. P.

    1993-06-01

    Moments of the local contacts at 24 points on E and W solar limbs are determined from the July 31, 1981 solar eclipse cinematographic observations in the continuum. The r.m.s. value of the solar radius, averaged over limb regions with different activity, is rs = 959.97 +/- 0.04 arcsec. The solar radius estimates made separately for limb active regions and for undisturbed ones demonstrated the significance of the active region effects on the measured solar radius (up to 0.14 arcsec).

  7. The Heliosphere Through the Solar Activity Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balogh, A.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Suess, S. T.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding how the Sun changes though its 11-year sunspot cycle and how these changes affect the vast space around the Sun the heliosphere has been one of the principal objectives of space research since the advent of the space age. This book presents the evolution of the heliosphere through an entire solar activity cycle. The last solar cycle (cycle 23) has been the best observed from both the Earth and from a fleet of spacecraft. Of these, the joint ESA-NASA Ulysses probe has provided continuous observations of the state of the heliosphere since 1990 from a unique vantage point, that of a nearly polar orbit around the Sun. Ulysses results affect our understanding of the heliosphere from the interior of the Sun to the interstellar medium - beyond the outer boundary of the heliosphere. Written by scientists closely associated with the Ulysses mission, the book describes and explains the many different aspects of changes in the heliosphere in response to solar activity. In particular, the authors describe the rise in solar ESA and NASA have now unamiously agreed a third extension to operate the highly successful Ulysses spacecraft until March 2008 and, in 2007 and 2008, the European-built space probe will fly over the poles of the Sun for a third time. This will enable Ulysses to add an important chapter to its survey of the high-latitude heliosphere and this additional material would be included in a 2nd edition of this book.

  8. Observations of particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    1979-01-01

    Solar flares provide several examples of nonthermal particle acceleration. The paper reviews the information gained about these processes via X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, which can presently distinguish among three separate particle-acceleration processes at the sun: an impulsive accelerator of more than 20 keV electrons, a gradual accelerator of more than 20 keV electrons, and a gradual accelerator of more than 10 MeV ions. The acceleration energy efficiency (total particle energy divided by total flare energy) of any of these mechanisms cannot be less than about 0.1%, although the gradual acceleration does not occur in every flare. The observational material suggests that both the impulsive and gradual accelerations take place preferentially in closed magnetic-field structures, but that the electrons decay in these traps before they can escape. The ions escape very efficiently.

  9. Millimeter Observation of Solar Flares with Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, D. F.; Valio, A. B. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present the investigation of two solar flares on February 17 and May 13, 2013, studied in radio from 5 to 405 GHz (RSTN, POEMAS, SST), and in X-rays up to 300 keV (FERMI and RHESSI). The objective of this work is to study the evolution and energy distribution of the population of accelerated electrons and the magnetic field configuration. For this we constructed and fit the radio spectrum by a gyro synchrotron model. The optically thin spectral indices from radio observations were compared to that of the hard X-rays, showing that the radio spectral index is harder than the latter by 2. These flares also presented 10-15 % circular polarized emission at 45 and 90 GHz that suggests that the sources are located at different legs of an asymmetric loop.

  10. Solar variability observed with GMS/SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Tsugunobu

    1987-06-01

    Daily averaged data on energetic protons, alpha particles, and electrons obtained between 1978-1986 with different channels of SEM aboard the Geostationary Meteorological Satellite 'Himawari' are presented and discussed. Most solar particle events (SPEs), observed in the P2-P6 and A1-A5 channels, show a gradual rise and a further gradual decay of the particle fluxes, although some SREs displayed a sharp rise and a gradual decay. SPEs, which occurred frequently in the 1978-1979 and 1981-1982 periods, were less frequent after 1983; however, there occurred several large and energetic SREs between 1983 and 1986. Therefore, the long-term trend in the high-energy particle ejection from the sun is quite different from that in the sunspot number. The fluxes from the EL and P1 channel response, largely due to energetic particles trapped in the earth's magnetic field, show substorm-induced variations, the characteristics of which depend highly on local time.

  11. Solar Eruptions Initiated in Sigmoidal Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savcheva, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    active regions that have been shown to possess high probability for eruption. They present a direct evidence of the existence of flux ropes in the corona prior to the impulsive phase of eruptions. In order to gain insight into their eruptive behavior and how they get destabilized we need to know their 3D magnetic field structure. First, we review some recent observations and modeling of sigmoidal active regions as the primary hosts of solar eruptions, which can also be used as useful laboratories for studying these phenomena. Then, we concentrate on the analysis of observations and highly data-constrained non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) models over the lifetime of several sigmoidal active regions, where we have captured their magnetic field structure around the times of major flares. We present the topology analysis of a couple of sigmoidal regions pointing us to the probable sites of reconnection. A scenario for eruption is put forward by this analysis. We demonstrate the use of this topology analysis to reconcile the observed eruption features with the standard flare model. Finally, we show a glimpse of how such a NLFFF model of an erupting region can be used to initiate a CME in a global MHD code in an unprecedented realistic manner. Such simulations can show the effects of solar transients on the near-Earth environment and solar system space weather.

  12. Observation and Modeling of the Solar Transition Region. 1; Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oluseyi, Hakeem M.; Walker, A. B. C., II; Porter, Jason; Hoover, Richard B.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    We report on observations of the solar atmosphere in several extreme-ultraviolet and far-ultraviolet bandpasses obtained by the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array, a rocket-borne spectroheliograph, on flights in 1987, 1991, and 1994, spanning the last solar maximum. Quiet-Sun emission observed in the 171-175 Angstrom bandpass, which includes lines of O v, O VI, Fe IX, and Fe X, has been analyzed to test models of the temperatures and geometries of the structures responsible for this emission. Analyses of intensity variations above the solar limb reveal scale heights consistent with a quiet-Sun plasma temperature of 500,000 less than or equal to T (sub e) less than or equal to 800,000 K. The structures responsible for the quiet-Sun EUV emission are modeled as small quasi-static loops. We submit our models to several tests. We compare the emission our models would produce in the bandpass of our telescope to the emission we have observed. We find that the emission predicted by loop models with maximum temperatures between 700,000 and 900,000 K are consistent with our observations. We also compare the absolute flux predicted by our models in a typical upper transition region line to the flux measured by previous observers. Finally, we present a preliminary comparison of the predictions of our models with diagnostic spectral line ratios from previous observers. Intensity modulations in the quiet Sun are observed to occur on a scale comparable to the supergranular scale. We discuss the implications that a distribution of loops of the type we model here would have for heating the local network at the loops' footpoints.

  13. VLA observations of a solar noise storm

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, K.R.; Willson, R.F.

    1987-08-01

    The first Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the sun at 92 cm wavelength (328 MHz) are presented. A 3-hr solar noise storm was detected; it consisted of burst-like spikes superimposed on a slowly varying background, and both storm components were 95 + or - 5 percent right-hand circularly polarized. A long duration soft X ray event preceeded the radio radiation by 30 m, suggesting a disturbance moving outwards at a velocity of v = 78 km/s. The 92 cm noise storm was resolved with an angular resolution of 9 sec for time intervals as short as 13 s. During the onset and early phases, the storm consisted of four compact sources, each with an angular diameter of 40 sec, oriented within an elongated source with angular dimensions of 40 sec by 200 sec. During the subsequent hour the most intense emission was located in two 40 sec sources separated by 100 sec. Snapshot maps revealed a persistent elongated source ta successive Peaks, with a scatter in the source position. A systematic position shift of Delta Theta sub I greater than or = 15 sec can be produced by the earth's ionoshere, but these effects can be removed by frequent observations of a nearby calibrator source. The observations confirm previously reported trends for a decrease in source size at higher frequencies, but they suggest a hitherto unresolved complexity in source structure. 18 references.

  14. Recent advances in satellite observations of solar variability and global atmospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    The launch of Nimbus 4 in April 1974 has made possible simultaneous measurements of the ultraviolet solar irradiance and the global distribution of atmospheric ozone by the monitor of ultraviolet solar energy (MUSE) and backscatter ultraviolet (BUV) experiments respectively. Two long lived ultraviolet active solar regions which are about 180 deg apart in solar longitude were observed to be associated with central meridian passages of solar magnetic sector boundaries. The boundaries may be significant in the evaluation of correlations between solar magnetic sector structure and atmospheric circulation.

  15. Solar activity during the deep minimum of 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylwester, Janusz; Siarkowski, Marek; Gburek, Szymon; Gryciuk, Magdalena; Kepa, Anna; Kowaliński, Mirosław; Mrozek, Tomek; Phillips, Kenneth J. H.; Podgórski, Piotr; Sylwester, Barbara

    2014-12-01

    We discuss the character of the unusually deep solar activity minimum of 2009 between Solar Cycles 23 and 24. Levels of solar activity in various parts of the solar atmosphere -- photosphere, chromosphere, transition region, and corona -- were observed to be at their lowest for a century. The soft X-ray emission from the corona (hot outer part of the Sun's atmosphere) was measured throughout most of 2009 with the Polish-built SphinX spectrophotometer. Unlike other X-ray monitoring spacecraft, this sensitive spacecraft-borne instrument was able to continue measurements throughout this extended period of low activity.

  16. Description and primary results of Total Solar Irradiance Monitor, a solar-pointing instrument on an Earth observing satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongrui; Fang, Wei; Li, Huiduan

    2015-04-01

    Solar driving mechanism for Earth climate has been a controversial problem for centuries. Long-time data of solar activity is required by the investigations of the solar driving mechanism, such as Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) record. Three Total Solar Irradiance Monitors (TSIM) have been developed by Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics for China Meteorological Administration to maintain continuities of TSI data series which lasted for nearly 4 decades.The newest TSIM has recorded TSI daily with accurate solar pointing on the FY-3C meteorological satellite since Oct 2013. TSIM/FY-3C has a pointing system for automatic solar tracking, onboard the satellite designed mainly for Earth observing. Most payloads of FY-3C are developed for observation of land, ocean and atmosphere. Consequently, the FY-3C satellite is a nadir-pointing spacecraft with its z axis to be pointed at the center of the Earth. Previous TSIMs onboard the FY-3A and FY-3B satellites had no pointing system, solar observations were only performed when the sun swept through field-of-view of the instruments. And TSI measurements are influenced inevitably by the solar pointing errors. Corrections of the solar pointing errors were complex. The problem is now removed by TSIM/FY-3C.TSIM/FY-3C follows the sun accurately by itself using its pointing system based on scheme of visual servo control. The pointing system is consisted of a radiometer package, two motors for solar tracking, a sun sensor and etc. TSIM/FY-3C has made daily observations of TSI for more than one year, with nearly zero solar pointing errors. Short time-scale variations in TSI detected by TSIM/FY-3C are nearly the same with VIRGO/SOHO and TIM/SORCE.Instrument details, primary results of solar pointing control, solar observations and etc will be given in the presentation.

  17. Apparent Relations Between Solar Activity and Solar Tides Caused by the Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    2007-01-01

    A solar storm is a storm of ions and electrons from the Sun. Large solar storms are usually preceded by solar flares, phenomena that can be characterized quantitatively from Earth. Twenty-five of the thirty-eight largest known solar flares were observed to start when one or more tide-producing planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Jupiter) were either nearly above the event positions (less than 10 deg. longitude) or at the opposing side of the Sun. The probability for this to happen at random is 0.039 percent. This supports the hypothesis that the force or momentum balance (between the solar atmospheric pressure, the gravity field, and magnetic field) on plasma in the looping magnetic field lines in solar corona could be disturbed by tides, resulting in magnetic field reconnection, solar flares, and solar storms. Separately, from the daily position data of Venus, Earth, and Jupiter, an 11-year planet alignment cycle is observed to approximately match the sunspot cycle. This observation supports the hypothesis that the resonance and beat between the solar tide cycle and nontidal solar activity cycle influences the sunspot cycle and its varying magnitudes. The above relations between the unpredictable solar flares and the predictable solar tidal effects could be used and further developed to forecast the dangerous space weather and therefore reduce its destructive power against the humans in space and satellites controlling mobile phones and global positioning satellite (GPS) systems.

  18. Small solar wind transients: Stereo-A observations in 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; Farrugia, C. J.; Galvin, A. B.; Simunac, K. D. C.; Popecki, M. A.; Lugaz, N.; Kilpua, E. K. J.; Moestl, C.; Luhmann, J. G.; Opitz, A.; Sauvaud, J.-A.

    2013-06-13

    Year 2009 was the last year of a long and pronounced solar activity minimum. In this year the solar wind in the inner heliosphere was for 90% of the time slow (< 450 km s{sup -1}) and with a weaker magnetic field strength compared to the previous solar minimum 1995-1996. We choose this year to present the results of a systematic search for small solar wind transients (STs) observed by the STEREO-Ahead (ST-A) probe. The data are from the PLASTIC and IMPACT instrument suites. By 'small' we mean a duration from {approx}1 to 12 hours. The parameters we search for to identify STs are (i) the total field strength, (ii) the rotation of the magnetic field vector, (iii) its smoothness, (iv) proton temperature, (v) proton beta, and (vi) Alfven Mach number. We find 45 examples. The STs have an average duration of {approx}4 hours. Ensemble averages of key quantities are: (i) maximum B = 7.01 nT; (ii) proton {beta}= 0.18; (iii) proton thermal speed = 20.8 km s{sup -1}; and (iv) Alfven Mach number = 6.13. No distinctive feature is found in the pitch angle distributions of suprathermal electrons. Our statistical results are compared with those of STs observed near Earth by Wind during 2009.

  19. Small solar wind transients: Stereo-A observations in 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, W.; Farrugia, C. J.; Galvin, A. B.; Simunac, K. D. C.; Kilpua, E. K. J.; Popecki, M. A.; Moestl, C.; Lugaz, N.; Luhmann, J. G.; Opitz, A.; Sauvaud, J.-A.

    2013-06-01

    Year 2009 was the last year of a long and pronounced solar activity minimum. In this year the solar wind in the inner heliosphere was for 90% of the time slow (< 450 km s-1) and with a weaker magnetic field strength compared to the previous solar minimum 1995-1996. We choose this year to present the results of a systematic search for small solar wind transients (STs) observed by the STEREO-Ahead (ST-A) probe. The data are from the PLASTIC and IMPACT instrument suites. By "small" we mean a duration from ~1 to 12 hours. The parameters we search for to identify STs are (i) the total field strength, (ii) the rotation of the magnetic field vector, (iii) its smoothness, (iv) proton temperature, (v) proton beta, and (vi) Alfvén Mach number. We find 45 examples. The STs have an average duration of ~4 hours. Ensemble averages of key quantities are: (i) maximum B = 7.01 nT; (ii) proton β = 0.18; (iii) proton thermal speed = 20.8 km s-1 and (iv) Alfvén Mach number = 6.13. No distinctive feature is found in the pitch angle distributions of suprathermal electrons. Our statistical results are compared with those of STs observed near Earth by Wind during 2009.

  20. Sir William Herschel's notebooks - Abstracts of solar observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, Douglas V.; Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1992-01-01

    An introduction to the background of Sir William Herschel's notebooks and the historical context within which his observations were made are provided. The observations have relevance in reconstructing solar behavior, as discussed in a separate analysis paper by Hoyt and Schatten (1992), and in understanding active features on the sun such as faculae. The text of Herschel's notebooks with modern terms used throughout forms the body of this paper. The complete text has not previously been published and is not easily accessible to scholars. Herschel used different words for solar features than are used today, and thus, for clarity, his terminology is changed on two occasions. A glossary explains the terminology changed. In the text of the notebooks, several contemporaries are mentioned; a brief description of Herschel's colleagues is provided.

  1. Coronal Rotation at Solar Minimum from UV Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancuso, S.

    2008-01-01

    UVCS/SOHO observations have been analyzed to reconstruct intensity time series of the O VI 1032 A and H 11216 A spectral lines at different coronal heliolatitudes from 1.5 to 3.0 solar radii from Sun center. Evidence was found for coronal differential rotation that differs significantly from that of the photospheric plasma. The study of the latitudinal variation shows that the UV corona decelerates toward the photospheric rates from the equator up to the poleward boundary 2 of the midlatitude streamers, reaching a peak of 28.16+/-0.20 days around +30 from the equator at 1.5 solar radii, while a less evident peak is observed in the northern hemisphere. This result suggests a real north-south rotational asymmetry as a consequence of different activity and weak coupling between the magnetic fields of the two hemispheres. The study of the radial rotation profiles shows that the corona is rotating almost rigidly with height.

  2. Interpretation of Solar Magnetic Field Strength Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, R. K.; Bertello, L.; Boyden, J. E.; Webster, L.

    2009-03-01

    This study based on longitudinal Zeeman effect magnetograms and spectral line scans investigates the dependence of solar surface magnetic fields on the spectral line used and the way the line is sampled to estimate the magnetic flux emerging above the solar atmosphere and penetrating to the corona from magnetograms of the Mt. Wilson 150-foot tower synoptic program (MWO). We have compared the synoptic program λ5250 Å line of Fe i to the line of Fe i at λ5233 Å since this latter line has a broad shape with a profile that is nearly linear over a large portion of its wings. The present study uses five pairs of sampling points on the λ5233 Å line. Line profile observations show that the determination of the field strength from the Stokes V parameter or from line bisectors in the circularly polarized line profiles lead to similar dependencies on the spectral sampling of the lines, with the bisector method being the less sensitive. We recommend adoption of the field determined with the line bisector method as the best estimate of the emergent photospheric flux and further recommend the use of a sampling point as close to the line core as is practical. The combination of the line profile measurements and the cross-correlation of fields measured simultaneously with λ5250 Å and λ5233 Å yields a formula for the scale factor δ -1 that multiplies the MWO synoptic magnetic fields. By using ρ as the center-to-limb angle (CLA), a fit to this scale factor is δ -1=4.15-2.82sin 2( ρ). Previously δ -1=4.5-2.5sin 2( ρ) had been used. The new calibration shows that magnetic fields measured by the MDI system on the SOHO spacecraft are equal to 0.619±0.018 times the true value at a center-to-limb position 30°. Berger and Lites (2003, Solar Phys. 213, 213) found this factor to be 0.64±0.013 based on a comparison using the Advanced Stokes Polarimeter.

  3. Observational Investigation of Solar Interior and Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Jeffrey R.

    2003-01-01

    The Imaging Vector Magnetograph (IVM) has been modified to make it easier to observe at more than one spectral line. The cell holding the blocking filter has been replaced by a four-position filter wheel, so that changing to a different line is a matter of a few minutes rather than the several hours it used to take to disassemble the cell and install a new filter. Three new filters have been obtained, for Na 1589.6 nm, Fe 1630.25 nm, and H 1656.3 nm. The new filters have better bandpass profiles than the ones they replaced: somewhat wider, with flatter tops and steeper wings. This results in a reduction of parasitic light coming from adjacent Fabry-Perot orders, from seven percent to about two percent, and flattens the apparent continuum. The Mees CCD Imaging Spectrograph (MCCD) was upgraded under this grant, with a new control computer and data system. The camera was replaced with a faster, larger-format frame-transfer camera. Final integration of the upgrades is not yet complete, but tests indicate that the system cadence will be improved by a factor of five to ten, while increasing the spatial coverage by a factor of two (depending on observation options). Synoptic observations with the IVM and MCCD continue to be conducted daily, to the extent permitted by the fact that we have a single observer responsible for the observations. The older Haleakala Stokes Polarimeter is also used to make a daily vector magnetogram, normally of the region selected by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) duty scientists. This instrument, however, is showing its age to the extent that its maintenance is becoming something of a challenge. We also run a white light full-disk imager and a video H alpha prominence camera, continuously during times of observations. Of particular interest, we obtained rapid-cadence observations of the 2003 July 15 white light flare with both the IVM and MCCD. The vector magnetograms show no obvious difference between the

  4. Early Observations with the Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gary, Dale E.

    2016-05-01

    The Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array (EOVSA) is a newly expanded and upgraded, solar-dedicated radio array consisting of 13 antennas of 2.1 m diameter equipped with receivers designed to cover the 1-18 GHz frequency range. Two large (27-m diameter) dishes are being outfitted with He-cooled receivers for use in calibration of the small dishes. During 2015, the array obtained observations from dozens of flares in total power mode on 8 antennas. Since February 2016, it has begun taking solar data on all 13 small antennas with full interferometric correlations, as well as calibration observations with the first of the two large antennas equipped with its He-cooled receiver. The second He-cooled receiver is nearly complete, and will be available around the time of the meeting. We briefly review the commissioning activities leading up to full operations, including polarization and gain measurements and calibration methods, and resulting measures of array performance. We then present some early imaging observations with the array, emphasizing the remarkable temporal and spectral resolution of the instrument, together with joint RHESSI hard X-ray and SDO EUV observations.

  5. Solar irradiance variations due to active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, L.; Schatten, K.H.; Sofia, S.

    1982-05-15

    We have been able to reproduce the variations of the solar irradiance observed by ACRIM to an accuracy of better than +- 0.4 W m/sup -2/, assuming that during the 6 month observation period in 1980 the solar luminosity was constant. The improvement over previous attempts is primarily due to the inclusion of faculae. The reproduction scheme uses simple geometrical data on spot and facula areas, and conventional parameters for the respective fluxes and angular dependencies. The quality of reproduction is not very sensitive to most of the details of these parameters; nevertheless, there conventional parameters cannot be very different from their actual values in the solar atmosphere. It is interesting that the time average of the integrated excess emission (over directions) of the faculae cancels out the integrated deficit produced by the spots, within an accuracy of about 10%. If this behavior were maintained over longer periods of time, say, on the order of an activity cycle, active regions could be viewed as a kind of lighthouse where the energy deficit near the normal direction, associated with the spots, is primarily reemitted close to the tangential directions by the faculae. The currently available data suggest that energy ''storage'' associated with the redirection of flux near active regions on the Sun is comparable to the lifetime of the faculae.

  6. Solar activity predicted with artificial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundstedt, Henrik

    The variability of solar activity has been described as a non-linear chaotic dynamic system. AI methods are therefore especially suitable for modelling and predicting solar activity. Many indicators of the solar activity have been used, such as sunspot numbers, F 10.7 cm solar radio flux, X-ray flux, and magnetic field data. Artificial neural networks have also been used by many authors to predict solar cycle activity. Such predictions will be discussed. A new attempt to predict the solar activity using SOHO/MDI high-time resolution solar magnetic field data is discussed. The purpose of this new attempt is to be able to predict episodic events and to predict occurrence of coronal mass ejections. These predictions will be a part of the Lund Space Weather Model.

  7. Division E Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Fletcher, Lyndsay; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Asai, Ayumi; Cally, Paul S.; Charbonneau, Paul; Gibson, Sarah E.; Gomez, Daniel; Hasan, Siraj S.; Veronig, Astrid M.; Yan, Yihua

    2016-04-01

    After more than half a century of community support related to the science of ``solar activity'', IAU's Commission 10 was formally discontinued in 2015, to be succeeded by C.E2 with the same area of responsibility. On this occasion, we look back at the growth of the scientific disciplines involved around the world over almost a full century. Solar activity and fields of research looking into the related physics of the heliosphere continue to be vibrant and growing, with currently over 2,000 refereed publications appearing per year from over 4,000 unique authors, publishing in dozens of distinct journals and meeting in dozens of workshops and conferences each year. The size of the rapidly growing community and of the observational and computational data volumes, along with the multitude of connections into other branches of astrophysics, pose significant challenges; aspects of these challenges are beginning to be addressed through, among others, the development of new systems of literature reviews, machine-searchable archives for data and publications, and virtual observatories. As customary in these reports, we highlight some of the research topics that have seen particular interest over the most recent triennium, specifically active-region magnetic fields, coronal thermal structure, coronal seismology, flares and eruptions, and the variability of solar activity on long time scales. We close with a collection of developments, discoveries, and surprises that illustrate the range and dynamics of the discipline.

  8. Solar Activity Forecasting for use in Orbit Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth

    2001-01-01

    Orbital prediction for satellites in low Earth orbit (LEO) or low planetary orbit depends strongly on exospheric densities. Solar activity forecasting is important in orbital prediction, as the solar UV and EUV inflate the upper atmospheric layers of the Earth and planets, forming the exosphere in which satellites orbit. Geomagnetic effects also relate to solar activity. Because of the complex and ephemeral nature of solar activity, with different cycles varying in strength by more than 100%, many different forecasting techniques have been utilized. The methods range from purely numerical techniques (essentially curve fitting) to numerous oddball schemes, as well as a small subset, called 'Precursor techniques.' The situation can be puzzling, owing to the numerous methodologies involved, somewhat akin to the numerous ether theories near the turn of the last century. Nevertheless, the Precursor techniques alone have a physical basis, namely dynamo theory, which provides a physical explanation for why this subset seems to work. I discuss this solar cycle's predictions, as well as the Sun's observed activity. I also discuss the SODA (Solar Dynamo Amplitude) index, which provides the user with the ability to track the Sun's hidden, interior dynamo magnetic fields. As a result, one may then update solar activity predictions continuously, by monitoring the solar magnetic fields as they change throughout the solar cycle. This paper ends by providing a glimpse into what the next solar cycle (#24) portends.

  9. New vacuum solar telescope and observations with high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhong; Xu, Jun; Gu, Bo-Zhong; Wang, Sen; You, Jian-Qi; Shen, Long-Xiang; Lu, Ru-Wei; Jin, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Lin-Fei; Lou, Ke; Li, Zhi; Liu, Guang-Qian; Xu, Zhi; Rao, Chang-Hui; Hu, Qi-Qian; Li, Ru-Feng; Fu, Hao-Wen; Wang, Feng; Bao, Men-Xian; Wu, Ming-Chan; Zhang, Bo-Rong

    2014-06-01

    The New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) is a one meter vacuum solar telescope that aims to observe fine structures on the Sun. The main goals of NVST are high resolution imaging and spectral observations, including measurements of the solar magnetic field. NVST is the primary ground-based facility used by the Chinese solar research community in this solar cycle. It is located by Fuxian Lake in southwest China, where the seeing is good enough to perform high resolution observations. We first introduce the general conditions at the Fuxian Solar Observatory and the primary science cases of NVST. Then, the basic structures of this telescope and instruments are described in detail. Finally, some typical high resolution data of the solar photosphere and chromosphere are also shown.

  10. Satellite Observations of Solar Irradiance and Sun-Climate Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Solar activity is now near its maximum, with events such as the 2001 "Bastille Day Event", a Coronal Mass Ejection which merited a full session at AGUs annual meeting - and two major sunspot groupings earlier this year, with associated variations in TSI (Total Solar Irradiance). We discuss recent satellite measurements of TSI by ACRIM 2 and 3 and Virgo, and new precision observations of TSI and SSI (Solar Spectral Irradiance) expected from the SORCE mission, planned to launch in fall 2002. SSI has been added to TSI as a required EOS and NPOESS measurement because different spectral components provide energy inputs to different components of the climate system - UV into upper atmosphere and ozone, IR into lower atmosphere and clouds, and Visible into the biosphere. Succeeding satellite missions being planned for 2006 and 2010 will continue to monitor both TSI and SSI. We summarize current ideas about the potential impact of solar variability on Earth's climate on time scales from days to decades to centuries.

  11. Satellite Observations of Solar Irradiance and Sun-Climate Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Solar activity is now near its maximum, with events such as the 2001 "Bastille Day Event", a Coronal Mass Ejection which merited a full session at AGO'S annual meeting - and two major sunspot groupings earlier this year, with associated variations in TSI (Total Solar Irradiance). We discuss recent satellite measurements of TSI by ACRIM 2 and 3 And Virgo, and new precision observations of TSI and SSI (Solar Spectral Irradiance) expected from the SORCE mission, planned to launch in fall 2002. SSG has been added to TSI as a required EOS and NPOESS measurement because different spectral components provide energy inputs to different components of the climate system - UV into upper atmosphere and ozone, IR into lower atmosphere and clouds, and Visible into the biosphere. Succeeding satellite missions being planned for 2006 and 2010 will continue to monitor both TSI and SSI. We summarize current ideas about the potential impact of solar variability on Earth's climate on time scales from days to decades to centuries.

  12. Dual frequency observations of solar microwave bursts using the VLA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevgaonkar, R. K.; Kundu, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous VLA observations of microwave bursts at 6 and 2 cm in a solar active region are presented and discussed. Using the full-day synthesis, I and V maps of the active region are produced. The radiation mechanisms at these wavelengths are discussed and the upper and lower bounds on the magnetic field of the active region are derived. The magnetic fields in the microwave burst source are estimated from the brightness temperature and the degree of circular polarization. It is concluded that the 6 cm radiation originates from the bulk heated plasma, whereas the 2 cm radiation is due to the nonthermal particles generated in the energy-release process. The delay between the peaks of emission at the two wavelengths is interpreted using a dc electric field model of flares. Depending on the strength of the electric field and the density in the flaring region, delays in either sense can be observed.

  13. Solar wind observations by Lyman alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyroelae, E.; Summanen, T.

    1995-01-01

    The interaction between the solar wind and the local interstellar matter takes place at two distinct regions. The plasma component of the interstellar matter meets the solar wind at the heliospheric interface region and it is excluded from entering into the heliosphere. The neutral component consisting mainly of the hydrogen atoms flows through the whole heliosphere. It gets, however, partly ionized by charge exchange collisions with solar wind protons and energetic photons from the Sun. The neutral atom trajectories are also affected by the radiation pressure from the Sun. While the properties of the interface region are still too sparsely known to be useful for solar wind studies the neutral H distribution near the Sun has been used successfully for this purpose. Measuring Lyman alpha light scattered by neutral hydrogen atoms can serve as a remote sensing measurement of the solar wind's three-dimensional and temporal distribution. In this work we will particularly focus on the solar cycle effects on the neutral hydrogen distribution and how it affects the solar wind monitoring.

  14. Recurrence of solar activity - Evidence for active longitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogart, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that the autocorrelation coefficients of the daily Wolf sunspot numbers over a period of 128 years reveal a number of interesting features of the variability of solar activity. Besides establishing periodicities for the solar rotation, solar activity cycle, and, perhaps, the 'Gleissberg Cycle', they suggest that active longitudes do exist, but with much greater strength and persistence in some solar cycles than in others. Evidence is adduced for a variation in the solar rotation period, as measured by sunspot number, of as much as two days between different solar cycles.

  15. The Magnetic Origins of Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.

    2012-01-01

    The defining physical property of the Sun's corona is that the magnetic field dominates the plasma. This property is the genesis for all solar activity ranging from quasi-steady coronal loops to the giant magnetic explosions observed as coronal mass ejections/eruptive flares. The coronal magnetic field is also the fundamental driver of all space weather; consequently, understanding the structure and dynamics of the field, especially its free energy, has long been a central objective in Heliophysics. The main obstacle to achieving this understanding has been the lack of accurate direct measurements of the coronal field. Most attempts to determine the magnetic free energy have relied on extrapolation of photospheric measurements, a notoriously unreliable procedure. In this presentation I will discuss what measurements of the coronal field would be most effective for understanding solar activity. Not surprisingly, the key process for driving solar activity is magnetic reconnection. I will discuss, therefore, how next-generation measurements of the coronal field will allow us to understand not only the origins of space weather, but also one of the most important fundamental processes in cosmic and laboratory plasmas.

  16. Radius of the Sun from observations of the total solar eclipse of 31 July 1981.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, L. A.; Belkina, I. L.; Dyatel, N. P.; Marchenko, G. P.

    The moments of local contacts of 24 points on the east and west solar limbs are determined from the cinematographic solar continuum observations during the 31 July 1981 eclipse. The value of the solar radius averaged over limb regions with different activity was found by the least-squares method - rs = 959.97±0.04″ The solar radius estimates made separately for active and quiet limb regions reveal that the effect of active regions on the measured radius value is significant and may be as much as 0.14″

  17. Ionospheric effects of the extreme solar activity of February 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boska, J.; Pancheva, D.

    1989-01-01

    During February 1986, near the minimum of the 11 year Solar sunspot cycle, after a long period of totally quiet solar activity (R sub z = 0 on most days in January) a period of a suddenly enhanced solar activity occurred in the minimum between solar cycles 21 and 22. Two proton flares were observed during this period. A few other flares, various phenomena accompanying proton flares, an extremely severe geomagnetic storm and strong disturbances in the Earth's ionosphere were observed in this period of enhanced solar activity. Two active regions appeared on the solar disc. The flares in both active regions were associated with enhancement of solar high energy proton flux which started on 4 February of 0900 UT. Associated with the flares, the magnetic storm with sudden commencement had its onset on 6 February 1312 UT and attained its maximum on 8 February (Kp = 9). The sudden enhancement in solar activity in February 1986 was accompanied by strong disturbances in the Earth's ionosphere, SIDs and ionospheric storm. These events and their effects on the ionosphere are discussed.

  18. Submillimeter observations of solar limb-brightening in the total solar eclipse of 31 July 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becklin, E. E.; Jefferies, J. T.; Lindsey, C.; Orrall, F.; Gatley, I.; Werner, M.

    1981-01-01

    Eight flights of the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) were devoted to solar observation. The successful observation of a total solar eclipse was accomplished. The observations were made simultaneously at 30, 50, 100, and 200 microns. The successful adaptation of the KAO for solar observations thus provided the most detailed data to date in this spectral band. The results from a preliminary analysis of the KAO data are summarized: (1) the 200 micron limb is extended about 3 arc sec above the 30 micron limb, indicating the prescence of cool dense material up to the altitudes of spicules; (2) strong radial darkening of the quiet sun intensity profile appeared at 200 microns, probably an indication that hot material in the low chromosphere is recessed into vertical magnetic flux tubes embedded in a cooler nonmagnetic substrate, which obscures the heated material approaching the limb; (3) active regions were observed to undergo a strong increase in contrast above the quiet sun background at wave lengths of 100 microns and longer; and (4) the moon was mapped for use as a photometric standard for determining the absolute intensity of the sun in all four wavelength bands.

  19. Coronal Activity and Extended Solar Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altrock, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Wilson et al. (1988, Nature 333, 748) discussed a number of solar parameters, which appear at high latitudes and gradually migrate towards the equator, merging with the sunspot "butterfly diagram". They found that this concept had been identified by earlier investigators extending back to 1957. They named this process the "Extended Solar Cycle" (ESC). Altrock (1997, Solar Phys. 170, 411) found that this process continued in Fe XIV 530.3 nm emission features. In cycles 21 - 23 solar maximum occurred when the number of Fe XIV emission regions per day > 0.19 (averaged over 365 days and both hemispheres) first reached latitudes 18°, 21° and 21°, for an average of 20° ± 1.7°. Other recent studies have shown that Torsional Oscillation (TO) negative-shear zones are co-located with the ESC from at least 50° down to the equator and also in the zones where the Rush to the Poles occur. These phenomena indicate that coronal activity occurring up to 50° and higher latitudes is related to TO shear zones, another indicator that the ESC is an important solar process. Another high-latitude process, which appears to be connected with the ESC, is the "Rush to the Poles" ("Rush") of polar crown prominences and their associated coronal emission, including Fe XIV. The Rush is is a harbinger of solar maximum (cf. Altrock, 2003, Solar Phys. 216, 343). Solar maximum in cycles 21 - 23 occurred when the center line of the Rush reached a critical latitude. These latitudes were 76°, 74° and 78°, respectively, for an average of 76° ± 2°. Applying the above conclusions to Cycle 24 is difficult due to the unusual nature of this cycle. Cycle 24 displays an intermittent "Rush" that is only well-defined in the northern hemisphere. In 2009 an initial slope of 4.6°/yr was found in the north, compared to an average of 9.4 ± 1.7 °/yr in the previous three cycles. This early fit to the Rush would have reached 76° at 2014.6. However, in 2010 the slope increased to 7.5°/yr (an increase

  20. Slow Solar Wind: Observations and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbo, L.; Ofman, L.; Antiochos, S. K.; Hansteen, V. H.; Harra, L.; Ko, Y.-K.; Lapenta, G.; Li, B.; Riley, P.; Strachan, L.; von Steiger, R.; Wang, Y.-M.

    2016-06-01

    While it is certain that the fast solar wind originates from coronal holes, where and how the slow solar wind (SSW) is formed remains an outstanding question in solar physics even in the post-SOHO era. The quest for the SSW origin forms a major objective for the planned future missions such as the Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus. Nonetheless, results from spacecraft data, combined with theoretical modeling, have helped to investigate many aspects of the SSW. Fundamental physical properties of the coronal plasma have been derived from spectroscopic and imaging remote-sensing data and in situ data, and these results have provided crucial insights for a deeper understanding of the origin and acceleration of the SSW. Advanced models of the SSW in coronal streamers and other structures have been developed using 3D MHD and multi-fluid equations. However, the following questions remain open: What are the source regions and their contributions to the SSW? What is the role of the magnetic topology in the corona for the origin, acceleration and energy deposition of the SSW? What are the possible acceleration and heating mechanisms for the SSW? The aim of this review is to present insights on the SSW origin and formation gathered from the discussions at the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) by the Team entitled "Slow solar wind sources and acceleration mechanisms in the corona" held in Bern (Switzerland) in March 2014 and 2015.

  1. Testing Fractal Methods on Observed and Simulated Solar Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M.; Falconer, D. A.; Lee, J. K.; Jones, C.

    2003-01-01

    The term "magnetic complexity" has not been sufficiently quantified. To accomplish this, we must understand the relationship between the observed magnetic field of solar active regions and fractal dimension measurements. Using data from the Marshall Space Flight Center's vector magnetograph ranging from December 1991 to July 2001, we compare the results of several methods of calculating a fractal dimension, e.g., Hurst coefficient, the Higuchi method, power spectrum, and 2-D Wavelet Packet Analysis. In addition, we apply these methods to synthetic data, beginning with representations of very simple dipole regions, ending with regions that are magnetically complex.

  2. Variation of Meteor Heights and Solar-Cycle Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porubcan, Vladimír; Bucek, Marek; Cevolani, Giordano; Zigo, Pavel

    2012-08-01

    Photographic meteor observations of the Perseid meteoroid stream compiled from the IAU Meteor Data Center catalogue are analyzed from the viewpoint of possible long-term variation of meteor heights with the solar-cycle activity, which was previously reported from radio observations. The observed beginning and end-point heights of the Perseids, normalized for the geocentric velocity and the absolute photographic magnitude, do not show a variation consistent with the solar-cycle activity. This result is valid for the mass range of larger meteoroids observed by photographic techniques, and must be still verified also for the range of smaller meteoroids observed by TV and radio methods.

  3. Overview of TIMED CEDAR observations showing the MLTI system response to changing drivers from solar maximum to solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Crowley, G.; Doe, R. A.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Paxton, L. J.; Skinner, W. R.; Solomon, S. C.; Talaat, E.; Woods, T. N.; Wu, Q.; Yee, J.

    2007-12-01

    TIMED CEDAR observations have spanned a large range of solar activity conditions from just past solar maximum during which active region eruptions dominate, through the descending phase during which corotating interaction regions reach a maximum, and now fast approaching a 22-year minimum in magnetic activity during which inputs from below become increasingly prominent against a magnetically quieting state. During this interval, TIMED observed the response of the MLTI to a large number of powerful X-class flares, severe solar proton events, 7 superstorms, newly identified sawtooth events, high dynamic pressure during both southward and northward IMF, and to the strongest CIR-driven magnetic activity of the last 4 solar cycles. We will summarize new knowledge about the response of the MLTI to the very different characteristic inputs from this range of drivers and explore resulting insights into the behavior of the geospace system. As the ascending phase of solar cycle 24 begins, TIMED will observe the response of the MLTI to a new regime in the balance between solar irradiance and magnetic activity, specifically to rising F10.7 in the presence of low magnetic activity. An developing list of unanswered questions related to the MLTI state under these driving conditions will be presented in preparation for continuing community interactions in support of TIMED CEDAR MLTI science.

  4. Multi-wavelength solar activity complexes evolution from Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolkova, Olga; Benevolenskaya, Elena

    The main problem of the solar physics is to understand a nature of the solar magnetic activity. New space missions and background observations provide us by data describing solar activity with a good space and time resolution. Space missions data observe the solar activity in multi-wavelength emissions come from photosphere to corona. The complex of the solar activity has roots in inte-rior and extends to the solar corona. Thus, modern data give an opportunity to study the activity on the Sun at different levels simultaneously. Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) [1] which launched at the beginning of 2010, looks at Sun in different wavelengths such as coronal lines 171Å & 335Å. Also SDO measures photospheric magnetic flux (line-of-sight component of the magnetic field strength) and gives images in continuum. We have studied a stable complexes of the solar activity (about 30 com-plexes) during 6 hours from 10 March 2013 to 14 October 2013 using 720s ca-dence of HMI (Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager) [2] and AIA (Atmospheric Imaging Assembly) [3] instruments of SDO. We have found a good relationship between the magnetic flux and coronal emissions. Here we discuss properties of the complexes in the different levels from photosphere to corona. References 1. W. Dean Pesnell, B.J. Thompson, P.C. Chamberlin // Solar Phys., v. 275, p. 3-15, (2012). 2. P.H. Scherrer, J. Schou, R.I. Bush et al. // Solar Phys., v. 275, p. 207-227, (2012). 3. James R. Lemen • Alan M. Title • David J. Akin et al. // Solar Phys., v. 275, p. 17-40, (2012).

  5. Preferred longitudes in solar and stellar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, S. V.

    An analysis of the distribution of starspots on the surfaces of very active stars, such as RS CVn- FK Com-type stars as well as young solar analogs, reveals preferred longitudes of spot formation and their quasi-periodic oscillations, i.e. flip-flop cycles. A non-linear migration of the preferred longitudes suggests the presence of the differential rotation and variations of mean spot latitudes. It enables recovering stellar butterfly diagrams. Such phenomena are found to persist in the sunspot activity as well. A comparison of the observed properties of preferred longitudes on the Sun with those detected on more active stars leads to the conclusion that we can learn fine details of the stellar dynamo by studying the Sun, while its global parameters on the evolutionary time scale are provided by a sample of active stars.

  6. Recent Development of Solar Observational Facilities in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Cheng; Yan, Y.; Liu, Z.; Chen, P.

    2013-07-01

    Since 1980’s, a series of solar telescopes in China has been put into observations and got some useful data. After briefly introducing these telescopes, we will mainly describe the development of solar instruments in recent years. They are as follows: A Chinese Spectral Radio Heliograph (CSRH) is constructing at Zheng xiang bai qi, inner Mongolia. The frequency coverage is 0.4 - 15 GHz . The spatial resolution is 1.3" - 50". The temporal resolution is better than 100 ms. CSRH has an array with 40 × 4.5 m plus 60 × 2 m parabolic antennas. The largest base line is 3 km and the field of view is 0.5 - 7 degree. The low frequency part, CSRH-I, already got the first image of the quiet Sun in Jan 2013. The high frequency part, CSRH-II, will be finished in this year. A new 1 m vacuum solar telescope (NVST) has been installed in 2010 at the observational base of YAO near the Fuxian lake, which is 60 km away from Kunming. At present it is the best seeing place in China. NVST aims at observing the sun in the range from 0.3 to 2.5 micron by high resolution imaging device and multi-wave spectrometers combined with polarization analyzer. It has obtained high resolution images at TiO, Hα and other wavelengths, as well as solar spectra in optical and near infrared bands. A new telescope called ONSET (Optical and NIR Solar Eruption Tracer) has been established at the observational base of YAO in 2011. ONSET aims at studying the dynamics of flares and small activities, CME onset and its source regions, coronal structures and evolution, and white light flares. It consists of four tubes: (1) a near-infrared vacuum tube with an aperture of 27.5 cm, working at He I 10830±4.0Å with a FWHM of 0.5 Å (2) a chromospheric vacuum tube with an aperture of 27.5 cm, working at 6562.8±2.5 Å with a FWHM of 0.25 Å (3) a white-light vacuum tube with an aperture of 20 cm, working at the wavelength 3600Å or 4250Å with a FWHM of 15 Å and (4) a guiding tube. ONSET can provide simultaneously

  7. Records of solar eclipse observations in ancient China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yanben; Qiao, Qiyuan

    2009-11-01

    Like ancient people at other places of the world, the ancient Chinese lived in awe of the Sun. As they felt solar eclipses extremely significant events, they closely observed the occurrence of solar eclipse. Ancient astronomers further realized very early that solar eclipses were one of the important astronomical phenomena to revise and improve the ancient calendar. Interestingly, ancient emperors regarded solar eclipses as warnings from heaven that might affect the stability of their throne. Consequently, observing and recording solar eclipses became official, which dated far back to ancient China when numerous relevant descriptions were recorded in historical books. These records contribute substantially to China as an ancient civilization, as well as to the research of the long-term variation of the rotation rate of the Earth during >2000 years before the 17th century. This paper briefly reviews the perception, observations and recording of solar eclipses by ancient Chinese astronomers.

  8. Particle kinematics in solar flares: observations and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Marina

    2008-12-01

    This thesis is devoted to the study of particle acceleration and propagation processes in solar flares. Solar flares are amongst the most powerful and energetic activity phenomena our Sun exhibits. They release energy of the order of 10(32) erg in seconds to minutes. In the process, electrons and protons are accelerated to relativistic energies, making flares very efficient particle accelerators. The most compelling observational signatures of flares can be found in X-rays and extreme ultra-violet wavelengths. Due to atmospheric absorption, those wavelengths can only be studied from space. Since the beginning of the space age, countless flares have been observed by satellites. The present work is largely based on observations by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), an X-ray satellite which has been observing the Sun since February 2002. It is a NASA mission with substantial Swiss hardware and software contribution. Using RHESSI observations of flares of different intensity, a deeper understanding of the particle transport and energy transport processes in flare loops, as well as the acceleration site and acceleration mechanism is sought. The time evolution of images and spectra is studied along with the quantitative relations between X-ray sources observed in the corona (coronal sources) and from the chromosphere (footpoints). The spectral relations found between coronal sources and footpoints are compared to the so-called ``intermediate thin-thick target model'', which was based on observations by the satellite Yohkoh. We show that the spectral relations between coronal sources and footpoints observed with RHESSI cannot be explained by the intermediate thin-thick target model. In a next step, return currents in the flare loop were considered. With this extension to the existing model, the spectra of the coronal source and the footpoints, as well as the relations between them can be explained, indicating the importance of return currents in

  9. Radio magnetography of the solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfreikh, G. B.; Shibasaki, K.

    The observations of the solar magnetic fields is one of the most important basics for study of all important processes in structuring the solar atmosphere and most kinds of the release of the energy. The radio methods are of the special interest here because they gain the information on the magnetic field strength in the solar corona and upper chromosphere where traditional optical methods do not work. The construction of the Nobeyama radio heliograph opens a new era in usage radio methods for solar radio magnetography due to some unique property of the instrument: - The 2D mapping of the whole disk of the sun both in I and V Stokes parameters with resolution of 10 arcsec. - Regular observations (without breaks due to weather conditions), eight hours a day, already for seven years. The most effective and representative radio method of measuring the solar magnetic fields is to use polarization measurements of the thermal bremsstrahlung (free-free emission). It is applicable both to analysis of chromospheric and coronal magnetic fields and presents information on longitude component of the magnetic field strength in solar active regions. Three problems are met, however: (i) One needs to measure very low degree of polarization (small fraction of a percent); (ii) To get the real value of the field the spectral data are necessary. (iii) While observing an active region on the disk we have got the overlapping effects on polarized signal of the chromospheric and coronal magnetic fields. To get higher sensitivity the averaging of the radio maps over periods of about ten minutes were used with the results of sensitivity on V-maps of the order 0.1%. Observations for a number of dates have been analysed (August 22, 1992, October 31, 1992; June 30, 1993, July 22,1994, June 15, 1995 and some more). In all cases a very good similarity was found of the polarized regions (V-maps) with the Ca^ + plages in form and total coincidence with the direction of the magnetic fields on the

  10. Solar activity and oscillation frequency splittings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, M. F.; Libbrecht, K. G.

    1993-01-01

    Solar p-mode frequency splittings, parameterized by the coefficients through order N = 12 of a Legendre polynomial expansion of the mode frequencies as a function of m/L, were obtained from an analysis of helioseismology data taken at Big Bear Solar Observatory during the 4 years 1986 and 1988-1990 (approximately solar minimum to maximum). Inversion of the even-index splitting coefficients confirms that there is a significant contribution to the frequency splittings originating near the solar poles. The strength of the polar contribution is anti correlated with the overall level or solar activity in the active latitudes, suggesting a relation to polar faculae. From an analysis of the odd-index splitting coefficients we infer an uppor limit to changes in the solar equatorial near-surface rotatinal velocity of less than 1.9 m/s (3 sigma limit) between solar minimum and maximum.

  11. Sustainable Buildings. Using Active Solar Power

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, M. Keith; Barnett, Russell

    2015-04-20

    The objective of this project is to promote awareness and knowledge of active solar energy technologies by installing and monitoring the following demonstration systems in Kentucky: 1) Pool heating system, Churchill Park School, 2) Water heating and daylighting systems, Middletown and Aiken Road Elementary Schools, 3) Photovoltaic street light comparison, Louisville Metro, 4) up to 25 domestic water heating systems across Kentucky. These tasks will be supported by outreach activities, including a solar energy installer training workshop and a Kentucky Solar Energy Conference.

  12. Archiving and Data Processing Software for Solar Radio Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov-Maksimov, V. E.; Bogod, V. M.; Korzhavin, A. N.; Opeikina, L. V.; Shatilov, V. A.

    1997-03-01

    Regular daily observations of the Sun have been made over long time intervals since 1975 with the RATAN--600 radio telescope in the centimeter and decimeter wavelength ranges with high spatial resolution. A huge archive of observational data has been accumulated. The archive contains valuable astrophysical information covering a period that exceeds the duration of a solar activity cycle. However, all these data were stored on different data media (magnetic tapes, diskettes, streamer's cartridges, etc.) and in different formats. The main purpose of the work presented here is to produce a homogeneous database with our experimental data. We plan to create an electronic journal of observations using a relational database. Presently the journal of observations exists only in the form of a single paper copy and information about observations must be searched for manually. The electronic journal of observations will contain all the information about the observations and allow an easy extraction of such information and a simple selection of the observational data for any specific astrophysical problem. We plan to develop a software package for primary data reduction of observations of the Sun on RATAN-600, stored in various primary formats, and to create a homogeneous archive in the FITS format. A binary table extension to FITS will be used. We also plan to record our archive on a CD-ROM.

  13. Observational evidence for enhanced magnetic activity of superflare stars.

    PubMed

    Karoff, Christoffer; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; De Cat, Peter; Bonanno, Alfio; Fogtmann-Schulz, Alexandra; Fu, Jianning; Frasca, Antonio; Inceoglu, Fadil; Olsen, Jesper; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Shi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Superflares are large explosive events on stellar surfaces one to six orders-of-magnitude larger than the largest flares observed on the Sun throughout the space age. Due to the huge amount of energy released in these superflares, it has been speculated if the underlying mechanism is the same as for solar flares, which are caused by magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Here, we analyse observations made with the LAMOST telescope of 5,648 solar-like stars, including 48 superflare stars. These observations show that superflare stars are generally characterized by larger chromospheric emissions than other stars, including the Sun. However, superflare stars with activity levels lower than, or comparable to, the Sun do exist, suggesting that solar flares and superflares most likely share the same origin. The very large ensemble of solar-like stars included in this study enables detailed and robust estimates of the relation between chromospheric activity and the occurrence of superflares. PMID:27009381

  14. Observational evidence for enhanced magnetic activity of superflare stars

    PubMed Central

    Karoff, Christoffer; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; De Cat, Peter; Bonanno, Alfio; Fogtmann-Schulz, Alexandra; Fu, Jianning; Frasca, Antonio; Inceoglu, Fadil; Olsen, Jesper; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Shi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Superflares are large explosive events on stellar surfaces one to six orders-of-magnitude larger than the largest flares observed on the Sun throughout the space age. Due to the huge amount of energy released in these superflares, it has been speculated if the underlying mechanism is the same as for solar flares, which are caused by magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Here, we analyse observations made with the LAMOST telescope of 5,648 solar-like stars, including 48 superflare stars. These observations show that superflare stars are generally characterized by larger chromospheric emissions than other stars, including the Sun. However, superflare stars with activity levels lower than, or comparable to, the Sun do exist, suggesting that solar flares and superflares most likely share the same origin. The very large ensemble of solar-like stars included in this study enables detailed and robust estimates of the relation between chromospheric activity and the occurrence of superflares. PMID:27009381

  15. Observational evidence for enhanced magnetic activity of superflare stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; De Cat, Peter; Bonanno, Alfio; Fogtmann-Schulz, Alexandra; Fu, Jianning; Frasca, Antonio; Inceoglu, Fadil; Olsen, Jesper; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Shi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Superflares are large explosive events on stellar surfaces one to six orders-of-magnitude larger than the largest flares observed on the Sun throughout the space age. Due to the huge amount of energy released in these superflares, it has been speculated if the underlying mechanism is the same as for solar flares, which are caused by magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Here, we analyse observations made with the LAMOST telescope of 5,648 solar-like stars, including 48 superflare stars. These observations show that superflare stars are generally characterized by larger chromospheric emissions than other stars, including the Sun. However, superflare stars with activity levels lower than, or comparable to, the Sun do exist, suggesting that solar flares and superflares most likely share the same origin. The very large ensemble of solar-like stars included in this study enables detailed and robust estimates of the relation between chromospheric activity and the occurrence of superflares.

  16. Dynamo theory prediction of solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    The dynamo theory technique to predict decadal time scale solar activity variations is introduced. The technique was developed following puzzling correlations involved with geomagnetic precursors of solar activity. Based upon this, a dynamo theory method was developed to predict solar activity. The method was used successfully in solar cycle 21 by Schatten, Scherrer, Svalgaard, and Wilcox, after testing with 8 prior solar cycles. Schatten and Sofia used the technique to predict an exceptionally large cycle, peaking early (in 1990) with a sunspot value near 170, likely the second largest on record. Sunspot numbers are increasing, suggesting that: (1) a large cycle is developing, and (2) that the cycle may even surpass the largest cycle (19). A Sporer Butterfly method shows that the cycle can now be expected to peak in the latter half of 1989, consistent with an amplitude comparable to the value predicted near the last solar minimum.

  17. Corongraphic Observations and Analyses of The Ultraviolet Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, John L.

    2000-01-01

    The activities supported under NASA Grant NAG5-613 included the following: 1) reduction and scientific analysis of data from three sounding rocket flights of the Rocket Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer, 2) development of ultraviolet spectroscopic diagnostic techniques to provide a detailed empirical description of the extended solar corona, 3) extensive upgrade of the rocket instrument to become the Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS) for Spartan 201,4) instrument scientific calibration and characterization, 5) observation planning and mission support for a series of five Spartan 201 missions (fully successful except for STS 87 where the Spartan spacecraft was not successfully deployed and the instruments were not activated), and 6) reduction and scientific analysis of the UVCS/Spartan 201 observational data. The Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer for Spartan 201 was one unit of a joint payload and the other unit was a White Light Coronagraph (WLC) provided by the High Altitude Observatory and the Goddard Space Flight Center. The two instruments were used in concert to determine plasma parameters describing structures in the extended solar corona. They provided data that could be used individually or jointly in scientific analyses. The WLC provided electron column densities in high spatial resolution and high time resolution. UVCS/Spartan provided hydrogen velocity distributions, and line of sight hydrogen velocities. The hydrogen intensities from UVCS together with the electron densities from WLC were used to determine hydrogen outflow velocities. The UVCS also provided O VI intensities which were used to develop diagnostics for velocity distributions and outflow velocities of minor ions.

  18. Nanoflare activity in the solar chromosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M.; Keys, P. H.

    2014-11-10

    We use ground-based images of high spatial and temporal resolution to search for evidence of nanoflare activity in the solar chromosphere. Through close examination of more than 1 × 10{sup 9} pixels in the immediate vicinity of an active region, we show that the distributions of observed intensity fluctuations have subtle asymmetries. A negative excess in the intensity fluctuations indicates that more pixels have fainter-than-average intensities compared with those that appear brighter than average. By employing Monte Carlo simulations, we reveal how the negative excess can be explained by a series of impulsive events, coupled with exponential decays, that are fractionally below the current resolving limits of low-noise equipment on high-resolution ground-based observatories. Importantly, our Monte Carlo simulations provide clear evidence that the intensity asymmetries cannot be explained by photon-counting statistics alone. A comparison to the coronal work of Terzo et al. suggests that nanoflare activity in the chromosphere is more readily occurring, with an impulsive event occurring every ∼360 s in a 10,000 km{sup 2} area of the chromosphere, some 50 times more events than a comparably sized region of the corona. As a result, nanoflare activity in the chromosphere is likely to play an important role in providing heat energy to this layer of the solar atmosphere.

  19. Observation of the total solar eclipse on 21 June 2001 in Zambia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Noritsugu; Yumoto, Kiyohumi; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi

    2002-04-01

    On 21 June 2001, path of totality in Angola, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, and Madagascar in Africa. The Japan Scientific Observation Team, consisting primarily of the members of the Solar Eclipse Subcommittee of the Committee for International Collaboration in Astronomy of the Science Council of JAPAN, visited Lusaka in Zambia to observe the total solar eclipse. Blessed with fine weather, the observation was successful. The outline of the influence of solar eclipse on the terrestrial magnetism, polarization of the flash spectrum, and other observation data, as well as the way educational activities were carried out, are reported.

  20. Solar Sources and Geospace Consequences of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds Observed During Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Michalek, G.; Lepping, R. P.

    2007-01-01

    We present results of a statistical investigation of 99 magnetic clouds (MCs) observed during 1995-2005. The MC-associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are faster and wider on the average and originate within +/-30deg from the solar disk center. The solar sources of MCs also followed the butterfly diagram. The correlation between the magnetic field strength and speed of MCs was found to be valid over a much wider range of speeds. The number of south-north (SN) MCs was dominant and decreased with solar cycle, while the number of north-south (NS) MCs increased confirming the odd-cycle behavior. Two-thirds of MCs were geoeffective; the Dst index was highly correlated with speed and magnetic field in MCs as well as their product. Many (55%) fully northward (FN) MCs were geoeffective solely due to their sheaths. The non-geoeffective MCs were slower (average speed approx. 382 km/s), had a weaker southward magnetic field (average approx. -5.2nT), and occurred mostly during the rise phase of the solar activity cycle.

  1. MASC: Magnetic Activity of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchere, Frederic; Fineschi, Silvano; Gan, Weiqun; Peter, Hardi; Vial, Jean-Claude; Zhukov, Andrei; Parenti, Susanna; Li, Hui; Romoli, Marco

    We present MASC, an innovative payload designed to explore the magnetic activity of the solar corona. It is composed of three complementary instruments: a Hard-X-ray spectrometer, a UV / EUV imager, and a Visible Light / UV polarimetric coronagraph able to measure the coronal magnetic field. The solar corona is structured in magnetically closed and open structures from which slow and fast solar winds are respectively released. In spite of much progress brought by two decades of almost uninterrupted observations from several space missions, the sources and acceleration mechanisms of both types are still not understood. This continuous expansion of the solar atmosphere is disturbed by sporadic but frequent and violent events. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large-scale massive eruptions of magnetic structures out of the corona, while solar flares trace the sudden heating of coronal plasma and the acceleration of electrons and ions to high, sometimes relativistic, energies. Both phenomena are most probably driven by instabilities of the magnetic field in the corona. The relations between flares and CMEs are still not understood in terms of initiation and energy partition between large-scale motions, small-scale heating and particle acceleration. The initiation is probably related to magnetic reconnection which itself results magnetic topological changes due to e.g. flux emergence, footpoints motions, etc. Acceleration and heating are also strongly coupled since the atmospheric heating is thought to result from the impact of accelerated particles. The measurement of both physical processes and their outputs is consequently of major importance. However, despite its fundamental importance as a driver for the physics of the Sun and of the heliosphere, the magnetic field of our star’s outer atmosphere remains poorly understood. This is due in large part to the fact that the magnetic field is a very difficult quantity to measure. Our knowledge of its strength and

  2. Models of Impulsively Heated Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, Vladimir; Klimchuk, J.

    2009-05-01

    A number of attempts to model solar active regions with steady coronal heating have been modestly successful at reproducing the observed soft X-ray emission, but they fail dramatically at explaining EUV observations. Since impulsive heating (nanoflare) models can reproduce individual EUV loops, it seems reasonable to consider that entire active regions are impulsively heated. However, nanoflares are characterized by many parameters, such as magnitude, duration, and time delay between successive events, and these parameters may depend on the strength of the magnetic field or the length of field lines, for example, so a wide range of active region models must be examined. We have recently begun such a study. Each model begins with a magnetic "skeleton” obtained by extrapolating an observed photospheric magnetogram into the corona. Field lines are populated with plasma using our highly efficient hydro code called Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops (EBTEL). We then produce synthetic images corresponding to emission line or broad-band observations. By determining which set of nanoflare parameters best reproduces actual observations, we hope to constrain the properties of the heating and ultimately to reveal the physical mechanism. We here report on the initial progress of our study.

  3. Transient flows of the solar wind associated with small-scale solar activity in solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Veselovsky, Igor; Kuzin, Sergey; Gburek, Szymon; Ulyanov, Artyom; Kirichenko, Alexey; Shugay, Yulia; Goryaev, Farid

    The data obtained by the modern high sensitive EUV-XUV telescopes and photometers such as CORONAS-Photon/TESIS and SPHINX, STEREO/EUVI, PROBA2/SWAP, SDO/AIA provide good possibilities for studying small-scale solar activity (SSA), which is supposed to play an important role in heating of the corona and producing transient flows of the solar wind. During the recent unusually weak solar minimum, a large number of SSA events, such as week solar flares, small CMEs and CME-like flows were observed and recorded in the databases of flares (STEREO, SWAP, SPHINX) and CMEs (LASCO, CACTUS). On the other hand, the solar wind data obtained in this period by ACE, Wind, STEREO contain signatures of transient ICME-like structures which have shorter duration (<10h), weaker magnetic field strength (<10 nT) and lower proton temperature than usual ICMEs. To verify the assumption that ICME-like transients may be associated with the SSA events we investigated the number of weak flares of C-class and lower detected by SPHINX in 2009 and STEREO/EUVI in 2010. The flares were classified on temperature and emission measure using the diagnostic means of SPHINX and Hinode/EIS and were confronted with the parameters of the solar wind (velocity, density, ion composition and temperature, magnetic field, pitch angle distribution of the suprathermal electrons). The outflows of plasma associated with the flares were identified by their coronal signatures - CMEs (only in few cases) and dimmings. It was found that the mean parameters of the solar wind projected to the source surface for the times of the studied flares were typical for the ICME-like transients. The results support the suggestion that weak flares can be indicators of sources of transient plasma flows contributing to the slow solar wind at solar minimum, although these flows may be too weak to be considered as separate CMEs and ICMEs. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Programme

  4. Recent perspectives in solar physics - Elemental composition, coronal structure and magnetic fields, solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newkirk, G., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Elemental abundances in the solar corona are studied. Abundances in the corona, solar wind and solar cosmic rays are compared to those in the photosphere. The variation in silicon and iron abundance in the solar wind as compared to helium is studied. The coronal small and large scale structure is investigated, emphasizing magnetic field activity and examining cosmic ray generation mechanisms. The corona is observed in the X-ray and EUV regions. The nature of coronal transients is discussed with emphasis on solar-wind modulation of galactic cosmic rays. A schematic plan view of the interplanetary magnetic field during sunspot minimum is given showing the presence of magnetic bubbles and their concentration in the region around 4-5 AU by a fast solar wind stream.

  5. Solar Observation Target Identification Convention for use in Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibacher, John; Sakurai, Takashi; Schrijver, Carolus J.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia

    2010-05-01

    We strongly encourage the use of a standardized target identification to be included in pub- lications on solar events. The primary purpose is to enable the automated identification of publications on the same event, or on other related events, in the on-line literature by search engines such as the Astrophysics Data System (ADS). The convention does not aim to categorize or classify events, but is limited specifically to the identification of regions in space and intervals in time within which events occur.

  6. Solar neutrinos, solar flares, solar activity cycle and the proton decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raychaudhuri, P.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that there may be a correlation between the galactic cosmic rays and the solar neutrino data, but it appears that the neutrino flux which may be generated during the large solar cosmic ray events cannot in any way effect the solar neutrino data in Davis experiment. Only initial stage of mixing between the solar core and solar outer layers after the sunspot maximum in the solar activity cycle can explain the higher (run number 27 and 71) of solar neutrino data in Davis experiment. But solar flare induced atmospheric neutrino flux may have effect in the nucleon decay detector on the underground. The neutrino flux from solar cosmic rays may be a useful guide to understand the background of nucleon decay, magnetic monopole search, and the detection of neutrino flux in sea water experiment.

  7. Solar system object observations with Gaia Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashova, Maria; Tanga, Paolo; Mignard, Francois; CARRY, Benoit; Christophe, Ordenovic; DAVID, Pedro; Hestroffer, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    After a commissioning period, the astrometric mission Gaia of the European Space Agency (ESA) started its survey in July 2014. Throughout passed two years the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) has been treating the data. The current schedule anticipates the first Gaia Data Release (Gaia-DR1) toward the end of summer 2016. Nevertheless, it is not planned to include Solar System Objects (SSO) into the first release. This is due to a special treatment required by solar system objects, as well as by other peculiar sources (multiple and extended ones). In this presentation, we address issues and recent achivements in SSO processing, in particular validation of SSO-short term data processing chain, GAIA-SSO alerts, as well as the first runs of SSO-long term pipeline.

  8. RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF WEAK ENERGY RELEASES IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, R.; Kathiravan, C.; Barve, Indrajit V.; Beeharry, G. K.; Rajasekara, G. N.

    2010-08-10

    We report observations of weak, circularly polarized, structureless type III bursts from the solar corona in the absence of H{alpha}/X-ray flares and other related activity, during the minimum between the sunspot cycles 23 and 24. The spectral information about the event obtained with the CALLISTO spectrograph at Mauritius revealed that the drift rate of the burst is {approx}-30 MHz s{sup -1} is in the range 50-120 MHz. Two-dimensional imaging observations of the burst at 77 MHz obtained with the Gauribidanur radioheliograph indicate that the emission region was located at a radial distance of {approx}1.5 R{sub sun} in the solar atmosphere. The estimated peak brightness temperature of the burst at 77 MHz is {approx}10{sup 8} K. We derived the average magnetic field at the aforementioned location of the burst using the one-dimensional (east-west) Gauribidanur radio polarimeter at 77 MHz, and the value is {approx}2.5 {+-} 0.2 G. We also estimated the total energy of the non-thermal electrons responsible for the observed burst as {approx}1.1 x 10{sup 24} erg. This is low compared to the energy of the weakest hard X-ray microflares reported in the literature, which is about {approx}10{sup 26} erg. The present result shows that non-thermal energy releases that correspond to the nanoflare category (energy {approx}10{sup 24} erg) are taking place in the solar corona, and the nature of such small-scale energy releases has not yet been explored.

  9. UV solar irradiance in observations and the NRLSSI and SATIRE-S models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, K. L.; Ball, W. T.; Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.; Unruh, Y. C.; Morrill, J.

    2015-08-01

    Total solar irradiance and UV spectral solar irradiance has been monitored since 1978 through a succession of space missions. This is accompanied by the development of models aimed at replicating solar irradiance by relating the variability to solar magnetic activity. The Naval Research Laboratory Solar Spectral Irradiance (NRLSSI) and Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S) models provide the most comprehensive reconstructions of total and spectral solar irradiance over the period of satellite observation currently available. There is persistent controversy between the various measurements and models in terms of the wavelength dependence of the variation over the solar cycle, with repercussions on our understanding of the influence of UV solar irradiance variability on the stratosphere. We review the measurement and modeling of UV solar irradiance variability over the period of satellite observation. The SATIRE-S reconstruction is consistent with spectral solar irradiance observations where they are reliable. It is also supported by an independent, empirical reconstruction of UV spectral solar irradiance based on Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite/Solar Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitor measurements from an earlier study. The weaker solar cycle variability produced by NRLSSI between 300 and 400 nm is not evident in any available record. We show that although the method employed to construct NRLSSI is principally sound, reconstructed solar cycle variability is detrimentally affected by the uncertainty in the SSI observations it draws upon in the derivation. Based on our findings, we recommend, when choosing between the two models, the use of SATIRE-S for climate studies.

  10. The Importance of Long-Term Synoptic Observations and Data Sets for Solar Physics and Helioseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsworth, Yvonne; Broomhall, Anne-Marie; Gosain, Sanjay; Roth, Markus; Jefferies, Stuart M.; Hill, Frank

    2015-12-01

    A casual single glance at the Sun would not lead an observer to conclude that it varies. The discovery of the 11-year sunspot cycle was only made possible through systematic daily observations of the Sun over 150 years and even today historic sunspot drawings are used to study the behavior of past solar cycles. The origin of solar activity is still poorly understood as shown by the number of different models that give widely different predictions for the strength and timing of future cycles. Our understanding of the rapid transient phenomena related to solar activity, such as flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is also insufficient and making reliable predictions of these events, which can adversely impact technology, remains elusive. There is thus still much to learn about the Sun and its activity that requires observations over many solar cycles. In particular, modern helioseismic observations of the solar interior currently span only 1.5 cycles, which is far too short to adequately sample the characteristics of the plasma flows that govern the dynamo mechanism underlying solar activity. In this paper, we review some of the long-term solar and helioseismic observations and outline some future directions.