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Sample records for observational studies methods

  1. Studying Triggers for Interest and Engagement Using Observational Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renninger, K. Ann; Bachrach, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the contribution of observational methods to understanding the processes involved in triggering interest and establishing engagement. We begin by reviewing the literatures on interest and engagement, noting their similarities, differences, and the utility to each of better understanding the triggering process. We then…

  2. Mix of methods is needed to identify adverse events in general practice: A prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Wetzels, Raymond; Wolters, René; van Weel, Chris; Wensing, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Background The validity and usefulness of incident reporting and other methods for identifying adverse events remains unclear. This study aimed to compare five methods in general practice. Methods In a prospective observational study, with five general practitioners, five methods were applied and compared. The five methods were physician reported adverse events, pharmacist reported adverse events, patients' experiences of adverse events, assessment of a random sample of medical records, and assessment of all deceased patients. Results A total of 68 events were identified using these methods. The patient survey accounted for the highest number of events and the pharmacist reports for the lowest number. No overlap between the methods was detected. The patient survey accounted for the highest number of events and the pharmacist reports for the lowest number. Conclusion A mix of methods is needed to identify adverse events in general practice. PMID:18554418

  3. Generalizing Observational Study Results: Applying Propensity Score Methods to Complex Surveys

    PubMed Central

    DuGoff, Eva H; Schuler, Megan; Stuart, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo provide a tutorial for using propensity score methods with complex survey data. Data SourcesSimulated data and the 2008 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Study DesignUsing simulation, we compared the following methods for estimating the treatment effect: a naïve estimate (ignoring both survey weights and propensity scores), survey weighting, propensity score methods (nearest neighbor matching, weighting, and subclassification), and propensity score methods in combination with survey weighting. Methods are compared in terms of bias and 95 percent confidence interval coverage. In Example 2, we used these methods to estimate the effect on health care spending of having a generalist versus a specialist as a usual source of care. Principal FindingsIn general, combining a propensity score method and survey weighting is necessary to achieve unbiased treatment effect estimates that are generalizable to the original survey target population. ConclusionsPropensity score methods are an essential tool for addressing confounding in observational studies. Ignoring survey weights may lead to results that are not generalizable to the survey target population. This paper clarifies the appropriate inferences for different propensity score methods and suggests guidelines for selecting an appropriate propensity score method based on a researcher’s goal. PMID:23855598

  4. International Halley watch amateur observers' manual for scientific comet studies. Part 1: Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edberg, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    The International Halley Watch is described as well as comets and observing techniques. Information on periodic Comet Halley's apparition for its 1986 perihelion passage is provided. Instructions are given for observation projects valuable to the International Halley Watch in six areas of study: (1) visual observations; (2) photography; (3) astrometry; (4) spectroscopic observations; (5) photoelectric photometry; and (6) meteor observations.

  5. Are Private Schools Better Than Public Schools? Appraisal for Ireland by Methods for Observational Studies.

    PubMed

    Pfeffermann, Danny; Landsman, Victoria

    2011-09-01

    In observational studies the assignment of units to treatments is not under control. Consequently, the estimation and comparison of treatment effects based on the empirical distribution of the responses can be biased since the units exposed to the various treatments could differ in important unknown pretreatment characteristics, which are related to the response. An important example studied in this article is the question of whether private schools offer better quality of education than public schools. In order to address this question we use data collected in the year 2000 by OECD for the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). Focusing for illustration on scores in mathematics of 15-years old pupils in Ireland, we find that the raw average score of pupils in private schools is higher than of pupils in public schools. However, application of a newly proposed method for observational studies suggests that the less able pupils tend to enroll in public schools, such that their lower scores is not necessarily an indication of bad quality of the public schools. Indeed, when comparing the average score in the two types of schools after adjusting for the enrollment effects, we find quite surprisingly that public schools perform better on average. This outcome is supported by the methods of instrumental variables and latent variables, commonly used by econometricians for analyzing and evaluating social programs. PMID:22242110

  6. Overview of the epidemiology methods and applications: strengths and limitations of observational study designs.

    PubMed

    Colditz, Graham A

    2010-01-01

    The impact of study design on the results of medical research has long been an area of both substantial debate and a smaller body of empirical research. Examples come from many disciplines within clinical and public health research. Among the early major contributions in the 1970s was work by Mosteller and colleagues (Gilbert et al., 1997), who noted that innovations in surgery and anesthesia showed greater gains than standard therapy when nonrandomized, controlled trials were evaluated compared with the gains reported in randomized, controlled trials. More recently, we and others have evaluated the impact of design in medical and surgical research, and concluded that the mean gain comparing new therapies to established therapies was biased by study design in nonrandomized trials (Colditz et al., 1989; Miller et al., 1989). Benson and Hartz (2000) conducted a study in which they focused only on studies reported after 1985. On the basis of 136 reports of 19 diverse treatments, Benson and Hartz concluded that in only 2 of the 19 analyses did the combined data from the observational studies lie outside the 95% confidence interval for the combined data from the randomized trials. A similar study drew only on data reported from 1991 to 1995, which showed remarkably similar results among observational studies and randomized, controlled trials (Concato et al., 2000). These more recent data suggest that advancing the study design and analytic methods may reduce bias in some evaluations of medical and public health interventions. Such methods apply not only to the original studies, but also to the approaches that are taken to quantitatively combine results by using meta-analytic approaches such as random effects meta-regression, Bayesian meta-analysis, and the like (Normand, 1999). By focusing attention on thorough data analysis, design issues can be understood and their impact or bias can be estimated, on average, and then ideally accounted for in the interpretation of

  7. Study on pixel matching method of the multi-angle observation from airborne AMPR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weizhen; Qie, Lili; Li, Zhengqiang; Sun, Xiaobing; Hong, Jin; Chen, Xingfeng; Xu, Hua; Sun, Bin; Wang, Han

    2015-10-01

    For the along-track scanning mode, the same place along the ground track could be detected by the Advanced Multi-angular Polarized Radiometer (AMPR) with several different scanning angles from -55 to 55 degree, which provides a possible means to get the multi-angular detection for some nearby pixels. However, due to the ground sample spacing and spatial footprint of the detection, the different sizes of footprints cannot guarantee the spatial matching of some partly overlap pixels, which turn into a bottleneck for the effective use of the multi-angular detected information of AMPR to study the aerosol and surface polarized properties. Based on our definition and calculation of t he pixel coincidence rate for the multi-angular detection, an effective multi-angle observation's pixel matching method is presented to solve the spatial matching problem for airborne AMPR. Assuming the shape of AMPR's each pixel is an ellipse, and the major axis and minor axis depends on the flying attitude and each scanning angle. By the definition of coordinate system and origin of coordinate, the latitude and longitude could be transformed into the Euclidian distance, and the pixel coincidence rate of two nearby ellipses could be calculated. Via the traversal of each ground pixel, those pixels with high coincidence rate could be selected and merged, and with the further quality control of observation data, thus the ground pixels dataset with multi-angular detection could be obtained and analyzed, providing the support for the multi-angular and polarized retrieval algorithm research in t he next study.

  8. Studies of Trace Gas Chemical Cycles Using Observations, Inverse Methods and Global Chemical Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    2001-01-01

    For interpreting observational data, and in particular for use in inverse methods, accurate and realistic chemical transport models are essential. Toward this end we have, in recent years, helped develop and utilize a number of three-dimensional models including the Model for Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH).

  9. Case Study in the Santa Susana Mountains: Observing Discontinuities Using Non-invasive Surface Wave Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, S. L. C.; Miller, R. D.; Vander Velde, E. T.; Bower, M. O.; Tsoflias, G. P.

    2014-12-01

    A case study was performed at a former industrial site in the Santa Susana Mountains in Canoga Park, California in order to observe discontinuities such as faults and fractures that potentially affect groundwater flow and contaminant transport within the study area. The active multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) was performed using a landstreamer and weight drop source along a service road spanning approximately 1.4 miles. From previous geologic investigations, it is assumed that at least two faults cross the seismic profile and that one end of the profile is within a shear zone. The subsurface is composed of brittle to competent sandstone with intermittent shale beds that make up the Chatsworth Formation. Collected data were used to construct 2-D shear-wave velocity profiles and for backscatter analyses. Noise tests from an additional reflection survey along the same road was used as passive MASW to supplement the active data where low frequency data was absent. The goal of this case study is to observe the presence and orientation faults and fractures that could not be determined from surface mapping or downhole geophysical logging. Higher mode surface waves contaminated much of the data providing evidence of the complex geologic structure potentially caused by an abundance of faults, fractures, and changing topography throughout the profile. The passive MASW provided low frequency dispersion information which helped dispersion curve picking where the active data was not sufficient. The backscatter analyses observed several events that coincided with geologic features seen in the MASW results as well as in areas where the higher mode contamination was too great for MASW analysis. As a result, the combination of active MASW, passive MASW, and backscatter analyses provided velocity information at depths to 30 m. Several discontinuities were observed in the velocity profiles and backscatter analyses. These low velocity features may provide information

  10. Tissue components of weight loss in cancer patients. A new method of study and preliminary observations.

    PubMed

    Heymsfield, S B; McManus, C B

    1985-01-01

    A new approach using anthropometric, radiographic, biochemical, and ultrasonic methods allowed partition of body weight into fat, fat-free mass, skeletal muscle, and volume of heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, and tumor. These methods were used to evaluate body composition longitudinally in a pilot group of nine cancer patients, seven of whom lost weight (greater than 2.5 kg) during the study period. Two control groups also underwent the protocol: (1) healthy subjects (+/- 10% IBW) of similar age, sex, and height; and (2) patients with weight loss due to anorexia nervosa. Weight loss in both the cancer and anorexia nervosa groups could be accounted for primarily by loss in fat and skeletal muscle; although the relative magnitude of these tissue losses were approximately the same in both groups, cancer patients lost relatively less body weight. This was because (1) overt or occult ascites (detected radiographically) was present in cancer patients (3 of 9); (2) tumor bulk increased fat-free mass by up to 1 to 2 kg; and (3) the proportional loss in visceral organ volume was less in cancer patients than in anorexia nervosa patients. In the latter group, heart, liver, kidneys, and spleen were reduced in proportion to body weight, whereas in the cancer group as a whole, these organs (when uninvolved with tumor) lost little (heart and kidneys) or no volume (liver and spleen). This initial study suggests that the principal endogenous energy and nitrogen sources during evolution of weight loss in cancer are primarily adipose tissue triglycerides and skeletal muscle proteins. In some cancer patients, fluid accumulation, a large tumor burden, and the slow rate of visceral organ atrophy make body weight an unreliable index of available energy-nitrogen reserves. PMID:3965090

  11. Development of a method to study positron diffusion in metals by the observation of positronium negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takuji; Terabe, Hiroki; Iida, Shimpei; Yamashita, Takashi; Nagashima, Yasuyuki

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a new method to study positron diffusion in metals. In this method, we observe positronium negative ions emitted from the sample surfaces after coating with alkali-metals to evaluate the yields of the positrons which return to the surfaces. γ-rays from the ions accelerated using an electric field are clearly distinguished from those emitted from pair-annihilation of positrons in the bulk or on the surface and self-annihilation of emitted positronium atoms. Reliable studies on positron diffusion in metals have been enabled by this method.

  12. Approaches to Use of Observational Methods of a Study of Parent-Child Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumrind, Diana

    The methodology discussed is used in ongoing research to contrast the effectiveness of several patterns of parental authority with the same children at different ages. The first characteristic of these methods is the use of trait and behavior ratings to assess dispositional tendencies. The construct of a dispositional trait is used to account for…

  13. An observational study of the nightside ionospheres of Mars and Venus with radio occultation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Kliore, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    Using nightside electron density profiles obtained with radio occultation data from the Viking orbiters, the nightside ionospheres of Mars and Venus are investigated. It is shown that the Mars nightside ionosphere is generally weaker than the Venus nightside ionosphere, and, when it is present, the peak altitude is higher. Otherwise, there is considerable similarity. In particular, the dependence of peak density on solar zenith angle in the range of the Viking nightside observations (90-130 deg) is found to be similar for both planets.

  14. Exploring the Current Landscape of Intravenous Infusion Practices and Errors (ECLIPSE): protocol for a mixed-methods observational study

    PubMed Central

    Blandford, Ann; Furniss, Dominic; Chumbley, Gill; Iacovides, Ioanna; Wei, Li; Cox, Anna; Mayer, Astrid; Schnock, Kumiko; Bates, David Westfall; Dykes, Patricia C; Bell, Helen; Dean Franklin, Bryony

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intravenous medication is essential for many hospital inpatients. However, providing intravenous therapy is complex and errors are common. ‘Smart pumps’ incorporating dose error reduction software have been widely advocated to reduce error. However, little is known about their effect on patient safety, how they are used or their likely impact. This study will explore the landscape of intravenous medication infusion practices and errors in English hospitals and how smart pumps may relate to the prevalence of medication administration errors. Methods and analysis This is a mixed-methods study involving an observational quantitative point prevalence study to determine the frequency and types of errors that occur in the infusion of intravenous medication, and qualitative interviews with hospital staff to better understand infusion practices and the contexts in which errors occur. The study will involve 5 clinical areas (critical care, general medicine, general surgery, paediatrics and oncology), across 14 purposively sampled acute hospitals and 2 paediatric hospitals to cover a range of intravenous infusion practices. Data collectors will compare each infusion running at the time of data collection against the patient's medication orders to identify any discrepancies. The potential clinical importance of errors will be assessed. Quantitative data will be analysed descriptively; interviews will be analysed using thematic analysis. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from an NHS Research Ethics Committee (14/SC/0290); local approvals will be sought from each participating organisation. Findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at conferences for academic and health professional audiences. Results will also be fed back to participating organisations to inform local policy, training and procurement. Aggregated findings will inform the debate on costs and benefits of the NHS investing in smart pump technology

  15. Evaluation of Teaching Methods in Mass CPCR Training in Different Groups of the Society, an Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Hasani, Hamed; Bahrami, Mojtaba; Malekpour, Abdorrasoul; Dehghani, Mohammadreza; Allahyary, Elaheh; Amini, Mitra; Abdorahimi, Mehdi; khani, Sara; Kalantari Meibodi, Mohammad; Kojuri, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To determine the efficacy of different methods of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPCR) training in 3 different groups of the society. In a prospective and observational study of 2000 individuals in 3 different groups including G1, G2, and G3 4 different protocols of CPCR training were applied and their efficacy was compared between the groups. Also, 12 months after the study course, 460 participants from 3 groups were asked to take apart in a theoretical and practical examination to evaluate the long-term efficacy of the 4 protocols. Among 2000 individuals took a parted in the study, 950 (47.5%) were G1, 600 (30%) were G2, and 450 (22.5%) were G3. G1 in 4 groups were 2.37 and 2.65 times more successful in pretest theoretical and 2.61 and 18.20 times more successful in practical examinations compared with G2 and G3 and gained highest improvement in CPCR skills. Other groups also showed significantly improved CPCR skills. Comparison of different methods of CPCR learning showed that the workshop using interactive lecture as well as human model, educational film, and reference CPCR book has the highest efficacy in all groups. This protocol of CPCR training showed more efficacy in long-term postdelayed evaluation. On the contrary, medical students had better long-term outcomes from the course. Although G1 and G2 obtained better results in learning CPCR skills, in G3 also the theoretical and practical knowledge were improved significantly. This course increased confidence for doing CPCR in all groups of the study. Considering that the most of the bystanders at emergency states are general population, training this group of the society and increasing their confidence about performing CPCR can be so effective and lifesaving at emergency states. (Clinical trial. Gov registration: NCT02120573) PMID:26020392

  16. Designing Health Websites Based on Users’ Web-Based Information-Seeking Behaviors: A Mixed-Method Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Patrick Cheong-Iao; Verspoor, Karin; Pearce, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Background Laypeople increasingly use the Internet as a source of health information, but finding and discovering the right information remains problematic. These issues are partially due to the mismatch between the design of consumer health websites and the needs of health information seekers, particularly the lack of support for “exploring” health information. Objective The aim of this research was to create a design for consumer health websites by supporting different health information–seeking behaviors. We created a website called Better Health Explorer with the new design. Through the evaluation of this new design, we derive design implications for future implementations. Methods Better Health Explorer was designed using a user-centered approach. The design was implemented and assessed through a laboratory-based observational study. Participants tried to use Better Health Explorer and another live health website. Both websites contained the same content. A mixed-method approach was adopted to analyze multiple types of data collected in the experiment, including screen recordings, activity logs, Web browsing histories, and audiotaped interviews. Results Overall, 31 participants took part in the observational study. Our new design showed a positive result for improving the experience of health information seeking, by providing a wide range of information and an engaging environment. The results showed better knowledge acquisition, a higher number of page reads, and more query reformulations in both focused and exploratory search tasks. In addition, participants spent more time to discover health information with our design in exploratory search tasks, indicating higher engagement with the website. Finally, we identify 4 design considerations for designing consumer health websites and health information–seeking apps: (1) providing a dynamic information scope; (2) supporting serendipity; (3) considering trust implications; and (4) enhancing interactivity

  17. Skylab Earth Observation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This concept illustrates Skylab Earth observation studies, an Earth Resources Experiment Package (EREP). EREP was designed to explore the use of the widest possible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum for Earth resource investigations with sensors that recorded data in the visible, infrared, and microwave spectral regions. Resources subject to this study included a capability of mapping Earth resources and land uses, crop and forestry cover, health of vegetation, types of soil, water storage in snow pack, surface or near-surface mineral deposits, sea surface temperature, and the location of likely feeding areas for fish, etc. A significant feature of EREP was the ability of man to operate the sensors in a laboratory fashion.

  18. Asian couples in negotiation: a mixed-method observational study of cultural variations across five Asian regions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wai-Yung; Nakamura, Shin-Ichi; Chung, Moon Ja; Chun, Young Ju; Fu, Meng; Liang, Shu-Chuan; Liu, Cui-Lian

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore variations in how contemporary couples from five different Asian regions negotiate disagreements. Video recordings of 50 couples (10 each from Japan, Korea, Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong) discussing unresolved disagreements provided raw data for quantitative and qualitative analyses. First, teams of coders from each region used a common protocol to make quantitative ratings of content themes and interaction patterns for couples from their own region. An interregional panel of investigators then performed in-depth qualitative reviews for half of these cases, noting cultural differences not only in observed patterns of couple behavior but also in their own perceptions of these patterns. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses revealed clear regional differences on dimensions such as overt negativity, demand-withdraw interaction, and collaboration. The qualitative results also provided a richer, more nuanced view of other (e.g., gender-linked) conflict management patterns that the quantitative analyses did not capture. Inconsistencies between qualitative and quantitative data and between the qualitative observations of investigators from different regions were most pronounced for couples from Korea and Japan, whose conflict styles were subtler and less direct than those of couples from the other regions. PMID:24033245

  19. Using observational methods in nursing research.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Jenny

    2015-07-01

    Observation is a research data-collection method used generally to capture the activities of participants as well as when and where things are happening in a given setting. It checks description of the phenomena against what the researcher perceives to be fact in a rich experiential context. The method's main strength is that it provides direct access to the social phenomena under consideration. It can be used quantitatively or qualitatively, depending on the research question. Challenges in using observation relate to adopting the role of participant or non-participant researcher as observer. This article discusses some of the complexities involved when nurse researchers seek to collect observational data on social processes in naturalistic settings using unstructured or structured observational methods in qualitative research methodology. A glossary of research terms is provided. PMID:26153969

  20. HARPS Observes the Earth Transiting the Sun — A Method to Study Exoplanet Atmospheres Using Precision Spectroscopy on Large Ground-based Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, F.; Fosbury, R.; Petr-Gotzens, M.; Pallé, E.; Zhao, G.

    2015-09-01

    Exoplanetary transits offer the opportunity to measure the transmission of long, tangential pathlengths through their atmospheres. Since the fraction of the observed stellar light taking these paths is very small, transit photometric and spectrophotometric measurements of light curves require very high levels of measurement stability, favouring the use of intrinsically stable space telescopes. By studying the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect on the radial velocity of the transited star, pure, high-precision radial velocity measurements can be used to estimate the changes in planetary atmospheric transmission with wavelength: a promising method for future studies of small planets with very large ground-based telescopes since it removes the requirement for extreme photometric stability. This article describes a successful feasibility experiment using the HARPS instrument to measure reflected moonlight during the penumbral phases of a Lunar eclipse, effectively providing an observation of an Earth transit.

  1. Task-Based Evaluation of a 4D MAP-RBI-EM Image Reconstruction Method for Gated Myocardial Perfusion SPECT using a Human Observer Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Higuchi, Takahiro; Lautamäki, Riikka; Bengel, Frank M.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of a new 4D image reconstruction method for improved 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT using a task-based human observer study. We used a realistic 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that models cardiac beating motion. Half of the population was normal; the other half had a regional hypokinetic wall motion abnormality. Noise-free and noisy projection data with 16 gates/cardiac cycle were generated using an analytical projector that included the effects of attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter (ADS), and were reconstructed using the 3D FBP without and 3D OS-EM with ADS corrections followed by different cut-off frequencies of a 4D linear post-filter. A 4D iterative maximum a posteriori rescaled-block (MAP-RBI)-EM image reconstruction method with ADS corrections was also used to reconstruct the projection data using various values of the weighting factor for its prior. The trade-offs between bias and noise were represented by the normalized mean squared error (NMSE) and averaged normalized standard deviation (NSDav), respectively. They were used to select reasonable ranges of the reconstructed images for use in a human observer study. The observers were trained with the simulated cine images and were instructed to rate their confidence on the absence or presence of a motion defect on a continuous scale. We then applied receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) index. The results showed that significant differences in detection performance among the different NMSE-NSDav combinations were found and the optimal trade-off from optimized reconstruction parameters corresponded to a maximum AUC value. The 4D MAP-RBI-EM with ADS correction, which had the best trade-off among the tested reconstruction methods, also had the highest AUC value, resulting in significantly better human observer detection performance when detecting regional myocardial wall motion

  2. Task-based evaluation of a 4D MAP-RBI-EM image reconstruction method for gated myocardial perfusion SPECT using a human observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Higuchi, Takahiro; Lautamäki, Riikka; Bengel, Frank M.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the performance of a new 4D image reconstruction method for improved 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT using a task-based human observer study. We used a realistic 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that models cardiac beating motion. Half of the population was normal; the other half had a regional hypokinetic wall motion abnormality. Noise-free and noisy projection data with 16 gates/cardiac cycle were generated using an analytical projector that included the effects of attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter (ADS), and were reconstructed using the 3D FBP without and 3D OS-EM with ADS corrections followed by different cut-off frequencies of a 4D linear post-filter. A 4D iterative maximum a posteriori rescaled-block (MAP-RBI)-EM image reconstruction method with ADS corrections was also used to reconstruct the projection data using various values of the weighting factor for its prior. The trade-offs between bias and noise were represented by the normalized mean squared error (NMSE) and averaged normalized standard deviation (NSDav), respectively. They were used to select reasonable ranges of the reconstructed images for use in a human observer study. The observers were trained with the simulated cine images and were instructed to rate their confidence on the absence or presence of a motion defect on a continuous scale. We then applied receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) index. The results showed that significant differences in detection performance among the different NMSE-NSDav combinations were found and the optimal trade-off from optimized reconstruction parameters corresponded to a maximum AUC value. The 4D MAP-RBI-EM with ADS correction, which had the best trade-off among the tested reconstruction methods, also had the highest AUC value, resulting in significantly better human observer detection performance when detecting regional myocardial wall motion

  3. Task-based evaluation of a 4D MAP-RBI-EM image reconstruction method for gated myocardial perfusion SPECT using a human observer study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Higuchi, Takahiro; Lautamäki, Riikka; Bengel, Frank M; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the performance of a new 4D image reconstruction method for improved 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT using a task-based human observer study. We used a realistic 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that models cardiac beating motion. Half of the population was normal; the other half had a regional hypokinetic wall motion abnormality. Noise-free and noisy projection data with 16 gates/cardiac cycle were generated using an analytical projector that included the effects of attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter (ADS), and were reconstructed using the 3D FBP without and 3D OS-EM with ADS corrections followed by different cut-off frequencies of a 4D linear post-filter. A 4D iterative maximum a posteriori rescaled-block (MAP-RBI)-EM image reconstruction method with ADS corrections was also used to reconstruct the projection data using various values of the weighting factor for its prior. The trade-offs between bias and noise were represented by the normalized mean squared error (NMSE) and averaged normalized standard deviation (NSDav), respectively. They were used to select reasonable ranges of the reconstructed images for use in a human observer study. The observers were trained with the simulated cine images and were instructed to rate their confidence on the absence or presence of a motion defect on a continuous scale. We then applied receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) index. The results showed that significant differences in detection performance among the different NMSE-NSDav combinations were found and the optimal trade-off from optimized reconstruction parameters corresponded to a maximum AUC value. The 4D MAP-RBI-EM with ADS correction, which had the best trade-off among the tested reconstruction methods, also had the highest AUC value, resulting in significantly better human observer detection performance when detecting regional myocardial wall motion

  4. Changes in nurses’ work associated with computerised information systems: Opportunities for international comparative studies using the revised Work Observation Method By Activity Timing (WOMBAT)

    PubMed Central

    Westbrook, Johanna I.; Creswick, Nerida J.; Duffield, Christine; Li, Ling; Dunsmuir, William T. M.

    2012-01-01

    An important step in advancing global health through informatics is to understand how systems support health professionals to deliver improved services to patients. Studies in several countries have highlighted the potential for clinical information systems to change patterns of work and communication, and in particular have raised concerns that they reduce nurses’ time in direct care. However measuring the effects of systems on work is challenging and comparisons across studies have been hindered by a lack of standardised definitions and measurement tools. This paper describes the Work Observation Method by Activity Time (WOMBAT) technique version 1.0 and the ways in which the data generated can describe different aspects of health professionals’ work. In 2011 a revised WOMBAT version 2.0 was developed specifically to facilitate its use by research teams in different countries. The new features provide opportunities for international comparative studies of nurses’ work to be conducted. PMID:24199139

  5. Effect of reconstruction methods and x-ray tube current–time product on nodule detection in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom: A crossed-modality JAFROC observer study

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J. D.; Chakraborty, D. P.; Szczepura, K.; Tootell, A. K.; Vamvakas, I.; Manning, D. J.; Hogg, P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate nodule detection in an anthropomorphic chest phantom in computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR3D) and filtered back projection (FBP) over a range of tube current–time product (mAs). Methods: Two phantoms were used in this study: (i) an anthropomorphic chest phantom was loaded with spherical simulated nodules of 5, 8, 10, and 12 mm in diameter and +100, −630, and −800 Hounsfield units electron density; this would generate CT images for the observer study; (ii) a whole-body dosimetry verification phantom was used to ultimately estimate effective dose and risk according to the model of the BEIR VII committee. Both phantoms were scanned over a mAs range (10, 20, 30, and 40), while all other acquisition parameters remained constant. Images were reconstructed with both AIDR3D and FBP. For the observer study, 34 normal cases (no nodules) and 34 abnormal cases (containing 1–3 nodules, mean 1.35 ± 0.54) were chosen. Eleven observers evaluated images from all mAs and reconstruction methods under the free-response paradigm. A crossed-modality jackknife alternative free-response operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis method was developed for data analysis, averaging data over the two factors influencing nodule detection in this study: mAs and image reconstruction (AIDR3D or FBP). A Bonferroni correction was applied and the threshold for declaring significance was set at 0.025 to maintain the overall probability of Type I error at α = 0.05. Contrast-to-noise (CNR) was also measured for all nodules and evaluated by a linear least squares analysis. Results: For random-reader fixed-case crossed-modality JAFROC analysis, there was no significant difference in nodule detection between AIDR3D and FBP when data were averaged over mAs [F(1, 10) = 0.08, p = 0.789]. However, when data were averaged over reconstruction methods, a significant difference was seen between multiple pairs of mAs settings

  6. A phantom-based JAFROC observer study of two CT reconstruction methods: the search for optimisation of lesion detection and effective dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, John D.; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Szczepura, Katy; Vamvakas, Ioannis; Tootell, Andrew; Manning, David J.; Hogg, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dose saving potential of iterative reconstruction (IR) in a computed tomography (CT) examination of the thorax. Materials and Methods: An anthropomorphic chest phantom containing various configurations of simulated lesions (5, 8, 10 and 12mm; +100, -630 and -800 Hounsfield Units, HU) was imaged on a modern CT system over a tube current range (20, 40, 60 and 80mA). Images were reconstructed with (IR) and filtered back projection (FBP). An ATOM 701D (CIRS, Norfolk, VA) dosimetry phantom was used to measure organ dose. Effective dose was calculated. Eleven observers (15.11+/-8.75 years of experience) completed a free response study, localizing lesions in 544 single CT image slices. A modified jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis was completed to look for a significant effect of two factors: reconstruction method and tube current. Alpha was set at 0.05 to control the Type I error in this study. Results: For modified JAFROC analysis of reconstruction method there was no statistically significant difference in lesion detection performance between FBP and IR when figures-of-merit were averaged over tube current (F(1,10)=0.08, p = 0.789). For tube current analysis, significant differences were revealed between multiple pairs of tube current settings (F(3,10) = 16.96, p<0.001) when averaged over image reconstruction method. Conclusion: The free-response study suggests that lesion detection can be optimized at 40mA in this phantom model, a measured effective dose of 0.97mSv. In high-contrast regions the diagnostic value of IR, compared to FBP, is less clear.

  7. Ensemble transform sensitivity method for adaptive observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Xie, Yuanfu; Wang, Hongli; Chen, Dehui; Toth, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    The Ensemble Transform (ET) method has been shown to be useful in providing guidance for adaptive observation deployment. It predicts forecast error variance reduction for each possible deployment using its corresponding transformation matrix in an ensemble subspace. In this paper, a new ET-based sensitivity (ETS) method, which calculates the gradient of forecast error variance reduction in terms of analysis error variance reduction, is proposed to specify regions for possible adaptive observations. ETS is a first order approximation of the ET; it requires just one calculation of a transformation matrix, increasing computational efficiency (60%-80% reduction in computational cost). An explicit mathematical formulation of the ETS gradient is derived and described. Both the ET and ETS methods are applied to the Hurricane Irene (2011) case and a heavy rainfall case for comparison. The numerical results imply that the sensitive areas estimated by the ETS and ET are similar. However, ETS is much more efficient, particularly when the resolution is higher and the number of ensemble members is larger.

  8. The Moment Study: protocol for a mixed method observational cohort study of the Alternative Nicotine Delivery Systems (ANDS) initiation process among adult cigarette smokers

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Jennifer L; Smiley, Sabrina L; Rubin, Leslie F; Anesetti-Rothermel, Andrew; Elmasry, Hoda; Davis, Megan; DeAtley, Teresa; Harvey, Emily; Kirchner, Thomas; Abrams, David B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Alternative Nicotine Delivery Systems (ANDS) such as e-cigarettes are battery-powered devices that aerosolize nicotine and other substances to simulate smoking without using tobacco. Little is known about the ANDS initiation process among adult smokers. The aims of this research are threefold to: (1) examine how ANDS use affects cigarette use; (2) examine how the immediate environmental and psychosocial contexts of cigarette and ANDS use vary within—and between—participants in general and by menthol preference and race; and, (3) examine participants' ‘lived experience’ of the subjective perceptions, meaning, influences and utility of cigarette and ANDS use. Methods and analyses This study's mixed method, 6-week longitudinal design will produce a detailed description of the ANDS initiation process among adult smokers (N=100). Qualitative and quantitative data collection will include 3 weeks of: (1) ecological momentary assessment of patterns of cigarette/ANDS use, satisfaction, mood and craving; (2) geospatial assessment of participants' environment, including indoor and outdoor cigarette/ANDS norms and rules; (3) in-depth interviews about the meaning and utility of cigarette smoking and ANDS use; and, (4) saliva cotinine and exhaled carbon monoxide (CO) biomarkers. A diverse sample will be recruited with an equal number of menthol and non-menthol cigarette smokers. As the primary independent variable, we will investigate how ANDS use affects cigarette consumption. We will also examine how smoking-related and ANDS-related rules and norms surrounding product use influence cigarette and ANDS product use, and how the subjective effects of ANDS use affect ANDS perceptions, beliefs and use. Ethics and dissemination This study was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the US National Institutes of Health (1R21DA036472), registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02261363), and approved by the Chesapeake IRB (Pro00008526). Findings will be

  9. Building Capacity to Use Earth Observations in Decision Making: A Case Study of NASA's DEVELOP National Program Methods and Best Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs-Gleason, L. M.; Ross, K. W.; Crepps, G.; Miller, T. N.; Favors, J. E.; Rogers, L.; Allsbrook, K. N.; Bender, M. R.; Ruiz, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's DEVELOP National Program fosters an immersive research environment for dual capacity building. Through rapid feasibility Earth science projects, the future workforce and current decision makers are engaged in research projects to build skills and capabilities to use Earth observation in environmental management and policy making. DEVELOP conducts over 80 projects annually, successfully building skills through partnerships with over 150 organizations and providing over 350 opportunities for project participants each year. Filling a void between short-term training courses and long-term research projects, the DEVELOP model has been successful in supporting state, local, federal and international government organizations to adopt methodologies and enhance decision making processes. This presentation will highlight programmatic best practices, feedback from participants and partner organizations, and three sample case studies of successful adoption of methods in the decision making process.

  10. Observational Studies: Matching or Regression?

    PubMed

    Brazauskas, Ruta; Logan, Brent R

    2016-03-01

    In observational studies with an aim of assessing treatment effect or comparing groups of patients, several approaches could be used. Often, baseline characteristics of patients may be imbalanced between groups, and adjustments are needed to account for this. It can be accomplished either via appropriate regression modeling or, alternatively, by conducting a matched pairs study. The latter is often chosen because it makes groups appear to be comparable. In this article we considered these 2 options in terms of their ability to detect a treatment effect in time-to-event studies. Our investigation shows that a Cox regression model applied to the entire cohort is often a more powerful tool in detecting treatment effect as compared with a matched study. Real data from a hematopoietic cell transplantation study is used as an example. PMID:26712591

  11. Observational Study of Travelers' Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Meuris

    1995-03-01

    Background: European air travelers returning from Algeria, Egypt, Mexico, Morocco, and Tunisia were interviewed about their experience of travelers' diseases upon arrival in Brussels. Diarrhea was mentioned by 37% of the adults and 27% of the children. These subjects were questioned about the types of measures taken, type and duration of drug treatment (if any), and about duration of diarrhea and side effects experienced. Methods: Final analysis was performed based on 2160 interviews. The largest proportion of diarrhea was reported in the age group 15-24 years (46%). Results: The majority of the 2160 subjects had opted for drug treatment (81%): 927 subjects for loperamide alone, 235 for loperamide in combination with nifuroxazide, and 178 for nifuroxazide alone. Other drugs had been used less frequently. The median time to recovery was 2.4 days with loperamide compared to 3.2 days with nifuroxazide and to 3.4 days for the no-treatment group. Conclusions: A stratification of the results by severity of the diarrhea suggests a rank of antidiarrheal potency as follows: loperamide > nifuroxazide > no-drug treatment. The side effect with the highest incidence was constipation (2.4% with loperamide). (J Travel Med 2:11-15, 1995) Travelers' diarrhea is usually defined as the passage of at least three unformed stools per day or any number of such stools when accompanied by fever, abdominal cramping, or vomiting. The definition may be broadened to include more trivial bowel disturbance.1,2 The duration of this self-limited disease generally is 3 to 5 days. Medical intervention aims at shortening the duration of disease, thus allowing the sufferer to resume his or her usual activities at an early stage. A shortened period of recovery to physical well-being has obvious favorable economic implications if the traveler is on business and may help the maintenance of a desired level of quality of life while a traveler is on holiday. An observational study of various medical

  12. PM2.5 Characterization for Time Series Studies: Organic Molecular Marker Speciation Methods and Observations from Daily Measurements in Denver

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, Steven J.; Williams, Daniel E.; Garcia, Jessica K.; Vedal, Sverre; Hannigan, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5) has been shown to have a wide range of adverse health effects and consequently is regulated in accordance with the US-EPA’s National Ambient Air Quality Standards. PM2.5 originates from multiple primary sources and is also formed through secondary processes in the atmosphere. It is plausible that some sources form PM2.5 that is more toxic than PM2.5 from other sources. Identifying the responsible sources could provide insight into the biological mechanisms causing the observed health effects and provide a more efficient approach to regulation. This is the goal of the Denver Aerosol Sources and Health (DASH) study, a multi-year PM2.5 source apportionment and health study. The first step in apportioning the PM2.5 to different sources is to determine the chemical make-up of the PM2.5. This paper presents the methodology used during the DASH study for organic speciation of PM2.5. Specifically, methods are covered for solvent extraction of non-polar and semi-polar organic molecular markers using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Vast reductions in detection limits were obtained through the use of a programmable temperature vaporization (PTV) inlet along with other method improvements. Results are presented for the first 1.5 years of the DASH study revealing seasonal and source-related patterns in the molecular markers and their long-term correlation structure. Preliminary analysis suggests that point sources are not a significant contributor to the organic molecular markers measured at our receptor site. Several motor vehicle emission markers help identify a gasoline/diesel split in the ambient data. Findings show both similarities and differences when compared with other cities where similar measurements and assessments have been made. PMID:20161318

  13. Distracted Biking: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Elizabeth Suzanne; Arabian, Sandra Strack; Breeze, Janis L; Salzler, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Commuting via bicycle is a very popular mode of transportation in the Northeastern United States. Boston, MA, has seen a rapid increase in bicycle ridership over the past decade, which has raised concerns and awareness about bicycle safety. An emerging topic in this field is distracted bicycle riding. This study was conducted to provide descriptive data on the prevalence and type of distracted bicycling in Boston at different times of day. This was a cross-sectional study in which observers tallied bicyclists at 4 high traffic intersections in Boston during various peak commuting hours for 2 types of distractions: auditory (earbuds/phones in or on ears), and visual/tactile (electronic device or other object in hand). Nineteen hundred seventy-four bicyclists were observed and 615 (31.2%), 95% CI [29, 33%], were distracted. Of those observed, auditory distractions were the most common (N = 349; 17.7%), 95% CI [16, 19], p = .0003, followed by visual/tactile distractions (N = 266; 13.5%), 95% CI [12, 15]. The highest proportion (40.7%), 95% CI [35, 46], of distracted bicyclists was observed during the midday commute (between 13:30 and 15:00). Distracted bicycling is a prevalent safety concern in the city of Boston, as almost a third of all bicyclists exhibited distracted behavior. Education and public awareness campaigns should be designed to decrease distracted bicycling behaviors and promote bicycle safety in Boston. An awareness of the prevalence of distracted biking can be utilized to promote bicycle safety campaigns dedicated to decreasing distracted bicycling and to provide a baseline against which improvements can be measured. PMID:26953533

  14. Ways of learning: Observational studies versus experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaffer, T.L.; Johnson, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    Manipulative experimentation that features random assignment of treatments, replication, and controls is an effective way to determine causal relationships. Wildlife ecologists, however, often must take a more passive approach to investigating causality. Their observational studies lack one or more of the 3 cornerstones of experimentation: controls, randomization, and replication. Although an observational study can be analyzed similarly to an experiment, one is less certain that the presumed treatment actually caused the observed response. Because the investigator does not actively manipulate the system, the chance that something other than the treatment caused the observed results is increased. We reviewed observational studies and contrasted them with experiments and, to a lesser extent, sample surveys. We identified features that distinguish each method of learning and illustrate or discuss some complications that may arise when analyzing results of observational studies. Findings from observational studies are prone to bias. Investigators can reduce the chance of reaching erroneous conclusions by formulating a priori hypotheses that can be pursued multiple ways and by evaluating the sensitivity of study conclusions to biases of various magnitudes. In the end, however, professional judgment that considers all available evidence is necessary to render a decision regarding causality based on observational studies.

  15. Congruence of Teaching Method and Observed Teacher Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Terry; Miller, Edith

    This study examined the congruence of teaching method and observed teacher behavior. Its purpose was to find out the actual behaviors in which teachers engaged when using a specific teaching method and whether or not these behaviors were congruent with those dictated by a theoretically based teaching model. The specific objectives of the study…

  16. Observational studies of Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porco, Carolyn C.

    1987-01-01

    Several noteworthy phenomena in Saturn's rings were investigated which have until now received an inadequate amount of attention. Among these are the periodic variation of the spokes in the B ring and eccentric features throughout the rings. One of the major discoveries by Voyager was the existence of eccentric features within the predominantly circular rings of Saturn. Several of these nonaxisymmetric features are narrow elliptical rings which share many characteristics with the rings of Uranus. In recent work, two narrow ringlets were added to the list of eccentric features in the rings of Saturn. Voyager imaging and occultation data are now in hand, as well as image-processing software which allows accurate absolute positional measurements to be made in Voyager imaging data. Work is in progress to re-examine this region of Saturn's rings and to study the possibility of a dynamical interaction between the outer B ring edge, the Huygens ringlet and the nearby Mimas 2:1 resonance. An understanding of the kinematics and dynamics of this region promises to yield important clues to a matter of great interest in both theoretical and observation ring studies.

  17. Three-dimensional evaluation of postoperative swelling in treatment of zygomatic bone fractures using two different cooling therapy methods: a randomized, observer-blind, prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Surgical treatment and complications in patients with zygomatic bone fractures can lead to a significant degree of tissue trauma resulting in common postoperative symptoms and types of pain, facial swelling and functional impairment. Beneficial effects of local cold treatment on postoperative swelling, edema, pain, inflammation, and hemorrhage, as well as the reduction of metabolism, bleeding and hematomas, have been described. The aim of this study was to compare postoperative cooling therapy applied through the use of cooling compresses with the water-circulating cooling face mask manufactured by Hilotherm in terms of beneficial impact on postoperative facial swelling, pain, eye motility, diplopia, neurological complaints and patient satisfaction. Methods Forty-two patients were selected for treatment of unilateral zygomatic bone fractures and were divided randomly to one of two treatments: either a Hilotherm cooling face mask or conventional cooling compresses. Cooling was initiated as soon as possible after surgery until postoperative day 3 and was applied continuously for 12 hours daily. Facial swelling was quantified through a three-dimensional optical scanning technique. Furthermore, pain, neurological complaints, eye motility, diplopia and patient satisfaction were observed for each patient. Results Patients receiving a cooling therapy by Hilotherm demonstrated significantly less facial swelling, less pain, reduced limitation of eye motility and diplopia, fewer neurological complaints and were more satisfied compared to patients receiving conventional cooling therapy. Conclusions Hilotherapy is more efficient in managing postoperative swelling and pain after treatment of unilateral zygomatic bone fractures than conventional cooling. Trial registration German Clinical Trials Register ID: DRKS00004846 PMID:23895539

  18. [Critical reading of analytical observational studies].

    PubMed

    García Villar, C; Marín León, I

    2015-11-01

    Analytical observational studies provide very important information about real-life clinical practice and the natural history of diseases and can suggest causality. Furthermore, they are very common in scientific journals. The aim of this article is to review the main concepts necessary for the critical reading of articles about radiological studies with observational designs. It reviews the characteristics that case-control and cohort studies must have to ensure high quality. It explains a method of critical reading that involves checking the attributes that should be evaluated in each type of article using a structured list of specific questions. It underlines the main characteristics that confer credibility and confidence on the article evaluated. Readers are provided with tools for the critical analysis of the observational studies published in scientific journals. PMID:26123855

  19. Study of swelling behavior in ArF resist during development by the QCM method (3): observations of swelling layer elastic modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi

    2013-03-01

    The QCM method allows measurements of impedance, an index of swelling layer viscosity in a photoresist during development. While impedance is sometimes used as a qualitative index of change in the viscosity of the swelling layer, it has to date not been used quantitatively, for data analysis. We explored a method for converting impedance values to elastic modulus (Pa), a coefficient expressing viscosity. Applying this method, we compared changes in the viscosity of the swelling layer in an ArF resist generated during development in a TMAH developing solution and in a TBAH developing solution. This paper reports the results of this comparative study.

  20. Evaluation of internal noise methods for Hotelling observer models

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yani; Pham, Binh T.; Eckstein, Miguel P.

    2007-08-15

    The inclusion of internal noise in model observers is a common method to allow for quantitative comparisons between human and model observer performance in visual detection tasks. In this article, we studied two different strategies for inserting internal noise into Hotelling model observers. In the first strategy, internal noise was added to the output of individual channels: (a) Independent nonuniform channel noise, (b) independent uniform channel noise. In the second strategy, internal noise was added to the decision variable arising from the combination of channel responses. The standard deviation of the zero mean internal noise was either constant or proportional to: (a) the decision variable's standard deviation due to the external noise, (b) the decision variable's variance caused by the external noise, (c) the decision variable magnitude on a trial to trial basis. We tested three model observers: square window Hotelling observer (HO), channelized Hotelling observer (CHO), and Laguerre-Gauss Hotelling observer (LGHO) using a four alternative forced choice (4AFC) signal known exactly but variable task with a simulated signal embedded in real x-ray coronary angiogram backgrounds. The results showed that the internal noise method that led to the best prediction of human performance differed across the studied model observers. The CHO model best predicted human observer performance with the channel internal noise. The HO and LGHO best predicted human observer performance with the decision variable internal noise. The present results might guide researchers with the choice of methods to include internal noise into Hotelling model observers when evaluating and optimizing medical image quality.

  1. A pragmatic method for electronic medical record-based observational studies: developing an electronic medical records retrieval system for clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Keiichi; Sumi, Eriko; Yamazaki, Toru; Asai, Keita; Yamori, Masashi; Teramukai, Satoshi; Bessho, Kazuhisa; Yokode, Masayuki; Fukushima, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    Objective The use of electronic medical record (EMR) data is necessary to improve clinical research efficiency. However, it is not easy to identify patients who meet research eligibility criteria and collect the necessary information from EMRs because the data collection process must integrate various techniques, including the development of a data warehouse and translation of eligibility criteria into computable criteria. This research aimed to demonstrate an electronic medical records retrieval system (ERS) and an example of a hospital-based cohort study that identified both patients and exposure with an ERS. We also evaluated the feasibility and usefulness of the method. Design The system was developed and evaluated. Participants In total, 800 000 cases of clinical information stored in EMRs at our hospital were used. Primary and secondary outcome measures The feasibility and usefulness of the ERS, the method to convert text from eligible criteria to computable criteria, and a confirmation method to increase research data accuracy. Results To comprehensively and efficiently collect information from patients participating in clinical research, we developed an ERS. To create the ERS database, we designed a multidimensional data model optimised for patient identification. We also devised practical methods to translate narrative eligibility criteria into computable parameters. We applied the system to an actual hospital-based cohort study performed at our hospital and converted the test results into computable criteria. Based on this information, we identified eligible patients and extracted data necessary for confirmation by our investigators and for statistical analyses with our ERS. Conclusions We propose a pragmatic methodology to identify patients from EMRs who meet clinical research eligibility criteria. Our ERS allowed for the efficient collection of information on the eligibility of a given patient, reduced the labour required from the investigators and

  2. Robust Clustering Method in the Presence of Scattered Observations.

    PubMed

    Notsu, Akifumi; Eguchi, Shinto

    2016-06-01

    Contamination of scattered observations, which are either featureless or unlike the other observations, frequently degrades the performance of standard methods such as K-means and model-based clustering. In this letter, we propose a robust clustering method in the presence of scattered observations called Gamma-clust. Gamma-clust is based on a robust estimation for cluster centers using gamma-divergence. It provides a proper solution for clustering in which the distributions for clustered data are nonnormal, such as t-distributions with different variance-covariance matrices and degrees of freedom. As demonstrated in a simulation study and data analysis, Gamma-clust is more flexible and provides superior results compared to the robustified K-means and model-based clustering. PMID:26942745

  3. A Comparison of Methods for Ocean Reconstruction from Sparse Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streletz, G. J.; Kronenberger, M.; Weber, C.; Gebbie, G.; Hagen, H.; Garth, C.; Hamann, B.; Kreylos, O.; Kellogg, L. H.; Spero, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    We present a comparison of two methods for developing reconstructions of oceanic scalar property fields from sparse scattered observations. Observed data from deep sea core samples provide valuable information regarding the properties of oceans in the past. However, because the locations of sample sites are distributed on the ocean floor in a sparse and irregular manner, developing a global ocean reconstruction is a difficult task. Our methods include a flow-based and a moving least squares -based approximation method. The flow-based method augments the process of interpolating or approximating scattered scalar data by incorporating known flow information. The scheme exploits this additional knowledge to define a non-Euclidean distance measure between points in the spatial domain. This distance measure is used to create a reconstruction of the desired scalar field on the spatial domain. The resulting reconstruction thus incorporates information from both the scattered samples and the known flow field. The second method does not assume a known flow field, but rather works solely with the observed scattered samples. It is based on a modification of the moving least squares approach, a weighted least squares approximation method that blends local approximations into a global result. The modifications target the selection of data used for these local approximations and the construction of the weighting function. The definition of distance used in the weighting function is crucial for this method, so we use a machine learning approach to determine a set of near-optimal parameters for the weighting. We have implemented both of the reconstruction methods and have tested them using several sparse oceanographic datasets. Based upon these studies, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method and suggest possible ways to combine aspects of both methods in order to achieve an overall high-quality reconstruction.

  4. Methods of Studying Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinemann, Allen W.; Shontz, Franklin C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a method that permits answering research questions of general importance by examining individuals in a comprehensive, whole-person manner. Discusses their use in two studies of persons with spinal cord injuries. (LLL)

  5. Offering fragile X syndrome carrier screening: a prospective mixed-methods observational study comparing carrier screening of pregnant and non-pregnant women in the general population

    PubMed Central

    Martyn, M; Anderson, V; Archibald, A; Carter, R; Cohen, J; Delatycki, M; Donath, S; Emery, J; Halliday, J; Hill, M; Sheffield, L; Slater, H; Tassone, F; Younie, S; Metcalfe, S

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the leading cause of inherited intellectual and developmental disability. Policy development relating to carrier screening programmes for FXS requires input from large studies examining not only test uptake but also psychosocial aspects. This study will compare carrier screening in pregnant and non-pregnant populations, examining informed decision-making, psychosocial issues and health economics. Methods and Analysis Pregnant and non-pregnant women are being recruited from general practices and obstetric services. Women receive study information either in person or through clinic mail outs. Women are provided pretest counselling by a genetic counsellor and make a decision about testing in their own time. Data are being collected from two questionnaires: one completed at the time of making the decision about testing and the second 1 month later. Additional data are gathered through qualitative interviews conducted at several time points with a subset of participating women, including all women with a positive test result, and with staff from recruiting clinics. A minimum sample size of 500 women/group has been calculated to give us 88% power to detect a 10% difference in test uptake and 87% power to detect a 10% difference in informed choice between the pregnant and non-pregnant groups. Questionnaire data will be analysed using descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression models. Interview data will be thematically analysed. Willingness-to-pay and cost effectiveness analyses will also be performed. Recruitment started in July 2009 and data collection will be completed by December 2013. Ethics and Dissemination Ethics approval has been granted by the Universities of Melbourne and Western Australia and by recruiting clinics, where required. Results will be reported in peer-reviewed publications, conference presentations and through a website http://www.fragilexscreening.net.au. The results of this study will

  6. Parent-Collected Behavioral Observations: An Empirical Comparison of Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadler, Cy B.; Roberts, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Treatments for disruptive behaviors are often guided by parent reports on questionnaires, rather than by multiple methods of assessment. Professional observations and clinic analogs exist to complement questionnaires, but parents can also collect useful behavioral observations to inform and guide treatment. Two parent observation methods of child…

  7. An Observational Assessment Method for Aging Laboratory Rats

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Pamela M; Jarema, Kimberly A; Kurtz, David M; MacPhail, Robert C

    2010-01-01

    The rapid growth of the aging human population highlights the need for laboratory animal models to study the basic biologic processes of aging and susceptibility to disease, drugs, and environmental pollutants. Methods are needed to evaluate the health of aging animals over time, particularly methods for efficiently monitoring large research colonies. Here we describe an observational assessment method that scores appearance, posture, mobility, and muscle tone on a 5-point scale that can be completed in about 1 min. A score of 1 indicates no deterioration, whereas a score of 5 indicates severe deterioration. Tests were applied to male Brown Norway rats between 12 and 36 mo of age (n = 32). The rats were participating concurrently in experiments on the behavioral effects of intermittent exposure (approximately every 4 mo) to short-acting environmental chemicals. Results demonstrated that aging-related signs of deterioration did not appear before 18 mo of age. Assessment scores and variability then increased with age. Body weights increased until approximately 24 mo, then remained stable, but decreased after 31 mo for the few remaining rats. The incidence of death increased slightly from 20 to 28 mo of age and then rose sharply; median survival age was approximately 30 mo, with a maximum of 36 mo. The results indicate that our observational assessment method supports efficient monitoring of the health of aging rats and may be useful in studies on susceptibility to diseases, drugs, and toxicants during old age. PMID:21205442

  8. Clinical Utility of an Observation and Response Chart With Human Factors Design Characteristics and a Track and Trigger System: Study Protocol for a Two-Phase Multisite Multiple-Methods Design

    PubMed Central

    McKinley, Sharon; Perry, Lin; Duffield, Christine; Iedema, Rick; Gallagher, Robyn; Fry, Margaret; Roche, Michael; Allen, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical deterioration of adult patients in acute medical-surgical wards continues to occur, despite a range of systems and processes designed to minimize this risk. In Australia, a standardized template for adult observation charts using human factors design principles and decision-support characteristics was developed to improve the detection of and response to abnormal vital signs. Objective To describe the study protocol for the clinical testing of these observation and response charts (ORCs). Methods We propose a two-phase multisite multiple-methods design to test the initial clinical utility of the charts in 10 hospitals of differing types and sizes across state jurisdictions in Australia. Data collection in the first phase includes user surveys, observations and field notes by project officers, handover de-briefs (short interviews with small groups of staff), and an audit of ORC documentation completion compared to the site’s existing observation chart. For the second phase, data will be collected using a retrospective audit of observation documentation from the previous hospital observation chart, prospective audit of observation documentation following implementation of the selected ORC, user focus groups, observational field notes, and patient outcome data from routinely collected organizational data sources. Results Site selection and preparation, project officer training, chart selection and implementation, participant recruitment, and data collection has been completed and the analysis of these results are in progress. Conclusions This detailed description of these study methods and data collection approaches will enable a comprehensive assessment of the clinical utility of these newly developed track and trigger charts and will be useful for clinicians and researchers when planning and implementing similar studies. Potential methodological limitations are also noted. PMID:25116446

  9. Observation impact analysis methods for storm surge forecasting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlaan, Martin; Sumihar, Julius

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a simple method for estimating the impact of assimilating individual or group of observations on forecast accuracy improvement. This method is derived from the nsemble-based observation impact analysis method of Liu and Kalnay (Q J R Meteorol Soc 134:1327-1335, 2008). The method described here is different in two ways from their method. Firstly, it uses a quadratic function of model-minus-observation residuals as a measure of forecast accuracy, instead of model-minus-analysis. Secondly, it simply makes use of time series of observations and the corresponding model output generated without data assimilation. These time series are usually available in an operational database. Hence, it is simple to implement. It can be used before any data assimilation is implemented. Therefore, it is useful as a design tool of a data assimilation system, namely for selecting which observations to assimilate. The method can also be used as a diagnostic tool, for example, to assess if all observation contributes positively to the accuracy improvement. The method is applicable for systems with stationary error process and fixed observing network. Using twin experiments with a simple one-dimensional advection model, the method is shown to work perfectly in an idealized situation. The method is used to evaluate the observation impact in the operational storm surge forecasting system based on the Dutch Continental Shelf Model version 5 (DCSMv5).

  10. 3D reconstruction methods of coronal structures by radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Bastian, T. S.; White, Stephen M.

    1992-11-01

    The ability to carry out the three dimensional (3D) reconstruction of structures in the solar corona would represent a major advance in the study of the physical properties in active regions and in flares. Methods which allow a geometric reconstruction of quasistationary coronal structures (for example active region loops) or dynamic structures (for example flaring loops) are described: stereoscopy of multi-day imaging observations by the VLA (Very Large Array); tomography of optically thin emission (in radio or soft x-rays); multifrequency band imaging by the VLA; and tracing of magnetic field lines by propagating electron beams.

  11. 3D reconstruction methods of coronal structures by radio observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Bastian, T. S.; White, Stephen M.

    1992-01-01

    The ability to carry out the three dimensional (3D) reconstruction of structures in the solar corona would represent a major advance in the study of the physical properties in active regions and in flares. Methods which allow a geometric reconstruction of quasistationary coronal structures (for example active region loops) or dynamic structures (for example flaring loops) are described: stereoscopy of multi-day imaging observations by the VLA (Very Large Array); tomography of optically thin emission (in radio or soft x-rays); multifrequency band imaging by the VLA; and tracing of magnetic field lines by propagating electron beams.

  12. A new method of ARGO buoys system observation data interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, Natalia; Agoshkov, Valery; Parmuzin, Eugene

    2013-04-01

    Study and solution of geophysical hydrodynamics problems are based on experimental and observation data from different sources. Despite large amount of observation data, availability of them often remains insufficient because data are provided on sets of irregular points and during the asynchronous moments of time. In this work a new method of temperature fields creation on regular grids according to observation data is offered taking into account a transfer by their currents. By means of this method it is possible to receive "pseudo-observations" for the required moment of time and, thereby, to solve a problem of an asynchronism of geophysical information. The results of numerical experiments on the World Ocean area within ARGO buoys system data are given. This study was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project 11-01-12046, 12-05-00469) and by the Russian Federal target Program "Research and educational human resources for innovative Russia" (project 8219) for 2009-2013 and the Federal target program "Researches and development in priority fields of scientific and technological complex of Russia for 2007-2013" (project 11.519.11.1005) and the Ministry of education and science of Russia, project 14.A18.21.1901. References 1. Zakharova N.B., Agoshkov V.I., Parmuzin E.I., The new method of ARGO buoys system observation data interpolation. Russian Journal of Numerical Analysis and Mathematical Modelling. Vol. 28, Issue 1, 2013. 2. Agoshkov V.I., Zakharova N.B., The creation of piecewise - harmonic interpolation on spherical surfaces. Russian Journal of Numerical Analysis and Mathematical Modelling. Vol. 27, Issue 6, 2012. 3. Zakharova N.B., Lebedev S.A., Interpolation of on-line data of the ARGO buoys system for data assimilation in the World ocean circulation model. Actual problems in remote sensing of the Earth from space: Principal physics, physical methods and technologies for monitoring of environment, of potentially dangerous occurrences

  13. Using a Harmonic Scalpel "Drilling and Clamping" Method to Implement Zero Ischemic Robotic-assisted Partial Nephrectomy: An Observation Case Report Study.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chen-Pang; Lin, Yu-Hsiang; Hsu, Yu-Chao; Chen, Chien-Lun; Chang, Phei-Lang; Tsui, Ke-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RAPN) has gradually become a popular minimally invasive nephron-sparing surgical option for small renal tumors. Ischemic injury should be minimized because it impacts renal function outcomes following partial nephrectomy. Herein, the authors detail the technique and present initial perioperative outcomes of our novel harmonic scalpel "drilling and clamping" method to implement zero-ischemic RAPN. The authors prospectively collected baseline and perioperative data of patients who underwent zero ischemic RAPN performed by our harmonic scalpel "drilling and clamping" method. From April 2012 to December 2014, a total of 19 consecutive zero ischemic RAPN procedures were performed by a single surgeon. For 18 of the 19 patients, RAPN using our harmonic scalpel "Drilling and Clamping" method was successfully completed without the need for hilar clamping. The median tumor size was 3.4 cm (range: 1.8-6.2); operative time was 3.2 hours (range: 1.9-4.5); blood loss was 100 mL (range: 30-950); and postoperative hospital stay was 4 days (3-26). One patient required intraoperative blood transfusion. Two patients had intra or postoperative complications: 1 was converted to traditional laparotomy because of massive bleeding, whereas another had postoperative stress ulcer. Pathology confirmed renal cell carcinoma in 13 patients (63.2%), angiomyolipoma in 6 patients: (31.5%), and oncocytoma in 1 patient (5.3%). Mean pre- and postoperative serum creatinine (0.82 mg/dL and 0.85 mg/dL, respectively), estimated glomerular filtration rate (84.12 and 82.18, respectively), and hemoglobin (13.27 g/dL and 12.71 g/dL, respectively) were comparable. The authors present a novel zero-ischemic technique for RAPN. They believe that this technique is feasible and reproducible. PMID:26817867

  14. Can we observe changes in mRNA “state”? Overview of methods to study mRNA interactions with regulatory proteins relevant in cancer related processes

    PubMed Central

    Zurla, C.; Jung, J.; Santangelo, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    RNA binding proteins (RBP) regulate the editing, localization, stabilization, translation, and degradation of ribonucleic acids (RNA) through their interactions with specific cis-acting elements within target RNAs. Post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are directly involved in the control of the immune response and stress response and their alterations play a crucial role in cancer related processes. In this review, we discuss mRNAs and RNA binding proteins relevant to tumorigenesis, current methodologies for detecting RNA interactions, and last, we describe a novel method to detect such interactions, which combines peptide modified, RNA imaging probes (FMTRIPs) with proximity ligation (PLA) and rolling circle amplification (RCA). This assay detects native RNA in a sequence specific and single RNA sensitive manner, and PLA allows for the quantification and localization of protein–mRNA interactions with single-interaction sensitivity in situ. PMID:26605378

  15. Qualitative research: Observational methods in health care settings.

    PubMed Central

    Mays, N.; Pope, C.

    1995-01-01

    Clinicians used to observing individual patients, and epidemiologists trained to observe the course of disease, may be forgiven for misunderstanding the term observational method as used in qualitative research. In contrast to the clinician or epidemiologist, the qualitative researcher systematically watches people and events to find out about behaviours and interactions in natural settings. Observation, in this sense, epitomises the idea of the researcher as the research instrument. It involves "going into the field"--describing and analysing what has been seen. In health care settings this method has been insightful and illuminating, but it is not without pitfalls for the unprepared researcher. Images p183-a PMID:7613435

  16. Methods for studying oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Andrew M.; Cooley, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila oogenesis is an excellent system for the study of developmental cell biology. Active areas of research include stem cell maintenance, gamete development, pattern formation, cytoskeletal regulation, intercellular communication, intercellular transport, cell polarity, cell migration, cell death, morphogenesis, cell cycle control, and many more. The large size and relatively simple organization of egg chambers make them ideally suited for microscopy of both living and fixed whole mount tissue. A wide range of tools is available for oogenesis research. Newly available shRNA transgenic lines provide an alternative to classic loss-of-function F2 screens and clonal screens. Gene expression can be specifically controlled in either germline or somatic cells using the Gal4/UAS system. Protein trap lines provide fluorescent tags of proteins expressed at endogenous levels for live imaging and screening backgrounds. This review provides information on many available reagents and key methods for research in oogenesis. PMID:24440745

  17. Compositing radar reflectivity observations with an inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Sancho, Jordi; Berenguer, Marc; Sempere-Torres, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Quantitative Precipitation Estimation (QPE) has been one of the main applications of weather radars since its early stages. Nowadays, many advances have improved such estimates and radar networks have been deployed in many countries. In parallel, uncertainty in radar QPE has become a subject of interest by itself because of its significant role in the quality of estimates. When several radars cover the same area, some sources of uncertainty (e.g. path attenuation by intense precipitation, beam blockage or beam broadening), can be dealt using information from the least-affected radars instead of only reproducing a single radar approach in each one. So far, composites of radar observations are carried out through simple criteria (by picking the closest observation, the maximum value…) or quality indices -that need a priori definition of quality descriptors. This study proposes an alternative methodology to retrieve the 3-dimensional reflectivity field most compatible with the measurements from the different radars of the network. With this aim, the methodology uses a model that simulates the radar sampling of the atmosphere. The model settings consider the specific features of each radar such as the location, hardware parameters (frequency, beam width, pulse length…) and scanning strategy. The methodology follows the concept of an inverse method based on the minimization of a cost function that penalizes discrepancies between the simulated and actual observations for each radar of the network. It is worth noting that for radar at attenuating wavelengths, the proposed methodology implicitly corrects the effect of attenuation due to intense rainfall. The methodology has been applied on the network of C-band radars in the vicinity of Barcelona, Spain. The retrievals have been obtained for a 12 hours of rainfall with reflectivity observations of two radars; observations from a third independent radar have been used for verification at different heights. Conventional

  18. Observing Protein & Energy Nutrition (OPEN) Study

    Cancer.gov

    The Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition (OPEN) Study was designed to assess dietary measurement error by comparing results from self-reported dietary intake data with four dietary biomarkers: doubly labeled water and urinary nitrogen, sodium, and potassium.

  19. Community Engagement in Observational Human Exposure Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although observational human exposure studies do not deliberately expose participants to chemicals or environmental conditions, merely involving people as research participants and conducting research inside homes raises ethical issues. Community engagement offers a promising st...

  20. A Numerical Climate Observing Network Design Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stammer, Detlef

    2003-01-01

    This project was concerned with three related questions of an optimal design of a climate observing system: 1. The spatial sampling characteristics required from an ARGO system. 2. The degree to which surface observations from ARGO can be used to calibrate and test satellite remote sensing observations of sea surface salinity (SSS) as it is anticipated now. 3. The more general design of an climate observing system as it is required in the near future for CLIVAR in the Atlantic. An important question in implementing an observing system is that of the sampling density required to observe climate-related variations in the ocean. For that purpose this project was concerned with the sampling requirements for the ARGO float system, but investigated also other elements of a climate observing system. As part of this project we studied the horizontal and vertical sampling characteristics of a global ARGO system which is required to make it fully complementary to altimeter data with the goal to capture climate related variations on large spatial scales (less thanAttachment: 1000 km). We addressed this question in the framework of a numerical model study in the North Atlantic with an 1/6 horizontal resolution. The advantage of a numerical design study is the knowledge of the full model state. Sampled by a synthetic float array, model results will therefore allow to test and improve existing deployment strategies with the goal to make the system as optimal and cost-efficient as possible. Attachment: "Optimal observations for variational data assimilation".

  1. LONGITUDINAL COHORT METHODS STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate exposure classification tools are required to link exposure with health effects in epidemiological studies. Exposure classification for occupational studies is relatively easy compared to predicting residential childhood exposures. Recent NHEXAS (Maryland) study articl...

  2. Observations of Bacterial Behavior during Infection Using the ARGOS Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charest, A. J.; Algarni, S.; Iannacchione, G. S.

    2015-03-01

    This research employed the Area Recorded Generalized Optical Scattering (ARGOS) approach which allowed for the observation of bacterial changes in terms of individual particles and population dynamics in real time. This new approach allows for an aqueous environment to be manipulated while conducting time-specific measurements over an indefinite amount of time. This current study provides a more time-specific method in which the bacteria remained within the initial conditions and allows for more time precision than provided by analyzing concentrations of plaque-forming units (PFU). This study involved the bacteria (F-amp) during infection by bacteriophage (MS2). The relative total intensity allows for detailed measurements of the bacteria population over time. The bacteria characteristics were also evaluated such as the root mean square image difference (at specific wavevectors), fractal dimension and effective radius. The growth rate of the infected bacteria occurred at a rate higher than the uninfected bacteria similarly, the death rates were also higher for the infected bacteria than the uninfected bacteria. The present study indicates that bacteria may react to infection by increasing the rate of population growth.

  3. Observation of near earth asteroids with using of combined method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sybiryakova, Yevgeniya; Shulga, Alexandr; Vovk, Vasyl; Kulichenko, Mykola

    2016-07-01

    Observation of many near earth asteroids (NEAs) especially small diameters (less than 140m) are possible only during close approach with Earth when their magnitude and apparent motion increasing. The combined method of observation is used in RI NAO for observation of NEAs with high apparent motion. Combined method consists in separation of processes of observation of reference stars and NEA and using of the short time delay and integration mode (TDI). The main condition of TDI mode using is the fixing the column of CCD in the direction of NEA motion, for this goal the special device camera rotator was developed and applied. Camera rotator rotates the CCD camera around the optical axis of lens. All observations in RI NAO were carried out with using of KT-50 telescope (D=0.5m, F=3.0m). The telescope equipped with CCD-camera Apogee Alta U9000 (3k×3k) and camera rotator. Field of view of the telescope is 0.7°×0.7°. Limiting magnitude is 18.5. Since 2008, 5300 positions of 325 NEAs have been obtained on KT-50 telescope. RI NAO has an experience in the follow-up NEA observation and small size and low elongation (with solar elongation less then 45°) NEA observation. (O-C) of position are within ±1˝.

  4. Reproducibility in Nerve Morphometry: Comparison between Methods and among Observers

    PubMed Central

    Bilego Neto, Antônio Paulo da Costa; Silveira, Fernando Braga Cassiano; Rodrigues da Silva, Greice Anne; Sanada, Luciana Sayuri; Fazan, Valéria Paula Sassoli

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the reproducibility of a semiautomated method (computerized with manual intervention) for nerve morphometry (counting and measuring myelinated fibers) between three observers with different levels of expertise and experience with the method. Comparisons between automatic (fully computerized) and semiautomated morphometric methods performed by the same computer software using the same nerve images were also performed. Sural nerves of normal adult rats were used. Automatic and semiautomated morphometry of the myelinated fibers were made through the computer software KS-400. Semiautomated morphometry was conducted by three independent observers on the same images, using the semiautomated method. Automatic morphometry overestimated the myelin sheath area, thus overestimating the myelinated fiber size and underestimating the axon size. Fiber distributions overestimation was of 0.5 μm. For the semiautomated morphometry, no differences were found between observers for myelinated fiber and axon size distributions. Overestimation of the myelin sheath size of normal fibers by the fully automatic method might have an impact when morphometry is used for diagnostic purposes. We suggest that not only semiautomated morphometry results can be compared between different centers in clinical trials but it can also be performed by more than one investigator in one single experiment, being a reliable and reproducible method. PMID:23841086

  5. Embedding clinical interventions into observational studies.

    PubMed

    Newman, Anne B; Avilés-Santa, M Larissa; Anderson, Garnet; Heiss, Gerardo; Howard, Wm James; Krucoff, Mitchell; Kuller, Lewis H; Lewis, Cora E; Robinson, Jennifer G; Taylor, Herman; Treviño, Roberto P; Weintraub, William

    2016-01-01

    Novel approaches to observational studies and clinical trials could improve the cost-effectiveness and speed of translation of research. Hybrid designs that combine elements of clinical trials with observational registries or cohort studies should be considered as part of a long-term strategy to transform clinical trials and epidemiology, adapting to the opportunities of big data and the challenges of constrained budgets. Important considerations include study aims, timing, breadth and depth of the existing infrastructure that can be leveraged, participant burden, likely participation rate and available sample size in the cohort, required sample size for the trial, and investigator expertise. Community engagement and stakeholder (including study participants) support are essential for these efforts to succeed. PMID:26611435

  6. Observations on variational and projector Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Umrigar, C. J.

    2015-10-28

    Variational Monte Carlo and various projector Monte Carlo (PMC) methods are presented in a unified manner. Similarities and differences between the methods and choices made in designing the methods are discussed. Both methods where the Monte Carlo walk is performed in a discrete space and methods where it is performed in a continuous space are considered. It is pointed out that the usual prescription for importance sampling may not be advantageous depending on the particular quantum Monte Carlo method used and the observables of interest, so alternate prescriptions are presented. The nature of the sign problem is discussed for various versions of PMC methods. A prescription for an exact PMC method in real space, i.e., a method that does not make a fixed-node or similar approximation and does not have a finite basis error, is presented. This method is likely to be practical for systems with a small number of electrons. Approximate PMC methods that are applicable to larger systems and go beyond the fixed-node approximation are also discussed.

  7. Observational Studies of Transiting Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, J.

    2015-07-01

    The study of transiting extrasolar planets is only 15 years old, but has matured into a rich area of research. I review the observational aspects of this work, concentrating on the discovery of transits, the characterization of planets from photometry and spectroscopy, the Homogeneous Studies project, starspots, orbital obliquities, and the atmospheric properties of the known planets. I begin with historical context and conclude with a glance to a future of TESS, CHEOPS, Gaia and PLATO.

  8. Testing Fractal Methods on Observed and Simulated Solar Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M.; Falconer, D. A.; Lee, J. K.; Jones, C.

    2003-01-01

    The term "magnetic complexity" has not been sufficiently quantified. To accomplish this, we must understand the relationship between the observed magnetic field of solar active regions and fractal dimension measurements. Using data from the Marshall Space Flight Center's vector magnetograph ranging from December 1991 to July 2001, we compare the results of several methods of calculating a fractal dimension, e.g., Hurst coefficient, the Higuchi method, power spectrum, and 2-D Wavelet Packet Analysis. In addition, we apply these methods to synthetic data, beginning with representations of very simple dipole regions, ending with regions that are magnetically complex.

  9. Method for observing phase objects without halos and directional shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshimasa; Kajitani, Kazuo; Ohde, Hisashi

    2015-03-01

    A new microscopy method for observing phase objects without halos and directional shadows is proposed. The key optical element is an annular aperture at the front focal plane of a condenser with a larger diameter than those used in standard phase contrast microscopy. The light flux passing through the annular aperture is changed by the specimen's surface profile and then passes through an objective and contributes to image formation. This paper presents essential conditions for realizing the method. In this paper, images of colonies formed by induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells using this method are compared with the conventional phase contrast method and the bright-field method when the NA of the illumination is small to identify differences among these techniques. The outlines of the iPS cells are clearly visible with this method, whereas they are not clearly visible due to halos when using the phase contrast method or due to weak contrast when using the bright-field method. Other images using this method are also presented to demonstrate a capacity of this method: a mouse ovum and superimposition of several different images of mouse iPS cells.

  10. Mobile vehicle road and weather observation quality check methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, Daniel Raymond

    Today State Departments of Transportation rely more and more on road weather data to make maintenance decisions. Inaccurate data can result in wrong treatment applications or inadequate staffing levels to maintain the roadway at the desired level of service. Previous methods of road condition data reporting have been limited to static in situ sensor stations. These road weather information systems (RWIS) provide varied data about precipitation, winds, temperature, and more, but their siting does not always provide an accurate representation of weather and road conditions along the roadway. The use of mobile data collection from vehicles travelling the highway corridors may assist in the locations where RWIS sitings are sparse or non-existent. The United States Department of Transporation's "Connected Vehicle" (formally IntelliDrive) research project is designed to create a fully connected transportation system providing road and weather data collection from an extensive array of vehicles. While the implementation of Connected Vehicle is in the future, some of the theories and technologies are already in place today. Several states, as a part of the Pooled Fund Study Maintenance Decision Support System (MDSS), have equipped their winter maintenance vehicles with Mobile Data Collection Automated / Vehicle Location (MDC/AVL) systems. In addition, since 1996, automobiles sold in the United States are required to be equipped with an Onboard Diagnostic Version 2 (OBDII) port that streams live data from sensors located in and around the vehicle. While these sensors were designed for vehicle diagnostics, some of the data can be used to determine weather characteristics around the vehicle. The OBDII data can be collected by a smartphone and sent to a server in real time to be processed. These mobile systems may fill the information gap along the roads that stationary environmental sensor stations are not able to collect. Particular concern and care needs to be focused on

  11. Ozone Lidar Observations for Air Quality Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lihua; Newchurch, Mike; Kuang, Shi; Burris, John F.; Huang, Guanyu; Pour-Biazar, Arastoo; Koshak, William; Follette-Cook, Melanie B.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; McGee, Thomas J.; Sullivan, John T.; Langford, Andrew O.; Senff, Christoph J.; Alvarez, Raul; Eloranta, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone lidars are well suited to measuring the high spatio-temporal variability of this important trace gas. Furthermore, lidar measurements in conjunction with balloon soundings, aircraft, and satellite observations provide substantial information about a variety of atmospheric chemical and physical processes. Examples of processes elucidated by ozone-lidar measurements are presented, and modeling studies using WRF-Chem, RAQMS, and DALES/LES models illustrate our current understanding and shortcomings of these processes.

  12. Advanced Methods of Observing Surface Plasmon Polaritons and Magnons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Abolghasem Mobaraki

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The primary objectives of this thesis are the investigation of the theoretical and experimental aspects of the design and construction of advanced techniques for the excitation of surface plasmon-polaritons, surface magneto -plasmon-polaritons and surface magnons. They involve on -line observation of these phenomena and to accomplish these goals, analytical studies of the characteristic behaviour of these phenomena have been undertaken. For excitations of surface plasmon- and surface magneto-plasmon-polaritons the most robust and conventional configuration, namely Prism-Medium-Air, coupled to a novel angle scan (prism spinning) method was employed. The system to be described here can automatically measure the reflectivity of a multilayer system over a range of angles that includes the resonance angle in an Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) experiment. The computer procedure that controls the system is quite versatile so that it allows any right-angle prism of different angle or refractive index to be utilised. It also provided probes to check for optical alignment within the system. Moreover, it performs the angular scan many times and then averages the results in order to reduce the environmental and other possible sources of noise within the system. The mechanical side of the system is unique and could eventually be adopted as a marketable piece of equipment. It consists of a turntable for holding the prism-sample assembly and a drive motor in conjunction with a servo-potentiometer whose output not only operates the turntable but also sends a signal to a computer to measure accurately its position. The interface unit enables a computer to control automatically an angular scan ATR experiment for measuring the resonance reflectivity spectrum of a multilayer system. The interface unit uses an H-bridge switch formed by four bipolar power transistor and two small signal MOSFETs to convert

  13. An observational assessment method for aging laboratory rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The growth of the aging population highlights the need for laboratory animal models to study the basic biological processes ofaging and susceptibility to toxic chemicals and disease. Methods to evaluate health ofaging animals over time are needed, especially efficient methods for...

  14. Empirical methods of reducing the observations in geodetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadaj, Roman

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents empirical methodology of reducing various kinds of observations in geodetic network. A special case of reducing the observation concerns cartographic mapping. For numerical illustration and comparison of methods an application of the conformal Gauss-Krüger mapping was used. Empirical methods are an alternative to the classic differential and multi-stages methods. Numerical benefits concern in particular very long geodesics, created for example by GNSS vectors. In conventional methods the numerical errors of reduction values are significantly dependent on the length of the geodesic. The proposed empirical methods do not have this unfavorable characteristics. Reduction value is determined as a difference (or especially scaled difference) of the corresponding measures of geometric elements (distances, angles), wherein these measures are approximated independently in two spaces based on the known and corresponding approximate coordinates of the network points. Since in the iterative process of the network adjustment, coordinates of the points are systematically improved, approximated reductions also converge to certain optimal values.

  15. A novel observer design method for neural mass models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xian; Miao, Dong-Kai; Gao, Qing; Xu, Shi-Yun

    2015-09-01

    Neural mass models can simulate the generation of electroencephalography (EEG) signals with different rhythms, and therefore the observation of the states of these models plays a significant role in brain research. The structure of neural mass models is special in that they can be expressed as Lurie systems. The developed techniques in Lurie system theory are applicable to these models. We here provide a new observer design method for neural mass models by transforming these models and the corresponding error systems into nonlinear systems with Lurie form. The purpose is to establish appropriate conditions which ensure the convergence of the estimation error. The effectiveness of the proposed method is illustrated by numerical simulations. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61473245, 61004050, and 51207144).

  16. The NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, Stephen; Maier, Mark; Di Pietro, David

    2016-01-01

    NOAA is beginning a study, the NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture (NSOSA) study, to plan for the future operational environmental satellite system that will follow GOES and JPSS, beginning about 2030. This is an opportunity to design a modern architecture with no pre-conceived notions regarding instruments, platforms, orbits, etc. The NSOSA study will develop and evaluate architecture alternatives to include partner and commercial alternatives that are likely to become available. The objectives will include both functional needs and strategic characteristics (e.g., flexibility, responsiveness, sustainability). Part of this study is the Space Platform Requirements Working Group (SPRWG), which is being commissioned by NESDIS. The SPRWG is charged to assess new or existing user needs and to provide relative priorities for observational needs in the context of the future architecture. SPRWG results will serve as input to the process for new foundational (Level 0 and Level 1) requirements for the next generation of NOAA satellites that follow the GOES-R, JPSS, DSCOVR, Jason-3, and COSMIC-2 missions.

  17. Advanced Earth Observation System Instrumentation Study (aeosis)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R.; Grant, F.; Malchow, H.; Walker, B.

    1975-01-01

    Various types of measurements were studied for estimating the orbit and/or attitude of an Earth Observation Satellite. An investigation was made into the use of known ground targets in the earth sensor imagery, in combination with onboard star sightings and/or range and range rate measurements by ground tracking stations or tracking satellites (TDRSS), to estimate satellite attitude, orbital ephemeris, and gyro bias drift. Generalized measurement equations were derived for star measurements with a particular type of star tracker, and for landmark measurements with a multispectral scanner being proposed for an advanced Earth Observation Satellite. The use of infra-red horizon measurements to estimate the attitude and gyro bias drift of a geosynchronous satellite was explored.

  18. The World Health Organization hand hygiene observation method.

    PubMed

    Sax, Hugo; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Chraïti, Marie-Noëlle; Boyce, John; Larson, Elaine; Pittet, Didier

    2009-12-01

    Monitoring hand hygiene adherence and providing performance feedback to health care workers is a critical component of multimodal hand hygiene promotion programs, but important variations exist in the way adherence is measured. Within the framework of the World Health Organization's (WHO) First Global Patient Safety Challenge known as "Clean Care is Safer Care," an evidence-based, user-centered concept, "My five moments for hand hygiene," has been developed for measuring, teaching, and reporting hand hygiene adherence. This concept is an integral part of the WHO's hand hygiene improvement strategy conceived to translate the WHO Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care into practice. It has been tested in numerous health care facilities worldwide to ensure its applicability and adaptability to all settings irrespective of the resources available. Here we describe the WHO hand hygiene observation method in detail-the concept, the profile and the task of the observers, their training and validation, the data collection form, the scope, the selection of the observed staff, and the observation sessions-with the objective of making it accessible for universal use. Sample size estimates, survey analysis and report, and major bias and confounding factors associated with observation are discussed. PMID:20004812

  19. USGEO National Earth Observation Assessment Methods for Evaluating the Relative Contributions of Earth Observing Systems to Societal Benefit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, J.; Stryker, T.

    2015-12-01

    The second National Civil Earth Observation Assessment identifies the inputs and relative contributions of the portfolio of observing systems currently relied upon by Federal agencies to meet key Earth observing objectives. The Assessment employs a hierarchical value-tree framework that traces the pathways through which Earth observing systems contribute value across 13 societal benefit areas, utilizing multiple levels to provide logical traceability. This presentation describes the methods used to construct societal benefit area value-trees that include key objectives and the information products, services, and research derived from Earth observations that help satisfy them. It describes the methods for weighting nodes at multiple levels of each value-tree and the expert elicitation process for assessing the relative contributions of Earth observing systems to the development of information products, services, and research. The methodology employed in the Assessment is especially useful at assessing the interdependence and relative contributions of multiple Earth observing systems on the development of blended information products and tracing information pathways from direct observations through intermediate products, such as models, to end-products used to improve decision-making. This presentation will highlight case study examples from the 13 societal benefit areas (agriculture and forestry, biodiversity, climate, disasters, ecosystems, energy and mineral resources, human health, ocean and costal resources, space weather, transportation, water resources weather, and reference measurements) to demonstrate tractability from Earth observing systems, through information products and research that satisfy key objectives, to societal benefit.

  20. Globally Gridded Satellite observations for climate studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knapp, K.R.; Ansari, S.; Bain, C.L.; Bourassa, M.A.; Dickinson, M.J.; Funk, C.; Helms, C.N.; Hennon, C.C.; Holmes, C.D.; Huffman, G.J.; Kossin, J.P.; Lee, H.-T.; Loew, A.; Magnusdottir, G.

    2011-01-01

    Geostationary satellites have provided routine, high temporal resolution Earth observations since the 1970s. Despite the long period of record, use of these data in climate studies has been limited for numerous reasons, among them that no central archive of geostationary data for all international satellites exists, full temporal and spatial resolution data are voluminous, and diverse calibration and navigation formats encumber the uniform processing needed for multisatellite climate studies. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) set the stage for overcoming these issues by archiving a subset of the full-resolution geostationary data at ~10-km resolution at 3-hourly intervals since 1983. Recent efforts at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center to provide convenient access to these data include remapping the data to a standard map projection, recalibrating the data to optimize temporal homogeneity, extending the record of observations back to 1980, and reformatting the data for broad public distribution. The Gridded Satellite (GridSat) dataset includes observations from the visible, infrared window, and infrared water vapor channels. Data are stored in Network Common Data Format (netCDF) using standards that permit a wide variety of tools and libraries to process the data quickly and easily. A novel data layering approach, together with appropriate satellite and file metadata, allows users to access GridSat data at varying levels of complexity based on their needs. The result is a climate data record already in use by the meteorological community. Examples include reanalysis of tropical cyclones, studies of global precipitation, and detection and tracking of the intertropical convergence zone.

  1. Visual perception studies and observer models in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Arthur E

    2011-11-01

    Most academic radiologists will be familiar with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) studies. Fundamental studies of human observer performance are now usually performed by forced-choice methods. Both methods are based on signal detection theory. The ROC method gives an operating curve of true-positive versus false-positive probabilities. The area under the curve, A(Z), can be used a summary performance measure. In the forced-choice method, observers are given 2 or more images with one containing the signal. The observer's task is to select the option most likely to contain the signal. The percentage of correct responses, PC, is a summary performance measure. Precise comparison of the 2 methods is limited to very controlled experiments in which signals (simulated lesions for example) are carefully designed and detection or discrimination is limited by true random noise. Under these conditions, theory predicts a simple relationship between summary measures and human results are consistent with theory. There will be a description of forced-choice experimental methods and data analysis. There has also been considerable work on development of theoretic observer models. Human experiment results have used to evaluate the models. Models that correlate well with human performance in turn can be used for preliminary design of new imaging systems and for selection of image quality metrics for comparing equipment performance, this article will provide a summary of work during the last 30 years on evaluating human signal detection capabilities, observer models and image quality metrics. PMID:21978445

  2. Overview of the Ocean Observer Satellite Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, J. D.; McGuire, J. P.; Pichel, W. G.; Gerber, A. J.

    2002-12-01

    A two-year study of ocean satellite remote sensing requirements and instrument/satellite options is nearing completion. This Ocean Observer Study was sponsored by the U.S. Dept. of Commerce/Dept. of Defense/National Aeronautics and Space Administration Integrated Program Office, whose mission is to develop the future U.S. National Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). A comprehensive Ocean Observer User Requirements Document has been drafted by a team of over 150 government, academic, and private sector scientists, engineers, and administrators. Included are requirements for open and coastal ocean surface, cryospheric, hydrologic, and some land/hazard and atmospheric boundary layer parameters. This document was then used as input to the instrument and satellite study (conducted by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory) which produced five different instrument/satellite configuration options designed to address the maximum number of requirements which will not be met with the already-approved NPOESS instruments. Instruments studied include a synthetic aperture radar (SAR), an altimeter, and a hyper-spectral coastal infrared/visible imager. After analyzing the alternatives, it appears that one of the best options is a two-satellite system consisting of (1) an altimeter mission in the Topex/Poseidon orbit carrying both wide-swath and delayed doppler altimeters, and (2) a multi-polarization, multi-frequency, multi-mode interferometric SAR mission including a coastal imager in a polar sun-synchronous orbit. This paper summarizes the user requirements process, briefly describes the notional satellite configuration, and presents some of the capabilities of the instruments.

  3. The Home Observation Assessment Method (HOAM): Real-Time Naturalistic Observation of Families in Their Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinglass, Peter

    The vast bulk of psychosocial research data about the family are derived from two basic sources: self-report, retrospective data obtained by questionnaires or interviews; and direct observations of behavior occurring in a laboratory or treatment setting. Despite an emerging enthusiasm for the notion of studying behavior in its natural environment…

  4. Assessing the Accuracy of Classwide Direct Observation Methods: Two Analyses Using Simulated and Naturalistic Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dart, Evan H.; Radley, Keith C.; Briesch, Amy M.; Furlow, Christopher M.; Cavell, Hannah J.; Briesch, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    Two studies investigated the accuracy of eight different interval-based group observation methods that are commonly used to assess the effects of classwide interventions. In Study 1, a Microsoft Visual Basic program was created to simulate a large set of observational data. Binary data were randomly generated at the student level to represent…

  5. Development of acoustic observation method for seafloor hydrothermal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, M.; Tamura, H.; Asada, A.; Kinoshita, M.; Tamaki, K.

    2012-12-01

    In October 2009, we conducted seafloor reconnaissance using a manned deep-sea submersible Shinkai6500 in Central Indian Ridge 18-20deg.S, where hydrothermal plume signatures were previously perceived. Acoustic video camera "DIDSON" was equipped on the top of Shinkai6500 in order to get acoustic video images of hydrothermal plumes. The acoustic video images of the hydrothermal plumes had been captured in three of seven dives. We could identify shadings inside the acoustic video images of the hydrothermal plumes. Silhouettes of the hydrothermal plumes varied from second to second, and the shadings inside them also varied. These variations corresponded to internal structures and flows of the plumes. DIDSON (Dual-Frequency IDentification SONar) is acoustic lens-based sonar. It has sufficiently high resolution and rapid refresh rate that it can substitute for optical system in turbid or dark water where optical systems fail. Ins. of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo has understood DIDSON's superior performance and tried to develop a new observation method based on DIDSON for hydrothermal discharging from seafloor vent. We expected DIDSON to reveal whole image of hydrothermal plume as well as detail inside the plume. The proposed method to observe and measure hydrothermal flow is the one to utilize a sheet-like acoustic beam. Scanning with concentrated acoustic beam gives distances to the edges of the hydrothermal flows. And then, the shapes of the flows can be identified even in low and zero visibility conditions. Tank experiment was conducted. The purposes of this experiment were to make an attempt at proposed method to delineate underwater hydrothermal flows and to understand relationships among acoustic video image, flow rate and water temperature. Water was heated in the hot tub and pumped to the water tank through the silicon tube. We observed water flows discharging from the tip of the tube with DIDSON. Flow rate had been controlled and temperatures of the

  6. The Effects of Integrating Technology, Observation and Writing into a Teacher Education Method Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Syh-Jong

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to integrate asynchronous learning technology with teaching strategies on observation and writing into a teacher education method course. The research questions were to explore the effects of the innovative teaching method and to compare it with the traditional teaching method. There were 134 preservice teachers…

  7. STRengthening Analytical Thinking for Observational Studies: the STRATOS initiative

    PubMed Central

    Sauerbrei, Willi; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Altman, Douglas G; le Cessie, Saskia; Carpenter, James

    2014-01-01

    The validity and practical utility of observational medical research depends critically on good study design, excellent data quality, appropriate statistical methods and accurate interpretation of results. Statistical methodology has seen substantial development in recent times. Unfortunately, many of these methodological developments are ignored in practice. Consequently, design and analysis of observational studies often exhibit serious weaknesses. The lack of guidance on vital practical issues discourages many applied researchers from using more sophisticated and possibly more appropriate methods when analyzing observational studies. Furthermore, many analyses are conducted by researchers with a relatively weak statistical background and limited experience in using statistical methodology and software. Consequently, even ‘standard’ analyses reported in the medical literature are often flawed, casting doubt on their results and conclusions. An efficient way to help researchers to keep up with recent methodological developments is to develop guidance documents that are spread to the research community at large. These observations led to the initiation of the strengthening analytical thinking for observational studies (STRATOS) initiative, a large collaboration of experts in many different areas of biostatistical research. The objective of STRATOS is to provide accessible and accurate guidance in the design and analysis of observational studies. The guidance is intended for applied statisticians and other data analysts with varying levels of statistical education, experience and interests. In this article, we introduce the STRATOS initiative and its main aims, present the need for guidance documents and outline the planned approach and progress so far. We encourage other biostatisticians to become involved. PMID:25074480

  8. Reported Significant Observation (RSO) studies. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Eicher, R.W.

    1992-12-01

    The Reported Significant Observation (RSO) study used in the field of safety is an information-gathering technique where employee-participants describe situations they have personally witnessed involving good and bad practices and safe and unsafe conditions. This information is useful in the risk assessment process because it focuses on hazards and thereby facilitates their elimination. However, RSO cannot be the only component in a risk assessment program. Used by the Air Force in their aviation psychology program and further developed by John C. Flanagan, RSO is more commonly known as the ``Critical Incident Technique.`` However, the words ``Critical`` and ``Incident`` had other connotations in nuclear safety, prompting early users within the Aerojet Nuclear Company to coin the more fitting title of ``Reported Significant Observations.`` The technique spread slowly in the safety field primarily because the majority of users were researchers interested in after-the-fact data, with application to everyday problems and behavioral factors. RSO was formally recognized as a significant hazard reduction tool during the development of the Management Oversight and Risk Tree (MORT) program for the US Atomic Energy Commission. The Department of Energy (DOE) has, in turn, adopted MORT for its system safety program, and this has resulted in RSO being a modern and viable technique for DOE contractor safety programs.

  9. A method for combining passive microwave and infrared rainfall observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Giglio, Louis

    1995-01-01

    Because passive microwave instruments are confined to polar-orbiting satellites, rainfall estimates must interpolate across long time periods, during which no measurements are available. In this paper the authors discuss a technique that allows one to partially overcome the sampling limitations by using frequent infrared observations from geosynchronous platforms. To accomplish this, the technique compares all coincident microwave and infrared observations. From each coincident pair, the infrared temperature threshold is selected that corresponds to an area equal to the raining area observed in the microwave image. The mean conditional rainfall rate as determined from the microwave image is then assigned to pixels in the infrared image that are colder than the selected threshold. The calibration is also applied to a fixed threshold of 235 K for comparison with established infrared techniques. Once a calibration is determined, it is applied to all infrared images. Monthly accumulations for both methods are then obtained by summing rainfall from all available infrared images. Two examples are used to evaluate the performance of the technique. The first consists of a one-month period (February 1988) over Darwin, Australia, where good validation data are available from radar and rain gauges. For this case it was found that the technique approximately doubled the rain inferred by the microwave method alone and produced exceptional agreement with the validation data. The second example involved comparisons with atoll rain gauges in the western Pacific for June 1989. Results here are overshadowed by the fact that the hourly infrared estimates from established techniques, by themselves, produced very good correlations with the rain gauges. The calibration technique was not able to improve upon these results.

  10. BAYESIAN SHRINKAGE METHODS FOR PARTIALLY OBSERVED DATA WITH MANY PREDICTORS*

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Philip S.; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Taylor, Jeremy MG

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the increasing use of and rapid changes in array technologies, we consider the prediction problem of fitting a linear regression relating a continuous outcome Y to a large number of covariates X, eg measurements from current, state-of-the-art technology. For most of the samples, only the outcome Y and surrogate covariates, W, are available. These surrogates may be data from prior studies using older technologies. Owing to the dimension of the problem and the large fraction of missing information, a critical issue is appropriate shrinkage of model parameters for an optimal bias-variance tradeoff. We discuss a variety of fully Bayesian and Empirical Bayes algorithms which account for uncertainty in the missing data and adaptively shrink parameter estimates for superior prediction. These methods are evaluated via a comprehensive simulation study. In addition, we apply our methods to a lung cancer dataset, predicting survival time (Y) using qRT-PCR (X) and microarray (W) measurements. PMID:24436727

  11. [Methods of studying the microcirculation].

    PubMed

    Shagal, D I; Tsvik, A I; Razygrin, B A

    1980-01-01

    The article shows possibilities of thermography in the study of peripheral blood circulation. Data are presented on examining the patients with diverse pathology forms by means of conjunctival biomicroscopy and television capillaroscopy of the nail bed. Evaluation of these methods and analysis of the data obtained are presented. The authors believe in more extended possibilities of applying microcirculation study methods together with thermography for disclosure of some diseases. PMID:7402036

  12. A processing method and results of meteor shower radar observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belkovich, O. I.; Suleimanov, N. I.; Tokhtasjev, V. S.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of meteor showers permit the solving of some principal problems of meteor astronomy: to obtain the structure of a stream in cross section and along its orbits; to retrace the evolution of particle orbits of the stream taking into account gravitational and nongravitational forces and to discover the orbital elements of its parent body; to find out the total mass of solid particles ejected from the parent body taking into account physical and chemical evolution of meteor bodies; and to use meteor streams as natural probes for investigation of the average characteristics of the meteor complex in the solar system. A simple and effective method of determining the flux density and mass exponent parameter was worked out. This method and its results are discussed.

  13. Comparison of Observational Methods and Their Relation to Ratings of Engagement in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Brenna K.; Hojnoski, Robin L.; Laracy, Seth D.; Olson, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    Although, collectively, results of earlier direct observation studies suggest momentary time sampling (MTS) may offer certain technical advantages over whole-interval (WIR) and partial-interval (PIR) recording, no study has compared these methods for measuring engagement in young children in naturalistic environments. This study compared direct…

  14. Century Scale Evaporation Trend: An Observational Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bounoui, Lahouari

    2012-01-01

    Several climate models with different complexity indicate that under increased CO2 forcing, runoff would increase faster than precipitation overland. However, observations over large U.S watersheds indicate otherwise. This inconsistency between models and observations suggests that there may be important feedbacks between climate and land surface unaccounted for in the present generation of models. We have analyzed century-scale observed annual runoff and precipitation time-series over several United States Geological Survey hydrological units covering large forested regions of the Eastern United States not affected by irrigation. Both time-series exhibit a positive long-term trend; however, in contrast to model results, these historic data records show that the rate of precipitation increases at roughly double the rate of runoff increase. We considered several hydrological processes to close the water budget and found that none of these processes acting alone could account for the total water excess generated by the observed difference between precipitation and runoff. We conclude that evaporation has increased over the period of observations and show that the increasing trend in precipitation minus runoff is correlated to observed increase in vegetation density based on the longest available global satellite record. The increase in vegetation density has important implications for climate; it slows but does not alleviate the projected warming associated with greenhouse gases emission.

  15. Five Methods to Score the Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaptation Checklist and to Examine Group Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ze; Rohrer, David; Chuang, Chi-ching; Fujiki, Mayo; Herman, Keith; Reinke, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    This study compared 5 scoring methods in terms of their statistical assumptions. They were then used to score the Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaptation Checklist, a measure consisting of 3 subscales and 21 Likert-type items. The 5 methods used were (a) sum/average scores of items, (b) latent factor scores with continuous indicators, (c)…

  16. Air quality: from observation to applied studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Christiane H.; Wania, Annett; Hirsch, Jacky; Bruse, Michael

    2004-10-01

    Air qualities studies in urban areas embrace several directions that are strongly associated with urban complexity. In the last centuries cities evolution implied changes in urbanization trends: urban sprawl has modified the relationship between cities and surroundings settlements. The existence and protection of urban green and open areas is promoted as a mean to improve the quality of life of their citizens and increase the satisfactory level of the inhabitants against pollution and noise adverse effects. This paper outlines the methods and approaches used in the EU research project Benefits of Urban Green Space (BUGS). The main target of BUGS is to assess the role of urban green spaces in alleviating the adverse effects of urbanization trends by developing an integrative methodology, ranging from participatory planning tools to numerical simulation models. The influence of urban structures on atmospheric pollutants distribution is investigated as a multi-scale problem ranging from micro to macro/regional scale. Traditionally, air quality models are applied on a single scale, seldom considering the joint effects of traffic network and urban development together. In BUGS, several numerical models are applied to cope with urban complexity and to provide quantitative and qualitative results. The differing input data requirements for the various models demanded a methodology which ensures a coherent data extraction and application procedure. In this paper, the stepwise procedure used for BUGS is presented after a general presentation of the research project and the models implied. A discussion part will highlight the statements induced by the choices made and a conclusive part bring to the stage some insights for future investigations.

  17. The effects of different methods of accounting for observations from euthanized animals in survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Hosgood, G; Scholl, D T

    2001-01-29

    The issue of euthanasia is unique to veterinary clinical studies evaluating survival time. The decision to euthanize an animal is based on several factors including the health of the animal but also age and cost of treatment. The literature shows inconsistent methods used to account for observations from euthanized animals. Also, over 50% and up to 100% of animals in many studies have been euthanized. Our study illustrates the effects of different methods of accounting for observations from euthanized animals in survival analysis. Three data sets with different proportions of outcomes (alive, lost-to-follow-up, dead due to disease of interest, dead due to other disease, euthanized due to disease of interest, euthanized due to other disease) were used. Each data set was stratified according to treatment or a group characteristic (e.g. tumor type). Our methods for accounting for observations from euthanized animals were established from methods used in the literature and included right-censoring. Kaplan-Meier product-limit survival-function estimation was performed on each data set. Different methods resulted in inconsistent conclusions of significant differences between strata. At times, the ranking of the estimates of median survival time for strata was reversed. Right-censoring and use of Kaplan-Meier methods is inappropriate to evaluate observations from euthanized animals because censoring of such observations is informative. The current methods used by clinical investigators are inadequate to measure survival time reliably. PMID:11154786

  18. Rapid evaluation methods (REM) of health services performance: methodological observations.

    PubMed

    Anker, M; Guidotti, R J; Orzeszyna, S; Sapirie, S A; Thuriaux, M C

    1993-01-01

    The rapid evaluation method (REM) was developed by WHO in order to assess the performance and quality of health care services, identify operational problems, and assist in taking managerial action. It was tested in five developing countries (Botswana, Madagascar, Papua New Guinea, Uganda and Zambia) between 1988 and 1991. REM consists of a set of observation- and survey-based diagnostic activities, carried out mainly in health care facilities. The article describes the various steps of REM, methodological issues such as setting objectives and using an issue-information matrix, preparation of survey instruments, use of computer software (Epi Info), data quality control, fieldwork, and the use of data to produce useful information for decision-makers. REM aims at bringing prompt and relevant information to planners and decision-makers who need it for a specific purpose. In the present examples, REM provided information for preparing a programme proposal for external funding, for establishing baseline data for a situation analysis, and for assessing staff performance after extensive training in order to improve the curriculum. PMID:8440033

  19. A double-observer method to estimate detection rate during aerial waterfowl surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koneff, M.D.; Royle, J. Andrew; Otto, M.C.; Wortham, J.S.; Bidwell, J.K.

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated double-observer methods for aerial surveys as a means to adjust counts of waterfowl for incomplete detection. We conducted our study in eastern Canada and the northeast United States utilizing 3 aerial-survey crews flying 3 different types of fixed-wing aircraft. We reconciled counts of front- and rear-seat observers immediately following an observation by the rear-seat observer (i.e., on-the-fly reconciliation). We evaluated 6 a priori models containing a combination of several factors thought to influence detection probability including observer, seat position, aircraft type, and group size. We analyzed data for American black ducks (Anas rubripes) and mallards (A. platyrhynchos), which are among the most abundant duck species in this region. The best-supported model for both black ducks and mallards included observer effects. Sample sizes of black ducks were sufficient to estimate observer-specific detection rates for each crew. Estimated detection rates for black ducks were 0.62 (SE = 0.10), 0.63 (SE = 0.06), and 0.74 (SE = 0.07) for pilot-observers, 0.61 (SE = 0.08), 0.62 (SE = 0.06), and 0.81 (SE = 0.07) for other front-seat observers, and 0.43 (SE = 0.05), 0.58 (SE = 0.06), and 0.73 (SE = 0.04) for rear-seat observers. For mallards, sample sizes were adequate to generate stable maximum-likelihood estimates of observer-specific detection rates for only one aerial crew. Estimated observer-specific detection rates for that crew were 0.84 (SE = 0.04) for the pilot-observer, 0.74 (SE = 0.05) for the other front-seat observer, and 0.47 (SE = 0.03) for the rear-seat observer. Estimated observer detection rates were confounded by the position of the seat occupied by an observer, because observers did not switch seats, and by land-cover because vegetation and landform varied among crew areas. Double-observer methods with on-the-fly reconciliation, although not without challenges, offer one viable option to account for detection bias in aerial waterfowl

  20. Evaluating the Impact of Database Heterogeneity on Observational Study Results

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, David; Ryan, Patrick B.; Schuemie, Martijn; Stang, Paul E.; Overhage, J. Marc; Hartzema, Abraham G.; Suchard, Marc A.; DuMouchel, William; Berlin, Jesse A.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies that use observational databases to evaluate the effects of medical products have become commonplace. Such studies begin by selecting a particular database, a decision that published papers invariably report but do not discuss. Studies of the same issue in different databases, however, can and do generate different results, sometimes with strikingly different clinical implications. In this paper, we systematically study heterogeneity among databases, holding other study methods constant, by exploring relative risk estimates for 53 drug-outcome pairs and 2 widely used study designs (cohort studies and self-controlled case series) across 10 observational databases. When holding the study design constant, our analysis shows that estimated relative risks range from a statistically significant decreased risk to a statistically significant increased risk in 11 of 53 (21%) of drug-outcome pairs that use a cohort design and 19 of 53 (36%) of drug-outcome pairs that use a self-controlled case series design. This exceeds the proportion of pairs that were consistent across databases in both direction and statistical significance, which was 9 of 53 (17%) for cohort studies and 5 of 53 (9%) for self-controlled case series. Our findings show that clinical studies that use observational databases can be sensitive to the choice of database. More attention is needed to consider how the choice of data source may be affecting results. PMID:23648805

  1. Observer Rated Sleepiness and Real Road Driving: An Explorative Study

    PubMed Central

    Anund, Anna; Fors, Carina; Hallvig, David; Åkerstedt, Torbjörn; Kecklund, Göran

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore if observer rated sleepiness (ORS) is a feasible method for quantification of driver sleepiness in field studies. Two measures of ORS were used: (1) one for behavioural signs based on facial expression, body gestures and body movements labelled B-ORS, and (2) one based on driving performance e.g. if swerving and other indicators of impaired driving occurs, labelled D-ORS. A limited number of observers sitting in the back of an experimental vehicle on a motorway about 2 hours repeatedly 3 times per day (before lunch, after lunch, at night) observed 24 participant’s sleepiness level with help of the two observer scales. At the same time the participant reported subjective sleepiness (KSS), EOG was recorded (for calculation of blink duration) and several driving measure were taken and synchronized with the reporting. Based on mixed model Anova and correlation analysis the result showed that observer ratings of sleepiness based on drivers’ impaired performance and behavioural signs are sensitive to extend the general pattern of time awake, circadian phase and time of driving. The detailed analysis of the subjective sleepiness and ORS showed weak correspondence on an individual level. Only 16% of the changes in KSS were predicted by the observer. The correlation between the observer ratings based on performance (D-ORS) and behavioural signs (B-ORS) are high (r = .588), and the B-ORS shows a moderately strong association (r = .360) with blink duration. Both ORS measures show an association (r>0.45) with KSS, whereas the association with driving performance is weak. The results show that the ORS-method detects the expected general variations in sleepy driving in field studies, however, sudden changes in driver sleepiness on a detailed level as 5 minutes is usually not detected; this holds true both when taking into account driving behaviour or driver behavioural signs. PMID:23724094

  2. Field Science Ethnography: Methods For Systematic Observation on an Expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Haughton-Mars expedition is a multidisciplinary project, exploring an impact crater in an extreme environment to determine how people might live and work on Mars. The expedition seeks to understand and field test Mars facilities, crew roles, operations, and computer tools. I combine an ethnographic approach to establish a baseline understanding of how scientists prefer to live and work when relatively unemcumbered, with a participatory design approach of experimenting with procedures and tools in the context of use. This paper focuses on field methods for systematically recording and analyzing the expedition's activities. Systematic photography and time-lapse video are combined with concept mapping to organize and present information. This hybrid approach is generally applicable to the study of modern field expeditions having a dozen or more multidisciplinary participants, spread over a large terrain during multiple field seasons.

  3. Potential New Lidar Observations for Cloud Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winker, Dave; Hu, Yong; Narir, Amin; Cai, Xia

    2015-01-01

    The response of clouds to global warming represents a major uncertainty in estimating climate sensitivity. These uncertainties have been tracked to shallow marine clouds in the tropics and subtropics. CALIOP observations have already been used extensively to evaluate model predictions of shallow cloud fraction and top height (Leahy et al. 2013; Nam et al 2012). Tools are needed to probe the lowest levels of the troposphere. The large footprint of satellite lidars gives large multiple scattering from clouds which presents new possibilities for cloud retrievals to constrain model predictions.

  4. Observing Reel Life: Using Feature Films To Teach Ethnographic Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leblanc, Lauraine

    1998-01-01

    Extends the methods of using film as a tool to teach content analysis and examines the use of feature films in teaching ethnographic methods. Explores how feature films are a valuable pedagogical tool in qualitative methods instruction by drawing from an assignment developed for a course on youth subcultures. (DSK)

  5. Multispectral satellite observations for arid land studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    1992-01-01

    Multispectral satellite data when properly calibrated and standardized can be used synergistically for a quantitative analysis of processes and surface characteristics, and for quantifying land surface change. Relationships among multispectral satellite data (visible reflectance, surface temperature and polarization difference of microwave emission at 37 GHz frequency) have been used to develop hypotheses concerning the relative sensitivity of these data to varied land surface characteristics, which needs to be verified by field observations. Radiative transfer models have also been developed to understand these multispectral data. Interannual variations of visible reflectance and polarization difference for the period 1982-1986 over the Sahel and the Sudan zones of Africa show a lagged response with respect to the rainfall deficit during recovery from drought, which needs to be understood in terms of biophysical parameters.

  6. Advanced Earth Observation System Instrumentation Study (AEOSIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Var, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility, practicality, and cost are investigated for establishing a national system or grid of artificial landmarks suitable for automated (near real time) recognition in the multispectral scanner imagery data from an earth observation satellite (EOS). The intended use of such landmarks, for orbit determination and improved mapping accuracy is reviewed. The desirability of using xenon searchlight landmarks for this purpose is explored theoretically and by means of experimental results obtained with LANDSAT 1 and LANDSAT 2. These results are used, in conjunction with the demonstrated efficiency of an automated detection scheme, to determine the size and cost of a xenon searchlight that would be suitable for an EOS Searchlight Landmark Station (SLS), and to facilitate the development of a conceptual design for an automated and environmentally protected EOS SLS.

  7. Experimental land observing data system feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. L.; Kraiman, H.

    1982-01-01

    An end-to-end data system to support a Shuttle-based Multispectral Linear Array (MLA) mission in the mid-1980's was defined. The experimental Land Observing System (ELOS) is discussed. A ground system that exploits extensive assets from the LANDSAT-D Program to effectively meet the objectives of the ELOS Mission was defined. The goal of 10 meter pixel precision, the variety of data acquisition capabilities, and the use of Shuttle are key to the mission requirements, Ground mission management functions are met through the use of GSFC's Multi-Satellite Operations Control Center (MSOCC). The MLA Image Generation Facility (MIGF) combines major hardware elements from the Applications Development Data System (ADDS) facility and LANDSAT Assessment System (LAS) with a special purpose MLA interface unit. LANDSAT-D image processing techniques, adapted to MLA characteristics, form the basis for the use of existing software and the definition of new software required.

  8. Observational database for studies of nearby universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaisina, E. I.; Makarov, D. I.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Kaisin, S. S.

    2012-01-01

    We present the description of a database of galaxies of the Local Volume (LVG), located within 10 Mpc around the Milky Way. It contains more than 800 objects. Based on an analysis of functional capabilities, we used the PostgreSQL DBMS as a management system for our LVG database. Applying semantic modelling methods, we developed a physical ER-model of the database. We describe the developed architecture of the database table structure, and the implemented web-access, available at http://www.sao.ru/lv/lvgdb.

  9. Carbon Dioxide Observational Platform System (CO-OPS), feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, D. L.; Hall, D. W.; Mcelveen, R. P.

    1987-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Observational Platform System (CO-OPS) is a near-space, geostationary, multi-user, unmanned microwave powered monitoring platform system. This systems engineering feasibility study addressed identified existing requirements such as: carbon dioxide observational data requirements, communications requirements, and eye-in-the-sky requirements of other groups like the Defense Department, the Forestry Service, and the Coast Guard. In addition, potential applications in: earth system science, space system sciences, and test and verification (satellite sensors and data management techniques) were considered. The eleven month effort is summarized. Past work and methods of gathering the required observational data were assessed and rough-order-of magnitude cost estimates have shown the CO-OPS system to be most cost effective (less than $30 million within a 10 year lifetime). It was also concluded that there are no technical, schedule, or obstacles that would prevent achieving the objectives of the total 5-year CO-OPS program.

  10. Detecting Groupthink: Methods for Observing the Illusion of Unanimity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, Rebecca J. Welch

    1990-01-01

    Reconceptualizes groupthink symptoms as observable group interaction patterns. Proposes two coding systems for detecting the illusion of unanimity symptom, detecting both degree of unanimity and degree of the illusory versus substantive nature of that unanimity. (SR)

  11. What Is Popular Music Studies? Some Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloonan, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Popular Music Studies (PMS) is now taught in over 20 higher education institutions (HEIs) in the UK and numerous others across the world. This article outlines the constituent parts of PMS in the UK and questions its status as a discipline in its own right. It concludes by arguing that, having established itself, PMS will need to deal with two key…

  12. Environmental SEM and dye penetration observation on resin-tooth interface using different light curing method.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takako; Morigami, Makoto; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was the effects of different light curing methods on marginal sealing and resin composite adaptation to the cavity wall using the dye penetration test and environmental scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations. Cylindrical cavities were prepared on cervical regions. The teeth were restored with Clearfil Liner Bond 2 V adhesive and filled with Clearfil Photo Bright or Palfique Estelite resin composites. These resins were cured with a conventional light-curing method or a slow-start curing method. After thermal cycling, the specimens were subjected to the dye penetration test to evaluate marginal sealing and adaptation of the resin composites to the cavity walls. These resin-tooth interfaces were then observed using environmental SEM. The light-cured resin composite, which exhibited increased contrast ratios during polymerization, suggests high compensation for polymerization stress using the slow-start curing method. There was a high correlation between dye penetration test and environmental SEM observation. PMID:26830828

  13. Improving Method-in-Use through Classroom Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunn, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Method-in-use (Nunn, Describing classroom interaction in intercultural curricular research and development, University of Reading, 1996, International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching 37: 23-42, 1999) is a description of the method actually being enacted through classroom interaction in a particular context. The description is…

  14. Quality Reporting of Multivariable Regression Models in Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Real, Jordi; Forné, Carles; Roso-Llorach, Albert; Martínez-Sánchez, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Controlling for confounders is a crucial step in analytical observational studies, and multivariable models are widely used as statistical adjustment techniques. However, the validation of the assumptions of the multivariable regression models (MRMs) should be made clear in scientific reporting. The objective of this study is to review the quality of statistical reporting of the most commonly used MRMs (logistic, linear, and Cox regression) that were applied in analytical observational studies published between 2003 and 2014 by journals indexed in MEDLINE. Review of a representative sample of articles indexed in MEDLINE (n = 428) with observational design and use of MRMs (logistic, linear, and Cox regression). We assessed the quality of reporting about: model assumptions and goodness-of-fit, interactions, sensitivity analysis, crude and adjusted effect estimate, and specification of more than 1 adjusted model. The tests of underlying assumptions or goodness-of-fit of the MRMs used were described in 26.2% (95% CI: 22.0–30.3) of the articles and 18.5% (95% CI: 14.8–22.1) reported the interaction analysis. Reporting of all items assessed was higher in articles published in journals with a higher impact factor. A low percentage of articles indexed in MEDLINE that used multivariable techniques provided information demonstrating rigorous application of the model selected as an adjustment method. Given the importance of these methods to the final results and conclusions of observational studies, greater rigor is required in reporting the use of MRMs in the scientific literature. PMID:27196467

  15. Observational study of children with aerophagia.

    PubMed

    Loening-Baucke, Vera; Swidsinski, Alexander

    2008-09-01

    Aerophagia is a rare disorder in children. The diagnosis is often delayed, especially when it occurs concomitantly with constipation. The aim of this report is to increase awareness about aerophagia. This study describes 2 girls and 7 boys, 2 to 10.4 years of age, with functional constipation and gaseous abdominal distention. The abdomen was visibly distended, nontender, and tympanitic in all. Documenting less distention on awakening helped to make the diagnosis. Air swallowing, belching, and flatulence were infrequently reported. The rectal examination often revealed a dilated rectal ampulla filled with gas or stool and gas. The abdominal X-ray showed gaseous distention of the colon in all and of the stomach and small bowel in 8 children. Treatment consisted of educating parents and children about air sucking and swallowing, encouraging the children to stop the excessive air swallowing, and suggesting to them not to use drinking straws and not to drink carbonated beverages. The aerophagia resolved in all in 2 to 20 months (mean=8 months). PMID:18445758

  16. Estimation of nonfluctuating reservoir inflow from water level observations using methods based on flow continuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chao; Liu, Pan; Guo, Shenglian; Wang, Hao; Wang, Dingbao

    2015-10-01

    The accurate estimation of "true" reservoir inflow is important for hydrological forecasting and efficient operation of reservoirs. However, reservoir inflow estimated using the conventional simple water balance method is not always accurate because the estimation is very sensitive to errors in reservoir water level observations and uncertainty in the stage-storage relationship. An analytical method (AM) and a method using the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) are proposed to determine nonfluctuating reservoir inflow based on the concept of inflow continuity; that is, that inflow should not change much within a short time period. The AM is developed based on the simultaneous minimization of both the estimated reservoir water level error and the inflow variation. The EnKF, which is built on state equations (inflow continuity and water balance equations) and an observation equation (the reservoir stage-storage relationship), is used to update inflow states by assimilating water level observations. The two proposed methods are evaluated using a synthetic experiment with various conditions including water level observation error, reservoir stage-storage relationship error, and the influence of water surface slope. The AM outperforms the EnKF under all conditions. Case studies of the Gaobazhou and Danjiangkou Reservoirs in China demonstrate that both of the proposed methods can derive an hourly inflow without fluctuations. The results indicate that the AM and the EnKF method can improve reservoir inflow estimation compared with conventional methods.

  17. Alternating Renewal Process Models for Behavioral Observation: Simulation Methods, Software, and Validity Illustrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pustejovsky, James E.; Runyon, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Direct observation recording procedures produce reductive summary measurements of an underlying stream of behavior. Previous methodological studies of these recording procedures have employed simulation methods for generating random behavior streams, many of which amount to special cases of a statistical model known as the alternating renewal…

  18. Observations of Epsilon Lyrae by the Video Drift Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, Rick; Nelson, Nancy; Nelson, Eric; Buehlman, William; Wilson, Earl; Zapata, Deanna

    2015-01-01

    The major components of the famous "double-double" star Epsilon Lyrae, STF2382AB and STF2383CD, were measured by the Video Team at the Apple Valley Double Star Workshop in 2013, using the Video Drift Method. The results are in reasonable agreement with other recent measures and predictions of the latest orbital solutions.

  19. Nanoleakage evaluation at adhesive-dentin interfaces by different observation methods.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongye; Guo, Jingmei; Guo, Jinxin; Chen, Hongfei; Somar, Mirinal; Yue, Jiaxi; Huang, Cui

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the capability and characteristics of different nanoleakage observation methods, including light microscope (LM), field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Dentin specimens were bonded with either an etch-and-rinse adhesive (SBMP) or a self-etch adhesive (GB), and prepared for nanoleakge evaluation according to different observation methods. LM, FESEM and CLSM results demonstrated that the SBMP group showed more interfacial nanoleakage than the GB group (p<0.05); by contrast, no significant difference was found in TEM results (p>0.05), however, TEM illustrated concrete nanoleakage forms or patterns. The results suggested that different observation methods might exhibit distinct images and a certain degree of variations in nanoleakage statistical results. Researchers should carefully design and calculate the optimum assembly in combination with qualitative and quantitative approaches to obtain objective and accurate nanoleakage evaluation. PMID:26438989

  20. Development of a structured observational method for the systematic assessment of school food-choice architecture.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Orgul D; McInnes, Melayne M; Blake, Christine E; Frongillo, Edward A; Jones, Sonya J

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a structured observational method for the systematic assessment of the food-choice architecture that can be used to identify key points for behavioral economic intervention intended to improve the health quality of children's diets. We use an ethnographic approach with observations at twelve elementary schools to construct our survey instrument. Elements of the structured observational method include decision environment, salience, accessibility/convenience, defaults/verbal prompts, number of choices, serving ware/method/packaging, and social/physical eating environment. Our survey reveals important "nudgeable" components of the elementary school food-choice architecture, including precommitment and default options on the lunch line. PMID:26654767

  1. Linking Indigenous Knowledge and Observed Climate Change Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Chief Clarence; Bynum, Nora; Johnson, Liz; King, Ursula; Mustonen, Tero; Neofotis, Peter; Oettle, Noel; Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Sakakibara, Chie; Shadrin, Chief Vyacheslav; Vicarelli, Marta; Waterhouse, Jon; Weeks, Brian

    2010-01-01

    We present indigenous knowledge narratives and explore their connections to documented temperature and other climate changes and observed climate change impact studies. We then propose a framework for enhancing integration of these indigenous narratives of observed climate change with global assessments. Our aim is to contribute to the thoughtful and respectful integration of indigenous knowledge with scientific data and analysis, so that this rich body of knowledge can inform science, and so that indigenous and traditional peoples can use the tools and methods of science for the benefit of their communities if they choose to do so. Enhancing ways of understanding such connections are critical as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment process gets underway.

  2. Solution of nonlinear finite difference ocean models by optimization methods with sensitivity and observational strategy analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeter, Jens; Wunsch, Carl

    1986-01-01

    The paper studies with finite difference nonlinear circulation models the uncertainties in interesting flow properties, such as western boundary current transport, potential and kinetic energy, owing to the uncertainty in the driving surface boundary condition. The procedure is based upon nonlinear optimization methods. The same calculations permit quantitative study of the importance of new information as a function of type, region of measurement and accuracy, providing a method to study various observing strategies. Uncertainty in a model parameter, the bottom friction coefficient, is studied in conjunction with uncertain measurements. The model is free to adjust the bottom friction coefficient such that an objective function is minimized while fitting a set of data to within prescribed bounds. The relative importance of the accuracy of the knowledge about the friction coefficient with respect to various kinds of observations is then quantified, and the possible range of the friction coefficients is calculated.

  3. Pedagogical strategies used in clinical medical education: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Clinical teaching is a complex learning situation influenced by the learning content, the setting and the participants' actions and interactions. Few empirical studies have been conducted in order to explore how clinical supervision is carried out in authentic situations. In this study we explore how clinical teaching is carried out in a clinical environment with medical students. Methods Following an ethnographic approach looking for meaning patterns, similarities and differences in how clinical teachers manage clinical teaching; non-participant observations and informal interviews were conducted during a four month period 2004-2005. The setting was at a teaching hospital in Sweden. The participants were clinical teachers and their 4th year medical students taking a course in surgery. The observations were guided by the aim of the study. Observational notes and notes from informal interviews were transcribed after each observation and all data material was analysed qualitatively. Results Seven pedagogical strategies were found to be applied, namely: 1) Questions and answers, 2) Lecturing, 3) Piloting, 4) Prompting, 5) Supplementing, 6) Demonstrating, and 7) Intervening. Conclusions This study contributes to previous research in describing a repertoire of pedagogical strategies used in clinical education. The findings showed that three superordinate qualitatively different ways of teaching could be identified that fit Ramsden's model. Each of these pedagogical strategies encompass different focus in teaching; either a focus on the teacher's knowledge and behaviour or the student's behaviour and understanding. We suggest that an increased awareness of the strategies in use will increase clinical teachers' teaching skills and the consequences they will have on the students' ability to learn. The pedagogical strategies need to be considered and scrutinized in further research in order to verify their impact on students' learning. PMID:20105340

  4. A facile method to observe graphene growth on copper foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Yangqiao; Wu, Wei; Chen, Wei; Gao, Lian; Sun, Jing

    2012-11-01

    A novel scanning electron microscope (SEM) method is presented for high contrast identification of each layer of pyramidal graphene domains grown on copper. We obtained SEM images by combining the advantages of the high resolution property of the secondary electron signal and the elemental sensitivity of the backscattering electron signal. Through this method, we investigated the difference in the growth mechanisms of mono-layer and few-layer graphene. Due to different lattice mismatches, both the surface adsorption process and the epitaxial growth process existed under the atmospheric growth conditions. Moreover, the copper oxidation process can be easily discovered. It is obvious from the SEM images that the graphene greatly delayed the oxidation process of the copper surface. Finally, the nucleation and growth speed of graphene domains was found to depend on the linear array distribution of surface ledges and terraces of annealed rolled copper foil. This result explains the linear rows of graphene during the growth process and accords with theoretical results.

  5. Factors affecting recruitment to an observational multicentre palliative care study

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Patrick C; Gwilliam, Bridget; Keeley, Vaughan; Todd, Chris; Kelly, Laura C; Barclay, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To identify those factors which adversely affected recruitment to a large multicentre palliative care study. Methods Patient accrual to a multicentre, observational, palliative care study was monitored at three critical junctures in the research process. (1) Eligibility—did the patient fulfil the study entry criteria? (2) Accessibility—was it possible to access the patient to be able to inform them about the study? (3) Consent—did the patient agree to participate in the study? The reasons why patients were ineligible, inaccessible or refused consent were recorded. Results 12 412 consecutive referrals to participating clinical services were screened for study inclusion of whom 5394 (43%) were deemed to be ineligible. Of the remaining patients 4617/7018 (66%) were inaccessible to the research team. The most common reasons being precipitous death, ‘gatekeeping’ by clinical staff or rapid discharge. Of the 2410 patients who were visited by the research team and asked to participate in the study 1378 (57%) declined. Overall 8.2% (1018/12 412) of patients screened participated in the study. There were significant differences in recruitment patterns between hospice inpatient units, hospital support and community palliative care teams. Conclusions Systematic monitoring and analysis of patient flows through the clinical trial accrual process provided valuable insights about the reasons for failure to recruit patients to a clinical trial and may help to improve recruitment in future studies. PMID:24644750

  6. A novel method for correcting scanline-observational bias of discontinuity orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Tang, Huiming; Tan, Qinwen; Wang, Dingjian; Wang, Liangqing; Ez Eldin, Mutasim A. M.; Li, Changdong; Wu, Qiong

    2016-03-01

    Scanline observation is known to introduce an angular bias into the probability distribution of orientation in three-dimensional space. In this paper, numerical solutions expressing the functional relationship between the scanline-observational distribution (in one-dimensional space) and the inherent distribution (in three-dimensional space) are derived using probability theory and calculus under the independence hypothesis of dip direction and dip angle. Based on these solutions, a novel method for obtaining the inherent distribution (also for correcting the bias) is proposed, an approach which includes two procedures: 1) Correcting the cumulative probabilities of orientation according to the solutions, and 2) Determining the distribution of the corrected orientations using approximation methods such as the one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The inherent distribution corrected by the proposed method can be used for discrete fracture network (DFN) modelling, which is applied to such areas as rockmass stability evaluation, rockmass permeability analysis, rockmass quality calculation and other related fields. To maximize the correction capacity of the proposed method, the observed sample size is suggested through effectiveness tests for different distribution types, dispersions and sample sizes. The performance of the proposed method and the comparison of its correction capacity with existing methods are illustrated with two case studies.

  7. A novel method for correcting scanline-observational bias of discontinuity orientation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Tang, Huiming; Tan, Qinwen; Wang, Dingjian; Wang, Liangqing; Ez Eldin, Mutasim A. M.; Li, Changdong; Wu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Scanline observation is known to introduce an angular bias into the probability distribution of orientation in three-dimensional space. In this paper, numerical solutions expressing the functional relationship between the scanline-observational distribution (in one-dimensional space) and the inherent distribution (in three-dimensional space) are derived using probability theory and calculus under the independence hypothesis of dip direction and dip angle. Based on these solutions, a novel method for obtaining the inherent distribution (also for correcting the bias) is proposed, an approach which includes two procedures: 1) Correcting the cumulative probabilities of orientation according to the solutions, and 2) Determining the distribution of the corrected orientations using approximation methods such as the one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The inherent distribution corrected by the proposed method can be used for discrete fracture network (DFN) modelling, which is applied to such areas as rockmass stability evaluation, rockmass permeability analysis, rockmass quality calculation and other related fields. To maximize the correction capacity of the proposed method, the observed sample size is suggested through effectiveness tests for different distribution types, dispersions and sample sizes. The performance of the proposed method and the comparison of its correction capacity with existing methods are illustrated with two case studies. PMID:26961249

  8. A novel method for correcting scanline-observational bias of discontinuity orientation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Tang, Huiming; Tan, Qinwen; Wang, Dingjian; Wang, Liangqing; Ez Eldin, Mutasim A M; Li, Changdong; Wu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Scanline observation is known to introduce an angular bias into the probability distribution of orientation in three-dimensional space. In this paper, numerical solutions expressing the functional relationship between the scanline-observational distribution (in one-dimensional space) and the inherent distribution (in three-dimensional space) are derived using probability theory and calculus under the independence hypothesis of dip direction and dip angle. Based on these solutions, a novel method for obtaining the inherent distribution (also for correcting the bias) is proposed, an approach which includes two procedures: 1) Correcting the cumulative probabilities of orientation according to the solutions, and 2) Determining the distribution of the corrected orientations using approximation methods such as the one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The inherent distribution corrected by the proposed method can be used for discrete fracture network (DFN) modelling, which is applied to such areas as rockmass stability evaluation, rockmass permeability analysis, rockmass quality calculation and other related fields. To maximize the correction capacity of the proposed method, the observed sample size is suggested through effectiveness tests for different distribution types, dispersions and sample sizes. The performance of the proposed method and the comparison of its correction capacity with existing methods are illustrated with two case studies. PMID:26961249

  9. CNODES: the Canadian Network for Observational Drug Effect Studies.

    PubMed

    Suissa, Samy; Henry, David; Caetano, Patricia; Dormuth, Colin R; Ernst, Pierre; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Lelorier, Jacques; Levy, Adrian; Martens, Patricia J; Paterson, J Michael; Platt, Robert W; Sketris, Ingrid; Teare, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Although administrative health care databases have long been used to evaluate adverse drug effects, responses to drug safety signals have been slow and uncoordinated. We describe the establishment of the Canadian Network for Observational Drug Effect Studies (CNODES), a collaborating centre of the Drug Safety and Effectiveness Network (DSEN). CNODES is a distributed network of investigators and linked databases in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia. Principles of operation are as follows: (1) research questions are prioritized by the coordinating office of DSEN; (2) the linked data stay within the provinces; (3) for each question, a study team formulates a detailed protocol enabling consistent analyses in each province; (4) analyses are "blind" to results obtained elsewhere; (5) protocol deviations are permitted for technical reasons only; (6) analyses using multivariable methods are lodged centrally with a methods team, which is responsible for combining the results to provide a summary estimate of effect. These procedures are designed to achieve high internal validity of risk estimates and to eliminate the possibility of selective reporting of analyses or outcomes. The value of a coordinated multi-provincial approach is illustrated by projects studying acute renal injury with high-potency statins, community-acquired pneumonia with proton pump inhibitors, and hyperglycemic emergencies with antipsychotic drugs. CNODES is an academically based distributed network of Canadian researchers and data centres with a commitment to rapid and sophisticated analysis of emerging drug safety signals in study populations totalling over 40 million. PMID:23687528

  10. How Safe Do Teenagers Behave on Facebook? An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Vanderhoven, Ellen; Schellens, Tammy; Valcke, Martin; Raes, Annelies

    2014-01-01

    The substantial use of social network sites by teenagers has raised concerns about privacy and security. Previous research about behavior on social network sites was mostly based on surveys and interviews. Observational research overcomes problems inherent to this research method, for example social desirability. However, existing observational research mostly focuses on public profiles of young adults. Therefore, the current observation-study includes 1050 public and non-public Facebook-profiles of teenagers (13–18) to investigate (1) what kind of information teenagers post on their profile, (2) to what extent they protect this information using privacy-settings and (3) how much risky information they have on their profile. It was found that young people mostly post pictures, interests and some basic personal information on their profile. Some of them manage their privacy-settings as such that this information is reserved for friends' eyes only, but a lot of information is accessible on the friends-of-friends' pages. Although general risk scores are rather low, more detailed analyses show that teenagers nevertheless post a significant amount of risky information. Moreover, older teenagers and girls post more (risky) information while there are no differences in applying privacy settings. We found no differences in the Facebook behavior of teenagers enrolled in different education forms. Implications of these results are discussed. PMID:25162234

  11. How safe do teenagers behave on Facebook? An observational study.

    PubMed

    Vanderhoven, Ellen; Schellens, Tammy; Valcke, Martin; Raes, Annelies

    2014-01-01

    The substantial use of social network sites by teenagers has raised concerns about privacy and security. Previous research about behavior on social network sites was mostly based on surveys and interviews. Observational research overcomes problems inherent to this research method, for example social desirability. However, existing observational research mostly focuses on public profiles of young adults. Therefore, the current observation-study includes 1050 public and non-public Facebook-profiles of teenagers (13-18) to investigate (1) what kind of information teenagers post on their profile, (2) to what extent they protect this information using privacy-settings and (3) how much risky information they have on their profile. It was found that young people mostly post pictures, interests and some basic personal information on their profile. Some of them manage their privacy-settings as such that this information is reserved for friends' eyes only, but a lot of information is accessible on the friends-of-friends' pages. Although general risk scores are rather low, more detailed analyses show that teenagers nevertheless post a significant amount of risky information. Moreover, older teenagers and girls post more (risky) information while there are no differences in applying privacy settings. We found no differences in the Facebook behavior of teenagers enrolled in different education forms. Implications of these results are discussed. PMID:25162234

  12. Palliative care team visits. Qualitative study through participant observation

    PubMed Central

    Bueno Pernias, Maria José; Hueso Montoro, César; Guardia Mancilla, Plácido; Montoya Juárez, Rafael; García Caro, Maria Paz

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the clinical encounters that occur when a palliative care team provides patient care and the features that influence these encounters and indicate whether they are favorable or unfavorable depending on the expectations and feelings of the various participants. Methods: A qualitative case study conducted via participant observation. A total of 12 observations of the meetings of palliative care teams with patients and families in different settings (home, hospital and consultation room) were performed. The visits were follow-up or first visits, either scheduled or on demand. Content analysis of the observation was performed. Results: The analysis showed the normal follow-up activity of the palliative care unit that was focused on controlling symptoms, sharing information and providing advice on therapeutic regimens and care. The environment appeared to condition the patients' expressions and the type of patient relationship. Favorable clinical encounter conditions included kindness and gratitude. Unfavorable conditions were deterioration caused by approaching death, unrealistic family objectives and limited resources. Conclusion: Home visits from basic palliative care teams play an important role in patient and family well-being. The visits seem to focus on controlling symptoms and are conditioned by available resources. PMID:27226663

  13. Performance of statistical methods to correct food intake distribution: comparison between observed and estimated usual intake.

    PubMed

    Verly-Jr, Eliseu; Oliveira, Dayan C R S; Fisberg, Regina M; Marchioni, Dirce Maria L

    2016-09-01

    There are statistical methods that remove the within-person random error and estimate the usual intake when there is a second 24-h recall (24HR) for at least a subsample of the study population. We aimed to compare the distribution of usual food intake estimated by statistical models with the distribution of observed usual intake. A total of 302 individuals from Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) answered twenty, non-consecutive 24HR; the average length of follow-up was 3 months. The usual food intake was considered as the average of the 20 collection days of food intake. Using data sets with a pair of 2 collection days, usual percentiles of intake of the selected foods using two methods were estimated (National Cancer Institute (NCI) method and Multiple Source Method (MSM)). These estimates were compared with the percentiles of the observed usual intake. Selected foods comprised a range of parameter distributions: skewness, percentage of zero intakes and within- and between-person intakes. Both methods performed well but failed in some situations. In most cases, NCI and MSM produced similar percentiles between each other and values very close to the true intake, and they better represented the usual intake compared with 2-d mean. The smallest precision was observed in the upper tail of the distribution. In spite of the underestimation and overestimation of percentiles of intake, from a public health standpoint, these biases appear not to be of major concern. PMID:27523187

  14. Observation of Paramagnetic Supercurrent in Mesoscopic Superconducting Rings and Disks Using Multiple-Small Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, A.; Baelus, B. J.; Peeters, F. M.; Kadowaki, K.; Ootuka, Y.

    2005-08-01

    Responses of mesoscopic superconducting rings and disks to perpendicular magnetic fields are studied by using the multiple-small-tunnel-junction method, in which transport properties of several small tunnel junctions attached to the sample are measured simultaneously. This allows us for a direct experimental observation of the paramagnetic supercurrent, which is closely related to the paramagnetic Meissner effect. The results are compared with numerical results based on the nonlinear Ginzburg-Landau theory.

  15. Observation of autoionization in O 2 by an electron-electron coincidence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, J. P.; Yang, J.; Cooper, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    A strong transition to an autoionizing stata has been observed in O 2 at 16.83 ± 0.11 eV by means of a new electron-electron conincidence method. The method uses the fact that electrons arising from autoionizing states appear at a constant energy loss corresponding to the excitation energy of the autoionizing state rather than at a constant ionization potential as do electrons produced by direct ionization. Comparison of the present data with previous photoionization studies suggests that the autoionizing O 2 state is the same state deduced to be responsible for abnormal vibrational intensities in the O 2+X 2Πg ground state when 16.85 eV Ne(I) photons are used. These electron-electron coincidence experiments provide a direct new method for the study of autoionization produced by electron impact.

  16. Bias correction methods for regional climate model simulations considering the distributional parametric uncertainty underlying the observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kue Bum; Kwon, Hyun-Han; Han, Dawei

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we present a comparative study of bias correction methods for regional climate model simulations considering the distributional parametric uncertainty underlying the observations/models. In traditional bias correction schemes, the statistics of the simulated model outputs are adjusted to those of the observation data. However, the model output and the observation data are only one case (i.e., realization) out of many possibilities, rather than being sampled from the entire population of a certain distribution due to internal climate variability. This issue has not been considered in the bias correction schemes of the existing climate change studies. Here, three approaches are employed to explore this issue, with the intention of providing a practical tool for bias correction of daily rainfall for use in hydrologic models ((1) conventional method, (2) non-informative Bayesian method, and (3) informative Bayesian method using a Weather Generator (WG) data). The results show some plausible uncertainty ranges of precipitation after correcting for the bias of RCM precipitation. The informative Bayesian approach shows a narrower uncertainty range by approximately 25-45% than the non-informative Bayesian method after bias correction for the baseline period. This indicates that the prior distribution derived from WG may assist in reducing the uncertainty associated with parameters. The implications of our results are of great importance in hydrological impact assessments of climate change because they are related to actions for mitigation and adaptation to climate change. Since this is a proof of concept study that mainly illustrates the logic of the analysis for uncertainty-based bias correction, future research exploring the impacts of uncertainty on climate impact assessments and how to utilize uncertainty while planning mitigation and adaptation strategies is still needed.

  17. A passive acoustic monitoring method applied to observation and group size estimation of finless porpoises.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kexiong; Wang, Ding; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Li, Songhai; Xiao, Jianqiang

    2005-08-01

    The present study aimed at determining the detection capabilities of an acoustic observation system to recognize porpoises under local riverine conditions and compare the results with sighting observations. Arrays of three to five acoustic data loggers were stationed across the main channel of the Tian-e-zhou Oxbow of China's Yangtze River at intervals of 100-150 m to record sonar signals of free-ranging finless porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides). Acoustic observations, concurrent with visual observations, were conducted at two occasions on 20-22 October 2003 and 17-19 October 2004. During a total of 42 h of observation, 316 finless porpoises were sighted and 7041 sonar signals were recorded by loggers. The acoustic data loggers recorded ultrasonic signals of porpoises clearly, and detected the presence of porpoises with a correct detection level of 77.6% and a false alarm level of 5.8% within an effective distance of 150 m. Results indicated that the stationed passive acoustic observation method was effective in detecting the presence of porpoises and showed potential in estimating the group size. A positive linear correlation between the number of recorded signals and the group size of sighted porpoises was indicated, although it is faced with some uncertainty and requires further investigation. PMID:16158672

  18. A passive acoustic monitoring method applied to observation and group size estimation of finless porpoises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kexiong; Wang, Ding; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Li, Songhai; Xiao, Jianqiang

    2005-08-01

    The present study aimed at determining the detection capabilities of an acoustic observation system to recognize porpoises under local riverine conditions and compare the results with sighting observations. Arrays of three to five acoustic data loggers were stationed across the main channel of the Tian-e-zhou Oxbow of China's Yangtze River at intervals of 100-150 m to record sonar signals of free-ranging finless porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides). Acoustic observations, concurrent with visual observations, were conducted at two occasions on 20-22 October 2003 and 17-19 October 2004. During a total of 42 h of observation, 316 finless porpoises were sighted and 7041 sonar signals were recorded by loggers. The acoustic data loggers recorded ultrasonic signals of porpoises clearly, and detected the presence of porpoises with a correct detection level of 77.6% and a false alarm level of 5.8% within an effective distance of 150 m. Results indicated that the stationed passive acoustic observation method was effective in detecting the presence of porpoises and showed potential in estimating the group size. A positive linear correlation between the number of recorded signals and the group size of sighted porpoises was indicated, although it is faced with some uncertainty and requires further investigation.

  19. In-Hospital Recruitment to Observational Studies of Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Ruth M.; Kunkel, Dorit; Fitton, Carolyn; Ashburn, Ann; Jenkinson, Damian

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine recruitment in three observational follow-up studies of patients with stroke, focusing on reasons for nonparticipation and the role of potential factors in explaining recruitment rates. It comprised secondary analysis of the three studies. Recruitment rates varied between the studies. Between 10 and 50%…

  20. Novel observer design method for Lur'e differential inclusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun; Gao, Yu; Yu, Lei

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a new method to design observers for Lur'e differential inclusion systems. The feature of this method is that the designed observers do not contain any set-valued functions. single-input-single-output (SISO) systems are considered firstly, then the results are extended to multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) systems. For MIMO systems, the form of reduced-order observers is also presented. Simulations are given to show these observers work well.

  1. A double-observer method for reducing bias in faecal pellet surveys of forest ungulates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, K.J.; Manly, B.F.J.

    2008-01-01

    1. Faecal surveys are used widely to study variations in abundance and distribution of forest-dwelling mammals when direct enumeration is not feasible. The utility of faecal indices of abundance is limited, however, by observational bias and variation in faecal disappearance rates that obscure their relationship to population size. We developed methods to reduce variability in faecal surveys and improve reliability of faecal indices. 2. We used double-observer transect sampling to estimate observational bias of faecal surveys of Roosevelt elk Cervus elaphus roosevelti and Columbian black-tailed deer Odocoileus hemionus columbianus in Olympic National Park, Washington, USA. We also modelled differences in counts of faecal groups obtained from paired cleared and uncleared transect segments as a means to adjust standing crop faecal counts for a standard accumulation interval and to reduce bias resulting from variable decay rates. 3. Estimated detection probabilities of faecal groups ranged from < 0.2-1.0 depending upon the observer, whether the faecal group was from elk or deer, faecal group size, distance of the faecal group from the sampling transect, ground vegetation cover, and the interaction between faecal group size and distance from the transect. 4. Models of plot-clearing effects indicated that standing crop counts of deer faecal groups required 34% reduction on flat terrain and 53% reduction on sloping terrain to represent faeces accumulated over a standard 100-day interval, whereas counts of elk faecal groups required 0% and 46% reductions on flat and sloping terrain, respectively. 5. Synthesis and applications. Double-observer transect sampling provides a cost-effective means of reducing observational bias and variation in faecal decay rates that obscure the interpretation of faecal indices of large mammal abundance. Given the variation we observed in observational bias of faecal surveys and persistence of faeces, we emphasize the need for future

  2. Observation of swelling behavior of ArF resist during development by using QCM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Konishi, Hiroko; Isono, Mariko

    2012-03-01

    Many reports have discussed the swelling behavior of photoresists during development, as observed by the QCM method. Previously, we reported on the development of development analysis equipment based on the QCM method. In this paper, we report on a high-precision resist development analyzer also based on the QCM method. This equipment incorporates a high-precision developing solution temperature controller and features a high-precision air conditioning function for the measurement chamber. We also measured swelling behavior during development using a TBAH developer solution, which features larger molecules than TMAH, comparing these results with those obtained with TMAH. The results of this measurement indicate that the extent of resist swelling during development is less with TBAH developer solution than with TMAH developer solution. This result is consistent with results of a study by Itani et al. using high-speed AFM, suggesting the suitability of the measurement equipment used in our experiments.

  3. MOOSES: Multiple Option Observation System for Experimental Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapp, Jon; Wehby, Joseph

    The Multiple Option Observation System for Experimental Studies (MOOSES) is a flexible data collection and analysis package for applied behavioral research that addresses the needs of researchers interested in live coding of observational data. MOOSES allows the researcher to design a coding system for a particular research question. General types…

  4. An Observational Study of Skilled Memory in Waitresses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Joy

    A two-phase study about skilled memory as it is used by waitresses included a participant-observer phase and an observational phase. Participants were three experienced waitresses who had worked at a midtown Manhattan restaurant for 14, 7, and 3 years respectively and a team of 5 confederate customers. Waitresses and customers wore microphones.…

  5. Aneurysm Study of Pipeline in an Observational Registry (ASPIRe)

    PubMed Central

    Kallmes, David F.; Brinjikji, Waleed; Boccardi, Edoardo; Ciceri, Elisa; Diaz, Orlando; Tawk, Rabih; Woo, Henry; Jabbour, Pascal; Albuquerque, Felipe; Chapot, Rene; Bonafe, Alain; Dashti, Shervin R.; Almandoz, Josser E. Delgado; Given, Curtis; Kelly, Michael E.; Cross, DeWitte T.; Duckwiler, Gary; Razack, Nasser; Powers, Ciaran J.; Fischer, Sebastian; Lopes, Demetrius; Harrigan, Mark R.; Huddle, Daniel; Turner, Raymond; Zaidat, Osama O.; Defreyne, Luc; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Cekirge, Saruhan; Fiorella, David; Hanel, Ricardo A.; Lylyk, Pedro; McDougall, Cameron; Siddiqui, Adnan; Szikora, Istvan; Levy, Elad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Few prospective studies exist evaluating the safety and efficacy of the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. The Aneurysm Study of Pipeline In an observational Registry (ASPIRe) study prospectively analyzed rates of complete aneurysm occlusion and neurologic adverse events following PED treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Materials and Methods We performed a multicenter study prospectively evaluating patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms treated with PED. Primary outcomes included (1) spontaneous rupture of the Pipeline-treated aneurysm; (2) spontaneous nonaneurysmal intracranial hemorrhage (ICH); (3) acute ischemic stroke; (4) parent artery stenosis, and (5) permanent cranial neuropathy. Secondary endpoints were (1) treatment success and (2) morbidity and mortality at the 6-month follow-up. Vascular imaging was evaluated at an independent core laboratory. Results One hundred and ninety-one patients with 207 treated aneurysms were included in this registry. The mean aneurysm size was 14.5 ± 6.9 mm, and the median imaging follow-up was 7.8 months. Twenty-four aneurysms (11.6%) were small, 162 (78.3%) were large and 21 (10.1%) were giant. The median clinical follow-up time was 6.2 months. The neurological morbidity rate was 6.8% (13/191), and the neurological mortality rate was 1.6% (3/191). The combined neurological morbidity/mortality rate was 6.8% (13/191). The most common adverse events were ischemic stroke (4.7%, 9/191) and spontaneous ICH (3.7%, 7/191). The complete occlusion rate at the last follow-up was 74.8% (77/103). Conclusions Our prospective postmarket study confirms that PED treatment of aneurysms in a heterogeneous patient population is safe with low rates of neurological morbidity and mortality. Patients with angiographic follow-up had complete occlusion rates of 75% at 8 months. PMID:27610126

  6. Direct Insights Into Observational Absorption Line Analysis Methods of the Circumgalactic Medium Using Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher W.; Vander Vliet, Jacob R.; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Klypin, Anatoly

    2015-03-01

    We study the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of a z = 0.54 simulated dwarf galaxy using hydroART simulations. We present our analysis methods, which emulate observations, including objective absorption line detection, apparent optical depth (AOD) measurements, Voigt profile (VP) decomposition, and ionization modeling. By comparing the inferred CGM gas properties from the absorption lines directly to the gas selected by low ionization H i and Mg ii, and by higher ionization C iv and O vi absorption, we examine how well observational analysis methods recover the “true” properties of CGM gas. In this dwarf galaxy, low ionization gas arises in sub-kiloparsec “cloud” structures, but high ionization gas arises in multiple extended structures spread over 100 kpc; due to complex velocity fields, highly separated structures give rise to absorption at similar velocities. We show that AOD and VP analysis fails to accurately characterize the spatial, kinematic, and thermal conditions of high ionization gas. We find that H i absorption selected gas and O vi absorption gas arise in totally distinct physical gas structures, calling into question current observational techniques employed to infer metallicities and the total mass of “warm-hot” CGM gas. We present a method to determine whether C iv and O vi absorbing gas is photo or collisionally ionized and whether the assumption of ionization equilibrium is sound. As we discuss, these and additional findings have strong implications for how accurately currently employed observational absorption line methods recover the true gas properties, and ultimately, our ability to understand the CGM and its role in galaxy evolution.

  7. Algebraic methods for the identification problem with short arcs of observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronchi, G. F.

    The identification problem of short arcs of asteroid observations is related with the determination of the orbits of the observed asteroids. Recently this problem has been faced with algebraic methods using the first integrals of Kepler's problem. These methods allow us to solve the problem in an efficient way, keeping under control also alternative solutions, that may occur. However, the huge and continuously increasing amount of data produced by the new asteroid surveys suggests us to search for new algorithms, with shorter computation times. In this communication I'll review the known methods \\cite{p1}, \\cite{p2}, that lead to polynomial equations of degree 48 and 20 respectively. Then I'll present a new algorithm \\cite{p3}, that we are currently studying, allowing to deal with this problem with a polynomial of degree 9, thus decreasing the computation times in a significant way. Finally, I'll show some examples of computation of asteroid orbits using these methods.

  8. Association between day of delivery and obstetric outcomes: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Bottle, A; Aylin, P

    2015-01-01

    Study question What is the association between day of delivery and measures of quality and safety of maternity services, particularly comparing weekend with weekday performance? Methods This observational study examined outcomes for maternal and neonatal records (1 332 835 deliveries and 1 349 599 births between 1 April 2010 and 31 March 2012) within the nationwide administrative dataset for English National Health Service hospitals by day of the week. Groups were defined by day of admission (for maternal indicators) or delivery (for neonatal indicators) rather than by day of complication. Logistic regression was used to adjust for case mix factors including gestational age, birth weight, and maternal age. Staffing factors were also investigated using multilevel models to evaluate the association between outcomes and level of consultant presence. The primary outcomes were perinatal mortality and—for both neonate and mother—infections, emergency readmissions, and injuries. Study answer and limitations Performance across four of the seven measures was significantly worse for women admitted, and babies born, at weekends. In particular, the perinatal mortality rate was 7.3 per 1000 babies delivered at weekends, 0.9 per 1000 higher than for weekdays (adjusted odds ratio 1.07, 95% confidence interval 1.02 to 1.13). No consistent association between outcomes and staffing was identified, although trusts that complied with recommended levels of consultant presence had a perineal tear rate of 3.0% compared with 3.3% for non-compliant services (adjusted odds ratio 1.21, 1.00 to 1.45). Limitations of the analysis include the method of categorising performance temporally, which was mitigated by using a midweek reference day (Tuesday). Further research is needed to investigate possible bias from unmeasured confounders and explore the nature of the causal relationship. What this study adds This study provides an evaluation of the “weekend effect” in obstetric care

  9. NMR Methods to Study Dynamic Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Grutsch, Sarina; Brüschweiler, Sven; Tollinger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a unique toolbox of experimental probes for studying dynamic processes on a wide range of timescales, ranging from picoseconds to milliseconds and beyond. Along with NMR hardware developments, recent methodological advancements have enabled the characterization of allosteric proteins at unprecedented detail, revealing intriguing aspects of allosteric mechanisms and increasing the proportion of the conformational ensemble that can be observed by experiment. Here, we present an overview of NMR spectroscopic methods for characterizing equilibrium fluctuations in free and bound states of allosteric proteins that have been most influential in the field. By combining NMR experimental approaches with molecular simulations, atomistic-level descriptions of the mechanisms by which allosteric phenomena take place are now within reach. PMID:26964042

  10. The value of earth observations: methods and findings on the value of Landsat imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Holly; Serbina, Larisa O.; Richardson, Leslie A.; Ryker, Sarah J.; Newman, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Data from Earth observation systems are used extensively in managing and monitoring natural resources, natural hazards, and the impacts of climate change, but the value of such data can be difficult to estimate, particularly when it is available at no cost. Assessing the socioeconomic and scientific value of these data provides a better understanding of the existing and emerging research, science, and applications related to this information and contributes to the decision making process regarding current and future Earth observation systems. Recent USGS research on Landsat data has advanced the literature in this area by using a variety of methods to estimate value. The results of a 2012 survey of Landsat users, a 2013 requirements assessment, and 2013 case studies of applications of Landsat imagery are discussed.

  11. The role of local observations as evidence to inform effective mitigation methods for flood risk management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Paul; ODonnell, Greg; Owen, Gareth

    2014-05-01

    This poster presents a case study that highlights two crucial aspects of a catchment-based flood management project that were used to encourage uptake of an effective flood management strategy. Specifically, (1) the role of detailed local scale observations and (2) a modelling method informed by these observations. Within a 6km2 study catchment, Belford UK, a number of Runoff Attenuation Features (RAFs) have been constructed (including ponds, wetlands and woody debris structures) to address flooding issues in the downstream village. The storage capacity of the RAFs is typically small (200 to 500m3), hence there was skepticism as to whether they would work during large flood events. Monitoring was performed using a dense network of water level recorders installed both within the RAFs and within the stream network. Using adjacent upstream and downstream water levels in the stream network and observations within the actual ponds, a detailed understanding of the local performance of the RAFs was gained. However, despite understanding the local impacts of the features, the impact on the downstream hydrograph at the catchment scale could still not be ascertained with any certainty. The local observations revealed that the RAFs typically filled on the rising limb of the hydrograph; hence there was no available storage at the time of arrival of a large flow peak. However, it was also clear that an impact on the rising limb of the hydrograph was being observed. This knowledge of the functioning of individual features was used to create a catchment model, in which a network of RAFs could then be configured to examine the aggregated impacts. This Pond Network Model (PNM) was based on the observed local physical relationships and allowed a user specified sequence of ponds to be configured into a cascade structure. It was found that there was a minimum number of RAFs needed before an impact on peak flow was achieved for a large flood event. The number of RAFs required in the

  12. Regional Satellite Observations for Dryland Degradation Studies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, S. D.

    2009-12-01

    The lack of global scale maps of degraded drylands remains a significant obstacle to identification, prevention and mitigation of desertification. To fill this gap, maps are needed that have some or all of the following characteristics. i Use quantitative variables that have defined biogeophysical meaning. ii Identify areas that are currently in a state of desertification as well as showing areas having higher risk of degradation. iii Provide a synopsis of the condition of land over a number of years, not only a single point in time. iv Repeatable, using consistent observations and an explicit methodology, with a clear link to methods for monitoring and change detection. v Flexible enough to allow adaptation to regional needs while not compromising the ability to compare regions on the basis of consistent criteria. vi At a scale adequate to identify the normal spatial scales of desertification - sub-national, but greater than individual land holdings. vii Down-scalable to allow the specific factors and processes responsible for degradation in a specific location to be identified. viii Can be used as state variables in household-scale studies. ix Up-scalable to allow impacts on processes such as climate change that are relevant at a coarse spatial resolution. x Presented in a data base with appropriate additional maps, such as topography, land use, soil properties, and rainfall, to allow interpretation. xi Can be validated and have information on potential error. xii Not reliant on a single data source nor on a single institution.

  13. Home Videophones Improve Direct Observation in Tuberculosis Treatment: A Mixed Methods Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Victoria A.; Karnon, Jonathan; Eliott, Jaklin A.; Hiller, Janet E.

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of direct observation to monitor tuberculosis treatment is controversial: cost, practical difficulties, and lack of patient acceptability limit effectiveness. Telehealth is a promising alternative delivery method for improving implementation. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a telehealth service delivering direct observation, compared to an in-person drive-around service. Methodology/Principal Findings The study was conducted within a community nursing service in South Australia. Telehealth patients received daily video calls at home on a desktop videophone provided by the nursing call center. A retrospective cohort study assessed the effectiveness of the telehealth and traditional forms of observation, defined by the proportion of missed observations recorded in case notes. This data was inputted to a model, estimating the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of telehealth. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with current patients, community nursing and Chest Clinic staff, concerning service acceptability, usability and sustainability. The percentage of missed observations for the telehealth service was 12.1 (n = 58), compared to 31.1 for the in-person service (n = 70). Most of the difference of 18.9% (95% CI: 12.2 – 25.4) was due to fewer pre-arranged absences. The economic analysis calculated the ICER to be AUD$1.32 (95% CI: $0.51 – $2.26) per extra day of successful observation. The video service used less staff time, and became dominant if implemented on a larger scale and/or with decreased technology costs. Qualitative analysis found enabling factors of flexible timing, high patient acceptance, staff efficiency, and Chest Clinic support. Substantial technical problems were manageable, and improved liaison between the nursing service and Chest Clinic was an unexpected side-benefit. Conclusions/Significance Home video observation is a patient-centered, resource efficient way of

  14. Evaluation of flow direction methods against field observations of overland flow dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandini, S.; Moretti, G.; Corticelli, M. A.; Santangelo, P. E.; Capra, A.; Rivola, R.; Albertson, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Despite the broad effort made in grid-based distributed catchment modeling to account for planar overland flow dispersion, actual dispersion experienced by overland flow along a natural slope has not been measured so far, and the ability of terrain analysis methods to reproduce this dispersion has not been evaluated. In the present study, the D8, D8-LTD, D∞ -LTD, D∞ , MD∞ , and MD8 flow direction methods are evaluated against field observations of overland flow dispersion obtained from novel experimental methods. Thin flows of cold (2--10oC) water were released at selected points on a warmer (15--30oC) slope and individual overland flow patterns originating from each of these points were observed using a terrestrial laser scanner and a thermal imaging camera. Prior to each experimental water release, a ScanStation C10 terrestrial laser scanner by Leica Geosystems was used to acquire a point cloud having average density of 25~points/cm2. This point cloud was used to generate alternative grid-based digital elevation models having resolution h ranging from 1~cm to 2~m. During the experiments, an Avio Advanced Thermo TVS-500EX camera by Nippon Avionics was used to monitor land surface temperature with resolution better than 0.05oC. The overland flow patterns were also found to be discernible in terrestrial laser scanner reflectance signal acquired immediately following the flow experiments. Overland flow patterns were determined by considering contrasted temperature and reflectance of the dry and wetted land surface portions. Predicted propagation patterns and observed flow patterns were compared by considering the fractions of flow released at the point source that propagates through the grid cells. Predictions of these quantities were directly provided by flow direction methods and by related flow accumulation algorithms. Suitable data for the comparison were derived from observed overland flow patterns by assuming a uniform distribution of flow along each

  15. Detecting surface runoff location in a small catchment using distributed and simple observation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehotin, Judicaël; Breil, Pascal; Braud, Isabelle; de Lavenne, Alban; Lagouy, Mickaël; Sarrazin, Benoît

    2015-06-01

    Surface runoff is one of the hydrological processes involved in floods, pollution transfer, soil erosion and mudslide. Many models allow the simulation and the mapping of surface runoff and erosion hazards. Field observations of this hydrological process are not common although they are crucial to evaluate surface runoff models and to investigate or assess different kinds of hazards linked to this process. In this study, a simple field monitoring network is implemented to assess the relevance of a surface runoff susceptibility mapping method. The network is based on spatially distributed observations (nine different locations in the catchment) of soil water content and rainfall events. These data are analyzed to determine if surface runoff occurs. Two surface runoff mechanisms are considered: surface runoff by saturation of the soil surface horizon and surface runoff by infiltration excess (also called hortonian runoff). The monitoring strategy includes continuous records of soil surface water content and rainfall with a 5 min time step. Soil infiltration capacity time series are calculated using field soil water content and in situ measurements of soil hydraulic conductivity. Comparison of soil infiltration capacity and rainfall intensity time series allows detecting the occurrence of surface runoff by infiltration-excess. Comparison of surface soil water content with saturated water content values allows detecting the occurrence of surface runoff by saturation of the soil surface horizon. Automatic records were complemented with direct field observations of surface runoff in the experimental catchment after each significant rainfall event. The presented observation method allows the identification of fast and short-lived surface runoff processes at a small spatial and temporal resolution in natural conditions. The results also highlight the relationship between surface runoff and factors usually integrated in surface runoff mapping such as topography, rainfall

  16. Radiation energy budget studies using collocated AVHRR and ERBE observations

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, S.A.; Inoue, Toshiro

    1994-03-01

    Changes in the energy balance at the top of the atmosphere are specified as a function of atmospheric and surface properties using observations from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanner. By collocating the observations from the two instruments, flown on NOAA-9, the authors take advantage of the remote-sensing capabilities of each instrument. The AVHRR spectral channels were selected based on regions that are strongly transparent to clear sky conditions and are therefore useful for characterizing both surface and cloud-top conditions. The ERBE instruments make broadband observations that are important for climate studies. The approach of collocating these observations in time and space is used to study the radiative energy budget of three geographic regions: oceanic, savanna, and desert. 25 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Intelligent Photovoltaic Systems by Combining the Improved Perturbation Method of Observation and Sun Location Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yajie; Shi, Yunbo; Yu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yongjie

    2016-01-01

    Currently, tracking in photovoltaic (PV) systems suffers from some problems such as high energy consumption, poor anti-interference performance, and large tracking errors. This paper presents a solar PV tracking system on the basis of an improved perturbation and observation method, which maximizes photoelectric conversion efficiency. According to the projection principle, we design a sensor module with a light-intensity-detection module for environmental light-intensity measurement. The effect of environmental factors on the system operation is reduced, and intelligent identification of the weather is realized. This system adopts the discrete-type tracking method to reduce power consumption. A mechanical structure with a level-pitch double-degree-of-freedom is designed, and attitude correction is performed by closed-loop control. A worm-and-gear mechanism is added, and the reliability, stability, and precision of the system are improved. Finally, the perturbation and observation method designed and improved by this study was tested by simulated experiments. The experiments verified that the photoelectric sensor resolution can reach 0.344°, the tracking error is less than 2.5°, the largest improvement in the charge efficiency can reach 44.5%, and the system steadily and reliably works. PMID:27327657

  18. Intelligent Photovoltaic Systems by Combining the Improved Perturbation Method of Observation and Sun Location Tracking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajie; Shi, Yunbo; Yu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yongjie

    2016-01-01

    Currently, tracking in photovoltaic (PV) systems suffers from some problems such as high energy consumption, poor anti-interference performance, and large tracking errors. This paper presents a solar PV tracking system on the basis of an improved perturbation and observation method, which maximizes photoelectric conversion efficiency. According to the projection principle, we design a sensor module with a light-intensity-detection module for environmental light-intensity measurement. The effect of environmental factors on the system operation is reduced, and intelligent identification of the weather is realized. This system adopts the discrete-type tracking method to reduce power consumption. A mechanical structure with a level-pitch double-degree-of-freedom is designed, and attitude correction is performed by closed-loop control. A worm-and-gear mechanism is added, and the reliability, stability, and precision of the system are improved. Finally, the perturbation and observation method designed and improved by this study was tested by simulated experiments. The experiments verified that the photoelectric sensor resolution can reach 0.344°, the tracking error is less than 2.5°, the largest improvement in the charge efficiency can reach 44.5%, and the system steadily and reliably works. PMID:27327657

  19. Studies of Accreting Neutron Stars with RXTE Cycle 4 Observations: III: TOO Observations of Atoll Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Grant NAG 5-9244 provided funds for the research projects 'ASM-Triggered TOO Observations of Kilohertz Oscillations in Five Atoll Sources' and 'Further Measurements of the Kilohertz Oscillations in 4U 1705-44' approved under the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Guest Observer Program Cycle 4 and funded under the 1999 NASA Astrophysics Data Program. The principal investigator of the observing time proposals was Dr. E. C. Ford (U. of Amsterdam). The grant was funded for one year beginning 3/15/2000. The original ADP proposal was submitted by Prof. Jan van Paradijs, who passed away in 1999 before the funds were distributed. Prof. Wilham S. Padesas administered the grant during the period of performance. In spite of a wealth of observational data on the kHz QPO in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), the interpretation of this phenomenon is currently uncertain because the pairs of kHz QPO peaks and the oscillations seen in some Type I X-ray bursts are almost, but not quite, connected by a simple beat frequency relation. Further systematic studies of systems with known QPOs are required in order to better understand the phenomenon. The proposals were intended to contribute to a solution to this confusion by observing the sources as they vary over a wide range of X-ray flux. RXTE target-of-opportunity observations of six transient atoll sources, 4U 0614+09, KS 1732-260, Ser X-1, 4U 1702-42, 4U 1820-30 and 4U 1705-44 were to be performed at various flux levels based on ASM measurements.

  20. CLEM Methods for Studying Primary Cilia.

    PubMed

    Macaluso, Frank P; Perumal, Geoffrey S; Kolstrup, Johan; Satir, Peter

    2016-01-01

    CLEM (correlated light and electron microscope) imaging is a highly useful technique for examining primary cilia. With CLEM, it is possible to determine the distribution of tagged proteins along the ciliary membrane and axoneme with high precision. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) permits measurement of ciliary length and orientation in relation to nearby cellular structures in a 3D image; in optimal cases, this can be combined with superresolution microscopy of selected ciliary components as they enter or leave the cilium. This chapter discusses CLEM methods. In the method described in detail, samples are completely processed for sequential fluorescence and SEM observation. This method is ideal for robust antibody localization and minimizes image manipulation in correlating the fluorescent and SEM images. Alternative methods prepare samples for fluorescence imaging followed by processing for SEM then observation in the SEM. This method is ideal for optimal fluorescence imaging, particularly live cell imaging. PMID:27514923

  1. Comparison of different methods to compute a preliminary orbit of Space Debris using radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hélène; Gronchi, Giovanni F.

    2014-07-01

    We advertise a new method of preliminary orbit determination for space debris using radar observations, which we call Infang †. We can perform a linkage of two sets of four observations collected at close times. The context is characterized by the accuracy of the range ρ, whereas the right ascension α and the declination δ are much more inaccurate due to observational errors. This method can correct α, δ, assuming the exact knowledge of the range ρ. Considering no perturbations from the J 2 effect, but including errors in the observations, we can compare the new method, the classical method of Gibbs, and the more recent Keplerian integrals method. The development of Infang is still on-going and will be further improved and tested.

  2. An Observational Study of Algol-Type Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.

    2015-01-01

    The Algol-Type binary systems are a subtype of binary systems. Their unique semi-detached structure leads to have abundant physical phenomena, including the dramatically distorted donor star, strong magnetic activities, various ways of mass transfer, the evolution stage quite different from that of single stars, and specific formation tracks. In this paper, we introduce the fundamental physics of light curves, as well as the models or programs used in the past. We show the influence of different parameters on the light curves, including the inclination, temperature, abundance, surface gravity, the third light, radius, orbital eccentricity, and the argument of periastron. Based on the current catalog of Algols, we investigate their statistic characteristics. We observe three Algols and analyze the data in detail. The results are as follows: (1)Our statistical analyses of Algols support the previous suggestion that most of the detached component stars are main sequence stars. The distribution of the mass ratio agrees to our calculated critical value of the mass ratio for Algols. We suggest that there could be a lower limit of the radius ratio. We also show that there are good correlations among the temperature, luminosity, radius, and the mass of the component stars. (2) The binary FG Gem is observed, and the data are analyzed. Based on the solutions of large combinations of the temperature and luminosity, we use a new age-comparing method to show that the FG Gem is a semi-detached system, and a new temperature-searching method to get a better estimate of the temperature of the detached component star. We suggest that a combination of the intermittent mass flow and the continuous magnetic braking can explain its orbital period change. (3) Taking the VV Vir as an example, we discuss some properties of the mass flow in a semi-detached binary. Some of them can reflect the common characteristics of the mass flows in the Algol systems, e.g., the radius of the mass flow is

  3. Inverse Method for Estimating the Spatial Variability of Soil Particle Size Distribution from Observed Soil Moisture

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Feifei; Peters-lidard, Christa D.; King, Anthony Wayne

    2010-11-01

    Soil particle size distribution (PSD) (i.e., clay, silt, sand, and rock contents) information is one of critical factors for understanding water cycle since it affects almost all of water cycle processes, e.g., drainage, runoff, soil moisture, evaporation, and evapotranspiration. With information about soil PSD, we can estimate almost all soil hydraulic properties (e.g., saturated soil moisture, field capacity, wilting point, residual soil moisture, saturated hydraulic conductivity, pore-size distribution index, and bubbling capillary pressure) based on published empirical relationships. Therefore, a regional or global soil PSD database is essential for studying water cycle regionally or globally. At the present stage, three soil geographic databases are commonly used, i.e., the Soil Survey Geographic database, the State Soil Geographic database, and the National Soil Geographic database. Those soil data are map unit based and associated with great uncertainty. Ground soil surveys are a way to reduce this uncertainty. However, ground surveys are time consuming and labor intensive. In this study, an inverse method for estimating mean and standard deviation of soil PSD from observed soil moisture is proposed and applied to Throughfall Displacement Experiment sites in Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. This method is based on the relationship between spatial mean and standard deviation of soil moisture. The results indicate that the suggested method is feasible and has potential for retrieving soil PSD information globally from remotely sensed soil moisture data.

  4. Method to observe hemodynamic and metabolic changes during hemodiafiltration therapy with exercise.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Miguel; Pérez-Grovas, Héctor; Flores, Pedro; Azpiroz, Joaquín; Borja, Gisella; Medel, Humberto; Rodriguez, Fausto; Flores, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Intradyalitic exercise programas are important to improve patient's hemodynamic stability. Blood pressure and metabolic changes are correlated when heat accumulation is due to increment of the body core temperature (+1.0 °C). However, increase in temperature could be controlled by lowering dialysate's temperature using two main modalities techniques (isothermic and thermoneural) with different patient's thermal balance consequences, not yet well studied. In this work, a new method to observe the main physiological parameters (hearth rate variability (HRV), blood pressure, BTM dialysate temperature control and substrate utilization by indirect calorimtery) which are involved in hemodiafitration (HDF), are displayd. An experiment was carried out in a group of 5 patients waiting kidney transplant. In each patient, EE was assessed as well as the HRV during isothermic and thermoneutral modalities as a manner of cross and prospective study (a) at before therapy, (b) during therapy and (c) at the end of the HDF therapy. Power extraction was also measured by a BTM (Blood Temperature Monitor from Fresenius Inc), in order to determine how the dialysate temperature was controlled. The results showed important method's advantages which place the BTM performance as unstable control system with the possibility to produce undesirable HRV changes as the vagotonical response. However more patient cases are needed in order to identify the real advantage of this new method. PMID:21095679

  5. Interstellar dust: interfacing laboratory, theoretical and observational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Anthony Peter

    2015-08-01

    In this talk I will consider how our understanding of interstellar dust can only be advanced through a combination of laboratory, theoretical and observational studies, which provide the critical framework for advancing our understanding. I will summarise what we currently know, or think we know, about the physical and compositional properties of dust and their evolution in interstellar media. Along the way I will question the utility of astronomical dust analogues and show, based on data from the laboratory, theoretical studies and from astronomical observations, that some of our prior interpretations need to be subjected to a critical re-evaluation. I will present interstellar dust modelling from a new vantage point and review ideas on the interpretation of observations within the framework of this model and its predictions for dust evolution within and between interstellar media. Finally, I will summarise some of the current outstanding issues and what we would like to learn in the future.

  6. Multiple indices method for real-time tsunami inundation forecast using a dense offshore observation network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, N.; Aoi, S.; Hirata, K.; Suzuki, W.; Kunugi, T.; Nakamura, H.

    2015-12-01

    We started to develop a new methodology for real-time tsunami inundation forecast system (Aoi et al., 2015, this meeting) using densely offshore tsunami observations of the Seafloor Observation Network for Earthquakes and Tsunamis (S-net), which is under construction along the Japan Trench (Kanazawa et al., 2012, JpGU; Uehira et al., 2015, IUGG). In our method, the most important concept is involving any type and/or form uncertainties in the tsunami forecast, which cannot be dealt with any of standard linear/nonlinear least square approaches. We first prepare a Tsunami Scenario Bank (TSB), which contains offshore tsunami waveforms at the S-net stations and tsunami inundation information calculated from any possible tsunami source. We then quickly select several acceptable tsunami scenarios that can explain offshore observations by using multiple indices and appropriate thresholds, after a tsunami occurrence. At that time, possible tsunami inundations coupled with selected scenarios are forecasted (Yamamoto et al., 2014, AGU). Currently, we define three indices: correlation coefficient and two variance reductions, whose L2-norm part is normalized either by observations or calculations (Suzuki et al., 2015, JpGU; Yamamoto et al., 2015, IUGG). In this study, we construct the TSB, which contains various tsunami source models prepared for the probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment in the Japan Trench region (Hirata et al., 2014, AGU). To evaluate the propriety of our method, we adopt the fault model based on the 2011 Tohoku earthquake as a pseudo "observation". We also calculate three indices using coastal maximum tsunami height distributions between observation and calculation. We then obtain the correlation between coastal and offshore indices. We notice that the index value of coastal maximum tsunami heights is closer to 1 than the index value of offshore waveforms, i.e., the coastal maximum tsunami height may be predictable within appropriate thresholds defined for

  7. Mathematical methods of studying physical phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man'ko, Margarita A.

    2013-03-01

    In recent decades, substantial theoretical and experimental progress was achieved in understanding the quantum nature of physical phenomena that serves as the foundation of present and future quantum technologies. Quantum correlations like the entanglement of the states of composite systems, the phenomenon of quantum discord, which captures other aspects of quantum correlations, quantum contextuality and, connected with these phenomena, uncertainty relations for conjugate variables and entropies, like Shannon and Rényi entropies, and the inequalities for spin states, like Bell inequalities, reflect the recently understood quantum properties of micro and macro systems. The mathematical methods needed to describe all quantum phenomena mentioned above were also the subject of intense studies in the end of the last, and beginning of the new, century. In this section of CAMOP 'Mathematical Methods of Studying Physical Phenomena' new results and new trends in the rapidly developing domain of quantum (and classical) physics are presented. Among the particular topics under discussion there are some reviews on the problems of dynamical invariants and their relations with symmetries of the physical systems. In fact, this is a very old problem of both classical and quantum systems, e.g. the systems of parametric oscillators with time-dependent parameters, like Ermakov systems, which have specific constants of motion depending linearly or quadratically on the oscillator positions and momenta. Such dynamical invariants play an important role in studying the dynamical Casimir effect, the essence of the effect being the creation of photons from the vacuum in a cavity with moving boundaries due to the presence of purely quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field in the vacuum. It is remarkable that this effect was recently observed experimentally. The other new direction in developing the mathematical approach in physics is quantum tomography that provides a new vision of

  8. Scientific and Ethical Approaches for Observational Exposure Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Researchers conduct observational human exposure studies to understand how and the extent to which people come into contact with chemicals and environmental stressors in their everyday lives, through the air they breathe, the food and liquids they consume, and the things they tou...

  9. Space observations for global and regional studies of the biosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cihlar, J.; Li, Z.; Chen, J.; Sellers, P.; Hall, F.

    1994-01-01

    The capability to make space-based measurements of Earth at high spatial and temporal resolutions, which would not otherwise be economically or practically feasible, became available just in time to contribute to scientific understanding of the interactive processes governing the total Earth system. Such understanding has now become essential in order to take practical steps which would counteract or mitigate the pervasive impact of the growing human population on the future habitability of the Earth. The paper reviews the rationale for using space observations for studies of climate and terrestrial ecosystems at global and regional scales, as well as the requirements for such observations for studies of climate and ecosystem dynamics. The present status of these developments is reported along with initiatives under way to advance the use of satellite observations for Earth system studies. The most important contribution of space observations is the provision of physical or biophysical parameters for models representing various components of the Earth system. Examples of such parameters are given for climatic and ecosystem studies.

  10. Observational Studies of Retarded Children with Multiple Stereotyped Movements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumeister, Alfred A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Three relatively long-term observational studies, involving seven retarded preschool children, each of whom exhibited multiple stereotypes, were conducted to determine the extent to which the type of activity or setting had any effect upon the rates of stereotyped movements. (Author)

  11. The Indiana Science Initiative: Lessons from a Classroom Observation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Nicole D.; Walker, William S.; Weaver, Gabriela C.; Sorge, Brandon H.

    2015-01-01

    The Indiana Science Initiative (ISI) is a systemic effort to reform K-8 science education. The program provides teachers with professional development, reform-oriented science modules, and materials support. To examine the impact of the initiative's professional development, a participant observation study was conducted in the program's pilot…

  12. Studies of the observed and theoretical variations of atmospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Julius

    1990-01-01

    The four related topics covered include: (1) distributions of total and upper atmospheric ozone and their time and space variations; (2) observed and theoretical models of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) ozone variation; (3) radiative processes in the upper atmosphere; and (4) relations between ozone and solar variations. The results of these studies are presented. They come from twenty-three published papers.

  13. Mosaic CCD method: A new technique for observing dynamics of cometary magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, T.; Takeuchi, H.; Kozuba, Y.; Okamura, S.; Konno, I.; Hamabe, M.; Aoki, T.; Minami, S.; Isobe, S.

    1992-01-01

    On April 29, 1990, the plasma tail of Comet Austin was observed with a CCD camera on the 105-cm Schmidt telescope at the Kiso Observatory of the University of Tokyo. The area of the CCD used in this observation is only about 1 sq cm. When this CCD is used on the 105-cm Schmidt telescope at the Kiso Observatory, the area corresponds to a narrow square view of 12 ft x 12 ft. By comparison with the photograph of Comet Austin taken by Numazawa (personal communication) on the same night, we see that only a small part of the plasma tail can be photographed at one time with the CCD. However, by shifting the view on the CCD after each exposure, we succeeded in imaging the entire length of the cometary magnetosphere of 1.6 x 10(exp 6) km. This new technique is called 'the mosaic CCD method'. In order to study the dynamics of cometary plasma tails, seven frames of the comet from the head to the tail region were twice imaged with the mosaic CCD method and two sets of images were obtained. Six microstructures, including arcade structures, were identified in both the images. Sketches of the plasma tail including microstructures are included.

  14. A method for three-dimensional quantitative observation of the microstructure of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengfei; Chen, Dieyan; Ma, Wanyun; Wu, Hongxin; Ji, Liang; Sun, Jialin; Lv, Danyu; Zhang, Lu; Li, Ying; Tian, Ning; Zheng, Jinggao; Zhao, Fengying

    2009-07-01

    Contemporary biology has developed into the era of cell biology and molecular biology, and people try to study the mechanism of all kinds of biological phenomena at the microcosmic level now. Accurate description of the microstructure of biological samples is exigent need from many biomedical experiments. This paper introduces a method for 3-dimensional quantitative observation on the microstructure of vital biological samples based on two photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM). TPLSM is a novel kind of fluorescence microscopy, which has excellence in its low optical damage, high resolution, deep penetration depth and suitability for 3-dimensional (3D) imaging. Fluorescent stained samples were observed by TPLSM, and afterward the original shapes of them were obtained through 3D image reconstruction. The spatial distribution of all objects in samples as well as their volumes could be derived by image segmentation and mathematic calculation. Thus the 3-dimensionally and quantitatively depicted microstructure of the samples was finally derived. We applied this method to quantitative analysis of the spatial distribution of chromosomes in meiotic mouse oocytes at metaphase, and wonderful results came out last.

  15. Method for optimizing channelized quadratic observers for binary classification of large-dimensional image datasets

    PubMed Central

    Kupinski, M. K.; Clarkson, E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method for computing optimized channels for channelized quadratic observers (CQO) that is feasible for high-dimensional image data. The method for calculating channels is applicable in general and optimal for Gaussian distributed image data. Gradient-based algorithms for determining the channels are presented for five different information-based figures of merit (FOMs). Analytic solutions for the optimum channels for each of the five FOMs are derived for the case of equal mean data for both classes. The optimum channels for three of the FOMs under the equal mean condition are shown to be the same. This result is critical since some of the FOMs are much easier to compute. Implementing the CQO requires a set of channels and the first- and second-order statistics of channelized image data from both classes. The dimensionality reduction from M measurements to L channels is a critical advantage of CQO since estimating image statistics from channelized data requires smaller sample sizes and inverting a smaller covariance matrix is easier. In a simulation study we compare the performance of ideal and Hotelling observers to CQO. The optimal CQO channels are calculated using both eigenanalysis and a new gradient-based algorithm for maximizing Jeffrey's divergence (J). Optimal channel selection without eigenanalysis makes the J-CQO on large-dimensional image data feasible. PMID:26366764

  16. Chunking Method of Teaching and Studying: II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furukawa, James M.; And Others

    Data from three general psychology classes were used in a study of the chunking method of teaching and studying. Two classes participated in a study on chunking study outline (CSO) length, and one in a study on retention rates. Results of students with high and low cognitive processing capacities (CPC) were also compared. It was found that a CSO…

  17. Theory, Method, and Triangulation in the Study of Street Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucchini, Riccardo

    1996-01-01

    Describes how a comparative study of street children in Montevideo (Uruguay), Rio de Janeiro, and Mexico City contributes to a synergism between theory and method. Notes how theoretical approaches of symbolic interactionism, genetic structuralism, and habitus theory complement interview, participant observation, and content analysis methods;…

  18. COMPARISON OF METHODS FOR THE ANALYSIS OF PANEL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three different methods of analysis of panels were compared using asthma panel data from a 1970-1971 study done by EPA in Riverhead, New York. The methods were (1) regression analysis using raw attack rates; (2) regression analysis using the ratio of observed attacks to expected ...

  19. Observer study to evaluate the simulation of mammographic calcification clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Maria A. Z.; Marcomini, Karem D.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Schiabel, Homero

    2016-03-01

    Numerous breast phantoms have been developed to be as realistic as possible to ensure the accuracy of image quality analysis, covering a greater range of applications. In this study, we simulated three different densities of the breast parenchyma using paraffin gel, acrylic plates and PVC films. Hydroxyapatite was used to simulate calcification clusters. From the images acquired with a GE Senographe DR 2000D mammography system, we selected 68 regions of interest (ROIs) with and 68 without a simulated calcification cluster. To validate the phantom simulation, we selected 136 ROIs from the University of South Florida's Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM). Seven trained observers performed two observer experiments by using a high-resolution monitor Barco mod. E-3620. In the first experiment, the observers had to distinguish between real or phantom ROIs (with and without calcification). In the second one, the observers had to indicate the ROI with calcifications between a pair of ROIs. Results from our study show that the hydroxyapatite calcifications had poor contrast in the simulated breast parenchyma, thus observers had more difficulty in identifying the presence of calcification clusters in phantom images. Preliminary analysis of the power spectrum was conducted to investigate the radiographic density and the contrast thresholds for calcification detection. The values obtained for the power spectrum exponent (β) were comparable with those found in the literature.

  20. Method for Determining the Radius Vector for a Planet from Two Observations of Position

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainer, Michael Kizinski

    1977-01-01

    Presents a method for determining the approximate radius vector of a planet or asteroid from two closely separated observation positions, using mathematics suitable for lower division college students. (MLH)

  1. The Effects of Three Methods of Observation on Couples in Interactional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Linda J.; Merkel, William T.

    1988-01-01

    Assessed the effects of three different methods of observation of couples (one-way mirror, audio recording, and video recording) on 30 volunteer, nonclinical married couples. Results suggest that types of observation do not produce significantly different effects on nonclinical couples. (Author/ABL)

  2. An Observational Method in the Foreign Language Classroom: A Closer Look at Interaction Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Leona G.

    1975-01-01

    This paper analyzes both Flanders' and the Foreign Language Interaction (FLint) methods of classroom observation and concludes that both systems are deficient in accuracy, reliability and practicality. Observing, recording and decision-making difficulties are inherent, and system complexities and teacher biases add to the problems. (CHK)

  3. A Study of the Extratropical Tropopause from Observations and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu Meir

    adequate horizontal resolution is needed to resolve the baroclinic mixing and the small-scale filamentary structures. We used many methods in this study to show that there is more baroclinic activity seen in higher horizontal resolution. We also compared the correlations of the tropopause height with three variations in different quantities (PV fluxes, the upper tropospheric vorticity, and heat fluxes), and found that the correlations of the tropopause height and PV fluxes are the highest among the three. Thus, we conclude that baroclinic mixing is the most important factor that controls the extratropical tropopause sharpness. This also explains why the extratropical tropopause is sharper at midlatitudes when higher horizontal resolution is used (see figure 2.4 in the thesis and figure 2 in Son and Polvani's (2007)) since there is more baroclinic activity in the higher horizontal resolution models. Since there is more baroclinic activity seen in higher horizontal resolution, the baroclinic eddy drag is larger, which intensifies the thermally direct cell. The stronger thermally direct cell with higher horizontal resolution has greater downward motion in higher latitudes, and thus lowers the extratropical tropopause more in higher horizontal resolution models, which explains why the extratropical tropopause is lower in higher horizontal than in lower horizontal resolution models, as in Son and Polvani's (2007) paper.

  4. Transurethral resection syndrome in elderly patients: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) involves the risk of transurethral resection (TUR) syndrome owing to hyponatremia. Irrigation fluid type, duration of operation, and weight of resected mass have been evaluated as risk factors for TUR syndrome. The purpose of the present study was to identify risk factors related to TUR syndrome in the elderly. Methods After obtaining approval from the Institutional Review Board, data on all elderly males (aged 70 years and older) who underwent TURP under regional anesthesia over a 6-year period at our institution were retrospectively reviewed. TUR syndrome was defined as evidence of a central nervous system disturbance such as nausea, vomiting, restlessness, confusion, or even coma with a circulatory abnormality both intra- and post-operatively. Patients were divided into two groups, positive and negative, for the occurrence of the syndrome. Data such as previous medical history, preoperative and postoperative serum data, weight of resected mass, duration of operation, irrigation fluid drainage technique, anesthetic technique, operative infusion and transfusion volume, and neurological symptoms were collected. Only observational variables with p < 0.05 on univariate analyses were included in the multivariate logistic regression model to ascertain their independent effects on TUR syndrome. Results Of the 98 patients studied, 23 had TUR syndrome (23.5%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 14.9–32.0%). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that volume of plasma substitute ≥ 500 ml (odds ratio [OR] 14.7, 95% CI 2.9–74.5), continuous irrigation through a suprapubic cystostomy (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.3–16.7), and weight of resected mass > 45 g (OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.2–14.7) were associated with significantly increased risks for TUR syndrome (Hosmer-Lemeshow test, p = 0.94, accuracy 84.7%). Conclusions These results suggest that the use of a plasma substitute and continuous irrigation through a

  5. A method for the routine observation of sexual behaviour in rats.

    PubMed

    Mercier, O; Perraud, J; Stadler, J

    1987-04-01

    In seeking a method for the routine observation of copulatory behaviour in rats we compared the use of a standard rectangular Makrolon cage, commonly used in toxicology studies, with a Plexiglas cylinder that provided 2.5 times more floor area. The cylinder resulted in a much higher incidence of copulation, either once or for multiple series, within 30 min. This was not affected by whether oestrus was natural or induced. Using the cylinder and 4 h observation periods, we found that the dark phase of a 12-12 h inverse light cycle resulted in many more copulations than occurred during the light phase of a natural cycle. The incidence increased from the first to the second to the last 4 h of the dark phase. We found that placing a virgin receptive female and a naive male together in a Plexiglas cylinder for 1 h towards the end of the dark phase is a useful tool in reproductive toxicology studies in which it is important to know the precise time of insemination. PMID:3599876

  6. Asteroid orbital inversion using a virtual-observation Markov-chain Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muinonen, Karri; Granvik, Mikael; Oszkiewicz, Dagmara; Pieniluoma, Tuomo; Pentikäinen, Hanna

    2012-12-01

    A novel virtual-observation Markov-chain Monte Carlo method (MCMC) is presented for the asteroid orbital inverse problem posed by small to moderate numbers of astrometric observations. In the method, the orbital-element proposal probability density is chosen to mimic the convolution of the a posteriori density by itself: first, random errors are simulated for each observation, resulting in a set of virtual observations; second, least-squares orbital elements are derived for the virtual observations using the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method; third, repeating the procedure gives a difference between two sets of what can be called virtual least-squares elements; and, fourth, the difference obtained constitutes a symmetric proposal in a random-walk Metropolis-Hastings algorithm, avoiding the explicit computation of the proposal density. In practice, the proposals are based on a large number of pre-computed sets of orbital elements. Virtual-observation MCMC is thus based on the characterization of the phase-space volume of solutions before the actual MCMC sampling. Virtual-observation MCMC is compared to MCMC orbital ranging, a random-walk Metropolis-Hastings algorithm based on sampling with the help of Cartesian positions at two observation dates, in the case of the near-Earth asteroid (85640) 1998 OX4. In the present preliminary comparison, the methods yield similar results for a 9.1-day observational time interval extracted from the full current astrometry of the asteroid. In the future, both of the methods are to be applied to the astrometric observations of the Gaia mission.

  7. Development and evaluation of an observational method for assessing repetition in hand tasks.

    PubMed

    Latko, W A; Armstrong, T J; Foulke, J A; Herrin, G D; Rabourn, R A; Ulin, S S

    1997-04-01

    Several physical stressors, including repetitive, sustained, and forceful exertions, awkward postures, localized mechanical stress, highly dynamic movements, exposures to low temperatures, and vibration have been linked to increased risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Repetitive exertions have been among the most widely studied of these stressors, but there is no single metric for assessing exposure to repetitive work. A new methodology enables repetitive hand activity to be rated based on observable characteristics of manual work. This method uses a series of 10-cm visual-analog scales with verbal anchors and benchmark examples. Ratings for repetition reflect both the dynamic aspect of hand movements and the amount of recovery or idle hand time. Trained job analysis experts rate the jobs individually and then agree on ratings. For a group of 33 jobs, repetition ratings using this system were compared to measurements of recovery time within the cycle, exertion counts, and cycle time. Amount of recovery time within the job cycle was found to be significantly correlated with the analysis ratings (r2 = 0.58), as were the number of exertions per second (r2 = 0.53). Cycle time was not related to the analyst ratings. Repeated analyses using the new method were performed 1 1/2 to 2 years apart on the same jobs with the same group of raters. Ratings for repetition differed less than 1 point (on the 10-cm scale), on average, among the different sessions. These results indicate that the method is sensitive to exertion level and recovery time, and that the decision criteria and benchmark examples allow for a consistent application of these methods over a period of time. This method of rating repetition can be combined with similar scales for other physical stressors. PMID:9115085

  8. Development of a standard method to observe the surface friction of high-strength gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kouhei; Watanabe, Yosuke; Yamada, Naoya; Wada, Masato; Gong, Jin; Makino, Masato; Kabir, M. Hasnat; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2014-03-01

    In 2003, the most effective but simple way was proposed to synthesize double network gels, whose compression fracture stress reached about 30MPa, while that of common gels were several tens kPa. Our group has focused on PAMPSPDMAAm DN gel, because it possibly has both biocompatibility and permeability, which are good for developing artificial articular cartilage and artificial blood vessel. It is also possibly used for rapid additive manufacturing with 3D gel printer. Here, we develop a novel apparatus of the ball on disk method to observe the surface friction of the DN gels. We hope to apply this apparatus for various studies about the tribological behavior of the gels, especially about the effect of external electric field on the gel friction.

  9. Method of smoothing laser range observations by corrections of orbital parameters and station coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lala, P.; Thao, Bui Van

    1986-11-01

    The first step in the treatment of satellite laser ranging data is its smoothing and rejection of incorrect points. The proposed method uses the comparison of observations with ephemerides and iterative matching of corresponding parameters. The method of solution and a program for a minicomputer are described. Examples of results for satellite Starlette are given.

  10. Intra-observer reliability of Prechtl’s method for the qualitative assessment of general movements in Taiwanese infants

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Kuo-Kuang; Liu, Wen-Yu; Wong, Alice May-Kuen; Chung, Chia-Ying; Lien, Reyin; Chuang, Yu-Fen

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the intra-observer reliability for Prechtl’s General Movements Assessment in Taiwanese infants. This includes the global General Movements Assessment, the Optimality List for Preterm General Movements and Writhing Movements, and the Assessment of Motor Repertoire—3 to 5 Months. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-nine videos of 37 infants were observed and rated by one physical therapist twice. [Results] The intra-observer reliability ranged from good to very good for the global General Movements Assessment. The overall intra-observer reliabilities for the total score of the Optimality List from preterm up to postmenstrual age 46 weeks and the total score of the Assessment of Motor Repertoire for postmenstrual age 49 to 60 weeks were both good. [Conclusion] The results suggest that the intra-observer reliability of a certified physical therapist was satisfactory for Prechtl’s method in Taiwanese infants. PMID:27313378

  11. Intra-observer reliability of Prechtl's method for the qualitative assessment of general movements in Taiwanese infants.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Kuo-Kuang; Liu, Wen-Yu; Wong, Alice May-Kuen; Chung, Chia-Ying; Lien, Reyin; Chuang, Yu-Fen

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the intra-observer reliability for Prechtl's General Movements Assessment in Taiwanese infants. This includes the global General Movements Assessment, the Optimality List for Preterm General Movements and Writhing Movements, and the Assessment of Motor Repertoire-3 to 5 Months. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-nine videos of 37 infants were observed and rated by one physical therapist twice. [Results] The intra-observer reliability ranged from good to very good for the global General Movements Assessment. The overall intra-observer reliabilities for the total score of the Optimality List from preterm up to postmenstrual age 46 weeks and the total score of the Assessment of Motor Repertoire for postmenstrual age 49 to 60 weeks were both good. [Conclusion] The results suggest that the intra-observer reliability of a certified physical therapist was satisfactory for Prechtl's method in Taiwanese infants. PMID:27313378

  12. Solar Flare Predictions Using Time Series of SDO/HMI Observations and Machine Learning Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilonidis, Stathis; Bobra, Monica; Couvidat, Sebastien

    2015-08-01

    Solar active regions are dynamic systems that can rapidly evolve in time and produce flare eruptions. The temporal evolution of an active region can provide important information about its potential to produce major flares. In this study, we build a flare forecasting model using supervised machine learning methods and time series of SDO/HMI data for all the flaring regions with magnitude M1.0 or higher that have been observed with HMI and several thousand non-flaring regions. We define and compute hundreds of features that characterize the temporal evolution of physical properties related to the size, non-potentiality, and complexity of the active region, as well as its flaring history, for several days before the flare eruption. Using these features, we implement and test the performance of several machine learning algorithms, including support vector machines, neural networks, decision trees, discriminant analysis, and others. We also apply feature selection algorithms that aim to discard features with low predictive power and improve the performance of the machine learning methods. Our results show that support vector machines provide the best forecasts for the next 24 hours, achieving a True Skill Statistic of 0.923, an accuracy of 0.985, and a Heidke skill score of 0.861, which improve the scores obtained by Bobra and Couvidat (2015). The results of this study contribute to the development of a more reliable and fully automated data-driven flare forecasting system.

  13. Foreshock structures observed by THEMIS: case and statistical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbar, Jaroslav; Jelinek, Karel; Nemecek, Zdenek; Safrankova, Jana; Prech, Lubomir

    The ion foreshock region is typically observed upstream of the Earth’s quasi-parallel bow shocks and is characterized by enhanced ULF waves. These waves are created due to the interaction of the solar wind plasma with the ions reflected at the bow shock. As a result, fast magnetosonic waves are generated with an in-phase relationship between ion flux and magnetic field fluctuations. Using multipoint observations upstream of Earth’s bow shock from the Themis mission, we present statistical maps of modification of upstream parameters due to foreshock processes (solar wind heating and deceleration, enhancements of the magnetic field fluctuation level, etc.). The statistical study is complemented with case studies of transient phenomena in the foreshock like foreshock bubbles, hot flow anomalies, and others. We investigate an influence of foreshock effects on the bow shock and magnetopause motions and discuss a role of energetic particles and magnetic field orientations in these processes.

  14. Observational and theoretical studies of rich clusters with multiple subcondensations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, M. J.; Huchra, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    Observational and theoretical studies of the formation and evolution of clusters of galaxies are investigated. The relationship between the properties of individual galaxies and their environment is examined. Perphaps the most remarkable physical result derived from these is the apparent substructure in redishift position space. The distribution of spiral galaxies is quite different from the distribution of the ellipticals. The velocity distribution for the spirals is also substantially broader than the distribution for the ellipticals.

  15. Strategies GeoCape Intelligent Observation Studies @ GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappelaere, Pat; Frye, Stu; Moe, Karen; Mandl, Dan; LeMoigne, Jacqueline; Flatley, Tom; Geist, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides information a summary of the tradeoff studies conducted for GeoCape by the GSFC team in terms of how to optimize GeoCape observation efficiency. Tradeoffs include total ground scheduling with simple priorities, ground scheduling with cloud forecast, ground scheduling with sub-area forecast, onboard scheduling with onboard cloud detection and smart onboard scheduling and onboard image processing. The tradeoffs considered optimzing cost, downlink bandwidth and total number of images acquired.

  16. The new worlds observer: The astrophysics strategic mission concept study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cash, W.

    2011-07-01

    We present some results of the Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study for the New Worlds Observer (NWO). We show that the use of starshades is the most effective and affordable path to mapping and understanding our neighboring planetary systems, to opening the search for life outside our solar system, while serving the needs of the greater astronomy community. A starshade-based mission can be implemented immediately with a near term program of technology demonstration.

  17. Some observations on a new numerical method for solving Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.

    1981-01-01

    An explicit-implicit technique for solving Navier-Stokes equations is described which, is much less complex than other implicit methods. It is used to solve a complex, two-dimensional, steady-state, supersonic-flow problem. The computational efficiency of the method and the quality of the solution obtained from it at high Courant-Friedrich-Lewy (CFL) numbers are discussed. Modifications are discussed and certain observations are made about the method which may be helpful in using it successfully.

  18. Handover patterns: an observational study of critical care physicians

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Handover (or 'handoff') is the exchange of information between health professionals that accompanies the transfer of patient care. This process can result in adverse events. Handover 'best practices', with emphasis on standardization, have been widely promoted. However, these recommendations are based mostly on expert opinion and research on medical trainees. By examining handover communication of experienced physicians, we aim to inform future research, education and quality improvement. Thus, our objective is to describe handover communication patterns used by attending critical care physicians in an academic centre and to compare them with currently popular, standardized schemes for handover communication. Methods Prospective, observational study using video recording in an academic intensive care unit in Ontario, Canada. Forty individual patient handovers were randomly selected out of 10 end-of-week handover sessions of attending physicians. Two coders independently reviewed handover transcripts documenting elements of three communication schemes: SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendations); SOAP (Subjective, Objective, Assessment, Plan); and a standard medical admission note. Frequency and extent of questions asked by incoming physicians were measured as well. Analysis consisted of descriptive statistics. Results Mean (± standard deviation) duration of patient-specific handovers was 2 min 58 sec (± 57 sec). The majority of handovers' content consisted of recent and current patient status. The remainder included physicians' interpretations and advice. Questions posed by the incoming physicians accounted for 5.8% (± 3.9%) of the handovers' content. Elements of all three standardized communication schemes appeared repeatedly throughout the handover dialogs with no consistent pattern. For example, blocks of SOAP's Assessment appeared 5.2 (± 3.0) times in patient handovers; they followed Objective blocks in only 45.9% of the

  19. Observational studies of reconnection in the solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, David E.

    2011-11-15

    In recent years, observational studies of the corona have shifted focus. Where they were once purely qualitative morphological explorations seeking to support the presence of reconnection, more investigations are providing empirical estimates of the physical conditions in the reconnecting corona. These studies are enabled and enhanced by orbiting telescopes with high angular and temporal resolution. In this article, some recent findings about the empirical quantities are reviewed, including recent estimates of the flux transferred in individual patchy reconnection episodes, the size distribution of post-reconnection flux tubes, and the energy released by the flux tubes as they shrink.

  20. Tropospheric Chemistry Studies using Observations from GOME and TOMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, Kelly; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Kurosu, Thomas P.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Gleason, James F.

    2003-01-01

    Studies to quantitatively determine trace gas and aerosol amounts from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and the Total Ozone Monitoring Experiment (TOMS) and to perform chemical modeling studies which utilize these results are given. This includes: 1. Analysis of measurements from the GOME and TOMS instruments for troposphere distributions of O3 and HCHO; troposphere enhancements of SO2, NO2 and aerosols associated with major sources; and springtime events of elevated BrO in the lower Arctic troposphere. 2. Application of a global 3-dimensional model of troposphere chemistry to interpret the GOME observations in terms of the factors controlling the abundances of troposphere ozone and OH.

  1. Evaluating Processes, Parameters and Observations Using Cross Validation and Computationally Frugal Sensitivity Analysis Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foglia, L.; Mehl, S.; Hill, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Sensitivity analysis methods are used to identify measurements most likely to provide important information for model development and predictions and therefore identify critical processes. Methods range from computationally demanding Monte Carlo and cross-validation methods, to very computationally efficient linear methods. The methods are able to account for interrelations between parameters, but some argue that because linear methods neglect the effects of model nonlinearity, they are not worth considering when examining complex, nonlinear models of environmental systems. However, when faced with computationally demanding models needed to simulate, for example, climate change, the chance of obtaining fundamental insights (such as important and relationships between predictions and parameters) with few model runs is tempting. In the first part of this work, comparisons of local sensitivity analysis and cross-validation are conducted using a nonlinear groundwater model of the Maggia Valley, Southern Switzerland; sensitivity analysis are then applied to an integrated hydrological model of the same system where the impact of more processes and of using different sets of observations on the model results are considered; applicability to models of a variety of situations (climate, water quality, water management) is inferred. Results show that the frugal linear methods produced about 70% of the insight from about 2% of the model runs required by the computationally demanding methods. Regarding important observations, linear methods were not always able to distinguish between moderately and unimportant observations. However, they consistently identified the most important observations which are critical to characterize relationships between parameters and to assess the worth of potential new data collection efforts. Importance both to estimate parameters and predictions of interest was readily identified. The results suggest that it can be advantageous to consider local

  2. A simple method to hide data loggers safely in observation wells.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Gunnar; Sprenger, Christoph; Pekdeger, Asaf

    2011-01-01

    Submersible data loggers are widely used for groundwater monitoring, but their application often runs the risk of hardware and data loss through vandalism or theft. During a field study in India, the authors of this article experienced that well locks attract the attention of unauthorized persons and do not provide secure protection in unattended areas. To minimize the risk of losing data loggers, a cheap and simple solution has been invented to hide the instruments and associated attachments below the ground surface, inside observation wells. It relies on attaching the logger to a length of small-diameter pipe that is submerged at the bottom of the well, instead of attaching it to the top of the well. The small-diameter pipe with the logger is connected to a small bottle containing a magnet that floats on the water surface of the well and can be recovered using another bottle also with a magnet. A logger that is concealed in this way is difficult to detect and access without knowledge of the method and adequate removal tools. The system was tested and successfully applied for monitoring shallow observation wells at three field sites in Greater Delhi, India. PMID:21087249

  3. Determination of miscibility pressure by direct-observation method. Quarterly report, July 1-September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.C.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the project is to conduct laboratory tests to: (1) develop a method for determining miscibility pressure (MMP) through direct observation using a high pressure cell; and (2) determine feasibility of in-situ foam generation by visual observation and microphotographic technique. The project is organized and carried out in three major tasks, i.e., (1) MMP test; (2) high pressure sampling and chemical analysis; and (3) foam study and displacement test. The MMP test was 100% completed. The summary and results were presented in the last quarterly report. Chemical analysis using the HP5880-A was continued for SACROC crude oil at 76/sup 0/F and 150/sup 0/F and was also conducted for Rock Creek crude oil at 78/sup 0/F and 120/sup 0/F. Generally speaking, the changes of crude oil composition caused by CO/sub 2/ extraction are similar for both crude oils. During this reporting period, 29 displacements were performed for SACROC and Rock Creek crude soils. Results are discussed. 5 figures, 1 table.

  4. A stepwedge-based method for measuring breast density: observer variability and comparison with human reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diffey, Jenny; Berks, Michael; Hufton, Alan; Chung, Camilla; Verow, Rosanne; Morrison, Joanna; Wilson, Mary; Boggis, Caroline; Morris, Julie; Maxwell, Anthony; Astley, Susan

    2010-04-01

    Breast density is positively linked to the risk of developing breast cancer. We have developed a semi-automated, stepwedge-based method that has been applied to the mammograms of 1,289 women in the UK breast screening programme to measure breast density by volume and area. 116 images were analysed by three independent operators to assess inter-observer variability; 24 of these were analysed on 10 separate occasions by the same operator to determine intra-observer variability. 168 separate images were analysed using the stepwedge method and by two radiologists who independently estimated percentage breast density by area. There was little intra-observer variability in the stepwedge method (average coefficients of variation 3.49% - 5.73%). There were significant differences in the volumes of glandular tissue obtained by the three operators. This was attributed to variations in the operators' definition of the breast edge. For fatty and dense breasts, there was good correlation between breast density assessed by the stepwedge method and the radiologists. This was also observed between radiologists, despite significant inter-observer variation. Based on analysis of thresholds used in the stepwedge method, radiologists' definition of a dense pixel is one in which the percentage of glandular tissue is between 10 and 20% of the total thickness of tissue.

  5. Critical Appraisal of Mixed Methods Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyvaert, Mieke; Hannes, Karin; Maes, Bea; Onghena, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    In several subdomains of the social, behavioral, health, and human sciences, research questions are increasingly answered through mixed methods studies, combining qualitative and quantitative evidence and research elements. Accordingly, the importance of including those primary mixed methods research articles in systematic reviews grows. It is…

  6. Exploring the Limits to Observational Diffuse Interstellar Band Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, B. H.

    2014-02-01

    The status of DIB research (Herbig 1995) has strongly advanced since the DIB conference in Boulder in 1994. In the same year we reported the discovery of two near IR diffuse bands coincident with C60 +, that was confirmed in subsequent years. Since then a number of DIB observational studies have been published such as DIB surveys, measurements of DIB families, correlations and environment dependences as well as DIBs in extra-galactic sources. Resolved substructures were measured and compared to predicted rotational contours of large molecules. Polarisation studies provided constraints on possible carrier molecules and upper limits. DIBs carriers have been linked with several classes of organic molecules observed in the interstellar medium, in particular to the UIR bands (assigned to PAHs), the Extended Red Emission (ERE) or the recently detected Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME, assigned to spinning dust). In particular fullerenes and PAHs have been proposed to explain some DIBs and specific molecules were searched for in DIB spectra. DIB carriers could be present in various dehydrogenation and ionization states. Experiments in the laboratory and in space contribute to our understanding of the photo-stability of possible DIB carriers. In summary, the status of DIB research in the last 20 years has strongly advanced. We review DIB observational results and their interpretation and introduce the relevant plenary discussion.

  7. Studies of Tropical/Mid-Latitude Exchange Using UARS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avallone, Linnea

    2001-01-01

    At the time this proposal was submitted, recent publications had suggested an important role for transport of midlatitude air into the tropical lower stratosphere. Most of these studies had employed data that gave only a time-averaged picture, making it difficult to determine the nature of the transport processes responsible for the observed behavior. We proposed to analyze observations of long-lived trace gases, such as nitric acid, methane, nitrous oxide, and chlorofluorocarbons, made from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, to investigate the seasonal behavior of mixing between the midlatitudes and tropics. We planned to construct probability distributions of the concentrations of these species over small altitude ranges and to compare them to expectations based on modeled mean concentrations and knowledge of instrument precision. Differences from expectation were to be analyzed with respect to meteorological parameters to determine whether wave activity may have induced apparent mixing.

  8. Supplementing Oscat winds with Saral Altika observations for cyclone studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niharika, K.; Usha Sundari, H. S. V.; Prasad, A. V. V.; Kumari, E. V. S. Sita; Dadhwal, V. K.; Ali, M. M.

    2014-11-01

    Accurate prediction of life cycle of cyclone is very critical to the disaster management practices. Since the cyclones originate over the oceans where in situ observations are limited, we have to resort to the remote sensing techniques. Both optical and microwave sensors help studying the cyclones. While scatterometer provide wind vectors, altimeters can give only wind speed. In this paper we present how altimeter measurements can supplement the scatterometer observations in determining the radius of maximum winds (RMW). Sustained maximum winds, indicator for the intensity of the cyclone, are within the eye wall of a cyclone at a distance of RMW. This parameter is also useful in predicting right time of the storm surge. In this paper we used the wind speed estimations from AltiKa, an altimeter operating at Ka band.

  9. A simple method for correcting spatially resolved solar intensity oscillation observations for variations in scattered light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, S. M.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A measurement of the intensity distribution in an image of the solar disk will be corrupted by a spatial redistribution of the light that is caused by the earth's atmosphere and the observing instrument. A simple correction method is introduced here that is applicable for solar p-mode intensity observations obtained over a period of time in which there is a significant change in the scattering component of the point spread function. The method circumvents the problems incurred with an accurate determination of the spatial point spread function and its subsequent deconvolution from the observations. The method only corrects the spherical harmonic coefficients that represent the spatial frequencies present in the image and does not correct the image itself.

  10. Methods for studying close-track efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Mac Mestayer; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Alexander Vlassov

    2004-05-01

    Wire chambers used for particle tracking suffer a loss of efficiency when the trajectories of two particles from the same event are very close together in space. We describe two new methods for the study of this close-track efficiency. One is based on the study of a correlation function for particles with different masses as a function of their relative momenta in the laboratory reference system. The other method is based on the analysis of artificial events, constructed by merging raw data from separate events. Both methods and the standard Monte Carlo method were applied to data from the CLAS detector at Jefferson Laboratory. All three methods provide the same result for close-track efficiency with an accuracy sufficient for practical application.

  11. Microbiota and healthy ageing: observational and nutritional intervention studies

    PubMed Central

    Brüssow, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Summary Hundred years ago Metchnikoff associated human health and particularly healthy ageing with a specific type of gut microbiota. Classical culture methods associated a decrease in bifidobacteria and an increase in enterobacteria with ageing. Modern molecular methods blurred this simple picture and documented a substantial inter-individual variability for the gut microbiome even when stratifying the elderly subjects according to health status. Nutritional interventions with resistant starch showed consistent gut microbiota changes across studies from different geographical areas and prebiotic supplementation induced a 10-fold increase in gut bifidobacteria. However, in the ELDERMET study, microbiota changes do not precede, but follow the changes in health status of elderly subjects possibly as a consequence of diet changes. PMID:23527905

  12. A simple method of observation impact analysis for operational storm surge forecasting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumihar, Julius; Verlaan, Martin

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a simple method is developed for analyzing the impact of assimilating observations in improving forecast accuracy of a model. The method simply makes use of observation time series and the corresponding model output that are generated without data assimilation. These two time series are usually available in an operational database. The method is therefore easy to implement. Moreover, it can be used before actually implementing any data assimilation to the forecasting system. In this respect, it can be used as a tool for designing a data assimilation system, namely for searching for an optimal observing network. The method can also be used as a diagnostic tool, for example, for evaluating an existing operational data assimilation system to check if all observations are contributing positively to the forecast accuracy. The method has been validated with some twin experiments using a simple one-dimensional advection model as well as with an operational storm surge forecasting system based on the Dutch Continental Shelf model version 5 (DCSMv5). It has been applied for evaluating the impact of observations in the operational data assimilation system with DCSMv5 and for designing a data assimilation system for the new model DCSMv6. References: Verlaan, M. and J. Sumihar (2016), Observation impact analysis methods for storm surge forecasting systems, Ocean Dynamics, ODYN-D-15-00061R1 (in press) Zijl, F., J. Sumihar, and M. Verlaan (2015), Application of data assimilation for improved operational water level forecasting of the northwest European shelf and North Sea, Ocean Dynamics, 65, Issue 12, pp 1699-1716.

  13. Impact of ambient fine particulate matter carbon measurement methods on observed associations with acute cardiorespiratory morbidity.

    PubMed

    Winquist, Andrea; Schauer, Jamie J; Turner, Jay R; Klein, Mitch; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt

    2015-01-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) represent a substantial portion of particulate matter <2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5), and have been associated with adverse health effects. EC and OC are commonly measured using the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) method or the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) method. Measurement method differences could have an impact on observed epidemiologic associations. Daily speciated PM2.5 data were obtained from the St Louis-Midwest Supersite, and St Louis emergency department (ED) visit data were obtained from the Missouri Hospital Association for the period June 2001 to April 2003. We assessed acute associations between cardiorespiratory ED visits and EC and OC from NIOSH and IMPROVE methods using Poisson generalized linear models controlling for temporal trends and meteorology. Associations were generally similar for EC and OC from the different measurement methods. The most notable difference between methods was observed for congestive heart failure and EC (for example, warm season rate ratios (95% confidence intervals) per interquartile range change in EC concentration were: NIOSH=1.06 (0.99-1.13), IMPROVE=1.01 (0.96-1.07)). Overall, carbon measurement method had little impact on acute associations between EC, OC, and ED visits. Some specific differences were observed, however, which may be related to particle composition. PMID:25138293

  14. Experience from the Argentine Pegvisomant Observational Study: preliminary data.

    PubMed

    García Basavilbaso, N; Guitelman, M; Nagelberg, A; Stalldecker, G; Carabelli, A; Bruno, O; Danilowitz, K; Manavela, M; Mallea Gil, S; Ballarino, C; Guelman, R; Katz, D; Fidalgo, S; Leal, R; Fideleff, H; Servidio, M; Bruera, D; Librandi, F; Chervin, A; Vitale, M; Basso, A

    2010-01-01

    The GH receptor antagonist pegvisomant is an efficient agent to achieve biochemical control of acromegaly in those cases refractory to surgery and medical therapy with somatostatin analogs. We conducted an observational multicenter study consisting of data collection in accordance with the standard management of patients with acromegaly in everyday practice. We reviewed the medical records of 28 patients, 23 females, who were treated with pegvisomant due to the lack of biochemical response or intolerance to the somatostatin analogs. The objective was to monitor long-term safety and efficacy of the antagonist. 82% of the patients had previous pituitary surgery, 53.6% radiotherapy and 96.4% received medical therapy for acromegaly. Only 19.2% of the patients had pituitary residual tumor size larger than 1 cm, the remainder harbored a microadenoma or no visible tumor in the pituitary images. In terms of biochemical efficacy, IGF-I levels decreased to normal ranges in 45% and 58.8% of patients after 3 and 6 months of treatment, respectively, the daily mean dose of pegvisomant being 9.6+/-1.1 mg. Adverse events, potentially related to pegvisomant were reported in 6 patients (21.4%), local injection site reaction and elevated liver enzymes being the most frequent. Tumor size did not show enlargement in the evaluated population (15 patients) during the period of the study. This paper presents preliminary data from a small observational study in Argentina which represents the first database in our country. PMID:20616494

  15. Globally Gridded Satellite (GridSat) Observations for Climate Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, Kenneth R.; Ansari, Steve; Bain, Caroline L.; Bourassa, Mark A.; Dickinson, Michael J.; Funk, Chris; Helms, Chip N.; Hennon, Christopher C.; Holmes, Christopher D.; Huffman, George J.; Kossin, James P.; Lee, Hai-Tien; Loew, Alexander; Magnusdottir, Gudrun

    2012-01-01

    Geostationary satellites have provided routine, high temporal resolution Earth observations since the 1970s. Despite the long period of record, use of these data in climate studies has been limited for numerous reasons, among them: there is no central archive of geostationary data for all international satellites, full temporal and spatial resolution data are voluminous, and diverse calibration and navigation formats encumber the uniform processing needed for multi-satellite climate studies. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project set the stage for overcoming these issues by archiving a subset of the full resolution geostationary data at approx.10 km resolution at 3 hourly intervals since 1983. Recent efforts at NOAA s National Climatic Data Center to provide convenient access to these data include remapping the data to a standard map projection, recalibrating the data to optimize temporal homogeneity, extending the record of observations back to 1980, and reformatting the data for broad public distribution. The Gridded Satellite (GridSat) dataset includes observations from the visible, infrared window, and infrared water vapor channels. Data are stored in the netCDF format using standards that permit a wide variety of tools and libraries to quickly and easily process the data. A novel data layering approach, together with appropriate satellite and file metadata, allows users to access GridSat data at varying levels of complexity based on their needs. The result is a climate data record already in use by the meteorological community. Examples include reanalysis of tropical cyclones, studies of global precipitation, and detection and tracking of the intertropical convergence zone.

  16. ADAPTIVE MATCHING IN RANDOMIZED TRIALS AND OBSERVATIONAL STUDIES

    PubMed Central

    van der Laan, Mark J.; Balzer, Laura B.; Petersen, Maya L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In many randomized and observational studies the allocation of treatment among a sample of n independent and identically distributed units is a function of the covariates of all sampled units. As a result, the treatment labels among the units are possibly dependent, complicating estimation and posing challenges for statistical inference. For example, cluster randomized trials frequently sample communities from some target population, construct matched pairs of communities from those included in the sample based on some metric of similarity in baseline community characteristics, and then randomly allocate a treatment and a control intervention within each matched pair. In this case, the observed data can neither be represented as the realization of n independent random variables, nor, contrary to current practice, as the realization of n/2 independent random variables (treating the matched pair as the independent sampling unit). In this paper we study estimation of the average causal effect of a treatment under experimental designs in which treatment allocation potentially depends on the pre-intervention covariates of all units included in the sample. We define efficient targeted minimum loss based estimators for this general design, present a theorem that establishes the desired asymptotic normality of these estimators and allows for asymptotically valid statistical inference, and discuss implementation of these estimators. We further investigate the relative asymptotic efficiency of this design compared with a design in which unit-specific treatment assignment depends only on the units’ covariates. Our findings have practical implications for the optimal design and analysis of pair matched cluster randomized trials, as well as for observational studies in which treatment decisions may depend on characteristics of the entire sample. PMID:25097298

  17. Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Anthony, Brian W.

    1997-01-01

    A method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries.

  18. Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, D.N.; Anthony, B.W.

    1997-02-25

    A method is described for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries. 3 figs.

  19. A statistical study of merging galaxies: Theory and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Tapan K.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the expected frequency of merging galaxies is conducted, using the impulsive approximation. Results indicate that if we consider mergers involving galaxy pairs without halos in a single crossing time or orbital period, the expected frequency of mergers is two orders of magnitude below the observed value for the present epoch. If we consider mergers involving several orbital periods or crossing times, the expected frequency goes up by an order of magnitude. Preliminary calculation indicate that if we consider galaxy mergers between pairs with massive halos, the merger is very much hastened.

  20. Study of a microflare observed with SUMER and TRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontikakis, C.; Winebarger, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    We study a GOES-A1 microflare, observed in active region NOAA 8541 on May 15, 1999 with TRACE images, SUMER spectra and MDI magnetograms. In TRACE filtergrams of 171A and 195A, the microflare is composed of two interacting, 20Mm long, loops. SUMER observations include four spectral lines: the Si II 1533A (a chromospheric line), the C IV 1548A, 1550 A (transition region lines) and the Ne VIII 770 A (a coronal line). These spectra record the impulsive stage of the microflare, which appears as a bright feature at the west footpoint of the TRACE loops. In an area adjacent to the microflare we observe, for the first time on the solar disk, a region where the lines intensity ratio 1548A/1550A equals to 4 which means that resonant scattering dominates the emission process. Over the microflare, the SUMER spectral lines are blue shifted, indicating upflows due to explosive evaporation, as well as red shifted, indicating, cooling downward motions. Moreover, the C IV microflare spectral profiles, indicate upflows of ~200 km/s even if most of them are damaged due to the SUMER detector over exposure, while the Si II 1533A profiles are self-reversed due to opacity effects.

  1. Assessing the Impact of Observations on Numerical Weather Forecasts Using the Adjoint Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelaro, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The adjoint of a data assimilation system provides a flexible and efficient tool for estimating observation impacts on short-range weather forecasts. The impacts of any or all observations can be estimated simultaneously based on a single execution of the adjoint system. The results can be easily aggregated according to data type, location, channel, etc., making this technique especially attractive for examining the impacts of new hyper-spectral satellite instruments and for conducting regular, even near-real time, monitoring of the entire observing system. This talk provides a general overview of the adjoint method, including the theoretical basis and practical implementation of the technique. Results are presented from the adjoint-based observation impact monitoring tool in NASA's GEOS-5 global atmospheric data assimilation and forecast system. When performed in conjunction with standard observing system experiments (OSEs), the adjoint results reveal both redundancies and dependencies between observing system impacts as observations are added or removed from the assimilation system. Understanding these dependencies may be important for optimizing the use of the current observational network and defining requirements for future observing systems

  2. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE): Explanation and Elaboration

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbroucke, Jan P; von Elm, Erik; Altman, Douglas G; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Mulrow, Cynthia D; Pocock, Stuart J; Poole, Charles; Schlesselman, James J; Egger, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Much medical research is observational. The reporting of observational studies is often of insufficient quality. Poor reporting hampers the assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of a study and the generalisability of its results. Taking into account empirical evidence and theoretical considerations, a group of methodologists, researchers, and editors developed the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) recommendations to improve the quality of reporting of observational studies. The STROBE Statement consists of a checklist of 22 items, which relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results and discussion sections of articles. Eighteen items are common to cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional studies and four are specific to each of the three study designs. The STROBE Statement provides guidance to authors about how to improve the reporting of observational studies and facilitates critical appraisal and interpretation of studies by reviewers, journal editors and readers. This explanatory and elaboration document is intended to enhance the use, understanding, and dissemination of the STROBE Statement. The meaning and rationale for each checklist item are presented. For each item, one or several published examples and, where possible, references to relevant empirical studies and methodological literature are provided. Examples of useful flow diagrams are also included. The STROBE Statement, this document, and the associated Web site (http://www.strobe-statement.org/) should be helpful resources to improve reporting of observational research. PMID:17941715

  3. UK pneumonectomy outcome study (UKPOS): a prospective observational study of pneumonectomy outcome

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ellie S; Pearce, Adrian C; Cook, David; Davies, Paul; Bishay, Ehab; Bowler, Geoffrey MR; Gao, Fang

    2009-01-01

    Background In order to assess the short term risks of pneumonectomy for lung cancer in contemporary practice a one year prospective observational study of pneumonectomy outcome was made. Current UK practice for pneumonectomy was observed to note patient and treatment factors associated with major complications. Methods A multicentre, prospective, observational cohort study was performed. All 35 UK thoracic surgical centres were invited to submit data to the study. All adult patients undergoing pneumonectomy for lung cancer between 1 January and 31 December 2005 were included. Patients undergoing pleuropneumonectomy, extended pneumonectomy, completion pneumonectomy following previous lobectomy and pneumonectomy for benign disease, were excluded from the study. The main outcome measure was suffering a major complication. Major complications were defined as: death within 30 days of surgery; treated cardiac arrhythmia or hypotension; unplanned intensive care admission; further surgery or inotrope usage. Results 312 pneumonectomies from 28 participating centres were entered. The major complication incidence was: 30-day mortality 5.4%; treated cardiac arrhythmia 19.9%; unplanned intensive care unit admission 9.3%; further surgery 4.8%; inotrope usage 3.5%. Age, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status ≥ P3, pre-operative diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) and epidural analgesia were collectively the strongest risk factors for major complications. Major complications prolonged median hospital stay by 2 days. Conclusion The 30 day mortality rate was less than 8%, in agreement with the British Thoracic Society guidelines. Pneumonectomy was associated with a high rate of major complications. Age, ASA physical status, DLCO and epidural analgesia appeared collectively most associated with major complications. PMID:19643006

  4. Business Research Methods: A Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, George

    This study guide provides an overview and model of business research. First, introductory material defines research and discusses the benefits of studying business research methods for both producers and consumers of research. In the next section different types of research are discussed, including experimental, ex post facto, quasi-experimental,…

  5. A Conceptual Study of Visual Training Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aik, Chong-Tek

    2003-01-01

    Proposes a research study to investigate the effects of two visual training methods on the productivity of new workers on an assembly line at a wood products plant in Indonesia. Suggests that such a study would be useful to the managers in deciding what types of training would be most appropriate. (Contains 23 references.) (CAK)

  6. GC/TOF-MS as a new method for halocarbon observation in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obersteiner, Florian; Boenisch, Harald; Hoker, Jesica; Engel, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The need for halocarbon measurements in the atmosphere arose with the anthropogenic emission of CFCs beginning in the 1950s and the discovery of their ozone depleting potential in the 1980s. CFCs were replaced by HCFCs and are nowadays replaced by HFCs, with new compounds continuously being developed and introduced to the atmosphere. While not being harmful to the ozone layer, HFCs are still greenhouse gases and many tend to be hazardous to human health at high concentration. They can also serve as tracers to study atmospheric transport at low concentration, making high precision measurement interesting to atmospheric studies. Gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS) is still a new method in the field of atmospheric halocarbon measurement compared to the well-established GC/QP(quadrupole)-MS. The QP-MS is indeed a very stable and easy-to-operate instrument but also limited by mass resolution and either mass range or sensitivity. We will present the general applicability of GC/TOF-MS to regular halocarbon observation by a time series of halocarbon measurements from the Taunus Observatory (Kleiner Feldberg, Germany) and the implementation of a second, high-resolution (max. R=4000) TOF-MS system. Both GC/TOF-MS systems are characterized with respect to reproducibility, non-linearity and limits of detection (LOD). Furthermore, the advantages of a higher mass resolution are demonstrated with respect to LOD, substance identification and substance quantification.

  7. Melt-Triggered Seismic Response in Hydraulically-Active Polar Ice: Observations and Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, Joshua D.

    Glacier ice responds to environmental forcing through changes in its sliding speed and mass balance. While these changes often occur on daily time scales or longer, they are initiated by brittle deformation events that establish hydrological pathways in hours or seconds and allow meltwater access to englacial or subglacial depths to facilitate ice motion. In this thesis, we (various contributing authors including myself) use seismic monitoring to detect and locate the creation and growth of some of these hydraulic pathways by monitoring their seismic emissions, or icequakes. More specifically, we address (1) what seismic observables, unavailable from other sensing methods, indicate an initial glaciogenic response to melt- water input and (2) if these comprise evidence of feedbacks that may destabilize polar ice under a warming climate. Supplemental to our scientific contributions, we advance statistical processing methods that demonstrably improve the capability of digital detectors at discriminating icequakes from astationary noise. We begin by interpreting geophysical observations collected from a dry-based, sub-freezing (--17 ° C), polar glacier environment (Taylor Glacier, ANT). By implementing a calibrated surface energy balance model, we estimate the timing and volume of surface meltwater generated during the collection of seismic data from a six-receiver geophone network. We proceed by contrasting these response characteristics with geophysical observations following an early (spring) supraglacial lake drainage within the lake-forming ablation zone of the Western Greenland Ice Sheet. Using measurements from a ˜5km-aperture geophone network, we find that the anticipated post-drainage icequakes are diurnally responsive, largely surficial in origin, and indicative of tensile fracturing from shallow cracks in the ice. The creation of the lake-drainage moulin appears to coincide with a shift in mean icequake source locations, and an increase in icequake

  8. Pandemrix™ and narcolepsy: A critical appraisal of the observational studies.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, Thomas; Cohet, Catherine; Dos Santos, Gaël; Ferreira, Germano Lc; Bollaerts, Kaatje; Bauchau, Vincent; Shinde, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    A link between Pandemrix™ (AS03-adjuvanted H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine, GSK Vaccines, Belgium) and narcolepsy was first suspected in 2010 in Sweden and Finland following a number of reports in children and adolescents. Initial scepticism about the reported association faded as additional countries reported similar findings, leading several regulatory authorities to restrict the use of Pandemrix™. The authors acknowledge that currently available data suggest an increased risk of narcolepsy following vaccination with Pandemrix™; however, from an epidemiologist's perspective, significant methodological limitations of the studies have not been fully addressed and raise questions about the reported risk estimates. We review the most important biases and confounders that potentially occurred in 12 European studies of the observed association between Pandemrix™ and narcolepsy, and call for further analyses and debate. PMID:26379011

  9. Spacelab Science Results Study. Volume 1; External Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    Some of the 36 Spacelab missions were more or less dedicated to specific scientific disciplines, while other carried a eclectic mixture of experiments ranging from astrophysics to life sciences. However, the experiments can be logically classified into two general categories; those that make use of the Shuttle as an observing platform for external phenomena (including those which use the Shuttle in an interactive mode) and those which use the Shuttle as a microgravity laboratory. This first volume of this Spacelab Science Results study will be devoted to experiments of the first category. The disciplines included are Astrophysics, Solar Physics, Space Plasma Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, and Earth Sciences. Because of the large number of microgravity investigations, Volume 2 will be devoted to Microgravity Sciences, which includes Fluid Physics, Combustion Science, Materials Science, and Biotechnology, and Volume 3 will be devoted to Space Life Sciences, which studies the response and adaptability of living organisms to the microgravity environment.

  10. Rotational Spectroscopic Studies and Observational Searches for HO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widicus Weaver, Susanna

    Interstellar chemistry is largely driven by reactions of unstable molecules that serve as reaction intermediates in terrestrial chemistry. One such class of compounds are weakly-bound clusters. These clusters could form in interstellar environments through radiative association reactions, but their identification and characterization in interstellar environments is limited by a lack of rotational spectral information. One such species is HO3, which could be formed in the interstellar medium from O2 and OH. HO3 has been studied extensively in the infrared, and there are a few microwave spectral studies that have also been reported. However, no millimeter or submillimeter spectral information is available to guide astronomical observations. In this talk, we will present the laboratory characterization of trans -HO3 and trans -DO3 from 70 to 450 GHz using our newly developed fast sweeping technique. The molecular constants have been significantly refined, and additional higher order centrifugal distortion constants have been determined. We will also present an initial observational search for HO3 in 32 star forming regions. Although no HO3 lines have been detected thus far, strict upper limits can be placed on the HO3 column density in these sources based on this analysis. Additional Authors: Luyao Zou, Brian M. Hays.

  11. An observational study of entrainment rate in deep convection

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xiaohao; Lu, Chunsong; Zhao, Tianliang; Zhang, Guang Jun; Liu, Yangang

    2015-09-22

    This study estimates entrainment rate and investigates its relationships with cloud properties in 156 deep convective clouds based on in-situ aircraft observations during the TOGA-COARE (Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment) field campaign over the western Pacific. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study on the probability density function of entrainment rate, the relationships between entrainment rate and cloud microphysics, and the effects of dry air sources on the calculated entrainment rate in deep convection from an observational perspective. Results show that the probability density function of entrainment rate can be well fitted by lognormal, gamma or Weibull distribution, with coefficients of determination being 0.82, 0.85 and 0.80, respectively. Entrainment tends to reduce temperature, water vapor content and moist static energy in cloud due to evaporative cooling and dilution. Inspection of the relationships between entrainment rate and microphysical properties reveals a negative correlation between volume-mean radius and entrainment rate, suggesting the potential dominance of homogeneous mechanism in the clouds examined. The entrainment rate and environmental water vapor content show similar tendencies of variation with the distance of the assumed environmental air to the cloud edges. Their variation tendencies are non-monotonic due to the relatively short distance between adjacent clouds.

  12. An observational study of entrainment rate in deep convection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Guo, Xiaohao; Lu, Chunsong; Zhao, Tianliang; Zhang, Guang Jun; Liu, Yangang

    2015-09-22

    This study estimates entrainment rate and investigates its relationships with cloud properties in 156 deep convective clouds based on in-situ aircraft observations during the TOGA-COARE (Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment) field campaign over the western Pacific. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study on the probability density function of entrainment rate, the relationships between entrainment rate and cloud microphysics, and the effects of dry air sources on the calculated entrainment rate in deep convection from an observational perspective. Results show that the probability density function of entrainment rate can be well fitted by lognormal,more » gamma or Weibull distribution, with coefficients of determination being 0.82, 0.85 and 0.80, respectively. Entrainment tends to reduce temperature, water vapor content and moist static energy in cloud due to evaporative cooling and dilution. Inspection of the relationships between entrainment rate and microphysical properties reveals a negative correlation between volume-mean radius and entrainment rate, suggesting the potential dominance of homogeneous mechanism in the clouds examined. The entrainment rate and environmental water vapor content show similar tendencies of variation with the distance of the assumed environmental air to the cloud edges. Their variation tendencies are non-monotonic due to the relatively short distance between adjacent clouds.« less

  13. Guideline adaptation and implementation planning: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adaptation of high-quality practice guidelines for local use has been advanced as an efficient means to improve acceptability and applicability of evidence-informed care. In a pan-Canadian study, we examined how cancer care groups adapted pre-existing guidelines to their unique context and began implementation planning. Methods Using a mixed-methods, case-study design, five cases were purposefully sampled from self-identified groups and followed as they used a structured method and resources for guideline adaptation. Cases received the ADAPTE Collaboration toolkit, facilitation, methodological and logistical support, resources and assistance as required. Documentary and primary data collection methods captured individual case experience, including monthly summaries of meeting and field notes, email/telephone correspondence, and project records. Site visits, process audits, interviews, and a final evaluation forum with all cases contributed to a comprehensive account of participant experience. Results Study cases took 12 to >24 months to complete guideline adaptation. Although participants appreciated the structure, most found the ADAPTE method complex and lacking practical aspects. They needed assistance establishing individual guideline mandate and infrastructure, articulating health questions, executing search strategies, appraising evidence, and achieving consensus. Facilitation was described as a multi-faceted process, a team effort, and an essential ingredient for guideline adaptation. While front-line care providers implicitly identified implementation issues during adaptation, they identified a need to add an explicit implementation planning component. Conclusions Guideline adaptation is a positive initial step toward evidence-informed care, but adaptation (vs. ‘de novo’ development) did not meet expectations for reducing time or resource commitments. Undertaking adaptation is as much about the process (engagement and capacity building) as it

  14. Methods for the Study of Gonadal Development.

    PubMed

    Piprek, Rafal P

    2016-01-01

    Current knowledge on gonadal development and sex determination is the product of many decades of research involving a variety of scientific methods from different biological disciplines such as histology, genetics, biochemistry, and molecular biology. The earliest embryological investigations, followed by the invention of microscopy and staining methods, were based on histological examinations. The most robust development of histological staining techniques occurred in the second half of the nineteenth century and resulted in structural descriptions of gonadogenesis. These first studies on gonadal development were conducted on domesticated animals; however, currently the mouse is the most extensively studied species. The next key point in the study of gonadogenesis was the advancement of methods allowing for the in vitro culture of fetal gonads. For instance, this led to the description of the origin of cell lines forming the gonads. Protein detection using antibodies and immunolabeling methods and the use of reporter genes were also invaluable for developmental studies, enabling the visualization of the formation of gonadal structure. Recently, genetic and molecular biology techniques, especially gene expression analysis, have revolutionized studies on gonadogenesis and have provided insight into the molecular mechanisms that govern this process. The successive invention of new methods is reflected in the progress of research on gonadal development. PMID:27300186

  15. TV Observations of Meteors in INASAN: Equipment, Methods and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartashova, Anna P.; Bagrov, A. V.; Leonov, V. A.

    2007-08-01

    For the analysis the risk from particles of meteor streams, we must have proved information about masses and densities of meteors. The prime task is to select minor streams from sporadic meteors. Very few astronomers tried to do it, when others only mark observed meteor “Sporadic” without registering its track. So very few previous observations cannot be used for streams detection, and we had to do it from special observations. As a width of meteoroid stream may be very narrow, the Earth will cross it in few hours and it is necessary to observe meteor events 24 hour a day. This is why we provide meteor monitoring and catch every ray of light in night skies and ask other observers to join our program. The current goal of our investigation is continuous monitoring of meteor events by two ways: from nearby sites (about 20-60 km distance) for triangle observations and simultaneously from some observation sites separated by approximately thousand kilometers for detection of minor streams. The last one will reveal spatial heterogeneity's of strong meteor showers also. Since July 2002 at the Arkhyz Space Tracking Station (North Caucasus) and near Moscow hybrid TV-cameras with CCD (“PatrolCa”) are used for meteor observations. Limiting magnitude of the first camera is about +5 magn in the 52-degrees field under frame rate 25 f/sec, the second camera has limiting magnitude 11,5m in field 18x22 degrees with rate 7,5 f/sec. Since June 2006 four extra PatrolCa begin stereo (basis) TV-observation near Moscow with the aims of determination of individual orbits of observed meteors and their physical densities. Observed by meteor monitoring data show that at least 40% of sporadic meteors may be referred to catalogued weak meteor streams. In this paper we present the method of definition of celestial coordinates of objects in the single frame of the wide-angle system. The method allows definition of celestial coordinates of a meteor at the restrictions of absents of enough

  16. Computational and Observational Studies of Interstellar Thioformaldehyde Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Lisa; Hoffman, I. M.

    2013-06-01

    Interstellar spectroscopy of thioformaldehyde (H2CS) holds considerable promise because of the close relationship between the H2CS molecule and the well-studied formaldehyde (H2CO) molecule. In particular, the well-known J(Ka,Kc) = 1(1,0) to 1(1,1) transition of H2CO at 6 cm (4.8 GHz) has an analogous H2CS transition at 1046 MHz. However, the 1046-MHz line of H2CS has never been detected astronomically. We present here a summary of: (1) a computational investigation of H2CS level populations related to known H2CO 6-cm masers, and (2) an observational campaign of four isotopologues of H2CS. Maser emission from H2CO has been observed at 6 cm for which Boland and de Jong (1981) have developed a pump model. We have extended this model to H2CS and we present preliminary calculations for a 1046-MHz maser. We intend to develop a quantitative tool for interpreting H2CS observations toward Galactic and extragalactic locations of H2CO maser emission by constructing a radiative-transfer maser model for H2CS. Thioformaldehyde has been detected in a few Galactic sources via J>1 transitions. However, interpretation of these results has two outstanding problems: the H2CS/H2CO abundances do not agree with known sulfur-to-oxygen ratios nor do the J>1 populations have the expected Boltzmann relationship to the J=1 states. A detection of the 1046-MHz transition of H2CS with J=1 would alleviate many of the ambiguities in the interpretation of existing observational results. We describe our forthcoming experiment to search in a Galactic star-forming region for thermal and nonthermal emission and absorption from four thioformaldehyde isotopologues: H2(12C)(32S), H2(13C)(32S), H2(12C)(34S), and D2(12C)(32S). Taken together, both parts of this research effort will provide valuable and novel constraints on H2CS and H2CO. New observations of H2CS isotopologues will yield new measurements of deuterium-to-hydrogen and sulfur-to-oxygen ratios in star-forming environments. Also, the application

  17. OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE MULTISTRUCTURED PLANETARY NEBULA NGC 7354

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, M. E.; Vazquez, R.; Miranda, L. F.; Zavala, S.; Ayala, S. E-mail: vazquez@astrosen.unam.mx E-mail: lorenzo@astro.uson.mx E-mail: sayala@ideabc.org

    2010-04-15

    We present an observational study of the planetary nebula (PN) NGC 7354 consisting of narrowband H{alpha} and [N II]{lambda}6584 imaging as well as low- and high-dispersion long-slit spectroscopy, and VLA-D radio continuum. According to our imaging and spectroscopic data, NGC 7354 has four main structures: a quite round outer shell and an elliptical inner shell, a collection of low-excitation bright knots roughly concentrated on the equatorial region of the nebula, and two asymmetrical jet-like features, not aligned either with the shells' axes, or with each other. We have obtained physical parameters like electron temperature and electron density as well as ionic and elemental abundances for these different structures. Electron temperature and electron density slightly vary throughout the nebula going from {approx_equal}11, 000 to {approx_equal}14, 000 K, and from {approx_equal}1000 to {approx_equal} 3000 cm{sup -3}, respectively. The local extinction coefficient c {sub H{beta}} shows an increasing gradient from south to north and a decreasing gradient from east to west consistent with the number of equatorial bright knots present in each direction. Abundance values show slight internal variations but most of them are within the estimated uncertainties. In general, abundance values are in good agreement with the ones expected for PNe. Radio continuum data are consistent with optically thin thermal emission. Mean physical parameters derived from the radio emission are electron density n{sub e} = 710 cm{sup -3} and M(H II) = 0.22 M {sub sun}. We have used the interactive three-dimensional modeling tool SHAPE to reproduce the observed morphokinematic structures in NGC 7354 with different geometrical components. Our observations and model show evidence that the outer shell is moving faster ({approx_equal}35 km s{sup -1}) than the inner one ({approx_equal} 30 km s{sup -1}). Our SHAPE model includes several small spheres placed on the outer shell wall to reproduce

  18. Method for residual household waste composition studies.

    PubMed

    Sahimaa, Olli; Hupponen, Mari; Horttanainen, Mika; Sorvari, Jaana

    2015-12-01

    The rising awareness of decreasing natural resources has brought forward the idea of a circular economy and resource efficiency in Europe. As a part of this movement, European countries have identified the need to monitor residual waste flows in order to make recycling more efficient. In Finland, studies on the composition of residual household waste have mostly been conducted using different methods, which makes the comparison of the results difficult. The aim of this study was to develop a reliable method for residual household waste composition studies. First, a literature review on European study methods was performed. Also, 19 Finnish waste composition studies were compared in order to identify the shortcomings of the current Finnish residual household waste composition data. Moreover, the information needs of different waste management authorities concerning residual household waste were studied through a survey and personal interviews. Stratification, sampling, the classification of fractions and statistical analysis were identified as the key factors in a residual household waste composition study. The area studied should be divided into non-overlapping strata in order to decrease the heterogeneity of waste and enable comparisons between different waste producers. A minimum of six subsamples, each 100 kg, from each stratum should be sorted. Confidence intervals for each waste category should be determined in order to evaluate the applicability of the results. A new three-level classification system was created based on Finnish stakeholders' information needs and compared to four other European waste composition study classifications. PMID:26337965

  19. Estimating transient climate response using consistent temperature reconstruction methods in models and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, M.; Cowtan, K.; Hawkins, E.; Stolpe, M.

    2015-12-01

    Observational temperature records such as HadCRUT4 typically have incomplete geographical coverage and blend air temperature over land with sea surface temperatures over ocean, in contrast to model output which is commonly reported as global air temperature. This complicates estimation of properties such as the transient climate response (TCR). Observation-based estimates of TCR have been made using energy-budget constraints applied to time series of historical radiative forcing and surface temperature changes, while model TCR is formally derived from simulations where CO2 increases at 1% per year. We perform a like-with-like comparison using three published energy-budget methods to derive modelled TCR from historical CMIP5 temperature series sampled in a manner consistent with HadCRUT4. Observation-based TCR estimates agree to within 0.12 K of the multi-model mean in each case and for 2 of the 3 energy-budget methods the observation-based TCR is higher than the multi-model mean. For one energy-budget method, using the HadCRUT4 blending method leads to a TCR underestimate of 0.3±0.1 K, relative to that estimated using global near-surface air temperatures.

  20. Spatiotemporal multiplexing method for visual field of view extension in holographic displays with naked eye observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, G.; Kujawińska, M.; Kozacki, T.; Zaperty, W.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we propose a method which allows to overcome the basic functional problems in holographic displays with naked eye observation caused by delivering too small images visible in narrow viewing angles. The solution is based on combining the spatiotemporal multiplexing method with a 4f optical system. It enables to increase an aperture of a holographic display and extend the angular visual field of view. The applicability of the modified display is evidenced by Wigner distribution analysis of holographic imaging with spatiotemporal multiplexing method and by the experiments performed at the display demonstrator.

  1. Mucocutaneous manifestations of acquired hypoparathyroidism: An observational study.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Somenath; Mondal, Modhuchanda; Das, Kapildev; Shrimal, Arpit

    2012-09-01

    Hypoparathyroidism is a disorder of calcium and phosphorus metabolism due to decreased secretion of parathyroid hormone. Hypoparathyroidism can be hereditary and acquired. Acquired hypoparathyroidism usually occurs following neck surgery (thyroid surgery or parathyroid surgery). Along with systemic manifestations, hypoparathyroidism produces some skin manifestations. Lack of study regarding mucocutaneous manifestations of acquired hypoparathyroidism prompted us to undertake this study. To evaluate the mucocutaneous manifestations of acquired hypoparathyroidism. An observational study done in a tertiary care hospital of Kolkata by comprehensive history taking, through clinical examination and relevant laboratory investigations. Twenty-one patients were included in the study. The commonest form of acquired hypoparathyroidism was neck surgery (thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy operation). Mucocutaneous manifestations were present in 76.19% of patients. The most frequent mucocutaneous manifestation was found in the hairs like the loss of axillary hair (61.9%), loss of pubic hair (52.38%), coarsening of body hair (47.62%), and alopecia areata (9.52%). The nail changes noted were brittle and ridged nail, followed by onycholysis, onychosezia, and onychomedesis. The most common skin features were xerotic skin in 11 patients (52.38%), followed by pellagra-like skin pigmentation, pustular psoriasis and acne form eruption, bullous impetigo, etc. Mucosa was normal in all the cases excepting the one which showed oral candidiasis. PMID:23087872

  2. [Economic assessment, a field between clinical research and observational studies].

    PubMed

    Launois, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Health technology assessments propose to study the differential impact of health interventions in a complex care system which is characterised by the multitude of individual behaviours and the diverse nature of the institutions involved. Current systems for data collection lend themselves poorly to this rigorous analysis of efficacy of treatments in the actual situations where they are used. Randomised trials endeavour to neutralise any parasitic interference which could compromise testing for a causal relationship between the treatment administered and the result obtained. Their methodology which establishes the term ceteris paribus in the principle of good practice lends itself poorly to an analysis of individual behaviour. Observational studies are start from actual treatment situations to describe them as reliably as possible. By definition, however, these assume that the natural course of events is not deviated by any intervention. The absence of an experimental plan increases the likelihood of bias and makes it more difficult to test for causal relationships. They lend themselves poorly to testing for incremental efficacy. The two instruments to be preferred are decisional analysis and quasi-experimental studies. Decisional analysis help to avoid the problems of external validity associated with randomised clinical trials by associating parameters which are extracted from data obtained from everyday practice. Quasi-experimental studies or pragmatic trials are based on the reality of behaviour of the prescriber and his/her patients; their impact on efficacy, quality of life social costs of the disease and of treatments may be identified under normal conditions of use. PMID:12609811

  3. Evaluation of flow direction methods against field observations of overland flow dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandini, Stefano; Moretti, Giovanni; Corticelli, Mauro A.; Santangelo, Paolo E.; Capra, Alessandro; Rivola, Riccardo; Albertson, John D.

    2012-10-01

    The D8, D8-LTD, D∞-LTD, D∞, MD∞, and MD8 flow direction methods are evaluated against field observations of overland flow dispersion obtained from novel experimental methods. Thin flows of cold water were released at selected points on a warmer slope and individual overland flow patterns originating from each of these points were observed using a terrestrial laser scanner and a thermal imaging camera. Land microtopography was determined by using laser returns from the dry land surface, whereas overland flow patterns were determined by using either laser returns or infrared emissions from the wetted portions of the land surface. Planar overland flow dispersion is found to play an important role in the region lying immediately downslope of the point source, but attenuates rapidly as flow propagates downslope. In contrast, existing dispersive flow direction methods are found to provide a continued dispersion with distance downslope. Predicted propagation patterns, for all methods considered here, depend critically on the size h of grid cells involved. All methods are found to be poorly sensitive in extremely fine grids (h ≤ 2 cm), and to be poorly specific in coarse grids (h = 2 m). Satisfactory results are, however, obtained in grids having resolutions h that approach the average flow width (50 cm), with the best performances displayed by the MD8 method in the finest grids (5 ≤ h ≤ 20 cm), and by the MD∞, D∞, and D∞-LTD methods in the coarsest grids (20 cm < h ≤ 1 m).

  4. Simulation Study Of Early Afterglows Observed With Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hededal, C.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-09-01

    A 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell code has been used to simulate the dynamics of forward and reverse shocks with thin and thick shells within the parameter constraints provided by present Swift observations and the present models of GRB emission. Our 3-D RPIC simulations have provided the dynamics of collisionless shocks in electron-ion and electron-positron plasmas with and without initial ambient magnetic fields and revealed the importance of ``jitter radiation'' with prompt and afterglow spectra due to the inhomogeneous magnetic fields generated by the Weibel instability. It is different from synchrotron radiation, which is usually assumed to be the dominant radiation process. We have investigated gamma-ray burst emissions from prompt, early, and late afterglows considering microscopic processes. Based on our previous investigation of the Weibel instability for each stage of evolution of ejecta propagating in the ISM, we have incorporated the plasma conditions (relativistic jets) with the density and composition of the plasmas, the magnetic field strength ($\\sigma$-values (the ratio of the electromagnetic energy flux to the particle energy flux)) and its direction, and the Lorentz factor for the different stages in prompt and afterglows. Systematic simulation studies of the relativistic collisionless shocks, associated particle acceleration, magnetic field generation and self-consistent radiation provide insight into undetermined issues in prompt and afterglows observed by Swift. Self-consistently calculated lightcurves, spectra, spectral evolutions, and polarization as function of viewing angle will be done to light a shed on recent new observations by Swift, in particular, X-ray flares, early steep decay, and shallow decay.

  5. Ragona-Scinà’s (1847) Method for, and Observations of, Simultaneous Color Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Brini, Stefano; Wade, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    In 1847, Domenico Ragona-Scinà (1820–1892) published a method of optically superimposing images using an angled piece of colored glass. He showed that if one looks at a black, filled circle through the colored glass and superimposes on it the reflection from the glass of something white, the filled circle looks tinted with the complementary color of the background: simultaneous color contrast or contrast color. Although Ragona-Scinà’s method and his observation have been cited into the 21st century, the former for its simplicity and the latter for its challenges to early theories of color vision, some errors have crept in and the phenomenon still lacks an agreed-on explanation. We provide some biographical information about Ragona-Scinà, set the method and the observation into their historical and theoretical contexts, and give a translation into English of Ragona-Scinà’s Italian-language paper. PMID:27433327

  6. Complementary methods of system usability evaluation: surveys and observations during software design and development cycles.

    PubMed

    Horsky, Jan; McColgan, Kerry; Pang, Justine E; Melnikas, Andrea J; Linder, Jeffrey A; Schnipper, Jeffrey L; Middleton, Blackford

    2010-10-01

    Poor usability of clinical information systems delays their adoption by clinicians and limits potential improvements to the efficiency and safety of care. Recurring usability evaluations are therefore, integral to the system design process. We compared four methods employed during the development of outpatient clinical documentation software: clinician email response, online survey, observations and interviews. Results suggest that no single method identifies all or most problems. Rather, each approach is optimal for evaluations at a different stage of design and characterizes different usability aspect. Email responses elicited from clinicians and surveys report mostly technical, biomedical, terminology and control problems and are most effective when a working prototype has been completed. Observations of clinical work and interviews inform conceptual and workflow-related problems and are best performed early in the cycle. Appropriate use of these methods consistently during development may significantly improve system usability and contribute to higher adoption rates among clinicians and to improved quality of care. PMID:20546936

  7. Survey on methods of increasing the efficiency of extended state disturbance observers.

    PubMed

    Madoński, R; Herman, P

    2015-05-01

    This survey presents various methods of improving the overall estimation quality in the class of extended state observers (ESO), which estimate not only the conventional states of the system, but the acting disturbance as well. This type of observers is crucial in forming the active disturbance rejection control structure (ADRC), where the precision of online perturbation reconstruction and cancellation directly influences the robustness of the closed-loop control system. Various aspects of the observer-based disturbance estimation/rejection loop are covered by this work and divided into three categories, related with observer: structure, tuning, and working conditions. The survey is dedicated to researchers and practitioners who are interested in increasing the efficiency of their ADRC-based governing schemes. PMID:25702045

  8. A new method for observing the running states of a single-variable nonlinear system.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yu; Chen, Hong; Chen, Cheng

    2015-03-01

    In order to timely grasp a single variable nonlinear system running states, a new method called Scatter Point method is put forward in this paper. It can be used to observe or monitor the running states of a single variable nonlinear system in real-time. In this paper, the definition of the method is given at first, and then its working principle is expounded theoretically, after this, some physical experiments based on Chua's nonlinear system are conducted. At the same time, many scatter point graphs are measured by a general analog oscilloscope. The motion, number, and distribution of these scatter points shown on the oscilloscope screen can directly reflect the current states of the tested system. The experimental results further confirm that the method is effective and practical, in which the system running states are not easily lost. In addition, this method is not only suitable for single variable systems but also for multivariable systems. PMID:25833428

  9. [Observational study of atmospheric HONO in summer of Beijing].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan-Wu; Liu, Wen-Qing; Xie, Pin-Hua; Dou, Ke; Liu, Shi-Sheng; Si, Fu-Qi; Li, Su-Wen; Qin, Min

    2009-06-15

    The concentration of HONO, NO2, O3 and other atmospheric pollutants were observed continuously by using differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) from 2007-08-14 to 2007-08-24 in Beijing, China. Diurnal variation characteristics of HONO and NO2 were analyzed. The HONO levels originated from the nocturnal direct emission were discussed. And the correlation between the heterogeneous formation of HONO and its related factors (BC, RH, and so on) was studied. The results showed that HONO had two peaks at about 01:00 and 06:00, respectively, while two peaks of NO2 concentrations appeared at about 01:00 and 07:00. The highest HONO(em)/HONO ratio of 31.3% was observed at about 20:00 between 19:00 to 07:00, and the average ratio was 15%. Good correlation of HONO(corr)/NO2 ratio with BC and RH at night was obtained. The correlation suggested that heterogeneous NO2 to HONO conversion processes may occur on BC surfaces by reaction with absorption water, and the average nighttime conversion frequency from NO2 into HONO (HONO/NO2) was calculated about 0.8% x h(-1). At the same time, the results showed that heterogeneous formation of HONO was increased with RH and inhibited at RH > 80%, and the hypothesis was further supported by detailed analysis of selected case. PMID:19662832

  10. Observational study of job satisfaction in hospital pharmacy technicians.

    PubMed

    Sanford, M E; Facchinetti, N J; Broadhead, R S

    1984-12-01

    Intrinsic and extrinsic factors contributing to job satisfaction of pharmacy technicians in two community hospitals were studied. A pharmacy student employed part-time as a pharmacy technician by one of the hospitals observed fellow technicians in a wide range of job activities for 22 months. In a second hospital, the same student conducted similar observations during one summer while posing as a social researcher. Both hospitals had technician training programs providing classroom instruction and on-the-job training. Data were gathered primarily from informal conversations with technicians and pharmacists and by recording activities through notetaking. Formal training programs, praise from pharmacists, opportunities to train other technicians, diversity of job activities, and autonomy in coordinating work with time demands were identified as factors contributing to job satisfaction of technicians. Negative aspects of the job that employers attempted to circumvent or clarify were the unchallenging nature of the work and the limited opportunities for advancement. Technicians' and pharmacists' attitudes toward job enrichment for technicians are discussed, and suggestions for improving technicians' intrinsic and extrinsic job satisfaction are provided. A reliable cadre of pharmacy technicians is necessary for further expansion of clinical pharmacy services under current hospital budgetary restraints. In addition to modifying job activities to promote technicians' intrinsic job satisfaction, pharmacy managers can improve extrinsic satisfaction by providing adequate salaries, job security, and flexible work schedules. PMID:6517083