Science.gov

Sample records for observations project ceop

  1. The Coordinated Energy and Water cycle Observations Project (CEOP) Data Integration Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S. F.

    2010-09-01

    Many of the Projects under the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) bring together numerous types of data to perform climate research on various regional and time scales using routine operational/research global observations and process studies. The Coordinated Energy and Water cycle Observations Project (CEOP) [under the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX)] goal is to demonstrate skill in predicting changes in water resources and soil moisture on time scales up to seasonal and annual as an integral part of the climate system. In order to satisfy the multi-disciplinary scientific objectives of CEOP, an integrated approach to bring together such global in-situ observations, remote sensing (satellite), and model output was needed. Both a centralized and distributed integrated data management strategy was then designed and implemented to incorporate and distribute such research quality data. There are multitudes of global/regional surface in-situ measurements made globally that are quite disparate in type, number, quality, and format. The concept of a "Reference Site" combining specialized observations of sub-surface (soil temperature and moisture profiles), near-surface (standard meteorological parameters, radiation, flux), and lower tropospheric profiles (tower, rawinsonde, lidar, wind profiler) over various spatial scales (from single point to 104 square km) was created for evaluation with satellite data and model output analyses. A network of 36 such Reference Sites from various climatic regions was identified and organized through coordination of CEOP's Regional Hydroclimate Projects (RHPs). Standardized observation times/averaging and format (with complete metadata) was agreed upon and a "composite" in-situ database developed. This presentation will describe CEOP's data integration approach and "lessons learned" from such a prototype network for use in global climate studies.

  2. Biomass Studies in Monsoon Regions Under the Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2003-01-01

    CEOP is an international program sponsored by the World Climate Research Project (WCRP) aiming at an integrated approach towards better understanding and prediction of the global water cycle. I will discuss the scientific rationale and approach that underpin the program, especially with regard to the important implications on variability of climate and rainfall in monsoon regions around the world.

  3. Distributed Data Integration Prototype System for Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, S. H.; Aizawa, K.

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of the JAXA Prototype for CEOP Distributed Data Integration Service is to provide user-friendly access to the CEOP (in-situ, satellite and global gridded model output) data. The system is distributed in the sense that, while the system is located in Tokyo, the data is located in archive centers which are globally distributed. The in-situ data is archived at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) in Boulder, Colorado, USA. The NWP global gridded model output data is archived at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPIM) in cooperation with the World Data Center for Climate (WDC-Climate) in Hamburg, Germany. The satellite data is archived at the IIS (Institute of Industrial Science) at the University of Tokyo, in Tokyo, Japan. Other (non-CEOP) globally distributed data that is on DODS servers can be added in the future according to scientist's requests. The system is integrated in the sense that all of the data is temporally and geospatially coordinated and can be selected and viewed within the same system. The in-situ data are time series data and the global gridded model output data and satellite data are 4D (time series of 2D scenes at levels or in multiple frequency bands). The system knows the geolocation and time of all data sets and supports selection of the data through a uniform set of menus, by data type, reference site and station, and supports sub-setting according to time, area and height/depth. The basic concept for developing the JAXA prototype is " to use existing software where possible". Based on this concept, OPeNDAP, which is widely used in the ocean and atmospheric sciences, was chosen as the data access protocol to enable "access to distributed data". And also the open source Live Access Serve (LAS) was selected as the JAXA Prototype component to enable "integration service". Users can access the system at http://jaxa.ceos.org/wtf_ceop. This system has been online since June 1, 2005

  4. CEOS Data Integration Support for CEOP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enloe, Y.; Ochiai, O.; McDonald, K. R.

    2005-12-01

    Information Systems and Services (WGISS) to see if they could assist in solving this problem. CEOS WGISS initiated a project where the CEOS information technologists work closely with the CEOP scientists to collaboratively prototype a set of tools and services needed to support data integration to support CEOP science. The initial CEOS/CEOP Prototype, demonstrating a limited set of services needed for data integration, was completed and demoed spring 2005 at the CEOP meeting to wide acclaim from the CEOP science community. A second phase is currently being planned. Existing tools and software (e.g. OPeNDAP suite of clients and servers such as the Grads client and server, the Open Geospatial Web Coverage Server, and NASA's ECHO catalog system) are expected to be tailored to provide a wider set of the data services needed for data integration. From a broader perspective, the goals of the work are clearly aligned with the strategic objectives of the international CEOS community to develop new technologies to improve the study of the Earth system utilizing Earth observations from space and are consistent with goals of the Global Earth Observation Systems of Systems (GEOSS). The CEOP/GEWEX science communities have identified barriers they have met in their attempts to access and use satellite data resources, and this input has guided the development of the prototype effort. However, the results of this project will also serve other Earth system studies that rely on the integration of satellite and in situ data and model results.

  5. Data Assimilation Office (DAO) Operational Analyses and Reanalyses for Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, M.

    2003-01-01

    The DAO operational assimilation system has produced and archived gridded data since 1998, and will continue through the CEOP period. However, major system upgrades and new assimilation variables will significantly affect the surface energy balance and data product. These changes will be discussed and the prospects for a CEOP reanalysis will be presented. W e will also review the data currently available and describe how to access the data.

  6. CEOP-TPE- Concerted Earth Observation and Prediction of Water and Energy Cycles in the Third Pole Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Z.; Ma, Y.; van der Velde, R.; Dente, L.; Wang, L.; Zeng, Y.; Chen, X.; Huang, Y.; Menenti, M.; Sobrino, J.; Li, Z.-L.; Sneeuw, N.; Wen, J.; He, Y.; Tang, B.; Zhong, L.

    2014-11-01

    In the past two years of the CEOP-TPE project, a number of progresses have been made. 1. The Tibetan Plateau SM & ST Observatory [1-3] has been further maintained and upgraded. 2. An assessment of ECMWF land surface analysis over the Tibetan plateau [4] has been conducted. 3. A blended soil moisture product over the Tibetan Plateau [5] has been generated. 4. A 10-year (2001-2010) land surface energy balance product for climate and ecohydrological studies has been developed [6,7] and on the basis of this data set it is concluded that the Tibetan plateau is a heating source for the atmosphere in particular in winter months. 5. A method for the quantification of water cycle components based on earth observation data and a comparison to reanalysis data has been developed. An analysis of the Yangtze river basin is preliminarily carried out and concluded that human influences are important in shorter terms, but climate influences seem dominate over direct human influences over longer terms.

  7. The development of an OpeNDAP satellite data server for CEOP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, D.; di, L.; Enloe, Y.; Holloway, D.; McDonald, K. R.

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes a project that develops an OPeNDAP server to serve satellite data to the Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) community. CEOP, which is built as the foundation of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) in Cooperation with World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) under the Framework of Integrated Global Observing Strategy Partnership (IGOS-P), seeks to establish an integrated global observing system for the water cycle to respond to both scientific and social needs. CEOP uses data from field observation, data assimilation, model outputs, and satellite remote sensing in research. The multi-source data integration is one of keys for the success of the CEOP program. Much of the satellite data identified in CEOP are Level-1B and Level-2 products. Data in these products are in Swath coordinates. While CEOP users commonly use the OPeNDAP protocols to access CEOP data for research, most of swath data are not available via this protocol. Instead, many space agencies have developed satellite data servers that implement the Open GIS Consortium (OGC)'s Web Coverage Service (WCS) Specification for serving satellite data to geospatial community. In order to provide satellite data to CEOP community, we developed a middleware, which act as a wrapper around an OpenGIS WCS implementation providing a gateway from the OPeNDAP protocols. The combination of the wrapper and any OGC-compliant WCS server acts as an OPeNDAP server. To provide the capabilities required to convert from Swath coordinates to an equirectangular latitude-longitude coordinate reference system, as well as perform grid cell interpolation and geo-spatial selection the server leverages the capabilities provided by an OGC WCS implementation. Basically, the middleware module does three things: 1). Translate the client requests in OpeNDAP protocols to WCS protocols and pass the requests to a WCS server; 2). Translate the server

  8. The contribution of CEOP data to the understanding and modeling of monsoon systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2005-01-01

    CEOP has contributed and will continue to provide integrated data sets from diverse platforms for better understanding of the water and energy cycles, and for validating models. In this talk, I will show examples of how CEOP has contributed to the formulation of a strategy for the study of the monsoon as a system. The CEOP data concept has led to the development of the CEOP Inter-Monsoon Studies (CIMS), which focuses on the identification of model bias, and improvement of model physics such as the diurnal and annual cycles. A multi-model validation project focusing on diurnal variability of the East Asian monsoon, and using CEOP reference site data, as well as CEOP integrated satellite data is now ongoing. Similar validation projects in other monsoon regions are being started. Preliminary studies show that climate models have difficulties in simulating the diurnal signals of total rainfall, rainfall intensity and frequency of occurrence, which have different peak hours, depending on locations. Further more model diurnal cycle of rainfall in monsoon regions tend to lead the observed by about 2-3 hours. These model bias offer insight into lack of, or poor representation of key components of the convective,and stratiform rainfall. The CEOP data also stimulated studies to compare and contrasts monsoon variability in different parts of the world. It was found that seasonal wind reversal, orographic effects, monsoon depressions, meso-scale convective complexes, SST and land surface land influences are common features in all monsoon regions. Strong intraseasonal variability is present in all monsoon regions. While there is a clear demarcation of onset, breaks and withdrawal in the Asian and Australian monsoon region associated with climatological intraseasonal variability, it is less clear in the American and Africa monsoon regions. The examination of satellite and reference site data in monsoon has led to preliminary model experiments to study the impact of aerosol on

  9. The Contribution of CEOP Data to the Understanding and Modeling of Monsoon Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2005-01-01

    CEOP has contributed and will continue to provide integrated data sets from diverse platforms for better understanding of the water and energy cycles, and for validaintg models. In this talk, I will show examples of how CEOP has contributed to the formulation of a strategy for the study of the monsoon as a system. The CEOP data concept has led to the development of the CEOP Inter-Monsoon Studies (CIMS), which focuses on the identification of model bias, and improvement of model physics such as the diurnal and annual cycles. A multi-model validation project focusing on diurnal variability of the East Asian monsoon, and using CEOP reference site data, as well as CEOP integrated satellite data is now ongoing. Preliminary studies show that climate models have difficulties in simulating the diurnal signals of total rainfall, rainfall intensity and frequency of occurrence, which have different peak hours, depending on locations. Further more model diurnal cycle of rainfall in monsoon regions tend to lead the observed by about 2-3 hours. These model bias offer insight into lack of, or poor representation of, key components of the convective and stratiform rainfall. The CEOP data also stimulated studies to compare and contrasts monsoon variability in different parts of the world. It was found that seasonal wind reversal, orographic effects, monsoon depressions, meso-scale convective complexes, SST and land surface land influences are common features in all monsoon regions. Strong intraseasonal variability is present in all monsoon regions. While there is a clear demarcation of onset, breaks and withdrawal in the Asian and Australian monsoon region associated with climatological intraseasonal variabillity, it is less clear in the American and Africa monsoon regions. The examination of satellite and reference site data in monsoon has led to preliminary model experiments to study the impact of aerosol on monsoon variability. I will show examples of how the study of the

  10. Development of CEOP Reference Site Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loehrer, S. M.; Cully, L. E.; Williams, S. F.

    2004-05-01

    This presentation will discuss the development of a series of specialized observational data sets for the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period. CEOP is composed of a number of global WCRP research programmes [i.e. Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX), Climate Variability and Predictability (CLIVAR), and Climate and Cryosphere (CliC)]. Each one of the GEWEX Continental Scale Experiments selected a number of well instrumented reference sites in various climatic regions of the world (36 in total) to support CEOP research activities. These reference sites provide observations of surface meteorology, radiation, fluxes, soils, and atmospheric profiles in a variety of spatial and temporal resolutions in different formats. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research/Joint Office for Science Support (UCAR/JOSS) takes these disparate data and conducts a consistent processing and quality assurance methodology leading to the development of a data set in a consistent format and temporal resolution. This presentation will discuss the current status of the CEOP EOP-3 (1 October 2002 to 30 September 2003) data processing, quality assurance, and data archival and distribution as well as plans for the remaining CEOP reference site data sets.

  11. Development of CEOP Reference Site Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loehrer, S. M.; Cully, L. E.; Williams, S. F.

    2003-12-01

    This presentation will discuss the development of a series of specialized observational data sets for the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period. CEOP is composed of a number of global WCRP research programmes [i.e. Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX), Climate Variability and Predictability (CLIVAR), and Climate and Cryosphere (CliC)]. Each one of the GEWEX Continental Scale Experiments selected a number of well instrumented reference sites in various climatic regions of the world (36 in total) to support CEOP research activities. These reference sites provide observations of surface meteorology, radiation, fluxes, soils, and atmospheric profiles in a variety of spatial and temporal resolutions in different formats. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research/Joint Office for Science Support (UCAR/JOSS) takes these disparate data and conducts a consistent processing and quality assurance methodology leading to the development of a data set in a consistent format and temporal resolution. This presentation will discuss the data processing, quality assurance, and data archival and distribution of the initial CEOP data set (1 July to 30 September 2001) and the current status of (and plans for) the three additional annual cycle data sets that will cover the period from October 2001 to December 2004.

  12. The Murrumbidgee Monitoring Network: Supporting CEOP, GEWEX and Hydrological Research in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellett, K. M.; Western, A. W.; Walker, J. P.; Sirawardena, L.; Young, R. I.; Smith, A. B.; Flint, A. L.; Summerell, G.

    2006-12-01

    In 2001 a network of 18 soil moisture monitoring sites were installed across the 80,000 square km Murrumbidgee River catchment in Australia with the aim of evaluating the land surface component of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's operational weather forecasting model. Since that time the Murrumbidgee Monitoring Network (MMN) has evolved to include 46 sites for continuous measurement of root-zone soil moisture, soil temperature and precipitation, as well as observations of deep soil moisture and ground water variability. Much of these data will soon be incorporated into the World Climate Research Programme's Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) database (www.ceop.net) marking a substantial new contribution from the Australian continent. This paper provides an overview of the MMN and presents current results from applications in a number of regional-scale research projects including the Murray-Darling Basin GEWEX study and the National Airborne Field Experiment 2006 (NAFE'06) aimed at improving the retrieval of soil moisture and vegetation parameters from airborne and satellite platforms. The MMN also plays an integral role in the HYDROGRACE project with the objectives of (1) providing the first in-situ based validation of terrestrial water storage observations from the GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) mission and (2) improving regional-scale model simulations through data assimilation of GRACE observations. The MMN is part of the broader OzNet hydrological monitoring network throughout eastern Australia. Details on OzNet and the projects mentioned above are provided at www.oznet.unimelb.edu.au.

  13. A HHV-8 positive, HIV negative multicentric Castleman disease treated with R-CEOP chemotherapy and valganciclovir combination.

    PubMed

    Kantarci, Fatma Eda Nuhoglu; Eren, Rafet; Gündoğan, Cihan; Huq, Gülben Erdem; Doğu, Mehmet Hilmi; Suyanı, Elif

    2016-07-01

    Multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by systemic symptoms like recurrent lymphadenopathy, fever and hepatosplenomegaly. Human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) can be associated with MCD whether the patient is infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or not. A 59-year-old male patient presented with fatigue, drowsiness and enlarged lymph nodes. Thoracic and abdominal computed tomography showed enlarged mediastinal, axillary, paracardiac, paraaortic, celiac, mesenteric, obturator and inguinal lymph nodes concomitant with enlarged liver and spleen. Cervical lymph node biopsy revealed HHV-8 positive plasma cell MCD. The patient's tests were negative for HIV. R-CEOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, vincristin, prednisolone) and valganciclovir treatments were started simultaneously. After sixth cycle of R-CEOP, the patient achieved unconfirmed complete remission. Rituximab combined with CEOP protocol and antiviral therapy against HHV-8 might be an effective therapeutic approach without a considerable side effect for HHV-8-positive HIV-negative MCD patients. PMID:26948831

  14. Observing Projects in Introductory Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Introductory astronomy classes without laboratory components face a unique challenge of how to expose students to the process of science in the framework of a lecture course. As a solution to this problem small group observing projects are incorporated into a 40 student introductory astronomy class composed primarily of non-science majors. Students may choose from 8 observing projects such as graphing the motion of the moon or a planet, measuring daily and seasonal motions of stars, and determining the rotation rate of the Sun from sunspots. Each group completes two projects, requiring the students to spend several hours outside of class making astronomical observations. Clear instructions and a check-list style observing log help students with minimal observing experience to take accurate data without direct instructor assistance. Students report their findings in a lab report-style paper, as well as in a formal oral or poster presentation. The projects serve a double purpose of allowing students to directly experience concepts covered in class as well as providing students with experience collecting, analyzing, and presenting astronomical data.

  15. Peer Observation Action Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandt, Fred-Ole

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines the initial findings of an action research project that focuses on the possible contribution of peer observation to a more collaborative environment and teachers' professional growth at The University High School. The research component played a significant part as previous attempts to change the culture at the school were…

  16. Weighting climate model projections using observational constraints

    PubMed Central

    Gillett, Nathan P.

    2015-01-01

    Projected climate change integrates the net response to multiple climate feedbacks. Whereas existing long-term climate change projections are typically based on unweighted individual climate model simulations, as observed climate change intensifies it is increasingly becoming possible to constrain the net response to feedbacks and hence projected warming directly from observed climate change. One approach scales simulated future warming based on a fit to observations over the historical period, but this approach is only accurate for near-term projections and for scenarios of continuously increasing radiative forcing. For this reason, the recent Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC AR5) included such observationally constrained projections in its assessment of warming to 2035, but used raw model projections of longer term warming to 2100. Here a simple approach to weighting model projections based on an observational constraint is proposed which does not assume a linear relationship between past and future changes. This approach is used to weight model projections of warming in 2081–2100 relative to 1986–2005 under the Representative Concentration Pathway 4.5 forcing scenario, based on an observationally constrained estimate of the Transient Climate Response derived from a detection and attribution analysis. The resulting observationally constrained 5–95% warming range of 0.8–2.5 K is somewhat lower than the unweighted range of 1.1–2.6 K reported in the IPCC AR5. PMID:26438283

  17. Introduction to Chinese Meridian Observation Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chi

    Chinese Meridian Chain Meridian Project is a ground-based network program to monitor Solar-Terrestrial space environment, which consists of a chain of ground-based observatories with multiple instruments including magnetometers, ionosondes, HF and VHF radar, Lidar, IPS monitors, sounding rockets etc. The chain is mainly located in the neighborhood of 120o E meridian, and is thus named the Meridian Project. Meridian Project has officially been ap-proved by the Chinese government. The project started construction in 2008, and will be finished by the end of 2010. This talk will give an overview, the recent progress and prelimi-nary observational results of the Meridian Project.

  18. Skylab 4 visual observations project report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaltenbach, J. L.; Lenoir, W. B.; Mcewen, M. C.; Weitenhagen, R. A.; Wilmarth, V. R.

    1974-01-01

    The Skylab 4 Visual Observations Project was undertaken to determine the ways in which man can contribute to future earth-orbital observational programs. The premission training consisted of 17 hours of lectures by scientists representing 16 disciplines and provided the crewmen information on observational and photographic procedures and the scientific significance of this information. During the Skylab 4 mission, more than 850 observations and 2000 photographs with the 70-millimeter Hasselblad and 35-millimeter Nikon cameras were obtained for many investigative areas. Preliminary results of the project indicate that man can obtain new and unique information to support satellite earth-survey programs because of his inherent capability to make selective observations, to integrate the information, and to record the data by describing and photographing the observational sites.

  19. HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS OBSERVING SYSTEM PILOT PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HABSOS Pilot Project is being developed through a partnership of federal, state and academic organizations as proof-of-concept for a coastal observing system in the Gulf of Mexico. The goal is to design a HAB data management system and develop the regional communication infra...

  20. Project PHOENIX SETI Observations at Parkes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backus, P. R.

    1995-12-01

    For sixteen weeks (February to June of 1995), Project Phoenix had the exclusive use of the 64 m Parkes radio telescope in New South Wales, Australia, as well as another element of the Australian Telescope National Facility (ATNF), the 22 m Mopra telescope, 200 km to the north at Coonabarabran. With these two telescopes, we conducted a targeted search of nearly two hundred solar-type stars covering the frequency range from 1.2 to 3 GHz. The signal detection system was optimized to detect narrowband signals (presumed to be transmitted by another technological civilization) originating in the vicinity of these targets. The system was sensitive to signals that were continuously present, or pulsed regularly, even if their frequencies drifted, or changed slowly in time. Many signals of precisely this nature were detected, but all were coming from our own technology! All manner of transmitters, from microwave ovens to satellite downlinks, are rapidly making this naturally quiet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum extremely noisy. The use of the two widely separated telescopes as a pseudo-interferometer was essential to discriminate against signals of terrestrial origin. The architecture and performance of the system and the results of the observing campaign are presented in this paper.

  1. Project Copernicus: An Earth observing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Hunsaker Aerospace Corporation is presenting this proposal for Project Copernicus to fulfill the need for space-based remote sensing of Earth. Concentration is on data acquisition. Copernicus is designed to be a flexible system of spacecraft in a low near-polar orbit. The goal is to acquire data so that the scientists may begin to understand many Earth processes and interactions. The mission objective of Copernicus is to provide a space-based, remote-sensing measurement data acquisition and transfer system for 15 years. A description of the design project is presented.

  2. A phase II study of cyclophosphamide, etoposide, vincristine and prednisone (CEOP) Alternating with Pralatrexate (P) as front line therapy for patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL): final results from the T- cell consortium trial.

    PubMed

    Advani, Ranjana H; Ansell, Stephen M; Lechowicz, Mary J; Beaven, Anne W; Loberiza, Fausto; Carson, Kenneth R; Evens, Andrew M; Foss, Francine; Horwitz, Steven; Pro, Barbara; Pinter-Brown, Lauren C; Smith, Sonali M; Shustov, Andrei R; Savage, Kerry J; Vose, Julie M

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) have suboptimal outcomes using conventional CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) chemotherapy. The anti-folate pralatrexate, the first drug approved for patients with relapsed/refractory PTCL, provided a rationale to incorporate it into the front-line setting. This phase 2 study evaluated a novel front-line combination whereby cyclophosphamide, etoposide, vincristine and prednisone (CEOP) alternated with pralatrexate (CEOP-P) in PTCL. Patients achieving a complete or partial remission (CR/PR) were eligible for consolidative stem cell transplantation (SCT) after 4 cycles. Thirty-three stage II-IV PTCL patients were treated: 21 PTCL-not otherwise specified (64%), 8 angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma (24%) and 4 anaplastic large cell lymphoma (12%). The majority (61%) had stage IV disease and 46% were International Prognostic Index high/intermediate or high risk. Grade 3-4 toxicities included anaemia (27%), thrombocytopenia (12%), febrile neutropenia (18%), mucositis (18%), sepsis (15%), increased creatinine (12%) and liver transaminases (12%). Seventeen patients (52%) achieved a CR. The 2-year progression-free survival and overall survival, were 39% (95% confidence interval 21-57) and 60% (95% confidence interval 39-76), respectively. Fifteen patients (45%) (12 CR) received SCT and all remained in CR at a median follow-up of 21·5 months. CEOP-P did not improve outcomes compared to historical data using CHOP. Defining optimal front line therapy in PTCL continues to be a challenge and an unmet need. PMID:26627450

  3. Astronomy Remote Observing Research Projects of US High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadooka, M.; Meech, K. J.

    2006-08-01

    In order to address the challenging climate for promoting astronomy education in the high schools we have used astronomy projects to give students authentic research experiences in order to encourage their pursuit of science and technology careers. Initially, we conducted teacher workshops to develop a cadre of teachers who have been instrumental in recruiting students to work on projects. Once identified, these students have been motivated to conduct astronomy research projects with appropriate guidance. Some have worked on these projects during non-school hours and others through a research course. The goal has been for students to meet the objectives of inquiry-based learning, a major US National Science Standard. Case studies will be described using event-based learning with the NASA Deep Impact mission. Hawaii students became active participants investigating comet properties through the NASA Deep Impact mission. The Deep Impact Education and Public Outreach group developed materials which were used by our students. After learning how to use image processing software, these students obtained Comet 9P/ Tempel 1 images in real time from the remote observing Faulkes Telescope North located on Haleakala, Maui for their projects. Besides conducting event-based projects which are time critical, Oregon students have worked on galaxies and sunspots projects. For variable star research, they used images obtained from the remote observing offline mode of Lowell Telescope located in Flagstaff, Arizona. Essential to these projects has been consistent follow-up required for honing skills in observing, image processing, analysis, and communication of project results through Science Fair entries. Key to our success has been the network of professional and amateur astronomers and educators collaborating in a multiplicity of ways to mentor our students. This work-in-progress and process will be shared on how to inspire students to pursue careers in science and technology with

  4. Online Peer Observation: An Exploration of a Cross-Discipline Observation Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolson, Margaret; Harper, Felicity

    2014-01-01

    In this article the authors compare two phases of an ongoing, annual online peer observation project at the Open University. Adopting a non-managerialist approach, the project aims to give teachers a renewed sense of collegiality, allowing them to take responsibility for aspects of their professional development and share practice points. While…

  5. Observations from The EV Project in Q4 2013

    SciTech Connect

    John Smart

    2014-02-01

    This is a summary report for The EV Project 4th quarter 2013 reports. It describes electric vehicle driver driving and charging behavior observed in Q4. It is the same report as the previously approved/published Q3 2013 report, only the numbers have been updated. It is for public release and does not have limited distribution.

  6. FRESIP project observations of cataclysmic variables: A unique opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Steve B.

    1994-01-01

    FRESIP Project observations of cataclysmic variables would provide unique data sets. In the study of known cataclysmic variables they would provide extended, well sampled temporal photometric information and in addition, they would provide a large area deep survey; obtaining a complete magnitude limited sample of the galaxy in the volume cone defined by the FRESIP field of view.

  7. The Lunar Phases Project: A Mental Model-Based Observational Project for Undergraduate Nonscience Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Angela Osterman; Mon, Manuel J.; Hibbard, Susan T.

    2011-01-01

    We present our Lunar Phases Project, an ongoing effort utilizing students' actual observations within a mental model building framework to improve student understanding of the causes and process of the lunar phases. We implement this project with a sample of undergraduate, nonscience major students enrolled in a midsized public university located…

  8. JPL Year 2000 Project. A Project Manager's Observations: Y2k

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathison, Richard P. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents observations from a project manager on the Y2K problem. The topics include: 1) Agenda: 2) Scope; 3) Project Organization; 4) The Fixes; 5) The Toughest Part; 6) Validation versus Time; and 7) Information Sources. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  9. SN 2014J and the Harvard Observing Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Melissa; Bieryla, Allyson; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Lewis, John A.; Vanderburg, Andrew; Alexander, Kate Denham; Blanchard, Peter

    2014-06-01

    A chance discovery on January 21, 2014 by Steve Fossey et al. of University College London during an undergraduate telescope training session revealed the closest type Ia supernova in the past 42 years. The bright SN 2014J was observed by undergraduates and graduate students alike in the Harvard Observing Project (see poster by A. Bieryla) with the Clay Telescope at Harvard University. Observations were obtained in multiple filters starting January 24, 2014, prior to the supernova reaching its peak brightness, and monitoring will continue as the supernova fades in brightness. We will present multiple band light curve photometry and color RGB images of SN 2014J and its host galaxy M82.

  10. Calibration support for the Earth Observing System Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guenther, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    The Earth Observing System Project (EOS) program guidelines establishes significantly more stringent requirements on calibrations of instruments. This requirement is driven by the need for long-term continuity of acquired data sets and the use of measurements in interdisciplinary investigations. Personnel from the Standards and Calibration Office have been supporting the Program and Project in interpreting these goals into specific requirements. Contributions to EOS have included participation in the Panel of Experts which produced a list of consensus items necessary for accomplishing an accurate calibration and suggested EOS Project Calibration Policy, and drafting the announcement of opportunity and bidders information package positions on instrument calibration and data product validation. Technical staffing was provided to the NASA delegates to the Committee on Earth Orbiting Satellites (club of space-faring nations) for the standing working group on Calibration and Data Validation.

  11. Observationally constrained projections of Antarctic ice sheet instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Tamsin; Ritz, Catherine; Durand, Gael; Payne, Anthony; Peyaud, Vincent; Hindmarsh, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Large parts of the Antarctic ice sheet lie on bedrock below sea level and may be vulnerable to a positive feedback known as Marine Ice Sheet Instability (MISI), a self-sustaining retreat of the grounding line triggered by oceanic or atmospheric changes. There is growing evidence MISI may be underway throughout the Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE) of West Antarctica, induced by circulation of warm Circumpolar Deep Water. If this retreat is sustained the region could contribute up to 1-2 m to global mean sea level, and if triggered in other areas the potential contribution to sea level on centennial to millennial timescales could be two to three times greater. However, physically plausible projections of Antarctic MISI are challenging: numerical ice sheet models are too low in spatial resolution to resolve grounding line processes or else too computationally expensive to assess modelling uncertainties, and no dynamical models exist of the ocean-atmosphere-ice sheet system. Furthermore, previous numerical ice sheet model projections for Antarctica have not been calibrated with observations, which can reduce uncertainties. Here we estimate the probability of dynamic mass loss in the event of MISI under a medium climate scenario, assessing 16 modelling uncertainties and calibrating the projections with observed mass losses in the ASE from 1992-2011. We project losses of up to 30 cm sea level equivalent (SLE) by 2100 and 72 cm SLE by 2200 (95% credibility interval: CI). Our results are substantially lower than previous estimates. The ASE sustains substantial losses, 83% of the continental total by 2100 and 67% by 2200 (95% CI), but in other regions losses are limited by ice dynamical theory, observations, or a lack of projected triggers.

  12. The SETI Radio Observational Project - Strategy, instrumentation, and objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelson, R. E.; Gulkis, S.; Janssen, M. A.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Morris, G. A.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes strategies, tradeoffs, instrumentation, and overall objectives for the SETI Radio Observation Project. Novel approaches have been formulated in order to achieve coverage of the desirable frequency and spatial regimes (about 80% of the sky and in the frequency range of 1.4-25 GHz). A mixed strategy has been developed which uses the survey capability of small antennas and the sensitivity of modern maser amplifiers to achieve sensitivities comparable to those reached by previous observers, but with as much as 10,000 times the scope of both the frequency and spatial coverage possible to those experimenters.

  13. Integrated Global Observation Strategy - Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, Ernest; Readings, C. J.; Kaye, J.; Mohnen, V.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The "Long Term Continuity of Stratospheric Ozone Measurements and Atmospheric Chemistry" project was one of six established by the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites (CEOS) in response to the Integrated Global Observing Strategy (IGOS) initiative. IGOS links satellite and ground based systems for global environmental observations. The strategy of this project is to develop a consensus of user requirements including the scientific (SPARC, IGAC, WCRP) and the applications community (WMO, UNEP) and to develop a long-term international plan for ozone and atmospheric chemistry measurements. The major components of the observing system include operational and research (meeting certain criteria) satellite platforms planned by the space faring nations which are integrated with a well supported and sustained ground, aircraft, and balloon measurements program for directed observations as well satellite validation. Highly integrated and continuous measurements of ozone, validation, and reanalysis efforts are essential to meet the international scientific and applications goals. In order to understand ozone trends, climate change, and air quality, it is essential to conduct long term measurements of certain other atmospheric species. These species include key source, radical, and reservoir constituents.

  14. The International Data Sharing Challenge: Realities and Lessons Learned from International Field Projects and Data Analysis Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S. F.; Moore, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    One of the major challenges facing science in general is how foster trust and cooperation between nations that then allows the free and open exchange of data. The rich data coming from many nations conducting Arctic research must be allowed to be brought together to understand and assess the huge changes now underway in the Arctic regions. The NCAR Earth Observing Laboratory has been supporting a variety of international field process studies and WCRP sponsored international projects that require international data collection and exchange in order to be successful. Some of the programs include the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) International Tundra Experiment (ITEX), the Arctic Climate Systems Study (ACSYS), the Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO), and the Coordinated Energy and water-cycle Observations Project (CEOP) to name a few. EOL played a major role in the data management of these projects, but the CEOP effort in particular involved coordinating common site documentation and data formatting across a global network (28 sites). All these unique projects occurred over 25 years but had similar challenges in the international collection, archival, and access to the rich datasets that are their legacy. The Belmont Forum offers as its main challenge to deliver knowledge needed for action to avoid or adapt to environmental change. One of their major themes is related to the study of these changes in the Arctic. The development of capable e-infrastructure (technologies and groups supporting international collaborative environments networks and data centers) to allow access to large diverse data collections is key to meeting this challenge. The reality of meeting this challenge, however, is something much more difficult. The authors will provide several specific examples of successes and failures when trying to meet the needs of an international community of researchers specifically related to Belmont Forum Work Package Themes regarding standards of

  15. Observational constraints on interannual variability projections in CMIP5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodina, Aleksandra; Fischer, Erich M.; Knutti, Reto

    2014-05-01

    Impacts of climate change are sensitive not only to changes in the mean state but also to potential changes in the internal variability of the climate system at diurnal to interannual and multi-decadal time scales. Internal variability arises from nonlinear interactions and complex feedbacks between ocean, sea ice, atmosphere and land surface without any external forcing. However, an external forcing may change both magnitude, spatial patterns and the time scales of these variations. It is crucial to understand whether and on what temporal and spatial scales internal variability will undergo changes under anthropogenic radiative forcing and to identify the underlying mechanisms. To address these questions, we here use model simulations of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 database (CMIP5) with historical (1850-2005) - RCP8.5 (2006-2100) concentration pathway. First, we show over which latitudes CMIP5 models simulate robust changes in variability. Second, we explore whether models with low present-day internal variability project changes that substantially differ from those models with high present-day internal variability. Such an inter-model relationship is found over the high-latitudes of both hemispheres. For the regions and seasons, for which a relationship across the multi-model ensemble exists, we use observations and reanalyses, to constrain the model projections. This model constraint is based on the assumption that models with a more realistic representation of present-day variability yield more reliable projections. Once a relationship is identified, physical understanding becomes crucial because it must have a strong physical grounding to justify the constraint. We explore mechanisms that explain the inter-model correlation between current variability and its future change especially at high latitudes. We use a "joint projection" approach, which is based on the fact that multiple climate variables are correlated over different scales in

  16. Evaluation of “all weather” microwave-derived land surface temperatures with in situ CEOP measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catherinot, J.; Prigent, C.; Maurer, R.; Papa, F.; JiméNez, C.; Aires, F.; Rossow, W. B.

    2011-12-01

    Land surface skin temperature Ts plays a key role in meteorological and climatological processes but the availability and the accuracy of Ts measurements over land are still limited, especially under cloudy conditions. Ts estimates from infrared satellite observations can only be derived under clear sky. Passive microwave measurements are much less affected by clouds and can provide Ts regardless of the cloud conditions. A neural network inversion including first guess information has been previously developed to retrieve Ts, along with atmospheric water vapor, cloud liquid water, and surface emissivities over land from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager measurements, with a spatial resolution of 0.25° × 0.25°, at least twice daily. In this study, Ts estimates are evaluated through careful comparisons with in situ measurements in different environments over a full annual cycle. Under clear sky conditions, the quality of our microwave neural network retrieval is equivalent to the infrared International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project products, for most in situ stations, with errors ˜3 K as compared to in situ measurements. The performance of the microwave algorithm is similar under clear and cloudy conditions, confirming the potential of the microwaves under clouds. The Ts accuracy does not depend upon the surface emissivity, as the variability of this parameter is accounted for in the processing. Our microwave Ts have been calculated for more than 15 years (1993 to mid-2008). These "all weather" Ts are a very valuable complement to the IR-derived Ts, for use in atmospheric and surface models.

  17. Project to Interface Climate Modeling on Global and Regional Scales with Earth Observing (EOS) Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    This ten-year NASA IDS project began in 1990. Its initial work plan adopted the NASA provided timeline that data would become available for new Earth Observing System (EOS) platforms beginning in 1995. Over its first phase, it was based at NCAR, which had submitted the original proposal and involved activities of a substantial number of co-investigators at NCAR who engaged in research over several areas related to the observations expected to be received from the EOS platforms. Their focus was the theme of use of EOS data for improving climate models for projecting global change. From the climate system viewpoint, the IDS addressed land, clouds-hydrological cycle, radiative fluxes and especially aerosol impacts, ocean and sea-ice, and stratosphere. Other research addressed issues of data assimilation, diagnostic analyses, and data set development from current satellite systems, especially use of SAR data for climate models.

  18. LCROSS: Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marmie, John

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the success of the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) project. The LCROSS mission science goals was to: (1) Confirm the presence or absence of water ice in a permanently shadowed region on the Moon (2) Identify the form/state of hydrogen observed by at the lunar poles (3) Quantify, if present, the amount of water in the lunar regolith, with respect to hydrogen concentrations (4) Characterize the lunar regolith within a permanently shadowed crater on the Moon. The mission confirmed the presence of water ice on the moon by impacting a part of the spent Centaur upper stage into the Cabeus crater.. The presentation includes pictures of the development of the spacecraft, testing, launch, impact site, impact and a section of what the author called "Lunacy" which showed joking cartoons.

  19. Crustal dynamics project observations: 1982 results and plans for 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H.

    1983-01-01

    The 1982 Crustal Dynamics Project observations by fixed and mobile SLR and VLBI systems are reviewed. Plate motion measurements between North America and Europe were conducted by both techniques and SLR measurements were also made between North America, the Pacific, Australia and South American plates. Regional deformation measurements by VLBI and SLR systems were restricted to the western United States in 1982, including a number of important intercomparison baseline measured by both techniques. In 1983 the observing program grows significantly, with new SLR systems in Mexico, Easter Island, the Pacific and Italy. New VLBI systems will include a dedicated VLBI site at Weltzell, in Germany. Two highly mobile SLR and two highly mobile VLBI systems will greatly increase the regional deformation measurements in California and through the Basin and Range, where more than 25 sites will be occupied in 1983.

  20. Arctic Sea Ice Decline: Observations, Projections, Mechanisms, and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWeaver, Eric T.; Bitz, Cecilia M.; Tremblay, L.-Bruno

    This volume addresses the rapid decline of Arctic sea ice, placing recent sea ice decline in the context of past observations, climate model simulations and projections, and simple models of the climate sensitivity of sea ice. Highlights of the work presented here include • An appraisal of the role played by wind forcing in driving the decline; • A reconstruction of Arctic sea ice conditions prior to human observations, based on proxy data from sediments; • A modeling approach for assessing the impact of sea ice decline on polar bears, used as input to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's decision to list the polar bear as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act; • Contrasting studies on the existence of a "tipping point," beyond which Arctic sea ice decline will become (or has already become) irreversible, including an examination of the role of the small ice cap instability in global warming simulations; • A significant summertime atmospheric response to sea ice reduction in an atmospheric general circulation model, suggesting a positive feedback and the potential for short-term climate prediction. The book will be of interest to researchers attempting to understand the recent behavior of Arctic sea ice, model projections of future sea ice loss, and the consequences of sea ice loss for the natural and human systems of the Arctic.

  1. Dream project: Applications of earth observations to disaster risk management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyke, G.; Gill, S.; Davies, R.; Betorz, F.; Andalsvik, Y.; Cackler, J.; Dos Santos, W.; Dunlop, K.; Ferreira, I.; Kebe, F.; Lamboglia, E.; Matsubara, Y.; Nikolaidis, V.; Ostoja-Starzewski, S.; Sakita, M.; Verstappen, N.

    2011-01-01

    The field of disaster risk management is relatively new and takes a structured approach to managing uncertainty related to the threat of natural and man-made disasters. Disaster risk management consists primarily of risk assessment and the development of strategies to mitigate disaster risk. This paper will discuss how increasing both Earth observation data and information technology capabilities can contribute to disaster risk management, particularly in Belize. The paper presents the results and recommendations of a project conducted by an international and interdisciplinary team of experts at the 2009 session of the International Space University in NASA Ames Research Center (California, USA). The aim is to explore the combination of current, planned and potential space-aided, airborne, and ground-based Earth observation tools, the emergence of powerful new web-based and mobile data management tools, and how this combination can support and improve the emerging field of disaster risk management. The starting point of the project was the World Bank's Comprehensive Approach to Probabilistic Risk Assessment (CAPRA) program, focused in Central America. This program was used as a test bed to analyze current space technologies used in risk management and develop new strategies and tools to be applied in other regions around the world.

  2. Carnegie Supernova Project: Spectroscopic Observations of Core Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrell, Nidia I.

    2012-09-01

    The Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) has performed, during the period 2004-2009, the optical and NIR follow up of 253 supernovae (SNe) of all types. Among those, 124 were core collapse events, comprising 93 SNe of type II and 31 of types Ib/Ic/IIb. Our follow up consisted of photometric observations suitable to build detailed light curves and a considerable amount of optical spectroscopy. The bulk of our observations is carried out at Las Campanas Observatory, while access to other facilities is also provided thanks to our strong collaboration with the Millennium Center for Supernova Studies (MCSS). Our spectroscopic observations were primarily aimed at typing possible new SNe, and follow-up the evolution of CSP targets. One of the goals of the follow-up of type II SNe is the application of independent distance indicators such as the Standard Candle (SCM) and the Expanding Photosphere (EPM) methods. Moreover, through the study of the spectroscopic evolution of these objects, from as early as possible after explosion to the nebular phases, we hope to contribute to their further understanding. Specific analysis of particular objects is underway by members of the CSP and an extended collaboration.

  3. QUANTIFYING OBSERVATIONAL PROJECTION EFFECTS USING MOLECULAR CLOUD SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Beaumont, Christopher N.; Offner, Stella S.R.; Shetty, Rahul; Glover, Simon C. O.; Goodman, Alyssa A.

    2013-11-10

    The physical properties of molecular clouds are often measured using spectral-line observations, which provide the only probes of the clouds' velocity structure. It is hard, though, to assess whether and to what extent intensity features in position-position-velocity (PPV) space correspond to 'real' density structures in position-position-position (PPP) space. In this paper, we create synthetic molecular cloud spectral-line maps of simulated molecular clouds, and present a new technique for measuring the reality of individual PPV structures. Using a dendrogram algorithm, we identify hierarchical structures in both PPP and PPV space. Our procedure projects density structures identified in PPP space into corresponding intensity structures in PPV space and then measures the geometric overlap of the projected structures with structures identified from the synthetic observation. The fractional overlap between a PPP and PPV structure quantifies how well the synthetic observation recovers information about the three-dimensional structure. Applying this machinery to a set of synthetic observations of CO isotopes, we measure how well spectral-line measurements recover mass, size, velocity dispersion, and virial parameter for a simulated star-forming region. By disabling various steps of our analysis, we investigate how much opacity, chemistry, and gravity affect measurements of physical properties extracted from PPV cubes. For the simulations used here, which offer a decent, but not perfect, match to the properties of a star-forming region like Perseus, our results suggest that superposition induces a ∼40% uncertainty in masses, sizes, and velocity dispersions derived from {sup 13}CO (J = 1-0). As would be expected, superposition and confusion is worst in regions where the filling factor of emitting material is large. The virial parameter is most affected by superposition, such that estimates of the virial parameter derived from PPV and PPP information typically disagree

  4. Integrated multidisciplinary fault observation in Marmara Through MARSite - Project Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meral Ozel, Nurcan; Necmioglu, Ocal; Oguz Ozel, Asım; Ergintav, Semih; Geli, Louis Louis; Favali, Paolo; Guralp, Cansun; Douglas, John; Mathieu, Pierre-Philippe; Tan, Onur; Gürbüz, Cemil; Erdik, Mustafa

    2015-04-01

    flow at the IGDAS district regulators during an extreme event. This work is funded by the project MARsite - New Directions in Seismic Hazard assessment through Focused Earth Observation in the Marmara Supersite FP7-ENV.2012 6.4-2, Grant 308417.

  5. All-weather estimates of the land surface skin temperatures from combined analyses of microwave and infrared satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, C.; Aires, F.; Prigent, C.; Catherinot, J.; Rossow, W. B.

    2011-12-01

    The surface skin temperature (Ts) is a key parameter at the land-atmosphere interface. Global datasets of Ts are traditionally estimated from satellite infrared radiance observations, under clear sky conditions. First, the inter-comparison of different IR land surface temperature satellite datasets (ISCCP, MODIS, and AIRS) is presented, along with an evaluation with in situ measurements at selected stations archived during CEOP (Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period). The objective is to assess the accuracy of the Ts estimates, and to evidence the major error sources in the retrieval. Results show that the major sources of differences between the different satellite products come from instrument calibration differences, especially for high Ts, followed by the impact of the water vapor treatment in the algorithm, and the differences in surface emissivities. The main limitation of satellite infrared measurements of Ts is their inability to penetrate clouds, limiting them to clear conditions. Microwave wavelengths, being much less affected by clouds than the infrared, are an attractive alternative in cloudy regions as they can be used to derive an all-sky skin Ts product. A neural network inversion scheme has been developed to retrieve surface Ts along with atmospheric water vapor, cloud liquid water, and surface emissivities over land from a combined analysis of Special Sensor Microwave /Imager (SSM/I) and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) data. In the absence of routine in situ Ts measurements, retrieved all-weather Ts values are first evaluated globally by comparison to the surface air temperature (Tair) measured by the meteorological station network. The Ts-Tair difference from the global comparisons showed all the expected variations with solar flux, soil characteristics, and cloudiness. This evaluation has been recently extended locally at a few sites by using the Ts in-situ measurements from several CEOP stations representing different

  6. The CONVEX project - Using Observational Evidence and Process Understanding to Improve Projections of Extreme Rainfall Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blenkinsop, Stephen; Fowler, Hayley; Kendon, Elizabeth; Chan, Steven; Ferro, Chris; Roberts, Nigel; Sessford, Pat

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade, widespread major flood events in the UK and across Europe have focussed attention on perceived increases in rainfall intensities. Whilst Regional Climate Models (RCMs) are able to simulate the magnitude and spatial pattern of observed daily extreme rainfall events more reliably than Global Circulation Models (GCMs), they still underestimate extreme rainfall in relation to observations and do not capture the properties of sub-daily events that may lead to flooding in urban areas. In the UK and Europe, particularly during the summer, a large proportion of precipitation comes from convective storms that are typically too small to be explicitly represented by climate models. Instead, convection parameterisation schemes are necessary to represent the larger-scale effect of unresolved convective cells. The CONVEX project (CONVective EXtremes) argues that an integrated approach is needed to provide improvements in estimates of change in extreme rainfall, particularly for summer convective events. As usable predictions require the synthesis of observations, understanding of atmospheric processes and models, a change in focus from traditional validation exercises (comparing modelled and observed extremes) to an understanding and quantification of the causes for model deficiencies in the simulation of extreme rainfall processes on different spatial and temporal scales is needed. By adopting this new focus CONVEX aims to contribute to the goals of enabling society to respond to global climate change and predicting the regional and local impacts of environmental change on timescales from days to decades. In addition to an improved understanding of the spatial-temporal characteristics of extreme rainfall processes (principally in the UK) the project is also assessing the influence of model parameterisations and resolution on the simulation of extreme rainfall events and processes. Under the project the UK Meteorological Office has run new RCM simulations

  7. Observation of Thermoacoustic Phenomena in a School Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beke, Tamas

    2009-01-01

    In this article we present project work on physical measurements and an examination task with a Rijke tube. The aim of our project is to help students increase their knowledge of thermoacoustics while at the same time developing their applied information technology skills and improving their cooperation skills. Our school project promotes pedagogy…

  8. Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project: Observations and Source Lists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getman, K. V.; Flaccomio, E.; Broos, P. S.; Feigelson, E. D.; Grosso, N.; Tsujimoto, M.; COUP Collaboration

    2004-08-01

    We present the observations, data analysis methodology, and tabulated results from the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP). COUP is based on a single nearly-continuous 850 ks pointing towards the Orion Nebula obtained in January 2003. Over 1600 young stars are detected. Data preparation includes correction for charge transfer inefficiency and subpixel event repositioning. Source detection is based on two wavelet-based search algorithms optimized for maximum reduction of background. For each source, we perform data extraction, pileup correction, spectral and variability analysis, and broad-band luminosity determinations using the sophisticated semi-automated IDL-based ACIS Extract (AE) package. Our treatment of photon pileup using annular extraction regions is effective for both lightly and heavily piledup sources. The AE data products efficiently provide detailed and comprehensive information for point sources in ACIS fields. COUP is supported by Chandra grant SAO GO3-4009A (Feigelson PI). ACIS Extract is available at http://www.astro.psu.edu/xray/docs/TARA/ae_users_guide.html.

  9. Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, LI; Sedlacek, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    The Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) was conducted to obtain a better understanding of how aerosols generated from biomass fires affect the atmosphere and climate. It is estimated that 40% of carbonaceous aerosol produced originates from biomass burning—enough to affect regional and global climate. Several biomass-burning studies have focused on tropical climates; however, few campaigns have been conducted within the United States, where millions of acres are burned each year, trending to higher values and greater climate impacts because of droughts in the West. Using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility (AAF), the BBOP deployed the Gulfstream-1 (G-1) aircraft over smoke plumes from active wildfire and agricultural burns to help identify the impact of these events and how impacts evolve with time. BBOP was one of very few studies that targeted the near-field time evolution of aerosols and aimed to obtain a process-level understanding of the large changes that occur within a few hours of atmospheric processing.

  10. Radical observations during the Clean air for London project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, L. K.; Stone, D.; Clancy, N.; Lee, J. D.; Laufs, S.; Kleffmann, J.; Heard, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    With greater than 50 % of the global population residing in urban conurbations, poor urban air quality has a demonstrable effect on human health. OH and HO2 radicals, (collectively termed HOx) together with RO2 radicals, mediate virtually all of the oxidative chemistry in the atmosphere, being responsible for the transformation of primary emissions into secondary pollutants such as NO2, O3 and particulates. Understanding the chemistry of free-radicals in the atmosphere is essential in improving predictions of the lifetimes of pollutants and spatial scales of their transport within urban areas. Results from earlier field campaigns in urban and polluted regions have demonstrated the significance of HONO photolysis and alkene ozonolysis in the production of HOx radicals. In many cases, however, measurements of HONO have not been made, reducing the ability to evaluate model successes for OH in these environments. Here we present measurements of OH, HO2, RO2 and OH reactivity taken during the wintertime (January - February, 2012) and summertime (July - August, 2012) as part of the Clean air for London (ClearfLo) project in London. RO2 was detected using a newly developed flow-reactor laser-induced fluorescence technique which is able to discriminate between HO2 and organic peroxy radicals [1]. Low concentrations of radicals were observed during the wintertime, midday [OH], [HO2] and [RO2] were ~ 0.04, 0.8 and 1.5 pptv respectively, comparable to observations of radicals at other urban locations in winter [2,3,4], and which displayed a negative correlation with NO concentrations. OH reactivity was high and largely tracked the diurnal profiles of NOx and CO, with the highest reactivity ~100 s-1 observed during the morning rush hour. Analysis of factors controlling OH concentrations during the wintertime suggests that the formation of OH from the photolysis of O3 and subsequent reaction of O(1D) with H2O is a minor contribution both under high and low NOx conditions owing

  11. NASA-SETI microwave observing project: Targeted Search Element (TSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, L. D.

    1991-01-01

    The Targeted Search Element (TSE) performs one of two complimentary search strategies of the NASA-SETI Microwave Observing Project (MOP): the targeted search. The principle objective of the targeted search strategy is to scan the microwave window between the frequencies of one and three gigahertz for narrowband microwave emissions eminating from the direction of 773 specifically targeted stars. The scanning process is accomplished at a minimum resolution of one or two Hertz at very high sensitivity. Detectable signals will be of a continuous wave or pulsed form and may also drift in frequency. The TSE will possess extensive radio frequency interference (RFI) mitigation and verification capability as the majority of signals detected by the TSE will be of local origin. Any signal passing through RFI classification and classifiable as an extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI) candidate will be further validated at non-MOP observatories using established protocol. The targeted search will be conducted using the capability provided by the TSE. The TSE provides six Targeted Search Systems (TSS) which independently or cooperatively perform automated collection, analysis, storage, and archive of signal data. Data is collected in 10 megahertz chunks and signal processing is performed at a rate of 160 megabits per second. Signal data is obtained utilizing the largest radio telescopes available for the Targeted Search such as those at Arecibo and Nancay or at the dedicated NASA-SETI facility. This latter facility will allow continuous collection of data. The TSE also provides for TSS utilization planning, logistics, remote operation, and for off-line data analysis and permanent archive of both the Targeted Search and Sky Survey data.

  12. Comparing climate projections to observations up to 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmstorf, Stefan; Foster, Grant; Cazenave, Anny

    2012-12-01

    We analyse global temperature and sea-level data for the past few decades and compare them to projections published in the third and fourth assessment reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The results show that global temperature continues to increase in good agreement with the best estimates of the IPCC, especially if we account for the effects of short-term variability due to the El Niño/Southern Oscillation, volcanic activity and solar variability. The rate of sea-level rise of the past few decades, on the other hand, is greater than projected by the IPCC models. This suggests that IPCC sea-level projections for the future may also be biased low.

  13. WATER TREATMENT PROJECT: OBSERVATIONS ON USE OF GAC IN PRACTICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this project were: (1) to determine if granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption beds applied in water treatment practice slough-off organic materials during the spring warm-up and (2) to evaluate the feasibility of the dilute or low-level COD procedure for the...

  14. Observations from The EV Project in Q3 2013

    SciTech Connect

    John Smart

    2013-12-01

    This is a brief report that summarizes results published in numerous other reports. It describes the usage of electric vehicles and charging units in the EV Project over the past 3 months. There is no new data or information provided in this report, only summarizing of information published in other reports (which have all been approved for unlimited distribution publication). This report will be posted to the INL/AVTA website for viewing by the general public.

  15. BEV Charging Behavior Observed in The EV Project for 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Brion D. Bennett

    2014-01-01

    This fact sheet will be issued quarterly to report on the number of Nissan Leafs vehicle usage, charging locations, and charging completeness as part of the EV Project. It will be posted on the INL/AVTA and ECOtality websites and will be accessible by the general public. The raw data that is used to create the report is considered proprietary/OUO and NDA protected, but the information in this report is NOT proprietary nor NDA protected.

  16. Microspacecraft and Earth observation: Electrical field (ELF) measurement project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Tanya; Elkington, Scot; Parker, Scott; Smith, Grover; Shumway, Andrew; Christensen, Craig; Parsa, Mehrdad; Larsen, Layne; Martinez, Ranae; Powell, George

    1990-01-01

    The Utah State University space system design project for 1989 to 1990 focuses on the design of a global electrical field sensing system to be deployed in a constellation of microspacecraft. The design includes the selection of the sensor and the design of the spacecraft, the sensor support subsystems, the launch vehicle interface structure, on board data storage and communications subsystems, and associated ground receiving stations. Optimization of satellite orbits and spacecraft attitude are critical to the overall mapping of the electrical field and, thus, are also included in the project. The spacecraft design incorporates a deployable sensor array (5 m booms) into a spinning oblate platform. Data is taken every 0.1 seconds by the electrical field sensors and stored on-board. An omni-directional antenna communicates with a ground station twice per day to down link the stored data. Wrap-around solar cells cover the exterior of the spacecraft to generate power. Nine Pegasus launches may be used to deploy fifty such satellites to orbits with inclinations greater than 45 deg. Piggyback deployment from other launch vehicles such as the DELTA 2 is also examined.

  17. Microspacecraft and Earth observation: Electrical field (ELF) measurement project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Tanya; Elkington, Scot; Parker, Scott; Smith, Grover; Shumway, Andrew; Christensen, Craig; Parsa, Mehrdad; Larsen, Layne; Martinez, Ranae; Powell, George

    The Utah State University space system design project for 1989 to 1990 focuses on the design of a global electrical field sensing system to be deployed in a constellation of microspacecraft. The design includes the selection of the sensor and the design of the spacecraft, the sensor support subsystems, the launch vehicle interface structure, on board data storage and communications subsystems, and associated ground receiving stations. Optimization of satellite orbits and spacecraft attitude are critical to the overall mapping of the electrical field and, thus, are also included in the project. The spacecraft design incorporates a deployable sensor array (5 m booms) into a spinning oblate platform. Data is taken every 0.1 seconds by the electrical field sensors and stored on-board. An omni-directional antenna communicates with a ground station twice per day to down link the stored data. Wrap-around solar cells cover the exterior of the spacecraft to generate power. Nine Pegasus launches may be used to deploy fifty such satellites to orbits with inclinations greater than 45 deg. Piggyback deployment from other launch vehicles such as the DELTA 2 is also examined.

  18. Principle characteristics of the National Earth Observation Satellite. Project SPOT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cazenave, M.

    1977-01-01

    A recent meeting of the Economic and Social Committee examined the programs and means currently being implemented by France in the field in the field of space research and industry which could bring about fast results. This was prompted by man's desire to insure rational resource management of his planet and by man's awareness of the definite contribution that space observation can make to this field of research. Through discussion, the Economic and Social Committee has approved the plan for creating an earth observation satellite. A detailed discussion of the principle characteristics of this earth observation satellite include the objectives, the orbit, characteristics and operations of the platform, maintenance, attitude measurement, the power available and many other characteristics.

  19. THE MEGAMASER COSMOLOGY PROJECT. VI. OBSERVATIONS OF NGC 6323

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, C. Y.; Suyu, S. H.; Braatz, J. A.; Lo, K. Y.; Condon, J. J.; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Reid, M. J.; Pesce, D. W.; Henkel, C.

    2015-02-10

    We present observations of the H{sub 2}O megamasers in the accretion disk of NGC 6323. By combining interferometric and spectral monitoring data, we estimate H{sub 0}=73{sub −22}{sup +26} km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1}, where the low strength of the systemic masers (<15 mJy) limits the accuracy of this estimate. The methods developed here for dealing with weak maser emission provide guidance for observations of similar sources, until significant increases in radio telescope sensitivity, such as anticipated from the next generation Very Large Array, are realized.

  20. Personality Projections. The Montessori Observer. Volume 32, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Montessori Society (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    "The Montessori Observer" is mailed four times each year, in March, May, September and November, to Society members throughout the world. The purpose is to provide news and information about the Society's work in Montessori education, and to extend awareness of Montessori principles throughout the world. This issue contains a feature article,…

  1. PROJECT CONDORS - CONVECTIVE DIFFUSION OBSERVED BY REMOTE SENSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The data report presents results from two diffusion experiments conducted at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in 1982 and 1983. The objective was to compare diffusion in the atmospheric convective boundary layer with that observed in laboratory tank experiments and numer...

  2. Microspacecraft and Earth observation: Electrical Field (ELF) measurement project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    There is a need for an inexpensive, extensive, long-lasting global electric field measurement system (ELF). The primary performance driver of this mission is the need to measure the attitude of each spacecraft in the Earth's electric field very accurately. In addition, it is necessary to know the electric charge generated by the satellite as it crosses the magnetic field lines (E equals V times B). In order to achieve the desired global coverage, a constellation of about 50 satellites in at least 18 different orbits will be used. To reduce the cost of each satellite, off-the-shelf, proven technology will be used whenever possible. Researchers have set a limit of $500,000 per satellite. Researchers expect the program cost, including the deployment of the entire constellation, to be less than $100 million. The minimum projected mission life is five years.

  3. Observed and Projected Climate Extremities in Chennai Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anushiya, j.; Andimuthu, R.

    2013-12-01

    Analyses of observed climate throughout world revealed some significant changes in the extremes. Any change in the frequency or severity of extreme climate events would have profound impacts on the resilience of nature and society. It is thus very important to analyze extreme events to reliably monitor and detect climate change. Chennai is the fourth largest metropolis in India and one of the fastest growing economic and Industrial growth centers in South Asia. Population has grown rapidly in the last 20 years due to its major industrialization and tremendous growth. Already Chennai's day and night time Temperature shows an increasing trend. The past incidence of catastrophic flooding was observed in the city due to heavy rains associated with depressions and cyclonic storm lead floods in major rivers. After 2000, the incidents were reported repeatedly. The effort has made in this study to find the observed climate extremities over the past years and in the future. For observed changes, IMD gridded data set, and station data are used. Future high resolution climate scenarios (0.220x0.220) are developed through RCM using PRECIS. The boundary data have provided by the UK Met office. The selected members are simulated under the A1B scenario (a mid range emission scenario) for a continuous run till 2100. Climate indices listed by Expert Team (ET) on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI) by the CLIVAR are considered in this study. The indices were obtained using the software package RClimDex. Kendall's tau based slope estimator has been used to find the significance lavel. The results shows the significant increasing tendency of warm days (TX90P) in the past and in future. The trends in extreme wet days (R99P) are also increased. The growth in population, urban and industrial area, economic activities, depletion of natural resources along with changing climate are forced to develop the infrastructure includes climate friendly policies to adopt and to ensure the

  4. NASA SETI microwave observing project: Sky Survey element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The SETI Sky Survey Observing Program is one of two complimentary strategies that NASA plans to use in its microwave Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). The primary objective of the sky survey is to search the entire sky over the frequency range of 1.0 to 10.0 GHz for evidence of narrow band signals of extraterrestrial intelligent origin. Frequency resolutions of 30 Hz or narrower will be used across the entire band. Spectrum analyzers with upwards of ten million channels are required to keep the survey time approximately 6 years. Data rates in excess of 10 megabits per second will be generated in the data taking process. Sophisticated data processing techniques will be required to determine the ever changing receiver baselines, and to detect and archive potential SETI signals. Existing radio telescopes, including several of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) 34 meter antennas located at Goldstone, CA and Tidbinbilla, Australia will be used for the observations. The JPL has the primary responsibility to develop and carry out the sky survey. In order to lay the foundation for the full scale SETI Sky Survey, a prototype system is being developed at the JPL. The system will be installed at the new 34-m high efficiency antenna at the Deep Space Station (DSS) 13 research and development station, Goldstone, CA, where it will be used to initiate the observational phase of the NASA SETI Sky Survey. It is anticipated that the early observations will be useful to test signal detection algorithms, scan strategies, and radio frequency interference rejection schemes. The SETI specific elements of the prototype system are: (1) the Wide Band Spectrum Analyzer (WBSA); a 2-million channel fast Fourier transformation (FFT) spectrum analyzer which covers an instantaneous bandpass of 40 MHz; (2) the signal detection processor; and (3) the SETI Sky Survey Manager, a network-based C-language environment that provides observatory control, performs data acquisition and analysis

  5. Expectation on Observation of Supernova Remnants with the LHAASO Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ye; Cao, Zhen; Chen, Songzhan; Chen, Yang; Cui, Shuwang; He, Huihai; Huang, Xingtao; Ma, Xinhua; Yuan, Qiang; Zhang, Xiao; LHAASO Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are believed to be the most important acceleration sites for cosmic rays (CRs) below ∼1015 eV in the Galaxy. High-energy photons, either directly from the shocks of the SNRs or indirectly from the interaction between SNRs and the nearby clouds, are crucial probes for the CR acceleration. Big progresses on observations of SNRs have been achieved by space- and ground-based γ-ray facilities. However, whether γ-rays come from accelerated hadrons or not, as well as their connection with the CRs observed at Earth, remains in debate. Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), a next-generation experiment, is designed to survey the northern part of the very high energy γ-ray sky from ∼0.3 TeV to PeV with the sensitivity of ≲1% of the Crab Nebula flux. In this paper, we indicate that LHAASO will be dedicated to enlarging the γ-ray SNR samples and improving the spectral and morphological measurements. These measurements, especially at energies above 30 TeV, will be important for us to finally understand the CR acceleration in SNRs.

  6. Final Results From the Circumarctic Lakes Observation Network (CALON) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, K. M.; Arp, C. D.; Eisner, W. R.; Frey, K. E.; Grosse, G.; Jones, B. M.; Kim, C.; Lenters, J. D.; Liu, H.; Townsend-Small, A.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2012, the physical and biogeochemical properties of ~60 lakes in northern Alaska have been investigated under CALON, a project to document landscape-scale variability of Arctic lakes in permafrost terrain. The network has ten nodes along two latitudinal transects extending inland 200 km from the Arctic Ocean. A meteorological station is deployed at each node and six representative lakes instrumented and continuously monitored, with winter and summer visits for synoptic assessment of lake conditions. Over the 4-year period, winter and summer climatology varied to create a rich range of lake responses over a short period. For example, winter 2012-13 was very cold with a thin snowpack producing thick ice across the region. Subsequent years had relatively warm winters, yet regionally variable snow resulted in differing gradients of ice thickness. Ice-out timing was unusually late in 2014 and unusually early in 2015. Lakes are typically well-mixed and largely isothermal, with minor thermal stratification occurring in deeper lakes during calm, sunny periods in summer. Lake water temperature records and morphometric data were used to estimate the ground thermal condition beneath 28 lakes. Application of a thermal equilibrium steady-state model suggests a talik penetrating the permafrost under many larger lakes, but lake geochemical data do not indicate a significant contribution of subpermafrost groundwater. Biogeochemical data reveal distinct spatial and seasonal variability in chlorophyll biomass, chromophoric dissolved organic carbon (CDOM), and major cations/anions. Generally, waters sampled beneath ice in April had distinctly higher concentrations of inorganic solutes and methane compared with August. Chlorophyll concentrations and CDOM absorption were higher in April, suggesting significant biological/biogeochemical activity under lake ice. Lakes are a positive source of methane in summer, and some also emit nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide. As part of the

  7. Status of the NASA SETI Sky Survey microwave observing project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, M. J.; Gulkis, S.; Wilck, H. C.; Olsen, E. T.; Garyantes, M. F.; Burns, D. J.; Asmar, P. R.; Brady, R. B.; Deich, W. T. S.; Renzetti, N. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Sky Survey observing program is one of two complementary strategies that NASA plans to use in its microwave Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). The primary objective of the Sky Survey is to search the entire sky over the frequency range 1000-10,000 MHz for evidence of narrow band signals of extraterrestrial, intelligent origin. Spectrum analyzers with upwards of 10 million channels and data rates in excess of 10 gigabits per second are required to complete the survey in less than 7 years. To lay the foundation for the operational SETI Sky Survey, a prototype system has been built to test and refine real time signal detection algorithms, to test scan strategies and observatory control functions, and to test algorithms designed to reject radio frequency interference. This paper presents a high level description of the prototype hardware and reports on the preparations to deploy the system to the 34-m antenna at the research and development station of NASA's Deep Space Communication Complex, Goldstone, California.

  8. Status of the NASA SETI Sky Survey microwave observing project.

    PubMed

    Klein, M J; Gulkis, S; Wilck, H C; Olsen, E T; Garyantes, M F; Burns, D J; Asmar, P R; Brady, R B; Deich, W T; Renzetti, N A

    1992-01-01

    The Sky Survey observing program is one of two complementary strategies that NASA plans to use in its microwave Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). The primary objective of the Sky Survey is to search the entire sky over the frequency range 1000-10,000 MHz for evidence of narrow band signals of extraterrestrial, intelligent origin. Spectrum analyzers with upwards of 10 million channels and data rates in excess of 10 gigabits per second are required to complete the survey in less than 7 years. To lay the foundation for the operational SETI Sky Survey, a prototype system has been built to test and refine real time signal detection algorithms, to test scan strategies and observatory control functions, and to test algorithms designed to reject radio frequency interference. This paper presents a high level description of the prototype hardware and software and reports on the preparations to deploy the system to the 34-m antenna at the research and development station of NASA's Deep Space Communication Complex, Goldstone, California. PMID:11537160

  9. Initial Results from the Circumarctic Lakes Observation Network (CALON) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, K. M.; Lenters, J. D.; Grosse, G.; Arp, C. D.; Jones, B.; Beck, R. A.; Eisner, W. R.; Frey, K. E.; Liu, H.; Kim, C.; Townsend-Small, A.

    2011-12-01

    About half of the Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) of northern Alaska is covered with thermokarst lakes and drained lake basins, making lakes a dominant landscape element and a crucial component of the Arctic permafrost system. However, to date there has been no systematic collection of key lake parameters or baseline data with which to make spatial and temporal comparisons to assess the impact of warmer temperatures, changing cloud cover and precipitation patterns, permafrost degradation, and direct human impacts on lakes. As separate groups, we have been working on lakes in arctic Alaska for the past decade and are currently monitoring some lakes. This effort has recently been organized into the Circumarctic Lakes Observation Network (CALON) with funding from NSF's Arctic Observing Network (AON) program. The objective of CALON is to expand and integrate our existing lake monitoring network across arctic Alaska to provide data for key indices using in situ measurements, field surveys, interviews with members of the indigenous community, and remote sensing/GIS technologies. In 2012, we will enhance the existing in situ network by developing lake monitoring sites to collect year-round baseline data and assess physical, chemical, and biological lake characteristics across environmental gradients. This will be accomplished by implementing a multiscale (hierarchical) lake instrumentation scheme such that basic data are collected from 51 lakes, while a subset of 16 lakes is more intensively instrumented. Regional scaling and extrapolation of key metrics is accomplished through validation of satellite imagery with ground measurements, and standardized protocols will be developed to enable inter-site comparison and to prepare for expansion towards a pan-Arctic network. Initial results are available from lake water profile temperature measurements made in summer 2010 along a 130-km transect extending from Barrow southward toward the interior. Ice-out occurs about 2-4 weeks later

  10. How historic simulation-observation discrepancy affects future warming projections in a very large model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Projections of future climate made by model-ensembles have credibility because the historic simulations by these models are consistent with, or near-consistent with, historic observations. However, it is not known how small inconsistencies between the ranges of observed and simulated historic climate change affects the future projections made by a model ensemble. Here, the impact of historical simulation-observation inconsistencies on future warming projections is quantified in a 4-million member Monte Carlo ensemble from a new efficient Earth System Model (ESM). Of the 4-million ensemble members, a subset of 182,500 are consistent with historic ranges of warming, heat uptake and carbon uptake simulated by the Climate Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) ensemble. This simulation-consistent subset projects similar future warming ranges to the CMIP5 ensemble for all four RCP scenarios, indicating the new ESM represents an efficient tool to explore parameter space for future warming projections based on historic performance. A second subset of 14,500 ensemble members are consistent with historic observations for warming, heat uptake and carbon uptake. This observation-consistent subset projects a narrower range for future warming, with the lower bounds of projected warming still similar to CMIP5, but the upper warming bounds reduced by 20-35 %. These findings suggest that part of the upper range of twenty-first century CMIP5 warming projections may reflect historical simulation-observation inconsistencies. However, the agreement of lower bounds for projected warming implies that the likelihood of warming exceeding dangerous levels over the twenty-first century is unaffected by small discrepancies between CMIP5 models and observations.

  11. The Due Innovators II Apollo Project: Monitoring Atmospheric Pollution with Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, P.; Del Frate, F.; Di Noia, A.; Sambucini, V.; Bojkov, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper we present the Innovators II - APOLLO (monitoring Atmospheric POLLution with earth Observation) project which has been carried out in the framework of the ESA Data User Element programme (http://www.esa.int/due). The projects aims at the development of an innovative service for the monitoring of the air quality from ground based measurements and by means of satellite data e.g. provided by the OMI mission. The core of the APOLLO project is the OMI-TOC NN (neural networks) algorithm.

  12. Citizen Science participation in the NASA CERES Students' Cloud Observations Online Project (S'COOL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, P. M.; Moore, S.; Crecelius, S.; Rogerson, T.; Chambers, L. H.

    2012-12-01

    Many science programs designed for the classroom see little participation when school is not in session. Many factors, such as materials, cost, needing a teacher to lead discussion, and reporting/assessment criteria are classroom-centric. The S'COOL project has the ability to serve not only as a classroom-teaching tool, but as a citizen science project in which anyone can help NASA collect cloud data. Since its inception in 1997, the S'COOL project has invited help from the citizen science community from age 6 to 99. The S'COOL project has the ability to reach everyone in the world through satellite overpasses. This provides the citizen scientist with a temporal "match", i.e., the opportunity to make cloud observations "looking up" as various NASA Earth observing satellites make cloud observations "looking down" at the same location. After an observation is made, the observing scientist completes an online report form and sends this directly to NASA Langley Research Center's Atmospheric Science Data Center. After the satellite data are processed, generally within a week, an auto-generated email informs the observer of what the satellite observed, compared side-by-side with what they observed. All of the observations are stored in a database for later viewing and analysis. The ability to view satellite matches and past observations allows the citizen scientist to develop good scientific practices, particularly skills in cloud observation and data analysis techniques. Much of the success of the S'COOL project can be associated with its aim as a classroom-based program that transcends to the citizen science community. This allows both parties to have access to the same materials and data, creating an authentic science experience. Another avenue of success can be found in the project's translation of materials into French and Spanish. Translation provides a multicultural perspective and enables broader participation. Since the aim of the S'COOL project is to collect

  13. Project 5322 Mid-Term Report: Key Eco-Hydrological Parameters Retrieval And Land Data Assimilation System Development In A Typical Inland River Basin Of Chinas Arid Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faivre, R.; Colin, J.; Menenti, M.; Lindenbergh, R.; Van Den Bergh, L.; Yu, H.; Jia, L.; Xin, L.

    2010-10-01

    Improving the understanding and the monitoring of high elevation regions hydrology is of major relevance from both societal and environmental points of view for many Asian countries, in particular in terms of flood and drought, but also in terms of food security in a chang- ing environment. Satellite and airborne remote sensing technologies are of utmost for such a challenge. Exist- ing imaging spectro-radiometers, radars, microwave ra- diometers and backscatter LIDAR provide a very com- prehensive suite of measurements over a wide rage of wavelengths, time frequencies and spatial resolu- tions. It is however needed to devise new algorithms to convert these radiometric measurements into useful eco-hydrological quantitative parameters for hydrologi- cal modeling and water management. The DRAGON II project entitled Key Eco-Hydrological Parameters Re- trieval and Land Data Assimilation System Development in a Typical Inland River Basin of Chinas Arid Region (ID 5322) aims at improving the monitoring, understand- ing, and predictability of hydrological and ecological pro- cesses at catchment scale, and promote the applicability of quantitative remote sensing in watershed science. Ex- isting Earth Observation platforms provided by the Euro- pean Space Agency as well as prototype airborne systems developed in China - ENVISAT/AATSR, ALOS/PRISM and PALSAR, Airborne LIDAR - are used and combined to retrieve advanced land surface physical properties over high elevation arid regions of China. The existing syn- ergies between this project, the CEOP-AEGIS project (FP7) and the WATER project (CAS) provide incentives for innovative studies. The investigations presented in the following report focus on the development of advanced and innovative methodologies and algorithms to monitor both the state and the trend of key eco-hydrological vari- ables: 3D vegetation properties, land surface evaporation, glacier mass balance and drought indicators.

  14. Requirements for Expanding the Role of Science and Technology through the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) to meet the Information Needs of Water Managers (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawford, R. G.

    2010-12-01

    Earth Observations provide broad support for the management of renewable resources including water. In the past and even today, water managers do not have access to the best scientific understanding and information to support their decision making. Through the Group on Earth Observations (GEO), initiatives are underway to bring together science and information systems in three broad areas related to water management namely: 1) integrated data sets using both emerging and operational remote sensing technologies, 2) integrated information systems that rely on water cycle science to focus on floods and droughts, and 3) capacity building through technology transfer and training. Specific areas of progress that rely on science and new technological developments include new observational capabilities for ground water (e.g. GRACE), soil moisture (e.g. SMOS) and precipitation (e.g., Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM)). The development of information systems builds upon the Hydrologic Ensembles Prediction Experiment (HEPEX), drought studies, and aspects of the former Coordinated Energy and Water Cycle Observations Project (CEOP) that was developed through the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX). In addition to outlining the contributions of science to the GEO water tasks this talk will seek to draw some more fundamental lessons about the interface of science with GEO in the water sector. Although progress is being made, this progress is sometimes sub-optimal for reasons unrelated to science. The talk will conclude with a short discussion of some emerging priority areas being considered for the 2012-2015 GEO Work Plan where more scientific inputs are required. It also will provide suggestions for interested experts on how they could become more actively involved in GEO water-related activities.

  15. Impacts of sea ice / SST changes for the observed climate change -GREENICE project-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Fumiaki; Gao, Yongqi; Keenlyside, Noel; Koenigk, Torben; Semenov, Vladimir; Suo, Lingling; Yang, Shuting; Wang, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Under the recent global warming, melting of arctic sea-ice in recent decades could have contributed to recent climate changes including its long-term trend and extreme weather events. While the climatic response to the sea-ice loss have been studied recently, it is still an open question to what extent the sea-ice change has influenced recent climate change. Other factors, such as for example, SST could also have had an influence. A main objective of GREENICE research project is to show what extent of the observed climate trend as well as observed weather extremes could be explained by the change and variability in sea ice and SST, respectively. In this project, we designed two atmospheric general circulation model experiments: In both experiments observed daily sea ice cover variations are prescribed, while for SST, one experiment uses observed daily variations and the other the observed climatology. The experiment is performed by several different state-of-the-art AGCMs. Our preliminary results show that the observed wintertime temperature trend near the surface is poorly reproduced in our hindcast experiments using observed SIC and SST. The impact of SIC variation seems to be confined near the surface, while SST variation seems a key for temperature trend above. It suggests a necessity to consider the atmospheric poleward energy transport associated with SST variation to understand the observed arctic amplification. Other aspects of SIC/SST impact on the observed circulation change such as NAO shall also be discussed.

  16. The Climate and Cryosphere Project (CliC): Helping bring sea ice Models and Observations together.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytle, V.; Goodison, B.; Worby, A.; Ryabinin, V.; Prick, A.; Villinger, T.

    2007-12-01

    The Climate and Cryosphere Project is sponsored by the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and the Scientific Committee for Antarctic Research (SCAR). One of the four themes within the CliC project is the Marine Cryosphere Theme (MarC). This paper will review the recent projects and workshops held within this Theme and how they relate to other, international initiatives. Recent recommendations on sea ice thickness are being implemented, and groups have been formed to work towards improvements in models, particularly in their representation of the Southern Ocean. SOPHOCLES (Southern Ocean Physical Oceanography and Cryosphere Processes and Climate) will work with other modeling groups to improve the representation of the Southern Ocean in climate models. This will include cooperation with other modeling and observational groups to develop metrics to help evaluate models. In the Arctic, we are working to help develop, standardize, and implement observation and measurement protocols for Arctic sea ice in coastal, seasonal, and perennial ice zones.

  17. Special Education Management System Project Document. 2. Santa Cruz BCP Observation Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Cruz County Superintendent of Schools, CA.

    Presented in booklet and chart form is the Behavioral Characteristics Progression (BCP), part of the Santa Cruz Special Education Management Project, consisting of 2400 observable traits grouped into 50 behavioral strands. The BCP is seen to be a nonstandardized criterion referenced tool which replaces conventional age and disability labels with…

  18. Observing Classroom Processes in Project-Based Learning Using Multimedia: A Tool for Evaluators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William R.; Means, Barbara

    This paper describes how researchers at SRI International's Center for Technology and Learning designed and used an observation tool as part of its evaluation of a local Technology Innovation Challenge Grant program called Challenge 2000: Multimedia Project. The paper aims to present both the process and the tool that researchers, program…

  19. Interobserver Agreement for the Observation Procedures for the DMP and WDRSD Observers. Descriptive Study. Phase IV. Project Paper 79-25. Parts 1 and 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Norman L.

    This project paper reports the interobserver agreements and reliabilities for the observation procedures used in the Descriptive Study of Phase IV of the Individually Guided Education Evaluation Project. Only data from four observers--at the two Developing Mathematical Processes Schools and the two Wisconsin Design for Reading Skills Development…

  20. Observation of magnetic field-induced contraction of fission yeast cells using optical projection microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Beckwith, Andrew; Miller, John; Wood, Lowell

    2004-12-01

    The charges in live cells interact with or produce electric fields, which results in enormous dielectric responses, flexoelectricity, and related phenomena. Here we report on a contraction of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast) cells induced by magnetic fields, as observed using a phase-sensitive projection imaging technique. Unlike electric fields, magnetic fields only act on moving charges. The observed behavior is therefore quite remarkable, and may result from a contractile Lorentz force acting on diamagnetic screening currents. This would indicate extremely high intracellular charge mobilities. Besides, we observed a large electro-optic response from fission yeast cells.

  1. Observation of magnetic field-induced contraction of fission yeast cells using optical projection microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Beckwith, A. W.

    2005-03-01

    The charges in live cells interact with or produce electric fields, which results in enormous dielectric responses, flexoelectricity, and related phenomena. Here we report on a contraction of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast) cells induced by magnetic fields, as observed using a phase-sensitive projection imaging technique. Unlike electric fields, magnetic fields only act on moving charges. The observed behavior is therefore quite remarkable, and may result from a contractile Lorentz force acting on diamagnetic screening currents. This would indicate extremely high intracellular charge mobilities. Besides, we observed a large electro-optic response from fission yeast cells.

  2. Projected metastable Markov processes and their estimation with observable operator models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Prinz, Jan-Hendrik; Noé, Frank

    2015-10-01

    The determination of kinetics of high-dimensional dynamical systems, such as macromolecules, polymers, or spin systems, is a difficult and generally unsolved problem — both in simulation, where the optimal reaction coordinate(s) are generally unknown and are difficult to compute, and in experimental measurements, where only specific coordinates are observable. Markov models, or Markov state models, are widely used but suffer from the fact that the dynamics on a coarsely discretized state spaced are no longer Markovian, even if the dynamics in the full phase space are. The recently proposed projected Markov models (PMMs) are a formulation that provides a description of the kinetics on a low-dimensional projection without making the Markovianity assumption. However, as yet no general way of estimating PMMs from data has been available. Here, we show that the observed dynamics of a PMM can be exactly described by an observable operator model (OOM) and derive a PMM estimator based on the OOM learning.

  3. Projected metastable Markov processes and their estimation with observable operator models

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hao Prinz, Jan-Hendrik Noé, Frank

    2015-10-14

    The determination of kinetics of high-dimensional dynamical systems, such as macromolecules, polymers, or spin systems, is a difficult and generally unsolved problem — both in simulation, where the optimal reaction coordinate(s) are generally unknown and are difficult to compute, and in experimental measurements, where only specific coordinates are observable. Markov models, or Markov state models, are widely used but suffer from the fact that the dynamics on a coarsely discretized state spaced are no longer Markovian, even if the dynamics in the full phase space are. The recently proposed projected Markov models (PMMs) are a formulation that provides a description of the kinetics on a low-dimensional projection without making the Markovianity assumption. However, as yet no general way of estimating PMMs from data has been available. Here, we show that the observed dynamics of a PMM can be exactly described by an observable operator model (OOM) and derive a PMM estimator based on the OOM learning.

  4. Improving Future Ecosystem Benefits through Earth Observations: the H2020 Project ECOPOTENTIAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provenzale, Antonello; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Ziv, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial and marine ecosystems provide essential goods and services to human societies. In the last decades, however, anthropogenic pressures caused serious threats to ecosystem integrity, functions and processes, potentially leading to the loss of essential ecosystem services. ECOPOTENTIAL is a large European-funded H2020 project which focuses its activities on a targeted set of internationally recognised protected areas in Europe, European Territories and beyond, blending Earth Observations from remote sensing and field measurements, data analysis and modelling of current and future ecosystem conditions and services. The definition of future scenarios is based on climate and land-use change projections, addressing the issue of uncertainties and uncertainty propagation across the modelling chain. The ECOPOTENTIAL project addresses cross-scale geosphere-biosphere interactions and landscape-ecosystem dynamics at regional to continental scales, using geostatistical methods and the emerging approaches in Macrosystem Ecology and Earth Critical Zone studies, addressing long-term and large-scale environmental and ecological challenges. The project started its activities in 2015, by defining a set of storylines which allow to tackle some of the most crucial issues in the assessment of present conditions and the estimate of the future state of selected ecosystem services. In this contribution, we focus on some of the main storylines of the project and discuss the general approach, focusing on the interplay of data and models and on the estimate of projection uncertainties.

  5. Constraining future terrestrial carbon cycle projections using observation-based water and carbon flux estimates.

    PubMed

    Mystakidis, Stefanos; Davin, Edouard L; Gruber, Nicolas; Seneviratne, Sonia I

    2016-06-01

    The terrestrial biosphere is currently acting as a sink for about a third of the total anthropogenic CO2  emissions. However, the future fate of this sink in the coming decades is very uncertain, as current earth system models (ESMs) simulate diverging responses of the terrestrial carbon cycle to upcoming climate change. Here, we use observation-based constraints of water and carbon fluxes to reduce uncertainties in the projected terrestrial carbon cycle response derived from simulations of ESMs conducted as part of the 5th phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). We find in the ESMs a clear linear relationship between present-day evapotranspiration (ET) and gross primary productivity (GPP), as well as between these present-day fluxes and projected changes in GPP, thus providing an emergent constraint on projected GPP. Constraining the ESMs based on their ability to simulate present-day ET and GPP leads to a substantial decrease in the projected GPP and to a ca. 50% reduction in the associated model spread in GPP by the end of the century. Given the strong correlation between projected changes in GPP and in NBP in the ESMs, applying the constraints on net biome productivity (NBP) reduces the model spread in the projected land sink by more than 30% by 2100. Moreover, the projected decline in the land sink is at least doubled in the constrained ensembles and the probability that the terrestrial biosphere is turned into a net carbon source by the end of the century is strongly increased. This indicates that the decline in the future land carbon uptake might be stronger than previously thought, which would have important implications for the rate of increase in the atmospheric CO2 concentration and for future climate change. PMID:26732346

  6. Observed and Projected Ocean Wind Speed Trends and Marine Boundary Layer Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.

    2013-12-01

    Marine boundary layer clouds respond to wind speed, inter alia, via the wind speed dependence of surface fluxes of heat, moisture, and sea spray aerosol. Wind speed trends have the potential to change the properties and radiative forcing of marine boundary layer clouds in the 21st century. Satellite observations show a trend in mean ocean surface wind speed over the period 1991-2008, with increases by at least 5-10 %, depending on region. This observed trend in ocean surface wind speed is not necessarily related to anthropogenic climate forcing, but could arise from decadal internal variability of the climate system. Climate simulations project a decrease in surface wind speed in the north Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, and an increase in the Southern Ocean over the 21st century in response to anthropogenic climate forcing. This presentation addresses the response of cloud properties and cloud radiative forcing in the large, climatically relevant stratocumulus decks along the western shores of continents to the observed and projected trends in ocean wind speed. Results of cloud-system-resolving simulations of marine stratocumulus clouds are presented, in which the response of cloud properties and of cloud radiative forcing to the observed and projected changes in surface wind speed is quantified.

  7. Pan-Arctic observations in GRENE Arctic Climate Change Research Project and its successor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanouchi, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    We started a Japanese initiative - "Arctic Climate Change Research Project" - within the framework of the Green Network of Excellence (GRENE) Program, funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan (MEXT), in 2011. This Project targeted understanding and forecasting "Rapid Change of the Arctic Climate System and its Global Influences." Four strategic research targets are set by the Ministry: 1. Understanding the mechanism of warming amplification in the Arctic; 2. Understanding the Arctic climate system for global climate and future change; 3. Evaluation of the impacts of Arctic change on the weather and climate in Japan, marine ecosystems and fisheries; 4. Projection of sea ice distribution and Arctic sea routes. Through a network of universities and institutions in Japan, this 5-year Project involves more than 300 scientists from 39 institutions and universities. The National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) works as the core institute and The Japan Agency for Marine- Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) joins as the supporting institute. There are 7 bottom up research themes approved: the atmosphere, terrestrial ecosystems, cryosphere, greenhouse gases, marine ecology and fisheries, sea ice and Arctic sea routes and climate modeling, among 22 applications. The Project will realize multi-disciplinal study of the Arctic region and connect to the projection of future Arctic and global climatic change by modeling. The project has been running since the beginning of 2011 and in those 5 years pan-Arctic observations have been carried out in many locations, such as Svalbard, Russian Siberia, Alaska, Canada, Greenland and the Arctic Ocean. In particular, 95 GHz cloud profiling radar in high precision was established at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, and intensive atmospheric observations were carried out in 2014 and 2015. In addition, the Arctic Ocean cruises by R/V "Mirai" (belonging to JAMSTEC) and other icebreakers belonging to other

  8. Sludge Settling Rate Observations and Projections at the Savannah River Site - 13238

    SciTech Connect

    Gillam, Jeffrey M.; Shah, Hasmukh B.; Keefer, Mark T.

    2013-07-01

    Since 2004, sludge batches have included a high percentage of stored sludge generated from the H- modified (HM) process. The slow-settling nature of HM sludge means that the settling is often the major part of the washing tank quiescent period between required pump runs to maintain flammability control. Reasonable settling projections are needed to wash soluble salts from sludge in an efficient manner, to determine how much sludge can be washed in a batch within flammability limits, and to provide composition projections for batch qualification work done in parallel with field preparation. Challenges to providing reasonably accurate settling projections include (1) large variations in settling behavior from tank-to-tank, (2) accounting for changing initial concentrations, sludge masses, and combinations of different sludge types, (3) changing the settling behavior upon dissolving some sludge compounds, and (4) sludge preparation schedules that do not allow for much data collection for a particular sludge before washing begins. Scaling from laboratory settling tests has provided inconsistent results. Several techniques have been employed to improve settling projections and therefore the overall batch preparation efficiency. Before any observations can be made on a particular sludge mixture, projections can only be made based on historical experience with similar sludge types. However, scaling techniques can be applied to historical settling models to account for different sludge masses, concentrations, and even combinations of types of sludge. After sludge washing/settling cycles begin, the direct measurement of the sludge height, once generally limited to a single turbidity meter measurement per settle period, is now augmented by examining the temperature profile in the settling tank, to help determine the settled sludge height over time. Recently, a settling model examined at PNNL [1,2,3] has been applied to observed thermocouple and turbidity meter readings to

  9. Carolinas Coastal Change Processes Project data report for nearshore observations at Cape Hatteras, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, Brandy N.; Warner, John C.; Voulgaris, George; List, Jeffrey H.; Thieler, Robert; Martini, Marinna A.; Montgomery, Ellyn T.; McNinch, Jesse E.; Book, Jeffrey W.; Haas, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    An oceanographic field study conducted in February 2010 investigated processes that control nearshore flow and sediment transport dynamics at Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. This report describes the project background, field program, instrumentation setup, and locations of the sensor deployments. The data collected, and supporting meteorological and streamflow observations, are presented as time-series plots for data visualization. Additionally, the data are available as part of this report.

  10. Site Observational Work Plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Shiprock, New Mexico. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site is one of the first documents for developing an approach for achieving ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies Shiprock site information to a regulatory compliance framework, which identifies strategies for meeting ground water compliance at the site. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA ground water programmatic environmental impact statement.

  11. Using Roving Cloud Observations from the S'COOL Project to Engage Citizen Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, P. M.; Oostra, D.; Moore, S. W.; Rogerson, T. M.; Crecelius, S. A.; Chambers, L. H.

    2011-12-01

    Students' Clouds Observations On-Line (S'COOL) is a hands-on project, which supports NASA research on the Earth's climate. Through their observations, participants are engaged in identifying cloud-types and levels and sending that information to NASA. The two main groups of S'COOL observers are permanent locations such as regularly participating classrooms, and non-permanent locations or Rovers. These non-permanent locations can be a field trip, vacation, or just an occasional observation from a backyard. S'COOL welcomes participation from any interested observers, especially from places where official weather observations are few and far between. This program is offered to citizen scientists all over the world. They are participating in climate research by reporting cloud types and levels within +/- 15 minutes of a satellite overpass and sending that information back to NASA. When a participant's cloud observation coincides with a satellite overpass, the project sends them an email with a MODIS image of the overpass location, and a comparison of the satellite's cloud data results next to their ground-based report. This allows for the students and citizen scientists to participate in ground-truthing the CERES satellite data, to determine the level of agreement/disagreement. A new tool slated for future use in cloud identification, developed by the S'COOL team, is a mobile application. The application is entitled "Cloud Identification for Students" or "CITRUS". The mobile application utilizes a cloud dichotomous key with images to help with cloud identification. Also included in the application is a link to the project's cloud-reporting page to help with data submission in the field. One of the project's recent and most unique roving observers is a solo ocean rower who has traversed many of the world's ocean basins alone in a rowboat. While rowing across the oceans, she has recently been making cloud observations, which she sends back to us for analysis. In doing so

  12. Project Phoenix: A Summary of SETI Observations and Results, 1995 - 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backus, P. R.; Project Phoenix Team

    2004-05-01

    Project Phoenix was a Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) that observed nearly 800 stars within about 80 parsecs over the available frequencies in the microwave spectrum from 1200 to 3000 MHz with a resolution of 0.7 Hz. The search had three major observing campaigns using the Parkes 64 meter, the NRAO 140 Foot, and the Arecibo 305 meter antennas. Phoenix used real time signal detection and immediate verification of possible ETI signals. The search looked for narrowband signals that were continuously present, or pulsed regularly, and allowed for frequency drift rates of up to about 1 Hz per second. A database of terrestrial signals found in the previous week was used to match against detections for each observation. Candidate signals, i.e., those not in the database, were checked immediately with a "pseudo-interferometric" observation using a second, distant antenna, or by simple on-off observations if the second antenna was unavailable. While millions of signals were detected, all proved to be from terrestrial technology. In conclusion, we can set upper limits on the power of narrowband transmitters in the vicinity of nearby stars. Project Phoenix was the privately-funded continuation of the NASA Targeted Search SETI program and we gratefully acknowledge the use of NASA equipment on long term loan through 2002. The search was supported by contributions from Bernard M. Oliver, William and Rosemary Hewlett, Gordon and Betty Moore, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, and the Paul G. Allen Foundation.

  13. Astropol: Russian pilot project on coordinated observations of hazardous celestial objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahimov, Mansur

    Cooperative graund-based ASTROPOL (ASTeRoid and cOmet POLice) project had been started in June 2012. ASTROPOL was initiated and currently advised by the Institute of Astronomy RAS (INASAN). It is believed to be a long-term dedicated Russian pilot project on coordinated observations of hazardous celestial objects - potentially hazardous asteroids, comets, and meteoroids. Basic facility of ASTROPOL is its (permanently enlarged) observational network which presently incorporates 12 academical and university observatories. Network includes all the largest Russian optical telescopes (SAO RAS 6m, INASAN TB 2m, ISTP SSO 1.6m) and a number of 1-1.5m telescopes located around Russia (Uzbek UBAI MAO 1.5m, Russian-Turkish 1.5m RTT150 in Antalya, Turkey, Latvian IAUL BAO 1.2m Schmidt, and Ukrainian CrAO Simeiz 1m). All mentioned telescopes together with a number of 0.4-0.6m ones have been using to get low-resolution spectroscopy, photometry, and astrometry of hazardous objects. By the end of 2013 two successful coordinated sessions had been undertaken by ASTROPOL cooperation: observations of Apophis in Jan13-Feb28 and 2010 CF19 in Aug16-Sep02 2013. Observation and reduction methods and results obtained during the both coordinated sessions as well as some current problem and prospects of the ASTROPOL cooperation are analysed and discussed in the talk.

  14. Sea Level Change for Norway: Past and Present Observations and Projections to 2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Matthew; Øie Nilsen, Jan Even; Ravndal, Oda; Breili, Kristian; Sande, Hilde; Kierulf, Halfdan; Steffen, Holger; Jansen, Eystein; Carson, Mark; Vestol, Olav

    2016-04-01

    Changes to mean sea level and/or sea level extremes (e.g., storm surges) will lead to changes in coastal impacts. These changes represent a changing exposure or risk to our society. Here we try to synthesize our understanding of past and present observed sea level changes for Norway, as well as providing sea level projections up until 2100. Our primary focus is changes to mean sea level but we also give updated return heights for each coastal municipality in Norway. We first analyse observed sea level changes from the Norwegian tide gauge network and from satellite altimetry. After the tide gauge data have been corrected for the effects of glacial isostatic adjustment, we show that 20th century sea level rise in Norwegian waters is broadly similar to the global average rise. Contributions to the observed sea level change and variability are discussed. We find that rate of sea level rise along the Norwegian coast is significantly higher for the period 1993-2014 than for the period 1960-2010. It is unclear, however, to what extent this higher rate represents natural variability rather than a sustained increase owing to global warming. Our regional sea level projections are based on findings from the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC), and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) output. Average projected 21st century relative sea level change in Norway is -0.10-0.35 m (5 to 95% model ranges which is the likely range in AR5; P>66%) for RCP2.6, -0.05-0.45 m for RCP4.5, and 0.10-0.65 m for RCP8.5. The relative sea level projections can differ as much as 0.50 m from place to place. This pattern is governed by the vertical uplift rates. Quantifying the probability of levels above the likely range (i.e., the upper tail of the probability distribution) remains difficult because information is lacking. And of particular concern is that the ice sheet contribution might have a skewed distribution, which would

  15. Absolute gravity measurements in Southeast Alaska and continuous gravity observation in Juneau by ISEA2 project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Kazama, T.; Miura, S.; Ohta, Y.; Okubo, S.; Fujimoto, H.; Kaufman, M.; Herreid, S. J.; Larsen, C. F.; Freymueller, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    It is known that Southeast Alaska (SE-AK) shows a large uplift rates exceeding 32 mm/year at the maximum mainly due to the three ice changes in ages, i.e. in the Large Glacier Maximum, the Little Ice Age and the present day. Comparisons between rates of change obtained from GPS and absolute gravimeter (AG) observations and the rates predicted by model computations based on independently estimated ice mass changes indicate the existence of a very thin lithosphere (on the order of 60 km) and a low viscousity upper mantle (on the order of 1.E18 Pa s) beneath SE-AK (Larsen et al., 2005; Sato et al, 2011; Sato et al., 2012). On the other hand, it is also known that there are very large oceanic tidal loading effects in SE-AK, i.e. exceeding 2.7 cm and 8 microGals for the M2 constituent of the vertical displacement and gravity, respectively (Sato et al., 2008; Inazu et al., 2009; Sun et al., 2010; Sato et al., 2012). These regional large loading and unloading effects provide good signals to study the viscoelastic structure beneath SE-AK. A joint observation project (ISEA2) between Japan and USA groups has restarted as a five years project beginning in 2012. In June 2012, we conducted the AG measurements at the 6 sites in SE-AK at where the AG measurements were conducted by the previous ISEA1 project (Sun et al., 2010). Continuous gravity observation started also on June 2012 with a portable super conducting gravimeter (iGrav) at the EGAN library of UAS. We will introduce the results for these observations and comparisons with the previous observations and model computations. It is noted that the precipitation during the period from the winter in 2011 to the spring in 2012 was very large compared with the usual amount. We evaluate this effect on our gravity observations with a hydrological model computation (Kazama and Okubo, 2009) using the observed precipitation data as an input data. The observation with the iGrav super conducting gravimeter shall give us a useful data

  16. Factorization of air pollutant emissions: projections versus observed trends in Europe.

    PubMed

    Rafaj, Peter; Amann, Markus; Siri, José G

    2014-10-01

    This paper revisits the emission scenarios of the European Commission's 2005 Thematic Strategy on Air Pollution (TSAP) in light of today's knowledge. We review assumptions made in the past on the main drivers of emission changes, i.e., demographic trends, economic growth, changes in the energy intensity of GDP, fuel-switching, and application of dedicated emission control measures. Our analysis shows that for most of these drivers, actual trends have not matched initial expectations. Observed ammonia and sulfur emissions in European Union in 2010 were 10% to 20% lower than projected, while emissions of nitrogen oxides and particulate matter exceeded estimates by 8% to 15%. In general, a higher efficiency of dedicated emission controls compensated for a lower-than-expected decline in total energy consumption as well as a delay in the phase-out of coal. For 2020, updated projections anticipate lower sulfur and nitrogen oxide emissions than those under the 2005 baseline, whereby the degree to which these emissions are lower depends on what assumptions are made for emission controls and new vehicle standards. Projected levels of particulates are about 10% higher, while smaller differences emerge for other pollutants. New emission projections suggest that environmental targets established by the TSAP for the protection of human health, eutrophication and forest acidification will not be met without additional measures. PMID:25058894

  17. Operational tools for irrigation water management based on Earth observation: the DEMETER project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calera, Alfonso; Jochum, M. Anna Osann

    2006-09-01

    The project DEMETER (DEMonstration of Earth observation TEchnologies in Routine irrigation advisory services) was designed to assess and demonstrate improvements introduced by Earth observation (EO) and Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in farm and Irrigation Advisory Service (IAS) day-to-day operations. The DEMETER concept of near-real-time delivery of EO-based irrigation scheduling information to IAS and farmers has proven to be valid. The operationality of the space segment was demonstrated in three different pilot zones in South Europe during the 2005 irrigation campaigns. Extra-fast image delivery and quality controlled operational processing make the EO-based crop coefficient maps available at the same speed and quality as ground-based data (point samples), while significantly extending the spatial coverage and reducing service cost. The new online Space-Assisted Irrigation Advisory Service (e-SAIAS) is the central outcome of the project. Its key feature is the operational generation of irrigation scheduling information products from a virtual constellation of high-resolution EO satellites and their delivery to farmers in near-real-time using leading-edge on-line analysis and visualization tools. First feedback of users at IAS and farmer level is encouraging. The paper gives an overview of the project and its main achievements.

  18. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this initial site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Grand Junction, Colorado. This SOWP is one of the first UMTRA Ground Water Project documents developed to select a compliance strategy that meets the UMTRA ground water standards (40 CFR Part 192, as amended by 60 FR 2854) for the Grand Junction site. This SOWP applies information about the Grand Junction site to the compliance strategy selection framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water Project draft programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS). This risk-based, decision-making framework identifies the decision logic for selecting compliance strategies that could be used to meet the ground water standards. The DOE goal is to use the observational method to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. Based on an evaluation of the site characterization and risk assessment data available for the preparation of this SOWP, DOE proposes that the most likely compliance strategy for the Grand Junction site is no remediation based on the application of supplemental standards. This proposed strategy is based on a conceptual site model that indicates site-related contamination is confined to a limited-use aquifer as defined in the ground water standards.

  19. FAME project: use of ESA earth observation data for flood modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willems, P.; Timbe, L.; Thompson, S.; Campling, P.; Barbieri, M.

    2003-04-01

    The FAME project on "Flood risk and damage Assessment using Modelling and Earth observation techniques" aims to meet the flood and spatial information needs of the water authorities and the insurance industry. The project is supported by the DUP-2 Programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). In the first phase of the project, the improvements in flood modelling performance by the use of earth observation products have been demonstrated. Also the use of the earth observation data for flood mapping (historical events) and flood risk mapping (at given risk levels) has been studied. On the basis of three case-studies (incl. rivers Dender and Demer in Belgium) and existing hydrodynamic flood models, the use of different types of earth observation data has been demonstrated. Landsat ETM+ images have been used to update the land use map and the infrastructural map using supervised classification techniques. Both maps provide the hydrological and hydraulic modeller with more detailed data, and allow further refinement of the flood model. The land use map is also useful for flood damage and flood risk calculations. For a limited stretch along the Dender river, additional IKONOS images were processed and compared with the Landsat data. For validation of the flood models, historical flood information is needed. Apart from historical flood maps collected by the water authorities, use can be made of satellite images: ERS SAR, RADARSAT and ENVISAT images. For the Dender catchment, SAR image acquisitions were made for 2 historical floods. For the spatial extent of the flooding and the temporal evolution, a comparison was made between the flood model results (using the MIKE11 hydraulic river sofware), the SAR derived flood maps and the map of recent floods from the Flemish water authorities.

  20. TAOS Project: Searching for Variable Stars in the Selected TAOS Fields and Optical Followup Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngeow, Chow Choong; Chang, D.; Pan, K.; Chung, T.; Koptelova, E.; TAOS Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    The Taiwan-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) project is aimed to find Kuiper Belt Objects (KBO) and measure their size distribution using the occultation technique. The TAOS project employed four 20-inch wide-field (F/1.9, 3 degree-squared FOV) telescopes, equipped with a 2K x 2K CCD, to simultaneously monitor the same patch of the sky. All four TAOS telescopes, which can be operated automatically, were located at the Lulin Observatory in central Taiwan. The TAOS project has been continuously taking data since 2005. In addition of finding KBO, the dense sampling strategy employed in TAOS can also be used to find variable stars. We report the search of variable stars from selected TAOS fields at this Meeting. For example, we found about 50 candidate variables (out of 2600 stars) in TAOS 60 Field (RA: 04h48m00s, DEC: +20d46m20s, with limiting magnitudes about15 mag. at S/N=10), including three previously known variables, using sigma deviation and Stetson's J-index methods. The available data in this field spanned about 150 days in time. However, TAOS observations were conducted using a customized filter. We therefore initiated a followup program to observe and construct the light curves of these candidate variables in the BVRI bands, using the Lulin's One-Meter telescope, Lulin's SLT telescope (16-inch aperture) and 32-inch telescope from the Tenagra II Observatory. The multi-band optical followup observation will help in improving the classification of these candidates, estimate their BVRI mean magnitudes, colors as well as extinction. This will enable a wide range of research in astrophysics for these variables. We also present our preliminary results based on the first season of the followup observations. CCN acknowledges the support from NSC 98-2112-M-008-013-MY3.

  1. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Falls City, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Produced by the US Department of Energy (DOE), this site observational work plan (SOWP) will be used to determine site-specific activities to comply with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards at this Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. The purpose of the SOWP is to recommend a site-specific ground water compliance strategy at the Falls City UMTRA Project site. The Falls City SOWP presents a comprehensive summary of site hydrogeological data, delineates a conceptual model of the aquifer system, and discusses the origins of milling-related ground water contamination. It also defines the magnitude of ground water contamination, potential environmental and health risks associated with ground water contamination and data gaps, and targets a proposed compliance strategy.

  2. Elusive drought: uncertainty in observed trends and short- and long-term CMIP5 projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlowsky, B.; Seneviratne, S. I.

    2013-05-01

    Recent years have seen a number of severe droughts in different regions around the world, causing agricultural and economic losses, famines and migration. Despite their devastating consequences, the Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI) of these events lies within the general range of observation-based SPI time series and simulations from the 5th phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). In terms of magnitude, regional trends of SPI over the last decades remain mostly inconclusive in observation-based datasets and CMIP5 simulations, but Soil Moisture Anomalies (SMAs) in CMIP5 simulations hint at increased drought in a few regions (e.g., the Mediterranean, Central America/Mexico, the Amazon, North-East Brazil and South Africa). Also for the future, projections of changes in the magnitude of meteorological (SPI) and soil moisture (SMA) drought in CMIP5 display large spreads over all time frames, generally impeding trend detection. However, projections of changes in the frequencies of future drought events display more robust signal-to-noise ratios, with detectable trends towards more frequent drought before the end of the 21st century in the Mediterranean, South Africa and Central America/Mexico. Other present-day hot spots are projected to become less drought-prone, or display non-significant changes in drought occurrence. A separation of different sources of uncertainty in projections of meteorological and soil moisture drought reveals that for the near term, internal climate variability is the dominant source, while the formulation of Global Climate Models (GCMs) generally becomes the dominant source of spread by the end of the 21st century, especially for soil moisture drought. In comparison, the uncertainty from Green-House Gas (GHG) concentrations scenarios is negligible for most regions. These findings stand in contrast to respective analyses for a heat wave index, for which GHG concentrations scenarios constitute the main source of

  3. Observing the Arctic Ocean under melting ice - the UNDER-ICE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagen, Hanne; Ullgren, Jenny; Geyer, Florian; Bergh, Jon; Hamre, Torill; Sandven, Stein; Beszczynska-Möller, Agnieszka; Falck, Eva; Gammelsrød, Tor; Worcester, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The sea ice cover of the Arctic Ocean is gradually diminishing in area and thickness. The variability of the ice cover is determined by heat exchange with both the atmosphere and the ocean. A cold water layer with a strong salinity gradient insulates the sea ice from below, preventing direct contact with the underlying warm Atlantic water. Changes in water column stratification might therefore lead to faster erosion of the ice. As the ice recedes, larger areas of surface water are open to wind mixing; the effect this might have on the water column structure is not yet clear. The heat content in the Arctic strongly depends on heat transport from other oceans. The Fram Strait is a crucial pathway for the exchange between the Arctic and the Atlantic Ocean. Two processes of importance for the Arctic heat and freshwater budget and the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation take place here: poleward heat transport by the West Spitzbergen Current and freshwater export by the East Greenland Current. A new project, Arctic Ocean under Melting Ice (UNDER-ICE), aims to improve our understanding of the ocean circulation, water mass distribution, fluxes, and mixing processes, sea ice processes, and net community primary production in ice-covered areas and the marginal ice zone in the Fram Strait and northward towards the Gakkel Ridge. The interdisciplinary project brings together ocean acoustics, physical oceanography, marine biology, and sea ice research. A new programme of observations, integrated with satellite data and state-of-the-art numerical models, will be started in order to improve the estimates of heat, mass, and freshwater transport between the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean. On this poster we present the UNDER-ICE project, funded by the Research Council of Norway and GDF Suez E&P Norge AS for the years 2014-2017, and place it in context of the legacy of earlier projects in the area, such as ACOBAR. A mooring array for acoustic tomography combined with

  4. EXPANDED VERY LARGE ARRAY NOVA PROJECT OBSERVATIONS OF THE CLASSICAL NOVA V1723 AQUILAE

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Miriam I.; Chomiuk, Laura; Rupen, Michael; Roy, Nirupam; Mioduszewski, Amy J. E-mail: lchomiuk@nrao.edu E-mail: nroy@nrao.edu

    2011-09-20

    We present radio light curves and spectra of the classical nova V1723 Aql obtained with the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA). This is the first paper to showcase results from the EVLA Nova Project, which comprises a team of observers and theorists utilizing the greatly enhanced sensitivity and frequency coverage of EVLA radio observations, along with observations at other wavelengths, to reach a deeper understanding of the energetics, morphology, and temporal characteristics of nova explosions. Our observations of V1723 Aql span 1-37 GHz in frequency, and we report on data from 14 to 175 days following the time of the nova explosion. The broad frequency coverage and frequent monitoring show that the radio behavior of V1723 Aql does not follow the classic Hubble-flow model of homologous spherically expanding thermal ejecta. The spectra are always at least partially optically thin, and the flux rises on faster timescales than can be reproduced with linear expansion. Therefore, any description of the underlying physical processes must go beyond this simple picture. The unusual spectral properties and light curve evolution might be explained by multiple emitting regions or shocked material. Indeed, X-ray observations from Swift reveal that shocks are likely present.

  5. Expanded Very Large Array Nova Project Observations of the Classical NovaV1723 Aquilae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss, Miriam I.; Chomiuk, Laura; Rupen, Michael; Roy, Nirupam; Mioduszewski, Amy J.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Nelson, Thomas; Mukai, Koji; Bode, M. F.; Eyres, S. P. S.; OBrien, T. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present radio light curves and spectra of the classical nova VI723 Aql obtained with the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA). This is the first paper to showcase results from the EVLA Nova Project, which comprises a team of observers and theorists utilizing the greatly enhanced sensitivity and frequency coverage of EVLA radio observations, along with observations at other wavelengths, to reach a deeper understanding of the energetics, morphology, and temporal characteristics of nova explosions. Our observations of VI723 Aql span 1-37 GHz in frequency, and we report on data from 14 to 175 days following the time of the nova explosion. The broad frequency coverage and frequent monitoring show that the radio behavior of VI723 Aql does not follow the classic Hubble-flow model of homologous spherically expanding thermal ejecta. The spectra are always at least partially optically thin, and the flux rises on faster timescales than can be reproduced with linear expansion. Therefore, any description of the underlying physical processes must go beyond this simple picture. The unusual spectral properties and light curve evolution might be explained by multiple emitting regions or shocked material. Indeed, X-ray observations from Swift reveal that shocks are likely present.

  6. Expanded Very Large Array Nova Project Observations of the Classical Nova V1723 Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Miriam I.; Chomiuk, Laura; Rupen, Michael; Roy, Nirupam; Mioduszewski, Amy J.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Nelson, Thomas; Mukai, Koji; Bode, M. F.; Eyres, S. P. S.; O'Brien, T. J.

    2011-09-01

    We present radio light curves and spectra of the classical nova V1723 Aql obtained with the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA). This is the first paper to showcase results from the EVLA Nova Project, which comprises a team of observers and theorists utilizing the greatly enhanced sensitivity and frequency coverage of EVLA radio observations, along with observations at other wavelengths, to reach a deeper understanding of the energetics, morphology, and temporal characteristics of nova explosions. Our observations of V1723 Aql span 1-37 GHz in frequency, and we report on data from 14 to 175 days following the time of the nova explosion. The broad frequency coverage and frequent monitoring show that the radio behavior of V1723 Aql does not follow the classic Hubble-flow model of homologous spherically expanding thermal ejecta. The spectra are always at least partially optically thin, and the flux rises on faster timescales than can be reproduced with linear expansion. Therefore, any description of the underlying physical processes must go beyond this simple picture. The unusual spectral properties and light curve evolution might be explained by multiple emitting regions or shocked material. Indeed, X-ray observations from Swift reveal that shocks are likely present.

  7. ESA's STSE WACMOS Project: Towards a Water Cycle Multimission Observation Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Prieto, Diego; Su, Bob

    2010-05-01

    synergic manner; • Develop robust methodologies to integrate and assimilate space observations and in situ measurements into advance coupled models being able to describe biophysical processes and interactions between ocean, land and atmosphere describing the water cycle and hydrological processes; In this context, the European Space Agency (ESA) in collaboration with the Global Energy and Water Experiment (GEWEX) of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) launched the project Water Cycle Multi-mission Observation Strategy (WACMOS) early in 2009. The project, funded under the ESA's Support To Science Element, address the first of the above objectives. In particular, the project objective is twofold: • On the one hand, developing and validating a Product Portfolio of novel geo-information products responding to the GEWEX scientific priorities and exploiting the synergic capabilities between ESA EO data and other non-ESA missions. • Exploring and assessing different methodologies to exploit in a synergic manner different observations towards the development of long-term consistent datasets of key (essential) variables describing the water cycle. In this context, WACMOS is focused on four components of the above cycle that are also thematic priorities identified in close collaboration with the GEWEX scientific community: Evapotranspiration, soil moisture, clouds and water vapour. The product portfolio comprises: 1) AATSR-MERIS based evapotranspiration modelling approach; 2) Merged passive and active microwave first multi-decade soil moisture data set; 3) Novel MSG SEVIRI-SCIAMACHY cloud products and 4) Synergic SEVIRI-IASI and SEVIRI-MERIS water vapour products. In this paper, the methodologies and preliminary results of WACMOS are introduced. In the next phase of the project, consolidated methods, data products and validation results will be generated, so that a global water cycle product of evapotranpiration, soil moisture, clouds and water vapour with quantified

  8. Earth observations for the space radar laboratory mission: Report on the student challenge awards project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Jobea; Holt, Benjamin; Schier, Marguerite; Connors, Vickie; Godwin, Linda; Jones, Tom; Campbell, Alicyn; Dean, Freedom; Garrett, Timothy; Hartley, Hillary

    1994-01-01

    The Challenge Awards are designed to provide a unique perspective to students gifted in the arts and humanities from which to understand scientific endeavor by giving students an opportunity to participate in an ongoing research project. In the graduate program, seven students who had participated in previous Challenge Awards programs were selected to help develop the tools for Earth observations for the astronauts on the Space Radar Laboratory (SRL) missions. The goal of the Challenge Awards program was to prepare a training manual for the astronauts on the SRL missions. This paper describes the observations to be made by the astronauts on the SRL missions. The emphasis is on the dynamic seasonal features of the Earth's surface and atmosphere which justify the need for more than one flight of the SRL. Complete notebooks of the sites, global seasonal patterns, examples of radar and the Measurement of Air Pollution from Satellites data, and shuttle photographs have been given to each of the SRL crews.

  9. THE zCOSMOS-SINFONI PROJECT. I. SAMPLE SELECTION AND NATURAL-SEEING OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, C.; Renzini, A.; Foerster Schreiber, N. M.; Hicks, E. K. S.; Genzel, R.; Tacconi, L.; Davies, R.; Cresci, G.; Peng, Y.; Lilly, S.; Carollo, M.; Oesch, P.; Vergani, D.; Pozzetti, L.; Zamorani, G.; Daddi, E.; McCracken, H. J.; Bouche, N.; Shapiro, K.; and others

    2011-12-10

    The zCOSMOS-SINFONI project is aimed at studying the physical and kinematical properties of a sample of massive z {approx} 1.4-2.5 star-forming galaxies, through SINFONI near-infrared integral field spectroscopy (IFS), combined with the multiwavelength information from the zCOSMOS (COSMOS) survey. The project is based on one hour of natural-seeing observations per target, and adaptive optics (AO) follow-up for a major part of the sample, which includes 30 galaxies selected from the zCOSMOS/VIMOS spectroscopic survey. This first paper presents the sample selection, and the global physical characterization of the target galaxies from multicolor photometry, i.e., star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, age, etc. The H{alpha} integrated properties, such as, flux, velocity dispersion, and size, are derived from the natural-seeing observations, while the follow-up AO observations will be presented in the next paper of this series. Our sample appears to be well representative of star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 2, covering a wide range in mass and SFR. The H{alpha} integrated properties of the 25 H{alpha} detected galaxies are similar to those of other IFS samples at the same redshifts. Good agreement is found among the SFRs derived from H{alpha} luminosity and other diagnostic methods, provided the extinction affecting the H{alpha} luminosity is about twice that affecting the continuum. A preliminary kinematic analysis, based on the maximum observed velocity difference across the source and on the integrated velocity dispersion, indicates that the sample splits nearly 50-50 into rotation-dominated and velocity-dispersion-dominated galaxies, in good agreement with previous surveys.

  10. Changes of storm properties in the United States: Observations and multimodel ensemble projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Peng; Yu, Zhongbo; Gautam, Mahesh R.; Yuan, Feifei; Acharya, Kumud

    2016-07-01

    Changes in climate are likely to induce changes in precipitation characteristics including intensity, frequency, duration and patterns of events. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of multiple regional climate models (RCMs) in the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) to simulate storm properties including storm duration, inter-storm period, storm intensity, and within-storm patterns at eight locations in the continental US. We also investigate the future projections of them based on precipitation from NARCCAP historic runs and future runs. Results illustrate that NARCCAP RCMs are consistent with observed precipitation in the seasonal variation of storm duration and inter-storm period, but fail to simulate the magnitude. The ability to simulate the seasonal trend of average storm intensity varies among locations. Within-storm patterns from RCMs exhibit greater variability than from observed records. Comparisons between RCM-historic simulations and RCM projections indicate that there is a large variation in the future changes in storm properties. However, multi-model ensembles of the storm properties suggest that most regions of the United States will experience future changes in storm properties that includes shorter storm duration, longer inter-storm period, and larger average storm intensity.

  11. Site Observational Work Plan for the UMTRA project site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    Ground water compliance for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, including the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, site, is governed by the Uranium Mills Tailings Radiation Control Act (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s Health and Environmental Protection Standards for Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailings (40 CFR Part 192; 60 FR 2854). The EPA standards describe specific conditions for which the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) may apply for supplemental standards for contaminated ground water rather than meeting background levels or numerical standards. To achieve compliance with Subpart A of the EPA standards the residual radioactive materials are currently being consolidated on the site by the DOE in a disposal cell, isolating them from direct human or ecological contact and further dispersion into the environment. Completion of the disposal cell is scheduled for early 1995. An environmental assessment and a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) were completed in 1987. Concurrence with the UMTRA Surface Project Ambrosia Lake remedial action plan (RAP) was granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and state of New Mexico in 1990. The DOE deferred compliance with Subpart B of the EPA standards in the Surface Project RAP. This site observational work plan (SOWP) is the first document to address ground water compliance under Subpart B at the Ambrosia Lake site. The Ambrosia Lake UMTRA Project site is within the Grants Mineral Belt and was one of numerous uranium mills supplied by many local mines. Ground water contamination at the site occurred as a result of uranium mill operations. Contamination of ground water resulted from discharge of waste water, infiltration of water through the tailings pile, hydraulic placement of mill tailings in nearby mines, and water pumped from mine shafts.

  12. Projected Regional Climate Change in the Context of Recent Observed Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arritt, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    Since 1950 most of the north-central U.S. has seen an increase in warm-season precipitation. In contrast, the ensemble mean of CMIP5 global model projections suggest that warm season precipitation will decrease over the region during the coming decades. Given that this is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world the discrepancy between observations and simulations is important to understand from societal and economic perspectives. We explore some of the reasons for this discrepancy by focusing on results from regional climate model simulations over the CORDEX North America domain. We show that results from RCM simulations agree better with observed trends compared to the CMIP5 global models and discuss the reasons for this improved agreement, namely the role of organized mesoscale convection. We also show that trends in extreme precipitation intensity are more robust than trends in mean precipitation, in that precipitation intensity trends are more consistent among global models, regional models and observations. We discuss the reasons for this seeming contradiction between mean and extreme precipitation.Since 1950 most of the north-central U.S. has seen an increase in warm-season precipitation. In contrast, the ensemble mean of CMIP5 global model projections suggest that warm season precipitation will decrease over the region during the coming decades. Given that this is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world the discrepancy between observations and simulations is important to understand from societal and economic perspectives. We explore some of the reasons for this discrepancy by focusing on results from regional climate model simulations over the CORDEX North America domain. We show that results from RCM simulations agree better with observed trends compared to the CMIP5 global models and discuss the reasons for this improved agreement, namely the role of organized mesoscale convection. We also show that trends in

  13. The HELCATS Project: Characterising the Evolution of Coronal Mass Ejections Observed During Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, M. M.; Harrison, R. A.; Davies, J. A.; Perry, C. H.; Moestl, C.; Rouillard, A. P.; Bothmer, V.; Rodriguez, L.; Eastwood, J. P.; Kilpua, E.; Gallagher, P.; Odstrcil, D.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is fundamental to advancing our knowledge of energy and mass transport in the solar system, thus also rendering it crucial to space weather and its prediction. The advent of truly wide-angle heliospheric imaging has revolutionised the study of CMEs, by enabling their direct and continuous observation as they propagate from the Sun out to 1 AU and beyond. The recently initiated EU-funded FP7 Heliospheric Cataloguing, Analysis and Technique Service (HELCATS) project combines European expertise in the field of heliospheric imaging, built up over the last decade in particular through lead involvement in NASA's STEREO mission, with expertise in such areas as solar and coronal imaging as well as the interpretation of in-situ and radio diagnostic measurements of solar wind phenomena. The goals of HELCATS include the cataloguing of CMEs observed in the heliosphere by the Heliospheric Imager (HI) instruments on the STEREO spacecraft, since their launch in late October 2006 to date, an interval that covers much of the historically weak solar cycle 24. Included in the catalogue will be estimates of the kinematic properties of the imaged CMEs, based on a variety of established, and some more speculative, modelling approaches (geometrical, forward, inverse, magneto-hydrodynamic); these kinematic properties will be verified through comparison with solar disc and coronal imaging observations, as well as through comparison with radio diagnostic and in-situ measurements made at multiple points throughout the heliosphere. We will provide an overview of the HELCATS project, and present initial results that will seek to illuminate the unusual nature of solar cycle 24.

  14. Elusive drought: uncertainty in observed trends and short- and long-term CMIP5 projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlowsky, B.; Seneviratne, S. I.

    2012-12-01

    Recent years have seen a number of severe droughts in different regions around the world, causing agricultural and economic losses, famines and migration. Despite their devastating consequences, the Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI) of these events lies within the range of internal climate variability, which we estimate from simulations from the 5th phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). In terms of drought magnitude, regional trends of SPI over the last decades remain mostly inconclusive in observations and CMIP5 simulations, although Soil Moisture Anomalies (SMAs) in CMIP5 simulations hint at increased drought in a few regions (e.g. the Mediterranean, Central America/Mexico, the Amazon, North-East Brazil and South Africa). Also for the future, projections of meteorological (SPI) and agricultural (SMA) drought in CMIP5 display large uncertainties over all time frames, generally impeding trend detection. Analogue analyses of the frequencies rather than magnitudes of future drought display, however, more robust signal-to-noise ratios with detectable trends towards more frequent drought until the end of the 21st century in the Mediterranean, South Africa and Central America/Mexico. Other present-day hot spots are projected to become less drought-prone, or to display unsignificant changes in drought occurrence. A separation of different sources of uncertainty in drought projections reveals that for the near term, internal climate variability is the dominant source, while the formulation of Global Climate Models (GCMs) generally becomes the dominant source of uncertainty by the end of the 21st century, especially for agricultural (soil moisture) drought. In comparison, the uncertainty in Green-House Gas (GHG) concentrations scenarios is negligible for most regions. These findings stand in contrast to respective analyses for a heat wave indicator, for which GHG concentrations scenarios constitute the main source of uncertainty. Our results

  15. Observational calibration of the projection factor of Cepheids. I. The type II Cepheid κ Pavonis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitfelder, J.; Kervella, P.; Mérand, A.; Gallenne, A.; Szabados, L.; Anderson, R. I.; Willson, M.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The distance of pulsating stars, in particular Cepheids, are commonly measured using the parallax of pulsation technique. The different versions of this technique combine measurements of the linear diameter variation (from spectroscopy) and the angular diameter variation (from photometry or interferometry) amplitudes, to retrieve the distance in a quasi-geometrical way. However, the linear diameter amplitude is directly proportional to the projection factor (hereafter p-factor), which is used to convert spectroscopic radial velocities (i.e., disk integrated) into pulsating (i.e., photospheric) velocities. The value of the p-factor and its possible dependence on the pulsation period are still widely debated. Aims: Our goal is to measure an observational value of the p-factor of the type-II Cepheid κ Pavonis. Methods: The parallax of the type-II Cepheid κ Pav was measured with an accuracy of 5% using HST/FGS. We used this parallax as a starting point to derive the p-factor of κ Pav, using the SPIPS technique (Spectro-Photo-Interferometry of Pulsating Stars), which is a robust version of the parallax-of-pulsation method that employs radial velocity, interferometric and photometric data. We applied this technique to a combination of new VLTI/PIONIER optical interferometric angular diameters, new CORALIE and HARPS radial velocities, as well as multi-colour photometry and radial velocities from the literature. Results: We obtain a value of p = 1.26 ± 0.07 for the p-factor of κ Pav. This result agrees with several of the recently derived Period-p-factor relationships from the literature, as well as previous observational determinations for Cepheids. Conclusions: Individual estimates of the p-factor are fundamental to calibrating the parallax of pulsation distances of Cepheids. Together with previous observational estimates, the projection factor we obtain points to a weak dependence of the p-factor on period. Based on observations realized with ESO

  16. Impacts of observation-driven trait variation on carbon fluxes in an earth system projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verheijen, Lieneke; van Bodegom, Peter; Aerts, Rien; Brovkin, Victor

    2014-05-01

    Climate projections are still highly uncertain and differences in predicted terrestrial global carbon budgets by earth system models (ESMs) are large, both with respect to the size and direction of change. Part of these uncertainties in the land carbon dynamics are caused by differences in the modeled functional responses of vegetation in reaction to climatic drivers. In reality, changes in vegetation responses to the environment are driven by processes like species plasticity, acclimation, (genotypic) adaptation, species turnover and shifts in species abundances. These processes can cause shifts within community mean trait values, which in turn are will affect carbon fluxes to and from the system. Because most current dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs, the terrestrial part of ESMs) are not species based, these processes are not or poorly modeled. The recent availability of a large trait database (TRY-database), including both field measurements and experimental data, enables parameterization of the models with observational trait data. Many community mean trait values correlate with local environmental conditions. Such trait-climate relationships can be used to model variation in traits in DGVMs and allow for spatial and temporal variation in functional vegetation responses. The aim of this study was to identify the impacts of observation-driven trait variation on modeled carbon fluxes in climate projections. We determined and incorporated relationships between observational trait and climate data for each plant functional type (PFT) in the DGVM JSBACH. Within each grid cell, traits were varied every year, based on the local climatic conditions in the model. We also included CO2 acclimation of traits based on FACE-experiments, as projections concern elevated CO2 concentrations. Impacts on global carbon budgets were large; in the simulation with variable traits the high latitudes (temperate, boreal and arctic areas) were stronger carbon sinks and the tropical

  17. SIM PlanetQuest Key Project Precursor Observations to Detect Gas Giant Planets Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Angelle; Beichman, Charles; Akeson, Rachel; Ghez, Andrea; Grankin, Konstantin N.; Herbst, William; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Huerta, Marcos; Konopacky, Quinn; Metchev, Stanimir; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Prato, L.; Simon, Michal

    2008-01-01

    We present a review of precursor observing programs for the SIM PlanetQuest Key project devoted to detecting Jupiter mass planets around young stars. In order to ensure that the stars in the sample are free of various sources of astrometric noise that might impede the detection of planets, we have initiated programs to collect photometry, high contrast images, interferometric data and radial velocities for stars in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres. We have completed a high contrast imaging survey of target stars in Taurus and the Pleiades and found no definitive common proper motion companions within one arcsecond (140 AU) of the SIM targets. Our radial velocity surveys have shown that many of the target stars in Sco-Cen are fast rotators and a few stars in Taurus and the Pleiades may have sub-stellar companions. Interferometric data of a few stars in Taurus show no signs of stellar or sub-stellar companions with separations of <5 mas. The photometric survey suggests that approximately half of the stars initially selected for this program are variable to a degree (1(sigma) >0.1 mag) that would degrade the astrometric accuracy achievable for that star. While the precursor programs are still a work in progress, we provide a comprehensive list of all targets ranked according to their viability as a result of the observations taken to date. By far, the observable that removes the most targets from the SIM-YSO program is photometric variability.

  18. Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project: Unraveling Tarantula's Web. I. Observational Overview and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbi, E.; Anderson, J.; Lennon, D. J.; van der Marel, R. P.; Aloisi, A.; Boyer, M. L.; Cignoni, M.; de Marchi, G.; de Mink, S. E.; Evans, C. J.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Gordon, K.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grebel, E. K.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Larsen, S. S.; Panagia, N.; Ryon, J. E.; Smith, L. J.; Tosi, M.; Zaritsky, D.

    2013-09-01

    The Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP) is an ongoing panchromatic imaging survey of stellar populations in the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud that reaches into the sub-solar mass regime (<0.5 M ⊙). HTTP utilizes the capability of the Hubble Space Telescope to operate the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3 in parallel to study this remarkable region in the near-ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared spectral regions, including narrow-band Hα images. The combination of all these bands provides a unique multi-band view. The resulting maps of the stellar content of the Tarantula Nebula within its main body provide the basis for investigations of star formation in an environment resembling the extreme conditions found in starburst galaxies and in the early universe. Access to detailed properties of individual stars allows us to begin to reconstruct the temporal and spatial evolution of the stellar skeleton of the Tarantula Nebula over space and time on a sub-parsec scale. In this first paper we describe the observing strategy, the photometric techniques, and the upcoming data products from this survey and present preliminary results obtained from the analysis of the initial set of near-infrared observations. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  19. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Riverton, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Riverton, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site is the first document for the UMTRA Ground Water Project to address site-specific activities to meet compliance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed ground water standards (52 FR 36000 (1987)). In support of the activities the regulatory framework and drivers are presented along with a discussion of the relationship of this SOWP to other UMTRA Ground Water Project programmatic documents. A combination of the two compliance strategies that will be recommended for this site are no remediation with the application of alternate concentration levels (ACL) and natural flushing in conjunction with institutional controls. ACLs are to be applied to constituents that occur at concentrations above background levels but which are essential nutrients and occur within nutritional ranges and/or have very low toxicity and high dietary intake rates compared to the levels detected in the ground water. The essential premise of natural flushing is that ground water movement and natural attenuation processes will reduce the detected contamination to background levels within 1 00 years. These two recommended compliance strategies were evaluated by applying Riverton site-specific data to the compliance framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement. There are three aquifers beneath the site: a surficial unconfined aquifer, a middle semiconfined aquifer, and a deeper confined aquifer. The milling-related contamination at the site has affected both the surficial and semiconfined aquifers, although the leaky shale aquifers separating these units limits the downward migration of contamination into the semiconfined aquifer. A shale aquitard separates the semiconfined aquifer from the underlying confined aquifer which has not been contaminated by milling-related constituents.

  20. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA project site at Shiprock, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site is the initial document for developing site-specific activities to achieve regulatory compliance in the UMTRA Ground Water Project. The regulatory framework used to select the proposed ground water compliance strategies is presented along with a discussion of the relationship of this SOWP to other UMTRA Ground Water Project programmatic documents. The Shiprock site consists of two, interconnected hydrogeologic systems: the terrace system and the floodplain system. Separate compliance strategies are proposed for these two systems. The compliance strategy for the terrace aquifer is no remediation with the application of supplemental standards based on classification of the terrace aquifer as having Class III (limited-use) ground water. The compliance strategy for the floodplain aquifer is active remediation using a subsurface biological barrier. These strategies were selected by applying site-specific data to the compliance framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) (DOE, 1994a). The site conceptual model indicates that milling-related contamination has impacted the ground water in the terrace and floodplain aquifers. Ground water occurs in both aquifers in alluvium and in fractures in the underlying Cretaceous age Mancos Shale. A mound of ground water related to fluids from the milling operations is thought to exist in the terrace aquifer below the area where settling ponds were in use during the mill operations. Most of the water occurring in the floodplain aquifer is from recharge from the San Juan River.

  1. Battery Electric Vehicle Driving and Charging Behavior Observed Early in The EV Project

    SciTech Connect

    John Smart; Stephen Schey

    2012-04-01

    demonstrations. One such previous study was a PHEV demonstration conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), led by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). AVTA's PHEV demonstration involved over 250 vehicles in the United States, Canada, and Finland. This paper summarizes driving and charging behavior observed in that demonstration, including the distribution of distance driven between charging events, charging frequency, and resulting proportion of operation charge depleting mode. Charging demand relative to time of day and day of the week will also be shown. Conclusions from the PHEV demonstration will be given which highlight the need for expanded analysis in The EV Project. For example, the AVTA PHEV demonstration showed that in the absence of controlled charging by the vehicle owner or electric utility, the majority of vehicles were charged in the evening hours, coincident with typical utility peak demand. Given this baseline, The EV Project will demonstrate the effects of consumer charge control and grid-side charge management on electricity demand. This paper will outline further analyses which will be performed by eTec and INL to documenting driving and charging behavior of vehicles operated in a infrastructure-rich environment.

  2. THE HUNT FOR EXOMOONS WITH KEPLER (HEK). I. DESCRIPTION OF A NEW OBSERVATIONAL PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Kipping, D. M.; Bakos, G. A.; Buchhave, L.; Nesvorny, D.; Schmitt, A.

    2012-05-10

    Two decades ago, empirical evidence concerning the existence and frequency of planets around stars, other than our own, was absent. Since that time, the detection of extrasolar planets from Jupiter-sized to, most recently, Earth-sized worlds has blossomed and we are finally able to shed light on the plurality of Earth-like, habitable planets in the cosmos. Extrasolar moons may also be frequently habitable worlds, but their detection or even systematic pursuit remains lacking in the current literature. Here, we present a description of the first systematic search for extrasolar moons as part of a new observational project called 'The Hunt for Exomoons with Kepler' (HEK). The HEK project distills the entire list of known transiting planet candidates found by Kepler (2326 at the time of writing) down to the most promising candidates for hosting a moon. Selected targets are fitted using a multimodal nested sampling algorithm coupled with a planet-with-moon light curve modeling routine. By comparing the Bayesian evidence of a planet-only model to that of a planet-with-moon, the detection process is handled in a Bayesian framework. In the case of null detections, upper limits derived from posteriors marginalized over the entire prior volume will be provided to inform the frequency of large moons around viable planetary hosts, {eta} leftmoon. After discussing our methodologies for target selection, modeling, fitting, and vetting, we provide two example analyses.

  3. Earth observation products for operational irrigation management: the PLEIADeS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Urso, G.; Vuolo, F.; Richter, K.; Calera Belmonte, A.; Osann, M. A.

    2009-09-01

    In the context of a sustainable agriculture, a controlled and efficient irrigation management is required to avoid negative effects of the increasing water scarcity, especially in arid and semi-arid regions. Within this background, the project 'Participatory multi-Level EO-assisted tools for Irrigation water management and Agricultural Decision-Support' (PLEIADeS: http://www.pleiades.es) addressed the efficient and sustainable use of water for food production in water-scarce environments. Economical, environmental, technical, social and political dimensions are considered by means of a synergy of leading-edge technologies and participatory approaches. Project partners, represented by a set of nine pilot case studies, include a broad range of conditions characteristic for the European, Southern Mediterranean and American regions. PLEIADeS aimed at improving the performance of irrigation schemes by means of a range of measures, made possible through wide space-time coverage of Earth observation (E.O.) data and interactive networking capabilities of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). Algorithms for a number of basic products to estimate Irrigation Water Requirements (IWR) in an operational context are defined. In this study, the pilot zone at the Nurra site in Sardinia, Italy, is chosen to test, validate and apply these methodologies.

  4. Global warming projections derived from an observation-based minimal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rypdal, K.

    2016-01-01

    A simple conceptual model for the global mean surface temperature (GMST) response to CO2 emissions is presented and analysed. It consists of linear long-memory models for the GMST anomaly response ΔT to radiative forcing and the atmospheric CO2-concentration response ΔC to emission rate. The responses are connected by the standard logarithmic relation between CO2 concentration and its radiative forcing. The model depends on two sensitivity parameters, αT and αC, and two "inertia parameters," the memory exponents βT and βC. Based on observation data, and constrained by results from the Climate Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), the likely values and range of these parameters are estimated, and projections of future warming for the parameters in this range are computed for various idealised, but instructive, emission scenarios. It is concluded that delays in the initiation of an effective global emission reduction regime is the single most important factor that influences the magnitude of global warming over the next 2 centuries. The most important aspect of this study is the simplicity and transparency of the conceptual model, which makes it a useful tool for communicating the issue to non-climatologists, students, policy makers, and the general public.

  5. Crop Production for Advanced Life Support Systems - Observations From the Kennedy Space Center Breadboard Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Sager, J. C.; Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Yorio, N. C.; Ruffe, L. M.; Peterson, B. V.; Goins, G. D.

    2003-01-01

    The use of plants for bioregenerative life support for space missions was first studied by the US Air Force in the 1950s and 1960s. Extensive testing was also conducted from the 1960s through the 1980s by Russian researchers located at the Institute of Biophysics in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, and the Institute for Biomedical Problems in Moscow. NASA initiated bioregenerative research in the 1960s (e.g., Hydrogenomonas) but this research did not include testing with plants until about 1980, with the start of the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Program. The NASA CELSS research was carried out at universities, private corporations, and NASA field centers, including Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The project at KSC began in 1985 and was called the CELSS Breadboard Project to indicate the capability for plugging in and testing various life support technologies; this name has since been dropped but bioregenerative testing at KSC has continued to the present under the NASA s Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. A primary objective of the KSC testing was to conduct pre-integration tests with plants (crops) in a large, atmospherically closed test chamber called the Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). Test protocols for the BPC were based on observations and growing procedures developed by university investigators, as well as procedures developed in plant growth chamber studies at KSC. Growth chamber studies to support BPC testing focused on plant responses to different carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, different spectral qualities from various electric lamps, and nutrient film hydroponic culture techniques.

  6. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Spook, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The Spook, Wyoming, site observational work plan proposes site-specific activities to achieve compliance with Subpart B of 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) of the final US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water protection standards 60 FR 2854 (1995) at this Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This draft SOWP presents a comprehensive summary of existing site characterization data, a conceptual site model of the nature and extent of ground water contamination, exposure pathways, and potential impact to human health and the environment. Section 2.0 describes the requirements for meeting ground water standards at UMTRA Project sites. Section 3.0 defines past and current conditions, describes potential environmental and human health risks, and provides site-specific data that supports the selection of a proposed ground water compliance strategy. Section 4.0 provides the justification for selecting the proposed ground water compliance strategy based on the framework defined in the ground water programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS).

  7. Increasing Climate Literacy in Introductory Oceanography Classes Using Ocean Observation Data from Project Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hams, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    This session will present educational activities developed for an introductory Oceanography lecture and laboratory class by NOAA Teacher-at-Sea Jacquelyn Hams following participation in Leg 3 of Project DYNAMO (Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation) in November-December 2011. The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is an important tropical weather phenomenon with origins in the Indian Ocean that impacts many other global climate patterns such as the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Northern Hemisphere monsoons, tropical storm development, and pineapple express events. The educational activities presented include a series of lessons based on the observational data collected during Project DYNAMO which include atmospheric conditions, wind speeds and direction, surface energy flux, and upper ocean turbulence and mixing. The lessons can be incorporated into any introductory Oceanography class discussion on ocean properties such as conductivity, temperature, and density, ocean circulation, and layers of the atmosphere. A variety of hands-on lessons will be presented ranging from short activities used to complement a lecture to complete laboratory exercises.

  8. Global warming projections derived from an observation-based minimal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rypdal, K.

    2015-09-01

    A simple conceptual model for the global mean surface temperature (GMST) response to CO2 emissions is presented and analysed. It consists of linear long-memory models for the GMST anomaly response ΔT to radiative forcing and atmospheric CO2-concentration response ΔC to emission rate. The responses are connected by the standard logarithmic relation between CO2 concentration and its radiative forcing. The model depends on two sensitivity parameters, αT and αC, and two "inertia parameters", the memory exponents βT and βC. Based on observation data, and constrained by results from the Climate Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), the likely values and range of these parameters are estimated, and projections of future warming for the parameters in this range are computed for various idealised, but instructive, emission scenarios. It is concluded that delays in the initiation of an effective global emission reduction regime is the single most important factor that influences the magnitude of global warming over the next two centuries. The main value of this study is the simplicity and transparency of the conceptual model, which makes it a useful tool for communicating the issue to non-climate scientists, students, policy-makers, and the general public.

  9. Observations and exploration of a sequence of design environments: Students designing a series of multimedia projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viner, Mark

    The goal of this research study was to observe and describe changes that occurred in student and teacher skills, conceptual beliefs and actions as students designed a series of multimedia projects for authentic audiences. Furthermore, the research was designed to explore the scaffolding of events and actions of sequence of five design environments. In each environment, an instructor and his students worked toward creating integrated, collaborative curriculum projects. HyperStudio authoring software was used as a construction tool and publishing medium for student artifacts. Results of this study indicate that both teacher and students need to have an active role in the design process. Working as 'student designers' is a collaborative process that is both time-consuming and complex. Overall, both the teacher and his students were receptive to the process of design and felt it provided valuable benefits when compared to the traditional learning process. While this study did not address the issues of content knowledge acquisition or performances on standardized tests, it does provide some practical recommendations for teachers working with students in a design environment.

  10. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA project site at Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This site observational work plan (SOWP) is one of the first Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project documents developed to select a compliance strategy that meets the UMTRA ground water standards for the Grand Junction site. This SOWP applies information about the Grand Junction site to the compliance strategy selection framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water Project draft programmatic environmental impact statement. This risk-based, decision-making framework identifies the decision logic for selecting compliance strategies that could be used to meet the ground water standards. The US Department of Energy (DOE) goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. Based on an evaluation of the site characterization and risk assessment data available for the preparation of this SOWP, DOE proposes that the most likely compliance strategy for the Grand Junction site is no remediation with the application of supplemental standards. This proposed strategy is based on a conceptual site model that indicates site-related contamination is confined to a limited-use aquifer as defined in the ground water standards. The conceptual model demonstrates that the uranium processing-related contamination at the site has affected the unconfined alluvial aquifer, but not the deeper confined aquifer.

  11. JPL's Real-Time Weather Processor project (RWP) metrics and observations at system completion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loesh, Robert E.; Conover, Robert A.; Malhotra, Shan

    1990-01-01

    As an integral part of the overall upgraded National Airspace System (NAS), the objective of the Real-Time Weather Processor (RWP) project is to improve the quality of weather information and the timeliness of its dissemination to system users. To accomplish this, an RWP will be installed in each of the Center Weather Service Units (CWSUs), located in 21 of the 23 Air Route Traffic Control Centers (ARTCCs). The RWP System is a prototype system. It is planned that the software will be GFE and that production hardware will be acquired via industry competitive procurement. The ARTCC is a facility established to provide air traffic control service to aircraft operating on Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) flight plans within controlled airspace, principally during the en route phase of the flight. Covered here are requirement metrics, Software Problem Failure Reports (SPFRs), and Ada portability metrics and observations.

  12. Evaluation of observation-driven evaporation algorithms: results of the WACMOS-ET project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles, Diego G.; Jimenez, Carlos; Ershadi, Ali; McCabe, Matthew F.; Michel, Dominik; Hirschi, Martin; Seneviratne, Sonia I.; Jung, Martin; Wood, Eric F.; (Bob) Su, Z.; Timmermans, Joris; Chen, Xuelong; Fisher, Joshua B.; Mu, Quiaozen; Fernandez, Diego

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial evaporation (ET) links the continental water, energy and carbon cycles. Understanding the magnitude and variability of ET at the global scale is an essential step towards reducing uncertainties in our projections of climatic conditions and water availability for the future. However, the requirement of global observational data of ET can neither be satisfied with our sparse global in-situ networks, nor with the existing satellite sensors (which cannot measure evaporation directly from space). This situation has led to the recent rise of several algorithms dedicated to deriving ET fields from satellite data indirectly, based on the combination of ET-drivers that can be observed from space (e.g. radiation, temperature, phenological variability, water content, etc.). These algorithms can either be based on physics (e.g. Priestley and Taylor or Penman-Monteith approaches) or be purely statistical (e.g., machine learning). However, and despite the efforts from different initiatives like GEWEX LandFlux (Jimenez et al., 2011; Mueller et al., 2013), the uncertainties inherent in the resulting global ET datasets remain largely unexplored, partly due to a lack of inter-product consistency in forcing data. In response to this need, the ESA WACMOS-ET project started in 2012 with the main objectives of (a) developing a Reference Input Data Set to derive and validate ET estimates, and (b) performing a cross-comparison, error characterization and validation exercise of a group of selected ET algorithms driven by this Reference Input Data Set and by in-situ forcing data. The algorithms tested are SEBS (Su et al., 2002), the Penman- Monteith approach from MODIS (Mu et al., 2011), the Priestley and Taylor JPL model (Fisher et al., 2008), the MPI-MTE model (Jung et al., 2010) and GLEAM (Miralles et al., 2011). In this presentation we will show the first results from the ESA WACMOS-ET project. The performance of the different algorithms at multiple spatial and temporal

  13. WFIP2 - The Second Wind Forecast Improvement Project: Observing Systems And Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczak, J. M.; Cline, J.; Banta, R. M.; Benjamin, L.; Benjamin, S.; Berg, L. K.; Bianco, L.; Bickford, J.; Brewer, A.; Choukulkar, A.; Clawson, K.; Clifton, A.; Cook, D. R.; Djalalova, I.; Fernando, H.; Friedrich, K.; Kenyon, J.; Kosovic, B.; King, C. W.; Marquis, M.; McCaa, J. R.; McCaffrey, K.; Olson, J. B.; Pichugina, Y. L.; Sharp, J.; Shaw, W. J.; Wade, K.; Wharton, S.; Lundquist, J. K.; Lantz, K. O.; Long, C. N.

    2015-12-01

    The second Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP2) is a DOE and NOAA funded public-private partnership whose goal is to improve NWP model forecast skill for turbine-height winds in regions with complex terrain. WFIP2 partners include DOE National Laboratories (PNNL, ANL, NREL, LLNL), NOAA Laboratories (ESRL, ARL), Vaisala Inc., NCAR, the University of Notre Dame and University of Colorado, and the Bonneville Power Administration. A core element of WFIP2 is an 18 month field program located in the Pacific Northwest, focusing on the Columbia River Gorge and Basin in eastern Oregon and Washington states, with instrument deployment occurring in the summer and autumn of 2015. The approach taken is to collect an extensive set of new meteorological observations, especially within the atmospheric boundary layer, use these to observe and understand relevant atmospheric processes, develop and test new model physical parameterization schemes, and ultimately transfer these improved models to NOAA/NWS operations and to the wider meteorological community. Observing systems that will be deployed for WFIP2 include: 11 wind profiling radars 17 sodars 5 wind profiling lidars 4 scanning lidars 4 radiometers 10 microbarographs ceilometer 28 sonic anemometers Numerical models that are being used for WFIP2 are WRF-based models including the NOAA RAP (Rapid Refresh) and High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR), as well as the NAM and GFS. Science issues that are being addressed include gap flow, mountain waves, mountain wakes, convective storm outflows, the mix-out of stable cold pools, and boundary layer turbulence profiling. An overview of WFIP2 will be given with an emphasis on the suite of instrumentation deployed and their observational capabilities. Several case studies of interesting meteorological events from the first several months of the field program will be presented, including comparisons with model forecasts.

  14. Dynamics of the middle atmosphere as observed by the ARISE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, E.

    2015-12-01

    It has been strongly demonstrated that variations in the circulation of the middle atmosphere influence weather and climate all the way to the Earth's surface. A key part of this coupling occurs through the propagation and breaking of planetary and gravity waves. However, limited observations prevent to faithfully reproduce the dynamics of the middle atmosphere in numerical weather prediction and climate models. The main challenge of the ARISE (Atmospheric dynamics InfraStructure in Europe) project is to combine existing national and international observation networks including: the International infrasound monitoring system developed for the CTBT (Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty) verification, the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) lidar network, European observation infrastructures at mid latitudes (OHP observatory), tropics (Maïdo observatory), high latitudes (ALOMAR and EISCAT), infrasound stations which form a dense European network and satellites. The ARISE network is unique by its coverage (polar to equatorial regions in the European longitude sector), its altitude range (from troposphere to mesosphere and ionosphere) and the involved scales both in time (from seconds to tens of years) and space (from tens of meters to thousands of kilometers). Advanced data products are produced with the scope to assimilate data in the Weather Prediction models to improve future forecasts over weeks and seasonal time scales. ARISE observations are especially relevant for the monitoring of extreme events such as thunderstorms, volcanoes, meteors and at larger scales, deep convection and stratospheric warming events for physical processes description and study of long term evolution with climate change. Among the applications, ARISE fosters integration of innovative methods for remote detection of non-instrumented volcanoes including distant eruption characterization to provide notifications with reliable confidence indices to the

  15. Realizing NASA's Goal of Societal Benefits From Earth Observations in Mesoamerica Through the SERVIR Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, D. M.; Irwin, D.; Sever, T.; Graves, S.

    2006-12-01

    One of the goals of NASA's Applied Sciences Program is to manifest societal benefits from the vast store of Earth Observations through partnerships with public, private and academic organizations. The SERVIR project represents an early success toward this goal. By combining Earth Observations from NASA missions, results from environmental models and decision support tools from its partners the SERVIR project has produced an integrated systems solution that is yielding societal benefits for the region of Mesoamerica. The architecture of the SERVIR system consists of an operational facility in Panama with regional nodes in Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador and Belize plus a Rapid Prototyping Center (RPC), located in Huntsville, Alabama. The RPC, funded by NASA's Applied Sciences Division, and developed by the Information Technology and Systems Center at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, produces scientifically strong decision support products and applications. When mature, the products and applications migrate to the operational center in Panama. There, they are available to environmental ministers and decision makers in Mesoamerica. In June 2004, the SERVIR project was contacted by the environmental ministry of El Salvador, which urgently requested remote sensing imagery of the location, direction, and extent of a HAB event off the coast of El Salvador and Guatemala. Using MODIS data the SERVIR team developed a value added product that predicts the location, direction, and extent of HABs. The products are produced twice daily and are used by the El Salvadoran and Guatemalan governments to alert their tourism and fishing industries of potential red tide events. This has enabled these countries to save millions of dollars for their industries as well as improve the health of harvested fish. In the area of short term weather forecasting the SERVIR team, in collaboration with the NASA Short

  16. Earth Observation in aid of surge monitoring and forecasting: ESA's eSurge Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwood, Phillip; Cipollini, Paolo; Snaith, Helen; Høyer, Jacob; Dwyer, Ned; Dunne, Declan; Stoffelen, Ad; Donlon, Craig

    2013-04-01

    The understanding and realistic modelling of surges supports both preparation and mitigation activities and should eventually bring enormous societal benefits, especially to some of the world's poorest countries. Earth Observation data from satellites have an important role to play in storm surge monitoring and forecasting, but the full uptake of these data by the users (such as environmental agencies and tidal prediction centres) must be first encouraged by showcasing their usefulness, and then supported by providing easy access. The European Space Agency has recognized the above needs and, through its Data User Element (DUE) programme, has initiated in 2011 the eSurge project, whose aims are: a) to contribute through Earth Observation to an integrated approach to storm surge, wave, sea-level and flood forecasting as part of a wider optimal strategy for building an improved forecast and warning capability for coastal inundation; and b) to increase the use of the advanced capabilities of ESA and other satellite data for storm surge applications. The project is led by Logica UK, with NOC (UK), DMI (Denmark), CMRC (Ireland) and KNMI (Netherlands) as scientific partners. eSurge aims to provide easy access to a wide range of relevant data for a range of historical surge events, as well as performing a series of experiments to demonstrate the value of this data, and running workshops and training courses to help users make use of the available data. The eSurge database of Earth Observation and in situ measurements for past surge events is now publicly available. In 2013 the project moves into its service demonstration phase, adding more data and events, including a demonstration near real time service. The project works closely with its users in order to meet their needs and to maximise the return of this data. A novel dataset provided by eSurge is coastal altimetry. Coastal altimetry has a prominent role to play as it measures directly the total water level envelope

  17. HUBBLE TARANTULA TREASURY PROJECT: UNRAVELING TARANTULA'S WEB. I. OBSERVATIONAL OVERVIEW AND FIRST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbi, E.; Anderson, J.; Van der Marel, R. P.; Aloisi, A.; De Mink, S. E.; Gordon, K.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Panagia, N.; Lennon, D. J.; Boyer, M. L.; Cignoni, M.; De Marchi, G.; Evans, C. J.; Gallagher, J. S. III; Ryon, J. E.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grebel, E. K.; Larsen, S. S.; and others

    2013-09-15

    The Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP) is an ongoing panchromatic imaging survey of stellar populations in the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud that reaches into the sub-solar mass regime (<0.5 M{sub Sun }). HTTP utilizes the capability of the Hubble Space Telescope to operate the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3 in parallel to study this remarkable region in the near-ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared spectral regions, including narrow-band H{alpha} images. The combination of all these bands provides a unique multi-band view. The resulting maps of the stellar content of the Tarantula Nebula within its main body provide the basis for investigations of star formation in an environment resembling the extreme conditions found in starburst galaxies and in the early universe. Access to detailed properties of individual stars allows us to begin to reconstruct the temporal and spatial evolution of the stellar skeleton of the Tarantula Nebula over space and time on a sub-parsec scale. In this first paper we describe the observing strategy, the photometric techniques, and the upcoming data products from this survey and present preliminary results obtained from the analysis of the initial set of near-infrared observations.

  18. Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project: Unraveling Tarantula's Web. I. Observational Overview and First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabbi, E.; Anderson, J.; Lennon, D. J.; van der Marel, R. P.; Aloisi, A.; Boyer, Martha L.; Cignoni, M.; De Marchi, G.; De Mink, S. E.; Evans, C. J.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Gordon, K.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grebel, E. K.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Larsen, S. S.; Panagia, N.; Ryon, J. E.; Smith, L. J.; Tosi, M.; Zaritsky, D.

    2013-01-01

    The Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP) is an ongoing panchromatic imaging survey of stellar populations in the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud that reaches into the sub-solar mass regime (<0.5 Stellar Mass). HTTP utilizes the capability of the Hubble Space Telescope to operate the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3 in parallel to study this remarkable region in the near-ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared spectral regions, including narrow-band H(alpha) images. The combination of all these bands provides a unique multi-band view. The resulting maps of the stellar content of the Tarantula Nebula within its main body provide the basis for investigations of star formation in an environment resembling the extreme conditions found in starburst galaxies and in the early universe. Access to detailed properties of individual stars allows us to begin to reconstruct the temporal and spatial evolution of the stellar skeleton of the Tarantula Nebula over space and time on a sub-parsec scale. In this first paper we describe the observing strategy, the photometric techniques, and the upcoming data products from this survey and present preliminary results obtained from the analysis of the initial set of near-infrared observations.

  19. SETI prototype system for NASA's Sky Survey microwave observing project - A progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, M. J.; Gulkis, S.; Wilck, H. C.

    1990-01-01

    Two complementary search strategies, a Targeted Search and a Sky Survey, are part of NASA's SETI microwave observing project scheduled to begin in October of 1992. The current progress in the development of hardware and software elements of the JPL Sky Survey data processing system are presented. While the Targeted Search stresses sensitivity allowing the detection of either continuous or pulsed signals over the 1-3 GHz frequency range, the Sky Survey gives up sensitivity to survey the 99 percent of the sky that is not covered by the Targeted Search. The Sky Survey spans a larger frequency range from 1-10 GHz. The two searches will deploy special-purpose digital signal processing equipment designed and built to automate the observing and data processing activities. A two-million channel digital wideband spectrum analyzer and a signal processor system will serve as a prototype for the SETI Sky Survey processor. The design will permit future expansion to meet the SETI requirement that the processor concurrently search for left and right circularly polarized signals.

  20. The CONVEX project - Using Observational Evidence and Process Understanding to Improve Predictions of Extreme Rainfall Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Hayley; Kendon, Elizabeth; Blenkinsop, Stephen; Chan, Steven; Ferro, Christopher; Roberts, Nigel; Stephenson, David; Jones, Richard; Sessford, Pat

    2013-04-01

    During the last decade, widespread major flood events in the UK and across the rest of Europe have focussed attention on perceived increases in rainfall intensities. Whilst Regional Climate Models (RCMs) are able to simulate the magnitude and spatial pattern of observed daily extreme rainfall events more reliably than Global Circulation Models (GCMs), they still underestimate extreme rainfall in relation to observations. Particularly during the summer a large proportion of the precipitation comes from convective storms that are typically too small to be explicitly represented by climate models. Instead, convection parameterisation schemes are necessary to represent the larger-scale effect of unresolved convective cells. Given the deficiencies in the simulation of extreme rainfall by climate models, even in the current generation of high-resolution RCMs, the CONVEX project (CONVective EXtremes) argues that an integrated approach is needed that brings together observations, basic understanding and models. This should go hand in hand with a change from a focus on traditional validation exercises (comparing modelled and observed extremes) to an understanding and quantification of the causes of model deficiencies in the simulation of extreme rainfall processes on different spatial and temporal scales. It is particularly true for localised intense summer convection. CONVEX therefore aims to contribute to the goals of enabling society to respond to global climate change and predicting the regional and local impacts of environmental change. In addition to an improved understanding of the spatial-temporal characteristics of extreme rainfall processes (principally in the UK) the project is also assessing the influence of model parameterisations and resolution on the simulation of extreme rainfall events and processes. This includes the running of new RCM simulations undertaken by the UK Meteorological Office at 50km and 12km resolutions (parameterised convection) and

  1. First Year Results from the Circumarctic Lakes Observation Network (CALON) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, K. M.; Arp, C. D.; Frey, K. E.; Lenters, J. D.; Beck, R. A.; Eisner, W. R.; Gaglioti, B.; Grosse, G.; Jones, B. M.; Kim, C.; Liu, H.; Townsend-Small, A.

    2012-12-01

    In April 2012, instruments were deployed in over 50 lakes in northern Alaska as the initial phase of CALON, a project designed to observe short- and long-term variability in physical, limnological and biogeochemical processes in Arctic lakes. The network currently consists of nine observation nodes on two parallel transects extending from the Arctic Ocean south to the Brooks Range Foothills. At each node, at least six representative lakes that vary by surface area and depth were instrumented at different intensity levels: basic, enhanced and comprehensive. At each node we deployed a suite of instrumentation and collected a variety of field measurements. This approach allows for the study of lakes and their diversity across strong physical and biological gradients. To date we have established sites at a wide variety of Arctic lake types; 25 are thermokarst lakes set in ice-rich, fine-grained marine surficial sediments (Outer Coastal Plain), 6 lakes are in alluvial/aeolian sediments (Inner Coastal Plain) and 6 are in ice-rich silt (Arctic Foothills Yedoma), 5 are depressional lakes formed in a late Pleistocene sand sheet (Ikpikpuk Sand Sea), 6 represent glacial thermokarst or kettle lakes near the Brooks Range (Toolik region), 7 lakes are of fluvial or deltaic origin (Fish Creek basin, Ikpikpuk Delta), and Teshekpuk Lake, the largest lake in Arctic Alaska, is of a complex origin. In April, sensors measuring water temperature and water depth were deployed through the ice cover, water samples were collected, and real-time time lapse cameras were installed to capture snow melt and ice-off. Sensors were recovered from lakes and meteorological stations in August, recording lake regimes and events from ice decay and snowmelt influx to open-water warming and water balance. In general, lake ice thickness increased with latitude; in lakes deeper than 2 m, ice was about 1.4 m thick in the Arctic Foothills and 1.7 m thick near the coast of the Arctic Ocean with inter

  2. HR Diagrams of Open Clusters: A Virtual Observational Exercise from Project CLEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Glenn; Marschall, L. A.; Cooper, P. R.

    2007-12-01

    Project CLEA announces a new laboratory exercise on the analysis of HR Diagrams of Open Clusters. The new software allows students to examine plots of V vs B-V for any of 14 open clusters for which high quality data has been published in the literature. (E.g., NGC 752, Alpha Persei, M45, and M67) The clusters range in distance from about 50 to 2000 pc, and in age from 2 x 106 to 4.5 x 109 years. Students can overlay theoretical isochrones and ZAMS lines to these plots using sliders on an interactive tool to determine the distance, age, and even the metallicity of the cluster. Files of magnitudes and colors can be loaded directly into the plotting program, or students can carry out their own photometry using a simulated optical telescope and photometer or a simulated CCD camera that produces FITS files. A student manual provides information on the software and alternative exercises for in-class use and independent study. This exercise is the first that utilizes CLEA's new Virtual Educational Observatory, VIREO. VIREO is a simulated multi-wavelength observatory including optical, radio, infrared, and x-ray instrumentation very large-all-sky database, and access to catalog resources on the Web. The VIREO software provides an environment under which a wide variety of astronomical exercises can be carried out, from observations of asteroids, to searches for high-redshift quasars using a multi-slit spectrograph. The website of Project CLEA is http://public.gettysburg.edu/~marschal/clea/CLEAhome.html This research was sponsored by the National Science Foundation and Gettysburg College.

  3. HR Diagrams of Open Clusters: A Virtual Observational Exercise from Project CLEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Glenn; Marschall, L. A.; Cooper, P. R.

    2007-05-01

    Project CLEA announces a new laboratory exercise on the analysis of HR Diagrams of Open Clusters. The new software allows students to examine plots of V vs B-V for any of 14 open clusters for which high quality data has been published in the literature. (E.g., NGC 752, Alpha Persei, M45, and M67) The clusters range in distance from about 50 to 2000 pc, and in age from 2 x 106 to 4.5 x 109 years. Students can overlay theoretical isochrones and ZAMS lines to these plots using sliders on an interactive tool to determine the distance, age, and even the metallicity of the cluster. Files of magnitudes and colors can be loaded directly into the plotting program, or students can carry out their own photometry using a simulated optical telescope and photometer or a simulated CCD camera that produces FITS files. A student manual provides information on the software and alternative exercises for in-class use and independent study. This exercise is the first that utilizes CLEA’s new Virtual Educational Observatory, VIREO. VIREO is a simulated multi-wavelength observatory including optical, radio, infrared, and x-ray instrumentation very large-all-sky database, and access to catalog resources on the Web. The VIREO software provides an environment under which a wide variety of astronomical exercises can be carried out, from observations of asteroids, to searches for high-redshift quasars using a multi-slit spectrograph. The website of Project CLEA is http://www.gettysburg.edu/ marschal/clea/CLEAhome.html This research was sponsored by the National Science Foundation and Gettysburg College.

  4. Ground Deformation Measurement with SAR Interferometry - Exupéry Project WP2 Space Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Xiaoying; Eineder, Michael; Minet, Christian

    2010-05-01

    As one of major natural hazards volcanic unrest and volcanic eruption are gaining more attention nowadays. The Exupéry project aimed at setting-up an Early Response System (VFRS) for volcanic activity was funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. Within Work Package 2 'Space Based Observations' SAR interferometry is used for monitoring the ground deformation. In comparison with conventional monitoring techniques like GPS the surface changes can be directly detected by using 2 SAR images from different acquisition times and an external DEM. Persistent scatterer SAR interferometry (PSI) method is applied by using a stack of interferograms with common master image. Instead of whole SAR scene only the coherent scatterers during whole acquisition duration are selected and its phase measurements are used to estimate modelled parameters such as deformation velocity, DEM error and atmospheric distortions. In mountainous area backscatterers are decorrelated during the time because of vegetation. To ensure the coherence corner reflector (CR) is used to get stable backscattering. To test the whole system a campaign was carried out during April to August 2009. Two CRs were installed for TerraSAR-X satellite on the test site Lagoa do Fogo volcano. During the campaign 11 strip-map scenes were gathered consequently. Post-processed interferograms as well as the coherence maps were delivered to database center in Hannover and would be published in project website. Time series analysis with coherent scatterers from the stacking was applied in order to detect complex deformation from mountainous area. The CRs were successfully detected in SAR image and will be used as reference points in PSI processing. At the end the interferograms computed from different wavelengths will be compared in this area.

  5. COCONet (Continuously Operating Caribbean GPS Observational Network): Network Status and Project Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feaux, K.; Braun, J. J.; Calais, E.; Dausz, K.; Friesen, B. T.; Mattioli, G. S.; Miller, M. M.; Normandeau, J.; Seider, E.; Wang, G.

    2012-12-01

    The beauty and diversity of the Caribbean region result from geological and atmospheric processes that also pose serious threats to the large population within reach of seismic faults, hurricanes tracks, or sea-level change. The capacity to understand, prepare for, adapt to, and in some cases predict these natural hazards requires Earth observations on both large and small scales. The COCONet project was funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) with the aim of developing a large-scale geodetic and atmospheric infrastructure in the Caribbean that will form the backbone for a broad range of geoscience and atmospheric investigations and enable research on process-oriented science questions with direct relevance to geohazards. COCONet will consist of 50 new GPS and meteorological stations throughout the Caribbean region, 15 existing stations refurbished with new receivers, antennas, and meteorological instruments, and will also incorporate data from up to 61 existing operational GPS stations. Additional funding has recently been allocated to install 2 new collocated GPS and tide gauge sites and also add GPS instruments at two existing tide gauge sites in the Caribbean region. COCONet will provide free, high-quality, low-latency, open-format data and data products for researchers, educators, students, and the private sector. Data will be used by US and international scientists to study solid earth processes such as plate kinematics and dynamics as well as plate boundary interactions and deformation, with an emphasis on the earthquake cycle. COCNet will also serve atmospheric science objectives by providing more precise estimates of tropospheric water vapor and enabling better forecast of the dynamics of airborne moisture associated with the yearly Caribbean hurricane cycle. COCONet is being installed and will be maintained by UNAVCO on behalf of the science and other user communities in the United States and abroad, thus leveraging UNAVCO's proven record of

  6. Local short-duration precipitation extremes in Sweden: observations, forecasts and projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Jonas; Berg, Peter; Simonsson, Lennart

    2015-04-01

    Local short-duration precipitation extremes (LSPEs) are a key driver of hydrological hazards, notably in steep catchments with thin soils and in urban environments. The triggered floodings, landslides, etc., have large consequences for society in terms of both economy and health. Accurate estimations of LSPEs on both climatological time-scales (past, present, future) and in real-time is thus of great importance for improved hydrological predictions as well as design of constructions and infrastructure affected by hydrological fluxes. Analysis of LSPEs is, however, associated with various limitations and uncertainties. These are to a large degree associated with the small-scale nature of the meteorological processes behind LSPEs and the associated requirements on observation sensors as well as model descriptions. Some examples of causes for the limitations involved are given in the following. - Observations: High-resolution data sets available for LSPE analyses are often limited to either relatively long series from one or a few stations or relatively short series from larger station networks. Radar data have excellent resolutions in both time and space but the estimated local precipitation intensity is still highly uncertain. New and promising techniques (e.g. microwave links) are still in their infancy. - Weather forecasts (short-range): Although forecasts with the required spatial resolution for potential generation of LSPEs (around 2-4 km) are becoming operationally available, the actual forecast precision of LSPEs is largely unknown. Forecasted LSPEs may be displaced in time or, more critically, in space which strongly affects the possibility to assess hydrological risk. - Climate projections: The spatial resolution of the current RCM generation (around 25 km) is not sufficient for proper description of LSPEs. Statistical post-processing (i.e. downscaling) is required which adds substantial uncertainty to the final result. Ensemble generation of sufficiently

  7. Observed and projected climate change implications for urban infrastructure and society in the Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streletskiy, D. A.; Shiklomanov, N. I.; Efimov, S. V.; Shkolnik, I.

    2012-12-01

    The discoveries of mineral resources followed by an extensive economic development of the Russian North in 1960s led to a development of complex infrastructure on permafrost and urbanization of the Russian Arctic. Despite the mass migration from the northern regions, followed by the collapse of the Soviet Union and the diminishing government support, the Russian Arctic inherited massive infrastructure and remained predominantly urban. Currently, only in five districts bordering Arctic Ocean more than 1.4 million people live in urban-style buildings built on permafrost. Majority of the buildings are constructed assuming the equilibrium conditions of heat-exchange between atmosphere and permafrost underneath. This is usually achieved by construction on piles with ventilated cellars allowing ground cooling in a winter and shading in a summer. The ability of the foundations to carry structural load or foundation bearing capacity (FBC) depends on permafrost properties and changes according to permafrost temperature and active-layer depth. Climate warming observed in recent decades created conditions of diminishing FBC and resulted in deformations and failures of structures built on permafrost. This work is focused on quantitative assessment of these changes at a regional scale. In order to estimate the role of climate change on stability of structures build according to the passive principle, the permafrost-geotechnical model was developed. The historical changes were assessed by comparing model results for period associated with industrialization and construction boom in the Russian North (1965-1975) and present conditions (1995-2005) using NCEP climatic datasets. Projected changes in FBC according to A2 IPCC scenario for the mid-21st century (2041-2060) relative to baseline period (1981-2000) were assessed using output from the ensemble of MGO RCM climate change simulations. It has been found that substantial decrease in FBC will likely occur for the majority of

  8. Microlensing Events from the 11 Year Observations of the Wendelstein Calar Alto Pixellensing Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.-H.; Riffeser, A.; Seitz, S.; Bender, R.; Koppenhoefer, J.

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of the decade-long M31 observation from the Wendelstein Calar Alto Pixellensing Project (WeCAPP). WeCAPP has monitored M31 from 1997 until 2008 in both R- and I-filters, and thus provides the longest baseline of all M31 microlensing surveys. The data are analyzed with difference imaging analysis, which is most suitable for studying variability in crowded stellar fields. We extracted light curves based on each pixel, and devised selection criteria that are optimized to identify microlensing events. This leads to 10 new events, and adds up to a total of 12 microlensing events from WeCAPP, for which we derive their timescales, flux excesses, and colors from their light curves. The colors of the lensed stars fall in the range (R - I) = 0.56 to 1.36, with a median of 1.0 mag, in agreement with our expectation that the sources are most likely bright, red stars at the post-main-sequence stage. The event FWHM timescales range from 0.5 to 14 days, with a median of 3 days, in good agreement with predictions based on the model of Riffeser et al.

  9. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Monument Valley, Arizona, US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is one of the first site-specific documents developed to achieve ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies information about the Monument Valley site to a regulatory compliance framework that identifies strategies that could be used to meet ground water compliance. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (DOE, 1995). The DOE`s goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. The compliance strategy that emerges in the final version of the SOWP will assess potential environmental impacts and provide stakeholder a forum for review and comment. When the compliance strategy is acceptable, it will be detailed in a remedial action plan that will be subject to review by the state and/or tribe and concurrence by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Information available for the preparation of this SOWP indicates active remediation is the most likely compliance strategy for the Monument Valley site. Additional data are needed to determine the most effective remediation technology.

  10. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Monument Valley, Arizona, US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action(UMTRA) Project site is one of the first site-specific documents developed to achieve ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies information about the Monument Valley site to a regulatory compliance framework that identifies strategies that could be used to meet ground water compliance. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (DOE, 1996). The DOE`s goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. The compliance strategy that emerges in the final version of the SOWP will be evaluated in the site-specific environmental assessment to determine potential environmental impacts and provide stakeholders a forum for review and comment. When the compliance strategy is acceptable, it will be detailed in a remedial action plan that will be subject to review by the state and/or tribe and concurrence by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Information for the preparation of this SOWP indicates active remediation is the most likely compliance strategy for the Monument Valley site. Additional data are needed to determine the most effective remediation technology.

  11. The Moon's Permanently Shadowed Regions as Observed by LRO's Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, R.; Retherford, K. D.; Stern, S. A.; Egan, A.; Miles, P. F.; Versteeg, M.; Slater, D.; Davis, M. W.; Parker, J.; Kaufmann, D.; Greathouse, T. K.; Steffl, A. J.; Mukherjee, J.; Horvath, D.; Rojas, P.; Feldman, P. D.; Hurley, D. M.; Pryor, W. R.; Hendrix, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    Although of great interest for science and resource utilization, the Moon's permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) near each pole present difficult targets for remote sensing. The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission is able to map PSRs at far-ultraviolet (FUV) wavelengths using two faint sources of illumination from the night sky: the all-sky Lyα glow produced as interplanetary medium (IPM) H atoms scatter the Sun's Lyα emissions, and the much fainter source from UV-bright stars. Since the reflected light from these two sources produces only a few hundred events per second in the photon-counting LAMP instrument, building maps with useful signal-to-noise (SNR) ratios requires the careful accumulation of the observations from thousands of individual LRO orbits. In this talk we present the latest FUV albedo maps obtained by LAMP of the Moon's southern and northern polar regions. The results show that 1) most PSR regions are darker at all FUV wavelengths, consistent with their surface soils having much larger porosities than non-PSR regions (e.g., P~0.9 or so), and 2) most PSRs are somewhat "redder" (i.e., more reflective at the longer FUV wavelengths) than non-PSR regions, consistent with the presence of ~1-2% water frost at the surface.

  12. European Space Agency Campaign Activities in Support of Earth Observation Projects: Examples for Snow and Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüttemeyer, D.; Davidson, M.; Casal, T.; Perrera, A.; Bianchi, R.; Kern, M.; Scipal, K.

    2012-04-01

    In the framework of its Earth Observation Programmes the European Space Agency (ESA) carries out groundbased and airborne campaigns to support geophysical algorithm development, calibration/validation, simulation of future spaceborne earth observation missions, and applications development related to land, oceans and atmosphere. Campaigns in support of future mission development have technological, geophysical and simulation objectives while exploitation projects need validation for the assessment of the quality of the earth observation products and of the service provision. ESA has been conducting airborne and ground measurements campaigns since 1981 by deploying a broad range of active and passive instrumentation in both the optical and microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum such as lidars, limb/nadir sounding interferometers/spectrometers, high-resolution spectral imagers, advanced synthetic aperture radars, altimeters and radiometers. These campaigns take place inside and outside Europe in collaboration with national research organisations in the ESA member states as well as with international organisations harmonising European campaign activities. For the different activities a rich variety of datasets has been recorded, are archived and users can access campaign data through the EOPI web portal [http://eopi.esa.int]. In 2005, ESA released a call for the next Earth Explorer Core Mission Ideas with the aim to select a 7th Earth Explorer (EE7) mission to be launched in the next decade. Twenty-four proposals were received and subject to detailed scientific and technical assessment. During the so-called Phase 0, six concepts were selected and further investigated. A down-selection was made after the User Consultation Meeting held in Lisbon, Portugal in January 2009. Three candidate mission concepts were selected for further feasibility phase (phase A) investigation. Each of the candidate missions are being elaborated through two parallel industrial

  13. Satellite Cloud Data Validation through MAGIC Ground Observation and the S'COOL Project: Scientific Benefits grounded in Citizen Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crecelius, S.; Chambers, L. H.; Lewis, P. M.; Rogerson, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Students' Cloud Observation On-Line (S'COOL) Project was launched in 1997 as the Formal Education and Public Outreach arm of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Mission. ROVER, the Citizen Scientist area of S'COOL, started in 2007 and allows participants to make 'roving' observations from any location as opposed to a fixed, registered classroom. The S'COOL Project aids the CERES Mission in trying to answer the research question: 'What is the Effect of Clouds on the Earth's Climate'. Participants from all 50 states, most U.S. Territories, and 63 countries have reported more than 100,500 observations to the S'COOL Project over the past 16 years. The Project is supported by an intuitive website that provides curriculum support and guidance through the observation steps; 1) Request satellite overpass schedule, 2) Observe clouds, and 3) Report cloud observations. The S'COOL Website also hosts a robust database housing all participants' observations as well as the matching satellite data. While the S'COOL observation parameters are based on the data collected by 5 satellite missions, ground observations provide a unique perspective to data validation. Specifically, low to mid level clouds can be obscured by overcast high-level clouds, or difficult to observe from a satellite's perspective due to surface cover or albedo. In these cases, ground observations play an important role in filling the data gaps and providing a better, global picture of our atmosphere and clouds. S'COOL participants, operating within the boundary layer, have an advantage when observing low-level clouds that affect the area we live in, regional weather patterns, and climate change. S'COOL's long-term data set provides a valuable resource to the scientific community in improving the "poorly characterized and poorly represented [clouds] in climate and weather prediction models'. The MAGIC Team contacted S'COOL in early 2012 about making cloud observations as part of the MAGIC

  14. Everyday Observations: Developing a Sociological Perspective through a Portfolio Term Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David R.; Renzulli, Linda; Bunch, Jackson; Paino, Maria

    2013-01-01

    We describe a semester-long active learning project in which students practice the skills of synthesis and analysis by developing portfolios organized around a topic of their own choosing (relevant to their substantive course). We build on prior contributions in four ways. First, we offer a project that is indicative of basic skills in the…

  15. Validation Engine for Observational Protocols. Measures of Effective Teaching (MET) Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In the fall of 2009, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation launched the two-year Measures of Effective Teaching (MET) project to rigorously develop and test multiple measures of teacher effectiveness. As part of the project, partners from more than a dozen reputable academic, non-profit and for-profit organizations collected and analyzed data from…

  16. Second-Year Results from the Circumarctic Lakes Observation Network (CALON) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, K. M.; Arp, C. D.; Beck, R. A.; Eisner, W. R.; Frey, K. E.; Gaglioti, B.; Grosse, G.; Jones, B. M.; Kim, C.; Lenters, J. D.; Liu, H.; Townsend-Small, A.

    2013-12-01

    Beginning in April 2012, over 55 lakes in northern Alaska were instrumented as the initial phase of CALON, a project designed to document landscape-scale variability in physical and biogeochemical processes of Arctic lakes developed atop permafrost. The current network has nine observation nodes along two latitudinal transects that extend from the Arctic Ocean south 200 km to the foothills of the Brooks Range. At each node, six representative lakes of differing area and depth were instrumented at different intensity levels, and a suite of instruments were deployed to collect field measurements on lake physiochemistry, lake-surface and terrestrial climatology, and lake bed and permafrost temperature. Each April, sensors measuring water temperature and water depth are deployed through the ice and water samples are collected. Sensors are downloaded from lakes and meteorological stations in August, recording a timeline of lake regimes and events from ice decay to the summertime energy and water balance. In general, lake ice thickness increased with latitude. In 2012, ice on deeper (>2 m) lakes was about 1.4 m thick in the Arctic Foothills and 1.7 m thick near the Arctic Ocean coast. Lake ice thickness was about 20 cm thicker in winter 2013 although winter temperatures were several degrees warmer than the previous year; this is likely due to a thinner snow cover in 2013. Lake ice elevations agree with this general trend, showing higher absolute elevation in April 2013 compared to 2012 for most of the surveyed lakes. Regionally, ice-off occurs 2-4 weeks later on lakes near the coast, although there is significant inter-lake variability related to lake depth. Following ice-off, rapid lake warming occurs and water temperature varies synchronously in response to synoptic weather variations and associated changes in net radiation and turbulent heat fluxes. Average mid-summer (July) lake temperatures spanned a relatively wide range in 2012 from 7°C to 18°C, with higher

  17. Third-Year Results from the Circumarctic Lakes Observation Network (CALON) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, K. M.; Arp, C. D.; Beck, R. A.; Eisner, W. R.; Frey, K. E.; Grosse, G.; Jones, B. M.; Kim, C.; Lenters, J. D.; Liu, H.; Townsend-Small, A.

    2014-12-01

    Since 2012, 60 lakes in northern Alaska have been instrumented under the auspices of CALON, a project designed to document landscape-scale variability in physical and biogeochemical processes of Arctic lakes in permafrost terrain. The network has ten observation nodes along two latitudinal transects extending from the Arctic Ocean inland some 200 km to the Brooks Range foothills. At each node, a meteorological station is deployed, and six representative lakes of differing area and depth are instrumented and sampled at different intensity levels to collect basic field measurements. In April, sensors measuring water temperature and depth are deployed through the ice in each lake, ice and snow thickness recorded, and water samples are collected. Data are downloaded, lakes re-sampled, and bathymetric surveys are conducted in August. In 2014, the snow cover on inland lakes was thinner than in previous years but thicker on lakes located near the coast. Lake ice was generally thinner near the coast, but the difference diminished inland. Winters (Oct-March) have been progressively warmer over the 3-year period, which partially explains the thinner lake ice that formed in 2013-14. Lakes are typically well-mixed and largely isothermal, with minor thermal stratification occurring in deeper lakes during calm, sunny periods. These regional lake and meteorological data sets, used in conjunction with satellite imagery, supports the wind-driven lake circulation model for the origin of thermokarst lakes. Results of biogeochemical analyses of lake waters generally show notably higher concentrations of cations/anions, chromophoric dissolved organic matter, and chlorophyll-a during April as compared with August. Dissolved methane concentrations are also much higher under ice than in open water during summer, although all lakes are a source of atmospheric methane. Interviews with indigenous elders in Anaktuvuk Pass indicate that mountain lakes are drying up. During the 2014 breakup

  18. Ten Tips for Talking to Townies: Observations on Risk Communication from the Multihazards Demonstration Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, K. A.; Jones, L. M.

    2010-12-01

    The USGS’s Multihazards Demonstration Project (MHDP) seeks to demonstrate how hazard science can improve a community’s resiliency to natural hazards. To do so, it must accurately but clearly communicate scientific concepts and findings to a wide variety of nonscientist stakeholders, many of whom are technical experts in their field primarily interested in the implications of MHDP’s science for them, and relatively uninterested in the science per se. During the development and rollout of the MHDP scenarios we found several strategies of risk communication helpful. Use availability. Relate new ideas to events the audience personally observed. Avoid sensationalism, since even the appearance of an appeal to emotion seemed to undermine the credibility of the message among certain constituencies. Avoid probability. However tempted we are as scientists to emphasize the unknown, stakeholders preferred a single coherent story. We can accompany the coherent story with an acknowledgment of uncertainty and limited knowledge. Engage stakeholders in the science as early as possible. They can help ground, direct, and vet the science as it emerges, and help us avoid “spherical-cow” simplifications. Get to the point. Soundbites, despite negative connotations, promote conciseness. Emphasize consensus. While scientists are primarily interested in the boundaries of knowledge, the public is more interested in what is known, and acts more readily where there is no ambiguity. Confront misinformation. Science sometimes competes with pseudoscience for public mindspace. Where the goal is enhancing community resiliency, the competition becomes a battle. Temper talk with activities. We learn by doing, and some of us have no patience for lectures. Use engaging imagery. We found that modern media such as Youtube videos with high production quality and geospatial imagery that the public sees as cutting edge, captured people’s attention, even senior professionals and academics who

  19. Observational Study in Ten Beauty Salons: Results Informing Development of the North Carolina BEAUTY and Health Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Felicia M.; Linnan, Laura A.; Wasilewski, Yvonne; Lee, Ann Marie; Katz, Mira L.; Yang, Jingzhen

    2004-01-01

    Researchers from the North Carolina BEAUTY and Health Project conducted an observational study in 10 North Carolina beauty salons to gain insight into naturally occurring conversations between cosmetologists and customers, and to assess features of the salon environment that might be used to inform the development of salon-based health promotion…

  20. NEETs versus EETs: An Observational Study in Italy on the Framework of the HEALTH25 European Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardi, Bernardo; Lucarelli, Chiara; Talamonti, Marta; Arimatea, Emidio; Fiori, Valentina; Moltedo-Perfetti, Andrès

    2015-01-01

    An observational study of young Italian NEETs (not in education, employment or training) and their EET peers (in education, employment or training) was conducted in the framework of a European Union (EU) project. Main characteristics and behaviours were compared to gain insights into the NEET condition in Italy. The sample included 111 NEETs…

  1. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Observed Atmospheric and Solar Information System (OASIS); Tucson, Arizona (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-11-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  2. From Funding Projects to Supporting Sectors? Observation on the Aid Relationship in Burkina Faso

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samoff, Joel

    2004-01-01

    Burkina Faso is among the largest recipients of development aid in West Africa. The new aid terminology emphasizes partnership and a sectoral approach. Yet, recent research suggests more continuity than change in the aid relationship. Projects persist. Funding and technical assistance agencies cooperate more but adhere to their interests,…

  3. Towards the creation of a European Network of Earth Observation Networks within GEO. The ConnectinGEO project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masó, Joan; Serral, Ivette; Menard, Lionel; Wald, Lucien; Nativi, Stefano; Plag, Hans-Peter; Jules-Plag, Shelley; Nüst, Daniel; Jirka, Simon; Pearlman, Jay; De Maziere, Martine

    2015-04-01

    ConnectinGEO (Coordinating an Observation Network of Networks EnCompassing saTellite and IN-situ to fill the Gaps in European Observations" is a new H2020 Coordination and Support Action with the primary goal of linking existing Earth Observation networks with science and technology (S&T) communities, the industry sector, the Group on Earth Observations (GEO), and Copernicus. ConnectinGEO aims to facilitate a broader and more accessible knowledge base to support the needs of GEO, its Societal Benefit Areas (SBAs) and the users of the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS). A broad range of subjects from climate, natural resources and raw materials, to the emerging UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will be addressed. The project will generate a prioritized list of critical gaps within available observation data and models to translate observations into practice-relevant knowledge, based on stakeholder consultation and systematic analysis. Ultimately, it will increase coherency of European observation networks, increase the use of Earth observations for assessments and forecasts and inform the planning for future observation systems. ConnectinGEO will initiate a European Network of Earth Observation Networks (ENEON) that will encompass space-based, airborne and in-situ observations networks. ENEON will be composed by project partners representing thematic observation networks along with the GEOSS Science and Technology Stakeholder Network, GEO Communities of Practices, Copernicus services, Sentinel missions and in-situ support data representatives, representatives of the space-based, airborne and in-situ observations European networks (e.g. EPOS, EMSO and GROOM, etc), representatives of the industry sector and European and national funding agencies, in particular those participating in the future ERA-PlaNET. At the beginning, the ENEON will be created and managed by the project. Then the management will be transferred to the network itself to ensure

  4. Skylab-4 visual observations project: Geological features of southwestern North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, L. T.

    1975-01-01

    Visual observations conducted by Skylab-4 crewmen on seven designated geological target areas and other targets of opportunity in parts of southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico were described. The experiments were designed to learn how effectively geologic features could be observed from orbit and what research information could be obtained from the observations when supported by ground studies. For the limited preparation they received, the crewmen demonstrated exceptional observational ability and produced outstanding photographic studies. They also formulated cogent opinions on how to improve future observational and photo-documentation techniques. From the photographs and other observations, it was possible to obtain significant research contributions to on-going field investigations. These contributions were integrated into other aspects of the ground investigations to the following topics: major faults, regional stratigraphy, occurrence of Precambrian crystalline rocks, mapping of Mesozoic volcanic rocks, regional geology.

  5. Improving Wind Energy Forecasts through Assimilation of New Meteorological Observations: Results from the Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, L.; Wilczak, J. M.; Djalalova, I. V.; Olson, J. B.; Benjamin, S.; Finley, C. A.; Freedman, J. M.; DiMego, G.; Carley, J. R.; Orwig, K.; Cline, J.; Marquis, M.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a joint research project with NOAA and private industry to improve wind energy forecasts, called the Wind Forecast Improvement Project. The key elements of this program have been 1) a one-year deployment of extensive meteorological observing systems in two regions with significant wind energy production, from August 2011-September 2012; 2) assimilation of these observations into the hourly-updated NOAA Rapid Refresh (RAP), run nationwide each hour at 13 km resolution; and 3) evaluation of the benefits of these improved wind forecasts on electrical utility operations, especially for ramp-events in the 0-6 h forecast time-frame. The special observation data sets assimilated are concentrated over the two selected regions of the U.S. and include: 12 wind profiling radars, 12 sodars, 185 instrumented tall towers (40-200m tall), and 400 nacelle anemometers. In this presentation we will describe results from data denial experiments that have been run for limited periods within the WFIP project. The goal of the data denial experiments is to quantitatively document the precise impact that assimilation of the special WFIP data had on model accuracy, by comparing simulations from identical models run with and without the new data. Standard statistical measures show a significant improvement from the assimilation of the new data, and metrics for wind ramp events (including magnitude and phase of the ramps) show an even larger impact of the observations.

  6. Nature's Notebook Provides Phenology Observations for NASA Juniper Phenology and Pollen Transport Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luval, J. C.; Crimmins, T. M.; Sprigg, W. A.; Levetin, E.; Huete, A.; Nickovic, S.; Prasad, A.; Vukovic, A.; VandeWater, P. K.; Budge, A. M.; Hudspeth, W.; Bunderson, L.

    2014-01-01

    Phenology Network has been established to provide national wide observations of vegetation phenology. However, as the Network is still in the early phases of establishment and growth, the density of observers is not yet adequate to sufficiently document the phenology variability over large regions. Hence a combination of satellite data and ground observations can provide optimal information regarding juniperus spp. pollen phenology. MODIS data was to observe Juniperus supp. pollen phenology. The MODIS surface reflectance product provided information on the Juniper supp. cone formation and cone density. Ground based observational records of pollen release timing and quantities were used as verification. Approximately 10, 818 records of juniper phenology for male cone formation Juniperus ashei., J. monosperma, J. scopulorum, and J. pinchotti were reported by Nature's Notebook observers in 2013 These observations provided valuable information for the analysis of satellite images for developing the pollen concentration masks for input into the PREAM (Pollen REgional Atmospheric Model) pollen transport model. The combination of satellite data and ground observations allowed us to improve our confidence in predicting pollen release and spread, thereby improving asthma and allergy alerts.

  7. SAFE Project: An integrated system of earthquake physics study from ground and space observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Santis, Angelo; De Franceschi, Giorgiana; Di Giovambattista, Rita; Perrone, Loredana; Alfonsi, Lucilla; Cianchini, Gianfranco; Pavón-Carrasco, Javier F.; Cesaroni, Claudio; Spogli, Luca; Piscini, Alessandro; De Santis, Anna; D'Angelo, Giulia; Musicò, Elvira; Malagnini, Andrea; Amoruso, Leonardo; Carbone, Marianna; Abbattista, Cristoforo; Drimaco, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    The Swarm satellite mission by ESA has the primary goal to measure the magnetic signals from the Earth to get new insights of the geomagnetic field and its sources. The SAFE ("Swarm for Earthquake study") project (funded by ESA in the framework "STSE Swarm+lnnovation", 2014) aims at applying the new approach of geosystemics to the analysis of Swarm satellite electromagnetic data for investigating the preparatory phase of earthquakes. The main objective of this project is to explore the possible link between magnetic ionospheric anomalies and large earthquakes analysing Swarm as well as ground based data (seismic, magnetic, GNSS, etc.). This work will show the state of the art in the study of lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling (LAIC) together with some recent case studies.

  8. Motivating and Constructing Understanding through Observation and Data Analysis: The S`COOL and MY NASA DATA Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, L. H.; Rogerson, T. M.; Diones, D. D.; Moore, S. W.; Oots, P. C.; Phelps, C. S.

    2008-05-01

    Inquiry is widely recognized as an effective method for science teaching. Exploration of the local environment lends itself well to this method. However, to foster understanding about the broader global scale of the Earth system, another approach is needed. Here we present two projects that seek to provide motivation and resources for helping K-12 students construct their own understanding of our Earth system. The S`COOL Project, begun in 1997, seeks to motivate students across the entire K-12 spectrum (with a particular focus on upper elementary grades) to learn relevant science basics and how these basics tie in to a larger picture. The project uses a connection to an on-going NASA science investigation, the Clouds and the Earth`s Radiant Energy System (CERES) project, as a powerful motivator. Student cloud observations coordinated with the passage of orbiting satellite instruments provide useful validation information for the CERES science team. The students receive timely feedback, with a simple and direct link to the corresponding piece of satellite data. Finally, students are encouraged to perform data analysis through an on-line database and the provision of simple tools that allow students to look at not only their own familiar observations, but also those from other participants around the world. The project is placed in the context of our efforts to understand the Earth's energy balance, which controls our climate. The MY NASA DATA project, begun in 2004, provides K-12 students (with a particular focus on middle and high school) with direct on-line access to Earth system science data for global inquiry. The project collects over 140 Earth system science parameters from NASA and other government resources through a single, relatively simple, web-based visualization interface. In addition to offering a large number of contributed lesson plans and science projects on specific topics, this website enables students to explore their own inquiry questions to

  9. Greenhouse gas observations from space: The GHG-CCI project of ESA's Climate Change Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwitz, Michael; Noël, Stefan; Bergamaschi, Peter; Boesch, Hartmut; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Notholt, Justus; Schneising, Oliver; Hasekamp, Otto; Reuter, Maximilian; Parker, Robert; Dils, Bart; Chevallier, Frederic; Zehner, Claus; Burrows, John

    2012-07-01

    The GHG-CCI project (http://www.esa-ghg-cci.org) is one of several projects of ESA's Climate Change Initiative (CCI), which will deliver various Essential Climate Variables (ECVs). The goal of GHG-CCI is to deliver global satellite-derived data sets of the two most important anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs) carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) suitable to obtain information on regional CO2 and CH4 surface sources and sinks as needed for better climate prediction. The GHG-CCI core ECV data products are column-averaged mole fractions of CO2 and CH4, XCO2 and XCH4, retrieved from SCIAMACHY on ENVISAT and TANSO on GOSAT. Other satellite instruments will be used to provide constraints in upper layers such as IASI, MIPAS, and ACE-FTS. Which of the advanced algorithms, which are under development, will be the best for a given data product still needs to be determined. For each of the 4 GHG-CCI core data products - XCO2 and XCH4 from SCIAMACHY and GOSAT - several algorithms are being further developed and the corresponding data products are inter-compared to identify which data product is the most appropriate. This includes comparisons with corresponding data products generated elsewhere, most notably with the operational data products of GOSAT generated at NIES and the NASA/ACOS GOSAT XCO2 product. This activity, the so-called "Round Robin exercise", will be performed in the first two years of this project. At the end of the 2 year Round Robin phase (end of August 2012) a decision will be made which of the algorithms performs best. The selected algorithms will be used to generate the first version of the ECV GHG. In the last six months of this 3 year project the resulting data products will be validated and made available to all interested users. In the presentation and overview about this project will be given focussing on the latest results.

  10. False-color images from observations by the Supernova Cosmology Project of one of the two most dista

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    TFalse-color images from observations by the Supernova Cosmology Project of one of the two most distant spectroscopically confirmed supernova. From the left: the first two images, from the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory 4-meter telescope, show a small region of sky just before and just after the the appearance of a type-Ia supernova that exploded when the universe was about half its present age. The third image shows the same supernova as observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. This much sharper picture allows a much better measurement of the apparent brightness and hence the distance of this supernova. Because their intrinsic brightness is predictable, such supernovae help to determine the deceleration, and so the eventual fate, of the universe. Credit: Perlmutter et al., The Supernova Cosmology Project

  11. Demonstration of random projections applied to the retrieval problem of geophysical parameters from hyper-spectral infrared observations.

    PubMed

    Serio, Carmine; Masiello, Guido; Liuzzi, Giuliano

    2016-08-20

    The random projections statistical technique has been used to reduce the dimensionality of the radiance data space generated from high spectral resolution infrared observations. The mathematical inversion of the physical radiative transfer equation for geophysical parameters has been solved in this space of reduced dimensionality. The great advantage of using random projections is that they provide an unified treatment of instrument noise and forward model error, which can be comprehensively modeled with a single variance term. The result is a novel retrieval approach, which combines computational efficiency to possibly improved accuracy of the retrieval products. The novel approach has been demonstrated through application to the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer. We have found that state-of-the-art spectroscopy and related line-mixing treatment for the ν2CO2 absorption band, i.e., the fundamental band for temperature retrieval, show an excellent consistency with satellite observations. PMID:27556974

  12. Coastal Change Processes Project data report for observations near Fire Island, New York, January to April 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, Brandy N.; Warner, John C.; List, Jeffrey H.; Martini, Marinna A.; Montgomery, Ellyn T.; Voulgaris, George; Traykovski, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    An oceanographic field study during January through April 2012 investigated processes that control the sediment-transport dynamics near Fire Island, New York. This report describes the project background, field program, instrumentation configuration, and locations of the sensors deploymed. The data collected and supporting meteorological observations are presented as time series plots for data visualization. Additionally, individual, links to the database containing digital data files are available as part of this report.

  13. Coastal Change Processes Project data report for oceanographic observations near Fire Island, New York, February through May 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, Brandy N.; Warner, John C.; List, Jeffrey H.; Martini, Marinna A.; Montgomery, Ellyn T.; Traykovski, Peter A.; Voulgaris, George

    2015-01-01

    An oceanographic field study during February through May 2014 investigated processes that control the sediment-transport dynamics along the western part of Fire Island, New York. This report describes the project background, field program, instrumentation configuration, and locations of the sensors deployed. The data collected, including meteorological observations, are presented as time-series plots for data visualization. Additionally, individual links to the database containing digital data files are available as part of this report.

  14. Light Pollution in Lowndes County, Georgia: An Observational Project for Introductory Astronomy Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumstay, K. S.; VSU Astronomy Students Team

    2000-12-01

    A long-term study of light pollution in Lowndes County, Georgia has been initiated as a collaborative project among students enrolled in introductory astronomy courses at Valdosta State University. A single honors student began the project in Spring 2000; during the Fall 2000 semester all students enrolled in ASTR 1020K (Stellar and Galactic Astronomy) were invited to participate on a voluntary basis. Students were provided with charts showing the appearance of the constellations Cygnus, Pegasus, Cassiopeia, and Orion (as appropriate) at limiting magnitudes ranging from 2.5 to 6.0 in 0.5-magnitude steps. On clear, moonless nights students compared the visual appearance of these constellations to the charts, allowing them to determine a limiting magnitude for their location. Preliminary results suggest that, even on the clearest nights, stars fainter than magnitude 5.0 are not visible from any location within Lowndes County. This limitation results largely from ambient light from Valdosta, the only urban area within the county, and also from atmospheric extinction in a region of high humidity. By participating in this exercise, students in a class traditionally populated by non-science majors gain an appreciation for the collaborative nature of modern science. They also become familiar more familiar with the night sky than they might were their exposure limited to the traditional two-hour weekly laboratory session. Most importantly, as young adults they experience first-hand the deleterious effects of light intrusion upon their enjoyment of the night sky!

  15. System study of the carbon dioxide observational platform system (CO-OPS): Project overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. Briscoe; Thompson, Wilbur E.

    1987-01-01

    The resulting options from a system study for a near-space, geo-stationary, observational monitoring platform system for use in the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Carbon Dioxide Observational Platform System (CO-OPS) on the greenhouse effect are discussed. CO-OPS is being designed to operate continuously for periods of up to 3 months in quasi-fixed position over most global regional targets of interest and could make horizon observations over a land-sea area of circular diameter up to about 600 to 800 statute miles. This affords the scientific and engineering community a low-cost means of operating their payloads for monitoring the regional parameters they deem relevant to their investigations of the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect at one-tenth the cost of most currently utilized comparable remote sensing techniques.

  16. Cirrus cloud spectra and layers observed during the FIRE and GASP projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flatau, Piotr J.; Gultepe, I.; Nastrom, G.; Cotton, William R.; Heymsfield, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    A general characterization is developed for cirrus clouds in terms of their spectra, shapes, optical thicknesses, and radiative properties for use in numerical models. Data sets from the Global Atmospheric Sampling Project (GASP) of the upper troposphere and the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) are combined and analyzed to study general traits of cirrus clouds. A definition is given for 2D turbulence, and the GASP and FIRE data sets are examined with respect to cirrus layers and entrainment and to dominant turbulent scales. The approach employs conditional sampling in cloudy and clear air, power-spectral analysis, and mixing-line-type diagrams. Evidence is given for a well mixed cloud deck and for the tendency of cirrus to be formed in multilayer structures. The results are of use in mesoscale and global circulation models which predict cirrus, in small-scale cirrus modeling, and in studying the role of gravity waves in the horizontal structure of upper tropospheric clouds.

  17. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Ambrosia Lake Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is within the Grants Mineral Belt and was one of numerous uranium mills supplied by many local mines. Ground water contamination at the site occurred as a result of uranium mill operations. The potential for impacts to human health and the environment from contaminated ground water currently does not exist. No domestic or livestock wells accessing ground water from the uppermost aquifer have been identified within a 5 mile radius from the site. Therefore, no current exposure pathways to humans, livestock, or wildlife exist, nor are any foreseen. The proposed ground water compliance strategy under consideration for application at the Ambrosia Lake site is to perform no remediation, based on the application of supplemental standards because the ground water has ``limited use.``

  18. Dynamics of the middle atmosphere as observed by the ARISE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Elisabeth

    2015-04-01

    The atmosphere is a complex system submitted to disturbances in a wide range of scales, including high frequency sources as volcanoes, thunderstorms, tornadoes and at larger scales, gravity waves from deep convection or wind over mountains, atmospheric tides and planetary waves. These waves affect the different atmospheric layers submitted to different temperature and wind systems which strongly control the general atmospheric circulation. The full description of gravity and planetary waves constitutes a challenge for the development of future models of atmosphere and climate. The objective of this paper is to present a review of recent advances obtained in this topic, especially in the framework of the ARISE (Atmospheric dynamics Research InfraStructure in Europe) project

  19. Induced Seismicity Related to Hydrothermal Operation of Geothermal Projects in Southern Germany - Observations and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megies, T.; Kraft, T.; Wassermann, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Geothermal power plants in Southern Germany are operated hydrothermally and at low injection pressures in a seismically inactive region considered very low seismic hazard. For that reason, permit authorities initially enforced no monitoring requirements on the operating companies. After a series of events perceived by local residents, a scientific monitoring survey was conducted over several years, revealing several hundred induced earthquakes at one project site.We summarize results from monitoring at this site, including absolute locations in a local 3D velocity model, relocations using double-difference and master-event methods and focal mechanism determinations that show a clear association with fault structures in the reservoir which extend down into the underlying crystalline basement. To better constrain the shear wave velocity models that have a strong influence on hypocentral depth estimates, several different approaches to estimate layered vp/vs models are employed.Results from these studies have prompted permit authorities to start imposing minimal monitoring requirements. Since in some cases these geothermal projects are only separated by a few kilometers, we investigate the capabilities of an optimized network combining the monitoring resources of six neighboring well doublets in a joint network. Optimization is taking into account the -- on this local scale, urban environment -- highly heterogeneous background noise conditions and the feasibility of potential monitoring sites, removing non-viable sites before the optimization procedure. First results from the actual network realization show good detection capabilities for small microearthquakes despite the minimum instrumentational effort, demonstrating the benefits of good coordination of monitoring efforts.

  20. The POLARCAT Model Intercomparison Project (POLMIP): overview and evaluation with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmons, L. K.; Arnold, S. R.; Monks, S. A.; Huijnen, V.; Tilmes, S.; Law, K. S.; Thomas, J. L.; Raut, J.-C.; Bouarar, I.; Turquety, S.; Long, Y.; Duncan, B.; Steenrod, S.; Strode, S.; Flemming, J.; Mao, J.; Langner, J.; Thompson, A. M.; Tarasick, D.; Apel, E. C.; Blake, D. R.; Cohen, R. C.; Dibb, J.; Diskin, G. S.; Fried, A.; Hall, S. R.; Huey, L. G.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Nowak, J.; Peischl, J.; Roberts, J. M.; Ryerson, T.; Warneke, C.; Helmig, D.

    2015-06-01

    A model intercomparison activity was inspired by the large suite of observations of atmospheric composition made during the International Polar Year (2008) in the Arctic. Nine global and two regional chemical transport models participated in this intercomparison and performed simulations for 2008 using a common emissions inventory to assess the differences in model chemistry and transport schemes. This paper summarizes the models and compares their simulations of ozone and its precursors and presents an evaluation of the simulations using a variety of surface, balloon, aircraft and satellite observations. Each type of measurement has some limitations in spatial or temporal coverage or in composition, but together they assist in quantifying the limitations of the models in the Arctic and surrounding regions. Despite using the same emissions, large differences are seen among the models. The cloud fields and photolysis rates are shown to vary greatly among the models, indicating one source of the differences in the simulated chemical species. The largest differences among models, and between models and observations, are in NOy partitioning (PAN vs. HNO3) and in oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as acetaldehyde and acetone. Comparisons to surface site measurements of ethane and propane indicate that the emissions of these species are significantly underestimated. Satellite observations of NO2 from the OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) have been used to evaluate the models over source regions, indicating anthropogenic emissions are underestimated in East Asia, but fire emissions are generally overestimated. The emission factors for wildfires in Canada are evaluated using the correlations of VOCs to CO in the model output in comparison to enhancement factors derived from aircraft observations, showing reasonable agreement for methanol and acetaldehyde but underestimate ethanol, propane and acetone, while overestimating ethane emission factors.

  1. The POLARCAT Model Intercomparison Project (POLMIP): overview and evaluation with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmons, L. K.; Arnold, S. R.; Monks, S. A.; Huijnen, V.; Tilmes, S.; Law, K. S.; Thomas, J. L.; Raut, J.-C.; Bouarar, I.; Turquety, S.; Long, Y.; Duncan, B.; Steenrod, S.; Strode, S.; Flemming, J.; Mao, J.; Langner, J.; Thompson, A. M.; Tarasick, D.; Apel, E. C.; Blake, D. R.; Cohen, R. C.; Dibb, J.; Diskin, G. S.; Fried, A.; Hall, S. R.; Huey, L. G.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Nowak, J.; Peischl, J.; Roberts, J. M.; Ryerson, T.; Warneke, C.; Helmig, D.

    2014-11-01

    A model intercomparison activity was inspired by the large suite of atmospheric chemistry observations made during the International Polar Year (2008) in the Arctic. Nine global and two regional chemical transport models have performed simulations for 2008 using a common emissions inventory to quantify the differences in model chemistry and transport schemes. This paper summarizes the models and compares their simulations of ozone and its precursors, and presents an evaluation of the simulations using a variety of surface, balloon, aircraft and satellite observations. Despite using the same emissions, large differences are seen among the models. Differences in a number of model parameters are identified as contributing to differences in the modelled chemical species, including cloud fields and photolysis rates. The largest differences among models, and between models and observations, are in NOy partitioning (PAN vs. HNO3) and in oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as acetaldehyde and acetone. Comparisons to surface site measurements of ethane and propane indicate that the emissions of these species are significantly underestimated. While limited in spatial and temporal coverage, the aircraft measurements provide a simultaneous evaluation of many species. Satellite observations of NO2 from OMI have been used to evaluate the models over source regions, indicating anthropogenic emissions are underestimated in East Asia, but fire emissions are generally overestimated. The emission factors for wildfires in Canada are evaluated using the correlations of VOCs to CO in the model output in comparison to enhancement factors derived from aircraft observations, showing reasonable agreement for methanol and acetaldehyde, but underestimate of ethanol, propane and acetone, while overestimating ethane emission factors.

  2. NOAA-ISRO joint science projects on Earth observation system science, technology, and applications for societal benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, A.; Jayarman, V.; Kondragunta, S.; Kogan, F.; Kuligowski, R.; Maturi, E.

    2006-12-01

    India and the United States of America (U.S.A.) held a joint conference from June 21-25, 2004 in Bangalore, India to strengthen and expand cooperation in the area of space science, applications, and commerce. Following the recommendations in the joint vision statement released at the end of the conference, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Indian Space and Reconnaissance Organization (ISRO) initiated several joint science projects in the area of satellite product development and applications. This is an extraordinary step since it concentrates on improvements in the data and scientific exchange between India and the United States, consistent with a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed by the two nations in 1997. With the relationship between both countries strengthening with President Bush's visit in early 2006 and new program announcements between the two countries, there is a renewed commitment at ISRO and other Indian agencies and at NOAA in the U.S. to fulfill the agreements reached on the joint science projects. The collaboration is underway with several science projects that started in 2005 providing initial results. NOAA and ISRO agreed that the projects must promote scientific understanding of the satellite data and lead to a satellite-based decision support systems for disaster and public health warnings. The projects target the following areas: --supporting a drought monitoring system for India --improving precipitation estimates over India from Kalpana-1 --increasing aerosol optical depth measurements and products over India --developing early indicators of malaria and other vector borne diseases via satellite monitoring of environmental conditions and linking them to predictive models --monitoring sea surface temperature (SST) from INSAT-3D to support improved forecasting of regional storms, monsoon onset and cyclones. The research collaborations and results from these projects will be presented and discussed in the

  3. The Supernova Spectropolarimetry Project: Results from Multi-Epoch Observations of the Type IIb SN 2011dh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilinski, Christopher; Williams, G. G.; Smith, P. S.; Smith, N.; Milne, P.; Hoffman, J. L.; Huk, L. N.; Leonard, D. C.; Dessart, L.

    2014-01-01

    The Supernova Spectropolarimetry Project is a recently formed collaboration between observers and theorists that focuses on decoding the complex, time-dependent spectropolarimetric behavior of supernovae (SNe) of all types. Using the CCD Imaging/Spectropolarimeter (SPOL) at the 61" Kuiper, the 90" Bok, and the 6.5-m MMT telescopes, we obtain multi-epoch observations of each target, aiming to construct the most comprehensive survey to date of supernovae in polarized light. Preliminary results from the SNSPOL project provide support for the increasingly popular hypothesis that many supernovae are aspherical explosion events. Thus far, we have observed 27 different SNe, many over multiple epochs, over the course of the last three years. While the history and evolution of these events is often studied with photometric and spectroscopic information, most supernovae are not studied with the combined advantage that spectropolarimetric data provides. The use of polarimetry allows us to probe the extent of the asphericity of the explosions while the use of spectroscopy allows us to characterize this asphericity across a variety of chemical species individually and as a function of velocity. Modern 3-D model simulations favor an explosion mechanism that is often inherently asymmetric in nature. Here, we showcase some of our initial results for the nearby type-IIb SN 2011dh that demonstrate the unique information that spectropolarimetric observations provide.

  4. Variability of Forest Change Rates within and among US Geographic Regions as Observed in the North American Forest Dynamics Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleeweis, K.; Goward, S. N.; Huang, C.; Thomas, N.

    2009-12-01

    Forest landscape dynamics are a combination of pattern and process, both varying in space and time to produce a complex mosaic, at any time step, of forest stands in various succession phases. The patterns are formed by discrete events that leave fine scale patches overlapping in space or time. The processes that drive discrete events have differing spatio-temporal manifestations which may or may not persist over larger regions and through longer time intervals than the patterns they create. The cumulative outcome of this complex intersection of pattern and process at the landscape scale impacts higher levels of biological organization and ecosystem function. The North American Forest Dynamics Project (NAFD), a core project of the North American Carbon Program, was designed to capture forest dynamics at the spatio-temporal scale at which they occur by combining USFS FIA field measurements and biennial Landsat observations. This work explores NAFD observations within and among geographic regions and across time. This study also places these observations into the context of the patterns of processes that constrain and determine observed forest change. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  5. The Planck-ATCA Co-eval Observations project: analysis of radio source properties between 5 and 217 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massardi, Marcella; Bonaldi, Anna; Bonavera, Laura; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Galluzzi, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The Planck-ATCA Co-eval Observations (PACO) project has yielded observations of 464 sources with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) between 4.5 and 40 GHz. The main purpose of the project was to investigate the spectral properties of mm-selected radio sources at frequencies below and overlapping with the ESA's Planck satellite frequency bands, minimizing the variability effects by observing almost simultaneously with the first two Planck all-sky surveys. In this paper we present the whole catalogue of observations in total intensity. By comparing PACO with the various measures of Planck Catalog of Compact Sources (PCCS) flux densities we found the best consistency with the PCCS `detection pipeline' photometry (DETFLUX) that we used to investigate the spectral properties of sources from 5 to 217 GHz. Of our sources, 91 per cent have remarkably smooth spectrum, well described by a double power-law over the full range. This suggests a single emitting region, at variance with the notion that `flat' spectra result from the superposition of the emissions from different compact regions, self-absorbed up to different frequencies. Most of the objects show a spectral steepening above ≃30 GHz, consistent with synchrotron emission becoming optically thin. Thus, the classical dichotomy between flat-spectrum/compact and steep-spectrum/extended radio sources, well established at cm wavelengths, breaks down at mm wavelengths. The mm-wave spectra do not show indications of the spectral break expected as the effect of `electron ageing', suggesting young source ages.

  6. NSTA-NASA Shuttle Student Involvement Project. Experiment Results: Insect Flight Observation at Zero Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, T. E.; Peterson, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The flight responses of common houseflies, velvetbean caterpillar moths, and worker honeybees were observed and filmed for a period of about 25 minutes in a zero-g environment during the third flight of the Space Shuttle Vehicle (flight number STS-3; March 22-30, 1982). Twelve fly puparia, 24 adult moths, 24 moth pupae, and 14 adult bees were loaded into an insect flight box, which was then stowed aboard the Shuttle Orbiter, the night before the STS-3 launch at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The main purpose of the experiment was to observe and compare the flight responses of the three species of insects, which have somewhat different flight control mechanisms, under zero-g conditions.

  7. Terahertz photometers to observe solar flares from space (SOLAR-T project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Pierre; Raulin, Jean-Pierre

    The space experiment SOLAR-T designed to observe solar flares at THz frequencies was completed. We present the concept, fabrication and performance of a double THz photometers system. An innovative optical setup allows observations of the full solar disk and the detection of small burst transients at the same time. It is the first detecting system conceived to observe solar flare THz emissions on board of stratospheric balloons. The system has been integrated to data acquisition and telemetry modules for this application. SOLAR-T uses two Golay cell detectors preceded by low-pass filters made of rough surface primary mirrors and membranes, 3 and 7 THz band-pass filters, and choppers. Its photometers can detect small solar bursts (tens of solar flux units) with sub second time resolution. One artificial Sun setup was developed to simulate actual observations. Tests comprised the whole system performance, on ambient and low pressure and temperature conditions. It is intended to provide data on the still unrevealed spectral shape of the mysterious THz solar flares emissions. The experiment is planned to be on board of two long-duration stratospheric balloon flights over Antarctica and Russia in 2014-2016. The SOLAR-T development, fabrication and tests has been accomplished by engineering and research teams from Mackenzie, Unicamp and Bernard Lyot Solar Observatory; Propertech Ltda.; Neuron Ltda.; and Samsung, Brazil; Tydex LCC, Russia; CONICET, Argentina; the stratospheric balloon missions will be carried in cooperation with teams from University of California, Berkeley, USA (flight over Antarctica), and Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow, Russia (flight over Russia).

  8. Inter-annual variations of CO2 observed by commercial airliner in the CONTRAIL project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawa, Yousuke; Machida, Toshinobu; Matsueda, Hidekazu; Niwa, Yosuke; Umezawa, Taku

    2016-04-01

    Since 2005, we have conducted an observation program for greenhouse gases using the passenger aircraft of the Japan Airlines named Comprehensive Observation Network for TRace gases by AIrLiner (CONTRAIL). Over the past 10 years, successful operation of Continuous CO2 Measuring Equipment (CME) has delivered more than 6 million in-situ CO2 data from about 12000 flights between Japan and Europe, Australia, North America, or Asia. The large number of CME data enable us to well characterize spatial distributions and seasonal changes of CO2 in wide regions of the globe especially the Asia-Pacific regions. While the mean growth rates for the past 10 years were about 2 ppm/year, large growth rates of about 3 ppm/year were found in the wide latitudinal bands from 30S to 70N from the second half of 2012 to the first half of 2013. The multiyear data sets have the potential to help understand the global/regional CO2 budget. One good example is the significant inter-annual difference in CO2 vertical profiles observed over Singapore between October 2014 and October 2015, which is attributable to the massive biomass burnings in Indonesia in 2015.

  9. Stereo observations of sprites in support of NHK project: The Cosmic Shore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; McHarg, M. G.; Haaland, R. K.; Kammae, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Sato, M.; Cummer, S. A.; Yair, Y.; Lyons, W.; Ahrns, J.; Yukman, P.; Kudo, T.; Warner, T. A.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.; Li, J.; Lu, G.

    2011-12-01

    High speed (~10,000 frames per second) stereo observations of sprites were made during a combined aircraft and ground-based campaign June 27 to July 10, 2011. Observations were made from two Gulfstream IV jet aircraft, based at Denver Centennial, and from the ground at Langmuir Laboratory, NM, Yucca Ridge Field Station, CO, and Rapid City, SD. The aircraft were flown at an altitude of 14 km along same track positioned 200-300 km from sprite producing thunderstorms. The aircraft separation was 30-50 km to provide good stereo viewing. The sprite activity during the campaign was good with several very large sprites, so-called jellyfish or super sprites. A number of sprites were recorded from both aircraft, and several from aircraft and one ground site. These recordings will in particular allow us to follow the development and the track of individual sprite streamers. In addition we recorded ground-based electromagnetic signals from the causal lightning strikes. On the last flight we observed a number of blue jets coming from a spatially small area, which may have been associated with local strong precipitation and hail.

  10. The Hubble Space Telescope quasar absorption line key project. III - First observational results on Milky Way gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Lu, Limin; Bahcall, John N.; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Boksenberg, Alec; Hartig, George F.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Kirhakos, Sofia; Lockman, Felix J.; Sargent, W. L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Absorption lines found near zero redshift due to Milky Way disk and halo gas in the spectra of 15 quasars observed with the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) of the HST at a resolution of about 230 km/s are reported. Results show that Milky Way absorption lines comprise about 44 percent of all absorption lines seen in the first group of Key Project FOS spectra. Milky Way lines were observed for 3C 273 and H1821 + 643. Limits to the Mg-to-H abundance ratio obtained for very high velocity Mg II absorption detections imply gas-phase Mg abundances for the very high velocity gas ranging from more than 0.059 to more than 0.32 times the solar abundance. In all cases where high-velocity H I emission is seen, corresponding high-velocity metal-line absorption is observed.

  11. Direct Observation of Rhyolite Magma by Drilling: The Proposed Krafla Magma Drilling Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J. C.; Sigmundsson, F.; Papale, P.; Markusson, S.; Loughlin, S.

    2014-12-01

    Remarkably, drilling in Landsvirkjun Co.'s geothermal field in Krafla Caldera, Iceland has encountered rhyolite magma or hypersolidus rhyolite at 2.1-2.5 km depth in 3 wells distributed over 3.5 km2, including Iceland Deep Drilling Program's IDDP-1 (Mortensen, 2012). Krafla's most recent rifting and eruption (basalt) episode was 1975-1984; deformation since that time has been simple decay. Apparently rhyolite magma was either emplaced during that episode without itself erupting or quietly evolved in situ within 2-3 decades. Analysis of drill cuttings containing quenched melt from IDDP-1 yielded unprecedented petrologic data (Zierenberg et al, 2012). But interpreting active processes of heat and mass transfer requires knowing spatial variations in physical and chemical characteristics at the margin of the magma body, and that requires retrieving core - a not-inconceivable task. Core quenched in situ in melt up to 1150oC was recovered from Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii by the Magma Energy Project >30 years ago. The site from which IDDP-1 was drilled, and perhaps IDDP-1 itself, may be available to attempt the first-ever coring of rhyolite magma, now proposed as the Krafla Magma Drilling Project (KMDP). KMDP would also include geophysical and geochemical experiments to measure the response of the magma/hydrothermal system to fluid injection and flow tests. Fundamental results will reveal the behavior of magma in the upper crust and coupling between magma and the hydrothermal system. Extreme, sustained thermal power output during flow tests of IDDP-1 suggests operation of a Kilauea-Iki-like freeze-fracture-flow boundary propagating into the magma and mining its latent heat of crystallization (Carrigan et al, EGU, 2014). Such an ultra-hot Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) might be developable beneath this and other magma-heated conventional hydrothermal systems. Additionally, intra-caldera intrusions like Krafla's are believed to produce the unrest that is so troubling in

  12. The Morehead State University 18 Meter Radio Telescope Project: Involving Undergraduates in Observational Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malphrus, B. K.; Combs, M. S.; Kruth, J.

    2002-12-01

    The Space Science Center at Morehead State University is in the process of developing a large aperture (18-21 meter) cm-wave radio telescope, the Morehead Radio Telescope (MRT). The telescope will be located in the mountainous region of Eastern Kentucky. The instrument will serve as a research instrument and active laboratory for undergraduate astronomy, physics, pre-engineering, and computer science students. The antenna system will be engaged in science programs (in astrophysics) and in satellite mission support services (telemetry, tracking, and control). The benefits to students are based upon a hands-on approach to learning concepts in astrophysics and engineering. Additionally, there are still research contributions that small aperture centimeter-wave instruments can make including long-term observations of microvariability in AGNs, observations of transient events, and surveys. The MRT will operate three receiver systems including an L-band receiver (1.4-1.7 GHz) covering the "water hole", an S-band receiver (2.2-2.4 GHz) and a Ku-band receiver (11.2- 12.7 GHz) for continuum observations and satellite telemetry. The technical specifications for the instrument have been developed and an RFP has been issued inviting antenna vendors to submit proposals. The reflector will have a surface accuracy of 0.020 inches RMS over the entire surface, which will support relatively high frequency (Ku-band) observations. The antenna system will be full-motion and have a slew speed of 2 deg per second and an acceleration of 2 deg per second2. The HI and OH spatial distribution associated with cosmic phenomena will be investigated as well as dynamics and kinematics (particularly in HI) by observing over a range of frequencies (up to 2.5 MHz) with a 2048-channel back-end spectrometer, providing up to 1 KHz frequency resolution. The sensitivity and versatility of the telescope design will facilitate investigation of a wide variety of cosmic phenomena. The MRT is funded by

  13. Projecting the voice: observations of audience behaviours in ICT-mediated contemporary opera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Wei; Williams, Alan E.

    2014-07-01

    This paper examines how audiences experience live opera performance and the behaviours they exhibit during live-streaming of the performance. It aims to contribute to our understanding of how audiences, who increasingly inhabit an environment saturated with digital media, respond to contemporary opera performance. Based on a comparative study of audience experiences and behaviours during a live opera performance and the streamed opera screening, we investigate whether digital mediation affects audience appreciation, and whether streaming live opera means the same thing to an audience as the unmediated performance. We firstly outline the conception, design and performance of a contemporary opera and its simultaneous streaming to nearby digital screens. Then, we report the evaluation of the project as measured by a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods during the rehearsals, the live performance and the screening. As one of the few social studies of contemporary classical music in Britain, our study of opera audience behaviours sheds light on the challenges and opportunities afforded by digital technologies for opera companies. Understanding how audiences appreciate digital operas offers practical advice on how theatres and opera companies could respond to new forms of digital activities.

  14. Observation of seismicity based on DOMERAPI and BMKG seismic networks: A preliminary result from DOMERAPI project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramdhan, Mohamad; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Widiyantoro, Sri; Kristyawan, Said; Sembiring, Andry Syaly; Mtaxian, Jean-Philippe

    2016-05-01

    DOMERAPI project has involved earth scientists from Indonesia and France to conduct comprehensively a study of the internal structure of Mt. Merapi and its vicinity based on seismic tomographic imaging. The DOMERAPI seismic network was running from October 2013 to April 2015 consisting of 53 broad-band seismometers, covering Mt. Merapi and Mt. Merbabu, and some geological features such as Opak and Dengkeng faults. Earthquake hypocenter determination conducted in this study is an important step before seismic tomographic imaging. The earthquake events were identified and picked manually and carefully. The majority of earthquakes occured outside the DOMERAPI network. The ray paths of seismic waves from these earthquakes passed through the deep part of the study area around Merapi. The joint data of BMKG and DOMERAPI networks can minimize the azimuthal gap, which is often used to obtain an indication of the reliability of the epicentral solution. Our preliminary results show 279 events from October 2013 to mid August 2014. For future work, we will incorporate the BPPTKG (Center for Research and Technology Development of Geological Disaster) data catalogue in order to enrich seismic ray paths. The combined data catalogues will provide information as input for further advanced studies and volcano hazards mitigation.

  15. The Lockman Hole project: LOFAR observations and spectral index properties of low-frequency radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahony, E. K.; Morganti, R.; Prandoni, I.; van Bemmel, I. M.; Shimwell, T. W.; Brienza, M.; Best, P. N.; Brüggen, M.; Rivera, G. Calistro; de Gasperin, F.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Harwood, J. J.; Heald, G.; Jarvis, M. J.; Mandal, S.; Miley, G. K.; Retana-Montenegro, E.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Sabater, J.; Tasse, C.; van Velzen, S.; van Weeren, R. J.; Williams, W. L.; White, G. J.

    2016-09-01

    The Lockman Hole is a well-studied extragalactic field with extensive multi-band ancillary data covering a wide range in frequency, essential for characterising the physical and evolutionary properties of the various source populations detected in deep radio fields (mainly star-forming galaxies and AGNs). In this paper we present new 150-MHz observations carried out with the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR), allowing us to explore a new spectral window for the faint radio source population. This 150-MHz image covers an area of 34.7 square degrees with a resolution of 18.6×14.7 arcsec and reaches an rms of 160 μJy beam-1 at the centre of the field. As expected for a low-frequency selected sample, the vast majority of sources exhibit steep spectra, with a median spectral index of α _{150}^{1400}=-0.78± 0.015. The median spectral index becomes slightly flatter (increasing from α _{150}^{1400}=-0.84 to α _{150}^{1400}=-0.75) with decreasing flux density down to S150 ˜10 mJy before flattening out and remaining constant below this flux level. For a bright subset of the 150-MHz selected sample we can trace the spectral properties down to lower frequencies using 60-MHz LOFAR observations, finding tentative evidence for sources to become flatter in spectrum between 60 and 150 MHz. Using the deep, multi-frequency data available in the Lockman Hole, we identify a sample of 100 Ultra-steep spectrum (USS) sources and 13 peaked spectrum sources. We estimate that up to 21 per cent of these could have z > 4 and are candidate high-z radio galaxies, but further follow-up observations are required to confirm the physical nature of these objects.

  16. Local - Air Project: Tropospheric Aerosol Monitoring by CALIPSO Lidar Satellite and Ground-Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarli, V.; Trippetta, S.; Bitonto, P.; Papagiannopoulos, N.; Caggiano, R.; Donvito, A.; Mona, L.

    2016-06-01

    A new method for the detection of the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) height from CALIPSO space-borne lidar data was developed and the possibility to infer the sub-micrometric aerosol particle (i.e., PM1) concentrations at ground level from CALIPSO observations was also explored. The comparison with ground-based lidar measurements from an EARLINET (European Aerosol Research LIdar Network) station showed the reliability of the developed method for the PBL. Moreover, empirical relationships between integrated backscatter values from CALIPSO and PM1 concentrations were found thanks to the combined use of the retrieved PBL heights, CALIPSO aerosol profiles and typing and PM1 insitu measurements.

  17. Integrating Observations and Knowledges for Earthquake Precursors Studies. Preliminary results and strategy of PRE-EARTHQUAKES FP7 Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramutoli, V.; Inan, S.; Jakowski, N.; Pulinets, S. A.; Romanov, A.; Filizzola, C.; Shagimuratov, I.; Pergola, N.; Genzano, N.; Alparslan, E.; Wilken, V.; Tsybulia, K.; Romanov, A.; Paciello, R.; Zakharenkova, I.; Lisi, M.; Borrries, C.; Trusov, S.; Coviello, I.; PRE-EARTHQUAKES Team

    2011-12-01

    From the combined use of different observations/parameters, from the refinement of data analysis methods and the development of suitable physical models, we are expecting major progresses in the research on earthquake's preparatory phases. More than from the use of a single parameter approach, reduced false alarm rates and improved reliability and precision (in the space-time domain) of predictions, are expected from a multi-parameter observational, multi-disciplinary, research, strategy. Less than one year after its start, PRE-EARTHQUAKES FP7 Project already demonstrated its capability to commit together independent expertise and different observation capabilities in order: a) to substantially improve our knowledge of preparatory phases of earthquakes and their possible precursors; b) to promote a worldwide Earthquake Observation System (EQuOS) as a dedicated component of GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems); c) to develop and offer to the international scientific community an integration platform where independent observations and new data analysis methodologies devoted to the research on/of earthquake precursors can be collected and cross-validated. In this paper results achieved so far, in particular on the earthquakes selected as test cases occurred in recent years in Italy (M6.3 Abruzzo April 2009), Sakhalin (M6,2, Nevelsk, August 2007) and Turkey (M6,1, Elazig March 2010) will be presented emphasizing the significant added values guaranteed by a multi-parameter, multi-disciplinary strategy.

  18. Microphysical Observations and Mesoscale Model Simulation of a Warm Fog Case during FRAM Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gultepe, I.; Milbrandt, J. A.

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this work is to apply a new microphysical parameterization for fog visibility for potential use in numerical weather forecast simulations, and to compare the results with ground-based observations. The observations from the Fog Remote Sensing And Modeling (FRAM) field which took place during the winter of 2005 2006 over southern Ontario, Canada (Phase I) were used in the analysis. The liquid water content (LWC), droplet number concentration (N d ), and temperature (T) were obtained from the fog measuring device (FMD) spectra and Rosemount probe, correspondingly. The visibility (Vis) from a visibility meter, liquid water path from microwave radiometers (MWR), and inferred fog properties such as mean volume diameter, LWC, and N d were also used in the analysis. The results showed that Vis is nonlinearly related to both LWC and N d . Comparisons between newly derived parameterizations and the ones already in use as a function of LWC suggested that if models can predict the total N d and LWC at each time step using a detailed microphysics parameterization, Vis can then be calculated for warm fog conditions. Using outputs from the Canadian Mesoscale Compressible Community (MC2) model, being tested with a new multi-moment bulk microphysical scheme, the new Vis parameterization resulted in more accurate Vis values where the correction reached up to 20 50%.

  19. Personal Active Dosimeter for Space: the Light Observer for Radiation Environment (LORE) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narici, Livio

    Long permanence in space outside the protections of the Earth magnetic shield and atmosphere (during long journeys, and on the Moon or/and Mars) requires a careful monitoring of absorbed doses by each astronaut. This is of paramount importance for transient and cumulative effects mostly due to Solar Particle Events. Alarming features and the possibility of monitoring absorbed dose also discriminating the kind of incoming radiation will be needed. Stemming from our large experience in detector building, in modelling, in designing of the supporting electronic, from our payloads flown on satellites, MIR Station and ISS (Nina, Mita, SilEye, SilEye2, Alteino, Pamela, ALTEA) we are developping a personal active dosimeter with alarming and wireless features. The goal is a small object able to measure charged and neutral ionizing radiation (the possibility to insert a miniaturized gamma detector will be investigated) The device will feature portability (cigarette-box dimensions, rechargeable batteries), sensitivity to ions (H to above Fe), to hard X-rays, and possibly to gamma with the ability to detect and count neutrons. Flash memories should contain pre loaded tables and the real Time code to perform the real time operations and risk thresholds so to activate an alarm if/when needed. Whenever in range, the device will connect wirelessly to the main computer and send there the raw and pre-analyzed data for a complete monitoring and possible more sophisticated analyses. The two major novelties and challenges in this project are the miniaturization of the device, including the firmware, and the definition of the transfer function and of its uncertainties, linking measured data with real flux data. This will require the proper balancing among size, radiation discrimination ability and uncertainty minimization.

  20. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Tuba City, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The requirements for ground water compliance for Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, including the Tuba City, Arizona, site, are found in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act; Subparts B and C of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s Health and Environmental Protection Standards for Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailings (40 CFR 192 (1994)), and the associated proposed 1987 standards (52 FR 36000). During the surface remedial action, an estimated 1,400,000 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (1,100,000 cubic meters [m{sup 3}]) of uranium mill tailings and other contaminated materials were consolidated and stabilized in place in an unlined disposal cell covering 50 acres (20 hectares). The surface remedial action was completed in April 1990. Ground water beneath the Tuba City site was contaminated by subsurface migration of water from uranium ore processing activities. The main source of contaminants was water from the tailings piles that began in 1956 when the mill opened and ended in 1966 when the mill closed. 800,000 tons (725,000 tonnes) of uranium ore were processed onsite over a 10-year period. The wet tailings remaining after processing were placed as a slurry in three piles at the site. Water from these tailings then seeped into the ground and migrated downward to the ground water. The Tuba City site is currently in a post-stabilization, prelicensing status. The site is expected to remain in this status until licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for long-term surveillance and maintenance. The preliminary ground water compliance strategy at the Tuba City site is active remediation-specific technology to be evaluated is in situ bioremediation. This selection was made because of the potential ability of bioremediation to reduce concentrations to lower levels than a conventional extraction system and to minimize disturbance of the water resource.

  1. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Tuba City, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    The requirements for ground water compliance for Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, including the Tuba City, Arizona, site, are found in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act; Subparts B and C of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s Health and Environmental Protection Standards for Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailings (40 CFR 192 (1994)), and the associated proposed 1987 standards (52 FR 36000). During the surface remedial action, an estimated 1,400,000 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (1,100,000 cubic meters [m{sup 3}]) of uranium mill tailings and other contaminated materials were consolidated and stabilized in place in an unlined disposal cell covering 50 acres (20 hectares). The surface remedial action was completed in April 1990. Ground water beneath the Tuba City site was contaminated by subsurface migration of water from uranium ore processing activities. The main source of contaminants was water from the tailings piles that began in 1956 when the mill opened and ended in 1966 when the mill closed. A total of 800,000 tons (725,000 tonnes) of uranium ore were processed onsite over a 10-year period. Two processes were used to refine the ore: an acid leach process and a sodium carbonate alkaline process. Water from these tailings then seeped into the ground and migrated downward to the ground water. The Tuba City site is currently in a post-stabilization, prelicensing status. The preliminary ground water compliance strategy at the Tuba City site is active remediation. The specific technology to be evaluated is in situ bioremediation. This selection was made because of the potential ability of bioremediation to reduce concentrations to lower levels than a conventional extraction system and to minimize disturbance of the water resource.

  2. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA project site at Falls City, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    During surface remedial action, an estimated 7.0 million tons (6.4 million tonnes) of uranium mill tailings and other contaminated materials were consolidated and stabilized on the Falls City site. The ground water protection strategy at the Falls City disposal site for the UMTRA Surface Project (Subpart A of 40 CFR Part 192 (1994)) was an application for supplemental standards, based on Class III (limited use) ground water in the uppermost aquifer. This water is not a current or potential source of drinking water. Ground water from the uppermost aquifer (ground water from the Deweesville/Conquista Members and the Dilworth Member) contains widespread ambient contamination resulting from naturally occurring conditions and from the effects of human activity not related to uranium milling operations (uranium exploration and mining activities). The ground water cannot be effectively cleaned up for drinking or other beneficial purposes using treatment methods reasonably employed by public water supply systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the state of Texas concurred with the ground water protection strategy for the disposal site in September 1992. Surface remedial action in accord with Subpart A was completed in April 1994. The proposed ground water compliance strategy (Subpart B of 40 CFR Part 192 (1994)) at the Falls City site is to perform no remedial action based on application for supplemental standards because the ground water in the uppermost aquifer is classified as Class III ground water. Class III ground water includes ground water that is not a current or potential source of drinking water because of widespread, ambient contamination that cannot be cleaned up using treatment methods reasonably employed by public water supply systems (40 CFR {section} 192.11 (e) (1994)). Although supplemental standards are being applied, the potential use of ground water in the site vicinity will be protected.

  3. Arctic aerosol and cloud measurements in the frame of the Ice-Atmosphere-Ocean Observing System (IAOOS) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelon, J.; Mariage, V.; Blouzon, F.; Geyskens, N.; Victori, S.; Amarouche, N.; Drezen, C.; Guillot, A.; Calzas, M.; Garracio, M.; Desautez, A.; Pascal, N.; Raut, J. C.; Sennechael, N.; Provost, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the frame of the French IAOOS Equipex project, a new observational network is to be developed for the ocean-ice-atmosphere survey over the Arctic starting in 2015 to better understand interactions and in particular the role of aerosols and clouds in the Arctic. Eye-safe lidar measurements will allow to profile aerosols and clouds for the atmospheric part, with the objective to perform regular measurements and characterize their vertical structure and optical properties complementing satellite observations. Radiation and meteorological parameters will simultaneously be measured at the surface. A first buoy has been prototyped and deployed in April 2014 at the Barneo site set by the Russian teams at the North Pole. Measurements with the first autonomous backscatter lidar ever deployed in the arctic have been taken from April to end of November 2014 before the buoy was lost. A second set of data were acquired during the N-ICE campaign north of Svalbard during winter 2015. Up to four profiles a day (10 mn sequence each) have been performed allowing a good sampling with respect to meteorological analyses. Observations have shown that the occurrence of low level clouds was higher than 90% during summer. New deployments are planned in summer 2015 as the start of the IAOOS network. The project is presented, instruments are described and first results are discussed.

  4. Observational Study Of The Pacific Western Boundary Currents And The Indonesian Throughflow by the CAS Strategic Priority Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, D.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    The warm pool in the western Pacific Ocean has significant impact on the evolution of ENSO and the East Asian monsoon. Ocean circulation in the western Pacific Ocean and in Indonesian seas plays an important role in the interannual climate variations and predictability of the tropical Indo-Pacific Ocean. A major observational program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences is recently launched to study the western Pacific Ocean circulation and the warm pool to test these scientific hypotheses. The physical oceanography project called the "Western Pacific Ocean Circulation and the Warm Pool Variability" is by far the largest and the most intensive observational program in history in the western Pacific ocean study. In this talk, the background and scientific hypotheses of the project, the observational design in the western Pacific Ocean, Indonesian seas, and the eastern Indian Ocean region, and some preliminary results of the program will be presented. The talk serves to encourage more scientists to collaborate in the studies of the ocean circulation and climate in the western Pacific and eastern Indian Oceans.

  5. The ESPRI project: astrometric exoplanet search with PRIMA. I. Instrument description and performance of first light observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahlmann, J.; Henning, T.; Queloz, D.; Quirrenbach, A.; Elias, N. M.; Launhardt, R.; Pepe, F.; Reffert, S.; Ségransan, D.; Setiawan, J.; Abuter, R.; Andolfato, L.; Bizenberger, P.; Baumeister, H.; Chazelas, B.; Delplancke, F.; Dérie, F.; Di Lieto, N.; Duc, T. P.; Fleury, M.; Graser, U.; Kaminski, A.; Köhler, R.; Lévêque, S.; Maire, C.; Mégevand, D.; Mérand, A.; Michellod, Y.; Moresmau, J.-M.; Mohler, M.; Müller, A.; Müllhaupt, P.; Naranjo, V.; Sache, L.; Salvade, Y.; Schmid, C.; Schuhler, N.; Schulze-Hartung, T.; Sosnowska, D.; Tubbs, B.; van Belle, G. T.; Wagner, K.; Weber, L.; Zago, L.; Zimmerman, N.

    2013-03-01

    Context. The ESPRI project relies on the astrometric capabilities offered by the PRIMA facility of the Very Large Telescope Interferometer for discovering and studying planetary systems. Our survey consists of obtaining high-precision astrometry for a large sample of stars over several years to detect their barycentric motions due to orbiting planets. We present the operation's principle, the instrument's implementation, and the results of a first series of test observations. Aims: We give a comprehensive overview of the instrument infrastructure and present the observation strategy for dual-field relative astrometry in the infrared K-band. We describe the differential delay lines, a key component of the PRIMA facility that was delivered by the ESPRI consortium, and discuss their performance within the facility. This paper serves as reference for future ESPRI publications and for the users of the PRIMA facility. Methods: Observations of bright visual binaries were used to test the observation procedures and to establish the instrument's astrometric precision and accuracy. The data reduction strategy for the astrometry and the necessary corrections to the raw data are presented. Adaptive optics observations with NACO were used as an independent verification of PRIMA astrometric observations. Results: The PRIMA facility was used to carry out tests of astrometric observations. The astrometric performance in terms of precision is limited by the atmospheric turbulence at a level close to the theoretical expectations and a precision of 30 μas was achieved. In contrast, the astrometric accuracy is insufficient for the goals of the ESPRI project and is currently limited by systematic errors that originate in the part of the interferometer beamtrain that is not monitored by the internal metrology system. Conclusions: Our observations led to defining corrective actions required to make the facility ready for carrying out the ESPRI search for extrasolar planets. Part of this

  6. Some observations on the cerebellopontine projections in the cat--with a hypothesis to explain species differences.

    PubMed

    Gerrits, N M; Willemse-vd Geest, L; Kornet, M

    1984-01-27

    The projection from the lateral and interposed nuclei of the cerebellum to the pons was investigated by means of autoradiography of anterogradely transported tritiated leucine. Dense termination, in part of axo-somatic nature, was observed in clusters within the central part of the nucleus reticularis tegmenti pontis. Termination in the pontine nuclei proper was found in small clusters directly ventral to the medial lemniscus and in trace-like amounts in the paramedian subnucleus. The results are discussed in relation to ponto-cerebellar circuits and comparative neuroanatomy. PMID:6717854

  7. ISEA (International geodetic project in SouthEastern Alaska) for rapid uplifting caused by glacial retreat: (4) Gravity tide observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Miura, S.; Sun, W.; Kaufman, A. M.; Cross, R.; Freymueller, J. T.; Heavner, M.

    2006-12-01

    The southeastern Alaska shows a large uplift rate as 30 mm/yr at most, which is considered to be closely related to the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) including two effects of the past and present-day ice melting (Larsen et al., 2004). So, this area is important to improve our knowledge of the viscoelastic property of the earth and to consider the global changes. Combing the displacement and gravity observations is useful to constrain the model computation results for GIA (Sato et al., 2006). In order to progress the previous work by the group of Univ. Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF), an observation project by Japan and USA groups was started in 2005 (Miura et al., this meeting). Under this project, June 2006, the continuous GPS measurements started (M. Kufman et al., this meeting) and the absolute gravity (AG) measurements were conducted (W. Sun et al., this meeting). Precise correction for the effect of ocean tide loading is one of the key to increase the observation accuracy of the GPS and gravity observations, especially for the AG measurement. Thanks for the satellite sea surface altimeters such as TOPEX/Poseidon and Jason-1, the accuracy of global ocean tide models based on these data has been much improved, and its accuracy is estimated at a level better than 1.3 cm as a RMS error of the vector differences of the 8 main tidal waves (Matsumoto et al., 2006). However, on the other hand, it is known that the southeastern Alaska is a place that shows a large discrepancy among the proposed global ocean tide models mainly due to a complex topography and bathymetry of the fjord area. In order to improve the accuracy of the ocean tide correction, we started the gravity tide observation at Juneau from June 2006. Two kinds of gravimeters are used for the observation. Sampling interval of the data is at every 1 min. We analyzed the 1 month data from the beginning of the observation and compared the tidal analysis results with the model tide including both effects of the

  8. Image-domain sampling properties of the Hotelling Observer in CT using filtered back-projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Adrian A.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2015-03-01

    The Hotelling Observer (HO),1 along with its channelized variants,2 has been proposed for image quality evaluation in x-ray CT.3,4 In this work, we investigate HO performance for a detection task in parallel-beam FBP as a function of two image-domain sampling parameters, namely pixel size and field-of-view. These two parameters are of central importance in adapting HO methods to use in CT, since the large number of pixels in a single image makes direct computation of HO performance for a full image infeasible in most cases. Reduction of the number of image pixels and/or restriction of the image to a region-of-interest (ROI) has the potential to make direct computation of HO statistics feasible in CT, provided that the signal and noise properties lead to redundant information in some regions of the image. For small signals, we hypothesize that reduction of image pixel size and enlargement of the image field-of-view are approximately equivalent means of gaining additional information relevant to a detection task. The rationale for this hypothesis is that the backprojection operation in FBP introduces long range correlations so that, for small signals, the reconstructed signal outside of a small ROI is not linearly independent of the signal within the ROI. In this work, we perform a preliminary investigation of this hypothesis by sweeping these two sampling parameters and computing HO performance for a signal detection task.

  9. Extending netCDF and CF conventions to support enhanced Earth Observation Ontology services: the Prod-Trees project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzetti, Paolo; Valentin, Bernard; Koubarakis, Manolis; Nativi, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Access to Earth Observation products remains not at all straightforward for end users in most domains. Semantically-enabled search engines, generally accessible through Web portals, have been developed. They allow searching for products by selecting application-specific terms and specifying basic geographical and temporal filtering criteria. Although this mostly suits the needs of the general public, the scientific communities require more advanced and controlled means to find products. Ranges of validity, traceability (e.g. origin, applied algorithms), accuracy, uncertainty, are concepts that are typically taken into account in research activities. The Prod-Trees (Enriching Earth Observation Ontology Services using Product Trees) project will enhance the CF-netCDF product format and vocabulary to allow storing metadata that better describe the products, and in particular EO products. The project will bring a standardized solution that permits annotating EO products in such a manner that official and third-party software libraries and tools will be able to search for products using advanced tags and controlled parameter names. Annotated EO products will be automatically supported by all the compatible software. Because the entire product information will come from the annotations and the standards, there will be no need for integrating extra components and data structures that have not been standardized. In the course of the project, the most important and popular open-source software libraries and tools will be extended to support the proposed extensions of CF-netCDF. The result will be provided back to the respective owners and maintainers for ensuring the best dissemination and adoption of the extended format. The project, funded by ESA, has started in December 2012 and will end in May 2014. It is coordinated by Space Applications Services, and the Consortium includes CNR-IIA and the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. The first activities included

  10. The Supernova Spectropolarimetry Project: Results from Multi-Epoch Observations of the Type IIn SN 2010jl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, George G.; Dessart, L.; Hoffman, J. L.; Huk, L. N.; Leonard, D. C.; Milne, P.; Smith, N.; Smith, P. S.

    2014-01-01

    The Supernova Spectropolarimetry Project is a recently formed collaboration between observers and theorists that focuses on decoding the complex, time-dependent spectropolarimetric behavior of supernovae (SNe) of all types. Using the CCD Imaging/Spectropolarimeter (SPOL) at the 61" Kuiper, the 90" Bok, and the 6.5-m MMT telescopes, we obtain multi-epoch observations of each target, aiming to construct the most comprehensive survey to date of supernovae in polarized light. We present results from the multi-epoch spectropolarimetric observations of the SN 2010jl. This type IIn supernova in UGC 5189A remained bright for an unusually long time allowing us to obtain 11 epochs of data over the course of 15 months. We find significant polarization in the continuum and variations in polarization across the Balmer and HeI lines. The measured polarized continuum decreased steadily over the 15 months of observations. This evolution allowed us to make a solid estimate of the interstellar polarization component thereby revealing the intrinsic supernova polarization. The polarization provides us with detailed information about the aspherical morphology of the explosion and the properties of the progenitor’s pre-explosion mass loss.

  11. Retrospective Exposure Estimation and Predicted versus Observed Serum Perfluorooctanoic Acid Concentrations for Participants in the C8 Health Project

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Verónica M.; Ryan, P. Barry; Steenland, Kyle; Bartell, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: People living or working in eastern Ohio and western West Virginia have been exposed to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) released by DuPont Washington Works facilities. Objectives: Our objective was to estimate historical PFOA exposures and serum concentrations experienced by 45,276 non-occupationally exposed participants in the C8 Health Project who consented to share their residential histories and a 2005–2006 serum PFOA measurement. Methods: We estimated annual PFOA exposure rates for each individual based on predicted calibrated water concentrations and predicted air concentrations using an environmental fate and transport model, individual residential histories, and maps of public water supply networks. We coupled individual exposure estimates with a one-compartment absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) model to estimate time-dependent serum concentrations. Results: For all participants (n = 45,276), predicted and observed median serum concentrations in 2005–2006 are 14.2 and 24.3 ppb, respectively [Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (rs) = 0.67]. For participants who provided daily public well water consumption rate and who had the same residence and workplace in one of six municipal water districts for 5 years before the serum sample (n = 1,074), predicted and observed median serum concentrations in 2005–2006 are 32.2 and 40.0 ppb, respectively (rs = 0.82). Conclusions: Serum PFOA concentrations predicted by linked exposure and ADME models correlated well with observed 2005–2006 human serum concentrations for C8 Health Project participants. These individualized retrospective exposure and serum estimates are being used in a variety of epidemiologic studies being conducted in this region. PMID:21813367

  12. Multi-year Satellite and Surface Observations of AOD in support of Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, John

    2012-11-01

    We use combined multi-year measurements from the surface and space for assessing the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosol properties within a large (~400x400 km) region centered on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, along the East Coast of the United States. The ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements at Martha’s Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO) site and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) sensors on board the Terra and Aqua satellites provide horizontal and temporal variations of aerosol optical depth, while the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) offers the altitudes of aerosol-layers. The combined ground-based and satellite measurements indicated several interesting features among which were the large differences in the aerosol properties observed in July and February. We applied the climatology of aerosol properties for designing the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP), which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The TCAP field campaign involves 12-month deployment (started July 1, 2012) of the ground-based ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) on Cape Cod and complimentary aerosol observations from two research aircraft: the DOE Gulfstream-1 (G-1) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) B200 King Air. Using results from the coordinated G-1 and B200 flights during the recent (July, 2012) Intensive Observation Period, we demonstrated that the G-1 in situ measurements and B200 active remote sensing can provide complementary information on the temporal and spatial changes of the aerosol properties off the coast of North America.

  13. Systematic lidar observations of Saharan dust layers over Athens, Greece in the frame of EARLINET project (2004-2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papayannis, A.; Mamouri, R. E.; Amiridis, V.; Kazadzis, S.; Pérez, C.; Tsaknakis, G.; Kokkalis, P.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2009-09-01

    In this paper we present a statistical analysis on the geometrical and optical properties of Saharan dust layers observed over Athens, Greece, in a three-year period from 1 January 2004 up to 31 December 2006. The observations of the vertical aerosol profile were performed by the multi-wavelength (355-532-1064-387-607 nm) Raman lidar system of the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) operated in the city of Athens (37°98' N, 23°77' E), Greece, in the frame of the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET-ASOS) project. The number of dust events was greatest in late spring, summer, and early autumn periods. This was evident also by aerosol observations during dust outbreaks obtained from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). In our lidar measurements, multiple aerosol dust layers of variable thickness (680-4800 m) were observed. The center of mass of these layers was located in altitudes between 1600 and 5800 m. However, the mean thickness of the dust layer typically stayed around 2700 m and the corresponding mean center of mass was of the order of 2900 m. The top of the dust layer ranged from 2000 to 8000 m, with a mean value of the order of 4700 m. MODIS observations during dust outbreaks showed that the AOD values at 550 nm ranged between 0.3-0.6, while the corresponding Angström exponent (AE) values were of the order of 0.5-0.65, indicating the presence of rather large particles.

  14. Cognitive Factors that Impact Learning in the Field: Observations from an REU Project on Precambrian Rocks of Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, D.; Mogk, D. W.; Goodwin, C.

    2011-12-01

    Field work requires cognitive processing on many different levels, and constitutes a powerful and important learning environment. To be effective and meaningful, the context of field work must be fully understood in terms of key research questions, earlier published work, regional geology, geologic history, and geologic processes. Scale(s) of observation and sample selection methods and strategies must be defined. Logistical decisions must be made about equipment needed, points of access, and navigation in the field. Professional skills such as field note-taking, measuring structural data, and rock descriptions must be employed, including appropriate use of field tools. Interpretations of geologic features in the field must be interpreted through recall of concepts from the geologic knowledge base (e.g. crystallization history of igneous rocks interpreted through phase diagrams). Field workers need to be able to self-monitor and self-regulate their actions (metacognitively), and make adjustments to daily plans as needed. The results of field work must be accurately and effectively communicated to other geoscientists. Personal and professional ethics and values are brought to bear as decisions are made about whether or not the work has been satisfactorily completed at a field site. And, all of this must be done against a back drop of environmental factors that affect the ability to do this work (e.g. inclement weather, bears, impassable landscapes). The simultaneous relevance of all these factors creates a challenging, but rewarding environment for learning on many different scales. During our REU project to study the Precambrian rocks in the back country of Yellowstone National Park (YNP), we considered these cognitive factors in designing our project curriculum. To reduce the "novelty space" of the project a website was developed that described the project goals and expected outcomes, introduced primary literature, and alerted students about the physical demands

  15. Research and Development of External Occultor Technology for the Direct Observation of Extrasolar Planetary Systems : JPL Starshades Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, Herbert; Stadeler, Mehnert

    2012-01-01

    Our group conducted work during the Summer of 2012 assembling and developing JPL's Starshades Project under the Technology Development for Exoplanet Missions(TDEM) initiative created by NASA, specifically TDEM stage 2. The goal of the work conducted at JPL by our group was to construct four occultor petals, the main optical components of the Starshade, for the analysis of joint deployment characteristics and of mechanical strain. A Starshade is an optical structure measuring approximately 30 meters in diameter that uses the effects of light diffraction off sheer edges, light scattering, and negative interference between waves to negate all on-axis light in a telescope's image, providing very high contrast that allows planets orbiting a target star to be observed. We completed our engineering goals in the time span of 10 weeks, during which the assembly processes of manufacture, alignment, and structural bonding took place. The Starshade technology and construction process is further discussed in the body of this paper.

  16. Trends and projections of temperature, precipitation, and snow cover during snow cover-observed period over southwestern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarenistanak, Mohammad; Dhorde, Amit G.; Kripalani, R. H.; Dhorde, Anargha A.

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, tendencies in temperature, precipitation, and snow cover area over the southwestern part of Iran have been assessed. The research mainly focused on snow cover-observed period which included the months of December, January, February, March, and April in the area. This research has been divided into two parts. First part consists of an analysis of the trends in temperature, precipitation, and snow cover area during the above months. Trends in these parameters were tested by linear regression, and significance was determined by t test. Mann-Kendall rank test (MK test) was also employed to confirm the results of linear regression. Sequential Mann-Kendall test (SQ-MK test) was applied for change point detection in the series. For snow cover analysis, remote sensing images from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellite with advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) sensor for the period 1987-2007 were used. The second part of the research involved future projections based on four models under B1 and A1B emission scenarios. The models used were centre national de recherches meteorologiques (CNRM), European Center Hamburg model (ECHAM), Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate (MIROCH) and United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMOC) under the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) AR4. The analysis of temperature trends revealed a significant increase during February and April. Temperature projections showed that temperature may increase between 1.12 to 7.87 °C by 2100 in the study area. The results of precipitation series indicated that majority of the stations registered insignificant trends during the twentieth century. However, precipitation may decrease according to most of the models under both scenarios, but the decrease may not be large, except according to MIROCH model. The results of trend analysis of snow cover area indicated that no significant trends were detected by any statistical tests

  17. Regional glacial isostatic adjustment in Antarctica estimated from GRACE, Enivsat/ICESat and GPS observations (ESA-STSE project REGINA).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemann, V.; Sasgen, I.; Horwath, M.; Petrie, E. J.; Schoen, N.; Pail, R.; Horvath, A.; Bamber, J. L.; Clarke, P. J.; Konrad, H.; Drinkwater, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    The viscoelastic adjustment of the solid Earth to former glacial loads in Antarctica and the associated gravity-field change and surface displacement is a major uncertainty in determining the mass balance of the ice sheet from satellite gravimetry, and, to a lesser extent, altimetry measurements such as CryoSat-2. On the other hand, measurements of GIA inferred from the geodetic observations provide valuable information on the glacial history and the lithosphere and mantle properties in Antarctica. Here, we present an improved regional GIA estimate based on GRACE, Envisat/ICESat and GPS measurements. Making use of the different sensitivities of the observations to surface-mass and solid Earth processes, we derive an improved GIA field, using an ensemble of viscoelastic response functions to a disc load forcing. The estimated GIA signal is interpreted for recent ice load changes in West Antarctica in the presence of a low-viscous upper mantle, and evaluated for correcting GRACE and CryoSat-2 measurements when determining present-day ice-mass balance in Antarctica. The results are part of the ESA-STSE project REGINA, www.regina-science.eu.

  18. The SunCloud project: worldwide compilation of long-term series of sunshine duration and cloudiness observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Pallé, Enric; Wild, Martin; Calbó, Josep; Brunetti, Michelle; Stanhill, Gerald; Brázdil, Rudolf; Barriendos, Mariano; Pereira, Paulo; Azorin-Molina, César

    2010-05-01

    homogenized sunshine series will be studied in order to reconstruct global and regional solar irradiance at the Earth's surface since the late 19th century. Equally, we plan to calibrate sunshine duration measurements against planetary albedo estimations from the Earthshine measurements and other satellite radiation data. Since clouds are the main cause of interannual and decadal variability of radiation reaching the Earth's surface, as a complement to the long-term sunshine series we will also compile worldwide surface cloudiness observations. With this abstract we seek to encourage the climate community to contribute with their own local datasets to the SunCloud project. In the near future we will create a webpage with the main details of this project.

  19. The VLA Low Band Project: Early Commissioning Results and Vision for a Primary Focus-based Commensal Observing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassim, Namir E.; Clarke, T. E.; Hicks, B.; Peters, W. M.; Wilson, T. L.; Cutchin, S.; Owen, F. N.; Perley, R. A.; Durand, S.; Kutz, C.; Harden, P.; Intema, H.; Brisken, W.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Taylor, G. B.; Lazio, T. J.

    2013-01-01

    We present an update on the Jansky Very Large Array Low Band (VLA-LB) project, currently undergoing scientific commissioning and expected to be fully available in 2013. VLA-LB is a joint NRL and NRAO initiative to equip the VLA with broadband low frequency receivers that cover the spectrum between 66 and 470 MHz. The current system can already access the 66 to 86 MHz and 230 to 436 MHz sub-bands by working with existing 74 and 330 MHz feeds, respectively. The bandwidth at 74 MHz will increase by more than an order of magnitude while the 330 MHz bandwidth increases by approximately a factor of 6. The improved bandwidth and system temperature, coupled with the power of the WIDAR correlator, promise significantly enhanced performance compared to past VLA capabilities. Early commissioning results at “P band” (330 MHz) with a handful of antennas accessing the larger bandwidth indicate sensitivity rivaling that of the legacy 27-antenna, narrow-band old VLA capability. New feeds that can exploit a larger fraction of the available receiver bandwidth are being explored. While VLA-LB is useful as a conventional system, we are looking to enhance its power by leveraging the VLA’s capability to detect radiation at its prime and Cassegrain foci simultaneously. The ability to observe with more than one band in parallel is a powerful multiplier of a telescope’s function, and many instruments (e.g. the GMRT, WSRT and VLA) offer this. A variant is being explored for VLA-LB: observing from the prime focus during all normal Cassegrain observations. This proposed VLA-LB commensal system would piggyback normal VLA observing time to survey at low frequencies with relatively large field of views. Shared fields with other multi-beaming, dipole-based arrays that view the same sky with the VLA, e.g. the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1), would be possible. The collected data will be assembled into a database of spectra and wide-field images, suitable for studies of

  20. Observation Targeting for the Tehachapi Pass and Mid-Columbia Basin: WindSENSE Phase III Project Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, D

    2011-10-22

    The overall goal of this multi-phased research project known as WindSENSE is to develop an observation system deployment strategy that would improve wind power generation forecasts. The objective of the deployment strategy is to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of wind speed at hub-height ({approx}80 m). In Phase III of the project, the focus was on the Mid-Columbia Basin region which encompasses the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) wind generation area shown in Figure 1 that includes Klondike, Stateline, and Hopkins Ridge wind plants. The typical hub height of a wind turbine is approximately 80-m above ground level (AGL). So it would seem that building meteorological towers in the region upwind of a wind generation facility would provide data necessary to improve the short-term forecasts for the 80-m AGL wind speed. However, this additional meteorological information typically does not significantly improve the accuracy of the 0- to 6-hour ahead wind power forecasts because processes controlling wind variability change from day-to-day and, at times, from hour-to-hour. It is also important to note that some processes causing significant changes in wind power production function principally in the vertical direction. These processes will not be detected by meteorological towers at off-site locations. For these reasons, it is quite challenging to determine the best type of sensors and deployment locations. To address the measurement deployment problem, Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA) was applied in the Phase I portion of the WindSENSE project. The ESA approach was initially designed to produce spatial fields that depict the sensitivity of a forecast metric to a set of prior state variables selected by the user. The best combination of variables and locations to improve the forecast was determined using the Multiple Observation Optimization Algorithm (MOOA) developed in Phase I. In Zack et al. (2010a), the ESA-MOOA approach was

  1. Roemer Redux: A Virtual Observational Exercise on Jupiter's Moons and the Speed of Light from Project CLEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Jan Paul; Snyder, G. A.; Marschall, L. A.

    2009-01-01

    Project CLEA announces a new laboratory exercise which allows students to determine the speed of light by timing eclipses of Jupiter's moon Io. The experiment is similar to Ole Roemer's classic 17th Century work which established, for the first time, that light did not travel through space instantaneously. Students view a simulated telescopic view of Jupiter and its satellites, similar to that used in the CLEA exercise, The Revolution of the Moons of Jupiter. After identifying Io, they record the precise time when the moon enters Jupiter's shadow at a date about two months after conjunction. Using the recorded time of this eclipse and the known period of Io, students predict the time of an eclipse near opposition and then record the observed time of that eclipse. The discrepancy between the predicted and observed times, along with the difference in the distance between Earth and Jupiter at the two eclipses yields a value of the speed of light accurate to about 10%. Software provided with the exercise enables students to calculate predicted times and Earth/Jupiter distances, as well as to analyze the time discrepancy and to visualize the logic of the analysis. A student manual, including historical and scientific background of the exercise is provided. Our poster will present examples of the screens and manuals for the exercise and will discuss the limits of accuracy of the method and sources of error. For further information on CLEA exercises, please visit http://www.gettysburg.edu/ marschal/clea/CLEAhome.html This research was sponsored by the National Science Foundation and Gettysburg College.

  2. The changing role of snowmelt- and rainfall dominated floods in Norway under climate change - observations, projections, and uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vormoor, Klaus; Lawrence, Deborah; Bronstert, Axel; Heistermann, Maik; Schlichting, Lena; Wilson, Donna; Kwok Wong, Wai

    2016-04-01

    Climate change is expected to modify the hydrometeorological conditions in Norway. There is increasing evidence for gradually increasing temperatures and recent changes in the intensity and frequency of (heavy) precipitation as well as in the number of days with snow cover in many parts of Norway. Climate projections for the end of the 21st century indicate continuous warming by 2.3-4.6°C, especially during winter and in northern Norway and increasing precipitation by 5-30 % particularly during autumn and winter along the west coast. Many catchments in Norway are characterized by a mixed snowmelt/rainfall regime with prominent peak flows during spring and autumn under current conditions. Changes in the temperature and precipitation regimes will have direct implications for the snow regime in Norway, and thus, most likely also on runoff and flooding via their direct effect on the relative importance of rainfall vs. snowmelt in runoff and flood generation. In this study, we have analyzed: (i) trends in the magnitude and frequency of observed snowmelt- and rainfall driven peak flows in up to 211 catchments in Norway; (ii) projected future changes in the seasonality and generation processes of floods in six Norwegian catchments based on a multi-model/multi-parameter ensemble; (iii) the contribution of the individual ensemble components to overall uncertainty; and (iv) the transferability of calibrated hydrological model parameters under contrasting flood seasonality conditions in five catchments with mixed regimes. The major findings of our analyses are as follows: i. Trends towards increasing flood frequency are more pronounced and spatially more consistent with hydrometeorological drivers than trends in flood magnitude. Regional patterns of positive trends in flood frequency agree with the increasing importance of rainfall driven peak flows, whereas negative trends are found in areas primarily dominated by snowmelt flood generation process. ii. Autumn and early

  3. New Directions in Seismic Hazard Assessment Through Focused Earth Observation in the MARmara SuperSITE - Project Achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meral OZel, Nurcan; Necmioǧlu, Öcal; Ergintav, Semih; Ozel, Oǧuz; Favali, Paolo; Bigarre, Pascal; Çakır, Ziyadin; Ozeren, Sinan; Geli, Louis; Douglas, John; Aochi, Hideo; Bossu, Remy; Zülfikar, Can; Şeşetyan, Karin; Erdik, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    The MARsite Project, which started in November 2012,funded by the EC/ FP7-ENV.2012 6.4-2 (Grant 308417) identifies the Marmara region as a 'Supersite' within European initiatives to aggregate on-shore, off-shore and space-based observations, comprehensive geophysical monitoring, improved hazard and risk assessments encompassed in an integrated set of activities. MARsite aimed to harmonize geological, geophysical, geodetic and geochemical observations to provide a better view of the post-seismic deformation of the 1999 Izmit earthquake (in addition to the post-seismic signature of previous earthquakes), loading of submarine and inland active fault segments and transient pre-earthquake signals, related to stress loading with different tectonic properties in and around Marmara Sea. This presentation provides an overview of the achievements of MARSite which aimed to coordinate research groups ranging from seismology to gas geochemistry in a comprehensive monitoring activity developed in the Marmara Region based on collection of multidisciplinary data to be shared, interpreted and merged in consistent theoretical and practical models suitable for the implementation of good practices to move the necessary information to the end users in charge of seismic risk management of the region. In addition, processes involved in earthquake generation and the physics of short-term seismic transients, 4D deformations to understand earthquake cycle processes, fluid activity monitoring and seismicity under the sea floor using existing autonomous instrumentation, early warning and development of real-time shake and loss information, real- and quasi-real-time earthquake and tsunami hazard monitoring and earthquake-induced landslide hazard topics are also covered within MARSite. In particular, achievements and progress in the design and building of a multi-parameter borehole system consisting of very wide dynamic range and stable borehole (VBB) broad band seismic sensor, with

  4. Stress orientations of Taiwan Chelungpu-Fault Drilling Project (TCDP) hole-A as observed from geophysical logs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, H.-Y.; Ma, K.-F.; Zoback, M.; Boness, N.; Ito, H.; Hung, J.-H.; Hickman, S.

    2007-01-01

    The Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project (TCDP) drilled a 2-km-deep research borehole to investigate the structure and mechanics of the Chelungpu Fault that ruptured in the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake. Geophysical logs of the TCDP were carried out over depths of 500-1900 in, including Dipole Sonic Imager (DSI) logs and Formation Micro Imager (FMI) logs in order to identify bedding planes, fractures and shear zones. From the continuous core obtained from the borehole, a shear zone at a depth of 1110 meters is interpreted to be the Chelungpu fault, located within the Chinshui Shale, which extends from 1013 to 1300 meters depth. Stress-induced borehole breakouts were observed over nearly the entire length of the wellbore. These data show an overall stress direction (???N115??E) that is essentially parallel to the regional stress field and parallel to the convergence direction of the Philippine Sea plate with respect to the Eurasian plate. Variability in the average stress direction is seen at various depths. In particular there is a major stress orientation anomaly in the vicinity of the Chelungpu fault. Abrupt stress rotations at depths of 1000 in and 1310 in are close to the Chinshui Shale's upper and lower boundaries, suggesting the possibility that bedding plane slip occurred during the Chi-Chi earthquake. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Supplement to the site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide additional and more detailed information to supplement review of the site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This document includes a discussion of (1) the average linear velocity of the ground water in the alluvium; (2) the ground water quality of the alluvium, weathered Mancos Shale, and the Tres Hermanos-C Member of the Mancos Shale; and (3) the fate and transport of contaminants from the uppermost aquifer to the Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation. The data from a 1989 aquifer test were analyzed using the curve-matching software AQTESOLV and then compared with the original results. A hydrograph of the ground water elevations in monitoring wells screened in the alluvium is presented to show how the ground water elevations change with time. Stiff and Piper diagrams were created to describe the changes in ground water geochemistry in the alluvium/weathered Mancos Shale unit, the Tres Hermanos-C Sandstone unit, the Tres Hermanos-B Sandstone unit, and the Dakota Sandstone. Background information on other related topics such as site history, cell construction, soil characteristics, and well construction are presented in the SOWP. Figure 1 is a geologic cross section depicting the conceptual model of the hydrostratigraphy and ground water chemistry of the Ambrosia Lake site. Table 1 presents hydrogeologic information of each hydrostratigraphic unit.

  6. Supplement to the site observational work plan for the UMTRA project site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide additional and more detailed information to supplement review of the site observational work plan (SOWP) (DOE, 1995) for the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This document includes a discussion of the average linear velocity of the ground water in the alluvium and a discussion of the ground water quality of the alluvium, weathered Mancos Shale, and the Tres Hermanos-C Member of the Mancos Shale. The data from a 1989 aquifer test were analyzed using the curve-matching software AQTESOLV and then compared with the original results. A hydrograph of the ground water elevations in monitoring wells screened in the alluvium is presented to show how the ground water elevations change with time. Stiff and Piper diagrams were created to describe the changes in ground water geochemistry in the alluvium/weathered Mancos Sahel unit, the Tres Hermanos-C Sandstone unit, the Tres Hermanos-B Sandstone unit, and the Dakota Sandstone. Background information on other related topics such as site history, cell construction, soil characteristics, and well construction are presented in the SOWP. A geologic cross section depicts the conceptual model of the hydrostratigraphy and ground water chemistry of the Ambrosia Lake site. Hydrogeologic information of each hydrostratigraphic unit is presented.

  7. Observational calibration of the projection factor of Cepheids. II. Application to nine Cepheids with HST/FGS parallax measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitfelder, J.; Mérand, A.; Kervella, P.; Gallenne, A.; Szabados, L.; Anderson, R. I.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.

    2016-03-01

    Context. The distance to pulsating stars is classically estimated using the parallax-of-pulsation (PoP) method, which combines spectroscopic radial velocity (RV) measurements and angular diameter (AD) estimates to derive the distance of the star. A particularly important application of this method is the determination of Cepheid distances in view of the calibration of their distance scale. However, the conversion of radial to pulsational velocities in the PoP method relies on a poorly calibrated parameter, the projection factor (p-factor). Aims: We aim to measure empirically the value of the p-factors of a homogeneous sample of nine bright Galactic Cepheids for which trigonometric parallaxes were measured with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Fine Guidance Sensor. Methods: We use the SPIPS algorithm, a robust implementation of the PoP method that combines photometry, interferometry, and radial velocity measurements in a global modeling of the pulsation of the star. We obtained new interferometric angular diameter measurements using the PIONIER instrument at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI), completed by data from the literature. Using the known distance as an input, we derive the value of the p-factor of the nine stars of our sample and study its dependence with the pulsation period. Results: We find the following p-factors: p = 1.20 ± 0.12 for RT Aur, p = 1.48 ± 0.18 for T Vul, p = 1.14 ± 0.10 for FF Aql, p = 1.31 ± 0.19 for Y Sgr, p = 1.39 ± 0.09 for X Sgr, p = 1.35 ± 0.13 for W Sgr, p = 1.36 ± 0.08 for β Dor, p = 1.41 ± 0.10 for ζ Gem, and p = 1.23 ± 0.12 for ℓ Car. Conclusions: The values of the p-factors that we obtain are consistently close to p = 1.324 ± 0.024. We observe some dispersion around this average value, but the observed distribution is statistically consistent with a constant value of the p-factor as a function of the pulsation period (χ2 = 0.669). The error budget of our determination of the p-factor values is

  8. Tower-scale performance of four observation-based evapotranspiration algorithms within the WACMOS-ET project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Dominik; Miralles, Diego; Jimenez, Carlos; Ershadi, Ali; McCabe, Matthew F.; Hirschi, Martin; Seneviratne, Sonia I.; Jung, Martin; Wood, Eric F.; (Bob) Su, Z.; Timmermans, Joris; Chen, Xuelong; Fisher, Joshua B.; Mu, Quiaozen; Fernandez, Diego

    2015-04-01

    Research on climate variations and the development of predictive capabilities largely rely on globally available reference data series of the different components of the energy and water cycles. Several efforts have recently aimed at producing large-scale and long-term reference data sets of these components, e.g. based on in situ observations and remote sensing, in order to allow for diagnostic analyses of the drivers of temporal variations in the climate system. Evapotranspiration (ET) is an essential component of the energy and water cycle, which cannot be monitored directly on a global scale by remote sensing techniques. In recent years, several global multi-year ET data sets have been derived from remote sensing-based estimates, observation-driven land surface model simulations or atmospheric reanalyses. The LandFlux-EVAL initiative presented an ensemble-evaluation of these data sets over the time periods 1989-1995 and 1989-2005 (Mueller et al. 2013). The WACMOS-ET project (http://wacmoset.estellus.eu) started in the year 2012 and constitutes an ESA contribution to the GEWEX initiative LandFlux. It focuses on advancing the development of ET estimates at global, regional and tower scales. WACMOS-ET aims at developing a Reference Input Data Set exploiting European Earth Observations assets and deriving ET estimates produced by a set of four ET algorithms covering the period 2005-2007. The algorithms used are the SEBS (Su et al., 2002), Penman-Monteith from MODIS (Mu et al., 2011), the Priestley and Taylor JPL model (Fisher et al., 2008) and GLEAM (Miralles et al., 2011). The algorithms are run with Fluxnet tower observations, reanalysis data (ERA-Interim), and satellite forcings. They are cross-compared and validated against in-situ data. In this presentation the performance of the different ET algorithms with respect to different temporal resolutions, hydrological regimes, land cover types (including grassland, cropland, shrubland, vegetation mosaic, savanna

  9. Evolution of the Physicochemical and Activation Properties of Aerosols within Smoke Plumes during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlinson, J. M.; Mei, F.; Wang, J.; Comstock, J. M.; Hubbe, J. M.; Pekour, M. S.; Shilling, J. E.; Fortner, E.; Chand, D.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Kleinman, L. I.; Senum, G.; Schmid, B.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning from wildfires and controlled agricultural burns are known to be a major source of fine particles and organic aerosols at northern temperate latitudes during the summer months. However, the evolution of the physicochemical properties of the aerosol during transport and the potential impact of this evolution on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity has rarely been studied for these events. During the DOE-sponsored Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) conducted in the summer and fall of 2013, over 30 research flights sampled biomass burning plumes from wildfires in the Northwestern United States and agricultural burns in the Mid-South region of the United States. A large suite of instruments aboard the DOE G-1 (Gulfstream-1) measured the chemical, physical, and optical properties of biomass burning aerosol with an emphasis on black carbon. A Fast Integrated Mobility Spectrometer (FIMS), Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer - Airborne (UHSAS-A), and Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer (PCASP) were used to measure the aerosol size distribution from 15 - 3,000 nm at 1-Hz. A dual column CCN counter measured the CCN number concentration at supersaturations of 0.25% and 0.50% at a time resolution of 1-Hz and the aerosol chemical composition was measured using a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS, Aerodyne, Inc). The SP-AMS was operated in two modes: (i) as a traditional high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, Aerodyne Inc.), which measured chemical composition of non-refractory aerosols and (ii) as the SP-AMS which measured chemical composition of the refractory black carbon-containing (rBC) particle coating and rBC aerosol mass. Utilizing the aforementioned measurements, a CCN closure study is used to investigate the emitted aerosol hygroscopicity, the evolution of the physicochemical properties of the aerosol, and the potential impacts on cloud microphysics from the different fuel sources.

  10. A case study of the Thunderstorm Research International Project. 2. Interrelations among the observable parameters controlling electrification

    SciTech Connect

    Nisbet, J.S.; Kasha, J.R.; Forbes, G.S. )

    1990-04-20

    In Part 1 of this paper, the data obtained at the time of the Thunderstorm Research International Project storm at the Kennedy Space Center on July 11, 1978, are discussed and analyzed in a model-independent manner. Here the parameters of the electrical system that would be consistent with these observations are discussed. Three-dimensional electrodynamic modeling of the thundercloud electrification allowed estimates to be made of the current moments and electrical power generated continuously throughout the evolution of the two cells of the storm that were studied. The evolution and configuration of the currents were consistent with the separation of an originally neutral ensemble of particles by gravity in the region of 7 km in the region close to the maximum of the updraft velocity. After about 370 s the effect of wind shears would have caused the particles to separate in the convective system of the cells. Rain did not appear to be the dominant charge carrier. The current moments generated were compared with the current moments transferred by intercloud and cloud-to-ground lightning. It is shown that for the southern cell, which produced a charge moment of about 8.4 (MC m), lightning utilized about 84% of the charge moment separated, while for the northern cell, which produced about 1.1 (MC m), this figure was approximately 60%. It was shown that the times of initiation and maximum electrical power generated correspond best with the normalized mass above 7.5 km. It was deduced that the median diameter heavier particles had a fall velocity of about 3 m/s. The generator currents, flash rates, cloud conductivities, and mean charge per flash were used to estimate the volume associated with the lower region of current divergence.

  11. Highly resolved observations of trace gases in the lowermost stratosphere and upper troposphere from the Spurt project: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, A.; Bönisch, H.; Brunner, D.; Fischer, H.; Franke, H.; Günther, G.; Gurk, C.; Hegglin, M.; Hoor, P.; Königstedt, R.; Krebsbach, M.; Maser, R.; Parchatka, U.; Peter, Th.; Schell, D.; Schiller, C.; Schmidt, U.; Spelten, N.; Szabo, T.; Weers, U.; Wernli, H.; Wetter, Th.; Wirth, V.

    2005-07-01

    During SPURT (Spurenstofftransport in der Tropopausenregion, trace gas transport in the tropopause region) we performed measurements of a wide range of trace gases with different lifetimes and sink/source characteristics in the northern hemispheric upper troposphere (UT) and lowermost stratosphere (LMS). A large number of in-situ instruments were deployed on board a Learjet 35A, flying at altitudes up to 13.7 km, at times reaching to nearly 380 K potential temperature. Eight measurement campaigns (consisting of a total of 36 flights), distributed over all seasons and typically covering latitudes between 35° N and 75° N in the European longitude sector (10° W-20° E), were performed. Here we present an overview of the project, describing the instrumentation, the encountered meteorological situations during the campaigns and the data set available from SPURT. Measurements were obtained for N2O, CH4, CO, CO2, CFC12, H2, SF6, NO, NOy, O3 and H2O. We illustrate the strength of this new data set by showing mean distributions of the mixing ratios of selected trace gases, using a potential temperature - equivalent latitude coordinate system. The observations reveal that the LMS is most stratospheric in character during spring, with the highest mixing ratios of O3 and NOy and the lowest mixing ratios of N2O and SF6. The lowest mixing ratios of NOy and O3 are observed during autumn, together with the highest mixing ratios of N2O and SF6 indicating a strong tropospheric influence. For H2O, however, the maximum concentrations in the LMS are found during summer, suggesting unique (temperature- and convection-controlled) conditions for this molecule during transport across the tropopause. The SPURT data set is presently the most accurate and complete data set for many trace species in the LMS, and its main value is the simultaneous measurement of a suite of trace gases having different lifetimes and physical-chemical histories. It is thus very well suited for studies of

  12. Highly resolved observations of trace gases in the lowermost stratosphere and upper troposphere from the Spurt project: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, A.; Bönisch, H.; Brunner, D.; Fischer, H.; Franke, H.; Günther, G.; Gurk, C.; Hegglin, M.; Hoor, P.; Königstedt, R.; Krebsbach, M.; Maser, R.; Parchatka, U.; Peter, T.; Schell, D.; Schiller, C.; Schmidt, U.; Spelten, N.; Szabo, T.; Weers, U.; Wernli, H.; Wetter, T.; Wirth, V.

    2006-02-01

    During SPURT (Spurenstofftransport in der Tropopausenregion, trace gas transport in the tropopause region) we performed measurements of a wide range of trace gases with different lifetimes and sink/source characteristics in the northern hemispheric upper troposphere (UT) and lowermost stratosphere (LMS). A large number of in-situ instruments were deployed on board a Learjet 35A, flying at altitudes up to 13.7 km, at times reaching to nearly 380 K potential temperature. Eight measurement campaigns (consisting of a total of 36 flights), distributed over all seasons and typically covering latitudes between 35° N and 75° N in the European longitude sector (10° W-20° E), were performed. Here we present an overview of the project, describing the instrumentation, the encountered meteorological situations during the campaigns and the data set available from SPURT. Measurements were obtained for N2O, CH4, CO, CO2, CFC12, H2, SF6, NO, NOy, O3 and H2O. We illustrate the strength of this new data set by showing mean distributions of the mixing ratios of selected trace gases, using a potential temperature-equivalent latitude coordinate system. The observations reveal that the LMS is most stratospheric in character during spring, with the highest mixing ratios of O3 and NOy and the lowest mixing ratios of N2O and SF6. The lowest mixing ratios of NOy and O3 are observed during autumn, together with the highest mixing ratios of N2O and SF6 indicating a strong tropospheric influence. For H2O, however, the maximum concentrations in the LMS are found during summer, suggesting unique (temperature- and convection-controlled) conditions for this molecule during transport across the tropopause. The SPURT data set is presently the most accurate and complete data set for many trace species in the LMS, and its main value is the simultaneous measurement of a suite of trace gases having different lifetimes and physical-chemical histories. It is thus very well suited for studies of

  13. The SunCloud project: An initiative for a development of a worldwide sunshine duration and cloudiness observations dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lorenzo, A.

    2010-09-01

    One problem encountered when establishing the causes of global dimming and brightening is the limited number of long-term solar radiation series with accurate and calibrated measurements. For this reason, the analysis is often supported and extended with the use of other climatic variables such as sunshine duration and cloud cover. Specifically, sunshine duration is defined as the amount of time usually expressed in hours that direct solar radiation exceeds a certain threshold (usually taken at 120 W m-2). Consequently, this variable can be considered as an excellent proxy measure of solar radiation at interannual and decadal time scales, with the advantage that measurements of this variable were initiated in the late 19th century in different, worldwide, main meteorological stations. Nevertheless, detailed and up-to-date analysis of sunshine duration behavior on global or hemispheric scales are still missing. Thus, starting on September 2010 in the framework of different research projects, we will engage a worldwide compilation of the longest daily or monthly sunshine duration series from the late 19th century until present. Several quality control checks and homogenization methods will be applied to the generated sunshine dataset. The relationship between the more precise downward solar radiation series from the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) and the homogenized sunshine series will be studied in order to reconstruct global and regional solar irradiance at the Earth's surface since the late 19th century. Since clouds are the main cause of interannual and decadal variability of radiation reaching the Earth's surface, as a complement to the long-term sunshine series we will also compile worldwide surface cloudiness observations. With this presentation we seek to encourage the climate community to contribute with their own local datasets to the SunCloud project. The SunCloud Team: M. Wild, Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, ETH Zurich, Switzerland

  14. Long-term variations of absolute and superconducting gravity values in Southeast Alaska, observed by the ISEA2 project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazama, T.; Hideaki, H.; Miura, S.; Kaufman, M.; Sato, T.; Larsen, C. F.; Freymueller, J. T.

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that gravity values have been decreasing in Southeast Alaska, mainly due to glacier mass changes from the end of the Little Ice Age to the present. For example, absolute gravity measurements made by the ISEA1 project (2006-2008) showed a maximum gravity change rate of -5.6 micro-gal/year (Sun et al., 2010; Sato et al., 2012a), which was consistent with large uplift rates obtained from GPS data (Larsen et al., 2005). However, the newly-obtained absolute gravity values in 2012 were about 10 micro-gal greater than expected based on the gravity trends of Sun et al. (2010), possibly because of above-average snowfall in the winter of 2011-2012 (Sato et al., 2012b). In order to monitor spatiotemporal gravity changes associated with glacier mass changes, seasonal hydrological gravity changes should be quantified via continuous gravity observations and/or hydrological modeling. We thus installed a superconducting gravimeter iGrav (serial number: 003) at Egan Library, University of Alaska Southeast in June 2012, as part of the ISEA2 project (2011-2015). The mass position (unit: volts) and air pressure have been recorded every second since June 2012, and the gravity value was then calculated from the mass position, using the scale factor of -89.561 micro-gal/V (Sato et al., 2012b). After the removal of tidal gravity changes using the BAYTAP software (Tamura et al., 1991), a gravity change of 4 micro-gal in peak to peak was extracted from the long-term superconducting gravity data from June 2012 to July 2013. Note that this non-tidal gravity change includes the instrumental drift, although the drift rate was very small (less than 1 micro-gal/year) according to the linear regression to the gravity change. We will discuss possible physical mechanisms of the non-tidal gravity change associated with water redistribution, using a hydrological model (e.g., Kazama et al., 2012) and/or long-term weather data. In addition, we also measured absolute gravity values at 6

  15. Observations of coastal sediment dynamics of the Tijuana Estuary Fine Sediment Fate and Transport Demonstration Project, Imperial Beach, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Rosenberger, Kurt J.; Lam, Angela; Ferreiera, Joanne; Miller, Ian M.; Rippy, Meg; Svejkovsky, Jan; Mustain, Neomi

    2012-01-01

    Coastal restoration and management must address the presence, use, and transportation of fine sediment, yet little information exists on the patterns and/or processes of fine-sediment transport and deposition for these systems. To fill this information gap, a number of State of California, Federal, and private industry partners developed the Tijuana Estuary Fine Sediment Fate and Transport Demonstration Project ("Demonstration Project") with the purpose of monitoring the transport, fate, and impacts of fine sediment from beach-sediment nourishments in 2008 and 2009 near the Tijuana River estuary, Imperial Beach, California. The primary purpose of the Demonstration Project was to collect and provide information about the directions, rates, and processes of fine-sediment transport along and across a California beach and nearshore setting. To achieve these goals, the U.S. Geological Survey monitored water, beach, and seafloor properties during the 2008–2009 Demonstration Project. The project utilized sediment with ~40 percent fine sediment by mass so that the dispersal and transport of fine sediment would be easily recognizable. The purpose of this report is to present and disseminate the data collected during the physical monitoring of the Demonstration Project. These data are available online at the links noted in the "Additional Digital Information" section. Synthesis of these data and results will be provided in subsequent publications.

  16. Large-scale atmospheric circulation and local particulate matter concentrations in Bavaria - from current observations to future projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christoph; Weitnauer, Claudia; Brosy, Caroline; Hald, Cornelius; Lochbihler, Kai; Siegmund, Stefan; Jacobeit, Jucundus

    2016-04-01

    Particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm or less (PM10) may have distinct adverse effects on human health. Spatial and temporal variations in PM10 concentrations reflect local emission rates, but are as well influenced by the local and synoptic-scale atmospheric conditions. Against this background, it can be furthermore argued that potential future climate change and associated variations in large-scale atmospheric circulation and local meteorological parameters will probably provoke corresponding changes in future PM10 concentration levels. The DFG-funded research project „Particulate matter and climate change in Bavaria" aimed at establishing quantitative relationships between daily and monthly PM10 indices at different Bavarian urban stations and the corresponding large-scale atmospheric circulation as well as local meteorological conditions. To this end, several statistical downscaling approaches have been developed for the period 1980 to 2011. PM10 data from 19 stations from the air quality monitoring network (LÜB) of the Bavarian Environmental Agency (LfU) have been utilized as predictands. Large-scale atmospheric gridded data from the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data base and local meteorological observational data provided by the German Meteorological Service (DWD) served as predictors. The downscaling approaches encompass the synoptic downscaling of daily PM10 concentrations and several multivariate statistical models for the estimation of daily and monthly PM10, i.e.monthly mean and number of days exceeding a certain PM10 concentration threshold. Both techniques utilize objective circulation type classifications, which have been optimized with respect to their synoptic skill for the target variable PM10. All downscaling approaches have been evaluated via cross validation using varying subintervals of the 1980-2011 period as calibration and validation periods respectively. The most suitable - in terms of model skill determined from cross

  17. The Megasecond Chandra X-Ray Visionary Project Observation of NGC 3115. II. Properties of Point Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Dacheng; Irwin, Jimmy A.; Wong, Ka-Wah; Jennings, Zachary G.; Homan, Jeroen; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Strader, Jay; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Brodie, Jean P.; Remillard, Ronald A.

    2015-07-01

    We carried out an in-depth study of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) detected in the nearby lenticular galaxy NGC 3115 using the Megasecond Chandra X-ray Visionary Project observation (total exposure time 1.1 Ms). In total we found 136 candidate LMXBs in the field and 49 in globular clusters (GCs) above 2σ detection, with 0.3-8 keV luminosity LX ˜ 1036-1039 erg s-1. Other than 13 transient candidates, the sources overall have less long-term variability at higher luminosity, at least at {L}{{X}}≳ 2× {10}37 erg s-1. In order to identify the nature and spectral state of our sources, we compared their collective spectral properties based on single-component models (a simple power law or a multicolor disk) with the spectral evolution seen in representative Galactic LMXBs. We found that in the LX versus photon index {{{Γ }}}{PL} and LX versus disk temperature kTMCD plots, most of our sources fall on a narrow track in which the spectral shape hardens with increasing luminosity below {L}{{X}}˜ 7× {10}37 erg s-1, but is relatively constant ({{{Γ }}}{PL}˜ 1.5 or {{kT}}{MCD}˜ 1.5 keV) above this luminosity, which is similar to the spectral evolution of Galactic neutron star (NS) LMXBs in the soft state in the Chandra bandpass. Therefore, we identified the track as the NS LMXB soft-state track and suggested sources with {L}{{X}}≲ 7× {10}37 erg s-1 as atolls in the soft state and those with {L}{{X}}≳ 7× {10}37 erg s-1 as Z sources. Ten other sources (five are transients) displayed significantly softer spectra and are probably black hole X-ray binaries in the thermal state. One of them (persistent) is in a metal-poor GC.

  18. The Megasecond Chandra X-Ray Visionary Project Observation of NGC 3115. II. Properties of Point Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Dacheng; Irwin, Jimmy A.; Wong, Ka-Wah; Jennings, Zachary G.; Homan, Jeroen; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Strader, Jay; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Brodie, Jean P.; Remillard, Ronald A.

    2015-07-01

    We carried out an in-depth study of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) detected in the nearby lenticular galaxy NGC 3115 using the Megasecond Chandra X-ray Visionary Project observation (total exposure time 1.1 Ms). In total we found 136 candidate LMXBs in the field and 49 in globular clusters (GCs) above 2σ detection, with 0.3–8 keV luminosity LX ∼ 1036–1039 erg s‑1. Other than 13 transient candidates, the sources overall have less long-term variability at higher luminosity, at least at {L}{{X}}≳ 2× {10}37 erg s‑1. In order to identify the nature and spectral state of our sources, we compared their collective spectral properties based on single-component models (a simple power law or a multicolor disk) with the spectral evolution seen in representative Galactic LMXBs. We found that in the LX versus photon index {{{Γ }}}{PL} and LX versus disk temperature kTMCD plots, most of our sources fall on a narrow track in which the spectral shape hardens with increasing luminosity below {L}{{X}}∼ 7× {10}37 erg s‑1, but is relatively constant ({{{Γ }}}{PL}∼ 1.5 or {{kT}}{MCD}∼ 1.5 keV) above this luminosity, which is similar to the spectral evolution of Galactic neutron star (NS) LMXBs in the soft state in the Chandra bandpass. Therefore, we identified the track as the NS LMXB soft-state track and suggested sources with {L}{{X}}≲ 7× {10}37 erg s‑1 as atolls in the soft state and those with {L}{{X}}≳ 7× {10}37 erg s‑1 as Z sources. Ten other sources (five are transients) displayed significantly softer spectra and are probably black hole X-ray binaries in the thermal state. One of them (persistent) is in a metal-poor GC.

  19. Comparison of Channel Methods and Observer Models for the Task-Based Assessment of Multi-Projection Imaging in the Presence of Structured Anatomical Noise.

    PubMed

    Park, Subok; Zhang, George; Myers, Kyle J

    2016-06-01

    Although Laguerre-Gauss (LG) channels are often used for the task-based assessment of multi-projection imaging, LG channels may not be the most reliable in providing performance trends as a function of system or object parameters for all situations. Partial least squares (PLS) channels are more flexible in adapting to background and signal data statistics and were shown to be more efficient for detection tasks involving 2D non-Gaussian random backgrounds (Witten , 2010). In this work, we investigate ways of incorporating spatial correlations in the multi-projection data space using 2D LG channels and two implementations of PLS in the channelized version of the 3D projection Hotelling observer (Park , 2010) (3Dp CHO). Our task is to detect spherical and elliptical 3D signals in the angular projections of a structured breast phantom ensemble. The single PLS (sPLS) incorporates the spatial correlation within each projection, whereas the combined PLS (cPLS) incorporates the spatial correlations both within each of and across the projections. The 3Dp CHO-R indirectly incorporates the spatial correlation from the response space (R), whereas the 3Dp CHO-C from the channel space (C). The 3Dp CHO-R-sPLS has potential to be a good surrogate observer when either sample size is small or one training set is used for training both PLS channels and observer. So does the 3Dp CHO-C-cPLS when the sample size is large enough to have a good sized independent set for training PLS channels. Lastly a stack of 2D LG channels used as 3D channels in the CHO-C model showed the capability of incorporating the spatial correlation between the multiple angular projections. PMID:26742128

  20. Back to the Future - Observing the Transit of Venus now and then a student project supporting by Europlanet Outreach Funding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, A.

    2013-09-01

    The project had many - sided targets: we tried to focus on both global as well as local aims, such as international co-operation, global and local interaction, innovation and sharing best practice. By implementing the project, we would have liked to popularise the results and impacts of the 1769 Venus expedition performed by János Sajnovics and Miksa Hell. We would have liked to highlight the pioneer work done by the two scientists, and to inspire the young generation to be creative in using modern technology.

  1. Observing Some Life Cycles. Teacher's Guide. Unit E3. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitepo, Thoko; And Others

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide contains instructional…

  2. The Costa Rica GLOBE (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment) Project as a Learning Science Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro Rojas, María Dolores; Zuñiga, Ana Lourdes Acuña; Ugalde, Emmanuel Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    GLOBE is a global educational program for elementary and high school levels, and its main purpose in Costa Rica is to develop scientific thinking and interest for science in high school students through hydrology research projects that allow them to relate science with environmental issues in their communities. Youth between 12 and 17 years old…

  3. CEOP/IVE/GDP Compared With CEOP as the First-line Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Adult Patients With PTCL

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma; ALK-negative Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T Cell Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis Like T Cell Lymphoma; Acute Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  4. Using SMOS observations in the development of the SMAP level 4 surface and root-zone soil moisture project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS; [1]) mission was launched by ESA in November 2009 and has since been observing L-band (1.4 GHz) upwelling passive microwaves. Along with these brightness temperature observations, ESA also disseminates retrievals of surface soil moisture that are derived ...

  5. Dynamic Assessment of Seismic Risk (DASR) by Multi-parametric Observations: Preliminary Results of PRIME experiment within the PRE-EARTHQUAKES EU-FP7 Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramutoli, V.; Inan, S.; Jakowski, N.; Pulinets, S. A.; Romanov, A.; Filizzola, C.; Shagimuratov, I.; Pergola, N.; Ouzounov, D. P.; Papadopoulos, G. A.; Parrot, M.; Genzano, N.; Lisi, M.; Alparlsan, E.; Wilken, V.; Tsybukia, K.; Romanov, A.; Paciello, R.; Zakharenkova, I.; Romano, G.

    2012-12-01

    The integration of different observations together with the refinement of data analysis methods, is generally expected to improve our present knowledge of preparatory phases of earthquakes and of their possible precursors. This is also the main goal of PRE-EARTHQUAKES (Processing Russian and European EARTH observations for earthQUAKE precursors Studies) the FP7 Project which, to this aim, committed together, different international expertise and observational capabilities, in the last 2 years. In the learning phase of the project, different parameters (e.g. thermal anomalies, total electron content, radon concentration, etc.), measured from ground and satellite systems and analyzed by using different data analysis approaches, have been studied for selected geographic areas and specific seismic events in the past. Since July 2012 the PRIME (PRE-EARTHQUAKES Real-time Integration and Monitoring Experiment) started attempting to perform, on the base of independent observations collected and integrated in real-time through the PEG (PRE-EARTHQUAKES Geo-portal), a Dynamic Assessment of Seismic Risk (DASR) on selected geographic areas of Europe (Italy-Greece-Turkey) and Asia (Kamchatka, Sakhalin, Japan). In this paper, results so far achieved as well as the potential and opportunities they open for a worldwide Earthquake Observation System (EQuOS) - as a dedicated component of GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) - will be presented.

  6. [The results of the multicenter pharmaco-epidemiological observational project on the use of mydocalm in the treatment of pain syndromes with the muscle spasm].

    PubMed

    Skoromets, A A; Gekht, A B; Galanov, D V; Danilenko, O A; Barantsevich, E R; Lebedeva, A V; Belova, A N; Shprakh, V V; Bogdanov, E I; Prokopenko, S V; Khabirov, F A; Spirin, N N; Baliazin, V A; Miakotnykh, V S; Volkova, L I; Gafurov, B G; Mishchenko, T S; Toktomushev, Ch T; Shyralieva, R K; Musaev, S K; Guseinov, S G

    2015-01-01

    The prospective multicenter open noncomparative pharmaco-epidemiological observational project on the use of mydocalm in real clinical practice has been completed in 2013. The project has been performed in 2090 clinical/rehabilitation settings in 284 cities of 13 countries using the results of 35,383 patients. The project aimed to assess the safety of treatment (percentage of patients with adverse-effects) and pain relieving efficacy as well as patient's satisfaction with the treatment. In total, 6603 (19%) adverse-effects were recorded. Their severity was evaluated as mild in 84,48%, no serious adverse-effects were noted. The high efficacy of mydocalm in the treatment of pain syndromes with the muscle spasm has been demonstrated. The high level of tolerability and absence of the clinically significant increase of adverse effects in the combination with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been confirmed. PMID:26978502

  7. Impacts of wave energy conversion devices on local wave climate: observations and modelling from the Perth Wave Energy Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeke, Ron; Hemer, Mark; Contardo, Stephanie; Symonds, Graham; Mcinnes, Kathy

    2016-04-01

    As demonstrated by the Australian Wave Energy Atlas (AWavEA), the southern and western margins of the country possess considerable wave energy resources. The Australia Government has made notable investments in pre-commercial wave energy developments in these areas, however little is known about how this technology may impact local wave climate and subsequently affect neighbouring coastal environments, e.g. altering sediment transport, causing shoreline erosion or accretion. In this study, a network of in-situ wave measurement devices have been deployed surrounding the 3 wave energy converters of the Carnegie Wave Energy Limited's Perth Wave Energy Project. This data is being used to develop, calibrate and validate numerical simulations of the project site. Early stage results will be presented and potential simulation strategies for scaling-up the findings to larger arrays of wave energy converters will be discussed. The intended project outcomes are to establish zones of impact defined in terms of changes in local wave energy spectra and to initiate best practice guidelines for the establishment of wave energy conversion sites.

  8. Simulated lesion, human observer performance comparison between thin-section dedicated breast CT images versus computed thick-section simulated projection images of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Boone, JM; Abbey, CK; Hargreaves, J; Bateni, C; Lindfors, KK; Yang, K; Nosratieh, A; Hernandez, A; Gazi, P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to compare the lesion detection performance of human observers between thin-section computed tomography images of the breast, with thick-section (>40 mm) simulated projection images of the breast. Methods Three radiologists and six physicists each executed a two alterative force choice (2AFC) study involving simulated spherical lesions placed mathematically into breast images produced on a prototype dedicated breast CT scanner. The breast image data sets from 88 patients were used to create 352 pairs of image data. Spherical lesions with diameters of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 11 mm were simulated and adaptively positioned into 3D breast CT image data sets; the native thin section (0.33 mm) images were averaged to produce images with different slice thicknesses; average section thicknesses of 0.33 mm, 0.71 mm, 1.5 mm, and 2.9 mm were representative of breast CT; the average 43 mm slice thickness served to simulate simulated projection images of the breast. Results The percent correct of the human observer’s responses were evaluated in the 2AFC experiments. Radiologists lesion detection performance was significantly (p<0.05) better in the case of thin-section images, compared to thick section images similar to mammography, for all but the 1 mm lesion diameter lesions. For example, the average of three radiologist’s performance for 3 mm diameter lesions was 92 % correct for thin section breast CT images while it was 67 % for the simulated projection images. A gradual reduction in observer performance was observed as the section thickness increased beyond about 1 mm. While a performance difference based on breast density was seen in both breast CT and the projection image results, the average radiologist performance using breast CT images in dense breasts outperformed the performance using simulated projection images in fatty breasts for all lesion diameters except 11 mm. The average radiologist performance outperformed that of the

  9. Microtremor Array Measurement Survey and Strong Ground Motion Observation Activities of The MarDiM (SATREPS) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgur Citak, Seckin; Karagoz, Ozlem; Chimoto, Kosuke; Ozel, Oguz; Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Aksahin, Bengi; Arslan, Safa; Hatayama, Ken; Ohori, Michihiro; Hori, Muneo

    2015-04-01

    Since 1939, devastating earthquakes with magnitude greater than seven ruptured North Anatolian Fault (NAF) westward, starting from 1939 Erzincan (Ms=7.9) at the eastern Turkey and including the latest 1999 Izmit-Golcuk (Ms=7.4) and the Duzce (Ms=7.2) earthquakes in the eastern Marmara region, Turkey. On the other hand, the west of the Sea of Marmara an Mw7.4 earthquake ruptured the NAF' s Ganos segment in 1912. The only un-ruptured segments of the NAF in the last century are within the Sea of Marmara, and are identified as a "seismic gap" zone that its rupture may cause a devastating earthquake. In order to unravel the seismic risks of the Marmara region a comprehensive multidisciplinary research project The MarDiM project "Earthquake And Tsunami Disaster Mitigation in The Marmara Region and Disaster Education in Turkey", has already been started since 2003. The project is conducted in the framework of "Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS)" sponsored by Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) and Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). One of the main research field of the project is "Seismic characterization and damage prediction" which aims to improve the prediction accuracy of the estimation of the damages induced by strong ground motions and tsunamis based on reliable source parameters, detailed deep and shallow velocity structure and building data. As for detailed deep and shallow velocity structure microtremor array measurement surveys were conducted in Zeytinburnu district of Istanbul and Tekirdag province at about 81 sites on October 2013 and September 2014. Also in September 2014, 11 accelerometer units were installed mainly in public buildings in both Zeytinburnu and Tekirdag area and are currently in operation. Each accelerometer unit compose of a Network Sensor (CV-374A2) by Tokyo Sokushin, post processing PC for data storage and power supply unit. The Network Sensor (CV-374A2) consist of three servo

  10. Microtremor Array Measurement Survey and Strong Ground Motion observation activities of The SATREPS, MarDiM project -Part 2-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citak, Seckin; Karagoz, Ozlem; Chimoto, Kosuke; Ozel, Oguz; Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Arslan, Safa; Aksahin, Bengi; Hatayama, Ken; Ohori, Michihiro; Hori, Muneo

    2016-04-01

    Since 1939, devastating earthquakes with magnitude greater than seven ruptured North Anatolian Fault (NAF) westward, starting from 1939 Erzincan (Ms=7.9) at the eastern Turkey and including the latest 1999 Izmit-Golcuk (Ms=7.4) and the Duzce (Ms=7.2) earthquakes in the eastern Marmara region, Turkey. On the other hand, the west of the Sea of Marmara an Mw7.4 earthquake ruptured the NAF' s Ganos segment in 1912. The only un-ruptured segments of the NAF in the last century are within the Sea of Marmara, and are identified as a "seismic gap" zone that its rupture may cause a devastating earthquake. In order to unravel the seismic risks of the Marmara region a comprehensive multidisciplinary research project The MarDiM project "Earthquake And Tsunami Disaster Mitigation in The Marmara Region and Disaster Education in Turkey", has already been started since 2003. The project is conducted in the framework of "Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS)" sponsored by Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) and Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). One of the main research field of the project is "Seismic characterization and damage prediction" which aims to improve the prediction accuracy of the estimation of the damages induced by strong ground motions and tsunamis based on reliable source parameters, detailed deep and shallow velocity structure and building data. As for detailed deep and shallow velocity structure microtremor array measurement surveys were conducted in Zeytinburnu district of Istanbul, Tekirdag, Canakkale and Edirne provinces at about 109 sites on October 2013, September 2014 and 2015. Also in September 2014, 11 accelerometer units were installed mainly in public buildings in both Zeytinburnu and Tekirdag area and are currently in operation. Each accelerometer unit compose of a Network Sensor (CV-374A) by Tokyo Sokushin, post processing PC for data storage and power supply unit. The Network Sensor (CV-374