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Sample records for observe planetary systems

  1. Observations of an extreme planetary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raetz, Stefanie; Schmidt, Tobias O. B.; Briceno, Cesar; Neuhäuser, Ralph

    2015-12-01

    Almost 500 planet host stars are already known to be surrounded by more than one planet. Most of them (except HR8799) are old and all planets were found with the same or similar detection method.We present an unique planetary system. For the first time, a close in transiting and a wide directly imaged planet are found to orbit a common host star which is a low mass member of a young open cluster. The inner candidate is the first possible young transiting planet orbiting a previously known weak-lined T-Tauri star and was detected in our international monitoring campaign of young stellar clusters. The transit shape is changing between different observations and the transit even disappears and reappears. This unusual transit behaviour can be explained by a precessing planet transiting a gravity-darkened star.The outer candidate was discovered in the course of our direct imaging survey with NACO at ESO/VLT. Both objects are consistent with a <5 Jupiter mass planet. With ~2.4 Myrs it is among the youngest exoplanet systems. Both planets orbit its star in very extreme conditions. The inner planet is very close to its Roche limiting orbital radius while the outer planet is far away from its host star at a distance of ~660 au. The detailed analysis will provide important constraints on planet formation and migration time-scales and their relation to protoplanetary disc lifetimes. Furthermore, this system with two planets on such extreme orbits gives us the opportunity to study the possible outcome of planet-planet scattering theories for the first time by observations.I will report on our monitoring and photometric follow-up observations as well as on the direct detection and the integral field spectroscopy of this extreme planetary system.

  2. JWST Planetary Observations Within the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, Jonathan; Hammel, Heidi; Schaller, Emily; Sonneborn, George; Orton, Glenn; Rieke, George; Rieke, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    JWST provides capabilities unmatched by other telescopic facilities in the near to mid infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Its combination of broad wavelength range, high sensitivity and near diffraction-limited imaging around two microns wavelength make it a high value facility for a variety of Solar System targets. Beyond Neptune, a class of cold, large bodies that include Pluto, Triton and Eris exhibits surface deposits of nitrogen, methane, and other molecules that are poorly observed from the ground, but for which JWST might provide spectral mapping at high sensitivity and spatial resolution difficult to match with the current generation of ground-based observatories. The observatory will also provide unique sensitivity in a variety of near and mid infrared windows for observing relatively deep into the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune, searching there for minor species. It will examine the Jovian aurora in a wavelength regime where the background atmosphere is dark. Special provision of a subarray observing strategy may allow observation of Jupiter and Saturn over a larger wavelength range despite their large surface brightnesses, allowing for detailed observation of transient phenomena including large scale storms and impact-generation disturbances. JWST's observations of Saturn's moon Titan will overlap with and go beyond the 2017 end-of-mission for Cassini, providing an important extension to the time-series of meteorological studies for much of northern hemisphere summer. It will overlap with a number of other planetary missions to targets for which JWST can make unique types of observations. JWST provides a platform for linking solar system and extrasolar planet studies through its unique observational capabilities in both arenas.

  3. The Jupiter System Observer: Probing the Foundations of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senske, D.; Prockter, L.; Collins, G.; Cooper, J.; Hendrix, A.; Hibbitts, K.; Kivelson, M.; Orton, G.; Schubert, G.; Showman, A.; Turtle, E.; Williams, D.; Kwok, J.; Spilker, T.; Tan-Wang, G.

    2007-12-01

    Galileo's observations in the 1600's of the dynamic system of Jupiter and its moons launched a revolution in understanding the way planetary systems operate. Now, some 400 years later, the discovery of extra solar planetary systems with Jupiter-sized bodies has led to a similar revolution in thought regarding how these systems form and evolve. From the time of Galileo, the Jovian system has been viewed as a solar system in miniature, providing a laboratory to study, diverse and dynamic processes in a single place. The icy Galilean satellites provide a window into solar system history by preserving in their cratering records a chronology dating back nearly 4.5 By and extending to the present. The continuously erupting volcanoes of Io may provide insight into the era when magma oceans were common. The discovery of an internally generated magnetic field at Ganymede, one of only three terrestrial bodies to possess such a field, is a place to gain insight as to how dynamos work. The confirmation and characterization of icy satellite subsurface oceans impacts the way habitability is considered. Understanding the composition and volatile inventory of Jupiter can shed light into how planets accrete from the solar nebulae. Finally, like our sun, Jupiter influences its system through its extensive magnetic field. In early 2007, NASA's Science Mission Directorate formed four Science Definition Teams (SDTs) to formulate science goals and objectives in anticipation of the initiation of a flagship-class mission to the outer solar system (Europa, Jupiter system, Titan and Enceladus). The Jupiter System Observer (JSO) mission concept emphasizes overall Jupiter system science: 1) Jupiter and its atmosphere, 2) the geology and geophysics of the Galilean satellites (Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto), 3) the magnetosphere environment - both Jupiter's and Ganymede's&pand 4) interactions within the system. Focusing on the unique geology, presence of an internal magnetic field and

  4. The Jupiter System Observer: Exploring the Origins of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prockter, Louise; Senske, D.; Collins, G. C.; Cooper, J. F.; Hendrix, A.; Hibbitts, C.; Kivelson, M.; Schubert, G.; Showman, A.; Turtle, E.; Williams, D.

    2007-10-01

    The Jupiter System Observer (JSO) is one of four studies commissioned by NASA's Science Mission Directorate to examine the potential science return from a flagship-class mission to the outer solar system. JSO is a long-duration mission that will study the entire Jupiter system, focusing on both its individual components, including Jupiter's atmosphere, rocky and icy moons, rings, and magnetospheric phenomena, and the interactions between them. The wealth of data to be returned by JSO will enable a fuller understanding of a variety of magnetospheric, atmospheric, and geological processes, and will illuminate the question of how planetary systems form and evolve. The science team has outlined a number of significant science goals that can be accomplished by a spacecraft that tours the Jovian system for several years before ultimately ending up in Ganymede orbit. Ganymede was selected as the final destination for JSO because of its unique place in the Jovian system and the solar system - it is only the third body known to have its own dynamo-generated magnetic field. Ganymede is thought to contain a subsurface ocean and exhibits a surface with a variety of older and younger terrains, making it an excellent target for understanding the formation and evolution of icy satellites. Long-term monitoring of Jupiter's atmosphere and rings, Io's volcanism and torus, and high-resolution flyby imaging of Europa, Callisto and Io will enable an unprecedented study of the Jovian system as a solar system analog, and enables cross-cutting scientific objectives in the fields of atmospheres, geology, magnetospheres, and geophysics.

  5. Observational Research on Star and Planetary System Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Janet P.

    1998-01-01

    Institute scientists collaborate with a number of NASA Ames scientists on observational studies of star and planetary system formation to their mutual benefit. As part of this collaboration, SETI scientists have, from 1988 to the present: (1) contributed to the technical studies at NASA Ames of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), an infrared 2.5 meter telescope in a Boeing 747, which will replace the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), a 0.9 meter telescope in a Lockheed C-141. SOFIA will be an important facility for the future exploration of the formation of stars and planetary systems, and the origins of life, and as such will be an important future facility to SETI scientists; (2) worked with the Laboratory Astrophysics Group at Ames, carrying out laboratory studies of the spectroscopic properties of ices and pre-biotic organics, which could be formed in the interstellar or interplanetary media; (3) helped develop a photometric approach for determining the Frequency of Earth-Sized Inner Planets (FRESIP) around solar-like stars, a project (now called Kepler) which complements the current efforts of the SETI Institute to find evidence for extraterrestrial intelligence; and (4) carried out independent observational research, in particular research on the formation of stars and planetary systems using both ground-based telescopes as well as the KAO.

  6. Observational Research on Star and Planetary System Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Janet P.

    1998-07-01

    Institute scientists collaborate with a number of NASA Ames scientists on observational studies of star and planetary system formation to their mutual benefit. As part of this collaboration, SETI scientists have, from 1988 to the present: (1) contributed to the technical studies at NASA Ames of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), an infrared 2.5 meter telescope in a Boeing 747, which will replace the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), a 0.9 meter telescope in a Lockheed C-141. SOFIA will be an important facility for the future exploration of the formation of stars and planetary systems, and the origins of life, and as such will be an important future facility to SETI scientists; (2) worked with the Laboratory Astrophysics Group at Ames, carrying out laboratory studies of the spectroscopic properties of ices and pre-biotic organics, which could be formed in the interstellar or interplanetary media; (3) helped develop a photometric approach for determining the Frequency of Earth-Sized Inner Planets (FRESIP) around solar-like stars, a project (now called Kepler) which complements the current efforts of the SETI Institute to find evidence for extraterrestrial intelligence; and (4) carried out independent observational research, in particular research on the formation of stars and planetary systems using both ground-based telescopes as well as the KAO.

  7. Thermal Infrared MMTAO Observations of the HR 8799 Planetary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinz, Philip M.; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Sivanandam, Suresh; Heinze, Aren N.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Meyer, Michael R.

    2010-06-01

    We present direct imaging observations at wavelengths of 3.3, 3.8 (L' band), and 4.8 (M band) μm, for the planetary system surrounding HR 8799. All three planets are detected at L' . The c and d components are detected at 3.3 μm, and upper limits are derived from the M-band observations. These observations provide useful constraints on warm giant planet atmospheres. We discuss the current age constraints on the HR 8799 system and show that several potential co-eval objects can be excluded from being co-moving with the star. Comparison of the photometry is made to models for giant planet atmospheres. Models that include non-equilibrium chemistry provide a reasonable match to the colors of c and d. From the observed colors in the thermal infrared, we estimate T eff < 960 K for b and T eff = 1300 and 1170 K for c and d, respectively. This provides an independent check on the effective temperatures and thus masses of the objects from the Marois et al. results. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution.

  8. THERMAL INFRARED MMTAO OBSERVATIONS OF THE HR 8799 PLANETARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Hinz, Philip M.; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Sivanandam, Suresh; Meyer, Michael R.; Heinze, Aren N.; Mamajek, Eric E.

    2010-06-10

    We present direct imaging observations at wavelengths of 3.3, 3.8 (L' band), and 4.8 (M band) {mu}m, for the planetary system surrounding HR 8799. All three planets are detected at L' . The c and d components are detected at 3.3 {mu}m, and upper limits are derived from the M-band observations. These observations provide useful constraints on warm giant planet atmospheres. We discuss the current age constraints on the HR 8799 system and show that several potential co-eval objects can be excluded from being co-moving with the star. Comparison of the photometry is made to models for giant planet atmospheres. Models that include non-equilibrium chemistry provide a reasonable match to the colors of c and d. From the observed colors in the thermal infrared, we estimate T {sub eff} < 960 K for b and T {sub eff} = 1300 and 1170 K for c and d, respectively. This provides an independent check on the effective temperatures and thus masses of the objects from the Marois et al. results.

  9. The Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial Planetary Systems (HOSTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defrère, D.; Hinz, P.; Bryden, G.; Danchi, W. C.; Mennesson, B.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Skemer, A.; Stapeldfeld, K.; Weinberger, A.; Wyatt, M.; Absil, O.; Bailey, V.; Beichman, C.; Downey, E.; Grenz, P.; Haniff, C.; Hoffmann, W.; Kennedy, G.; Lebreton, J.; Leisenring, J.; Marion, L.; Mahon, T. M.; Montoya, M.; Rieke, G.; Roberge, A.; Serabyn, E.; Su, K.; Vaitheeswaran, V.; Vaz, A.

    2014-03-01

    The presence of large amounts of exozodiacal dust around nearby main sequence stars is considered as a potential threat for the direct imaging of Earth-like exoplanets and, hence, the search for biosignatures (Roberge et al. 2012). However, it is also considered as a signpost for the presence of terrestrial planets that might be hidden in the dust disk (Stark and Kuchner 2008). Characterizing exozodiacal dust around nearby sequence stars is therefore a crucial step toward one of the main goals of modern astronomy: finding extraterrestrial life. After briefly reviewing the latest results in this field, we present the exozodiacal dust survey on the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI). The survey is called HOSTS and is specifically designed to determine the prevalence and brightness of exozodiacal dust disks with the sensitivity required to prepare for future New Worlds Missions that will image Earth-like exoplanets. To achieve this objective, the LBTI science team has carefully established a balanced list of 50 nearby main-sequence stars that are likely candidates of these missions and/or can be observed with the best instrument performance (see companion abstract by Roberge et al.). Exozodiacal dust disk candidates detected by the Keck Interferometer Nuller will also be observed. The first results of the survey will be presented. To precisely detect exozodiacal dust, the LBTI combines the two 8-m primary mirrors of the LBT using N-band nulling interferometry. Interferometric combination provides the required angular resolution (70-90 mas) to resolve the habitable zone of nearby main sequence stars while nulling is used to subtract the stellar light and reach the required contrast of a few 10-4. A Kband fringe tracker ensures the stability of the null. The current performance of the instrument and the first nulling measurements will be presented.

  10. Extrasolar planetary systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S.-S.

    1973-01-01

    The terms 'planet' and 'planet-like objects' are defined. The observational search for extrasolar planetary systems is described, as performable by earthbound optical telescopes, by space probes, by long baseline radio interferometry, and finally by inference from the reception of signals sent by intelligent beings in other worlds. It is shown that any planetary system must be preceded by a rotating disk of gas and dust around a central mass. A brief review of the theories of the formation of the solar system is given, along with a proposed scheme for classification of these theories. The evidence for magnetic activity in the early stages of stellar evolution is presented. The magnetic braking theories of solar and stellar rotation are discussed, and an estimate is made for the frequency of occurrence of planetary systems in the universe.

  11. Forming different planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ji-Lin; Xie, Ji-Wei; Liu, Hui-Gen; Zhang, Hui; Sun, Yi-Sui

    2012-08-01

    With the increasing number of detected exoplanet samples, the statistical properties of planetary systems have become much clearer. In this review, we summarize the major statistical results that have been revealed mainly by radial velocity and transiting observations, and try to interpret them within the scope of the classical core-accretion scenario of planet formation, especially in the formation of different orbital architectures for planetary systems around main sequence stars. Based on the different possible formation routes for different planet systems, we tentatively classify them into three major catalogs: hot Jupiter systems, standard systems and distant giant planet systems. The standard system can be further categorized into three sub-types under different circumstances: solar-like systems, hot Super-Earth systems, and subgiant planet systems. We also review the theory of planet detection and formation in binary systems as well as planets in star clusters.

  12. CONSTRAINING THE PLANETARY SYSTEM OF FOMALHAUT USING HIGH-RESOLUTION ALMA OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, A. C.; Payne, M. J.; Ford, E. B.; Shabram, M.; Corder, S.; Dent, W. R. F.

    2012-05-01

    The dynamical evolution of planetary systems leaves observable signatures in debris disks. Optical images trace micron-sized grains, which are strongly affected by stellar radiation and need not coincide with their parent body population. Observations of millimeter-sized grains accurately trace parent bodies, but previous images lack the resolution and sensitivity needed to characterize the ring's morphology. Here we present ALMA 350 GHz observations of the Fomalhaut debris ring. These observations demonstrate that the parent body population is 13-19 AU wide with a sharp inner and outer boundary. We discuss three possible origins for the ring and suggest that debris confined by shepherd planets is the most consistent with the ring's morphology.

  13. Confrontation Between a Quantized Periods of Some Exo-planetary Systems and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Fady Morcos, Abd

    2012-07-01

    Confrontation Between a Quantized Periods of Some Exo-planetary Systems and Observations A.B. Morcos Corot and Kepler were designed to detect Earth-like extra solar planets. The orbital elements and periods of these planets will contain some uncertainties. Many theoretical treatments depend on the idea of quantization were done aiming to find orbital elements of these exoplenets. In the present work, as an extension of previous works, the periods of some extoplanetary systems are calculated by using a simple derived formula. The orbital velocities of some of them are predicted . A comparison between the calculated and observed data is done References 1-J.M. Barnothy , the stability of the Solar System and of small Stellar Systems . (Y.Kazai edn,IAU,1974). 2-L.Nottale,Fractal Space-Time and Microphysics,Towards a Theory of Scale Relativity,( World Scientific, London,1994). 3-L. Nottale, A&A Lett. 315, L9 (1996). 4-L. Nottale, G. Schumacher and J. Gay, A&A , 322, 1018 , (1997). 5-L. Nottale, A&A , 361, 379 (2000). 6-A.G. Agnese and R.Festa, arXiv:astro-ph/9807186v1, (1998). 7-A.G. Agnese and R.Festa, arXiv:astro-ph/9910534v2. (1999). 8- A.B.Morcos, MG 12 , France (2009). 9- A.B.Morcs, Cospar 38 , Bremen , Germany (2010)

  14. Survival of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, William R.

    1996-06-01

    Recent low frequency results from attempts to detect Jupiter-sized planets around nearby stars have raised a question as to whether such objects are all that common. In the over 200 stars observed so far, the yield has been 3%. And, the close orbit (0.05 AU) of the nearly Jupiter-sized object around Peg 51 places the object in an environment where the current paradigm of planetary formation would not predict planets to form at all. Other newly discovered candidates, such a Vir 70 and HR3522, also have suspiciously small semi-major axes for gas giants. Of course, the low yield may be strongly influenced by selection effects since massive planets close to their primaries are more easily detected. Nevertheless, given the results to date, it is natural to wonder whether a planetary system like ours is such a natural outgrowth of a circumplantary disk. In particular, could there be forces absent from the existing paradigm that tend to destroy a planetary system once formed? We point out that strong gravitational interactions (i.e., disk tides) between a newly formed protoplanet and its precursor disk give rise to a net torque that drains angular momentum from the protoplanet's orbit. As a result, protoplanetary objects suffer orbital decay as the disk attempts to destroy the very system it spawns. Strong interaction (type I) leads to gap formation and co-evolution with the disk; weak inter- action (type II) leads to drift relative to the disk and in some cases, a much more rapid decay. Survival of a planetary system may be a comparatively uncommon outcome. Newly discovered planets such as Peg 51b may be evidence of such large-scale orbit migration due to disk tidal torques (i.e., Lin et al., 1996).

  15. The Birth of Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    1997-01-01

    Models of planet formation and of the orbital stability of planetary systems are described and used to discuss possible characteristics of undiscovered planetary systems. Modern theories of star and planet formation, which are based upon observations of the Solar System and of young stars and their environments, predict that rocky planets should form in orbit about most single stars. It is uncertain whether or not gas giant planet formation is common, because most protoplanetary disks may dissipate before solid planetary cores can grow large- enough to gravitationally trap substantial quantities of gas. Another potential hazard to planetary systems is radial decay of planetary orbits resulting from interactions with material within the disk. Planets more massive than Earth have the potential to decay the fastest, and may be able to sweep up smaller planets in their path. The implications of the giant planets found in recent radial velocity searches for the abundances of habitable planets are discussed.

  16. The planetary data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Steven W.

    1991-01-01

    Nasa has sponsored the development of the Planetary Data System (PDS) in order to preserve the scientific returns from past and future planeary missions and to make those data readily accessible in a well-documented form. The PDS encompasses all planetary data, but also provides a distributed, discipline-oriented architecture to best serve the needs of the diverse planetary sciences user-community. It is the intention of the PDS to ease and promote the analysis of planetary data through the development and application of data and documentation standards, basic analysis tools, and technology.

  17. Planetary Ringmoon Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The last decade has seen an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Much of the structure revealed was thoroughly puzzling and fired the imagination of workers in a variety of disciplines. Consequently, we have also seen steady progress in our understanding of these systems as our intuitions (and our computers) catch up with the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems (refs 1-5). The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems and families of regular satellites are invariably found together, and there is an emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system.

  18. Exploring Extrasolar Planetary Systems: New Observations of Extrasolar Planets Enabled by the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The search for extrasolar planets has been increasingly success over the last few years. In excess of 700 systems are now known, and Kepler has approx.2500 additional candidate systems, yet to be confirmed. Recently, progress has also been made in directly imaging extrasolar planets, both from the ground and in space. In this presentation will discuss the techniques employed to discover planetary systems, and highlight the capabilities, enabled by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). JWST is a large 6.5 meter aperture infrared telescope that is scheduled for launch in 2018, and will allow us to transition to characterizing the properties of these extrasolar planets and the planetary systems in which they reside.

  19. Planetary mass function and planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominik, M.

    2011-02-01

    With planets orbiting stars, a planetary mass function should not be seen as a low-mass extension of the stellar mass function, but a proper formalism needs to take care of the fact that the statistical properties of planet populations are linked to the properties of their respective host stars. This can be accounted for by describing planet populations by means of a differential planetary mass-radius-orbit function, which together with the fraction of stars with given properties that are orbited by planets and the stellar mass function allows the derivation of all statistics for any considered sample. These fundamental functions provide a framework for comparing statistics that result from different observing techniques and campaigns which all have their very specific selection procedures and detection efficiencies. Moreover, recent results both from gravitational microlensing campaigns and radial-velocity surveys of stars indicate that planets tend to cluster in systems rather than being the lonely child of their respective parent star. While planetary multiplicity in an observed system becomes obvious with the detection of several planets, its quantitative assessment however comes with the challenge to exclude the presence of further planets. Current exoplanet samples begin to give us first hints at the population statistics, whereas pictures of planet parameter space in its full complexity call for samples that are 2-4 orders of magnitude larger. In order to derive meaningful statistics, however, planet detection campaigns need to be designed in such a way that well-defined fully deterministic target selection, monitoring and detection criteria are applied. The probabilistic nature of gravitational microlensing makes this technique an illustrative example of all the encountered challenges and uncertainties.

  20. PREDICTING THE CONFIGURATION OF A PLANETARY SYSTEM: KOI-152 OBSERVED BY KEPLER

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Su; Ji Jianghui; Zhou Jilin E-mail: jijh@pmo.ac.cn

    2012-07-10

    The recent Kepler discovery of KOI-152 reveals a system of three hot super-Earth candidates that are in or near a 4:2:1 mean motion resonance. It is unlikely that they formed in situ; the planets probably underwent orbital migration during the formation and evolution process. The small semimajor axes of the three planets suggest that migration stopped at the inner edge of the primordial gas disk. In this paper, we focus on the influence of migration halting mechanisms, including migration 'dead zones', and inner truncation by the stellar magnetic field. We show that the stellar accretion rate, stellar magnetic field, and the speed of migration in the protoplanetary disk are the main factors affecting the final configuration of KOI-152. Our simulations suggest that three planets may be around a star with low star accretion rate or with high magnetic field. On the other hand, slow type I migration, which decreases to one-tenth of the linear analysis results, favors forming the configuration of KOI-152. Under such a formation scenario, the planets in the system are not massive enough to open gaps in the gas disk. The upper limits of the planetary masses are estimated to be about 15, 19, and 24 M{sub Circled-Plus }, respectively. Our results are also indicative of the near Laplacian configurations that are quite common in planetary systems.

  1. MODELING PLANETARY SYSTEM FORMATION WITH N-BODY SIMULATIONS: ROLE OF GAS DISK AND STATISTICS COMPARED TO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Huigen; Zhou Jilin; Wang Su

    2011-05-10

    During the late stage of planet formation, when Mars-sized cores appear, interactions among planetary cores can excite their orbital eccentricities, accelerate their merging, and thus sculpt their final orbital architecture. This study contributes to the final assembling of planetary systems with N-body simulations, including the type I or II migration of planets and gas accretion of massive cores in a viscous disk. Statistics on the final distributions of planetary masses, semimajor axes, and eccentricities are derived and are comparable to those of the observed systems. Our simulations predict some new orbital signatures of planetary systems around solar mass stars: 36% of the surviving planets are giant planets (>10 M{sub +}). Most of the massive giant planets (>30 M{sub +}) are located at 1-10 AU. Terrestrial planets are distributed more or less evenly at <1-2 AU. Planets in inner orbits may accumulate at the inner edges of either the protostellar disk (3-5 days) or its magnetorotational instability dead zone (30-50 days). There is a planet desert in the mass-eccentricity diagram, i.e., a lack of planets with masses 0.005-0.08M{sub J} in highly eccentric orbits (e > 0.3-0.4). The average eccentricity ({approx}0.15) of the giant planets (>10 M{sub +}) is greater than that ({approx}0.05) of the terrestrial planets (<10 M{sub +}). A planetary system with more planets tends to have smaller planet masses and orbital eccentricities on average.

  2. Ordinary planetary systems - Architecture and formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, E. H.

    1993-01-01

    Today we believe ordinary planetary systems to be an unremarkable consequence of star formation. The solar system, so far the only confidently known example in the universe of a planetary system, displays a set of striking structural regularities. These structural regularities provide fossil clues about the conditions and mechanisms that gave rise to the planets. The formation of our planetary system, as well as its general characteristics, resulted from the physical environment in the disk-shaped nebula that accompanied the birth of the sun. Observations of contemporary star formation indicate that the very conditions and mechanisms thought to have produced our own planetary system are widely associated with the birth of stars elsewhere. Consequently, it is reasonable to believe that planetary systems occur commonly, at least in association with single, sunlike stars. Moreover, it is reasonable to believe that many planetary systems have gross characteristics resembling those of our own solar system.

  3. Astrometry of natural satellites: improving the dynamics of planetary systems with old observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Vincent; Pascu, Dan; Lainey, Valery; Arlot, Jean-Eudes

    2014-05-01

    A new astrometric reduction of old photographic plates, benefiting from modern technologies such as sub-micrometric scanners associated with a reduction using accurate catalogues (UCAC at the present time and GAIA in a near future), provides improved knowledge of the orbital motion of planetary satellites.In the framework of an international collaboration first, and in the FP7 ESPaCE european project afterward, U.S. Naval Observatory plates were digitized with the new generation DAMIAN scanning machine of the Royal Observatory of Belgium. The procedure was applied to a few hundred photographic plates of the Galilean satellites covering the years 1967-1998, and of the Martian satellites covering the years 1967-1997. We provide results with an accuracy better than 70 mas in (RA,Dec) positions of the Galilean moons, and better than 60 mas in (RA,Dec) positions of the Martian satellites.Since the positions of Jupiter and Mars may be deduced from the observed (RA,Dec) positions of their satellites, we can also assess the accuracy of the ephemerides of Jupiter and Mars.

  4. GALEX Observations of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Swayamtrupta

    2016-05-01

    The first ultraviolet (UV) photometric observations of planetary nebulae (PNe) are presented using observations made by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). We have found 108 PNe detected by GALEX and resolved their angular diameters in near-UV (NUV) and also in far-UV (FUV) for 28 PNe considering a 3σ emission level beyond the background. Of the PNe, 57 are elliptical, 41 are circular and the rest 10 are bipolar in NUV. The emission lines that contribute to the NUV intrinsic flux are C III] and He II. The measured intrinsic luminosities considering the sole contribution from the central stars have been found to lie in the range of 10^37-10^51 erg/s. The comparative study of the angular sizes against effective wavelengths in 5 distinct regimes has shown that the listed PNe are bright in NUV which opens up the discussion related to the extent of hotness, the very high temperatures of the CSPNe and the exact nature of it. The intensity contour plots of the PNe have also provided us with over 10 well-defined candidates having bipolar morphological signatures, the origin and evolution of whose can be traced back to the dynamics of stellar winds in the post-AGB stage.

  5. Evolution of Planetary Ringmoon Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1995-01-01

    The last few decades have seen an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of these systems as our intuition (and our computers) catch up with the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is an emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system.

  6. Extrasolar Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksanfomaliti, L. V.

    2000-11-01

    The discovery of planetary systems around alien stars is an outstanding achievement of recent years. The idea that the Solar System may be representative of planetary systems in the Galaxy in general develops upon the knowledge, current until the last decade of the 20th century, that it is the only object of its kind. Studies of the known planets gave rise to a certain stereotype in theoretical research. Therefore, the discovery of exoplanets, which are so different from objects of the Solar System, alters our basic notions concerning the physics and very criteria of normal planets. A substantial factor in the history of the Solar System was the formation of Jupiter. Two waves of meteorite bombardment played an important role in that history. Ultimately there arose a stable low-entropy state of the Solar System, in which Jupiter and the other giants in stable orbits protect the inner planets from impacts by dangerous celestial objects, reducing this danger by many orders of magnitude. There are even variants of the anthropic principle maintaining that life on Earth owes its genesis and development to Jupiter. Some 20 companions more or less similar to Jupiter in mass and a few ``infrared dwarfs,'' have been found among the 500 solar-type stars belonging to the main sequence. Approximately half of the exoplanets discovered are of the ``hot-Jupiter'' type. These are giants, sometimes of a mass several times that of Jupiter, in very low orbits and with periods of 3-14 days. All of their parent stars are enriched with heavy elements, [Fe/H] = 0.1-0.2. This may indicate that the process of exoplanet formation depends on the chemical composition of the protoplanetary disk. The very existence of exoplanets of the hot-Jupiter type considered in the context of new theoretical work comes up against the problem of the formation of Jupiter in its real orbit. All the exoplanets in orbits with a semimajor axis of more than 0.15-0.20 astronomical units (AU) have orbital

  7. Planetary System Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, S. J.

    2002-01-01

    Contents include a summary of publications followed by their abstracts titeled: 1. On microlensing rates and optical depth toward the Galactic center. 2. Newly discovered brown dwarfs not seen in microlensing timescale frequency distribution? 3. Origin and evolution of the natural satellites. 4. Probing the structure of the galaxy with microlensing. 5. Tides, Encyclopedia of Astronomy and Astrophysics. 6. The Puzzle of the Titan-Hyperion 4:3 Orbital Resonance. 7. On the Validity of the Coagulation Equation and the Nature of Runaway Growth. 8. Making Hyperion. 9. The MESSENGER mission to Mercury: Scientific objectives and implementation. 10. A Survey of Numerical Solutions to the Coagulation. 11. Probability of detecting a planetary companion during a microlensing event. 12. Dynamics and origin of the 2:l orbital resonances of the GJ876 planets. 13. Planetary Interior Structure Revealed by Spin Dynamics. 14. A primordial origin of the Laplace relation among the Galilean Satellites. 15. A procedure for determining the nature of Mercury's core. 16. Secular evolution of hierarchical planetary systems. 17. Tidally induced volcanism. 18. Extrasolar planets and mean motion resonances. 19. Comparison of a ground-based microlensing search for planets with a search from space.

  8. Finding the Needle in the Haystack: High-Fidelity Models of Planetary Systems for Simulating Exoplanet Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincowski, Andrew; Roberge, Aki; Stark, Christopher C.; Wilkins, Ashlee N.; Nesvold, Erika; Haystacks Team

    2015-01-01

    Future missions to characterize exoplanets will require instruments tailored to the problem of finding a habitable exoplanet: suppressing the bright star while still directly observing planets at small angular separations. This problem is compounded by interplanetary dust, which will likely be a significant source of astrophysical background noise. Instrument parameters must be constrained with detailed performance simulations, which must then be analyzed to determine if the instruments are capable of discerning the desired exoplanet characteristics. One valuable characteristic is the mass of the planet. A constraint on a planet's mass can quickly show if it is likely to be a rocky terrestrial planet, which may have the potential to form life as we know it. Unfortunately, it is difficult to measure the masses of small planets with traditional indirect techniques (e.g. radial velocity).A planet's gravitational effects on nearby interplanetary dust (or 'exozodi') can be more easily observed than the planet itself. A single observation of a planetary disk could constrain the mass of an exoplanet if the dust distribution varies sufficiently to be distinguished by future instruments. The NASA Haystacks team (PI: A. Roberge) has completed preliminary high-fidelity spectral image cubes of our entire Solar System at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, including star & planet spectra and scattered light from dust. In addition to these models, we present new planetary system architectures designed to test whether we can distinguish between mini-Neptune-mass planets and Earth-mass planets by their effects on the dust structure. These spectral image cubes will be processed through instrument simulators, allowing comparison of known disk structure with simulated observations of the disk. The results will help inform future exoplanet telescope missions in development (e.g. WFIRST/AFTA and ATLAST).Spectral image cubes will be available for download from a NASA website once

  9. Planetary Systems Around Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolszczan, Alexander

    1997-01-01

    This project was initiated in 1993, about one year after the announcement of two planets around PSR B1257+12. Its goal was to investigate planetary systems around neutron stars using high precision timing of radio pulsars as a tool. A microsecond precision of the pulse timing analysis, which is equivalent to a millimeter-per-second radial velocity resolution, makes it possible to detect asteroid-mass bodies in orbit around pulsars and to study the dynamics of pulsar planetary systems. The project originally consisted of two longterm efforts: (i) routine observations and timing analysis of the millisecond pulsar PSR B1257+12 which was found to be orbited by at least two earth-mass bodies (Wolszczan and Frail, Nature, 355, 145) and (ii) a sensitive all-sky search for millisecond pulsars to detect further examples of neutron stars with planetary systems. In the third year of the project, it was expanded to include long-term timing observations of slow pulsars in search for planetary systems around these younger neutron stars. The instrumentation used to conduct these investigations included the 305-m Arecibo antenna with the Penn State Pulsar Machine (PSPM-1), the 100-m Effelsberg telescope with the local pulse timing hardware, and the 32-m paraboloid of the Torun Centre for Astronomy in Torun, Poland (TCFA) with the PSPM-2, the second pulsar machine built at Penn State. The PI's collaborators included pulsar groups led by D. Backer (Berkeley), R. Foster (NRL), S. Kulkarni (Caltech), J. Taylor (Princeton) and R. Wielebinski (Bonn). One postdoc (Stuart Anderson), one graduate student (Brian Cadwell) and several undergraduates have been engaged in various aspects of research related to this project.

  10. On the Diversity of Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Models of planet formation and of the orbital stability of planetary systems are described and used to discuss possible characteristics of undiscovered planetary systems. Modern theories of star and planet formation, which are based upon observations of the Solar System and of young stars and their environments, predict that rocky planets should form in orbit about most single stars. It is uncertain whether or not gas giant planet formation is common, because most protoplanetary disks may dissipate before solid planetary cores can grow large enough to gravitationally trap substantial quantities of gas. A potential hazard to planetary systems is radial decay of planetary orbits resulting from interactions with material within the disk. Planets more massive than Earth have the potential to decay the fastest, and may be able to sweep up smaller planets in their path. The implications of the giant planets found in recent radial velocity searches for the abundances of habitable planets are discussed.

  11. Theoretical and observational planetary physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, J.

    1986-01-01

    This program supports NASA's deep space exploration missions, particularly those to the outer Solar System, and also NASA's Earth-orbital astronomy missions, using ground-based observations, primarily with the NASA IRTF at Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and also with such instruments as the Kitt Peak 4 meter Mayall telescope and the NRAO VLA facility in Socorro, New Mexico. An important component of the program is the physical interpretation of the observations. There were two major scientific discoveries resulting from 8 micrometer observations of Jupiter. The first is that at that wavelength there are two spots, one near each magnetic pole, which are typically the brightest and therefore warmest places on the planet. The effect is clearly due to precipitating high energy magnetospheric particles. A second ground-based discovery is that in 1985, Jupiter exhibited low latitude (+ or - 18 deg.) stratospheric wave structure.

  12. Observational studies of the clearing phase in proto-planetary disk systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol A.

    1995-01-01

    Progress in this study is summarized for its second year. An extensive program of high dispersion UV spectral studies using the IUE (International Ultraviolet Explorer) has resulted in acquisition of 40 Herbig Ae/Be star and related object spectra. We find that accreting, circumstellar gas is detected with velocities consistent with material in free-fall toward the stars in approximately 38% of the sample. With acquisition of optical measurements of the projected stellar rotational velocities, we find that the systems with accreting gas exhibit systematically higher projected rotational velocities than the systems showing signatures of outflowing material only. When combined with polarimetric and photometric data, the IUE spectra for these stars indicate that accretion in intermediate-mass pre-main sequence stars is confined to the plane of the circumstellar dust disk. This is in contrast to lower-mass PMS stars where accretion, persumably along magnetic field lines, is seen at polar latitudes. Our data also support significant clearing of the central regions of these circumstellar disks, as originally suggested. The model which most closely matches the observational data is accretion from a disk envelope, as developed by Calvet et al. (1994).

  13. Post-main-sequence planetary system evolution

    PubMed Central

    Veras, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    The fates of planetary systems provide unassailable insights into their formation and represent rich cross-disciplinary dynamical laboratories. Mounting observations of post-main-sequence planetary systems necessitate a complementary level of theoretical scrutiny. Here, I review the diverse dynamical processes which affect planets, asteroids, comets and pebbles as their parent stars evolve into giant branch, white dwarf and neutron stars. This reference provides a foundation for the interpretation and modelling of currently known systems and upcoming discoveries. PMID:26998326

  14. Post-main-sequence planetary system evolution.

    PubMed

    Veras, Dimitri

    2016-02-01

    The fates of planetary systems provide unassailable insights into their formation and represent rich cross-disciplinary dynamical laboratories. Mounting observations of post-main-sequence planetary systems necessitate a complementary level of theoretical scrutiny. Here, I review the diverse dynamical processes which affect planets, asteroids, comets and pebbles as their parent stars evolve into giant branch, white dwarf and neutron stars. This reference provides a foundation for the interpretation and modelling of currently known systems and upcoming discoveries. PMID:26998326

  15. Post-main-sequence planetary system evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veras, Dimitri

    2016-02-01

    The fates of planetary systems provide unassailable insights into their formation and represent rich cross-disciplinary dynamical laboratories. Mounting observations of post-main-sequence planetary systems necessitate a complementary level of theoretical scrutiny. Here, I review the diverse dynamical processes which affect planets, asteroids, comets and pebbles as their parent stars evolve into giant branch, white dwarf and neutron stars. This reference provides a foundation for the interpretation and modelling of currently known systems and upcoming discoveries.

  16. Theory of Planetary System Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassen, Patrick

    1996-01-01

    Observations and theoretical considerations support the idea that the Solar System formed by the collapse of tenuous interstellar matter to a disk of gas and dust (the primitive solar nebula), from which the Sun and other components separated under the action of dissipative forces and by the coagulation of solid material. Thus, planets are understood to be contemporaneous byproducts of star formation. Because the circumstellar disks of new stars are easier to observe than mature planetary systems, the possibility arises that the nature and variety of planets might be studied from observations of the conditions of their birth. A useful theory of planetary system formation would therefore relate the properties of circumstellar disks both to the initial conditions of star formation and to the consequent properties of planets to those of the disk. Although the broad outlines of such a theory are in place, many aspects are either untested, controversial, or otherwise unresolved; even the degree to which such a comprehensive theory is possible remains unknown.

  17. Submission of Earth-based ring occultation observations to the NASA planetary data system rings discipline node

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, Richard G.

    1993-01-01

    This is a technical report summarizing our progress in our program of contributing high quality Earth-based occultation observations to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) Rings Node. During our first year of funding, we selected five data sets for eventual inclusion in the PDS Rings Node. These were Uranus occultation observations obtained by the PI and co-workers from the IRTF of event stars U34 (26 April 1986), U1052 (5 May 1988), U65 (21 June 1990), U7872 (25 June 1991), and U7808 (28 June 1991). In our original proposal, we described four tasks: data sets to a common format; documentation of the occultation observations and associated calibrations; calculation of the occultation geometry for each event; establish prototype PDS templates. As discussed in our renewal proposal, submitted 8 June 1993, we have completed the first three tasks, and are working on the fourth. As an indication of our progress to date, we provide information about each of the data sets, their formats, the documentation, and the method used for reconstructing the occultation geometry.

  18. Sensor requirements for Earth and planetary observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, Moustafa T.

    1990-01-01

    Future generations of Earth and planetary remote sensing instruments will require extensive developments of new long-wave and very long-wave infrared detectors. The upcoming NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) will carry a suite of instruments to monitor a wide range of atmospheric and surface parameters with an unprecedented degree of accuracy for a period of 10 to 15 years. These instruments will observe Earth over a wide spectral range extending from the visible to nearly 17 micrometers with a moderate to high spectral and spacial resolution. In addition to expected improvements in communication bandwidth and both ground and on-board computing power, these new sensor systems will need large two-dimensional detector arrays. Such arrays exist for visible wavelengths and, to a lesser extent, for short wavelength infrared systems. The most dramatic need is for new Long Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) and Very Long Wavelength Infrared (VLWIR) detector technologies that are compatible with area array readout devices and can operate in the temperature range supported by long life, low power refrigerators. A scientific need for radiometric and calibration accuracies approaching 1 percent translates into a requirement for detectors with excellent linearity, stability and insensitivity to operating conditions and space radiation. Current examples of the kind of scientific missions these new thermal IR detectors would enhance in the future include instruments for Earth science such as Orbital Volcanological Observations (OVO), Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS), and Spectroscopy in the Atmosphere using Far Infrared Emission (SAFIRE). Planetary exploration missions such as Cassini also provide examples of instrument concepts that could be enhanced by new IR detector technologies.

  19. On the Migratory Behavior of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Rebekah Ilene

    For centuries, an orderly view of planetary system architectures dominated the discourse on planetary systems. However, there is growing evidence that many planetary systems underwent a period of upheaval, during which giant planets "migrated" from where they formed. This thesis addresses a question key to understanding how planetary systems evolve: is planetary migration typically a smooth, disk-driven process or a violent process involving strong multi-body gravitational interactions? First, we analyze evidence from the dynamical structure of debris disks dynamically sculpted during planets' migration. Based on the orbital properties our own solar systems Kuiper belt, we deduce that Neptune likely underwent both planet-planet scattering and smooth migration caused by interactions with leftover planetesimals. In another planetary system, beta Pictoris, we find that the giant planet discovered there must be responsible for the observed warp of the systems debris belt, reconciling observations that suggested otherwise. Second, we develop two new approaches for characterizing planetary orbits: one for distinguishing the signal of a planets orbit from aliases, spurious signals caused by gaps in the time sampling of the data, and another to measure the eccentricity of a planet's orbit from transit photometry, "the photoeccentric effect." We use the photoeccentric effect to determine whether any of the giant planets discovered by the Kepler Mission are currently undergoing planetary migration on highly elliptical orbits. We find a lack of such "super-eccentric" Jupiters, allowing us to place an upper limit on the fraction of hot Jupiters created by the stellar binary Kozai mechanism. Finally, we find new correlations between the orbital properties of planets and the metallicity of their host stars. Planets orbiting metal-rich stars show signatures of strong planet-planet gravitational interactions, while those orbiting metal-poor stars do not. Taken together, the

  20. IUE observations of Beta Pictoris - An IRAS candidate for a proto-planetary system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Bruhweiler, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a preliminary analysis of high-resolution and low-resolution UV spectra of the edge-on extended-disk shell star Beta Pic, obtained with the IUE SWP and LWR instruments on November 5-6, 1984, are reported and compared with IRAS and ground-based observations. No selective UV extinction is detected, and the fine structure of the Fe II and C I absorption lines and the presence of metastable Fe II lines are considered consistent with a circumstellar nebula or extended envelope of density greater than 1000/cu cm and electron density (1-10) x 10 to the 8th/cu cm or less at 1-2 AU from the central star. The possibility that the extended orbiting disk is clumpy, as observed by Smith and Terrile (1985), is discussed.

  1. IUE observations of new A star candidate proto-planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol A.

    1994-01-01

    As a result of the detection of accreting gas in the A5e PMS Herbig Ae star, HR 5999, most of the observations for this IUE program were devoted to Herbig Ae stars rather than to main sequence A stars. Mid-UV emission at optical minimum light was detected for UX Ori (A1e), BF Ori (A5e), and CQ Tau (F2e). The presence of accreting gas in HD 45677 and HD 50138 prompted reclassification of these stars as Herbig Be stars rather than as protoplanetary nebulae. Detailed results are discussed.

  2. Resonance Trapping in Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pour, Nader H.

    1998-09-01

    We study dynamics of a planetary system that consists of a star and two planets taking into account dynamical friction. Numerical integrations of a restricted planar circular three body model of this system indicate resonance capture. The main purpose of this paper is to present the results of an extensive numerical experiment performed on this model and also to present analytical arguments for the observed resonance trapping and its consequences. The equations of motion are written in terms of Delaunay variables and the recently developed method of partial averaging near resonance* is employed in order to account for the behavior of the system at resonance. * C.Chicone, B.Mashhoon and D.Retzloff, Ann.Inst.Henri Poincare, Vol.64, no 1, 1996, p.87-125.

  3. SPICE Supports Planetary Science Observation Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall Acton, Charles; Bachman, Nathaniel J.; Semenov, Boris V.; Wright, Edward D.

    2015-11-01

    "SPICE" is an information system, comprising both data and software, providing scientists with the observation geometry needed to plan observations from instruments aboard robotic spacecraft, and to subsequently help in analyzing the data returned from those observations. The SPICE system has been used on the majority of worldwide planetary exploration missions since the time of NASA's Galileo mission to Jupiter. Along with its "free" price tag, portability and the absence of licensing and export restrictions, its stable, enduring qualities help make it a popular choice. But stability does not imply rigidity-improvements and new capabilities are regularly added. This poster highlights recent additions that could be of interest to planetary scientists.Geometry Finder allows one to find all the times or time intervals when a particular geometric condition exists (e.g. occultation) or when a particular geometric parameter is within a given range or has reached a maximum or minimum.Digital Shape Kernel (DSK) provides means to compute observation geometry using accurately modeled target bodies: a tessellated plate model for irregular bodies and a digital elevation model for large, regular bodies.WebGeocalc (WGC) provides a graphical user interface (GUI) to a SPICE "geometry engine" installed at a mission operations facility, such as the one operated by NAIF. A WGC user need have only a computer with a web browser to access this geometry engine. Using traditional GUI widgets-drop-down menus, check boxes, radio buttons and fill-in boxes-the user inputs the data to be used, the kind of calculation wanted, and the details of that calculation. The WGC server makes the specified calculations and returns results to the user's browser.Cosmographia is a mission visualization program. This tool provides 3D visualization of solar system (target) bodies, spacecraft trajectory and orientation, instrument field-of-view "cones" and footprints, and more.The research described in this

  4. Migration-induced architectures of planetary systems.

    PubMed

    Szuszkiewicz, Ewa; Podlewska-Gaca, Edyta

    2012-06-01

    The recent increase in number of known multi-planet systems gives a unique opportunity to study the processes responsible for planetary formation and evolution. Special attention is given to the occurrence of mean-motion resonances, because they carry important information about the history of the planetary systems. At the early stages of the evolution, when planets are still embedded in a gaseous disc, the tidal interactions between the disc and planets cause the planetary orbital migration. The convergent differential migration of two planets embedded in a gaseous disc may result in the capture into a mean-motion resonance. The orbital migration taking place during the early phases of the planetary system formation may play an important role in shaping stable planetary configurations. An understanding of this stage of the evolution will provide insight on the most frequently formed architectures, which in turn are relevant for determining the planet habitability. The aim of this paper is to present the observational properties of these planetary systems which contain confirmed or suspected resonant configurations. A complete list of known systems with such configurations is given. This list will be kept by us updated from now on and it will be a valuable reference for studying the dynamics of extrasolar systems and testing theoretical predictions concerned with the origin and the evolution of planets, which are the most plausible places for existence and development of life. PMID:22684330

  5. The Birth of Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    An overview of current theories of star and planet formation is presented. These models are based upon observations of the Solar System and of young stars and their environments, and they predict that rocky planets should form around most single stars, although it is possible that in some cases such planets are lost to orbital decay within the protoplanetary disk. The frequency of formation of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth like terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates.

  6. The Birth of Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissaur, Jack L.

    1997-01-01

    An overview of current theories of star and planet formation is presented. These models are based upon observations of the Solar System and of young stars and their environments. They predict that rocky planets should form around most single stars, although it is possible that in some cases such planets are lost to orbital decay within the protoplanetary disk. The frequency of formation of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth like terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates.

  7. Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray-Clay, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Observations confirm that planet formation is a ubiquitous process that produces a diversity of planetary systems. However, a class of solar system analogs has yet to be identified among the thousands of currently known planets and candidates, the overwhelming majority of which are more easily detectable than direct counterparts of the Sun's worlds. To understand whether our solar system's history was unusual and, more generally, to properly characterize the galactic population of extrasolar planets, we must identify how differences in formation environment translate into different planetary system architectures. In this talk, I will consider our solar system in the context of theoretical advances in planet formation driven by the study of extrasolar planets. Along the way, I will discuss several examples of physical processes operating at different stages of planet formation that imprint observable structures on the dynamical and compositional demographics of planetary systems.

  8. Architectures of Planetary System - Snapshots in Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Michele; Goel, Amit

    2015-08-01

    Architectures of planetary systems are observable snapshots in time, a study of which can aide in our understanding of how planetary systems form and evolve dynamically. For example, if we compare architectures of exoplanetary systems having various stellar host ages with laws that apply to our own Solar System architecture, population, and age, we gain insights into when these laws hold with stellar age and which systems are outliers at various stellar ages. In this work, we study Keplerian motion in confirmed planetary systems as a function of stellar age. Systems eliminated from the study are those with unknown planetary orbital periods, unknown planetary semi-major axis, and/or unknown stellar ages, the latter of which eliminates several Kepler multi-planet systems. As expected, we find Keplerian motion holds for systems that are the age of the Solar System or older, but this result does not seem to hold true for younger systems. In this work we discuss these findings, we identify the outlier systems at various stellar ages from our statistical analysis, and we provide explanations as to why these exo-systems are outliers.

  9. Planetary Data System (PDS) Strategic Roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Emily; McNutt, Ralph; Crichton, Daniel J.; Morgan, Tom

    2016-07-01

    The Planetary Data System (PDS) archives and distributes scientific data from NASA planetary missions, astronomical observations, and laboratory measurements. NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) sponsors the PDS. Its purpose is to ensure the long-term usability of NASA data and to stimulate advanced research. The Planetary Science Division (PSD) within the SMD at NASA Headquarters has directed the PDS to set up a Roadmap team to formulate a PDS Roadmap for the period 2017-2026. The purpose of this activity is to provide a forecast of both the rapidly changing Information Technology (IT) environment and the changing expectations of the planetary science communities with respect to Planetary Data archives including, specifically, increasing assessability to all planetary data. The Roadmap team will also identify potential actions that could increase interoperability with other archive and curation elements within NASA and with the archives of other National Space Agencies. The Roadmap team will assess the current state of the PDS and report their findings to the PSD Director by April 15, 2017. This presentation will give an update of this roadmap activity and serve as an opportunity to engage the planetary community at large to provide input to the Roadmap.

  10. The fragility of planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portegies Zwart, S. F.; Jílková, Lucie

    2015-07-01

    We specify the range to which perturbations penetrate a planetesimal system. Such perturbations can originate from massive planets or from encounters with other stars. The latter can have an origin in the star cluster in which the planetary system was born, or from random encounters once the planetary system has escaped its parental cluster. The probability of a random encounter, either in a star cluster or in the Galactic field depends on the local stellar density, the velocity dispersion and the time spend in that environment. By adopting order of magnitude estimates, we argue that the majority of planetary systems born in open clusters will have a Parking zone, in which planetesimals are affected by encounters in their parental star cluster but remain unperturbed after the star has left the cluster. Objects found in this range of semimajor axis and eccentricity preserve the memory of the encounter that last affected their orbits, and they can therefore be used to reconstruct this encounter. Planetary systems born in a denser environment, such as in a globular cluster are unlikely to have a Parking zone. We further argue that some planetary systems may have a Frozen zone, in which orbits are not affected either by the more inner massive planets or by external influences. Objects discovered in this zone will have preserved information about their formation in their orbital parameters.

  11. In search of other planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    Numerous recent developments have led to an increasing awareness of and interest in the detection of other planetary systems. A brief review of the modern history of this subject is presented with emphasis on the status of data concerning Barnard's star. A discussion is given of plausible observable effects of other planetary systems with numerical examples to indicate the nature of the detection problem. Possible types of information (in addition to discovery) that observations of these effects might yield (e.g., planetary mass and temperature) are outlined. Also discussed are various candidate detection techniques (e.g., astrometric observations) which might be employed to conduct a search, the current state-of-the art of these techniques in terms of measurement accuracy, and the capability of existing or planned facilities (e.g., space telescope) to perform a search. Finally, consideration is given to possible search strategies and the scope of a comprehensive search program.

  12. Modelling resonant planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'yanenko, V.

    2012-09-01

    Many discovered multi-planet systems are in meanmotion resonances. The aim of this work is to study dynamical processes leading to the formation of resonant configurations on the basis of a unified model described earlier [1]. The model includes gravitational interactions of planets and migration of planets due to the presence of a gas disc. For the observed systems 24 Sex, HD 37124, HD 73526, HD 82943, HD 128311, HD 160691, Kepler 9, NN Ser with planets moving in the 2:1 resonance, it is shown that the capture in this resonance occurs at very wide ranges of parameters of both type I and type II migration. Conditions of migration leading to the formation of the resonant systems HD 45364 и HD 200964 (3:2 and 4:3, respectively) are obtained. Formation scenarios are studied for the systems HD 102272, HD 108874, HD 181433, HD 202206 with planets in high order resonances. We discuss also how gravitational interactions of planets and planetesimal discs lead to the breakup of resonant configurations and the formation of systems similar to the 47 UMa system.

  13. Stability of inner planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szebehely, V.

    1979-01-01

    The stability of inner planetary systems with arbitrary mass ratios is studied on the basis of the model of the plane restricted three-body problem. A quantitative stability criterion is obtained in terms of the difference between the critical value of the Jacobi constants (at which bifurcation can occur) and the critical value corresponding to a planetary orbit. An orbit is stable if it cannot leave a region that contains only the larger central body (Hill). For small values of the mass parameter, the maximum dimensionless radius of a Hill-stable orbit is 1 minus 2.4 times the cube root of the mass parameter.

  14. The effects of birth environment on planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Melvyn B.

    2015-10-01

    The birth environments of stars and the planetary systems they host are hazardous places. Close encounters may destabilise planetary systems leading to orbit crossings and thus planetary scatterings (leading ultimately to ejections) or planetary collisions. Stellar binary companions may induce similar outcomes via the Kozai mechanism which will put the outer planet of a planetary system on a periodically eccentric orbit. If the natural outcome of the planetary formation process is a stable planetary system with the planets on relatively co-planar, low-eccentricity orbits, then close encounters and the perturbations from stellar binary companions may explain the relatively high eccentricities observed for some exoplanets, and may in part also explain the origin of so-called hot Jupiters.

  15. Mathematical optimization of matter distribution for a planetary system configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Yegor; Bukhtoyarov, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Planetary formation is mostly a random process. When the humanity reaches the point when it can transform planetary systems for the purpose of interstellar life expansion, the optimal distribution of matter in a planetary system will determine its population and expansive potential. Maximization of the planetary system carrying capacity and its potential for the interstellar life expansion depends on planetary sizes, orbits, rotation, chemical composition and other vital parameters. The distribution of planetesimals to achieve maximal carrying capacity of the planets during their life cycle, and maximal potential to inhabit other planetary systems must be calculated comprehensively. Moving much material from one planetary system to another is uneconomic because of the high amounts of energy and time required. Terraforming of the particular planets before the whole planetary system is configured might drastically decrease the potential habitability the whole system. Thus a planetary system is the basic unit for calculations to sustain maximal overall population and expand further. The mathematical model of optimization of matter distribution for a planetary system configuration includes the input observed parameters: the map of material orbiting in the planetary system with specified orbits, masses, sizes, and the chemical compound for each, and the optimized output parameters. The optimized output parameters are sizes, masses, the number of planets, their chemical compound, and masses of the satellites required to make tidal forces. Also the magnetic fields and planetary rotations are crucial, but they will be considered in further versions of this model. The optimization criteria is the maximal carrying capacity plus maximal expansive potential of the planetary system. The maximal carrying capacity means the availability of essential life ingredients on the planetary surface, and the maximal expansive potential means availability of uranium and metals to build

  16. RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF HD 80606 NEAR PLANETARY PERIASTRON

    SciTech Connect

    Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Farrell, W. M.; Shankland, P. D.; Blank, D. L.

    2010-12-15

    This paper reports Very Large Array observations at 325 and 1425 MHz ({lambda}90 cm and {lambda}20 cm) during and near the periastron passage of HD 80606b on HJD 2454424.86 (2007 November 20). We obtain flux density limits (3{sigma}) of 1.7 mJy and 48 {mu}Jy at 325 and 1425 MHz, respectively, equivalent to planetary luminosity limits of 2.3 x 10{sup 24} erg s{sup -1} and 2.7 x 10{sup 23} erg s{sup -1}. Unfortunately, these are several orders of magnitude above the nominal Jovian value (at 40 MHz) of 2 x 10{sup 18} erg s{sup -1}. The motivation for these observations was that the planetary magnetospheric emission is driven by a stellar wind-planetary magnetosphere interaction so that the planetary luminosity would be elevated near periastron. We estimate that, near periastron, HD 80606b might be as much as 3000 times more luminous than Jupiter. Recent transit observations of HD 80606b provide reasonably stringent constraints on the planetary mass and radius, and, because of the planet's highly eccentric orbit, its rotation period is likely to be 'pseudo-synchronized' to its orbital period, allowing a robust estimate of the former. Consequently, we are able to make relatively robust estimates of the emission frequency of the planetary magnetospheric emission and find it to be around 60-90 MHz. While this is too low for our reported observations, we compare HD 80606b to other high-eccentricity systems and assess the detection possibilities for both near-term and more distant future systems. Of the known high-eccentricity planets, only HD 80606b is likely to be detectable, as the others (HD 20782B and HD 4113) are both lower mass and longer rotational periods, which imply weaker magnetic field strengths. We find that both the forthcoming 'EVLA low band' system, which will operate as low as 65 MHz, and the Low Frequency Array may be able to improve upon our planetary luminosity limits for HD 80606b, and do so at a more optimum frequency. If the low-frequency component

  17. Large-Scale Structures of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray-Clay, Ruth; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2015-12-01

    A class of solar system analogs has yet to be identified among the large crop of planetary systems now observed. However, since most observed worlds are more easily detectable than direct analogs of the Sun's planets, the frequency of systems with structures similar to our own remains unknown. Identifying the range of possible planetary system architectures is complicated by the large number of physical processes that affect the formation and dynamical evolution of planets. I will present two ways of organizing planetary system structures. First, I will suggest that relatively few physical parameters are likely to differentiate the qualitative architectures of different systems. Solid mass in a protoplanetary disk is perhaps the most obvious possible controlling parameter, and I will give predictions for correlations between planetary system properties that we would expect to be present if this is the case. In particular, I will suggest that the solar system's structure is representative of low-metallicity systems that nevertheless host giant planets. Second, the disk structures produced as young stars are fed by their host clouds may play a crucial role. Using the observed distribution of RV giant planets as a function of stellar mass, I will demonstrate that invoking ice lines to determine where gas giants can form requires fine tuning. I will suggest that instead, disk structures built during early accretion have lasting impacts on giant planet distributions, and disk clean-up differentially affects the orbital distributions of giant and lower-mass planets. These two organizational hypotheses have different implications for the solar system's context, and I will suggest observational tests that may allow them to be validated or falsified.

  18. Stratospheric Balloons for Planetary Science and the Balloon Observation Platform for Planetary Science (BOPPS) Mission Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kremic, Tibor; Cheng, Andrew F.; Hibbitts, Karl; Young, Eliot F.; Ansari, Rafat R.; Dolloff, Matthew D.; Landis, Rob R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA and the planetary science community have been exploring the potential contributions approximately 200 questions raised in the Decadal Survey have identified about 45 topics that are potentially suitable for addressing by stratospheric balloon platforms. A stratospheric balloon mission was flown in the fall of 2014 called BOPPS, Balloon Observation Platform for Planetary Science. This mission observed a number of planetary targets including two Oort cloud comets. The optical system and instrumentation payload was able to provide unique measurements of the intended targets and increase our understanding of these primitive bodies and their implications for us here on Earth. This paper will discuss the mission, instrumentation and initial results and how these may contribute to the broader planetary science objectives of NASA and the scientific community. This paper will also identify how the instrument platform on BOPPS may be able to contribute to future balloon-based science. Finally the paper will address potential future enhancements and the expected science impacts should those enhancements be implemented.

  19. High precision defocused observations of planetary transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baştürk, Ö.; Hinse, T. C.; Özavcı, İ.; Tezcan, C. T.; Şenavcı, H. V.; Burdanov, A.; Y&örükoǧlu, O.; Orhan, R.; Selam, S. O.

    2014-03-01

    It is only possible to measure physical properties of extrasolar planets, if they transit their host stars. One can determine the masses and the radii of this kind of objects, and hence, have constraints on their chemical composition, internal structure, formation and evolution. The availability of high quality light curves of planetary transits is essential in determining these properties within a few percent. In order to obtain high-quality transit light curves, we apply the well-established defocus technique on meter and sub-meter class telescopes in our project. This technique allows longer integration times, and hence collecting more photons to build up a higher S/N ratio. In this study, we present our first photometric results with the 1m Turkish telescope (T100) located at TÜBİTAK National Observatory (TUG) of Turkey, which proved to be a well suited instrument to these observations with its large field of view. %

  20. The final fate of planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaensicke, Boris

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of the first extra-solar planet around a main-sequence star in 1995 has changed the way we think about the Universe: our solar system is not unique. Twenty years later, we know that planetary systems are ubiquitous, orbit stars spanning a wide range in mass, and form in an astonishing variety of architectures. Yet, one fascinating aspect of planetary systems has received relatively little attention so far: their ultimate fate.Most planet hosts will eventually evolve into white dwarfs, Earth-sized stellar embers, and the outer parts of their planetary systems (in the solar system, Mars and beyond) can survive largely intact for billions of years. While scattered and tidally disrupted planetesimals are directly detected at a small number of white dwarfs in the form infrared excess, the most powerful probe for detecting evolved planetary systems is metal pollution of the otherwise pristine H/He atmospheres.I will present the results of a multi-cycle HST survey that has obtained COS observations of 136 white dwarfs. These ultraviolet spectra are exquisitely sensitive to the presence of metals contaminating the white atmosphere. Our sophisticated model atmosphere analysis demonstrates that at least 27% of all targets are currently accreting planetary debris, and an additional 29% have very likely done so in the past. These numbers suggest that planet formation around A-stars (the dominant progenitors of today's white dwarf population) is similarly efficient as around FGK stars.In addition to post-main sequence planetary system demographics, spectroscopy of the debris-polluted white dwarf atmospheres provides a direct window into the bulk composition of exo-planetesimals, analogous to the way we use of meteorites to determine solar-system abundances. Our ultraviolet spectroscopy is particularly sensitive to the detection of Si, a dominant rock-forming species, and we identify up to ten additional volatile and refractory elements in the most strongly

  1. Magellan AO System z‧, Y S , and L‧ Observations of the Very Wide 650 AU HD 106906 Planetary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ya-Lin; Close, Laird M.; Bailey, Vanessa P.; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Males, Jared R.; Morzinski, Katie M.; Follette, Katherine B.; Hinz, Philip M.; Puglisi, Alfio; Briguglio, Runa; Xompero, Marco

    2016-05-01

    We analyze archival data from Bailey and co-workers from the Magellan adaptive optics system and present the first 0.9 μm detection (z‧ = 20.3 ± 0.4 mag; Δz‧ = 13.0 ± 0.4 mag) of the 11 M Jup circumbinary planet HD 106906AB b, as well as 1 and 3.8 μm detections of the debris disk around the binary. The disk has an east–west asymmetry in length and surface brightness, especially at 3.8 μm where the disk appears to be one-sided. The spectral energy distribution of b, when scaled to the K S -band photometry, is consistent with 1800 K atmospheric models without significant dust reddening, unlike some young, very red, low-mass companions such as CT Cha B and 1RXS 1609 B. Therefore, the suggested circumplanetary disk of Kalas and co-workers might not contain much material, or might be closer to face-on. Finally, we suggest that the widest (a ≳ 100 AU) low mass ratio (M p/M ⋆ ≡ q ≲ 0.01) companions may have formed inside protoplanetary disks but were later scattered by binary/planet interactions. Such a scattering event may have occurred for HD 106906AB b with its central binary star, but definitive proof at this time is elusive. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Clay Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  2. Observations and Modeling of Tropical Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laraia, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is a comprised of three different projects within the topic of tropical atmospheric dynamics. First, I analyze observations of thermal radiation from Saturn's atmosphere and from them, determine the latitudinal distribution of ammonia vapor near the 1.5-bar pressure level. The most prominent feature of the observations is the high brightness temperature of Saturn's subtropical latitudes on either side of the equator. After comparing the observations to a microwave radiative transfer model, I find that these subtropical bands require very low ammonia relative humidity below the ammonia cloud layer in order to achieve the high brightness temperatures observed. We suggest that these bright subtropical bands represent dry zones created by a meridionally overturning circulation. Second, I use a dry atmospheric general circulation model to study equatorial superrotation in terrestrial atmospheres. A wide range of atmospheres are simulated by varying three parameters: the pole-equator radiative equilibrium temperature contrast, the convective lapse rate, and the planetary rotation rate. A scaling theory is developed that establishes conditions under which superrotation occurs in terrestrial atmospheres. The scaling arguments show that superrotation is favored when the off-equatorial baroclinicity and planetary rotation rates are low. Similarly, superrotation is favored when the convective heating strengthens, which may account for the superrotation seen in extreme global-warming simulations. Third, I use a moist slab-ocean general circulation model to study the impact of a zonally-symmetric continent on the distribution of monsoonal precipitation. I show that adding a hemispheric asymmetry in surface heat capacity is sufficient to cause symmetry breaking in both the spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation. This spatial symmetry breaking can be understood from a large-scale energetic perspective, while the temporal symmetry breaking requires

  3. The Allegheny Observatory search for planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatewood, George D.

    1989-01-01

    The accomplishments of the observatory's search for planetary systems are summarized. Among these were the construction, implementation, and regular use of the Multichannel Astrometric Photometer (MAP), and the design, fabrication and use of the second largest refractor objective built since 1950. The MAP parallax and planetary observing programs are described. Various developments concerning alternate solid state photodetectors and telescope instrumentation are summarized. The extreme accuracy of the system is described in relation to a study of the position and velocity of the members of the open cluster Upgren 1. The binary star system stringently tests the theory of stellar evolution since it is composed of an evolved giant F5 III and a subgiant F5 IV star. A study that attempts to measure the luminosities, surface temperatures, and masses of these stars is discussed.

  4. Evolutionary outcomes for pairs of planets undergoing orbital migration and circularization: second-order resonances and observed period ratios in Kepler's planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang-Gruess, M.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    2015-05-01

    In order to study the origin of the architectures of low-mass planetary systems, we perform numerical surveys of the evolution of pairs of coplanar planets in the mass range (1-4) M⊕. These evolve for up to 2 × 107 yr under a range of orbital migration torques and circularization rates assumed to arise through interaction with a protoplanetary disc. Near the inner disc boundary, significant variations of viscosity, interaction with density waves or with the stellar magnetic field could occur and halt migration, but allow circularization to continue. This was modelled by modifying the migration and circularization rates. Runs terminated without an extended period of circularization in the absence of migration torques gave rise to either a collision, or a system close to a resonance. These were mostly first order with a few per cent terminating in second-order resonances. Both planetary eccentricities were small <0.1 and all resonant angles liberated. This type of survey produced only a limited range of period ratios and cannot reproduce Kepler observations. When circularization alone operates in the final stages, divergent migration occurs causing period ratios to increase. Depending on its strength the whole period ratio range between 1 and 2 can be obtained. A few systems close to second-order commensurabilities also occur. In contrast to when arising through convergent migration, resonant trapping does not occur and resonant angles circulate. Thus, the behaviour of the resonant angles may indicate the form of migration that led to near resonance.

  5. Liberating exomoons in white dwarf planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Matthew J.; Veras, Dimitri; Holman, Matthew J.; Gänsicke, Boris T.

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies indicate that more than a quarter of all white dwarf (WD) atmospheres are polluted by remnant planetary material, with some WDs being observed to accrete the mass of Pluto in 106 yr. The short sinking time-scale for the pollutants indicates that the material must be frequently replenished. Moons may contribute decisively to this pollution process if they are liberated from their parent planets during the post-main-sequence evolution of the planetary systems. Here, we demonstrate that gravitational scattering events amongst planets in WD systems easily trigger moon ejection. Repeated close encounters within tenths of planetary Hill radii are highly destructive to even the most massive, close-in moons. Consequently, scattering increases both the frequency of perturbing agents in WD systems, as well as the available mass of polluting material in those systems, thereby enhancing opportunities for collision and fragmentation and providing more dynamical pathways for smaller bodies to reach the WD. Moreover, during intense scattering, planets themselves have pericentres with respect to the WD of only a fraction of an astronomical unit, causing extreme Hill-sphere contraction, and the liberation of moons into WD-grazing orbits. Many of our results are directly applicable to exomoons orbiting planets around main-sequence stars.

  6. News from the γ Cephei Planetary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; Hatzes, Artie P.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.

    2011-03-01

    The γ Cephei planetary system is one of the most interesting systems due to several reasons: 1.) it is the first planet candidate detected by precise radial velocity (RV) measurements that was discussed in the literature (Campbell et al.. 1988) 2.) it is a tight binary system with α~20 AU; and 3.) the planet host star is an evolved K-type star. In Hatzes et al.. (2003) we confirmed the presence of the planetary companion with a minimum mass of 1.7 MJup at 2 AU. In this paper we present additional eight years of precise RV data from the Harlan J. Smith 2.7 m Telescope and its Tull Cóude spectrograph at McDonald Observatory. The 900 d signal, that is interpreted as the presence of the giant planetary companion,is strongly confirmed by adding the new data. We present an updated orbital solution for the planet, which shows that the planet is slightly more massive and the orbit more circular than previous results have suggested. An intensive high-cadence week of RV observations in 2007 revealed that γ Cep A is a multi-periodic pulsator. We discuss this issue within the context of searching for additional planets in this system.

  7. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Origin of Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Origin of Planetary Systems" included the following reports: (12753) Povenmire - Standard Comparison Small Main Belt Asteroid?; Gravitational Frequencies of Extra-Solar Planets; 'Jumping Jupiters' in Binary Star Systems; Hermes, Asteroid 2002 SY50 and the Northern Cetids - No Link Found!; What Kind of Accretion Model is Required for the Solar System; and Use of an Orbital Phase Curve of Extrasolar Planet for Specification of its Mass.

  8. Europlanet/IDIS: Combining Diverse Planetary Observations and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Walter; Capria, Maria Teresa; Chanteur, Gerard

    2013-04-01

    Planetary research involves a diversity of research fields from astrophysics and plasma physics to atmospheric physics, climatology, spectroscopy and surface imaging. Data from all these disciplines are collected from various space-borne platforms or telescopes, supported by modelling teams and laboratory work. In order to interpret one set of data often supporting data from different disciplines and other missions are needed while the scientist does not always have the detailed expertise to access and utilize these observations. The Integrated and Distributed Information System (IDIS) [1], developed in the framework of the Europlanet-RI project, implements a Virtual Observatory approach ([2] and [3]), where different data sets, stored in archives around the world and in different formats, are accessed, re-formatted and combined to meet the user's requirements without the need of familiarizing oneself with the different technical details. While observational astrophysical data from different observatories could already earlier be accessed via Virtual Observatories, this concept is now extended to diverse planetary data and related model data sets, spectral data bases etc. A dedicated XML-based Europlanet Data Model (EPN-DM) [4] was developed based on data models from the planetary science community and the Virtual Observatory approach. A dedicated editor simplifies the registration of new resources. As the EPN-DM is a super-set of existing data models existing archives as well as new spectroscopic or chemical data bases for the interpretation of atmospheric or surface observations, or even modeling facilities at research institutes in Europe or Russia can be easily integrated and accessed via a Table Access Protocol (EPN-TAP) [5] adapted from the corresponding protocol of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance [6] (IVOA-TAP). EPN-TAP allows to search catalogues, retrieve data and make them available through standard IVOA tools if the access to the archive

  9. Planetary system detection by POINTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    The final report and semiannual reports 1, 2, and 3 in response to the study of 'Planetary System Detection by POINTS' is presented. The grant covered the period from 15 Jun. 1988 through 31 Dec. 1989. The work during that period comprised the further development and refinement of the POINTS concept. The status of the POINTS development at the end of the Grant period was described by Reasenberg in a paper given at the JPL Workshop on Space Interferometry, 12-13 Mar. 1990, and distributed as CfA Preprint 3138. That paper, 'POINTS: a Small Astrometric Interferometer,' follows as Appendix-A. Our proposal P2276-7-09, dated July 1990, included a more detailed description of the state of the development of POINTS at the end of the tenure of Grant NAGW-1355. That proposal, which resulted in Grant NAGW-2497, is included by reference.

  10. XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS OF HD 189733 DURING PLANETARY TRANSITS

    SciTech Connect

    Pillitteri, I.; Wolk, S. J.; Cohen, O.; Kashyap, V.; Knutson, H.; Lisse, C. M.; Henry, G. W.

    2010-10-20

    We report on two XMM-Newton observations of the planetary host star HD 189733. The system has a close in planet and it can potentially affect the coronal structure via interactions with the magnetosphere. We have obtained X-ray spectra and light curves from EPIC and the Reflection Grating Spectrometer on board XMM-Newton which we have analyzed and interpreted. We reduced X-ray data from the primary transit and secondary eclipse that occurred on 2007 April 17 and 2009 May 18, respectively. In the 2007 April observation, only variability due to weak flares is recognized. In 2009 HD 189733 exhibited an X-ray flux that was always larger than in the 2007 observation. The average flux in 2009 was higher than in the 2007 observation by a factor of 45%. During the 2009 secondary eclipse we observed a significant softening of the X-ray spectrum at a level of {approx}3{sigma}. Furthermore, we observed the most intense flare recorded at either epoch. This flare occurred 3 ks after the end of the eclipse. The flare decay shows several minor ignitions perhaps linked to the main event and hinting at secondary loops that are triggered by the main loop. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations show that the magnetic interaction between planet and star enhances the density and the magnetic field in a region between the planet and the star because of their relative orbital/rotation motion. X-ray observations and model predictions are globally found in agreement, despite the quite simple MHD model and the lack of precise estimate of parameters including the alignment and the intensity of stellar and planetary magnetic fields. Future observations should confirm or disprove this hypothesis, by determining whether flares are systematically recurring in the light curve at the same planetary phase.

  11. Dynamical habitability of planetary systems.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Rudolf; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Bois, Eric; Schwarz, Richard; Funk, Barbara; Beichman, Charles; Danchi, William; Eiroa, Carlos; Fridlund, Malcolm; Henning, Thomas; Herbst, Tom; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Lammer, Helmut; Léger, Alain; Liseau, René; Lunine, Jonathan; Paresce, Francesco; Penny, Alan; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Röttgering, Huub; Selsis, Frank; Schneider, Jean; Stam, Daphne; Tinetti, Giovanna; White, Glenn J

    2010-01-01

    The problem of the stability of planetary systems, a question that concerns only multiplanetary systems that host at least two planets, is discussed. The problem of mean motion resonances is addressed prior to discussion of the dynamical structure of the more than 350 known planets. The difference with regard to our own Solar System with eight planets on low eccentricity is evident in that 60% of the known extrasolar planets have orbits with eccentricity e > 0.2. We theoretically highlight the studies concerning possible terrestrial planets in systems with a Jupiter-like planet. We emphasize that an orbit of a particular nature only will keep a planet within the habitable zone around a host star with respect to the semimajor axis and its eccentricity. In addition, some results are given for individual systems (e.g., Gl777A) with regard to the stability of orbits within habitable zones. We also review what is known about the orbits of planets in double-star systems around only one component (e.g., gamma Cephei) and around both stars (e.g., eclipsing binaries). PMID:20307181

  12. Planetary Habitability of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, Abel

    2009-09-01

    Habitability is a qualitative concept generally defined as the suitability of an environment to support life. Although there are many works related to planetary habitability, there is no practical quantitative definition of habitability. The search for habitable environments in the Solar System and beyond requires a method to quantify and compare their significance. Therefore, this study presents a quantitative approach to assess the habitability of Earth and other planetary bodies. A Quantitative Habitability Model (QH Model) was develop and used to model the terrestrial habitability as a standard for comparison. The QH Model provides a simple ecophysiology-based framework that can be used to predict the potential distribution, abundance and productivity of life in planetary bodies from local to global scales. The simplest QH Model calculates habitability from the environment temperature and relative humidity in gas phases (i.e. atmospheres), and from temperature and salinity in liquid phases (i.e. oceans). The model was used to explain the latitudinal gradients of primary producers on Earth and was validated with ground and satellites observations of net primary productivity (NPP). The potential global habitability for prokaryotes of the upper-troposphere of Venus, the subsurface of Mars, Europa, Titan, and Enceladus was compared. Results show that Enceladus has the zone with the highest mean habitability in the Solar System although to deep for direct exploration. Results also show that the current global terrestrial environment of land areas is not optimized for primary producers, but it was during some paleoclimates. The QH Model has applications in ecosystem modeling, global climate studies including paleoclimates and global warming, planetary protection, and astrobiology. It can also be used to quantify the potential for life of any terrestrial-size extrasolar planet as compared to Earth. This study was partially supported by UPR Arecibo and NASA

  13. Orbital Stability of High Mass Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Sarah J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2016-05-01

    In light of the observation of systems like HR 8799 that contain several planets with planet-star mass ratios larger than Jupiter's, we explore the relationships between planet separation, mass, and stability timescale for high mass multi-planet systems detectable via direct imaging. We discuss the role of overlap between 1st and sometimes 2nd order mean motion resonances, and show how trends in stability time vary from previous studies of lower mass multi-planet systems. We show that extrapolating empirically derived relationships between planet mass, separation, and stability timescale derived from lower mass planetary systems misestimate the stability timescales for higher mass planetary systems by more than an order of magnitude at separations near the Hill stability limit. We also address what metrics of planet separation are most useful for estimating a system's dynamical stability. We apply these results to young, gapped, debris disk systems of the ScoCen association in order to place limits on the maximum mass and number of planets that could persist for the lifetimes of the disks. These efforts will provide useful constraints for on-going direct imaging surveys. By setting upper limits on the most easily detectable systems, we can better interpret both new discoveries and non-dectections.

  14. Discovery of Planetary Systems With SIM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Butler, Paul R.; Frink, Sabine; Fischer, Debra; Oppenheimer, Ben; Monet, David G.; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    2004-01-01

    We are witnessing the birth of a new observational science: the discovery and characterization of extrasolar planetary systems. In the past five years, over 70 extrasolar planets have been discovered by precision Doppler surveys, most by members of this SIM team. We are using the data base of information gleaned from our Doppler survey to choose the best targets for a new SIN planet search. In the same way that our Doppler database now serves SIM, our team will return a reconnaissance database to focus Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) into a more productive, efficient mission.

  15. Planetary camera observations of the double nucleus of M31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, Tod R.; Faber, S. M.; Groth, Edward J.; Shaya, Edward J.; Campbell, Bel; Code, Arthur; Currie, Douglas G.; Baum, William A.; Ewald, S. P.; Hester, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    HST Planetary Camera images obtained in the V and I band for M31 show its inner nucleus to consist of two components that are separated by 0.49 arcsec. The nuclear component with lower surface brightness closely coincides with the bulge photocenter and is argued to be at the kinematic center of the galaxy. It is surmised that, if dust absorption generates the asymmetric nuclear morphology observed, the dust grain size must either be exceptionally large, or the dust optical depth must be extremely high; the higher surface-brightness and off-center nuclear component may alternatively be a separate stellar system.

  16. Planetary Regolith Delivery Systems for ISRU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantovani, James G.; Townsend, Ivan I., III

    2012-01-01

    The challenges associated with collecting regolith on a planetary surface and delivering it to an in-situ resource utilization system differ significantly from similar activities conducted on Earth. Since system maintenance on a planetary body can be difficult or impossible to do, high reliability and service life are expected of a regolith delivery system. Mission costs impose upper limits on power and mass. The regolith delivery system must provide a leak-tight interface between the near-vacuum planetary surface and the pressurized ISRU system. Regolith delivery in amounts ranging from a few grams to tens of kilograms may be required. Finally, the spent regolith must be removed from the ISRU chamber and returned to the planetary environment via dust tolerant valves capable of operating and sealing over a large temperature range. This paper will describe pneumatic and auger regolith transfer systems that have already been field tested for ISRU, and discuss other systems that await future field testing.

  17. Allegheny Observatory search for planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatewood, George D.

    1991-01-01

    The newly developed Multichannel Astrometric Photometer (MAP) and a rebuilt red light 0.76 meter Thaw refractor are used in an astrometric observational program to detect Jupiter-like planets in orbit about nearby stars. The program includes 15 stars and is obtaining approx. 12 good observations per year of each of them, sufficient to assure an annual normal point precision of 0.001 arcsec (1 mas) per object. The observational program will yield the first astrometric information about planetary systems in general. The astrometric technique is most sensitive to nearby planetary systems and to massive planets that have orbits that place them within the regions around a star where the temperature is sufficiently low to permit the existence of water ice grains. Thus it covers a different search space than that of radial velocity techniques. Currently the only astrometric survey program, it is complementary to other detection programs and some target stars have been included to assure overlap with them. The minimum detectable mass varies with the particular target star from objects almost twice as massive as Neptune to bodies almost twice as massive as Jupiter.

  18. The HU Aqr planetary system hypothesis revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goździewski, K.; Słowikowska, A.; Dimitrov, D.; Krzeszowski, K.; Żejmo, M.; Kanbach, G.; Burwitz, V.; Rau, A.; Irawati, P.; Richichi, A.; Gawroński, M.; Nowak, G.; Nasiroglu, I.; Kubicki, D.

    2015-04-01

    We study the mid-egress eclipse timing data gathered for the cataclysmic binary HU Aquarii during the years 1993-2014. The (O-C) residuals were previously attributed to a single ˜7 Jupiter mass companion in ˜5 au orbit or to a stable two-planet system with an unconstrained outermost orbit. We present 22 new observations gathered between 2011 June and 2014 July with four instruments around the world. They reveal a systematic deviation of ˜60-120 s from the older ephemeris. We re-analyse the whole set of the timing data available. Our results provide an erratum to the previous HU Aqr planetary models, indicating that the hypothesis for a third and fourth body in this system is uncertain. The dynamical stability criterion and a particular geometry of orbits rule out coplanar two-planet configurations. A putative HU Aqr planetary system may be more complex, e.g. highly non-coplanar. Indeed, we found examples of three-planet configurations with the middle planet in a retrograde orbit, which are stable for at least 1 Gyr, and consistent with the observations. The (O-C) may be also driven by oscillations of the gravitational quadrupole moment of the secondary, as predicted by the Lanza et al. modification of the Applegate mechanism. Further systematic, long-term monitoring of HU Aqr is required to interpret the (O-C) residuals.

  19. Architectures of planetary systems and implications for their formation.

    PubMed

    Ford, Eric B

    2014-09-01

    Doppler planet searches revealed that many giant planets orbit close to their host star or in highly eccentric orbits. These and subsequent observations inspired new theories of planet formation that invoke gravitation interactions in multiple planet systems to explain the excitation of orbital eccentricities and even short-period giant planets. Recently, NASA's Kepler mission has identified over 300 systems with multiple transiting planet candidates, including many potentially rocky planets. Most of these systems include multiple planets with closely spaced orbits and sizes between that of Earth and Neptune. These systems represent yet another new and unexpected class of planetary systems and provide an opportunity to test the theories developed to explain the properties of giant exoplanets. Presently, we have limited knowledge about such planetary systems, mostly about their sizes and orbital periods. With the advent of long-term, nearly continuous monitoring by Kepler, the method of transit timing variations (TTVs) has blossomed as a new technique for characterizing the gravitational effects of mutual planetary perturbations for hundreds of planets. TTVs can provide precise, but complex, constraints on planetary masses, densities, and orbits, even for planetary systems with faint host stars. In the coming years, astronomers will translate TTV observations into increasingly powerful constraints on the formation and orbital evolution of planetary systems with low-mass planets. Between TTVs, improved Doppler surveys, high-contrast imaging campaigns, and microlensing surveys, astronomers can look forward to a much better understanding of planet formation in the coming decade. PMID:24778212

  20. Architectures of planetary systems and implications for their formation

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Eric B.

    2014-01-01

    Doppler planet searches revealed that many giant planets orbit close to their host star or in highly eccentric orbits. These and subsequent observations inspired new theories of planet formation that invoke gravitation interactions in multiple planet systems to explain the excitation of orbital eccentricities and even short-period giant planets. Recently, NASA’s Kepler mission has identified over 300 systems with multiple transiting planet candidates, including many potentially rocky planets. Most of these systems include multiple planets with closely spaced orbits and sizes between that of Earth and Neptune. These systems represent yet another new and unexpected class of planetary systems and provide an opportunity to test the theories developed to explain the properties of giant exoplanets. Presently, we have limited knowledge about such planetary systems, mostly about their sizes and orbital periods. With the advent of long-term, nearly continuous monitoring by Kepler, the method of transit timing variations (TTVs) has blossomed as a new technique for characterizing the gravitational effects of mutual planetary perturbations for hundreds of planets. TTVs can provide precise, but complex, constraints on planetary masses, densities, and orbits, even for planetary systems with faint host stars. In the coming years, astronomers will translate TTV observations into increasingly powerful constraints on the formation and orbital evolution of planetary systems with low-mass planets. Between TTVs, improved Doppler surveys, high-contrast imaging campaigns, and microlensing surveys, astronomers can look forward to a much better understanding of planet formation in the coming decade. PMID:24778212

  1. On the stability of circumbinary planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E. A.; Shevchenko, I. I.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of circumbinary planetary systems (the systems in which the planets orbit a central binary) with a small binary mass ratio discovered to date is considered. The domains of chaotic motion have been revealed in the "pericentric distance-eccentricity" plane of initial conditions for the planetary orbits through numerical experiments. Based on an analytical criterion for the chaoticity of planetary orbits in binary star systems, we have constructed theoretical curves that describe the global boundary of the chaotic zone around the central binary for each of the systems. In addition, based on Mardling's theory describing the separate resonance "teeth" (corresponding to integer resonances between the orbital periods of a planet and the binary), we have constructed the local boundaries of chaos. Both theoretical models are shown to describe adequately the boundaries of chaos on the numerically constructed stability diagrams, suggesting that these theories are efficient in providing analytical criteria for the chaoticity of planetary orbits.

  2. Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudritz, Ralph; Higgs, Paul; Stone, Jonathon

    2013-01-01

    Preface; Part I. Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life: 1. Observations of extrasolar planetary systems Shay Zucker; 2. The atmospheres of extrasolar planets L. Jeremy Richardson and Sara Seager; 3. Terrestrial planet formation Edward Thommes; 4. Protoplanetary disks, amino acids and the genetic code Paul Higgs and Ralph Pudritz; 5. Emergent phenomena in biology: the origin of cellular life David Deamer; Part II. Life on Earth: 6. Extremophiles: defining the envelope for the search for life in the Universe Lynn Rothschild; 7. Hyperthermophilic life on Earth - and on Mars? Karl Stetter; 8. Phylogenomics: how far back in the past can we go? Henner Brinkmann, Denis Baurain and Hervé Philippe; 9. Horizontal gene transfer, gene histories and the root of the tree of life Olga Zhaxybayeva and J. Peter Gogarten; 10. Evolutionary innovation versus ecological incumbency Adolf Seilacher; 11. Gradual origins for the Metazoans Alexandra Pontefract and Jonathan Stone; Part III. Life in the Solar System?: 12. The search for life on Mars Chris McKay; 13. Life in the dark dune spots of Mars: a testable hypothesis Eörs Szathmary, Tibor Ganti, Tamas Pocs, Andras Horvath, Akos Kereszturi, Szaniszlo Berzci and Andras Sik; 14. Titan: a new astrobiological vision from the Cassini-Huygens data François Raulin; 15. Europa, the Ocean Moon: tides, permeable ice, and life Richard Greenberg; Index.

  3. (abstract) The Distribution of Carbon in the Outer Solar System: New Constraints on Planetary Formation Mechanisms from Groundbased Spectroscopic Observations of Uranus and Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baines, Kevin H.; Mickelson, M. E.; Larson, L. E.

    1994-01-01

    New limits on the methane mixing ratio within the well-mixed tropospheres of Uranus and Neptune place significant constraints on planetary formation mechanisms within the outer solar system. Our results support the conclusion of other researchers that a nontrivial amount of methane in the outer solar system was incorporated into the planets by dissolution of carbon-bearing planetesimals during the early evolutionary stages of both Uranus and Neptune.

  4. Research and Development of External Occultor Technology for the Direct Observation of Extrasolar Planetary Systems : JPL Starshades Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, Herbert; Stadeler, Mehnert

    2012-01-01

    Our group conducted work during the Summer of 2012 assembling and developing JPL's Starshades Project under the Technology Development for Exoplanet Missions(TDEM) initiative created by NASA, specifically TDEM stage 2. The goal of the work conducted at JPL by our group was to construct four occultor petals, the main optical components of the Starshade, for the analysis of joint deployment characteristics and of mechanical strain. A Starshade is an optical structure measuring approximately 30 meters in diameter that uses the effects of light diffraction off sheer edges, light scattering, and negative interference between waves to negate all on-axis light in a telescope's image, providing very high contrast that allows planets orbiting a target star to be observed. We completed our engineering goals in the time span of 10 weeks, during which the assembly processes of manufacture, alignment, and structural bonding took place. The Starshade technology and construction process is further discussed in the body of this paper.

  5. A Space Station-based search for other planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, E. H.

    1986-01-01

    The physical forces shaping and maintaining the form of the solar system and disk galaxies are reviewed to define the basis for an observational campaign from the Space Station, to find other planetary systems. The evolution of the distribution of types of matter in the solar system is regarded as typical of the formation of planetary systems around other stars. The observation campaign would cover 100 stars out to 10 pc and last 15-30 yr. Technological challenges which must be met to realize the telescope on the Station are described.

  6. Jupiter System Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senske, Dave; Prockter, Louise

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the scientific philosophy that is guiding the planning behind the Jupiter System Observer (JSO). The JSO would be a long-term platform for studying Jupiter and the complete Jovian system. The goal is to advance the understanding of the fundamental processes of planetary systems, their formation and evolution.

  7. A Balloon-borne Telescope for Planetary Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Taguchi, Makoto; Yoshida, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Yuji; Watanabe, Makoto; Nakano, Toshihiko; Fujimura, Ryosuke; Yamamoto, Mutsumi

    2012-07-01

    This presentation reports the development status of the balloon-borne telescope(BBT) for planetary observations which is scheduled to launch in August 2012. The BBT flies in the stratosphere where the atmosphere is as 1/100 thin as that around the ground, and is higher than the ozone layer. The telescope can receive star light with the band from NIR to UV through less atmospheric distortions. Our project aims to take images of target planets from the BBT in such advantageous environment, and to observe atmospheric phenomena in other planets. As the technology demonstration, a prototype flight system with a 30cm diameter telescope was launched in 2009 in Japan. The second demonstration with an improved system is scheduled to launch in this August. With the improved flight system, the BBT is expected to take images of Venus with the resolution of as high as 0.2 arc-seconds in a few hours. Eventually, the BBT is planned to launch into the polar jet stream and to observe target planets in a few hundreds hours. For the following flight observation, the successor flight system is already being developed. In this presentation, the target planets and its science which the project aims are briefly introduced. And also the development status of the flight system for the next launch is introduced.

  8. Ideas for a three-aircraft planetary observing fleet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, David J.; Schumann, Ulrich

    2003-04-01

    A new generation of research aircraft, based on modern mid-sized business jets, will provide access to upper regions of the atmosphere and remote regions of the planet not reachable by the current research aircraft. Equipped with extensive research modifications, modern instruments, and advanced air-to-ground communication systems, these new aircraft will allow investigators to attack key questions in global atmospheric dynamics, global cycles of water and carbon, global energy budgets, and regional and global air quality and chemical transport. A three-aircraft fleet of these aircraft could provide unprecedented coordinated intercalibrated coverage of the planetary atmosphere and surfaces in a manner that greatly enhances the total ground, ocean, and satellite observing system.

  9. UNSTABLE PLANETARY SYSTEMS EMERGING OUT OF GAS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Soko; Thommes, Edward W.; Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2010-05-01

    The discovery of over 400 extrasolar planets allows us to statistically test our understanding of the formation and dynamics of planetary systems via numerical simulations. Traditional N-body simulations of multiple-planet systems without gas disks have successfully reproduced the eccentricity (e) distribution of the observed systems by assuming that the planetary systems are relatively closely packed when the gas disk dissipates, so that they become dynamically unstable within the stellar lifetime. However, such studies cannot explain the small semimajor axes a of extrasolar planetary systems, if planets are formed, as the standard planet formation theory suggests, beyond the ice line. In this paper, we numerically study the evolution of three-planet systems in dissipating gas disks, and constrain the initial conditions that reproduce the observed a and e distributions simultaneously. We adopt initial conditions that are motivated by the standard planet formation theory, and self-consistently simulate the disk evolution and planet migration, by using a hybrid N-body and one-dimensional gas disk code. We also take into account eccentricity damping, and investigate the effect of saturation of corotation resonances on the evolution of planetary systems. We find that the a distribution is largely determined in a gas disk, while the e distribution is determined after the disk dissipation. We also find that there may be an optimum disk mass which leads to the observed a-e distribution. Our simulations generate a larger fraction of planetary systems trapped in mean-motion resonances (MMRs) than the observations, indicating that the disk's perturbation to the planetary orbits may be important to explain the observed rate of MMRs. We also find a much lower occurrence of planets on retrograde orbits than the current observations of close-in planets suggest.

  10. Planetary System Evolution in the Terrestrial Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George

    We propose to characterize the role of major collisional episodes in the terrestrial zones of other planetary systems, using data from WISE (and Spitzer). We will: 1.) identify old stars whose terrestrial zones have recently been shaken up dynamically (e.g., activity similar to the Late Heavy Bombardment); and 2.) look for young stars where major collisions are occurring, signaling a phase analogous to the one when our Moon was formed. These two phases represent critical periods in the evolution of the Solar System. The Late Heavy Bombardment resulted from a destabilization of the Solar System by a mean-motion resonance between Jupiter and Saturn, leading to ejection of most of the planetesimals and an intense period of impacts onto the terrestrial planets. The formation of the Moon occurred in a younger violent phase, extending roughly from 30 to 130 Myr, when dynamical models predict that giant impacts will still occur even though most of the terrestrial planet formation is complete. Both of these phases would have produced copious dust in the terrestrial zone. Similar activity around other stars is detectable through the mid-infrared excesses emitted by such dust when it is warmed by the star (creating warm debris disks). However, previous infrared surveys have lacked the sensitivity, accuracy, or sky coverage to study this process systematically. For the first time, the WISE all-sky survey at 22 microns combines: 1.) a sufficiently large number of stars that these rare events should be seen in reasonable numbers; and 2.) mid-infrared photometry with sufficient accuracy to detect the excesses, even to within < 10% of the stellar photospheres. After extracting candidates from the WISE data, we will weed out false positives due to chance superpositions of sources or stellar mass loss. This will require acquiring ancillary data through a combination of information from the literature and new targeted observations using groundbased facilities. We will determine ages

  11. Spreading the passion for scientifically useful planetary observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardasis, E.; Vourliotis, E.; Bellias, I.; Maravelias, G.; Vakalopoulos, E.; Papadeas, P.; Marouda, K.; Voutyras, O.

    2015-10-01

    Τhe "March 2015 - Planetary Observation Project (POP)" was a series of talks and hands-on workshops focused on planetary observation organized in March 2015 by the planetary section of the Hellenic Amateur Astronomy Association. Building on our previous experience (Voutyras et al. 2013), which also includes more than 500 attendants in our 2013-2014 series of lectures in Astronomy, we identified that there is a lack of more focused lectures/workshops on observing techniques. In particular, POP's structure included two talks and two workshops aiming to inspire and educate astronomy enthusiasts. The talks tried to stimulate the participants about the importance of ground-based observations by presenting the most current scientific news and puzzling problems that we are facing in the observation of planets. During the hands-on workshops the beauty of planetary observation was used to inspire participants. However, we trained participants on observing techniques and image processing to enable them to produce scientifically useful results. All POP's events were open to the public and free, meaning both out-of-charge and freely available material provided to the participants (through our website). The project offered attendants unique experiences that may have a significant impact with potential lifelong benefits. In this work we present an overview of the project structure that may work as a prototype for similar outreach programs.

  12. The Role of Planetary Data System Archive Standards in International Planetary Data Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinness, Edward; Slavney, Susan; Beebe, Reta; Crichton, Daniel

    A major objective of NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) is to efficiently archive and make accessible digital data produced by NASA's planetary missions, research programs, and data analysis programs. The PDS is comprised of a federation of groups known as nodes, with each node focused on archiving and managing planetary data from a given science discipline. PDS nodes include Atmospheres, Geosciences, Small Bodies (asteroids, comets, and dust), Rings, Planetary Plasma Interactions, and Imaging. There are also support nodes for engineering, radio science, and ancillary data, such as geometry information. The PDS archives include space-borne, ground-based, and laboratory experiment data from several decades of NASA exploration of comets, asteroids, moons, and planets. PDS archives are peer-reviewed, welldocumented, and accessible online via web sites, catalogs, and other user-interfaces that provide search and retrieval capabilities. Current holdings within the PDS online repositories total approximately 50 TB of data. Over the next few years, the PDS is planning for a rapid expansion in the volume of data being delivered to its archives. The archive standards developed by the PDS are crucial elements for producing planetary data archives that are consistent across missions and planetary science disciplines and that yield archives that are useable by the planetary research community. These standards encompass the full range of archiving needs. They include standards for the format of data products and the metadata needed to detail how observations were made. They also specify how data products and ancillary information such as documentation, calibration, and geometric information are packaged into data sets. The PDS standards are documented in its Planetary Science Data Dictionary and in its Standards Reference Document and Archive Preparation Guide. The PDS standards are being used to design and implement data archives for current and future NASA planetary missions

  13. Planetary radio astronomy observations from voyager 1 near saturn.

    PubMed

    Warwick, J W; Pearce, J B; Evans, D R; Carr, T D; Schauble, J J; Alexander, J K; Kaiser, M L; Desch, M D; Pedersen, M; Lecacheux, A; Daigne, G; Boischot, A; Barrow, C H

    1981-04-10

    The Voyager 1 planetary radio astronomy experiment detected two distinct kinds of radio emissions from Saturn. The first, Saturn kilometric radiation, is strongly polarized, bursty, tightly correlated with Saturn's rotation, and exhibits complex dynamic spectral features somewhat reminiscent of those in Jupiter's radio emission. It appears in radio frequencies below about 1.2 megahertz. The second kind of radio emission, Saturn electrostatic discharge, is unpolarized, extremely impulsive, loosely correlated with Saturn's rotation, and very broadband, appearing throughout the observing range of the experiment (20.4 kilohertz to 40.2 megahertz). Its sources appear to lie in the planetary rings. PMID:17783837

  14. Planetary radio astronomy observations from Voyager 1 near Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.; Pearce, J. B.; Evans, D. R.; Carr, T. D.; Schauble, J. J.; Alexander, J. K.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Pedersen, M.; Lecacheux, A.

    1981-01-01

    The Voyager 1 planetary radio astronomy experiment detected two distinct kinds of radio emissions from Saturn. The first, Saturn kilometric radiation, is strongly polarized, bursty, tightly correlated with Saturn's rotation, and exhibits complex dynamic spectral features somewhat reminiscent of those in Jupiter's radio emission. It appears in radio frequencies below about 1.2 megahertz. The second kind of radio emission, Saturn electrostatic discharge, is unpolarized, extremely impulsive, loosely correlated with Saturn's rotation, and very broadband, appearing throughout the observing range of the experiment (20.4 kilohertz to 40.2 megahertz). Its sources appear to lie in the planetary rings.

  15. A review of the scientific rationale and methods used in the search for other planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Planetary systems appear to be one of the crucial links in the chain leading from simple molecules to living systems, particularly complex (intelligent?) living systems. Although there is currently no observational proof of the existence of any planetary system other than our own, techniques are now being developed which will permit a comprehensive search for other planetary systems. The scientific rationale for and methods used in such a search effort are reviewed here.

  16. Observations of Planetary and Satellite Atmospheres and Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lellouch, E.

    2001-07-01

    The full opening of the submillimeter range with the operation of Herschel is expected to prove very useful for the study of planetary atmospheres and surfaces. Areas of anticipated progress include: (i) the origin and evolution of the Giant Planets, from improved determinations of the abundance of deuterium and helium (ii) the origin of the external source of oxygen in the Giant Planets and Titan (iii) several compositional and physical aspects of planetary atmospheres, especially the issue of vertical transport in Uranus and Neptune and the martian photochemistry and (iv) the thermophysical and compositional properties of planetary surfaces, including the size distribution of transneptunian objects. The high sensitivity of all instruments and the diversity of their spectral resolutions is well suited to the diversity of size and atmospheric pressure within the bodies of the Solar System.

  17. Estimation of planetary surface roughness by HF sounder observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Ono, T.

    Japanese Martian exploration project "Nozomi" was to carry out several science missions. Plasma Wave Sounder, one of those onboard missions, was an HF sounder to study Martian plasma environment, and Martian surface with the altimetry mode (Oya and Ono, 1998) as well. The altimetry mode observation was studied by means of computer simulations utilizing the KiSS code which had been originally designed to simulate the SELENE Lunar Radar Sounder, a spaceborne HF GPR, based on Kirchhoff approximation theory (Kobayashi, Oya and Ono, 2002). We found an empirical power law for the standard deviation of observed altitudes over Gaussian random rough surfaces: it varies in proportion to the square of the RMS gradient of the surface √{2} hRMS{λ_0, where hRMS and λ_0 are the RMS height of the surface and the correlation distance of the surface, respectively. We applied Geometrical optics to understand this empirical power law, and derived a square power law for the standard deviation of the observed altitude. Our Geometrical optics model assumed the followings: 1) the observed surface is a Gaussian random rough surface, 2) the mean surface is a flat horizontal plane, 3) the observed surface echo is the back scattering echoes, 4) the observed altitude is the mean value of the apparent range of those back scattering echoes. These results imply that HF sounder may be utilized to measure the surface roughness of planetary bodies in terms of the RMS gradient of the surface. Refrence: H. Oya and T. Ono, A new altimeter for Mars land shape observations utilizing the ionospheric sounder system onboard the Planet-B spacecraft, Earth Planets Space, Vol. 50, pp.229-234, 1998 T. Kobayashi, H. Oya, and T. Ono, A-scope analysis of subsurface radar sounding of lunar mare region, Earth Planets Space, Vol. 54, pp.973-982, 2002

  18. Communication System Architecture for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braham, Stephen P.; Alena, Richard; Gilbaugh, Bruce; Glass, Brian; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Future human missions to Mars will require effective communications supporting exploration activities and scientific field data collection. Constraints on cost, size, weight and power consumption for all communications equipment make optimization of these systems very important. These information and communication systems connect people and systems together into coherent teams performing the difficult and hazardous tasks inherent in planetary exploration. The communication network supporting vehicle telemetry data, mission operations, and scientific collaboration must have excellent reliability, and flexibility.

  19. Origin and formation of planetary systems.

    PubMed

    Alibert, Y; Broeg, C; Benz, W; Wuchterl, G; Grasset, O; Sotin, C; Eiroa, Carlos; Henning, Thomas; Herbst, Tom; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Léger, Alain; Liseau, Réne; Lammer, Helmut; Beichman, Charles; Danchi, William; Fridlund, Malcolm; Lunine, Jonathan; Paresce, Francesco; Penny, Alan; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Röttgering, Huub; Selsis, Frank; Schneider, Jean; Stam, Daphne; Tinetti, Giovanna; White, Glenn J

    2010-01-01

    To estimate the occurrence of terrestrial exoplanets and maximize the chance of finding them, it is crucial to understand the formation of planetary systems in general and that of terrestrial planets in particular. We show that a reliable formation theory should not only explain the formation of the Solar System, with small terrestrial planets within a few AU and gas giants farther out, but also the newly discovered exoplanetary systems with close-in giant planets. Regarding the presently known exoplanets, we stress that our current knowledge is strongly biased by the sensitivity limits of current detection techniques (mainly the radial velocity method). With time and improved detection methods, the diversity of planets and orbits in exoplanetary systems will definitely increase and help to constrain the formation theory further. In this work, we review the latest state of planetary formation in relation to the origin and evolution of habitable terrestrial planets. PMID:20307180

  20. Tracing Planetary System Architecture with Debris Disk Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryden, Geoffrey

    2014-06-01

    Planetary systems can be imaged indirectly via their debris disks - the remnants left over after planets form. Ongoing destruction of asteroids and comets in these disks creates a continual supply of orbiting dust around most Sun-like stars, including our own. In the Solar System such dust is bright enough to be seen with the naked eye - the Zodiacal light. Far-infrared observations by the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Herschel Space Observatory have identified many nearby stars with even brighter orbiting debris, orders of magnitude more than in the Solar System. Because they are so bright, optical imaging of debris disks is much easier than detecting their embedded planets. Such planets can be inferred from disk structure - the inner warp of beta Pic and the sharply defined eccentric rings of Fomalhaut and HD 202628, for example. Resolving individual belts of debris, meanwhile, infers the location of intermediate planets (as in the HR 8799 planetary system) and allows for comparison with the 2-belt architecture of Solar System. Debris disk imaging is particularly well suited toward exploring the outer regions of planetary systems (>10 AU), where mature (cold) planets cannot otherwise be detected. Overall, images of debris disks probe their underlying planetary systems both generally, by mapping the system architecture, and specifically, by determining the location of individual planets.

  1. A new inclination instability in planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madigan, Ann-Marie

    2015-08-01

    I describe a new instability in Keplerian disks of massive particles on eccentric orbits. Gravitational torques between the orbits align their angles of pericenter and drive exponential growth in orbital inclination. This instability implies specific ratios for Kepler elements of the orbits, similar to what is seen in the inner Oort Cloud of our solar system. I also discuss implications for extra-solar planetary systems and for nuclear star clusters in the centers of galaxies.

  2. The complex planetary synchronization structure of the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, N.

    2014-01-01

    The complex planetary synchronization structure of the solar system, which since Pythagoras of Samos (ca. 570-495 BC) is known as the music of the spheres, is briefly reviewed from the Renaissance up to contemporary research. Copernicus' heliocentric model from 1543 suggested that the planets of our solar system form a kind of mutually ordered and quasi-synchronized system. From 1596 to 1619 Kepler formulated preliminary mathematical relations of approximate commensurabilities among the planets, which were later reformulated in the Titius-Bode rule (1766-1772), which successfully predicted the orbital position of Ceres and Uranus. Following the discovery of the ~ 11 yr sunspot cycle, in 1859 Wolf suggested that the observed solar variability could be approximately synchronized with the orbital movements of Venus, Earth, Jupiter and Saturn. Modern research has further confirmed that (1) the planetary orbital periods can be approximately deduced from a simple system of resonant frequencies; (2) the solar system oscillates with a specific set of gravitational frequencies, and many of them (e.g., within the range between 3 yr and 100 yr) can be approximately constructed as harmonics of a base period of ~ 178.38 yr; and (3) solar and climate records are also characterized by planetary harmonics from the monthly to the millennial timescales. This short review concludes with an emphasis on the contribution of the author's research on the empirical evidences and physical modeling of both solar and climate variability based on astronomical harmonics. The general conclusion is that the solar system works as a resonator characterized by a specific harmonic planetary structure that also synchronizes the Sun's activity and the Earth's climate. The special issue Pattern in solar variability, their planetary origin and terrestrial impacts (Mörner et al., 2013) further develops the ideas about the planetary-solar-terrestrial interaction with the personal contribution of 10

  3. Possible consequences of absence of "Jupiters" in planetary systems.

    PubMed

    Wetherill, G W

    1994-01-01

    The formation of the gas giant planets Jupiter and Saturn probably required the growth of massive approximately 15 Earth-mass cores on a time scale shorter than the approximately 10(7) time scale for removal of nebular gas. Relatively minor variations in nebular parameters could preclude the growth of full-size gas giants even in systems in which the terrestrial planet region is similar to our own. Systems containing "failed Jupiters," resembling Uranus and Neptune in their failure to capture much nebular gas, would be expected to contain more densely populated cometary source regions. They will also eject a smaller number of comets into interstellar space. If systems of this kind were the norm, observation of hyperbolic comets would be unexpected. Monte Carlo calculations of the orbital evolution of region of such systems (the Kuiper belt) indicate that throughout Earth history the cometary impact flux in their terrestrial planet regions would be approximately 1000 times greater than in our Solar System. It may be speculated that this could frustrate the evolution of organisms that observe and seek to understand their planetary system. For this reason our observation of these planets in our Solar System may tell us nothing about the probability of similar gas giants occurring in other planetary systems. This situation can be corrected by observation of an unbiased sample of planetary systems. PMID:11539457

  4. Circumbinary Planetary Systems at Home and Abroad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Shannon, Andrew B.; Youdin, Andrew; Kenyon, Scott

    2014-05-01

    The Kepler mission has revealed a new class of (main-sequence) planetary system: circumbinaries. In these systems, a tight binary is orbited by one or more planets. From a dynamical perspective, these systems are not new, but rather a scaled up version of the Pluto-Charon system. In this talk I will discuss what we can learn from a detailed study of the dynamics of both Pluto-Charon and Kepler circumbinary systems. I will describe how circumbinary planets may be crucial for our understanding of binary star formation, and why these unique systems may be excellent places to search for habitable zone planets.

  5. Carbon Chemistry in Planetary Nebulae: Observations of the CCH Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Deborah Rose; Ziurys, Lucy

    2015-08-01

    The presence of infrared (IR) emission features observed in interstellar environments is consistent with models that suggest they are produced by complex organic species containing both aliphatic and aromatic components (Kwok & Zhang 2011). These IR signals change drastically over the course of the AGB, proto-planetary, and planetary nebulae phases, and this dramatic variation is yet to be understood. The radical CCH is a potential tracer of carbon chemistry and its evolution in dying stars. CCH is very common in carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes of AGB stars, and is present in the proto-planetary nebulae. It has also been observed at one position in the very young planetary nebula, NGC 7027 (Hasegawa & Kwok 2001), as well as at one position in the Helix Nebula (Tenenbaum et al. 2009) - a dense clump east of the central white dwarf. In order to further probe the chemistry of carbon, we have initiated a search for CCH in eight PNe previously detected in HCN and HCO+ from a survey conducted by Schmidt and Ziurys, using the telescopes of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). Observations of the N=1→0 transition of CCH at 87 GHz have been conducted using the new ARO 12-m ALMA prototype antenna, while measurements of the N=3→2 transition at 262 GHz are being made with the ARO Sub-Millimeter Telescope (SMT). We also have extended our study in the Helix Nebula. Thus far, CCH has been detected at 8 new positions across the Helix Nebula, and appears to be widespread in this source. The radical has also been identified in K4-47, M3-28, K3-17, and K3-58. These sources represent a range of nebular ages. Additional observations are currently being conducted for CCH in other PNe, as well as abundance analyses. These results will be presented.

  6. Planetary system formation: The view from Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trilling, D. E.; Rieke, G. H.; Su, K. Y. L.; Stansberry, J. A.; Beichman, C. A.; Bryden, G.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Werner, M. W.

    2004-11-01

    In the past year, the Spitzer Space Telescope has returned thermal infrared (24, 70, 160 micron) images of unprecedented sensitivity, allowing searches for debris disks around stars. We will provide a brief overview of results from several ongoing Spitzer debris disk programs, highlighting results from three programs. First, we learn from our survey of more than 250 A stars that there is substantial variety in the intrinsic properties of debris disks, dating from their protoplanetary stages. We further argue that much of the dust we see today is generated from episodic planetesimal collisions. Second, our detailed study of Vega allows us to map a large debris disk and constrain particle size and dust dynamics. We find that very small dust grains are being blown out from the inner part of the Vega system, suggesting a recent dust-producing collision. Third, from a preliminary survey of nearby Sun-like stars, we find that the prevalence of debris disks around extrasolar planet-bearing stars is relatively high, implying the presence of dust-producing bodies (asteroids, comets) in those systems. The overall picture of planetary system formation from planetesimals is supported by all of these results. However, the observational signatures of dust disks (and consequently the late-stage evolution of those disks) may be alluding not to steady-state conditions but to large, individual, dust-producing events. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, operated by JPL/Caltech under NASA contract 1407. Support for this work was provided by NASA through contract number 960785 issued by JPL/Caltech.

  7. The Evolution and Disruption of Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Gregory; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Planetary systems that encounter passing stars can experience severe orbital disruption, and the efficiency of this process is greatly enhanced when the impinging systems are binary pairs rather than single stars. Using a Monte Carlo approach, we have performed nearly half a million numerical experiments to examine the long term ramifications of planetary scattering on planetary systems. We have concluded that systems which form in dense environments such as Orion's Trapezium cluster have roughly a ten percent chance of being seriously disrupted. We have also used our programs to explore the long-term prospects for our own Solar system. Given the current interstellar environment, we have computed the odds that Earth will find its orbit seriously disrupted prior to the emergence of a runaway greenhouse effect driven by the Sun's increasing luminosity. This estimate includes both direct disruption events and scattering processes that seriously alter the orbits of the Jovian planets, which then force severe changes upon the Earth's orbit. We then explore the consequences of the Earth being thrown into deep space. The surface biosphere would rapidly shut down under conditions of zero insolation, but the Earth's radioactive heat is capable of maintaining life deep underground, and perhaps in hydrothermal vent communities, for some time to come. Although unlikely for the Earth, this scenario may be common throughout the universe, since many environments where liquid water could exist (e.g., Europa and Callisto) must derive their energy from internal (rather than external) heating.

  8. Kepler's Planetary Systems in Motion

    NASA Video Gallery

    The animation shows an overhead view of the orbital position of the planets in systems with multiple transiting planets discovered by NASA's Kepler mission as of Jan. 2012. All the colored planets ...

  9. New approaches to planetary exploration - Spacecraft and information systems design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, A. V.; Neugebauer, M.; Stuart, J.; Miller, R. B.

    1983-01-01

    Approaches are recommended for use by the NASA Solar System Exploration Committee (SSEC) in lowering the costs of planetary missions. The inclusion of off-the-shelf hardware, i.e., configurations currently in use for earth orbits and constructed on a nearly assembly-line basis, is suggested. Alterations would be necessary for the thermal control, power supply, telecommunications equipment, and attitude sensing in order to be serviceable as a planetary observer spacecraft. New technology can be developed only when cost reduction for the entire mission would be realized. The employment of lower-cost boost motors, or even integrated boost motors, for the transfer out of earth orbit is indicated, as is the development of instruments that do not redundantly gather the same data as previous planetary missions. Missions under consideration include a Mars geoscience climatology Orbiter, a lunar geoscience Orbiter, a near-earth asteroid rendezvous, a Mars aeronomy Orbiter, and a Venus atmospheric probe.

  10. Earth As an Evolving Planetary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meert, Joseph G.

    2005-05-01

    ``System'' is an overused buzzword in textbooks covering geological sciences. Describing the Earth as a system of component parts is a reasonable concept, but providing a comprehensive framework for detailing the system is a more formidable task. Kent Condie lays out the systems approach in an easy-to-read introductory chapter in Earth as an Evolving Planetary System. In the book, Condie makes a valiant attempt at taking the mélange of diverse subjects in the solid Earth sciences and weaving them into a coherent tapestry.

  11. Planetary radio astronomy observations during the Voyager 1 Titan flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigne, G.; Pedersen, B. M.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    During the Voyager 1 Titan flyby, unusual radio emissions were observed by the planetary radio astronomy experiment in the 20- to 97-kHz frequency range. It is shown that Titan itself is not the source of the observed radio emission. The emission features are attributed to modification of the normal Saturn kilometric radiation by propagation effects in enhanced density structures within the Titan wake. Furthermore, spiky emissions observed in the magnetic wake of Titan are interpreted in terms of local electrostatic instabilities at the electron plasma frequency. From these measurements a range of electron densities in the wake region is derived, and the consistency of the results is discussed.

  12. Planetary magnetism in the outer solar system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonett, C. P.

    1973-01-01

    A brief review of the salient considerations which apply to the existence of magnetic fields in connection with planetary and subplanetary objects in the outer solar system is given. Consideration is given to internal dynamo fields, fields which might originate from interaction with the solar wind or magnetospheres (externally driven dynamos) and lastly fossil magnetic fields such as have been discovered on the moon. Where possible, connection is made between magnetism, means of detection, and internal body properties.

  13. History of the Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, J. L. E.

    2014-10-01

    Introduction. The earliest cosmological ideas; 1. The early Greek philosophers; 2. The Pythagorean school; 3. Plato; 4. The homocentric spheres of Eudoxus; 5. Aristotle; 6. Herakleides and Aristarchus; 7. The theory of Epicycles; 8. The dimensions of the world; 9. The Ptolemaic system; 10. Medieval cosmology; 11. Oriental astronomers; 12. The revival of astronomy in Europe; 13. Copernicus; 14. Tycho Brahe and his contemporaries; 15. Kepler; 16. Conclusion; Index.

  14. Upper atmospheric planetary-wave and gravity-wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Woodrum, A.

    1973-01-01

    Previously collected data on atmospheric pressure, density, temperature and winds between 25 and 200 km from sources including Meteorological Rocket Network data, ROBIN falling sphere data, grenade release and pitot tube data, meteor winds, chemical release winds, satellite data, and others were analyzed by a daily-difference method, and results on the magnitude of atmospheric perturbations interpreted as gravity waves and planetary waves are presented. Traveling planetary-wave contributions in the 25-85 km range were found to have significant height and latitudinal variation. It was found that observed gravity-wave density perturbations and wind are related to one another in the manner predicted by gravity-wave theory. It was determined that, on the average, gravity-wave energy deposition or reflection occurs at all altitudes except the 55-75 km region of the mesosphere.

  15. SNOOPY: Student Nanoexperiments for Outreach and Observational Planetary Inquiry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlma, K. R.; Hecht, M. H.; Brinza, D. E.; Feldman, J. E.; Fuerstenau, S. D.; Friedman, L.; Kelly, L.; Oslick, J.; Polk, K.; Moeller, L. E.

    2001-01-01

    As scientists and engineers primarily employed by the public, we have a responsibility to "communicate the results of our research so that the average American could understand that NASA is an investment in our future...". Not only are we employed by the public, but they are also the source of future generations of scientists and engineers. Teachers typically don't have the time or expertise to research recent advances in space science and reduce them to a form that students can absorb. Teachers are also often intimidated by both the subject and the researchers themselves. Therefore, the burden falls on us - the space scientists and engineers of the world - to communicate our findings in ways both teachers and students can understand. Student Nanoexperiments for Outreach and Observational Planetary InquirY (SNOOPY) provides just such an opportunity to directly involve our customers in planetary science missions.

  16. User friendly database for Neptune planetary radio astronomy observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, David R.

    1993-01-01

    Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) data from the Voyager Neptune encounter were cleaned and reformatted in a variety of formats. Most of these formats are new and have been specifically designed to provide easy access and use of the data without the need to understand esoteric characteristics of the PRA instrument or the Voyager spacecraft. Several data sets were submitted to the Planetary Data System (PDS) and have either appeared already on peer reviewed CDROM's or are in the process of being reviewed for inclusion in forthcoming CD-ROM's. Many of the data sets are also available online electronically through computer networks; it is anticipated that as time permits, the PDS will make all the data sets that were a part of this contract available both online and on CD-ROM's.

  17. Designing planetary protection into the Mars Observer mission.

    PubMed

    Sweetser, T H; Halsell, C A; Cesarone, R J

    1995-03-01

    Planetary protection has been an important consideration during the process of designing the Mars Observer mission. It affected trajectory design of both the interplanetary transfer and the orbits at Mars; these in turn affected the observation strategies developed for the mission. The Project relied mainly on the strategy of collision avoidance to prevent contamination of Mars. Conservative estimates of spacecraft reliability and Martian atmosphere density were used to evaluate decisions concerning the interplanetary trajectory, the orbit insertion phase at Mars, and operations in orbit at Mars and afterwards. Changes in the trajectory design, especially in the orbit insertion phase, required a refinement of those estimates. PMID:11539235

  18. Long-term evolution and stability of planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juric, Mario

    This dissertation studies the dynamical evolution and stability of planetary systems over long time spans (10 8 -10 9 years). I investigated the dynamical evolution of few-planet systems by simulating ensembles of systems consisting of hundreds to thousands of randomly constructed members. I looked at ways to classify the systems according to their dynamical activity, and found the median Hill separation of an ensemble to be a sufficiently good criterion for separation into active (those exhibiting frequent planetary close encounters, collisions or ejections) and inactive ensembles. I examined the evolution of dynamical parameters in active systems. I found that in ensembles of dynamically active (initially unstable) systems the eccentricity distribution evolves towards the same equilibrium form, irrespective of the distribution it began with. Furthermore, this equilibrium distribution is indistinguishable, within observational errors, from the distribution found in extrasolar planets. This is to my knowledge the first successful detailed theoretical reproduction of the form of observed exoplanet eccentricity distribution. I further looked for quantities that can be used as indicators of long-term stability of planetary systems, specifically the angular momentum deficit (AMD) as originally proposed by Laskar. I found that the quantity Q , defined as the ratio of minimum AMD required for a planetary collision to occur in secular theory and the total AMD of the system, may be used to predict the likelihood of decay of a planetary system. Qualitatively, the decay in systems having Q [Special characters omitted.] 1 is highly probable, while systems with Q [Special characters omitted.] 1 were found to be stable. To conduct the above investigations, I developed a new integrator package (VENUS), and the HYBRID/EE integration scheme designed for nearly-symplectic long-term integrations. VENUS implements integration algorithms for few-body planetary system integrations

  19. The Planetary Data System Geosciences Node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinness, Edward A.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Slavney, Susan

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the Planetary Data System Geosciences Node is to archive and distribute planetary geosciences datasets relevant to the surfaces and interiors of the terrestrial planets and moons. This objective is accomplished through the following efforts. The Node works with planetary missions to help ensure that data of relevance to the geosciences discipline are properly documented and archived. The Node restores and publishes selected geoscience datasets from past missions on CD-ROM for distribution to the planetary science community. Data archived at the Node are distributed on CD-ROM, magnetic tape, CD-WO, or by electronic transfer over the Internet. The Geo-sciences Node provides information and expert assistance on its data holdings. Derived image, geophysics, microwave, spaceborne thermal, and radio science data are archived at the lead node or at one of the subnodes. Currently, the amount of data archived at the Node is on the order of 500 Gbytes stored on a combination of nearly 800 CD-ROMs and CD-WOs. Current archives within the Node include data from the Magellan and Viking missions, the Geological Remote Sensing Field Experiment, and a collection of radar, altimetry, and gravity datasets for Venus, Mercury, Mars, Earth, and the Moon, together with software to analyze the data. The Node maintains on-line catalogs that enable the science community to search through the Geosciences Node archives and to order selected datasets. Access to the Node's catalogs and on-line datasets is available via the Internet using a remote login or via the World Wide Web (WWW).

  20. Planetary Rings: a Brief History of Observation and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, P. D.

    2000-05-01

    Over several centuries, and extending down to today, the ring systems encircling Saturn and the other jovian planets have provided an endless source of speculation and theorizing for astronomers, theologians, and physicists. In the past two decades they have also become a testing ground for dynamical models of more distant astrophysical disks, such as those which surround protostars and even the stellar disks of spiral galaxies. I will review some of the early theories, and their sometimes rude confrontation with observational data, starting with Christiaan Huygens and touching on seminal contributions by Laplace, Bessel, Maxwell, Barnard, Russell (of H-R diagram fame) and Jeffreys. In the modern era, observations at infrared and radio wavelengths have revealed Saturn's rings to be composed of large chunks of almost pure water ice, and to have a vertical thickness measured in tens of meters. A renaissance in planetary rings studies occurred in the period 1977--1981, first with the discoveries of the narrow, dark and non-circular rings of Uranus and the tenuous jovian ring system, and capped off by the spectacular images returned during the twin Voyager flybys of Saturn. Along with the completely unsuspected wealth of detail these observations revealed came an unwelcome problem: are the rings ancient or are we privileged to live at a special time in history? The answer to this still-vexing question may lie in the complex gravitational interactions recent studies have revealed between the rings themselves and their retinues of attendant satellites. Between the four known ring systems, we see elegant examples of Lindblad and corotation resonances (first invoked in the galactic context), electromagnetic resonances, many-armed spiral density waves and bending waves, narrow ringlets which exhibit internal modes due to a collective instability, sharp-edged gaps maintained via tidal torques from embedded moonlets, and tenuous dust belts created by meteoroid impact onto

  1. High-resolution Imaging of Transiting Extrasolar Planetary systems (HITEP). I. Lucky imaging observations of 101 systems in the southern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, D. F.; Southworth, J.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Skottfelt, J.; Hundertmark, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Dominik, M.; Alsubai, K. A.; Andersen, M. I.; Bozza, V.; Bramich, D. M.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Gu, S.-H.; Haugbølle, T.; Hinse, T. C.; Juncher, D.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Kuffmeier, M.; Mancini, L.; Peixinho, N.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Schmidt, R. W.; Snodgrass, C.; Starkey, D.; Surdej, J.; Tronsgaard, R.; von Essen, C.; Wang, Yi-Bo; Wertz, O.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Wide binaries are a potential pathway for the formation of hot Jupiters. The binary fraction among host stars is an important discriminator between competing formation theories, but has not been well characterised. Additionally, contaminating light from unresolved stars can significantly affect the accuracy of photometric and spectroscopic measurements in studies of transiting exoplanets. Aims: We observed 101 transiting exoplanet host systems in the Southern hemisphere in order to create a homogeneous catalogue of both bound companion stars and contaminating background stars, in an area of the sky where transiting exoplanetary systems have not been systematically searched for stellar companions. We investigate the binary fraction among the host stars in order to test theories for the formation of hot Jupiters. Methods: Lucky imaging observations from the Two Colour Instrument on the Danish 1.54 m telescope at La Silla were used to search for previously unresolved stars at small angular separations. The separations and relative magnitudes of all detected stars were measured. For 12 candidate companions to 10 host stars, previous astrometric measurements were used to evaluate how likely the companions are to be physically associated. Results: We provide measurements of 499 candidate companions within 20 arcsec of our sample of 101 planet host stars. 51 candidates are located within 5 arcsec of a host star, and we provide the first published measurements for 27 of these. Calibrations for the plate scale and colour performance of the Two Colour Instrument are presented. Conclusions: We find that the overall multiplicity rate of the host stars is 38+17-13 %, consistent with the rate among solar-type stars in our sensitivity range, suggesting that planet formation does not preferentially occur in long period binaries compared to a random sample of field stars. Long period stellar companions (P> 10 yr) appear to occur independently of short period companions

  2. High-resolution Imaging of Transiting Extrasolar Planetary systems (HITEP). I. Lucky imaging observations of 101 systems in the southern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, D. F.; Southworth, J.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Skottfelt, J.; Hundertmark, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Dominik, M.; Alsubai, K. A.; Andersen, M. I.; Bozza, V.; Bramich, D. M.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Gu, S.-H.; Haugbølle, T.; Hinse, T. C.; Juncher, D.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Kuffmeier, M.; Mancini, L.; Peixinho, N.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Schmidt, R. W.; Snodgrass, C.; Starkey, D.; Surdej, J.; Tronsgaard, R.; von Essen, C.; Wang, Yi-Bo; Wertz, O.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Wide binaries are a potential pathway for the formation of hot Jupiters. The binary fraction among host stars is an important discriminator between competing formation theories, but has not been well characterised. Additionally, contaminating light from unresolved stars can significantly affect the accuracy of photometric and spectroscopic measurements in studies of transiting exoplanets. Aims: We observed 101 transiting exoplanet host systems in the Southern hemisphere in order to create a homogeneous catalogue of both bound companion stars and contaminating background stars, in an area of the sky where transiting exoplanetary systems have not been systematically searched for stellar companions. We investigate the binary fraction among the host stars in order to test theories for the formation of hot Jupiters. Methods: Lucky imaging observations from the Two Colour Instrument on the Danish 1.54 m telescope at La Silla were used to search for previously unresolved stars at small angular separations. The separations and relative magnitudes of all detected stars were measured. For 12 candidate companions to 10 host stars, previous astrometric measurements were used to evaluate how likely the companions are to be physically associated. Results: We provide measurements of 499 candidate companions within 20 arcsec of our sample of 101 planet host stars. 51 candidates are located within 5 arcsec of a host star, and we provide the first published measurements for 27 of these. Calibrations for the plate scale and colour performance of the Two Colour Instrument are presented. Conclusions: We find that the overall multiplicity rate of the host stars is 38+17-13 %, consistent with the rate among solar-type stars in our sensitivity range, suggesting that planet formation does not preferentially occur in long period binaries compared to a random sample of field stars. Long period stellar companions (P> 10 yr) appear to occur independently of short period companions

  3. The Planetary Data System Information Model for Geometry Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinness, E. A.; Gordon, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Planetary Data System (PDS) has recently developed a new set of archiving standards based on a rigorously defined information model. An important part of the new PDS information model is the model for geometry metadata, which includes, for example, attributes of the lighting and viewing angles of observations, position and velocity vectors of a spacecraft relative to Sun and observing body at the time of observation and the location and orientation of an observation on the target. The PDS geometry model is based on requirements gathered from the planetary research community, data producers, and software engineers who build search tools. A key requirement for the model is that it fully supports the breadth of PDS archives that include a wide range of data types from missions and instruments observing many types of solar system bodies such as planets, ring systems, and smaller bodies (moons, comets, and asteroids). Thus, important design aspects of the geometry model are that it standardizes the definition of the geometry attributes and provides consistency of geometry metadata across planetary science disciplines. The model specification also includes parameters so that the context of values can be unambiguously interpreted. For example, the reference frame used for specifying geographic locations on a planetary body is explicitly included with the other geometry metadata parameters. The structure and content of the new PDS geometry model is designed to enable both science analysis and efficient development of search tools. The geometry model is implemented in XML, as is the main PDS information model, and uses XML schema for validation. The initial version of the geometry model is focused on geometry for remote sensing observations conducted by flyby and orbiting spacecraft. Future releases of the PDS geometry model will be expanded to include metadata for landed and rover spacecraft.

  4. The Influence of Planetary Mass on the Dynamical Lifetime of Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.; Duncan, M. J.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Recent numerical and analytic studies of planetary orbits have demonstrated the importance of resonances and chaos in destabilizing planetary systems. Newton's "clockwork" description of regular, predictable planetary orbits has been replaced by a view in which many systems can have long but finite lifetimes. This new knowledge has altered our perceptions of the later stages of planetary growth and of the stability of planetary systems. Stability criteria are inexact and time dependent. Most previous studies have focused on the effects in initial planetary orbits on the stability of the system. We are conducting an investigation which focuses on the dependence of stability criteria on planetary mass. Synthetic systems are created by increasing the masses of the planets in our Solar System or of the moons of a particular planet; these systems are then integrated until orbit crossing occurs. We have found that over some ranges, the time until orbit crossing varies to a good approximation as a power clothe factor by which the masses of the secondaries arc increased; some scatter occurs as a consequence of vie chaotic nature of orbital evolution. The slope of this power law varies substantially from system to system, and for moons it is mildly dependent on the inclusion of the planet's quadrupole moment in the gravitational potential.

  5. Completing the Copernican Revolution: The search for other planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, David C.

    1995-01-01

    The past few decades have witnessed significant advances in our understanding of how stars form, and there has been an associated increase in our knowledge of conditions and phenomena in the early solar system. These have led to the formulation of a paradigm for the origin of the solar system that is sufficiently complete that its basic elements can be tested directly through observations. A simple, but profound, consequence of the paradigm is that most if not all stars should be accompanied by planetary systems. The accuracy of instruments that can be used in such searches has improved to the point that Jupiter-like companions to a number of nearby stars could be detected. However, the results to date are that no other planetary systems have been detected, and the absence of detection is becoming statistically significant, particularly as it relates to the existence of brown dwarf companions to main-sequence stars.

  6. DYNAMICS OF PLANETARY SYSTEMS IN STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Spurzem, R.; Giersz, M.; Heggie, D. C.; Lin, D. N. C.

    2009-05-20

    At least 10%-15% of nearby Sunlike stars have known Jupiter-mass planets. In contrast, very few planets are found in mature open and globular clusters such as the Hyades and 47 Tuc. We explore here the possibility that this dichotomy is due to the postformation disruption of planetary systems associated with the stellar encounters in long-lived clusters. One supporting piece of evidence for this scenario is the discovery of freely floating low-mass objects in star forming regions. We use two independent numerical approaches, a hybrid Monte Carlo and a direct N-body method, to simulate the impact of the encounters. We show that the results of numerical simulations are in reasonable agreement with analytical determinations in the adiabatic and impulsive limits. They indicate that distant stellar encounters generally do not significantly modify the compact and nearly circular orbits. However, moderately close stellar encounters, which are likely to occur in dense clusters, can excite planets' orbital eccentricity and induce dynamical instability in systems that are closely packed with multiple planets. The disruption of planetary systems occurs primarily through occasional nearly parabolic, nonadiabatic encounters, though eccentricity of the planets evolves through repeated hyperbolic adiabatic encounters that accumulate small-amplitude changes. The detached planets are generally retained by the potential of their host clusters as free floaters in young stellar clusters such as {sigma} Orionis. We compute effective cross sections for the dissolution of planetary systems and show that, for all initial eccentricities, dissolution occurs on timescales that are longer than the dispersion of small stellar associations, but shorter than the age of typical open and globular clusters. Although it is much more difficult to disrupt short-period planets, close encounters can excite modest eccentricity among them, such that subsequent tidal dissipation leads to orbital decay

  7. The dynamical fate of planetary systems in young star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaochen; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Wang, Long

    2015-11-01

    We carry out N-body simulations to examine the effects of dynamical interactions on planetary systems in young open star clusters. We explore how the planetary populations in these star clusters evolve, and how this evolution depends on the initial amount of substructure, the virial ratio, the cluster mass and density, and the initial semi-major axis of the planetary systems. The fraction of planetary systems that remains intact as a cluster member, fBPS, is generally well-described by the functional form fBPS = f0(1 + [a/a0]c)-1, where (1 - f0) is the fraction of stars that escapes from the cluster, a0 the critical semi-major axis for survival, and c a measure for the width of the transition region. The effect of the initial amount of substructure over time t can be quantified as fBPS = A(t) + B(D), where A(t) decreases nearly linearly with time, and B(D) decreases when the clusters are initially more substructured. Provided that the orbital separation of planetary systems is smaller than the critical value a0, those in clusters with a higher initial stellar density (but identical mass) have a larger probability of escaping the cluster intact. These results help us to obtain a better understanding of the difference between the observed fractions of exoplanets-hosting stars in star clusters and in the Galactic field. It also allows us to make predictions about the free-floating planet population over time in different stellar environments.

  8. Planetary Dynamics and Habitable Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighipour, Nader; Dvorak, Rudolf; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke

    How our planet was formed, how life came about, and whether life exists elsewhere in the universe are among some of the long-standing questions in human history. The latter, which has been the main drive behind many decades of searching for planets outside the solar system, is one of the most outstanding problems in planetary science and astrobiology. Although no Earth-like planet has yet been found, the success of observational techniques in identifying now more than 350 extrasolar planets has greatly contributed to addressing this question, and has extended the concept of habitability to billions of miles beyond the boundaries of our solar system. It is now certain that our planetary system is not unique and many terrestrial-size planets may exist throughout the universe.

  9. Collisional and Dynamical Evolution of Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, Stuart J.

    2004-01-01

    Senior Scientst S. J. Weidenschilling presents his final administrative report in the research program entitled "Collisional and Dynamical Evolution of Planetary Systems," on which he was the Principal Investigator. This research program produced the following publications: 1) "Jumping Jupiters" in binary star systems. F. Marzari, S. J. Weidenschilling, M. Barbieri and V. Granata. Astrophys. J., in press, 2005; 2) Formation of the cores of the outer planets. To appear in "The Outer Planets" (R. Kallenbach, ED), ISSI Conference Proceedings (Space Sci. Rev.), in press, 2005; 3) Accretion dynamics and timescales: Relation to chondrites. S. J. Weidenschilling and J. Cuzzi. In Meteorites and the Early Solar System LI (D. Lauretta et al., Eds.), Univ. of Arizona Press, 2005; 4) Asteroidal heating and thermal stratification of the asteroid belt. A. Ghosh, S. J.Weidenschilling, H. Y. McSween, Jr. and A. Rubin. In Meteorites and the Early Solar System I1 (D. Lauretta et al., Eds.), Univ. of Arizona Press, 2005.

  10. Oscillations of relative inclination angles in compact extrasolar planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Juliette C.; Adams, Fred C.

    2016-01-01

    The Kepler mission has detected dozens of compact planetary systems with more than four transiting planets. This sample provides a collection of close-packed planetary systems with relatively little spread in the inclination angles of the inferred orbits. A large fraction of the observational sample contains limited multiplicity, begging the question whether there is a true diversity of multitransiting systems, or if some systems merely possess high mutual inclinations, allowing them to appear as single-transiting systems in a transit-based survey. This paper begins an exploration of the effectiveness of dynamical mechanisms in exciting orbital inclination within exoplanetary systems of this class. For these tightly packed systems, we determine that the orbital inclination angles are not spread out appreciably through self-excitation. In contrast, the two Kepler multiplanet systems with additional non-transiting planets are susceptible to oscillations of their inclination angles, which means their currently observed configurations could be due to planet-planet interactions alone. We also provide constraints and predictions for the expected transit duration variations for each planet. In these multiplanet compact Kepler systems, oscillations of their inclination angles are remarkably hard to excite; as a result, they tend to remain continually mutually transiting (CMT-stable). We study this issue further by augmenting the planet masses and determining the enhancement factor required for oscillations to move the systems out of transit. The oscillations of inclination found here inform the recently suggested dichotomy in the sample of Solar systems observed by Kepler.

  11. Dynamics of Populations of Planetary Systems (IAU C197)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic, Zoran; Milani, Andrea

    2005-05-01

    1. Resonances and stability of extra-solar planetary systems C. Beaugé, N. Callegari, S. Ferraz-Mello and T. A. Michtchenko; 2. Formation, migration, and stability of extrasolar planetary systems Fred C. Adams; 3. Dynamical evolution of extrasolar planetary systems Ji-Lin Zhou and Yi-Sui Sun; 4. Dynamics of planetesimals: the role of two-body relaxation Eiichiro Kokubo; 5. Fitting orbits Andrzej J. Maciejewski, Krzysztof Gozdziewski and Szymon Kozlowski; 6. The secular planetary three body problem revisited Jacques Henrard and Anne-Sophie Libert; 7. Dynamics of extrasolar systems at the 5/2 resonance: application to 47 UMa Dionyssia Psychoyos and John D. Hadjidemetriou; 8. Our solar system as model for exosolar planetary systems Rudolf Dvorak, Áron Süli and Florian Freistetter; 9. Planetary motion in double stars: the influence of the secondary Elke Pilat-Lohinger; 10. Planetary orbits in double stars: influence of the binary's orbital eccentricity Daniel Benest and Robert Gonczi; 11. Astrometric observations of 51 Peg and Gliese 623 at Pulkovo observatory with 65 cm refractor N. A. Shakht; 12. Observations of 61 Cyg at Pulkovo Denis L. Gorshanov, N. A. Shakht, A. A. Kisselev and E. V. Poliakow; 13. Formation of the solar system by instability Evgeny Griv and Michael Gedalin; 14. Behaviour of a two-planetary system on a cosmogonic time-scale Konstantin V. Kholshevnikov and Eduard D. Kuznetsov; 15. Boundaries of the habitable zone: unifying dynamics, astrophysics, and astrobiology Milan M. Cirkovic; 16. Asteroid proper elements: recent computational progress Fernando Roig and Cristian Beaugé; 17. Asteroid family classification from very large catalogues Anne Lemaitre; 18. Non-gravitational perturbations and evolution of the asteroid main belt David Vokrouhlicky, M. Broz and W. F. Bottke, D. Nesvorny and A. Morbidelli; 19. Diffusion in the asteroid belt Harry Varvoglis; 20. Accurate model for the Yarkovsky effect David Capek and David Vokrouhlicky; 21. The

  12. Planetary lightning flash and thundercloud observation with spacecraft and telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Sato, M.; Hoshino, H.; Fukuhara, T.; Watanabe, M.; Nakajima, K.; Yair, Y.; Fischer, G.; Aplin, K.

    2011-10-01

    It has been revealed that lightning is an good proxy of atmospheric circulation in the Earth. In planetary exploration, such as Venus and Jupiter, where very limited in-situ measurements can be made, the lightning measurement would be a powerful tool. Recently it is reported that the magnetometer on board Venus Express detected whistler mode waves whose source could be lightning discharge occurring well below the spacecraft. In order to identify the discharge phenomena in the atmosphere of Venus without ambiguity, we sent a high-speed optical sensor to Venus, the lightning and airglow camera, LAC onboard Akatsuki. In Jupiter, the latest observational and theoretical studies suggest that strong moist convective clouds, that is thunderclouds, in Jupiter's atmosphere are very important. It is not only because of an essential ingredient of meteorology of Jupiter, which determines the large scale structures such as belt/zone and big ovals, but also as a potentially very useful tool for probing the water abundance of the deep atmosphere, which is crucial to constrain the behavior of volatiles in early solar system. We would suggest a very simple high-speed imaging unit onboard Jovian orbiter, Optical Lightning Detector, OLD, optimized for detecting optical emissions from lightning discharge in Jupiter. OLD consists of radiation-tolerant CMOS sensors and two H Balmer Alpha line (656.3nm) filters. In normal sampling mode the frame intervals is 29ms with a full frame format of 512x512 pixels and in high-speed sampling mode the interval could be reduced down to 0.1ms by concentrating a limited area of 30x30 pixels. Weight, size and power consumption are about 1kg, 16x7x5.5 cm (sensor) and 16x12x4 cm (circuit), and 4W, respectively, though they can be reduced according to the spacecraft resources in EJSM orbiters. Also we plan to investigate the optical flashes using a ground-based middle-sized telescope, which will be built by Hokkaido University, with narrow-band high speed

  13. SOFIA Observations of the Planetary Nebula NGC7027

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuck, Timothy; Werner, M. W.; Sahai, R.; Hartley, M.; Herter, T. L.; Horner, J.; Keller, L. D.; Livingston, J.; Morris, M.

    2013-01-01

    NGC7027 is one of the brightest and best-studied planetary nebulae. The nebula is 2900 light years from earth, and approximately 0.08 parsec in physical size making it one of the youngest known planetary nebula with an estimated age of just 600 years. NGC7027’s central 16th magnitude star is pumping out the energy of 6000 suns, and at 185,000 Kelvin the star is one of the hottest known. NGC7027 was imaged using the FORCAST instrument on SOFIA at 6.4, 6.6, 11.1, 19.7, 24.2, 33.6, and 37.1 microns. The HBPW of the measurements is 4-to-6 pixels 3 to 4.5 arc sec] across the bands. Analysis indicates a bright well-resolved nebula with an overall angular size of ~10 X 13 arc sec. The morphology is similar to what is seen in ground-based infrared and radio continuum images. The size varies little with wavelength. The SED derived from the SOFIA observations varies moderately but systematically across the nebula, with the longer wavelengths becoming relatively brighter at the edges. Analysis of the images has been carried out under the NASA-IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program with portions of the work being carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, operated by the California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA.

  14. The search for extra-solar planetary systems.

    PubMed

    Paresce, F

    1992-01-01

    I review the observational evidence for planetary systems around nearby stars and, using our own solar system as a guide, assess the stringent requirements that new searches need to meet in order to unambiguously establish the presence of another planetary system. Basically, these requirements are: 1 milliarcsecond or better positional accuracy for astrometric techniques, 9 orders of magnitude or better star to planet luminosity ratio discrimination at 0.5 to 1" separation in the optical for direct imaging techniques, 10 meters sec-1 or better radial velocity accuracy for reflex motion techniques and +/-1% or better brightness fluctuation accuracy for planet/star occultation measurements. The astrometric accuracy is in reach of HST, direct imaging will require much larger telescopes and/or a 50 times smoother mirror than HST while the reflex motion and occultation techniques best performed on the ground are just becoming viable and promise exciting new discoveries. On the other band, new indirect evidence on the existence of other planetary systems also comes from the observation of large dusty disks around nearby main sequence stars not too dissimilar from our sun. In one particular case, that of Beta Pictoris, a flattened disk seen nearly edge-on has been imaged in the optical and near IR down to almost 70 AU of the star. It probably represents a young planetary system in its clearing out phase as planetesimals collide, erode and are swept out of the inner system by radiation pressure. The hypothesized Kuiper belt around our solar system may be the analogous structure in a later evolutionary stage. Features of this type have been detected in the far IR and sub-millimeter wavelength regions around 50-100 nearby main sequence and pre-main sequence stars. I discuss a battery of new accurate observations planned in the near future of these objects some of which may actually harbour planets or planetesimals that will certainly dramatically improve our knowledge of

  15. Natural fracture systems on planetary surfaces: Genetic classification and pattern randomness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossbacher, Lisa A.

    1987-01-01

    One method for classifying natural fracture systems is by fracture genesis. This approach involves the physics of the formation process, and it has been used most frequently in attempts to predict subsurface fractures and petroleum reservoir productivity. This classification system can also be applied to larger fracture systems on any planetary surface. One problem in applying this classification system to planetary surfaces is that it was developed for ralatively small-scale fractures that would influence porosity, particularly as observed in a core sample. Planetary studies also require consideration of large-scale fractures. Nevertheless, this system offers some valuable perspectives on fracture systems of any size.

  16. Planetary Protection Considerations in EVA System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, Dean B.; Kosmo, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    very little expression of these anomalies. hardware from the human-occupied area may limit (although not likely eliminate) external materials in the human habitat. Definition of design-to requirements is critical to understanding technical feasibility and costs. The definition of Planetary Protection needs in relation to EVA mission and system element development cost impacts should be considered and interpreted in terms of Plausible Protection criteria. Since EVA operations will have the most direct physical interaction with the Martian surface, PP needs should be considered in the terms of mitigating hardware and operations impacts and costs.

  17. CHARACTERISTICS OF PLANETARY CANDIDATES OBSERVED BY KEPLER. II. ANALYSIS OF THE FIRST FOUR MONTHS OF DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Basri, Gibor; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Batalha, Natalie; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas; DeVore, Edna; Jenkins, Jon M.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Cochran, William D.; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Geary, John C.; Latham, David W.; Gilliland, Ronald; Gould, Alan; Howell, Steve B. E-mail: Martin.Still@nasa.gov

    2011-07-20

    On 2011 February 1 the Kepler mission released data for 156,453 stars observed from the beginning of the science observations on 2009 May 2 through September 16. There are 1235 planetary candidates with transit-like signatures detected in this period. These are associated with 997 host stars. Distributions of the characteristics of the planetary candidates are separated into five class sizes: 68 candidates of approximately Earth-size (R{sub p} < 1.25 R{sub +}), 288 super-Earth-size (1.25 R{sub +} {<=} R{sub p} < 2 R{sub +}), 662 Neptune-size (2 R{sub +} {<=} R{sub p} < 6 R{sub +}), 165 Jupiter-size (6 R{sub +} {<=} R{sub p} < 15 R{sub +}), and 19 up to twice the size of Jupiter (15 R{sub +} {<=} R{sub p} < 22 R{sub +}). In the temperature range appropriate for the habitable zone, 54 candidates are found with sizes ranging from Earth-size to larger than that of Jupiter. Six are less than twice the size of the Earth. Over 74% of the planetary candidates are smaller than Neptune. The observed number versus size distribution of planetary candidates increases to a peak at two to three times the Earth-size and then declines inversely proportional to the area of the candidate. Our current best estimates of the intrinsic frequencies of planetary candidates, after correcting for geometric and sensitivity biases, are 5% for Earth-size candidates, 8% for super-Earth-size candidates, 18% for Neptune-size candidates, 2% for Jupiter-size candidates, and 0.1% for very large candidates; a total of 0.34 candidates per star. Multi-candidate, transiting systems are frequent; 17% of the host stars have multi-candidate systems, and 34% of all the candidates are part of multi-candidate systems.

  18. Urey prize lecture: On the diversity of plausible planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    Models of planet formation and of the orbital stability of planetary systems are used to predict the variety of planetary and satellite systems that may be present within our galaxy. A new approximate global criterion for orbital stability of planetary systems based on an extension of the local resonance overlap criterion is proposed. This criterion implies that at least some of Uranus' small inner moons are significantly less massive than predicted by estimates based on Voyager volumes and densities assumed to equal that of Miranda. Simple calculations (neglecting planetary gravity) suggest that giant planets which acrete substantial amounts of gas while their envelopes are extremely distended ultimately rotate rapidly in the prgrade direction.

  19. Exo-Planetary Phoenix: Rebirth of Planetary Systems Beyond the Main Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marengo, M.

    2014-04-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that planetary systems may be a common feature of stars that have evolved beyond the main sequence. Warm debris disks around white dwarfs and "pulsar" planets orbiting a neutron star are a strong indication that planetary systems may, at least in same cases, survive the dramatic phenomena leading to stellar death. A close look at these late evolutionary stages, however, suggests that these systems may be more than mere survivors of doomed pre-existing exo-planetary systems. The circumstellar environment of post-main sequence stars bears surprising similarities to the conditions leading to pre-main sequence planetary formation: a metal-rich environment often characterized by the presence of circumstellar or circumbinary disks. Are these conditions conducive to the birth of a second-generation planetary system, like a phoenix rising from the ashes of ancient worlds? In this talk we will discuss how the physical conditions in the winds of dusty giant stars may be favorable for renewed planetary formation, with particular emphasis on the effects of enhanced metallicity, binarity and the timescales available for the formation of a new generation of planets.

  20. Planetary Formation and Dynamics in Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    As of today, over 500 exoplanets have been detected since the first exoplanet was discovered around a solar-like star in 1995. The planets in binaries could be common as stars are usually born in binary or multiple star systems. Although current observations show that the planet host rate in multiple star systems is around 17%, this fraction should be considered as a lower limit because of noticeable selection effects against binaries in planet searches. Most of the current known planet-bearing binary systems are S-types, meaning the companion star acts as a distant satellite, typically orbiting the inner star-planet system over 100 AU away. Nevertheless, there are four systems with a smaller separation of 20 AU, including the Gamma Cephei, GJ 86, HD 41004, and HD 196885. In addition to the planets in circumprimary (S-type) orbits discussed above, planets in circumbinary (P-type) orbits have been found in only two systems. In this thesis, we mainly study the planet formation in the S-type binary systems. In chapter 1, we first summarize current observational facts of exoplanets both in single-star and binary systems, then review the theoretical models of planet formation, with special attention to the application in binary systems. Perturbative effects from stellar companions render the planet formation process in binary systems even more complex than that in single-star systems. The perturbations from a binary companion can excite planetesimal orbits, and increase their mutual impact velocities to the values that might exceed their escape velocity or even the critical velocity for the onset of eroding collisions. The intermediate stage of the formation process---from planetesimals to planetary embryos---is thus the most problematic. In the following chapters, we investigate whether and how the planet formation goes through such a problematic stage. In chapter 2, we study the effects of gas dissipation on the planetesimals' mutual accretion. We find that in a

  1. Planetary nebula progenitors that swallow binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam

    2016-01-01

    I propose that some irregular messy planetary nebulae (PNe) owe their morphologies to triple-stellar evolution where tight binary systems evolve inside and/or on the outskirts of the envelope of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. In some cases, the tight binary system can survive, in others, it is destroyed. The tight binary system might break up with one star leaving the system. In an alternative evolution, one of the stars of the broken-up tight binary system falls towards the AGB envelope with low specific angular momentum, and drowns in the envelope. In a different type of destruction process, the drag inside the AGB envelope causes the tight binary system to merge. This releases gravitational energy within the AGB envelope, leading to a very asymmetrical envelope ejection, with an irregular and messy PN as a descendant. The evolution of the triple-stellar system can be in a full common envelope evolution or in a grazing envelope evolution. Both before and after destruction (if destruction takes place), the system might launch pairs of opposite jets. One pronounced signature of triple-stellar evolution might be a large departure from axisymmetrical morphology of the descendant PN. I estimate that about one in eight non-spherical PNe is shaped by one of these triple-stellar evolutionary routes.

  2. Voyager 1 Planetary Radio Astronomy Observations Near Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.; Pearce, J. B.; Riddle, A. C.; Alexander, J. K.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Thieman, J. R.; Carr, T. B.; Gulkis, S.; Boischot, A.

    1979-01-01

    Results are reported from the first low frequency radio receiver to be transported into the Jupiter magnetosphere. Dramatic new information was obtained both because Voyager was near or in Jupiter's radio emission sources and also because it was outside the relatively dense solar wind plasma of the inner solar system. Extensive radio arcs, from above 30 MHz to about 1 MHz, occurred in patterns correlated with planetary longitude. A newly discovered kilometric wavelength radio source may relate to the plasma torus near Io's orbit. In situ wave resonances near closest approach define an electron density profile along the Voyager trajectory and form the basis for a map of the torus. Studies in progress are outlined briefly.

  3. Voyager 1 planetary radio astronomy observations near Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.; Pearce, J. B.; Riddle, A. C.; Alexander, J. K.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Thieman, J. R.; Carr, T. D.; Gulkis, S.; Boischot, A.

    1979-01-01

    Results from the first low-frequency radio receiver to be transported into the Jupiter magnetosphere are reported. Dramatic new information was obtained, both because Voyager was near or in Jupiter's radio emission sources and because it was outside the relatively dense solar wind plasma of the inner solar system. Extensive radio spectral arcs, from above 30 to about 1 MHz, occurred in patterns correlated with planetary longitude. A newly discovered kilometric wavelength radio source may relate to the plasma torus near Io's orbit. In situ wave resonances near closest approach define an electron density profile along the Voyager trajectory and form the basis for a map of the torus. Detailed studies are in progress and are outlined briefly.

  4. Gravito-electrodynamics and the structure of planetary ring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Recent spacecraft observations of the Saturnian and Jovian ring systems have highlighted a plethora of interesting new phenomena associated with those regions containing fine (micron and sub-micron sized) dust. Recognizing that these dust grains, by virtue of being immersed within the planetary magnetospheres, are electrostatically charged to the point that they experience comparable gravitational and electric forces, a new 'gravito-electrodynamic' theory has been developed to describe their dynamics. This theory has been successful in explaining all these phenomena in a systematic way. In this review, the basic model and its range of validity are outlined, and its application to the Saturnian and Jovian ring systems are discussed.

  5. Gravito-electrodynamics and the structure of planetary ring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendis, D. A.

    1984-08-01

    Recent spacecraft observations of the Saturnian and Jovian ring systems have highlighted a plethora of interesting new phenomena associated with those regions containing fine (micron and sub-micron sized) dust. Recognizing that these dust grains, by virtue of being immersed within the planetary magnetospheres, are electrostatically charged to the point that they experience comparable gravitational and electric forces, a new 'gravito-electrodynamic' theory has been developed to describe their dynamics. This theory has been successful in explaining all these phenomena in a systematic way. In this review, the basic model and its range of validity are outlined, and its application to the Saturnian and Jovian ring systems are discussed.

  6. Introduction - Solar and Extra-Solar Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Iwan P.

    Over the last decade, there have been many exciting advances in all fields relating to our understanding of planetary systems. There has been a significant increase in our understanding of the general process of star formation, leading to an expectation that matter will be captured in a flattened envelope or nebula surrounding the young Sun. Theoretical models had predicted this for some time, but in the last decade, firm observational evidence of this has become fairly commonplace, with β Pictoris in particular displaying all the characteristics that were expected in systems where planets formed. The discovery of extra-solar planets has also confirmed the view that planetary formation is a normal phenomenon so that our system is no longer regarded as a one off or special. Within the Solar System itself, both space exploration and improved facilities for ground-based observations have increased our knowedge of our own system dramatically. Pluto is now the only planet not to have been visited by a spacecraft, and spacecraft images also exist of asteroids and comets. In addition, it is now known that all the major planets have extensive satellite systems as well as complex ring structures. Finally, two new classes of objects have been discovered: the Centaurs orbiting between the major planets; and the Edgeworth-Kuiper objects beyond Neptune.This book is based on the lectures given at a Pre-Doctoral Summer School held in Ballyvaughn, County Clare, Ireland during 7 - 18 September 1998, supported by the European Astrophysical Doctoral Network (EADN). The aim of the School was to give an authoritative account of these new developments so that a thorough general background in the state of our knowledge would be obtained by all participants. The scientific contents of the School can be divided into a number of broad fields. The areas are: Formation of Planetary Systems; Planets and Satellites; and Small Bodies and Dust. The chapter on Dynamics by Murray spans all of

  7. MESSENGER Observations of the Distribution of Planetary Ions Near Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurbuchen, T.; Raines, J. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Gershman, D. J.; Gilbert, J. A.; Gloeckler, G.; Anderson, B. J.; Baker, D. N.; Korth, H.; Krimigis, S. M.; Sarantos, M.; Schriver, D.; McNutt, R. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    We report global observations of the ionized exosphere of Mercury measured by the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) on MESSENGER during the spacecraft's first months in orbit since March 18, 2011. We observe considerable variability, presumably due to changes in the solar wind and heliospheric magnetic field near Mercury, but some large-scale properties were persistent throughout the observation period. Global maps of heavy ion fluxes at Mercury are clearly peaked in the northern cusp region, pointing to the importance of the polar regions as sources of Mercury's ionized exosphere. On the nightside, plasma is regularly observed near equatorial regions. The observed fluxes of He ions are more evenly distributed, indicating a spatially more uniform source of neutral He in Mercury's environment. The observed ion distributions suggest either rapid energization in the inner magnetosphere, to energies greater than 10 keV within only 0.2 Mercury radii, or that ions energized in the magnetosheath or other regions are transported to lower latitudes. We derive densities and temperatures of key constituents using a model-based technique to account for observation geometry and effects of limited field of view. Although, on average, protons dominate by number density, the pressure of Na ions can exceed that of protons in the cusp and nightside equatorial regions. This initial survey of Mercury's plasma ion environment indicates that the mass loading and thermal pressure effects of the heavier planetary ions, especially the oxygen and sodium groups, will be very important, and perhaps even dominant, in determining magnetospheric structure and dynamics.

  8. FOREVER ALONE? TESTING SINGLE ECCENTRIC PLANETARY SYSTEMS FOR MULTIPLE COMPANIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Horner, Jonathan; Tinney, C. G.; Bailey, J.; Salter, G. S.; Wright, D.; Wang Songhu; Zhou Jilin; Butler, R. P.; Jones, H. R. A.; O'Toole, S. J.; Carter, B. D.

    2013-09-15

    Determining the orbital eccentricity of an extrasolar planet is critically important for understanding the system's dynamical environment and history. However, eccentricity is often poorly determined or entirely mischaracterized due to poor observational sampling, low signal-to-noise, and/or degeneracies with other planetary signals. Some systems previously thought to contain a single, moderate-eccentricity planet have been shown, after further monitoring, to host two planets on nearly circular orbits. We investigate published apparent single-planet systems to see if the available data can be better fit by two lower-eccentricity planets. We identify nine promising candidate systems and perform detailed dynamical tests to confirm the stability of the potential new multiple-planet systems. Finally, we compare the expected orbits of the single- and double-planet scenarios to better inform future observations of these interesting systems.

  9. Monitoring requested for developing planetary systems dust production study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2015-03-01

    Dr. George Rieke (University of Arizona) and colleagues have requested AAVSO assistance in monitoring four stars with developing planetary systems: RZ Psc, HD 15407A, V488 Per, and HD 23514. This campaign is similar to the one conducted in 2013 (see AAVSO Alert Notice 482). Dr. Rieke writes: "We have obtained 130 hours of time on the Spitzer Space Telescope to continue monitoring planetary debris disks for variability. We are asking for help from AAVSO for this program. Debris disks [are] systems of dust and particles associated with planetary systems...There are about a dozen planetary systems in which there is evidence that massive collisions are occurring right now, collisions that are building planets in much the same way that a large body added most of its mass to that of the Earth and created the Moon as a byproduct when the Solar System was young...A key part of our program is to obtain optical photometry of the same stars that we are observing in the infrared under the Spitzer program. The optical data are needed to verify that any changes we see in the infrared are not just driven by changes in the brightness of the star, but are truly due to changes in the structure or dust content of the debris disk. AAVSO observers provided this support for our previous program, as summarized in a paper [in preparation]; all of those who contributed data are co-authors of the paper. We request AAVSO to take similar observations for the new program...", which begins immediately and runs in two segments, now through May and September through December [target information and satellite schedule in full Alert Notice 511]. Observations in V are requested, with a S/N of about 100 so that the accuracy will be 1-2%. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (https://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for schedule and other details.

  10. STABILITY OF SATELLITES IN CLOSELY PACKED PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Matthew J.; Holman, Matthew J.; Deck, Katherine M.; Perets, Hagai B.

    2013-10-01

    We perform numerical integrations of four-body (star, planet, planet, satellite) systems to investigate the stability of satellites in planetary systems with tightly packed inner planets (STIPs). We find that the majority of closely spaced stable two-planet systems can stably support satellites across a range of parameter-space which is only slightly decreased compared to that seen for the single-planet case. In particular, circular prograde satellites remain stable out to ∼0.4 R{sub H} (where R{sub H} is the Hill radius) as opposed to 0.5 R{sub H} in the single-planet case. A similarly small restriction in the stable parameter-space for retrograde satellites is observed, where planetary close approaches in the range 2.5-4.5 mutual Hill radii destabilize most satellites orbits only if a ∼ 0.65 R{sub H} . In very close planetary pairs (e.g., the 12:11 resonance) the addition of a satellite frequently destabilizes the entire system, causing extreme close approaches and the loss of satellites over a range of circumplanetary semi-major axes. The majority of systems investigated stably harbored satellites over a wide parameter-space, suggesting that STIPs can generally offer a dynamically stable home for satellites, albeit with a slightly smaller stable parameter-space than the single-planet case. As we demonstrate that multi-planet systems are not a priori poor candidates for hosting satellites, future measurements of satellite occurrence rates in multi-planet systems versus single-planet systems could be used to constrain either satellite formation or past periods of strong dynamical interaction between planets.

  11. TOPS: Toward Other Planetary Systems. A report by the solar system exploration division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a general plan and the pertinent technological requirements for TOPS (Toward Other Planetary Systems), a staged program to ascertain the prevalence and character of other planetary systems and to construct a definitive picture of the formation of stars and their planets. The first stages focus on discovering and studying a significant number of fully formed planetary systems, as well as expanding current studies of protoplanetary systems. As the TOPS Program evolves, emphasis will shift toward intensive study of the discovered systems and of individual planets. Early stages of the TOPS Program can be undertaken with ground-based observations and space missions comparable in scale to those now being performed. In the long term, however, TOPS will become an ambitious program that challenges our capabilities and provides impetus for major space initiatives and new technologies.

  12. Photochemical hazes in planetary atmospheres: solar system bodies and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanaka, Hiroshi; Cruikshank, Dale P.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2015-11-01

    Recent transit observations of exoplanets have demonstrated the possibility of a wide prevalence of haze/cloud layers at high altitudes. Hydrocarbon photochemical haze could be the candidate for such haze particles on warm sub-Neptunes, but the lack of evidence for methane poses a puzzle for such hydrocarbon photochemical haze. The CH4/CO ratios in planetary atmospheres vary substantially from their temperature and dynamics. An understanding of haze formation rates and plausible optical properties in a wide diversity of planetary atmospheres is required to interpret the current and future observations.Here, we focus on how atmospheric compositions, specifically CH4/CO ratios, affect the haze production rates and their optical properties. We have conducted a series of cold plasma experiments to constrain the haze mass production rates from gas mixtures of various CH4/CO ratios diluted either in H2 or N2 atmosphere. The mass production rates in the N2-CH4-CO system are much greater than those in the H2-CH4-CO system. They are rather insensitive to the CH4/CO ratios larger than at 0.3. Significant formation of solid material is observed both in H2-CO and N2-CO systems without CH4 in the initial gas mixtures. The complex refractive indices were derived for haze samples from N2-CH4, H2-CH4, and H2-CO gas mixtures. These are the model atmospheres for Titan, Saturn, and exoplanets, respectively. The imaginary part of the complex refractive indices in the UV-Vis region are distinct among these samples, which can be utilized for modeling these planetary atmospheres.

  13. Survival of habitable planets in unstable planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Daniel; Davies, Melvyn B.; Johansen, Anders

    2016-09-01

    Many observed giant planets lie on eccentric orbits. Such orbits could be the result of strong scatterings with other giant planets. The same dynamical instability that produces these scatterings may also cause habitable planets in interior orbits to become ejected, destroyed, or be transported out of the habitable zone. We say that a habitable planet has resilient habitability if it is able to avoid ejections and collisions and its orbit remains inside the habitable zone. Here we model the orbital evolution of rocky planets in planetary systems where giant planets become dynamically unstable. We measure the resilience of habitable planets as a function of the observed, present-day masses and orbits of the giant planets. We find that the survival rate of habitable planets depends strongly on the giant planet architecture. Equal-mass planetary systems are far more destructive than systems with giant planets of unequal masses. We also establish a link with observation; we find that giant planets with present-day eccentricities higher than 0.4 almost never have a habitable interior planet. For a giant planet with an present-day eccentricity of 0.2 and semimajor axis of 5 AU orbiting a Sun-like star, 50% of the orbits in the habitable zone are resilient to the instability. As semimajor axis increases and eccentricity decreases, a higher fraction of habitable planets survive and remain habitable. However, if the habitable planet has rocky siblings, there is a significant risk of rocky planet collisions that would sterilize the planet.

  14. Future observations of planetary rings from groundbased observatories and earth-orbiting satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. A.

    1984-01-01

    Three of the outer planets of our solar system are known to possess ring systems and, among the three known systems, all have one or more components that are detectable from the vicinity of the earth. Among the more promising methods for continuing study are direct imaging and occultations, obtainable both from the ground and from earth-orbiting facilities such as Space Telescope. Relevant future observations made from the vicinity of earth are expected to provide new knowledge of the dynamical and photometric properties of these outer solar system planetary rings.

  15. The Planetary Data System - A solution to data management for the planetary science community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobinson, Elaine R.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of the first release of the Planetary Data System (PDS) is presented, and some of the challenges encountered during development of the system are described. The principal goals of the PDS are to distribute planetary science data and information about these data to NASA, to provide scientific knowledge to users of these data, and to provide for permanent storage. The current architecture and capabilities of the PDS (Version 1.0) are examined, and some of the special challenges encountered and lessons learned during the application are highlighted. Finally, implications for future versions of the PDS as well as for other science data systems are discussed.

  16. PDS4: Developing the Next Generation Planetary Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crichton, D.; Beebe, R.; Hughes, S.; Stein, T.; Grayzeck, E.

    2011-01-01

    The Planetary Data System (PDS) is in the midst of a major upgrade to its system. This upgrade is a critical modernization of the PDS as it prepares to support the future needs of both the mission and scientific community. It entails improvements to the software system and the data standards, capitalizing on newer, data system approaches. The upgrade is important not only for the purpose of capturing results from NASA planetary science missions, but also for improving standards and interoperability among international planetary science data archives. As the demands of the missions and science community increase, PDS is positioning itself to evolve and meet those demands.

  17. The diversity of planetary system from formation/composition population synthesis models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibert, Yann; thiabaud, amaury; marboeuf, ulysses; swoboda, david; benz, willy; mezger, klaus; leya, ingo

    2015-12-01

    Extrasolar planetary systems show an extreme diversity in mass and orbital architecture. Explaining this diversity is one of the key challenges for theoretical models and requires understanding the formation, composition and evolution of planetary systems from the stage of the protoplanetary disk up to the full mature planetary system. Such an effort needs the development of end-to-end, necessarily simplified, formation models used in a population synthesis approach. We present in this contribution such planetary system formation and composition models. Our planetary system formation models include the following effects: planetary growth by capture of solids and gas, protoplanetary disk structure and evolution, planet-planet and planet-disk interactions. In addition, we compute the composition of the solids and gas in the protoplanetary disk and their evolution with time. The formation and composition models allow therefore the determination of the composition of planets in terms of refractory elements (Mg, Si, Fe, etc…) as well as volatile compounds (water, CO2, CO, NH3, etc…), in a way that is self-consistent with the formation process of the different members of the planetary system. We will show the results of these formation/composition models, and will compare the diversity of observed and synthetic planetary systems. Considering the solar system, we will show how different formation scenarios translate into different planetary compositions. Finally, we will demonstrate how the simultaneous determination of mass and radius of a statistical number of warm to cold earth to neptune mass bodies at different ages can be used to constrain the composition (in particular the volatile content) of planets, and how the same observations (mass, radius, period) can be used in order to select planets that are best suited for follow-up habitability studies.

  18. An Observational Study of Pulsations in Proto-Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Lu, Wenxian; Henson, Gary D.; Hillwig, Todd C.

    2016-01-01

    We have been carrying out a long-term monitoring program to study the light variability in proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe). PPNe are post-Asymptotic Giant Branch objects in transition between the AGB and PN phases in the evolution of low and intermediate-mass stars. As such, it is not surprising that they display pulsational variability. We have been carrying out photometric monitoring of 30 of these at the Valparaiso University campus observatory over the last 20 years, with the assistance of undergraduate students. The sample size has been enlarged over the past six years by observations made using telescopes in the SARA consortium at KPNO and CTIO. Periods have been determined for those of F-G spectral types. We have also enlarged the sample with PPNe from outside the Milky Way by determining periods of eight PPNe in the lower metalicity environment of the Magellanic Clouds. Periods for the entire sample range from 35 to 160 days. Some clear patterns have emerged, with those of higher temperature possessing shorter periods and smaller amplitudes, indicating a reduction in period and pulsation amplitude as the objects evolve. Radial velocity monitoring of several of the brightest of these has allowed us to document their changes in brightness, color, and size during a pulsation cycle. The results of this study will be presented. This research is supported by grants from the National Science Foundation (most recently AST 1413660), with additional student support from the Indiana Space Grant Consortium.

  19. Planetary radio astronomy observations from Voyager 2 near Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.; Evans, D. R.; Romig, J. H.; Alexander, J. K.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Aubier, M.; Leblanc, Y.; Lecacheux, A.; Pedersen, B. M.

    1982-01-01

    Planetary radio astronomy measurements obtained by Voyager 2 near Saturn have added further evidence that Saturnian kilometric radiation is emitted by a strong dayside source at auroral latitudes in the northern hemisphere and by a weaker source at complementary latitudes in the southern hemisphere. These emissions are variable because of Saturn's rotation and, on longer time scales, probably because of influences of the solar wind and Dione. The electrostatic discharge bursts first discovered by Voyager 1 and attributed to emissions from the B ring were again observed with the same broadband spectral properties and an episodic recurrence period of about 10 hours, but their occurrence frequency was only about 30 percent of that detected by Voyager 1. While crossing the ring plane at a distance of 2.88 Saturn radii, the spacecraft detected an intense noise event extending to above 1 megahertz and lasting about 150 seconds. The event is interpreted to be a consequence of the impact, vaporization, and ionization of charged, micrometer-size G ring particles distributed over a vertical thickness of about 1500 kilometers.

  20. Spitzer mid-infrared spectroscopic observations of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, H.; Ramos-Larios, G.; Guerrero, M. A.; Nigoche-Netro, A.; Toalá, J. A.; Fang, X.; Rubio, G.; Kemp, S. N.; Navarro, S. G.; Corral, L. J.

    2016-06-01

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope archival mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectroscopy of a sample of 11 planetary nebulae (PNe). The observations, acquired with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), cover the spectral range 5.2-14.5 μm that includes the H2 0-0 S(2) to S(7) rotational emission lines. This wavelength coverage has allowed us to derive the Boltzmann distribution and calculate the H2 rotational excitation temperature (Tex). The derived excitation temperatures have consistent values ≃900 ± 70 K for different sources despite their different structural components. We also report the detection of mid-IR ionic lines of [Ar III], [S IV], and [Ne II] in most objects, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features in a few cases. The decline of the [Ar III]/[Ne II] line ratio with the stellar effective temperature can be explained either by a true neon enrichment or by high density circumstellar regions of PNe that presumably descend from higher mass progenitor stars.

  1. Solar and Planetary Observations with a Lunar Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassim, N.; Weiler, K. W.; Lazio, J. W.; MacDowall, R. J.; Jones, D. L.; Bale, S. D.; Demaio, L.; Kasper, J. C.

    2006-05-01

    Ground-based radio telescopes cannot observe at frequencies below about 10 MHz (wavelengths longer than 30 m) because of ionospheric absorption. The Lunar Imaging Radio Array (LIRA) is a mission concept in which an array of radio telescopes is deployed on the Moon, as part of the Vision for Space Exploration, with the aim of extending radio observations to lower frequencies than are possible from the Earth. LIRA would provide the capability for dedicated monitoring of solar and planetary bursts as well as the search for magnetospheric emissions from extrasolar planets. The highest sensitivity observations can be accomplished by locating LIRA on the far side of the Moon. The array would be composed of 10-12 radial arms, each 1-2 km in length. Each arm would have several hundred dipole antennas and feedlines printed on a very thin sheet of kapton with a total mass of about 300 kg. This would provide a convenient way to deploy thousands of individual antennas and a centrally condensed distribution of array baselines. The lunar farside provides shielding from terrestrial natural and technological radio interference and freedom from the corrupting influence of Earth's ionosphere. This paper will describe the science case for LIRA as well as various options for array deployment and data transmission to Earth. Part of this work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Basic research in radio astronomy at the NRL is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  2. The Planetary Data System Distributed Inventory System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, J. Steven; McMahon, Susan K.

    1996-01-01

    The advent of the World Wide Web (Web) and the ability to easily put data repositories on-line has resulted in a proliferation of digital libraries. The heterogeneity of the underlying systems, the autonomy of the individual sites, and distributed nature of the technology has made both interoperability across the sites and the search for resources within a site major research topics. This article will describe a system that addresses both issues using standard Web protocols and meta-data labels to implement an inventory of on-line resources across a group of sites. The success of this system is strongly dependent on the existence of and adherence to a standards architecture that guides the management of meta-data within participating sites.

  3. The Planetary Data System Web Catalog Interface--Another Use of the Planetary Data System Data Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, S.; Bernath, A.

    1995-01-01

    The Planetary Data System Data Model consists of a set of standardized descriptions of entities within the Planetary Science Community. These can be real entities in the space exploration domain such as spacecraft, instruments, and targets; conceptual entities such as data sets, archive volumes, and data dictionaries; or the archive data products such as individual images, spectrum, series, and qubes.

  4. The Rocky World of Young Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Panel A of Inset Panel B of Inset Panel C of Inset

    This artist's concept illustrates how planetary systems arise out of massive collisions between rocky bodies. New findings from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope show that these catastrophes continue to occur around stars even after they have developed full-sized planets, when they are as old as one hundred million years. For reference, our own Sun, at 4.5 billion years old, is far past this late stage of planet formation.

    In this image, a young star is shown circled by full-sized planets, and rings of dust beyond. These rings, also called 'debris discs,' arise when embryonic planets smash into each other. One of these collisions is illustrated in the inset of Figure 1.

    Spitzer was able to see the dust generated by these collisions with its powerful infrared vision.

  5. The Planetary Data System--preparing for a New Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Thomas H.; Knopf, William P.; Grayzeck, Edwin J.

    2015-11-01

    In order to improve NASA’s ability to serve the Planetary Science Community, the Planetary Data System (PDS) has been transformed. NASA has used the highly successful virtual institute model (e.g., for NASA’s Astrobiology Program) to re-compete the Science Nodes within the PDS Structure. The new institute structure will facilitate our efforts within the PDS to improve both archive searchability and product discoverability. We will continue the adaption of the new PDS4 Standard, and enhance our ability to work with other archive/curation activities within NASA and with the community of space faring nations (through the IPDA). PDS science nodes will continue to work with NASA missions from the initial Announcement of Opportunity through the end of mission to define, organize, and document the data. This process includes peer-review of data sets by members of the science community to ensure that the data sets are scientifically useful, effectively organized, and well documented.The Science nodes were selected through a Cooperative Agreement Notice (NNH15ZDA006C) which specifically allowed the community to propose specific archive concepts. The selected nodes are: Cartography and Imaging Sciences, Rings-Moon Systems, Planetary Geosciences, Planetary Plasma Interactions, Atmospheres, and Small Bodies. Other elements of the PDS include an Engineering Node, the Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility, and a small project office.The prime role of the PDS is unchanged. We archive and distribute scientific data from NASA planetary missions, astronomical observations, and laboratory measurements. NASA’s Science Mission Directorate sponsors the PDS. Its purpose is to ensure the long-term usability of NASA data and to stimulate advanced research.In this presentation we discuss recent changes in the PDS, and our future activities to build on the new Institute. Near term efforts include developing a PDS Roadmap for the next decade lead by PDS Chief Scientist, Dr

  6. Strong plume fluxes at Mars observed by MAVEN: An important planetary ion escape channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Y.; Fang, X.; Brain, D. A.; McFadden, J. P.; Halekas, J. S.; Connerney, J. E.; Curry, S. M.; Harada, Y.; Luhmann, J. G.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-11-01

    We present observations by the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission of a substantial plume-like distribution of escaping ions from the Martian atmosphere, organized by the upstream solar wind convection electric field. From a case study of MAVEN particle-and-field data during one spacecraft orbit, we identified three escaping planetary ion populations: plume fluxes mainly along the upstream electric field over the north pole region of the Mars-Sun-Electric field (MSE) coordinate system, antisunward ion fluxes in the tail region, and much weaker upstream pickup ion fluxes. A statistical study of O+ fluxes using 3 month MAVEN data shows that the plume is a constant structure with strong fluxes widely distributed in the MSE northern hemisphere, which constitutes an important planetary ion escape channel. The escape rate through the plume is estimated to be ~30% of the tailward escape and ~23% of the total escape for > 25 eV O+ ions.

  7. OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE MULTISTRUCTURED PLANETARY NEBULA NGC 7354

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, M. E.; Vazquez, R.; Miranda, L. F.; Zavala, S.; Ayala, S. E-mail: vazquez@astrosen.unam.mx E-mail: lorenzo@astro.uson.mx E-mail: sayala@ideabc.org

    2010-04-15

    We present an observational study of the planetary nebula (PN) NGC 7354 consisting of narrowband H{alpha} and [N II]{lambda}6584 imaging as well as low- and high-dispersion long-slit spectroscopy, and VLA-D radio continuum. According to our imaging and spectroscopic data, NGC 7354 has four main structures: a quite round outer shell and an elliptical inner shell, a collection of low-excitation bright knots roughly concentrated on the equatorial region of the nebula, and two asymmetrical jet-like features, not aligned either with the shells' axes, or with each other. We have obtained physical parameters like electron temperature and electron density as well as ionic and elemental abundances for these different structures. Electron temperature and electron density slightly vary throughout the nebula going from {approx_equal}11, 000 to {approx_equal}14, 000 K, and from {approx_equal}1000 to {approx_equal} 3000 cm{sup -3}, respectively. The local extinction coefficient c {sub H{beta}} shows an increasing gradient from south to north and a decreasing gradient from east to west consistent with the number of equatorial bright knots present in each direction. Abundance values show slight internal variations but most of them are within the estimated uncertainties. In general, abundance values are in good agreement with the ones expected for PNe. Radio continuum data are consistent with optically thin thermal emission. Mean physical parameters derived from the radio emission are electron density n{sub e} = 710 cm{sup -3} and M(H II) = 0.22 M {sub sun}. We have used the interactive three-dimensional modeling tool SHAPE to reproduce the observed morphokinematic structures in NGC 7354 with different geometrical components. Our observations and model show evidence that the outer shell is moving faster ({approx_equal}35 km s{sup -1}) than the inner one ({approx_equal} 30 km s{sup -1}). Our SHAPE model includes several small spheres placed on the outer shell wall to reproduce

  8. NASA and the Search for Planetary Systems: An Historical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, S. J.

    2005-08-01

    Historically the search for planetary systems arose in three successive but overlapping contexts at NASA: 1) the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) in the 1970s; 2) the expansion of planetary science in the 1980s; and 3) studies in the 1990s that coalesced into the program known as the ``Astronomical Search for Origins." What began as workshops and ad hoc discussions in the early 1970s ended a quarter-century later in some of the most complex programs NASA had ever conceived, including detailed designs for real space missions. Under the realm of SETI, planetary detection techniques were discussed in three NASA-sponsored activities in the 1970s: the report of the workshops chaired by Philip Morrison, The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (1977), based on two smaller workshops chaired by Jesse Greenstein; David Black's 1976 Project Orion summer study to design a ground-based optical interferometer; and a 1979 workshop on planetary systems run by Black and William Brunk from NASA Headquarters. In the second area, by the mid-1980s, in the wake of the IRAS findings and the Beta Pictoris phenomenon, NASA's planetary science program was attempting to extend its reach from our solar system to other planetary systems. It did this through its own committees and the advisory capacity of the National Academy's Space Science Board (SSB). The NASA publication Planetary Exploration through the Year 2000: An Augmented Program (1986), the SSB's own study published in 1990, and the study known as Toward Other Planetary Systems (TOPS), were particularly important. By 1996 NASA's new ``Origins" program was announced, including NGST, SIM and TPF. Under the Origins program, the search for planetary systems was an integral part of the NASA space science enterprise guiding principle of cosmic evolution, an essential step in the search for life.

  9. Planetary Dynamics and Evolution in Evolved Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perets, Hagai; Kratter, K.; Kenyon, S.

    2011-09-01

    Exo-planets typically form in protoplanetary disks left over from the formation of their host star. We discuss additional evolutionary routes which may may exist in old evolved binary systems. Stellar evolution in binaries could lead to the formation of symbiotic stars, where mass is lost from one star and (partially) transferred to its binary companion, forming an accretion disk. Planetary orbits around the mass losing star can expand and destabilize, and may result in chaotic evolution. Possible outcomes include exchange of the planet to the companion star, ejection, collision, or tidal capture by one of the binary components. We show that the conditions in the newly formed accretion disk could be very similar to protoplanetary disks. Planets around the accreting companion may interact with the disk, leading to (re)growth and (re)migration of the planets. The disk may also provide the necessary environment for the formation of a new, second generation of planets in both circumstellar or circumbinary configurations. Pre-existing planets and/or planetesimals may serve as seeds for the formation of the second generation planets. Such systems should be found in white dwarf binary systems, and may show various unique observational signatures. Most notably, second generation planets could form in environments which are unfavorable for first generation planets. The phase space available for these planets could be forbidden (unstable) to first generation planets in the pre-evolved progenitor binaries. Planets may also form in double compact object binaries and in metal poor environments. Observations of exo-planets in such unfavorable regions could possibly serve to uniquely identify their second generation character. Finally, we point out a few observed candidate second generation planetary systems (Gl 86, HD 27442 and observed circumbinary planet candidates). A second generation origin for these systems could explain their unique configurations.

  10. Mission operations systems for planetary exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, William I.; Wolff, Donna M.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is twofold: (1) to present an overview of the processes comprising planetary mission operations as conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and (2) to present a project-specific and historical context within which this evolving process functions. In order to accomplish these objectives, the generic uplink and downlink functions are described along with their specialization to current flight projects. Also, new multimission capabilities are outlined, including prototyping of advanced-capability software for subsequent incorporation into more automated future operations. Finally, a specific historical ground is provided by listing some major operations software plus a genealogy of planetary missions beginning with Mariner 2 in 1962.

  11. Observing Planetary Nebulae with JWST and Extremely Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra

    2015-01-01

    Most stars in the Universe that leave the main sequence in a Hubble time will end their lives evolving through the Planetary Nebula (PN) evolutionary phase. The heavy mass loss which occurs during the preceding AGB phase is important across astrophysics, dramatically changing the course of stellar evolution, dominantly contributing to the dust content of the interstellar medium, and influencing its chemical composition. The evolution from the AGB phase to the PN phases remains poorly understood, especially the dramatic transformation that occurs in the morphology of the mass-ejecta as AGB stars and their round circumstellar envelopes evolve into mostly PNe, the majority of which deviate strongly from spherical symmetry. In addition, although the PN [OIII] luminosity function (PNLF) has been used as a standard candle (on par with distance indicators such as Cepheids), we do not understand why it works. It has been argued that the resolution of these issues may be linked to binarity and associated processes such as mass transfer and common envelope evolution.Thus, understanding the formation and evolution of PNe is of wide astrophysical importance. PNe have long been known to emit across a very large span of wavelengths, from the radio to X-rays. Extensive use of space-based observatories at X-ray (Chandra/ XMM-Newton), optical (HST) and far-infrared (Spitzer, Herschel) wavelengths in recent years has produced significant new advances in our knowledge of these objects. Given the expected advent of the James Webb Space Telescope in the near future, and ground-based Extremely Large Telescope(s) somewhat later, this talk will focus on future high-angular-resolution, high-sensitivity observations at near and mid-IR wavelengths with these facilities that can help in addressing the major unsolved problems in the study of PNe.

  12. The distribution of period ratios in Kepler planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Jason H.; Hwang, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Kepler's multi-planet systems are a valuable tool to understand the architectures and dynamics of the inner parts of planetary systems. I present an analysis of the distribution of orbital period ratios from candidate systems identified in the Quarter 8 catalog (Burke et al. 2014). This distribution is corrected for the effects of geometric transit probabilities and the completeness of the data reduction pipeline. We find that the distribution of period ratios falls as a power law with exponent -1.26 ± 0.05. We also identify a new, statistically significant feature near a period ratio of 2.2. These observations may provide insights into the formation and evolution of these systems.

  13. On-Board Perception System For Planetary Aerobot Balloon Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balaram, J.; Scheid, Robert E.; T. Salomon, Phil

    1996-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is implementing the Planetary Aerobot Testbed to develop the technology needed to operate a robotic balloon aero-vehicle (Aerobot). This earth-based system would be the precursor for aerobots designed to explore Venus, Mars, Titan and other gaseous planetary bodies. The on-board perception system allows the aerobot to localize itself and navigate on a planet using information derived from a variety of celestial, inertial, ground-imaging, ranging, and radiometric sensors.

  14. The GAPS Programme with HARPS-N at TNG. VIII. Observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and characterisation of the transiting planetary systems HAT-P-36 and WASP-11/HAT-P-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Esposito, M.; Covino, E.; Raia, G.; Southworth, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Biazzo, K.; Bonomo, A. S.; Desidera, S.; Lanza, A. F.; Maciejewski, G.; Poretti, E.; Sozzetti, A.; Borsa, F.; Bruni, I.; Ciceri, S.; Claudi, R.; Cosentino, R.; Gratton, R.; Martinez Fiorenzano, A. F.; Lodato, G.; Lorenzi, V.; Marzari, F.; Murabito, S.; Affer, L.; Bignamini, A.; Bedin, L. R.; Boccato, C.; Damasso, M.; Henning, Th.; Maggio, A.; Micela, G.; Molinari, E.; Pagano, I.; Piotto, G.; Rainer, M.; Scandariato, G.; Smareglia, R.; Zanmar Sanchez, R.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Orbital obliquity is thought to be a fundamental parameter in tracing the physical mechanisms that cause the migration of giant planets from the snow line down to roughly 10-2 au from their host stars. We are carrying out a large programme to estimate the spin-orbit alignment of a sample of transiting planetary systems to study what the possible configurations of orbital obliquity are and whether they correlate with other stellar or planetary properties. Aims: We determine the true and the projected obliquity of HAT-P-36 and WASP-11/HAT-P-10 systems, respectively, which are both composed of a relatively cool star (with effective temperature Teff< 6100 K) and a hot-Jupiter planet. Methods: Thanks to the high-resolution spectrograph HARPS-N, we observed the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for both systems by acquiring precise (3-8 m s-1) radial-velocity measurements during planetary transit events. We also present photometric observations comprising six light curves that cover five transit events, which were obtained using three medium-class telescopes. One transit of WASP-11/HAT-P-10 was followed simultaneously from two observatories. The three transit light curves of HAT-P-36 b show anomalies that are attributable to starspot complexes on the surface of the parent star, in agreement with the analysis of its spectra that indicates moderate activity ( log R'HK = -4.65 dex). By analysing the complete HATNet data set of HAT-P-36, we estimated the stellar rotation period by detecting a periodic photometric modulation in the light curve caused by star spots, obtaining Prot = 15.3 ± 0.4 days, which implies that the inclination of the stellar rotational axis with respect to the line of sight is i⋆ = 65° ± 34°. Results: We used the new spectroscopic and photometric data to revise the main physical parameters and measure the sky-projected misalignment angle of the two systems. We found λ = -14° ± 18° for HAT-P-36 and λ = 7° ± 5° for WASP-11/HAT-P-10

  15. Planetary system disruption by Galactic perturbations to wide binary stars.

    PubMed

    Kaib, Nathan A; Raymond, Sean N; Duncan, Martin

    2013-01-17

    Nearly half the exoplanets found within binary star systems reside in very wide binaries with average stellar separations greater than 1,000 astronomical units (one astronomical unit (AU) being the Earth-Sun distance), yet the influence of such distant binary companions on planetary evolution remains largely unstudied. Unlike their tighter counterparts, the stellar orbits of wide binaries continually change under the influence of the Milky Way's tidal field and impulses from other passing stars. Here we report numerical simulations demonstrating that the variable nature of wide binary star orbits dramatically reshapes the planetary systems they host, typically billions of years after formation. Contrary to previous understanding, wide binary companions may often strongly perturb planetary systems, triggering planetary ejections and increasing the orbital eccentricities of surviving planets. Although hitherto not recognized, orbits of giant exoplanets within wide binaries are statistically more eccentric than those around isolated stars. Both eccentricity distributions are well reproduced when we assume that isolated stars and wide binaries host similar planetary systems whose outermost giant planets are scattered beyond about 10 AU from their parent stars by early internal instabilities. Consequently, our results suggest that although wide binaries eventually remove the most distant planets from many planetary systems, most isolated giant exoplanet systems harbour additional distant, still undetected planets. PMID:23292514

  16. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Exploration and Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session, "Exploration and Observations" includes the following topics: 1) Charged Particle dose Measurements by the Odyssey/MARIE Instrument in Mars Orbit and Model Calculations; 2) Earth Thermal Field Variations in Dependence from Lunisolar Tides (by Vorotilovo Deep Well Observations); 3) ASTROHAB: A Modular Construction System for Lunar Bases; and 4) Solar Power Satellites for Orbital and Non-Terrestrial Applications.

  17. Ancillary Data Services of NASA's Planetary Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, C.

    1994-01-01

    JPL's Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility (NAIF) has primary responsibility for design and implementation of the SPICE ancillary information system, supporting a wide range of space science mission design, observation planning and data analysis functions/activities. NAIF also serves as the geometry and ancillary data node of the Planetary Data System (PDS). As part of the PDS, NAIF archives SPICE and other ancillary data produced by flight projects. NAIF then distributes these data, and associated data access software and high-level tools, to researchers funded by NASA's Office of Space Science. Support for a broader user community is also offered to the extent resources permit. This paper describes the SPICE system and customer support offered by NAIF.

  18. Correlation tracking for a Planetary Pointing and Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assefi, T.

    1978-01-01

    The Planetary Pointing and Tracking System (PPTS) is being developed to provide precision pointing for science platforms on future autonomous planetary spacecraft. The PPTS design approach using a CCD optical sensor for closed-loop control with respect to the target body, a gyro for inertial stabilization, and brushless dc torque motors for smooth and continuous platform articulation is essential for high resolution planetary imaging and automated science execution. An integral part of PPTS is the correlation tracker which has the potential to revolutionize autonomous guidance.

  19. β Pictoris, a young planetary system? A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal-Madjar, A.; Lecavelier des Etangs, A.; Ferlet, R.

    1998-02-01

    β Pictoris is a bright southern hemisphere star observed in 1983 by the IRAS satellite as presenting a large and unexpected IR excess. This excess was called the Vega-like phenomenon and quickly identified as due to circumstellar dust. Subsequently in 1984, using stellar coronography, dust was also directly seen as an edge-on disk extended to several hundreds of AUs. Since then, β Pictoris has been continuously observed. We present here a review of our present understanding of the β Pictoris circumstellar environment which still appears unique in the solar neighborhood. The circumstellar dust disk is predominantly made of relatively large particles (one micron or more) extending outward to more than 1000 AU and presenting a clearer (dust free) central region away to about 35 AU from the star. The gas is detected through stable and variable spectroscopic signatures revealing a permanent gas disk with sporadic inflows and also a few outflows. These are partially interpreted in terms of evaporation of kilometer-sized bodies very close to the star. Evaporation or destruction through collisions of kilometer-sized bodies seems to be needed also to explain both the dust as well as the very presence of the CO molecule detected in the circumstellar gas. Several indirect arguments along with the observation of a very peculiar photometric variation of the star suggests that even giant planets may have already formed in the β Pictoris system. β Pictoris is thus possibly the missing link between young stellar objects presenting proto-planetary circumstellar disks and much more evolved systems in which planets (at least giant ones) are already formed. β Pictoris is probably a unique place where we may now observe planetary formation as well as other phenomena that have taken place in the first 10 8 years of a young stellar system.

  20. Solar System Observations with JWST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norwood, James; Hammel, Heidi; Milam, Stefanie; Stansberry, John; Lunine, Jonathan; Chanover, Nancy; Hines, Dean; Sonneborn, George; Tiscareno, Matthew; Brown, Michael; Ferruit, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope will enable a wealth of new scientific investigations in the near- and mid- infrared, with sensitivity and spatial-spectral resolution greatly surpassing its predecessors. In this paper, we focus upon Solar System science facilitated by JWST, discussing the most current information available concerning JWST instrument properties and observing techniques relevant to planetary science. We also present numerous example observing scenarios for a wide variety of Solar System targets to illustrate the potential of JWST science to the Solar System community. This paper updates and supersedes the Solar System white paper published by the JWST Project in 2010 (Lunine et al., 2010). It is based both on that paper and on a workshop held at the annual meeting of the Division for Planetary Sciences in Reno, NV in 2012.

  1. Hubble Space Telescope Planetary Camera observations of Arp 220

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaya, Edward J.; Dowling, Daniel M.; Currie, Douglas G.; Faber, S. M.; Groth, Edward J.

    1994-01-01

    Planetary Camera images of peculiar galaxy Arp 220 taken with V, R, and I band filters reveal a very luminous object near the position of the western radio continuum source, assumed to be the major nucleus, ans seven lesser objects within 2 sec of this position. The most luminous object is formally coincident with the radio source to within the errors of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) pointing accuracy, but we have found an alternate, more compelling alignment of maps in which the eastern radio source coincides with one of the lesser objects and the OH radio sources reside near the surfaces of other optical objects. The proposed centering places the most luminous object 150 pc (0.4 sec) away from the western radio source. We explore the possibilities that the objects are either holes in the dense dust distribution, dusty clouds reflecting a hidden bright nucleus, or associations of bright young stars. We favor the interpretation that at least the brightest two objects are massive young star associations with luminosities 10(exp 9) to 10(exp 11) solar luminosity, but highly extinguished by intervening dust. These massive associations should fall into the nucleus on a time scale of 10(exp 8) yr. About 10% of the enigmatic far-IR flux arises from the observed objects. In addition, if the diffuse starlight out to a radius of 8 sec is dominated by stars with typical ages of order 10(exp 8) yr (the time since the alleged merger of two galaxies), as indicated by the blue colors at larger radius, then the lower limit to the reradiation of diffuse starlight contributes 3 x 10(exp 11) solar luminosity to the far-infrared flux, or greater than or equal to 25% of the total far-IR flux. Three additional bright objects (M(sub V) approximately equals -13) located about 6 sec from the core are likely young globular clusters, but any of these could be recently exploded supernovae instead. The expected supernovae rate, if the dominant energy source is young stars, is about one per

  2. MAVEN Observations of Escaping Planetary Ions from the Martian Atmosphere: Mass, Velocity, and Spatial Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yaxue; Fang, Xiaohua; Brain, D. A.; McFadden, James P.; Halekas, Jasper; Connerney, Jack

    2015-04-01

    The Mars-solar wind interaction accelerates and transports planetary ions away from the Martian atmosphere through a number of processes, including ‘pick-up’ by electromagnetic fields. The MAVEN spacecraft has made routine observations of escaping planetary ions since its arrival at Mars in September 2014. The SupraThermal And Thermal Ion Composition (STATIC) instrument measures the ion energy, mass, and angular spectra. It has detected energetic planetary ions during most of the spacecraft orbits, which are attributed to the pick-up process. We found significant variations in the escaping ion mass and velocity distributions from the STATIC data, which can be explained by factors such as varying solar wind conditions, contributions of particles from different source locations and different phases during the pick-up process. We also study the spatial distributions of different planetary ion species, which can provide insight into the physics of ion escaping process and enhance our understanding of atmospheric erosion by the solar wind. Our results will be further interpreted within the context of the upstream solar wind conditions measured by the MAVEN Solar Wind Ion Analyzer (SWIA) instrument and the magnetic field environment measured by the Magnetometer (MAG) instrument. Our study shows that the ion spatial distribution in the Mars-Sun-Electric-Field (MSE) coordinate system and the velocity space distribution with respect to the local magnetic field line can be used to distinguish the ions escaping through the polar plume and those through the tail region. The contribution of the polar plume ion escape to the total escape rate will also be discussed.

  3. Dynamical Tides and Oscillations in Star and Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Jim

    2015-04-01

    The oscillations of stars and planets are a powerful tool for understanding the structure and evolution of these bodies. In compact white dwarf (WD) binaries, tidally excited waves within the WDs deposit energy and angular momentum within the WDs, producing strong tidal dissipation. The tidal torque spins up the WDs such that they are nearly synchronously rotating by the onset of mass transfer. Tidal heating may make the WDs more luminous by orders of magnitude, and it could even reignite thermonuclear fusion in the WD's hydrogen shell. In various types of star systems observed by Kepler, tidally excited oscillations are detectable and provide direct constraints on tidal dissipation rates in these systems. Finally, in the planet Saturn, planetary oscillation modes have been detected via their gravitational influence on the rings. The frequencies of the modes allow for the first seismic constraints on a planet other than the Earth, and they provide evidence for non-conventional structures within Saturn.

  4. Debris Disks as Tracers of Nearby Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapelfeldt, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Many main-sequence stars possess tenuous circumstellar dust clouds believed to trace extrasolar analogs of the Sun's asteroid and Kuiper Belts. While most of these "debris disks" are known only from far-infrared photometry, dozens are now spatially resolved. In this talk, I'll review the observed structural properties of debris disks as revealed by imaging with the Hubble, Spitzer, and Herschel Space Telescopes. I will show how modeling of the far-infrared spectral energy distributions of resolved disks can be used to constrain their dust particle sizes and albedos. I will review cases of disks whose substructures suggest planetary perturbations, including a newly-discovered eccentric ring system. I'll conclude with thoughts on the potential of upcoming and proposed facilities to resolve similar structures around a greatly expanded sample of nearby debris systems.

  5. The Inner Debris Structure in the Fomalhaut Planetary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Kate Y. L.; Rieke, George H.; Defrére, Denis; Wang, Kuo-Song; Lai, Shih-Ping; Wilner, David J.; van Lieshout, Rik; Lee, Chin-Fei

    2016-02-01

    Fomalhaut plays an important role in the study of debris disks and small bodies in other planetary systems. The proximity and luminosity of the star make key features of its debris, like the water ice line, accessible. Here we present ALMA cycle 1, 870 μm (345 GHz) observations targeted at the inner part of the Fomalhaut system with a synthesized beam of 0.″45 × 0.″37 (˜3 AU linear resolution at the distance of Fomalhaut) and an rms of 26 μJy beam-1. The high angular resolution and sensitivity of the ALMA data enable us to place strong constraints on the nature of the warm excess revealed by Spitzer and Herschel observations. We detect a point source at the star position with a total flux consistent with thermal emission from the stellar photosphere. No structures that are brighter than 3σ are detected in the central 15 AU × 15 AU region. Modeling the spectral energy distribution using parameters expected for a dust-producing planetesimal belt indicates a radial location in the range of ˜8-15 AU. This is consistent with the location where ice sublimates in Fomalhaut, i.e., an asteroid-belt analog. The 3σ upper limit for such a belt is <1.3 mJy at 870 μm. We also interpret the 2 and 8-13 μm interferometric measurements to reveal the structure in the inner 10 AU region as dust naturally connected to this proposed asteroid belt by Poynting-Robertson drag, dust sublimation, and magnetically trapped nanograins. Fomalhaut is a triple system; here we refer to the Fomalhaut planetary system as the one around the primary star Fomalhaut A.

  6. Spectral classification of stars likely to have planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.; Minniti, D.

    Since all the techniques used for the detection of extrasolar planets are indirect, the characterization of the detected planets is not always quite certain. Up to the present, around 150 planets have been discovered orbiting other stars. The estimation of planetary masses and radii depends on the physical parameters of the mother stars. Therefore, the more those star's parameters are defined, the more accurate the estimates of the masses and radii of their related planets will be. It is essential to count on a reliable spectral classification of these stars in order to estimate the main astrophysical parameters of the stars that have orbiting planets. In this work, we determine the spectral type and luminosity class of 52 bright stars which are likely to have planetary systems. The spectral classification was performed by comparing low resolution spectra obtained at CASLEO (Argentina) with template spectra taken from the Silva & Cornell (1992) library. 73% of the observed stars proved to be of G spectral type, whereas 94% turned out to be main sequence stars or very close to main sequence.

  7. Planetary system formation in thermally evolving viscous protoplanetary discs.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Richard P; Hellary, Phil; Fendyke, Stephen M; Coleman, Gavin

    2014-04-28

    Observations of extrasolar planets are providing new opportunities for furthering our understanding of planetary formation processes. In this paper, we review planet formation and migration scenarios and describe some recent simulations that combine planetary accretion and gas-disc-driven migration. While the simulations are successful at forming populations of low- and intermediate-mass planets with short orbital periods, similar to those that are being observed by ground- and space-based surveys, our models fail to form any gas giant planets that survive migration into the central star. The simulation results are contrasted with observations, and areas of future model development are discussed. PMID:24664913

  8. Laboratory Simulations of Planetary Surfaces: Understanding Regolith Physical Properties from Astronomical Photometric Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Robert M.; Hapke, Bruce W.; Boryta, Mark D.; Manatt, Ken S.; Smythe, William D.

    2015-08-01

    Abstract BodySolar system bodies are observed at many scattering angles. The reflection and polarization change with phase angle of light scattered from particulates has been studied for a century in the lab in efforts to understand clouds, aerosols, planetary ring systems and planetary regoliths. These effects must be understood in order to infer surface properties from astronomical data. The increase in reflectance with decreasing phase angle, the ‘Opposition Effect’ (OE), has been well documented in astronomical observations and laboratory studies. Variations in linear polarization with phase angle have also been well studied. Nevertheless, there is no generally accepted physical explanation. Our lab studies show that the OE in particulate materials is due to two processes, Shadow Hiding (SHOE) and Coherent Backscattering (CBOE). SHOE arises because, as phase angle nears zero, shadows cast by regolith grains upon one another become less visible. CBOE results from constructive interference between rays traveling the same path but in opposite directions. The CBOE process assumes the returned radiation is multiply scattered. We have deconstructed the scattering process using a goniometric photopolarimeter (GPP). This permits us to present samples with light that is linearly polarized in, and perpendicular to, the scattering plane. We make angular scattering measurements of the light scattered from a simulated planetary surface. The GPP also illuminates samples with both right handed and left handed circularly polarized light. This permits us to measure the phase curve, the linear and circular polarization ratios and the linear polarization as a function of phase angle. These GPP measurements permit us to quantify the amount of multiple scattering in a particulate medium in the laboratory. At smaller phase angles in highly reflective material such as Al2O3, multiple scattering increases. This is a consequence of coherent backscattering of photons that are

  9. Exoplanetary System Dynamics: Planetary Multiplicity and Mass Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isoe, Mari; Kokubo, Eiichiro; Turner, Edwin

    2015-12-01

    Recently numerous systems consisting of multiple exoplanets have been discovered. Using a dataset of 375 systems (500 planets) discovered by the radial velocity method and 365 systems (899 planets) containing planet candidates found by the Kepler Mission, we investigate the dependence of the dynamical structure of planetary systems on their multiplicity and the masses of the member planets. We classify the planetary system by three parameters: planetary multiplicity, planetary mass, and the evolutionary stage of the central star. We normalize planetary masses by the mass of the central star and divide the planets into small and large categories by a cut at $10^{-4}$. The central star is classified into main-sequence or giant according to its evolutionary stage. We focus on the angular momentum deficit (AMD) of the systems and the orbital separation between adjacent planets normalized by their Hill radii. We find that in all categories the system AMD decreases with increasing multiplicity. This suggests that in order for multiple systems to be stable, each planet's orbit must be relatively circular. In addition, we find that the distribution of orbital eccentricities of the massive planets and low-mass planets differs. In particular, only high-mass planets have eccentricities larger than 0.4. In the low-mass systems around main sequence stars, we find that the orbital separation decreases with increasing multiplicity. In addition, the orbital separation around main-sequence stars is wider than that around giants. Furthermore, the minimum orbital separation is about 6.4 for non-resonant pairs. This paper presents the statistical properties of the dynamical structure of multiple planetary systems and discusses their formation.

  10. Planetary Data Systems (PDS) Imaging Node Atlas II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanboli, Alice; McAuley, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The Planetary Image Atlas (PIA) is a Rich Internet Application (RIA) that serves planetary imaging data to the science community and the general public. PIA also utilizes the USGS Unified Planetary Coordinate system (UPC) and the on-Mars map server. The Atlas was designed to provide the ability to search and filter through greater than 8 million planetary image files. This software is a three-tier Web application that contains a search engine backend (MySQL, JAVA), Web service interface (SOAP) between server and client, and a GWT Google Maps API client front end. This application allows for the search, retrieval, and download of planetary images and associated meta-data from the following missions: 2001 Mars Odyssey, Cassini, Galileo, LCROSS, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Exploration Rover, Mars Express, Magellan, Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Pathfinder, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, MESSENGER, Phoe nix, Viking Lander, Viking Orbiter, and Voyager. The Atlas utilizes the UPC to translate mission-specific coordinate systems into a unified coordinate system, allowing the end user to query across missions of similar targets. If desired, the end user can also use a mission-specific view of the Atlas. The mission-specific views rely on the same code base. This application is a major improvement over the initial version of the Planetary Image Atlas. It is a multi-mission search engine. This tool includes both basic and advanced search capabilities, providing a product search tool to interrogate the collection of planetary images. This tool lets the end user query information about each image, and ignores the data that the user has no interest in. Users can reduce the number of images to look at by defining an area of interest with latitude and longitude ranges.

  11. From Bursts to Back-Projection: Signal Processing Techniques for Earth and Planetary Observing Radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Discusses: (1) JPL Radar Overview and Historical Perspective (2) Signal Processing Needs in Earth and Planetary Radars (3) Examples of Current Systems and techniques (4) Future Perspectives in signal processing for radar missions

  12. Planetary Protection Considerations for Life Support and Habitation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Hogan, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Life support systems for future human missions beyond low Earth orbit may include a combination of existing hardware components and advanced technologies. Discipline areas for technology development include atmosphere revitalization, water recovery, solid waste management, crew accommodations, food production, thermal systems, environmental monitoring, fire protection and radiation protection. Life support systems will be influenced by in situ resource utilization (ISRU), crew mobility and the degree of extravehicular activity. Planetary protection represents an additional set of requirements that technology developers have generally not considered. Planetary protection guidelines will affect the kind of operations, processes, and functions that can take place during future exploration missions, including venting and discharge of liquids and solids, ejection of wastes, use of ISRU, requirements for cabin atmospheric trace contaminant concentrations, cabin leakage and restrictions on what materials, organisms, and technologies that may be brought on missions. Compliance with planetary protection requirements may drive development of new capabilities or processes (e.g. in situ sterilization, waste containment, contaminant measurement) and limit or prohibit certain kinds of operations or processes (e.g. unfiltered venting). Ultimately, there will be an effect on mission costs, including the mission trade space. Planetary protection requirements need to be considered early in technology development programs. It is expected that planetary protection will have a major impact on technology selection for future missions.

  13. "Planetary Orbit" Systems Composed of Cycloparaphenylenes.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, Steven M; Zayat, Zeina-Christina

    2016-06-01

    Cycloparaphenylenes (CPP) can serve as both guest and host in a complex. Geometric analysis indicates that optimal binding occurs when the CPP nanohoops differ by five phenyl rings. Employing C-PCM(THF)/ωB97X-D/6-31G(d) computations, we find that the strongest binding does occur when the host and guest differ by five phenyl rings. The guest CPP is modestly inclined relative to the plane of the host CPP except when the host and guest differ by four phenyl rings, when the inclination angle becomes >40°. The distortion/interaction model shows that interaction dominates and is best when the host and guest differ by five phenyl rings. The computed (1)H NMR shifts of the guest CPP are shifted by about 1 ppm upfield relative to their position when unbound. This distinct chemical shift should aid in experimental detection of these CPP planetary orbit complexes. PMID:27163409

  14. Planetary radio astronomy observations from Voyager 2 near Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.; Pearce, J. B.; Riddle, A. C.; Alexander, J. K.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Thieman, J. R.; Carr, T. D.; Gulkis, S.; Boischot, A.

    1979-01-01

    The Voyager 2 Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment to Jupiter has confirmed and extended to higher zenomagnetic latitudes results from the identical experiment carried by Voyager 1. The kilometric emissions discovered by Voyager 1 often extended to 1 megahertz or higher on Voyager 2 and often consisted of negatively, or less frequently, positively drifting narrowband bursts. On the basis of tentative identification of plasma wave emissions similar to those detected by Voyager 1, the plasma torus associated with Io appeared somewhat denser to Voyager 2 than it did to Voyager 1. The paper reports on quasi-periodic sinusoidal or impulsive bursts in the broadcast band range of wavelengths (800 to 1800 kHz). A Faraday effect appears at decametric frequencies, which probably results from propagation of the radiation near its sources on Jupiter. Finally, the occurrence of decametric emission in homologous arc families is discussed.

  15. Planetary Systems Associated with Main-Sequence Stars.

    PubMed

    Brown, H

    1964-09-11

    The luminosity function is used to estimate the number of invisible planet-like objects in the neighborhood of the sun, taking into account the likely chemical composition of planets in relation to the composition of main-sequence stars. There may be about 60 objects more massive than Mars for every visible star. An attempt is made to estimate the distribution of these planet-like cold bodies in relation to stars. It is suggested that stars, together with cold objects, were formed in clusters of bodies of random size distribution. Clusters averaging about 50 bodies each account for the observed distribution of frequencies of double and triple star systems relative to single stars. On this basis, virtually every star should have a planetary system associated with it. As a corollary, systems of cold bodies in which there are no luminous stars should be abundant. The possible distribution of planets around such stars has been studied, making use of the observed orbital characteristics of double star systems. It is concluded that favorable conditions for life processes may be far more abundant than has generally been thought possible. PMID:17743661

  16. Asteroseismology in PLATO. A necessary tool for characterizing planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, J. C.; Garrido, R.; Mas-Hesse, J. M.; Rodríguez, J.

    2015-05-01

    Today, the field of stellar physics is witnessing a significant boost thanks to the progress of asteroseismology from space with satellites like CoRoT and Kepler, which will be exploited to its full power with the PLATO mission now under development. Both the study of stellar interiors and the analysis of exo-planetary systems have mutual benefits since not only they share similar techniques for obtaining the data (analysis of light curves) but also the high precision with which today asteroseismology can provide the global parameters of stars is crucial to accurately and precisely characterize the planetary systems. In this contribution I briefly describe this symbiosis.

  17. Orbital stability constraints on the nature of planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graziani, F.; Black, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    A fully self-consistent, N-body computer code is used to study conditions under which model planetary systems, each consisting of a star and two 'planetary' companions, become orbitally unstable as a result of gravitational interactions between the companions. A formula describing a necessary condition for orbital stability is given. It is found that giant gaseous protoplanets of the type postulated by Cameron (1978) to be precursors of the present-day solar system planets could have stable orbits for at least 10,000 years, the time required for significant core formation in a typical giant gaseous protoplanet.

  18. Formation of Misaligned Planetary Systems: Primordial Spin-Disk Misalignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Dong

    2015-12-01

    Significant stellar obliquities have been observed in many exoplanetary systems containing hot Jupiters, including some coplanar multiplanet systems. It is traditionally assumed that planet migration in protoplanetary disks leads to aligned planetary orbital axis and stellar spin axis. This may not be the case because the diskitself may be misaligned with the protostar, for several reasons: (1) Since star formation takes place in a turbulent medium, the accreting gas assembled onto a protoplanetary disk may have a varying direction of angular momentum; (2) Magnetic star-disk interaction may produce a misalignment torque between the stellar spin and the disk; (3) Perturbation from a binary companion can change the orientation of the disk. We critically examine these mechanisms for generating primordial spin-disk misalignments. The importance of star-disk-binary interactions and the possibility of secular spin-orbit resonance in producing large stellar obliquities will be emphasized. The effects and uncertainties involving the dynamics of warped disks and star-disk magnetic interactions will be discussed. Possible observational constraints and tests on primordial misalignments will also be discussed, including the observed correlation between the stellar obliquity and effective temperature.

  19. On the HU Aquarii planetary system hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goździewski, Krzysztof; Nasiroglu, Ilham; Słowikowska, Aga; Beuermann, Klaus; Kanbach, Gottfried; Gauza, Bartosz; Maciejewski, Andrzej J.; Schwarz, Robert; Schwope, Axel D.; Hinse, Tobias C.; Haghighipour, Nader; Burwitz, Vadim; Słonina, Mariusz; Rau, Arne

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the eclipse timing of the polar binary HU Aquarii that has been observed for almost two decades. Recently, Qian et al. attributed large (O-C) deviations between the eclipse ephemeris and observations to a compact system of two massive Jovian companions. We improve the Keplerian, kinematic model of the light travel time effect and re-analyse the whole currently available data set. We add almost 60 new, yet unpublished, mostly precision light curves obtained using the time high-resolution photopolarimeter Optical Timing Analyzer (OPTIMA), as well as photometric observations performed at the Monitoring Network of Telescopes/North, Physics Innovations Robotic Astronomical Telescope Explorer and Carlos Sánchez Telescope. We determine new mid-egress times with a mean uncertainty at the level of 1 s or better. We claim that because the observations that currently exist in the literature are non-homogeneous with respect to spectral windows (ultraviolet, X-ray, visual and polarimetric mode) and the reported mid-egress measurements errors, they may introduce systematics that affect orbital fits. Indeed, we find that the published data, when taken literally, cannot be explained by any unique solution. Many qualitatively different and best-fit two-planet configurations, including self-consistent, Newtonian N-body solutions may be able to explain the data. However, using high-resolution, precision OPTIMA light curves, we find that the (O-C) deviations are best explained by the presence of a single circumbinary companion orbiting at a distance of ˜4.5 au with a small eccentricity and having ˜7 Jupiter masses. This object could be the next circumbinary planet detected from the ground, similar to the announced companions around close binaries HW Vir, NN Ser, UZ For, DP Leo, FS Aur or SZ Her, and planets of this type around Kepler-16, Kepler-34 and Kepler-35.

  20. Demonstration of Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) Performance for Planetary and Geostationary Earth Observing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revercomb, Henry E.; Sromovsky, Lawrence A.; Fry, Patrick M.; Best, Fred A.; LaPorte, Daniel D.

    2001-01-01

    The combination of massively parallel spatial sampling and accurate spectral radiometry offered by imaging FTS makes it extremely attractive for earth and planetary remote sensing. We constructed a breadboard instrument to help assess the potential for planetary applications of small imaging FTS instruments in the 1 - 5 micrometer range. The results also support definition of the NASA Geostationary Imaging FTS (GIFTS) instrument that will make key meteorological and climate observations from geostationary earth orbit. The Planetary Imaging FTS (PIFTS) breadboard is based on a custom miniaturized Bomen interferometer that uses corner cube reflectors, a wishbone pivoting voice-coil delay scan mechanism, and a laser diode metrology system. The interferometer optical output is measured by a commercial infrared camera procured from Santa Barbara Focalplane. It uses an InSb 128x128 detector array that covers the entire FOV of the instrument when coupled with a 25 mm focal length commercial camera lens. With appropriate lenses and cold filters the instrument can be used from the visible to 5 micrometers. The delay scan is continuous, but slow, covering the maximum range of +/- 0.4 cm in 37.56 sec at a rate of 500 image frames per second. Image exposures are timed to be centered around predicted zero crossings. The design allows for prediction algorithms that account for the most recent fringe rate so that timing jitter produced by scan speed variations can be minimized. Response to a fixed source is linear with exposure time nearly to the point of saturation. Linearity with respect to input variations was demonstrated to within 0.16% using a 3-point blackbody calibration. Imaging of external complex scenes was carried out at low and high spectral resolution. These require full complex calibration to remove background contributions that vary dramatically over the instrument FOV. Testing is continuing to demonstrate the precise radiometric accuracy and noise characteristics.

  1. Exploring the solar system: the view of planetary surfaces with VIS/IR remote sensing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Gabriele E.

    2011-09-01

    The structure of planetary surfaces unveils basic formation processes and evolution lines of different objects in the solar system, and often the view on the top of a planet is the only available information about it. Advanced remote sensing technologies on deep space missions are aimed at accessing a maximum of relevant data to characterize a planetary object holistically. This approach requires concert strategies in planetary and engineering science. In this framework VIS/IR spectroscopic remote sensing methods are key technologies for imaging planetary atmospheres and surfaces, for studying their composition, texture, structure and dynamics. Basing on these analyses it succeeds to observe the single objects in more global geo-scientific content. The paper focuses on main geo-scientific output coming from spectroscopic studies of planetary surfaces in conjunction with their interiors, atmospheres, and the interplanetary space. It summarizes selected results of spectral studies onboard of the ESA deep space missions BepiColombo, Venus Express, Mars Express, and Rosetta. The corresponding spectral instruments are introduced. The complex conflation of special knowledge of the disciplines planetology, optical and IR measuring techniques, and space flight engineering is demonstrated in several examples. Finally, the paper gives an outlook of current developments for spectral studies in planned missions, and sums up some of the driving questions in planetary science.

  2. Organic materials in planetary and protoplanetary systems: nature or nurture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalle Ore, C. M.; Fulchignoni, M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Barucci, M. A.; Brunetto, R.; Campins, H.; de Bergh, C.; Debes, J. H.; Dotto, E.; Emery, J. P.; Grundy, W. M.; Jones, A. P.; Mennella, V.; Orthous-Daunay, F. R.; Owen, T.; Pascucci, I.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Quirico, E.; Strazzulla, G.

    2011-09-01

    Aims: The objective of this work is to summarize the discussion of a workshop aimed at investigating the properties, origins, and evolution of the materials that are responsible for the red coloration of the small objects in the outer parts of the solar system. Because of limitations or inconsistencies in the observations and, until recently, the limited availability of laboratory data, there are still many questions on the subject. Our goal is to approach two of the main questions in a systematic way: - Is coloring an original signature of materials that are presolar in origin ("nature") or stems from post-formational chemical alteration, or weathering ("nurture")? - What is the chemical signature of the material that causes spectra to be sloped towards the red in the visible? We examine evidence available both from the laboratory and from observations sampling different parts of the solar system and circumstellar regions (disks). Methods: We present a compilation of brief summaries gathered during the workshop and describe the evidence towards a primordial vs. evolutionary origin for the material that reddens the small objects in the outer parts of our, as well as in other, planetary systems. We proceed by first summarizing laboratory results followed by observational data collected at various distances from the Sun. Results: While laboratory experiments show clear evidence of irradiation effects, particularly from ion bombardment, the first obstacle often resides in the ability to unequivocally identify the organic material in the observations. The lack of extended spectral data of good quality and resolution is at the base of this problem. Furthermore, that both mechanisms, weathering and presolar, act on the icy materials in a spectroscopically indistinguishable way makes our goal of defining the impact of each mechanism challenging. Conclusions: Through a review of some of the workshop presentations and discussions, encompassing laboratory experiments as well

  3. Small reactor power systems for manned planetary surface bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, Harvey S.

    1987-12-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the potential application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to manned planetary surface base missions was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology, performance, and safety issues associated with integration of reactor power systems with an evolutionary manned planetary surface exploration scenario. The requirements and characteristics of a variety of human-rated modular reactor power system configurations selected for a range of power levels from 25 kWe to hundreds of kilowatts is described. Trade-off analyses for reactor power systems utilizing both man-made and indigenous shielding materials are provided to examine performance, installation and operational safety feasibility issues. The results of this study have confirmed the preliminary feasibility of a wide variety of small reactor power plant configurations for growth oriented manned planetary surface exploration missions. The capability for power level growth with increasing manned presence, while maintaining safe radiation levels, was favorably assessed for nominal 25 to 100 kWe modular configurations. No feasibility limitations or technical barriers were identified and the use of both distance and indigenous planetary soil material for human rated radiation shielding were shown to be viable and attractive options.

  4. Small reactor power systems for manned planetary surface bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, Harvey S.

    1987-01-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the potential application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to manned planetary surface base missions was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology, performance, and safety issues associated with integration of reactor power systems with an evolutionary manned planetary surface exploration scenario. The requirements and characteristics of a variety of human-rated modular reactor power system configurations selected for a range of power levels from 25 kWe to hundreds of kilowatts is described. Trade-off analyses for reactor power systems utilizing both man-made and indigenous shielding materials are provided to examine performance, installation and operational safety feasibility issues. The results of this study have confirmed the preliminary feasibility of a wide variety of small reactor power plant configurations for growth oriented manned planetary surface exploration missions. The capability for power level growth with increasing manned presence, while maintaining safe radiation levels, was favorably assessed for nominal 25 to 100 kWe modular configurations. No feasibility limitations or technical barriers were identified and the use of both distance and indigenous planetary soil material for human rated radiation shielding were shown to be viable and attractive options.

  5. Archiving Mars Mission Data Sets with the Planetary Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinness, Edward A.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the Planetary Data System (PDS) to archive the datasets that are received from the Mars Missions. It reviews the lessons learned in the actual archiving process, and presents an overview of the actual archiving process. It also reviews the lessons learned from the perspectives of the projects, the data producers and the data users.

  6. Towards a sustainable modular robot system for planetary exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, S. G. M.

    This thesis investigates multiple perspectives of developing an unmanned robotic system suited for planetary terrains. In this case, the unmanned system consists of unit-modular robots. This type of robot has potential to be developed and maintained as a sustainable multi-robot system while located far from direct human intervention. Some characteristics that make this possible are: the cooperation, communication and connectivity among the robot modules, flexibility of individual robot modules, capability of self-healing in the case of a failed module and the ability to generate multiple gaits by means of reconfiguration. To demonstrate the effects of high flexibility of an individual robot module, multiple modules of a four-degree-of-freedom unit-modular robot were developed. The robot was equipped with a novel connector mechanism that made self-healing possible. Also, design strategies included the use of series elastic actuators for better robot-terrain interaction. In addition, various locomotion gaits were generated and explored using the robot modules, which is essential for a modular robot system to achieve robustness and thus successfully navigate and function in a planetary environment. To investigate multi-robot task completion, a biomimetic cooperative load transportation algorithm was developed and simulated. Also, a liquid motion-inspired theory was developed consisting of a large number of robot modules. This can be used to traverse obstacles that inevitably occur in maneuvering over rough terrains such as in a planetary exploration. Keywords: Modular robot, cooperative robots, biomimetics, planetary exploration, sustainability.

  7. Operation of the Planetary Plasma Interactions Node of the Planetary Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Raymond J.

    1997-01-01

    Five years ago NASA selected the Planetary Plasma Interactions (PPI) Node at UCLA to help the scientific community locate, access and preserve particles and fields data from planetary missions. We propose to continue to serve for 5 more years. During the first five years we have served the scientific community by providing them with high quality data products. We worked with missions and individual scientists to secure the highest quality data possible and to thoroughly document it. We validated the data, placed it on long lasting media and made sure it was properly archived for future use. So far we have prepared and archived over 10(exp 11) bytes of data from 26 instruments on 4 spacecraft. We have produced 106 CD-ROMs with peer reviewed data. In so doing, we have developed an efficient system to prepare and archive the data and thereby have been able to steadily increase the rate at which the data are produced. Although we produced a substantial archive during the initial five years, we have an even larger amount of work in progress. This includes preparing CD-ROM data sets with all of the Voyager, Pioneer and Ulysses data at Jupiter and Saturn. We will have the Jupiter data ready for the Galileo encounter in December, 1995. We are also completing the Pioneer Venus data restoration. The Galileo Venus archive and radio science data from Magellan will be prepared early in the next period. We are assisting the Small Bodies Node of PDS in the preparation of comet data and will be archiving the asteroid data from Galileo. We will be moving in several new directions as well. We will archive the PPI Node's first Earth based data with data from the International Jupiter Watch and Hubble data taken in support of Ulysses particles and field observations. We will work with the Cassini mission in archive planning efforts. For the inner planets we will begin an archive of Mars data starting with Phobos data and will support the US and Russian Mars missions in the late 1990's

  8. Operation of the Planetary Plasma Interactions Node of the Planetary Data System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Raymond J.

    1997-01-01

    Five years ago NASA selected the Planetary Plasma Interactions (PPI) Node at UCLA to help the scientific community locate, access and preserve particles and fields data from planetary missions. We propose to continue to serve for 5 more years. During the first five years we have served the scientific community by providing them with high quality data products. We worked with missions and individual scientists to secure the highest quality data possible and to thoroughly document it. We validated the data, placed it on long lasting media and made sure it was properly archived for future use. So far we have prepared and archived over 1011 bytes of data from 26 instruments on 4 spacecraft. We have produced 106 CD-ROMs with peer reviewed data. In so doing, we have developed an efficient system to prepare and archive the data and thereby have been able to steadily increase the rate at which the data are produced. Although we produced a substantial archive during the initial five years, we have an even larger amount of work in progress. This includes preparing CD-ROM data sets with all of the Voyager, Pioneer and Ulysses data at Jupiter and Saturn. We will have the Jupiter data ready for the Galileo encounter in December, 1995. We are also completing the Pioneer Venus data restoration. The Galileo Venus archive and radio science data from Magellan will be prepared early in the next period. We are assisting the Small Bodies Node of PDS in the preparation of comet data and will be archiving the asteroid data from Galileo. We will be moving in several new directions as well. We will archive the PPI Node's first Earth based data with data from the International Jupiter Watch and Hubble data taken in support of Ulysses particles and field observations. We will work with the Cassini mission in archive planning efforts. For the inner planets we will begin an archive of Mars data starting with Phobos data and will support the US and Russian Mars missions in the late 1990's. We

  9. Statistical properties of planetary heavy ion precipitations toward the Martian ionosphere based on Mars Express observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, T.; Seki, K.; Futaana, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Barabash, S.; Fedorov, A. O.; Yagi, M.; Delcourt, D. C.

    2013-09-01

    Picked-up ion precipitations are a potential mechanism to increase an atmospheric escape from the unmagnetized planet of Mars. The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) embedded in the supersonic solar wind is one of the crucial parameters to control the behavior of the Martian planetary heavy ions. We statistically investigated the effects of the IMF orientation on planetary heavy ions precipitating toward the Martian ionosphere by using data obtained from the Ion Mass Analyzer (IMA) onboard the Mars Express (MEX). To compensate for the absence of a magnetometer onboard MEX, we estimated the IMF orientation from the velocity distribution function of exospheric protons observed in the solar wind. The statistical analysis shows that the precipitations of planetary heavy ions tend to be observed in the direction or the anti-parallel direction of the solar wind electric field inferred from the estimated IMF orientation. We defined the IMF polarity for one event via comparisons of the ion velocity distribution function obtained from MEX/IMA observations and a statistical trajectory tracing of test particles. The estimated polarity corresponds to the anti-parallel direction to the solar wind electric field and is consistent with the asymmetrical distribution of planetary heavy ion precipitation in terms of the solar wind electric field derived from the previous numerical simulations. The observed precipitating planetary heavy ions are accelerated only up to a few keV. This feature may reflect the short distance from the picked-up region in the magnetosheath.

  10. On the formation age of the first planetary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, T.; Kunitomo, S.; Shigeyasu, M.; Kajiura, D.

    2008-05-01

    Recently, it has been observed the extreme metal-poor stars in the Galactic halo, which must be formed just after Pop III objects. On the other hand, the first gas clouds of mass 106 M are supposed to be formed at z 10, 20, and 30 for the 1σ, 2σ and 3σ, where the density perturbations are assumed of the standard ΛCDM cosmology. Usually it is approximated that the distribution of the density perturbation amplitudes is gaussian where σ means the standard deviation. If we could apply this gaussian distribution to the extreme small probability, the gas clouds would be formed at z 40, 60, and 80 for the 4σ, 6σ, and 8σ where the probabilities are approximately 3 × 10-5, 10-9, and 10-15. Within our universe, there are almost 1016 ( 1022M/106M) clouds of mass 106M. Then the first gas clouds must be formed around z 80, where the time is 20 Myr ( 13.7/(1 + z)3/2 Gyr). Even within our galaxy, there are 105 ( 1011M/106M) clouds, then the first gas clouds within our galaxy must be formed around z 40, where the time is 54 Myr ( 13.7/(1+z)3/2Gyr). The evolution time for massive star ( 102 M) is 3 Myr and the explosion of the massive supernova distributes the metal within a cloud. The damping time of the supernova shock wave in the adiabatic and isothermal era is several Myr and stars of the second generation (Pop II) are formed within a free fall time 20 Myr. Even if the gas cloud is metal poor, there is a lot of possibility to form the planets around such stars. The first planetary systems could be formed within 6 × 107 years after the Big Bang in the universe. Even in our galaxies, the first planetary systems could be formed within 1.7 × 108 years. If the abundance of heavy elements such as Fe is small compared to the elements of C, N, O, the planets must be the one where the rock fraction is small. It is interesting to wait the observations of planets around metal-poor stars. For the panspermia theory, the origin of life could be expected in such systems.

  11. Theoretical models of planetary system formation. II. Post-formation evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfyffer, S.; Alibert, Y.; Benz, W.; Swoboda, D.

    2015-07-01

    Aims: We extend the results of planetary formation synthesis by computing the long-term evolution of synthetic systems from the clearing of the gas disk into the dynamical evolution phase. Methods: We use the symplectic integrator SyMBA to numerically integrate the orbits of planets for 100 Myr, using populations from previous studies as initial conditions. Results: We show that within the populations studied, mass and semimajor axis distributions experience only minor changes from post-formation evolution. We also show that, depending upon their initial distribution, planetary eccentricities can statistically increase or decrease as a result of gravitational interactions. We find that planetary masses and orbital spacings provided by planet formation models do not result in eccentricity distributions comparable to observed exoplanet eccentricities, requiring other phenomena, such as stellar fly-bys, to account for observed eccentricities.

  12. ARE PLANETARY SYSTEMS FILLED TO CAPACITY? A STUDY BASED ON KEPLER RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Julia; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2013-04-20

    We used a sample of Kepler candidate planets with orbital periods less than 200 days and radii between 1.5 and 30 Earth radii (R{sub Circled-Plus }) to determine the typical dynamical spacing of neighboring planets. To derive the intrinsic (i.e., free of observational bias) dynamical spacing of neighboring planets, we generated populations of planetary systems following various dynamical spacing distributions, subjected them to synthetic observations by the Kepler spacecraft, and compared the properties of observed planets in our simulations with actual Kepler detections. We found that, on average, neighboring planets are spaced 21.7 mutual Hill radii apart with a standard deviation of 9.5. This dynamical spacing distribution is consistent with that of adjacent planets in the solar system. To test the packed planetary systems hypothesis, the idea that all planetary systems are dynamically packed or filled to capacity, we determined the fraction of systems that are dynamically packed by performing long-term (10{sup 8} years) numerical simulations. In each simulation, we integrated a system with planets spaced according to our best-fit dynamical spacing distribution but containing an additional planet on an intermediate orbit. The fraction of simulations exhibiting signs of instability provides an approximate lower bound on the fraction of systems that are dynamically packed; we found that {>=}31%, {>=}35%, and {>=}45% of two-planet, three-planet, and four-planet systems are dynamically packed, respectively. Such sizeable fractions suggest that many planetary systems are indeed filled to capacity. This feature of planetary systems is another profound constraint that formation and evolution models must satisfy.

  13. VLA Reveals a Close Pair of Potential Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-09-01

    in Cambridge, MA. "However, we don't think these solar systems would be able to form outer, icy planets like Uranus and Neptune, because of the small size of the dust disks." The new observations "imply that young protoplanetary disks can contain considerably more mass within (a distance equal to Saturn's orbital radius) than astronomers have been willing to contemplate," wrote Alan P. Boss of the Carnegie Institution of Washington in an accompanying Nature article analyzing the results. If the stars were a few times closer together, the researchers point out, the gravitational effects of both would disrupt the disks and prevent any planets from forming. "If these disks form planetary systems, they would be among the closest possible adjacent sets of planets in the universe," said Rodriguez. Boss suggested that a giant planet formed near the edge of one of the disks might be ejected from the system by the gravitational effect of the companion star. This, he says, might explain the possible "runaway planet" shown in a Hubble Space Telescope image released in May. In that result, a planet appears to have been ejected by a binary-star system similar in size to that seen by the VLA. Further observations are required to confirm that result. In addition to Rodriguez and Wilner, the researchers are Paola D'Alessio, Salvador Curiel, Yolanda Gomez, Susana Lizano, Jorge Canto, and Alejandro C. Raga of the National Autonomous University in Mexico City; Paul Ho of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; Jose M. Torrelles of the Astrophysical Institute of Andalucia in Spain; and Alan Pedlar of the Jodrell Bank observatory in Britain. The observations of the double-star system were made at a radio wavelength of 7 millimeters, a wavelength at which emission from cosmic dust is readily detected. Astronomers long realized that the VLA had sufficient resolving power - the ability to see fine detail - to make images of the dust disks around young stars that form the building

  14. Formation, Orbital and Internal Evolutions of Young Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruteau, Clément; Bai, Xuening; Mordasini, Christoph; Mollière, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The growing body of observational data on extrasolar planets and protoplanetary disks has stimulated intense research on planet formation and evolution in the past few years. The extremely diverse, sometimes unexpected physical and orbital characteristics of exoplanets lead to frequent updates on the mainstream scenarios for planet formation and evolution, but also to the exploration of alternative avenues. The aim of this review is to bring together classical pictures and new ideas on the formation, orbital and internal evolutions of planets, highlighting the key role of the protoplanetary disk in the various parts of the theory. We begin by briefly reviewing the conventional mechanism of core accretion by the growth of planetesimals, and discuss a relatively recent model of core growth through the accretion of pebbles. We review the basic physics of planet-disk interactions, recent progress in this area, and discuss their role in observed planetary systems. We address the most important effects of planets internal evolution, like cooling and contraction, the mass-luminosity relation, and the bulk composition expressed in the mass-radius and mass-mean density relations.

  15. Exploring Links Between Orbital Dynamics and Atmospheres in Kepler M Dwarf Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    The Solar System furnishes the most familiar planetary architecture: many planets, orbiting nearly coplanar to one another. However, the most common planetary systems in the Milky Way orbit much smaller M dwarf stars, and these may present a very different blueprint. The Kepler data set has furnished more than 100 exoplanets orbiting stars half the mass of the sun and smaller. Half of these planets reside in systems with at least one additional planet. The data much prefer a model with two distinct modes of planet formation around M dwarfs, which occur in roughly equal measure. One mode is one very similar to the Solar System in terms of multiplicity and coplanarity, and the other is very dissimilar. Given this so-called "Kepler Dichotomy," we examine the broadband transmission spectra (with data from Kepler and hundreds of hours of Spitzer observations) of dozens of M dwarf planets: half of which reside in one type of planetary system, and half in the other. Although the data set is too small and the observational uncertainty too large to characterize any one system alone, we examine ensemble trends between planetary dynamics and atmospheric content.

  16. PLANETARY MIGRATION AND ECCENTRICITY AND INCLINATION RESONANCES IN EXTRASOLAR PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Man Hoi; Thommes, Edward W. E-mail: ethommes@physics.uoguelph.ca

    2009-09-10

    The differential migration of two planets due to planet-disk interaction can result in capture into the 2:1 eccentricity-type mean-motion resonances. Both the sequence of 2:1 eccentricity resonances that the system is driven through by continued migration and the possibility of a subsequent capture into the 4:2 inclination resonances are sensitive to the migration rate within the range expected for type II migration due to planet-disk interaction. If the migration rate is fast, the resonant pair can evolve into a family of 2:1 eccentricity resonances different from those found by Lee. This new family has outer orbital eccentricity e {sub 2} {approx}> 0.4-0.5, asymmetric librations of both eccentricity resonance variables, and orbits that intersect if they are exactly coplanar. Although this family exists for an inner-to-outer planet mass ratio m {sub 1}/m {sub 2} {approx}> 0.2, it is possible to evolve into this family by fast migration only for m {sub 1}/m {sub 2} {approx}> 2. Thommes and Lissauer have found that a capture into the 4:2 inclination resonances is possible only for m {sub 1}/m {sub 2} {approx}< 2. We show that this capture is also possible for m {sub 1}/m {sub 2} {approx}> 2 if the migration rate is slightly slower than that adopted by Thommes and Lissauer. There is significant theoretical uncertainty in both the sign and the magnitude of the net effect of planet-disk interaction on the orbital eccentricity of a planet. If the eccentricity is damped on a timescale comparable to or shorter than the migration timescale, e {sub 2} may not be able to reach the values needed to enter either the new 2:1 eccentricity resonances or the 4:2 inclination resonances. Thus, if future observations of extrasolar planetary systems were to reveal certain combinations of mass ratio and resonant configuration, they would place a constraint on the strength of eccentricity damping during migration, as well as on the rate of the migration itself.

  17. Voyager energetic particle observations at interplanetary shocks and upstream of planetary bow shocks - 1977-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimigis, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    The Voyager 1 and 2 vehicles include instrumentation that makes comprehensive electron and ion measurements in several energy channels with good energy, temporal, and compositional resolution. Data gathered from 1977 to 1988, including observations downstream and upstream of four planetary bow shocks (earth, Saturn, Uranus, Jupiter) and numerous interplanetary shocks to about 30 AU, are analyzed in the context of the Fermi and shock drift acceleration models. Overall results indicate that electrons and ions observed upstream of planetary bow shocks have their source inside the parent magnetosphere, with first order Fermi acceleration playing a secondary role at best.

  18. ON THE HABITABLE ZONES OF CIRCUMBINARY PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Stephen R.; Hinkel, Natalie R.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the stellar flux on exoplanetary systems is becoming an increasingly important property as more planets are discovered in the habitable zone (HZ). The Kepler mission has recently uncovered circumbinary planets with relatively complex HZs due to the combined flux from the binary host stars. Here, we derive HZ boundaries for circumbinary systems and show their dependence on the stellar masses, separation, and time while accounting for binary orbital motion and the orbit of the planet. We include stability regimes for planetary orbits in binary systems with respect to the HZ. These methods are applied to several of the known circumbinary planetary systems such as Kepler-16, 34, 35, and 47. We also quantitatively show the circumstances under which single-star approximations break down for HZ calculations.

  19. Planetary observations at a wavelength of 1. 32 mm

    SciTech Connect

    Ulich, B.L.; Dickel, J.R.; De Pater, I.

    1984-12-01

    Observations at a wavelength of 1.32 mm have been made of the Jovian planets, Ceres, the satellites Callisto and Ganymede, and the HII region DR 21. The observed brightness temperatures are presented. Those of the Jovian planets agree with the values expected from model atmosphere calculations, except that of Jupiter, which is lower than expected. Ceres and the satellites do not have atmospheres so their emission arised in their subsurface layers. The observed brightness temperatures are intermediate between those measured at infrared and centimeter wavelengths. 30 references.

  20. Planetary-scale variability in the low-latitude E region field-aligned irregularities: First results from Gadanki observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phanikumar, D. V.; Patra, A. K.; Ratnam, M. V.; Sripathi, S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present for the first time planetary-scale wave signatures in the low-latitude E region field-aligned irregularities (FAI) observed during June 2004 to May 2005 using the Gadanki mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere radar. We have observed a clear signature of 5-8 day variability in echo occurrence, in SNR, and also in Doppler velocity observed above 100 km. Concurrent temperature observations made using the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) on board the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetic and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite have also clearly shown the presence of 5-8 day variability similar to that of FAI. The temperature variations have been characterized with zonal wave numbers of 3 and 4 and vertical wavelength of 15-20 km. These waves are found to have increasing amplitude with increasing height and phase progressing downward, suggesting that they were of lower atmospheric origin. It is emphasized that the planetary-scale characteristics of neutral atmosphere in the FAI observations are important in understanding the vertical coupling of the low-latitude ionosphere-atmosphere system. These observations and the pertinent issues are discussed in the light of current understanding of the planetary-scale role on the FAI variability.

  1. Planetary systems and real planetary nebulae from planet destruction near white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bear, Ealeal; Soker, Noam

    2015-07-01

    We suggest that tidal destruction of Earth-like and icy planets near a white dwarf (WD) might lead to the formation of one or more low-mass - Earth-like and lighter - planets in tight orbits around the WD. The formation of the new WD planetary system starts with a tidal breakup of the parent planet to planetesimals near the tidal radius of about 1 R⊙. Internal stress forces keep the planetesimal from further tidal breakup when their radius is less than about 100 km. We speculate that the planetesimals then bind together to form new sub-Earth daughter-planets at a few solar radii around the WD. More massive planets that contain hydrogen supply the WD with fresh nuclear fuel to reincarnate its stellar-giant phase. Some of the hydrogen will be inflated in a large envelope. The envelope blows a wind to form a nebula that is later (after the entire envelope is lost) ionized by the hot WD. We term this glowing ionized nebula that originated from a planet a real planetary nebula (RPN). This preliminary study of daughter-planets from a planet and the RPN scenarios are of speculative nature. More detailed studies must follow to establish whether the suggested scenarios can indeed take place.

  2. Review of methodology and technology available for the detection of extrasolar planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarter, J. C.; Black, D. C.; Billingham, J.

    1986-01-01

    Anyone undertaking an interstellar voyage might wish to be assured of the existence of a safe planetary harbor at the other end! Aside from the obvious interest of the participants in this Symposium, astronomers and astrophysicists are also eager to detect and study other planetary systems in order to better understand the formation of our own Solar System. Scientists involved in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence argue that planets suitable for the evolution of life may abound elsewhere within our own Milky Way Galaxy. On theoretical grounds, they are probably correct, but they lack any observational support. For in spite of decades of claimed astrometric detections of planetary companions and the recent exciting and tantalizing observations from the IRAS satellite and the IR speckle observations of Van Biesbroeck 8 and other cool stars, there is no unambiguous proof for the existence of another planetary system beyond our own. In this paper we review the various methods for detecting extrasolar planets and briefly describe the Earth and space based technology currently available and discuss the near-term plans to implement these different search techniques. In each case an attempt is made to identify the limiting source of systematic error inherent to the methodology and to assess the potential for technological improvements.

  3. Long-term stability of the HR 8799 planetary system without resonant lock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götberg, Ylva; Davies, Melvyn B.; Mustill, Alexander J.; Johansen, Anders; Church, Ross P.

    2016-08-01

    HR 8799 is a star accompanied by four massive planets on wide orbits. The observed planetary configuration has been shown to be unstable on a timescale much shorter than the estimated age of the system (~30 Myr) unless the planets are locked into mean motion resonances. This condition is characterised by small-amplitude libration of one or more resonant angles that stabilise the system by preventing close encounters. We simulate planetary systems similar to the HR 8799 planetary system, exploring the parameter space in separation between the orbits, planetary masses and distance from the Sun to the star. We find systems that look like HR 8799 and remain stable for longer than the estimated age of HR 8799. None of our systems are forced into resonances. We find, with nominal masses (Mb = 5 MJup and Mc,d,e = 7 MJup) and in a narrow range of orbit separations, that 5 of 100 systems match the observations and lifetime. Considering a broad range of orbit separations, we find 12 of 900 similar systems. The systems survive significantly longer because of their slightly increased initial orbit separations compared to assuming circular orbits from the observed positions. A small increase in separation leads to a significant increase in survival time. The low eccentricity the orbits develop from gravitational interaction is enough for the planets to match the observations. With lower masses, but still comfortably within the estimated planet mass uncertainty, we find 18 of 100 matching and long-lived systems in a narrow orbital separation range. In the broad separation range, we find 82 of 900 matching systems. Our results imply that the planets in the HR 8799 system do not have to be in strong mean motion resonances. We also investigate the future of wide-orbit planetary systems using our HR 8799 analogues. We find that 80% of the systems have two planets left after strong planet-planet scattering and these are on eccentric orbits with semi-major axes of a1 ~ 10 AU and a2

  4. New Ideas in Orreries and Planetary System Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Alan

    2008-05-01

    The NASA Kepler EPO team has created models and simulations of planetary systems (orreries) to use in demonstrating the transit technique of finding exoplanets. The first successful orrery, consisting of a 3-planet orrery with an electric lamp (model star) at the center, and a Vernier light sensor system connected to a laptop computer with real-time graphing software, was first on display at the Kepler booth in a 2006 AAS conference. That system was extended to a 4-planet model (one planet with a moon as well) and has been on display at many astronomy and teacher education conferences in the past few years. Construction of duplicate models costs about $60 for LEGO parts, plus $100 or so for light sensor hardware and software. The LEGO orrery effort stemmed from successful work in creating a large museum-grade orrery that was used in the Planet-Finding portion of the "Alien Earths" exhibit, a collaboration of Space Science Institute, NSF, NASA Kepler mission EPO and other NASA EPO groups. Replication of that model would cost in the neighborhood of $25,000. In recent months, Kepler EPO has worked on design of a more rudimentary, inexpensive orrery made of cardboard, paper plates, wine corks, and rubber bands. Work is also underway on a new plastic-geared orrery for use in classrooms with a Full Option Science System (FOSS) Planetary Science Unit for middle school. This presentation relays results and status of these new developments in planetary model systems.

  5. New Ideas in Orreries and Planetary System Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, A.; Koch, D.; Devore, E.; Harman, P.

    2008-11-01

    The NASA Kepler EPO team has created models and simulations of planetary systems (orreries) to use in demonstrating the transit technique of finding exoplanets. The first successful orrery, consisting of a three-planet orrery with an electric lamp (model star) at the center, and a Vernier light sensor system connected to a laptop computer with real-time graphing software, was first on display at the Kepler booth at the 2006 AAS conference. That system was extended to a four-planet model (one planet with a moon as well) and has been on display at many astronomy and teacher education conferences in the past few years. Construction of duplicate models costs about 60 for LEGO parts, plus 100 or so for light sensor hardware and software. The LEGO orrery effort stemmed from successful work in creating a large museum-grade orrery that was used in the Planet-Finding portion of the ``Alien Earths'' exhibit, a collaboration of Space Science Institute, NSF, NASA Kepler mission EPO and other NASA EPO groups. Replication of that model would cost in the neighborhood of $25,000. In recent months, Kepler EPO has worked on design of a more rudimentary, inexpensive orrery made of cardboard, paper plates, wine corks, and rubber bands. Work is also underway on a new plastic-geared orrery for use in classrooms with a Full Option Science System (FOSS) Planetary Science Unit for middle school. This presentation relays results and status of these new developments in planetary model systems.

  6. Building massive, tightly packed planetary systems by in-situ accretion of pebbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, John; Fischer, Debra

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of mass in planetary systems is one of the most important constraints available for understanding the process of planet formation. One particularly interesting observation is the large number of super-Earth sized planets in short period orbits and tightly packed systems. The amount of mass in these systems is about ten times what would be expected if they had surface density disributions similar to the solar system (i.e. the minimum mass solar nebula) extrapolated inwards of half an AU. This observation raises the question: how and when did all that mass get there? In this work we explore the idea that the radial drift and eventual accretion of small, centimeter sized pebbles leads to massive inner planetary systems.

  7. Uranus occults SAO158687. [stellar occultation and planetary parametric observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.; Veverka, J.; Millis, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Experience gained in obtaining atmospheric parameters, oblatenesses, and diameters of Jupiter and Mars from recent stellar occultations by these planets is used to predict what can be learned from the March 1977 occultation of the star SAO158687 by Uranus. The spectra of this star and Uranus are compared to indicate the relative instrument intensities of the two objects, the four passbands where the relative intensities are most nearly equal are listed, and expected photon fluxes from the star are computed on the assumption that it has UBVRI colors appropriate for a K5 main-sequence object. It is shown that low photon noise errors can be achieved by choosing appropriate passbands for observation, and the rms error expected for the Uranus temperature profiles obtained from the occultation light curves is calculated. It is suggested that observers of this occultation should record their data digitally for optimum time resolution.

  8. Planetary camera observations of the central parsec of M32

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, Tod R.; Faber, S. M.; Currie, Douglas G.; Ewald, S. P.; Groth, Edward J.; Hester, J. J.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Light, Robert M.; O'Neil, Earl J., Jr.; Shaya, Edward J.

    1992-01-01

    New HST observations are reported which show that the M32 nucleus is extremely dense, with rho0 not less than 4 x 10 exp 6 solar masses/cu pc if M32 has a core with rc not greater than 0.37 pc, and rho0 greater than 3 x 10 exp 7 solar masses/cu pc if it instead has a central r exp -1/2 cusp. Limits on the M32 core radius are nearly three times smaller, and those on the central density at least four times greater, than values inferred from the best ground-based observations. A central relaxation that is almost an order of magnitude shorter than previous estimates is inferred from the new core parameters; a shorter stellar collision time is also inferred. It is argued that a starlight cusp surrounds the central black hole.

  9. Diagrams of stability of circumbinary planetary systems (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E.

    2015-08-01

    The stability diagrams in the "pericentric distance - eccentricity" plane of initial data are built and analysed for Kepler-38, Kepler-47, and PH1. This completes a survey of stability of the known up to now circumbinary planetary systems, initiated by Popova and Shevchenko (ApJ, 769, 152, 2013), where the analysis was performed for Kepler-16, 34, and 35. In the diagrams, the planets appear to be "embedded" in the fractal chaos border; however, I make an attempt to measure the "distance" to the chaos border in a physically consistent way. The obtained distances are compared to those given by the widely used numerical-experimental criterion by Holman and Wiegert (1999), who employed smooth polynomial approximations to describe the border. I identify the resonance cells, hosting the planets. Results of this study will appear in Proceedings of IAU Symposium 310 "Complex planetary systems".

  10. Vibration in Planetary Gear Systems with Unequal Planet Stiffnesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frater, J. L.; August, R.; Oswald, F. B.

    1982-01-01

    An algorithm suitable for a minicomputer was developed for finding the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a planetary gear system which has unequal stiffnesses between the Sun/planet and planet/ring gear meshes. Mode shapes are represented in the form of graphical computer output that illustrates the lateral and rotational motion of the three coaxial gears and the planet gears. This procedure permits the analysis of gear trains utilizing nonuniform mesh conditions and user specified masses, stiffnesses, and boundary conditions. Numerical integration of the equations of motion for planetary gear systems indicates that this algorithm offers an efficient means of predicting operating speeds which may result in high dynamic tooth loads.

  11. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  12. The observational basis for JPL's DE 200, the planetary ephemerides of the Astronomical Almanac

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standish, E. M., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This paper documents the planetary observational data used in a series of ephemerides produced at JPL over six years preceding the creation of DE118/LE62, the set which transformed directly into the JD2000-based set, DE200/LE200. Details of the data reduction procedures are presented, and techniques to overcome the uncertainties due to planetary topography are described. For the spacecraft data, the basic reductions are augmented by formulations for locating the transponder, whether in orbit or landed on the surface of a planet.

  13. Constraints on common envelope magnetic fields from observations of jets in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tocknell, James; De Marco, Orsola; Wardle, Mark

    2014-04-01

    The common envelope (CE) interaction describes the swallowing of a nearby companion by a growing, evolving star. CEs that take place during the asymptotic giant branch phase of the primary may lead to the formation of a planetary nebula (PN) with a post-CE close binary in the middle. We have used published observations of masses and kinematics of jets in four post-CE PN to infer physical characteristics of the CE interaction. In three of the four systems studied, Abell 63, ETHOS 1 and the Necklace PN, the kinematics indicate that the jets were launched a few thousand years before the CE and we favour a scenario where this happened before Roche lobe overflow, although better models of wind accretion and wind Roche lobe overflow are needed. The magnetic fields inferred to launch pre-CE jets are of the order of a few gauss. In the fourth case, NGC 6778, the kinematics indicate that the jets were launched about 3000 yr after the CE interaction. Magnetic fields of the order of a few hundreds to a few thousands gauss are inferred in this case, approximately in line with predictions of post-CE magnetic fields. However, we remark that in the case of this system, we have not been able to find a reasonable scenario for the formation of the two jet pairs observed: the small orbital separation may preclude the formation of even one accretion disc able to supply the necessary accretion rate to cause the observed jets.

  14. A Planetary Park system for the Moon and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockell, Charles; Horneck, Gerda

    Deutschland International space exploration programs foresee the establishment of human settlements on the Moon and on Mars within the next decades, following a series of robotic precursor missions. These increasing robotic visits and eventual human exploration and settlements may have an environmental impact on scientifically important sites and sites of natural beauty in the form of contamination with microorganisms and spacecraft parts, or even pollution as a consequence of in situ resource use. This concern has already been reflected in the Moon Treaty, "The Agreement Governing the Activities of States on the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies" of the United Nations, which follows the Outer Space Treaty of the UN. However, so far, the Moon Treaty has not been ratified by any nation which engages in human space programs or has plans to do so. Planetary protection guidelines as formulated by the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) are based on the Outer Space Treaty and follow the objectives: (i) to prevent contamination by terrestrial microorganisms if this might jeopardize scientific investi-gations of possible extraterrestrial life forms, and (ii) to protect the Earth from the potential hazard posed by extraterrestrial material brought back to the Earth. As a consequence, they group exploratory missions according to the type of mission and target body in five different categories, requesting specific means of cleaning and sterilization. However, the protection of extraterrestrial environments might also encompass ethical and other non-instrumental reasons. In order to allow intense scientific research and exploitation, and on the other hand to preserve regions of the Moon for research and use by future generations, we proposed the introduction of a planetary (or lunar) park system, which would protect areas of scientific, historic and intrinsic value under a common scheme. A similar placePlaceNamePlanetary PlaceTypePark system could be established on Mars well

  15. Solar system exploration from the Moon: Synoptic and comparative study of bodies in our Planetary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruston, P.; Mumma, M. J.

    1994-06-01

    An observational approach to Planetary Sciences and exploration from Earth applies to a quite limited number of targets, but most of these are spatially complex, and exhibit variability and evolution on a number of temporal scales which lie within the scope of possible observations. Advancing our understanding of the underlying physics requires the study of interactions between the various elements of such systems, and also requires study of the comparative response of both a given object to various conditions and of comparable objects to similar conditions. These studies are best conducted in 'campaigns', i.e. comprehensive programs combining simultaneous coherent observations of every interacting piece of the puzzle. The requirements include both imaging and spectroscopy over a wide spectral range, from UV to IR. While temporal simultaneity of operation in various modes is a key feature, these observations are also conducted over extended periods of time. The moon is a prime site offering long unbroken observation times and high positional stability, observations at small angular separation from the sun, comparative studies of planet Earth, and valuable technical advantages. A lunar observatory should become a central piece of any coherent set of planetary missions, supplying in-situ explorations with the synoptic and comparative data necessary for proper advance planning, correlative observations during the active exploratory phase, and follow-up studies of the target body or of related objects.

  16. Solar system exploration from the Moon: Synoptic and comparative study of bodies in our Planetary system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruston, P.; Mumma, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    An observational approach to Planetary Sciences and exploration from Earth applies to a quite limited number of targets, but most of these are spatially complex, and exhibit variability and evolution on a number of temporal scales which lie within the scope of possible observations. Advancing our understanding of the underlying physics requires the study of interactions between the various elements of such systems, and also requires study of the comparative response of both a given object to various conditions and of comparable objects to similar conditions. These studies are best conducted in 'campaigns', i.e. comprehensive programs combining simultaneous coherent observations of every interacting piece of the puzzle. The requirements include both imaging and spectroscopy over a wide spectral range, from UV to IR. While temporal simultaneity of operation in various modes is a key feature, these observations are also conducted over extended periods of time. The moon is a prime site offering long unbroken observation times and high positional stability, observations at small angular separation from the sun, comparative studies of planet Earth, and valuable technical advantages. A lunar observatory should become a central piece of any coherent set of planetary missions, supplying in-situ explorations with the synoptic and comparative data necessary for proper advance planning, correlative observations during the active exploratory phase, and follow-up studies of the target body or of related objects.

  17. POSSIBLE TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS OF THE TrES-3 PLANETARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Ing-Guey; Wu, Yu-Ting; Chien, Ping; Lin, Yi-Ling; Chen, Hong-Yu; Hu, Juei-Hwa; Yeh, Li-Chin; Thakur, Parijat; Sun Zhao; Ji Jianghui

    2013-03-15

    Five newly observed transit light curves of the TrES-3 planetary system are presented. Together with other light-curve data from the literature, 23 transit light curves in total, which cover an overall timescale of 911 epochs, have been analyzed through a standard procedure. From these observational data, the system's orbital parameters are determined and possible transit timing variations (TTVs) are investigated. Given that a null TTV produces a fit with reduced {chi}{sup 2} = 1.52, our results agree with previous work, that TTVs might not exist in these data. However, a one-frequency oscillating TTV model, giving a fit with a reduced {chi}{sup 2} = 0.93, does possess a statistically higher probability. It is thus concluded that future observations and dynamical simulations for this planetary system will be very important.

  18. The Pluto System in the Context of Planetary Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA New Horizons mission will conduct a 6-month long reconnaissance flyby of the Pluto system from January to July 2015. In this presentation, I will set the scientific context for the mission by summarizing the revolution in planetary science brought about by the Kuiper Belt, then summarize the key science objectives of the mission, and the briefly review the payload capabilities aboard New Horizons to carry out these objetives. I will close with an overview of the encoutner timeline.

  19. Adaptive optics for directly imaging planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Vanessa Perry

    In this dissertation I present the results from five papers (including one in preparation) on giant planets, brown dwarfs, and their environments, as well as on the commissioning and optimization of the Adaptive Optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer. The first three Chapters cover direct imaging results on several distantly-orbiting planets and brown dwarf companions. The boundary between giant planets and brown dwarf companions in wide orbits is a blurry one. In Chapter 2, I use 3--5 mum imaging of several brown dwarf companions, combined with mid-infrared photometry for each system to constrain the circum-substellar disks around the brown dwarfs. I then use this information to discuss limits on scattering events versus in situ formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, I present results from an adaptive optics imaging survey for giant planets, where the target stars were selected based on the properties of their circumstellar debris disks. Specifically, we targeted systems with debris disks whose SEDs indicated gaps, clearings, or truncations; these features may possibly be sculpted by planets. I discuss in detail one planet-mass companion discovered as part of this survey, HD 106906 b. At a projected separation of 650 AU and weighing in at 11 Jupiter masses, a companion such as this is not a common outcome of any planet or binary star formation model. In the remaining three Chapters, I discuss pre-commissioning, on-sky results, and planned work on the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer Adaptive Optics system. Before construction of the LBT AO system was complete, I tested a prototype of LBTI's pyramid wavefront sensor unit at the MMT with synthetically-generated calibration files. I present the methodology and MMT on-sky tests in Chapter 5. In Chapter 6, I present the commissioned performance of LBTIAO. Optical imperfections within LBTI limited the quality of the science images, and I describe a simple method to use the adaptive optics system

  20. Multiple transiting extrasolar planetary systems - follow-up and Kepler discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pál, A.; Borkovits, T.; Szakáts, R.

    2011-10-01

    In this work we present a method that can be used as a tool for investigating such planetary systems in the framework of classic regression analysis. The base of the method is the employment of the Lie-integration method [3] that provides the solution of the differential equations (that describe the interacting planetary dynamics) in the form of power series and therefore provides a way to exploit the properties of the integrator for further analytical computations, such as error propagation calculations. This analytical description is rather relevant in the cases of not-so-well constrained orbital elements (for instance, mutual inclination): letting these parameters be varied might yield an unexpectedly high correlation that affects badly the otherwise efficient alternative methods, such as Monte- Carlo estimations. This analytical treatment aids us to perform almost any kind of regression analysis method as simple as it would be in case of well-known and or other well-behaved functions. Based on previously developed methods for similar types of analysis of radial velocity variations in multiple planetary systems [4], we present further possible applications discussing the above mentioned aspects of multiple transiting planetary systems. These applications include creating observation strategies for follow-up of Kepler discoveries after the mission, adaptive observation scheduling focusing on the more effective refinement of selected orbital parameters and of course, precise and accurate estimation of masses, orbital elements and their respective uncertainties.

  1. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.

    2011-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction: the allure of ringed planets; 2. Studies of planetary rings 1610-2004; 3. Diversity of planetary rings; 4. Individual ring particles and their collisions; 5. Large-scale ring evolution; 6. Moons confine and sculpt rings; 7. Explaining ring phenomena; 8. N-Body simulations; 9. Stochastic models; 10. Age and evolution of rings; 11. Saturn's mysterious F ring; 12. Neptune's partial rings; 13. Jupiter's ring-moon system after Galileo; 14. Ring photometry; 15. Dusty rings; 16. Cassini observations; 17. Summary: the big questions; Glossary; References; Index.

  2. The Imaging Node for the Planetary Data System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliason, Eric M.; LaVoie, Susan K.; Soderblom, Laurence A.

    1996-01-01

    The Planetary Data System Imaging Node maintains and distributes the archives of planetary image data acquired from NASA's flight projects with the primary goal of enabling the science community to perform image processing and analysis on the data. The Node provides direct and easy access to the digital image archives through wide distribution of the data on CD-ROM media and on-line remote-access tools by way of Internet services. The Node provides digital image processing tools and the expertise and guidance necessary to understand the image collections. The data collections, now approaching one terabyte in volume, provide a foundation for remote sensing studies for virtually all the planetary systems in our solar system (except for Pluto). The Node is responsible for restoring data sets from past missions in danger of being lost. The Node works with active flight projects to assist in the creation of their archive products and to ensure that their products and data catalogs become an integral part of the Node's data collections.

  3. Birth of an Unusual Planetary System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This artist's animation shows a brown dwarf surrounded by a swirling disc of planet-building dust. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope spotted such a disc around a surprisingly low-mass brown dwarf, or 'failed star.' The brown dwarf, called OTS 44, is only 15 times the size of Jupiter, making it the smallest brown dwarf known to host a planet-forming, or protoplanetary disc.

    Astronomers believe that this unusual system will eventually spawn planets. If so, they speculate that OTS 44's disc has enough mass to make one small gas giant and a few Earth-sized rocky planets.

    OTS 44 is about 2 million years old. At this relatively young age, brown dwarfs are warm and appear reddish in color. With age, they grow cooler and darker.

  4. Demonstration of imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) performance for planetary and geostationary Earth observing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revercomb, Henry E.; Sromovsky, Lawrence A.; Fry, Patrick M.; Best, Fred A.; LaPorte, Daniel D.

    2001-02-01

    The combination of massively parallel spatial sampling and accurate spectral radiometry offered by imaging FTS makes it extremely attractive for earth and planetary remote sensing. We constructed a breadboard instrument to help assess the potential for planetary applications of small imaging FTS instruments in the 1-5 micrometers range. The results also support definition of the NASA Geostationary Imaging FTS instrument that will make key meteorological and climate observations from geostationary earth orbit. The PIFTS pivoting voice- coil delay scan mechanism, and laser diode metrology system. The interferometer optical output is measured by a commercial IR camera procured from Santa Barbara Focal plane. It uses an InSb 128 by 128 detector array that covers the entire FOV of the instrument when coupled with a 25-mm focal length commercial camera lens. With appropriate lenses and cold filters the instrument can be used from the visible to 5 micrometers . The delay scan is continuos, but slow, covering the maximum range of +/- 0.4 cm in 37.56 sec at a rate of 500 image frames per second. Image exposures are timed to be centered around predicted zero crossings. The design allows for prediction algorithms that account for the most recent fringe rate so that timing jitter produced by scan speed variations can be minimized. Response to a fixed source is linear with exposure time nearly to the point of saturation. Linearity with respect to input variations was demonstrated to within 0.16 percent using a 3-point blackbody calibration. Imaging of external complex scenes was carried out at low and high spectral resolution. These require full complex calibration to remove background contributions that vary dramatically over the instrument FOV. Testing is continuing to demonstrate the precise radiometric accuracy and noise characteristics.

  5. Planetary radio astronomy observations from Voyager-2 near Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.; Evans, D. R.; Romig, J. H.; Alexander, J. K.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Aubier, M.; Leblanc, Y.; Lecacheux, A.; Pedersen, B. M.

    1981-01-01

    Voyager-2 planetry radio astronomy measurements obtained near Saturn are discussed. They indicate that Saturnian kilometric radiation is emitted by a strong, dayside source at auroral latitudes in the northern hemisphere and by a weaker (by more than an order of magnitude) source at complementary latitudes in the southern hemisphere. These emissions are variable both due to Saturn's rotation and, on longer time scales, probably due to influences of the solar wind and the satellite Dione. The Saturn electrostatic discharge bursts first discovered by Voyager-1 and attributed to emissions from the B-ring were again observed with the same broadband spectral properties and a 10(h)11(m) + or - 5(m) episodic recurrence period but with an occurrence frequency of only of about 30 percent of that detected with Voyager-1. During the crossing of the ring plane at a distance of 2.88 R sub S, an intense noise event is interpreted to be consequence of the impact/vaporization/ionization of charged micron-size G-ring particles distributed over a total vertical thickness of about 1500 km.

  6. Radial Velocity Detection of Extra-Solar Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.

    2004-01-01

    This NASA Origins Program grant supported four closely related research programs at The University of Texas at Austin: 1) The McDonald Observatory Planetary Search (MOPS) Program, using the McDonald Observatory 2.7m Harlan Smith telescope and its 2dcoude spectrometer, 2) A high-precision radial-velocity survey of Hyades dwarfs, using the Keck telescope and its HIRES spectrograph, 3) A program at McDonald Observatory to obtain spectra of the parent stars of planetary systems at R = 210,000, and 4) the start of high precision radial velocity surveys using the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The most important results from NASA support of these research programs are described. A list of all papers published under support of this grant is included at the end.

  7. Radial Velocity Detection of Extra-Solar Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.

    2004-01-01

    This NASA Origins Program grant supported four closely related research programs at The University of Texas at Austin: 1) The McDonald Observatory Planetary Search (MOPS) Program, using the McDonald Observatory 2.7m Harlan Smith telescope and its 2dcoud6 spectrometer, 2) A high-precision radial-velocity survey of Hyades dwarfs, using the Keck telescope and its HIRES spectrograph, 3) A program at McDonald Observatory to obtain spectra of the parent stars of planetary systems at R = 210,000, and 4) the start of high precision radial velocity surveys using the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The most important results from NASA support of these research programs are described below. A list of all papers published under support of this grant is included at the end.

  8. PDS4 - Positioning the Planetary Data System for the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, J. Steven; Beebe, Reta; Crichton, Daniel J.; Morgan, Tom

    The Planetary Data System (PDS) has just released PDS4, a modernization of the PDS architecture, data standards, and technical infrastructure. This next generation system positions the PDS to meet the demands of the coming decade, including big data, international cooperation, distributed nodes, and multiple ways of analysing and interpreting data. It also addresses three fundamental project goals: providing more efficient data delivery by data providers to the PDS, enabling a stable, long-term usable planetary science data archive, and enabling services for the data consumer to find, access, and use the data they require in contemporary data formats. The PDS is an active partner in the International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA), working with space agencies around the world to collaborate and share instruments and scientific data results. The IPDA has had a significant role in developing PDS4 and is promoting the standards and infrastructure toward a world-wide archive. PDS4 is a modern operational system resulting from the application of a lifecycle developed for model-driven software systems for science and is being used to coordinate the science communities. An information model formalizes the system’s information requirements and allows significant but controlled evolution of the system as the science domains and implementation technologies change. PDS4 will provide a scientific research asset that allows current and future users to re-analyse the data within new contexts. PDS4 is being used in the early phases of several missions to ensure they have adequate tools and that the system streamlines the preparation and delivery of data to the PDS. Data services are also under development to help in searching, accessing, and using data in formats and structures that will enhance the ability of researchers to perform analysis in cost-constrained environments. This presentation will cover the PDS4 project, system architecture, and its current status as a

  9. SPICE: A Geometry Information System Supporting Planetary Mapping, Remote Sensing and Data Mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, C.; Bachman, N.; Semenov, B.; Wright, E.

    2013-01-01

    SPICE is an information system providing space scientists ready access to a wide assortment of space geometry useful in planning science observations and analyzing the instrument data returned therefrom. The system includes software used to compute many derived parameters such as altitude, LAT/LON and lighting angles, and software able to find when user-specified geometric conditions are obtained. While not a formal standard, it has achieved widespread use in the worldwide planetary science community

  10. Tracking Advanced Planetary Systems (TAPAS) with HARPS-N . I. A multiple planetary system around the red giant star TYC 1422-614-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielski, A.; Villaver, E.; Wolszczan, A.; Adamów, M.; Kowalik, K.; Maciejewski, G.; Nowak, G.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Deka, B.; Adamczyk, M.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Stars that have evolved off the main sequence are crucial for expanding the frontiers of knowledge on exoplanets toward higher stellar masses and for constraining star-planet interaction mechanisms. These stars have an intrinsic activity, however, which complicates the interpretation of precise radial velocity (RV) measurements, and therefore they are often avoided in planet searches. Over the past ten years, we have monitored about 1000 evolved stars for RV variations in search for low-mass companions under the Penn State - Toruń Centre for Astronomy Planet Search program with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. Selected prospective candidates that required higher RV precision measurements have been followed with HARPS-N at the 3.6 m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Aims: We aim to detect planetary systems around evolved stars, to be able to build sound statistics on the frequency and intrinsic nature of these systems, and to deliver in-depth studies of selected planetary systems with evidence of star-planet interaction processes. Methods: We obtained 69 epochs of precise RV measurements for TYC 1422-614-1 collected over 3651 days with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, and 17 epochs of ultra-precise HARPS-N data collected over 408 days. We complemented these RV data with photometric time-series from the All Sky Automatic Survey archive. Results: We report the discovery of a multiple planetary system around the evolved K2 giant star TYC 1422-614-1. The system orbiting the 1.15 M⊙ star is composed of a planet with mass msini = 2.5 MJ in a 0.69 AU orbit, and a planet or brown dwarf with msini = 10 MJ in an orbit of 1.37 AU. The multiple planetary system orbiting TYC 1422-614-1 is the first finding of the TAPAS project, a HARPS-N monitoring of evolved planetary systems identified with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University

  11. Observational Studies of the Clearing Phase in Proto-Planetary Disks Surrounding Intermediate Mass Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol A.

    1999-01-01

    A detailed study of circumstellar gas associated with young, intermediate-mass stars has demonstrated that, far from being unique or an infrequently occurring phenomenon, beta Pic-like infall activity is routinely observed in stars younger than 10-50 Myr when the observer's line of sight lies within 15 degrees of the disk mid-plane. Detailed studies of 2 Herbig Ae/Be stars, AB Aur and HD 163296 demonstrate that enhanced infall episodes last 20-60 hours, comparable to the duration of similar episodes in beta Pictoris. The infall activity is consistent with detection of the comae of swarms of star-grazing bodies of asteroidal to cometary composition. Episodic fluctuations in the infall activity are clearly present by approximately 6 Myr, and may indicate the presence of massive planets within the disk. This study has therefore, directly contributed to NASA's Origins of Planetary Systems theme by identifying under what conditions extra-solar planetesimals can be remotely sensed, indicating that such bodies appear to be routinely detectable among young stars in the 1-10 Myr range, and suggesting that temporal studies of spectroscopic variability may provide a means of identifying those systems harboring massive planets. This study has resulted in 2 refereed review papers, 13 other refereed papers, and 17 conference papers.

  12. On the detection of other planetary systems - Detection of intrinsic thermal radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    There is currently no unambiguous observational evidence for the existence of other planetary systems. One possible way to detect and study such systems is infrared observations of continuum blackbody radiation from planets revolving around other stars. It is shown that the effective temperature of large planets revolving around mid- to late-spectral-type main-sequences stars is set by energy sources internal to the planet rather than by equilibrium with the radiation field of the central star, making them easier to detect than had been previously thought. Consideration is given to the two major observational constraints on detecting planetary companions to nearby stars, namely, angular resolution and sensitivity. A comparison is made between the performance of an ambient (T 200 K), single-aperture telescope and a cooled interferometer. In each case the required aperture (baseline) is large (in the 10-m class), but consistent with Shuttle launch capability.

  13. Saturn's magnetosphere: An example of dynamic planetary systems

    SciTech Connect

    Krimigis, Stamatios M.

    2011-01-04

    Planetary magnetospheres are prime examples of interacting plasma regimes at different scales. There is the principal interaction with the solar wind that seems to be the main driver of the dynamics at Mercury and Earth. But these inner planet magnetospheres are relatively simple when compared to those of the outer planets which are primarily driven by planetary rotation and include internal plasma sources from various moons and rings, in addition to those from the planetary ionospheres and the solar wind. Io's volcanic source at Jupiter is a prime example, but now Enceladus at Saturn has joined the fray, while Titan is a surprisingly minor player despite its thick nitrogen atmosphere and its continued bombardment by energetic particles. Mass loading of plasma leads to interchange instability in the inner magnetospheres at both Jupiter and Saturn, while ionospheric slippage, among other processes, seems to contribute to a variable rotation period in the spin-aligned dipole field of Saturn, manifested in auroral kilometric radiation (SKR), components of the magnetic field itself, and the plasma periodicities measured at several energies. Through use of the ENA (energetic neutral atom) technique, it is now possible to observe bulk motions of the plasma and their connection to planetary auroral processes. Such imaging at Saturn by Cassini has revealed the location of a region of post-midnight acceleration events that seem to corotate with the planet and coincide with auroral brightening and SKR. Periodic injections of plasma have been identified and repeat at the Kronian rotation period of 10.8 hours. A semi-permanent but asymmetric ring current has also been imaged, located between the orbits of the satellites Rhea ({approx}9 RS) and Titan ({approx}20 R{sub S}), with a maximum at {approx}10{+-} 1R{sub S} and dominated by the hot (>3 keV) plasma component.

  14. The Planetary System to KIC 11442793: A Compact Analogue to the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridlund, Carl; Cabrera, J.; Csizmadia, S.; Lehman, H.; Dvorak, R.; Gandolfi, D.; Rauer, H.; Erikson, A.; Dreyer, C.; Eigmueller, P.; Hatzes, A.

    2014-01-01

    Since exoplanets were first recognized, interpretations have concentrated on dynamics, since the most precise data come from radial velocity (RV) measurements. It is, recently, transit observations, obtained from space (CoRoT and Kepler) that have begun to acquire planetary radii with good precision. Mated to the RV data one can determine the average density of exoplanets and do planetology. We announce the discovery of a planetary system with 7 transiting planets around a Kepler target, a current record for transiting systems. Planets b, c, e and f are reported for the first time by our team (ApJ, accepted) Planets d, g and h were previously reported in the literature, although here we revise their orbital parameters and validate their planetary nature. Planets h and g are gas giants and show strong dynamical interactions. The orbit of planet g is perturbed in such way that its orbital period changes by 25.7h between two consecutive transits during the length of the observations, which is the largest such perturbation found so far. The rest of the planets also show mutual interactions: planets d, e and f are super-Earths close to a mean motion resonance chain (2:3:4), and planets b and c, with sizes below 2 Earth radii, are within 0.5% of the 4:5 mean motion resonance. This complex system presents some similarities to our Solar System, with small planets in inner orbits and gas giants in outer orbits. It is, however, more compact. The outer planet has an orbital distance around 1 AU, and the relative position of the gas giants is opposite to that of Jupiter and Saturn, which is closer to the expected result of planet formation theories. The dynamical interactions between planets are also much richer.

  15. Inferring the Architectures of Planetary Systems from Kepler Results with SysSim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Eric

    NASA's Kepler Mission is designed to gather statistical information about planets around other stars (exoplanets). Due to its unprecedented precision, Kepler has revolutionized the exoplanet community providing by far the largest homogeneous exoplanet dataset, with over 2300 planet candidates already identified in the first 19 months of data (Batalha et al. 2012, hereafter B12). Even more exciting is Kepler's new discovery of "multi-transiting systems" or stars with more than one transiting planet. B12 identified over 350 multi-transiting systems containing nearly 900 high-probability candidate planets (Lissauer et al. 2012). These multi-transiting systems are the most information-rich planetary systems outside our own solar system because they offer both the detailed physical characterization uniquely available from transiting planets (Winn 2010) and the ability to apply the tools of multi- planetary orbital dynamics (Ragozzine & Holman 2010, Lissauer, Ragozzine et al. 2011, hereafter LR+11). Within the funding period, publicly-available Kepler observations will triple in duration, yielding hundreds of new planets in multi-transiting systems and providing first insights into the frequency of Earth-size planets and solar system analogs. As with all astronomical surveys, Kepler data must be debiased in order to understand the true properties of the underlying population. Several studies have addressed the geometrical and detection biases to perform statistical analyses of Kepler results on a planet-by-planet basis (e.g., Borucki et al. 2011, Howard et al. 2011, Youdin 2011, Catanzarite & Shao 2011, Traub 2011). Other authors have analyzed specific multi- transiting systems to measure physical and orbital properties that will inform planet formation theories (e.g., Lissauer et al. 2011a, Migaszewski et al. 2012). However, there is a critical gap between these two techniques: a method for debiasing the Kepler planet data while accounting for multi-planet systems

  16. An old disk still capable of forming a planetary system.

    PubMed

    Bergin, Edwin A; Cleeves, L Ilsedore; Gorti, Uma; Zhang, Ke; Blake, Geoffrey A; Green, Joel D; Andrews, Sean M; Evans, Neal J; Henning, Thomas; Oberg, Karin; Pontoppidan, Klaus; Qi, Chunhua; Salyk, Colette; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2013-01-31

    From the masses of the planets orbiting the Sun, and the abundance of elements relative to hydrogen, it is estimated that when the Solar System formed, the circumstellar disk must have had a minimum mass of around 0.01 solar masses within about 100 astronomical units of the star. (One astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance.) The main constituent of the disk, gaseous molecular hydrogen, does not efficiently emit radiation from the disk mass reservoir, and so the most common measure of the disk mass is dust thermal emission and lines of gaseous carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide emission generally indicates properties of the disk surface, and the conversion from dust emission to gas mass requires knowledge of the grain properties and the gas-to-dust mass ratio, which probably differ from their interstellar values. As a result, mass estimates vary by orders of magnitude, as exemplified by the relatively old (3-10 million years) star TW Hydrae, for which the range is 0.0005-0.06 solar masses. Here we report the detection of the fundamental rotational transition of hydrogen deuteride from the direction of TW Hydrae. Hydrogen deuteride is a good tracer of disk gas because it follows the distribution of molecular hydrogen and its emission is sensitive to the total mass. The detection of hydrogen deuteride, combined with existing observations and detailed models, implies a disk mass of more than 0.05 solar masses, which is enough to form a planetary system like our own. PMID:23364742

  17. Argus: An Io observer mission concept study from the 2014 NASA/JPL Planetary Science Summer School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, L. E.; Holstein-Rathlou, C.; Becerra, P.; Basu, K.; Davis, B.; Fox, V. K.; Herman, J. F. C.; Hughes, A. C. G.; Keane, J. T.; Marcucci, E.; Mendez-Ramos, E.; Nelessen, A.; Neveu, M.; Parrish, N. L.; Scheinberg, A. L.; Wrobel, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Jupiter's satellite Io represents the ideal target for studying extreme tidal heating and volcanism, two of the most important processes in the formation and evolution of planetary bodies. The 2011 Planetary Decadal Survey identified an Io Observer as a high-priority New Frontiers class mission to be considered for the decade 2013-2022. In response to the 2009 New Frontiers Announcement of Opportunity, we propose a mission concept for an Io Observer mission, named Argus (after the mythical watchman of Io), developed by the students of the August 2014 session of the Planetary Science Summer School hosted by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, together with JPL's Team X. The goals of our mission are: (i) Study the effects of tidal heating and its implications for habitability in the Solar System and beyond; (ii) Investigate active lava flows on Io as an analog for early Earth; (iii) Analyze the interaction of Io with the Jovian system through material exchange and magnetospheric activity; (iv) Study the internal structure of Io, as well as its chemical and tectonic history in order to gain insight into its formation and that of the other Galilean satellites.

  18. XML-based information system for planetary sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, F.; Fonte, S.; Turrini, D.

    2009-04-01

    EuroPlaNet (EPN in the following) has been developed by the planetological community under the "Sixth Framework Programme" (FP6 in the following), the European programme devoted to the improvement of the European research efforts through the creation of an internal market for science and technology. The goal of the EPN programme is the creation of a European network aimed to the diffusion of data produced by space missions dedicated to the study of the Solar System. A special place within the EPN programme is that of I.D.I.S. (Integrated and Distributed Information Service). The main goal of IDIS is to offer to the planetary science community a user-friendly access to the data and information produced by the various types of research activities, i.e. Earth-based observations, space observations, modeling, theory and laboratory experiments. During the FP6 programme IDIS development consisted in the creation of a series of thematic nodes, each of them specialized in a specific scientific domain, and a technical coordination node. The four thematic nodes are the Atmosphere node, the Plasma node, the Interiors & Surfaces node and the Small Bodies & Dust node. The main task of the nodes have been the building up of selected scientific cases related with the scientific domain of each node. The second work done by EPN nodes have been the creation of a catalogue of resources related to their main scientific theme. Both these efforts have been used as the basis for the development of the main IDIS goal, i.e. the integrated distributed service. An XML-based data model have been developed to describe resources using meta-data and to store the meta-data within an XML-based database called eXist. A search engine has been then developed in order to allow users to search resources within the database. Users can select the resource type and can insert one or more values or can choose a value among those present in a list, depending on selected resource. The system searches for all

  19. Fractionated robotic architectures for planetary surface mobility systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibay, Farah; Desaraju, Vishnu R.; Duda, Jessica E.; Hoffman, Jeffrey A.

    2014-02-01

    Planetary surface exploration missions are becoming increasingly complex and future missions promise to be even more ambitious than those that have occurred thus far. To deal with this complexity, this paper proposes a fractionated approach to planetary surface exploration. Fractionation involves splitting up large vehicles into several smaller ones that work together in order to achieve the science goals. It is believed that fractionation of rovers can lead to increased value delivery and productivity, as well as helping manage complexity. A science goal-driven methodology for generating a tradespace of multi-vehicle architectures in the early stages of mission design is detailed. A set of carefully designed metrics are then put forward as a way to help compare multi-vehicle architectures to each other and to the single vehicle (monolithic) equivalent. These include science value delivery, productivity, system- and vehicle-level complexity, and mass metrics. Through two Mars-based case studies, the advantages and limitations of fractionation are explored. Fractionation is found to be particularly advantageous when the science goals are broad, when there are competing requirements between goals, and when the exploration environment is particularly treacherous. Additionally, multi-vehicle systems entail simpler vehicles with lower vehicle-level complexity, lower mission risk and higher productivity over the mission duration, as well as being more easily upgradeable. On the other hand, they lead to higher system-level complexity, and can somewhat increase the overall mass of the system. Thus, through this methodology, it was demonstrated that the fractionation of planetary surface exploration systems leads to mass being traded for higher science return and lower risk during the mission, and to complexity being shifted from design complexity to operational complexity. Multi-vehicle systems involve more testing and on-board automation than single vehicles, but they

  20. Secular chaos and its application to Mercury, hot Jupiters, and the organization of planetary systems.

    PubMed

    Lithwick, Yoram; Wu, Yanqin

    2014-09-01

    In the inner solar system, the planets' orbits evolve chaotically, driven primarily by secular chaos. Mercury has a particularly chaotic orbit and is in danger of being lost within a few billion years. Just as secular chaos is reorganizing the solar system today, so it has likely helped organize it in the past. We suggest that extrasolar planetary systems are also organized to a large extent by secular chaos. A hot Jupiter could be the end state of a secularly chaotic planetary system reminiscent of the solar system. However, in the case of the hot Jupiter, the innermost planet was Jupiter (rather than Mercury) sized, and its chaotic evolution was terminated when it was tidally captured by its star. In this contribution, we review our recent work elucidating the physics of secular chaos and applying it to Mercury and to hot Jupiters. We also present results comparing the inclinations of hot Jupiters thus produced with observations. PMID:24367108

  1. Secular chaos and its application to Mercury, hot Jupiters, and the organization of planetary systems

    PubMed Central

    Lithwick, Yoram; Wu, Yanqin

    2014-01-01

    In the inner solar system, the planets’ orbits evolve chaotically, driven primarily by secular chaos. Mercury has a particularly chaotic orbit and is in danger of being lost within a few billion years. Just as secular chaos is reorganizing the solar system today, so it has likely helped organize it in the past. We suggest that extrasolar planetary systems are also organized to a large extent by secular chaos. A hot Jupiter could be the end state of a secularly chaotic planetary system reminiscent of the solar system. However, in the case of the hot Jupiter, the innermost planet was Jupiter (rather than Mercury) sized, and its chaotic evolution was terminated when it was tidally captured by its star. In this contribution, we review our recent work elucidating the physics of secular chaos and applying it to Mercury and to hot Jupiters. We also present results comparing the inclinations of hot Jupiters thus produced with observations. PMID:24367108

  2. Northern Late Winter Planetary Waves: MRO/MARCI Observations and Mars Climate Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, J. L.; Kahre, M. A.; Haberle, R. M.; Wolff, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    As does Earth, Mars presents pronounced global atmospheric circulation patterns. Solar differential heating drives mean meridional overturning (Hadley) circulations which are deep and intense, are hemispherically asymmetric, and where a cross-equatorial single cell dominates. Within middle and high latitudes, thermally indirect eddy-driven (Ferrel) circulation cells have been indicated. Differently, however, large-amplitude orography on planetary and continental scales on Mars can force very non-Earth-like hemispheric circulation patterns. Recent observations from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, "Mars Color Imager" (MARCI) instrument are utilized that emphasize water ice clouds in ultra-violet (UV) wavelengths, and these measurements have been binned into "daily global maps" (DGMs) of water-ice cloud optical depth. The presence of large-scale, extratropical quasi-stationary atmospheric wave disturbances in middle and late winter of the northern hemisphere have been found to be present in such DGMs. In combination with such observations, a full-physics Mars global climate model (NASA ARC marsgcm 2.1) is applied to place the observations into context. During late northern winter, it is found that strong, forced Rossby modes (i.e., planetary waves) exist, and with direct correlation to column-integrated cloud opacity undulating spatial patterns. At this season, zonal wavenumber s = 2 dominates (in contrast to wavenumber s = 1), consistent with MGS/TES analyses at this particular season (Banfield et al., 2003). Large-scale, planetary waves dictate the "coherence" of the northern polar vortex. Fundamentally, such forced planetary waves influence the polar vortex's impermeability (wave-induced) to tracer transport (e.g., dust and water-ice aerosol) and temporal mean water vapor spatial variations. The large-scale dynamical features of such planetary waves will be highlighted and discussed.

  3. Exploration Planetary Surface Structural Systems: Design Requirements and Compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.

    2011-01-01

    The Lunar Surface Systems Project developed system concepts that would be necessary to establish and maintain a permanent human presence on the Lunar surface. A variety of specific system implementations were generated as a part of the scenarios, some level of system definition was completed, and masses estimated for each system. Because the architecture studies generally spawned a large number of system concepts and the studies were executed in a short amount of time, the resulting system definitions had very low design fidelity. This paper describes the development sequence required to field a particular structural system: 1) Define Requirements, 2) Develop the Design and 3) Demonstrate Compliance of the Design to all Requirements. This paper also outlines and describes in detail the information and data that are required to establish structural design requirements and outlines the information that would comprise a planetary surface system Structures Requirements document.

  4. On the formation of compact planetary systems via concurrent core accretion and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Gavin A. L.; Nelson, Richard P.

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of planet formation N-body simulations based on a comprehensive physical model that includes planetary mass growth through mutual embryo collisions and planetesimal/boulder accretion, viscous disc evolution, planetary migration and gas accretion on to planetary cores. The main aim of this study is to determine which set of model parameters leads to the formation of planetary systems that are similar to the compact low-mass multiplanet systems that have been discovered by radial velocity surveys and the Kepler mission. We vary the initial disc mass, solids-to-gas ratio and the sizes of the boulders/planetesimals, and for a restricted volume of the parameter space we find that compact systems containing terrestrial planets, super-Earths and Neptune-like bodies arise as natural outcomes of the simulations. Disc models with low values of the solids-to-gas ratio can only form short-period super-Earths and Neptunes when small planetesimals/boulders provide the main source of accretion, since the mobility of these bodies is required to overcome the local isolation masses for growing embryos. The existence of short-period super-Earths around low-metallicity stars provides strong evidence that small, mobile bodies (planetesimals, boulders or pebbles) played a central role in the formation of the observed planets.

  5. The planetary nebula system and dynamics of NGC 5128. I - Planetary nebulae as standard candles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Xiaohui; Ford, Holland C.; Ciardullo, Robin; Jacoby, George H.

    1993-01-01

    We present the result of a planetary nebula (PN) survey of the nearby giant elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 performed with CCD cameras at the prime focus of the CTIO 4 m telescope. By comparing CCD images centered on the characteristic emission line forbidden O III 5007 A and on the adjacent continuum, we identify a total of 785 PNs in areas extending 20 kpc along the photometric major axis and covering the whole galaxy to 10 kpc. From these data, we form a complete sample of 224 PNs extending to a dereddened limiting magnitude of m5007 = 24.8, which extends 1.5 mag down the PN luminosity function (PNLF). Adopting a foreground extinction of E(B-V) = 0.1, we derive a distance to the galaxy of 3.5 +/- 0.2 Mpc, in excellent agreement with the surface brightness fluctuation method. No population effect on the bright cutoff of PNLF is observed in the isophotal radius range of 2-16 kpc, but the luminosity specific PN density seems to increase with radius inside of 7 kpc, in agreement with the alpha(2.5)-color relation observed for other galaxies.

  6. Towards an International Planetary Community Built on Open Source Software: the Evolution of the Planetary Data System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crichton, D. J.; Ramirez, P.; Hardman, S.; Hughes, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Access to the worldwide planetary science research results from robotic exploration of the solar system has become a key driver in internationalizing the data standards from the Planetary Data System. The Planetary Data System, through international agency collaborations with the International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA), has been developing a next generation set of data standards and technical implementation known as PDS4. PDS4 modernizes the PDS towards a world-wide online data system providing data and technical standards for improving access and interoperability among planetary archives. Since 2006, the IPDA has been working with the PDS to ensure that the next generation PDS is capable of allowing agency autonomy in building compatible archives while providing mechanisms to link the archive together. At the 7th International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA) Meeting in Bangalore, India, the IPDA discussed and passed a resolution paving the way to adopt the PDS4 data standards. While the PDS4 standards have matured, another effort has been underway to move the PDS, a set of distributed discipline oriented science nodes, into a fully, online, service-oriented architecture. In order to accomplish this goal, the PDS has been developing a core set of software components that form the basis for many of the functions needed by a data system. These include the ability to harvest, validate, register, search and distribute the data products defined by the PDS4 data standards. Rather than having each group build their own independent implementations, the intention is to ultimately govern the implementation of this software through an open source community. This will enable not only sharing of software among U.S. planetary science nodes, but also has the potential of improving collaboration not only on core data management software, but also the tools by the international community. This presentation will discuss the progress in developing an open source infrastructure

  7. Gravitational microlensing by double stars and planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Shunde; Paczynski, Bohdan

    1991-01-01

    Almost all stars are in binary systems. When the separation between the two components is comparable to the Einstein ring radius corresponding to the combined mass of the binary acting as a gravitational lens, then an extra pair of images can be created, and the light curve of a lensed source becomes complicated. It is estimated that about 10 percent of all lensing episodes of the Galactic bulge stars will strongly display the binary nature of the lens. The effect is strong even if the companion is a planet. A massive search for microlensing of the Galactic bulge stars may lead to a discovery of the first extrasolar planetary systems.

  8. Planetary spacecraft - SEPS interface design. [Solar Electric Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pless, L. C.

    1980-01-01

    The interactions between a spacecraft which would rendezvous with the comet Tempel II, the stage, and the mission design are summarized along with solar electric propulsion system design issues. Attention is given to data communication, the spacecraft pointing control system, spacecraft power, plasma interactions, the release of a probe to study the comet Halley, and thruster usage. It was concluded that for a planetary mission design using a low-thrust stage, the control of the mission should reside in the payload spacecraft and that the power should be provided by the stage; the NASA standard 28 VDC bus is recommended.

  9. Deploying Object Oriented Data Technology to the Planetary Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, S.; Crichton, D.; Hughes, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    How do you provide more than 350 scientists and researchers access to data from every instrument in Odyssey when the data is curated across half a dozen institutions and in different formats and is too big to mail on a CD-ROM anymore? The Planetary Data System (PDS) faced this exact question. The solution was to use a metadata-based middleware framework developed by the Object Oriented Data Technology task at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Using OODT, PDS provided - for the first time ever - data from all mission instruments through a single system immediately upon data delivery.

  10. A novel wireless light sensing device for planetary and astronomical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durga Prasad, K.; Murty, S. V. S.; Chandrasekhar, T.

    2014-11-01

    A novel and versatile wireless light sensing device has been designed and tested for stellar and planetary photometric observations. The device weighing few 10 s of grams finds a number of potential applications in the fields of astronomy and in situ planetary exploration. A Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) using a number of these devices has been deployed to successfully carry out simultaneous photometric observations under different conditions viz. sunlight, twilight, moonlight etc. Observation of a star of known magnitude for flux calibration at low intensity has been carried out by coupling the device to a 1.2 m telescope which demonstrates its sensitivity. A WSN using these devices is further capable of spatio-temporal investigations of sky background intensities. Such a network can also be used to effectively monitor certain astronomical events (lunar eclipse, asteroid occultation etc.) simultaneously from several locations. The capability of the device, level of miniaturization and its versatility makes it a potential tool for many photometric applications.

  11. Constraints on Common Envelope Magnetic Fields from Observations of Jets in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, Orsola; Tocknell, J.; Wardle, M.

    2014-01-01

    The common envelope (CE) interaction describes the swallowing of a nearby companion by a growing, evolving star. CEs that take place during the asymptotic giant branch phase of the primary and may lead to the formation of a planetary nebula (PN) with a post-CE close binary in the middle. We have used published observations of masses and kinematics of jets in four post-CE PN to infer physical characteristics of the CE interaction. In three of the four systems studied, Abell 63, ETHOS 1 and the Necklace PN, the kinematics indicate that the jets were launched a few thousand years before the CE and we favour a scenario where this happened before Roche lobe overflow, although better models of wind accretion and wind Roche lobe overflow are needed. The magnetic fields inferred to launch pre-CE jets are of the order of a few Gauss. In the fourth case, NGC 6778, the kinematics indicate that the jets were launched about 3000 years after the CE interaction. Magnetic fields of the order of a few hundreds to a few thousands Gauss are inferred in this case, approximately in line with predictions of post-CE magnetic fields. However, we remark that in the case of this system, we cannot find a reasonable scenario for the formation of the two jet pairs observed: the small orbital separation would preclude the formation of even one accretion disk able to supply the necessary accretion rate to cause the observed jets. Additional and improved observations of post-CE PN will provide a powerful tool to constrain the CE interaction.

  12. Radial Velocity Detection of Extra-Solar Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.

    1998-01-01

    The McDonald Observatory Planetary Search (MOPS) was designed to search for Jovian-mass planets in orbit around solar-type stars by making high-precision measurements of the Radial Velocity (RV) of a star, to attempt to detect the reflex orbital motion of the star around the star-planet barycenter. In our solar system, the velocity of the Sun around the Sun-Jupiter barycenter averages 12.3 m/ s. The MOPS survey started operation in September 1987, and searches 36 bright, nearby, solar-type dwarfs to 10 m/s precision. The survey was started using telluric O2 absorption lines as the velocity reference metric. Observations use the McDonald Observatory 2.7-m Harlan Smith Telescope coude spectrograph with the six-foot camera. This spectrograph configuration isolates a single order of the echelle grating on a Texas Instruments 800 x 800 CCD. The telluric line method gave us a routine radial velocity precision of about 15 m/s for stars down to about 5-th magnitude. However, the data obtained with this technique suffered from some source of long-term systematic errors, which was probably the intrinsic velocity variability of the terrestrial atmosphere, i.e. winds. In order to eliminate this systematic error and to improve our overall measurement precision, we installed a stabilized I2 gas absorption cell as the velocity metric for the MOPS in October 1990. In use at the telescope, the cell is placed directly in front of the spectrograph entrance slit, with starlight passing through the cell. The use of this sealed stabilized I2 cell removes potential problems with possible long-term drifts in the velocity metric. The survey now includes a sample of 36 nearby F, G, and K type stars of luminosity class V or IV-V.

  13. Chaotic Diffusion in the Gliese-876 Planetary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí, J. G.; Cincotta, P. M.; Beaugé, C.

    2016-05-01

    Chaotic diffusion is supposed to be responsible for orbital instabilities in planetary systems after the dissipation of the protoplanetary disk, and a natural consequence of irregular motion. In this paper we show that resonant multi-planetary systems, despite being highly chaotic, not necessarily exhibit significant diffusion in phase space, and may still survive virtually unchanged over timescales comparable to their age.Using the GJ-876 system as an example, we analyze the chaotic diffusion of the outermost (and less massive) planet. We construct a set of stability maps in the surrounding regions of the Laplace resonance. We numerically integrate ensembles of close initial conditions, compute Poincaré maps and estimate the chaotic diffusion present in this system. Our results show that, the Laplace resonance contains two different regions: an inner domain characterized by low chaoticity and slow diffusion, and an outer one displaying larger values of dynamical indicators. In the outer resonant domain, the stochastic borders of the Laplace resonance seem to prevent the complete destruction of the system. We characterize the diffusion for small ensembles along the parameters of the outermost planet. Finally, we perform a stability analysis of the inherent chaotic, albeit stable Laplace resonance, by linking the behavior of the resonant variables of the configurations to the different sub-structures inside the three-body resonance.

  14. Optimal Asteroid Mass Determination from Planetary Range Observations: A Study of a Simplified Test Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchynka, P.; Laskar, J.; Fienga, A.

    2011-01-01

    Mars ranging observations are available over the past 10 years with an accuracy of a few meters. Such precise measurements of the Earth-Mars distance provide valuable constraints on the masses of the asteroids perturbing both planets. Today more than 30 asteroid masses have thus been estimated from planetary ranging data (see [1] and [2]). Obtaining unbiased mass estimations is nevertheless difficult. Various systematic errors can be introduced by imperfect reduction of spacecraft tracking observations to planetary ranging data. The large number of asteroids and the limited a priori knowledge of their masses is also an obstacle for parameter selection. Fitting in a model a mass of a negligible perturber, or on the contrary omitting a significant perturber, will induce important bias in determined asteroid masses. In this communication, we investigate a simplified version of the mass determination problem. Instead of planetary ranging observations from spacecraft or radar data, we consider synthetic ranging observations generated with the INPOP [2] ephemeris for a test model containing 25000 asteroids. We then suggest a method for optimal parameter selection and estimation in this simplified framework.

  15. The planetary system to KIC 11442793: A compact analogue to the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, J.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Rauer, H.; Erikson, A.; Dreyer, C.; Eigmüller, Ph.; Lehmann, H.; Hatzes, A.; Dvorak, R.; Gandolfi, D.

    2014-01-20

    We announce the discovery of a planetary system with seven transiting planets around a Kepler target, a current record for transiting systems. Planets b, c, e, and f are reported for the first time in this work. Planets d, g, and h were previously reported in the literature, although here we revise their orbital parameters and validate their planetary nature. Planets h and g are gas giants and show strong dynamical interactions. The orbit of planet g is perturbed in such a way that its orbital period changes by 25.7 hr between two consecutive transits during the length of the observations, which is the largest such perturbation found so far. The rest of the planets also show mutual interactions: planets d, e, and f are super-Earths close to a mean motion resonance chain (2:3:4), and planets b and c, with sizes below 2 Earth radii, are within 0.5% of the 4:5 mean motion resonance. This complex system presents some similarities to our solar system, with small planets in inner orbits and gas giants in outer orbits. It is, however, more compact. The outer planet has an orbital distance around 1 AU, and the relative position of the gas giants is opposite to that of Jupiter and Saturn, which is closer to the expected result of planet formation theories. The dynamical interactions between planets are also much richer.

  16. The Planetary System to KIC 11442793: A Compact Analogue to the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, J.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Lehmann, H.; Dvorak, R.; Gandolfi, D.; Rauer, H.; Erikson, A.; Dreyer, C.; Eigmüller, Ph.; Hatzes, A.

    2014-01-01

    We announce the discovery of a planetary system with seven transiting planets around a Kepler target, a current record for transiting systems. Planets b, c, e, and f are reported for the first time in this work. Planets d, g, and h were previously reported in the literature, although here we revise their orbital parameters and validate their planetary nature. Planets h and g are gas giants and show strong dynamical interactions. The orbit of planet g is perturbed in such a way that its orbital period changes by 25.7 hr between two consecutive transits during the length of the observations, which is the largest such perturbation found so far. The rest of the planets also show mutual interactions: planets d, e, and f are super-Earths close to a mean motion resonance chain (2:3:4), and planets b and c, with sizes below 2 Earth radii, are within 0.5% of the 4:5 mean motion resonance. This complex system presents some similarities to our solar system, with small planets in inner orbits and gas giants in outer orbits. It is, however, more compact. The outer planet has an orbital distance around 1 AU, and the relative position of the gas giants is opposite to that of Jupiter and Saturn, which is closer to the expected result of planet formation theories. The dynamical interactions between planets are also much richer.

  17. Journal Bearing Analysis Suite Released for Planetary Gear System Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, David E.; Clark, David A.

    2005-01-01

    Planetary gear systems are an efficient means of achieving high reduction ratios with minimum space and weight. They are used in helicopter, aerospace, automobile, and many industrial applications. High-speed planetary gear systems will have significant dynamic loading and high heat generation. Hence, they need jet lubrication and associated cooling systems. For units operating in critical applications that necessitate high reliability and long life, that have very large torque loading, and that have downtime costs that are significantly greater than the initial cost, hydrodynamic journal bearings are a must. Computational and analytical tools are needed for sufficiently accurate modeling to facilitate optimal design of these systems. Sufficient physics is needed in the model to facilitate parametric studies of design conditions that enable optimal designs. The first transient journal bearing code to implement the Jacobsson-Floberg-Olsson boundary conditions, using a mass-conserving algorithm devised by Professor Emeritus Harold Elrod of Columbia University, was written by David E. Brewe of the U.S. Army at the NASA Lewis Research Center1 in 1983. Since then, new features and improved modifications have been built into the code by several contributors supported through Army and NASA funding via cooperative agreements with the University of Toledo (Professor Ted Keith, Jr., and Dr. Desikakary Vijayaraghavan) and National Research Council Programs (Dr. Vijayaraghavan). All this was conducted with the close consultation of Professor Elrod and the project management of David Brewe.

  18. ADVANCED RADIOISOTOPE HEAT SOURCE AND PROPULSION SYSTEMS FOR PLANETARY EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect

    R. C. O'Brien; S. D. Howe; J. E. Werner

    2010-09-01

    The exploration of planetary surfaces and atmospheres may be enhanced by increasing the range and mobility of a science platform. Fundamentally, power production and availability of resources are limiting factors that must be considered for all science and exploration missions. A novel power and propulsion system is considered and discussed with reference to a long-range Mars surface exploration mission with in-situ resource utilization. Significance to applications such as sample return missions is also considered. Key material selections for radioisotope encapsulation techniques are presented.

  19. Angular momentum evolution during star and planetary system formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Claire L.; Greaves, Jane S.

    2014-01-01

    We focused on analysing the role played by protoplanetary disks in the evolution of angular momentum during star formation. If all the angular momentum contained within collapsing pre-stellar cores was conserved during their formation, proto-stars would reach rotation rates exceeding their break-up velocities before they reached the main sequence (Bodenheimer 1995). In order to avoid this occuring, methods by which proto-stars can lose angular momentum must exist. Angular momentum can be transferred from star to disk via stellar magnetic field lines through a process called magnetic braking (Camenzind 1990; Königl 1991). Alternatively, the stellar angular momentum can be lost from the star-disk system entirely via stellar- or disk-winds (e.g. Pelletier & Pudritz 1992; Matt & Pudritz 2005). The proportion of lost stellar angular momentum retained within the protoplanetary disk is important to studies of planetary system formation. If the bulk motion within the disk remains Keplerian, any increase of angular momentum in the disk causes an outward migration of disk material and an expansion of the disk. Therefore, an increase in disk angular momentum may cause a reduction in the disk surface density, often used to indicate the disk's ability to form planets. We made use of multi-wavelength data available in the literature to directly calculate the stellar and disk angular momenta for two nearby regions of star formation. Namely, these were the densely populated and highly irradiated Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) and the comparitively sparse Taurus-Auriga region. Due to the limited size of the ONC dataset, we produced an average surface density profile for the region. We modelled the stars as solid body rotators due to their fully convective nature (Krishnamurthi et al. 1997) and assumed the disks are flat and undergo Keplerian rotation about the same rotation axis as the star. We observed the older disks within each of the two star forming regions to be preferentially

  20. Continuing Improvement in the Planetary Ephemeris with VLBA Observations of Cassini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Dayton L.; Folkner, William M.; Jacobson, Robert A.; Jacobs, Christopher S.; Romney, Jonathan D.; Dhawan, Vivek; Fomalont, Edward B.

    2016-06-01

    During the past decade a continuing series of measurements of the barycentric position of the Saturn system in the inertial International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) has led to a significant improvement in our knowledge of Saturn's orbit. This in turn has improved the current accuracy and time range of the solar system ephemeris produced and maintained by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Our observing technique involves high-precision astrometry of the radio signal from Cassini with the NRAO Very Long Baseline Array, combined with solutions for the orbital motion of Cassini about the Saturn barycenter from Doppler tracking by the Deep Space Network. Our VLBA astrometry is done in a phase-referencing mode, providing nrad-level relative positions between Cassini and angularly nearby extragalactic radio sources. The positions of those reference radio sources are tied to the ICRF through dedicated VLBI observations by several groups around the world. We will present recent results from our astrometric observations of Cassini through early 2016. This program will continue until the end of the Cassini mission in 2017, although future improvement in Saturn's orbit will be more incremental because we have already covered more that a quarter of Saturn's orbital period. The Juno mission to Jupiter, which will orbit Jupiter for about 1.5 years starting in July 2016, will provide an excellent opportunity for us to apply the same VLBA astrometry technique to improve the orbit of Jupiter by a factor of several. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. This work made use of the Swinburne University of Technology software correlator, developed as part of the Australian Major National Research Facilities Program and operated under license. Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract

  1. SEQ-POINTER: Next generation, planetary spacecraft remote sensing science observation design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, Jeffrey S.

    1994-01-01

    Since Mariner, NASA-JPL planetary missions have been supported by ground software to plan and design remote sensing science observations. The software used by the science and sequence designers to plan and design observations has evolved with mission and technological advances. The original program, PEGASIS (Mariners 4, 6, and 7), was re-engineered as POGASIS (Mariner 9, Viking, and Mariner 10), and again later as POINTER (Voyager and Galileo). Each of these programs were developed under technological, political, and fiscal constraints which limited their adaptability to other missions and spacecraft designs. Implementation of a multi-mission tool, SEQ POINTER, under the auspices of the JPL Multimission Operations Systems Office (MOSO) is in progress. This version has been designed to address the limitations experienced on previous versions as they were being adapted to a new mission and spacecraft. The tool has been modularly designed with subroutine interface structures to support interchangeable celestial body and spacecraft definition models. The computational and graphics modules have also been designed to interface with data collected from previous spacecraft, or on-going observations, which describe the surface of each target body. These enhancements make SEQ POINTER a candidate for low-cost mission usage, when a remote sensing science observation design capability is required. The current and planned capabilities of the tool will be discussed. The presentation will also include a 5-10 minute video presentation demonstrating the capabilities of a proto-Cassini Project version that was adapted to test the tool. The work described in this abstract was performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. Probing the terrestrial regions of planetary systems: warm debris disks with emission features

    SciTech Connect

    Ballering, Nicholas P.; Rieke, George H.; Gáspár, András

    2014-09-20

    Observations of debris disks allow for the study of planetary systems, even where planets have not been detected. However, debris disks are often only characterized by unresolved infrared excesses that resemble featureless blackbodies, and the location of the emitting dust is uncertain due to a degeneracy with the dust grain properties. Here, we characterize the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra of 22 debris disks exhibiting 10 μm silicate emission features. Such features arise from small warm dust grains, and their presence can significantly constrain the orbital location of the emitting debris. We find that these features can be explained by the presence of an additional dust component in the terrestrial zones of the planetary systems, i.e., an exozodiacal belt. Aside from possessing exozodiacal dust, these debris disks are not particularly unique; their minimum grain sizes are consistent with the blowout sizes of their systems, and their brightnesses are comparable to those of featureless warm debris disks. These disks are in systems of a range of ages, though the older systems with features are found only around A-type stars. The features in young systems may be signatures of terrestrial planet formation. Analyzing the spectra of unresolved debris disks with emission features may be one of the simplest and most accessible ways to study the terrestrial regions of planetary systems.

  3. Significant achievements in the Planetary Geology Program. [geologic processes, comparative planetology, and solar system evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, J. W. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Developments reported at a meeting of principal investigators for NASA's planetology geology program are summarized. Topics covered include: constraints on solar system formation; asteriods, comets, and satellites; constraints on planetary interiors; volatiles and regoliths; instrument development techniques; planetary cartography; geological and geochemical constraints on planetary evolution; fluvial processes and channel formation; volcanic processes; Eolian processes; radar studies of planetary surfaces; cratering as a process, landform, and dating method; and the Tharsis region of Mars. Activities at a planetary geology field conference on Eolian processes are reported and techniques recommended for the presentation and analysis of crater size-frequency data are included.

  4. Planetary rings

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.; Brahic, A.

    1984-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are the development history of planetary ring research, the view of planetary rings in astronomy and cosmology over the period 1600-1900, the characteristics of the ring systems of Saturn and Uranus, the ethereal rings of Jupiter and Saturn, dust-magnetosphere interactions, the effects of radiation forces on dust particles, the collisional interactions and physical nature of ring particles, transport effects due to particle erosion mechanisms, and collision-induced transport processes in planetary rings. Also discussed are planetary ring waves, ring particle dynamics in resonances, the dynamics of narrow rings, the origin and evolution of planetary rings, the solar nebula and planetary disk, future studies of the planetary rings by space probes, ground-based observatories and earth-orbiting satellites, and unsolved problems in planetary ring dynamics.

  5. Dynamical stability of imaged planetary systems in formation: Application to HL Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayo, Daniel; Triaud, Amaury H. M. J.; Menou, Kristen; Rein, Hanno

    2015-08-01

    A recent ALMA image revealed several concentric gaps in the protoplanetary disk surrounding the young star HL Tau. We consider the hypothesis that these gaps are carved by planets, and present a general framework for understanding the dynamical stability of such systems over typical disk lifetimes, providing estimates for the maximum planetary masses.We argue that the locations of resonances should be significantly shifted in massive disks like HL Tau, and that theoretical uncertainties in the exact offset, together with observational errors, imply a large uncertainty in the dynamical state and stability in such disks. This may present an important barrier to using systems like HL Tau as a proxy for the initial conditions following planet formation. An important observational avenue to breaking this degeneracy is to search for eccentric gaps, which could implicate resonantly interacting planets. Unfortunately, a massive disk would also induce swift pericenter precession that would smear out any such eccentric features of planetary origin. This motivates pushing toward more typical, less massive disks.For a nominal non-resonant model of the HL Tau system with five planets, we find a maximum mass for the outer three bodies of approximately 2 Neptune masses. In a resonant configuration, these planets can reach at least the mass of Saturn. The inner two planets' masses are unconstrained by dynamical stability arguments. We will consider the implications for the HL Tau system, and discuss the exciting future of the planetary formation studies in the ALMA era.

  6. Unified Planetary Coordinates System: A Searchable Database of Geodetic Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, K. J.a; Gaddis, L. R.; Soderblom, L. A.; Kirk, R. L.; Archinal, B. A.; Johnson, J. R.; Anderson, J. A.; Bowman-Cisneros, E.; LaVoie, S.; McAuley, M.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, an enormous quantity of orbital remote sensing data has been collected for Mars from many missions and instruments. Unfortunately these datasets currently exist in a wide range of disparate coordinate systems, making it extremely difficult for the scientific community to easily correlate, combine, and compare data from different Mars missions and instruments. As part of our work for the PDS Imaging Node and on behalf of the USGS Astrogeology Team, we are working to solve this problem and to provide the NASA scientific research community with easy access to Mars orbital data in a unified, consistent coordinate system along with a wide variety of other key geometric variables. The Unified Planetary Coordinates (UPC) system is comprised of two main elements: (1) a database containing Mars orbital remote sensing data computed using a uniform coordinate system, and (2) a process by which continual maintainance and updates to the contents of the database are performed.

  7. Miniaturized electronic system for the Planetary Integrated Camera-Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soll, Stanley L.; Graham, Richard; Ramirez, Luis J.

    1994-09-01

    This paper discusses the design, and implementation of a miniaturized electronic system for the Planetary Integrated Camera Spectrometer (PICS). The PICS electronics demonstrate the application of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) and of analog hybrid technology to space flight multi-spectral systems. A discussion of the electronic system design illustrates how signals from a multi-sensor instrument containing an UV CCD, two visible CCDs, and a near-IR focal plane assembly can be processed through a common set of electronics. Following the system design discussion, the actual electronic design will be presented. Each miniaturized module will be discussed as to functionality and performance. The test setup for bench checkout of a cooled CCD and an IR FPA, including results with breadboard electronics and with the hybrids are also described.

  8. Observation of Planetary Oceans with Fully Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Wooil M.

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is one of the most cost effective and powerful all weather tools for observation of planetary surface without sun light. The SAR systems can observe planetary surfaces with the very high resolution and large spatial coverage. We have developed and improved the algorithms for extracting quantitative information on geophysical parameters using various types of SAR data available on Earth's surface, both space-borne SAR (ERS-1/2, RADARSAT, and ENVISAT ASAR) and airborne SAR (NASA(JPL) AIRSAR). SAR is the only system that can provide a synoptic view of find wind fields near the coastal area on Earth. Many SAR images including RADARSAT and ENVISAT ASAR's alternating polarization mode and wide swath mode were to investigate the ability of retrieving sea surface wind field and the results are quite accurate and operationally acceptable. We installed corner reflectors on the nearby beach to calibrate the SAR data, and we obtained in-situ measurements from the several coast-based automatic weather systems and ocean buoys. Using the simultaneously acquired polarization ENVISAT ASAR data (HH and VV), the most appropriate polarization ratio was evaluated and applied for improving the wind retrieval model. In addition, the best combinations depending on given sea states and incidence angle ranges were investigated. The characteristics of short-period and long-period (near-inertial) internal waves are also investigated with several space-borne SAR systems. The possibility of inferring characteristics of the interior ocean dynamics from the SAR image associated with internal solitary waves was tested using a hydrodynamic interaction model (action balance equation) and a radar backscattering model (two-scale tilted Bragg model). These models were used iteratively to fit the observed SAR data to the simulated SAR. The estimated results were compared with in-situ measurements. The typical scales and the spatial and temporal characteristics of internal

  9. Melt production in large-scale impact events: Planetary observations and implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cintala, Mark J.; Grieve, Richard A. F.

    1992-01-01

    Differences in scaling relationships for crater formation and the generation of impact melt should lead to a variety of observable features and phenomena. These relationships infer that the volume of the transient cavity (and final crater) relative to the volume of impact melt (and the depth to which melting occurs) decreases as the effects of gravity and impact velocity increase. Since planetary gravity and impact velocity are variables in the calculation of cavity and impact-melt volumes, the implications of the model calculation will vary between planetary bodies. Details of the model calculations of impact-melt generation as a function of impact and target physical conditions were provided elsewhere, as were attempts to validate the model through ground-truth data on melt volumes, shock attenuation, and morphology from terrestrial impact craters.

  10. A high-precision radial-velocity survey for other planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.; Hatzes, Artie P.

    1994-01-01

    The precise measurement of variations in stellar radial velocities provides one of several promising methods of surveying a large sample of nearby solar type stars to detect planetary systems in orbit around them. The McDonald Observatory Planetary Search (MOPS) was started in 1987 September with the goal of detecting other nearby planetary systems. A stabilized I2 gas absorption cell placed in front of the entrance slit to the McDonald Observatory 2.7 m telescope coude spectrograph serves as the velocity metric. With this I2 cell we can achieve radial velocity measurement precision better than 10 m/s in an individual measurement. At this level we can detect a Jupiter-like planet around a solar-type star, and have some hope of detecting Saturn-like planets in a long-term survey. The detectability of planets is ultimately limited by stellar pulsation modes and photospheric motions. Monthly MOPS observing runs allow us to obtain at least 5 independent observations per year of the 33 solar-type (F5-K7) stars on our observing list. We present representative results from the first five years of the survey.

  11. The Search for Young Planetary Systems And the Evolution of Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichman, Charles A.; Boden, Andrew; Ghez, Andrea; Hartman, Lee W.; Hillenbrand, Lynn; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Simon, Michael J.; Stauffer, John R.; Velusamy, Thangasamy

    2004-01-01

    The Space Interferometer Mission (SIM) will provide a census of planetary systems by con- ducting a broad survey of 2,000 stars that will be sensitive to the presence of planets with masses as small as approx. 15 Earth masses (1 Uranus mass) and a deep survey of approx. 250 of the nearest, stars with a mass limit of approx.3 Earth masses. The broad survey will include stars spanning a wide range of ages, spectral types, metallicity, and other important parameters. Within this larger context, the Young Stars and Planets Key Project will study approx. 200 stars with ages from 1 Myr to 100 Myr to understand the formation and dynamical evolution of gas giant planets. The SIM Young Stars and Planets Project will investigate both the frequency of giant planet formation and the early dynamical history of planetary systems. We will gain insight into how common the basic architecture of our solar system is compared with recently discovered systems with close-in giant planets by examining 200 of the nearest (less than 150 pc) and youngest (1-100 Myr) solar-type stars for planets. The sensitivity of the survey for stars located 140 pc away is shown in the planet mass-separation plane. We expect to find anywhere from 10 (assuming that only the presently known fraction of stars. 5-7%, has planets) to 200 (all young stars have planets) planetary systems. W-e have set our sensitivity threshold to ensure the detection of Jupiter-mass planets in the critical orbital range of 1 to 5 AU. These observations, when combined with the results of planetary searches of mature stars, will allow us to test theories of planetary formation and early solar system evolution. By searching for planets around pre-main sequence stars carefully selected to span an age range from 1 to 100 Myr, we will learn a t what epoch and with what frequency giant planets are found at the water-ice snowline where they are expected to form. This will provide insight into the physical mechanisms by which planets form

  12. Planets in Wide Binaries from Kepler: Ages, Stability and Evolution of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenburger, Kolby L.; West, Andrew A.; Janes, Kenneth; Dhital, Saurav

    2014-06-01

    Using the Kepler Input Catalog and the fourth U.S. Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalog, we have identified 1509 common proper motion (CPM) binaries in the Kepler field of view, of which a small subset host planet candidates, or Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs). We have verified the fidelity of the CPM pairs using a Galactic model and follow-up astrometric observations. We present 73 KOIs distributed over 58 CPM pairs and highlight the first wide binary system (separation > 1000 AU) where both stellar components host at least one KOI. Because our binary sample was initially targeted for a gyrochronology analysis, we also present measurements of stellar rotation periods and preliminary estimates of stellar (and planetary) ages. We use these extrapolated planetary ages to investigate longterm planet stability in wide binaries and test potential formation and evolution scenarios of these dynamically complex systems.

  13. Channel coding and data compression system considerations for efficient communication of planetary imaging data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    End-to-end system considerations involving channel coding and data compression which could drastically improve the efficiency in communicating pictorial information from future planetary spacecraft are presented.

  14. ARCHITECTURE OF PLANETARY SYSTEMS BASED ON KEPLER DATA: NUMBER OF PLANETS AND COPLANARITY

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Julia; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2012-12-20

    We investigated the underlying architecture of planetary systems by deriving the distribution of planet multiplicity (number of planets) and the distribution of orbital inclinations based on the sample of planet candidates discovered by the Kepler mission. The scope of our study included solar-like stars and planets with orbital periods less than 200 days and with radii between 1.5 and 30 Earth radii, and was based on Kepler planet candidates detected during Quarters 1-6. We created models of planetary systems with different distributions of planet multiplicity and inclinations, simulated observations of these systems by Kepler, and compared the properties of the transits of detectable objects to actual Kepler planet detections. Specifically, we compared with both the Kepler sample's transit numbers and normalized transit duration ratios in order to determine each model's goodness of fit. We did not include any constraints from radial velocity surveys. Based on our best-fit models, 75%-80% of planetary systems have one or two planets with orbital periods less than 200 days. In addition, over 85% of planets have orbital inclinations less than 3 Degree-Sign (relative to a common reference plane). This high degree of coplanarity is comparable to that seen in our solar system. These results have implications for planet formation and evolution theories. Low inclinations are consistent with planets forming in a protoplanetary disk, followed by evolution without significant and lasting perturbations from other bodies capable of increasing inclinations.

  15. PLANET-PLANET SCATTERING IN PLANETESIMAL DISKS. II. PREDICTIONS FOR OUTER EXTRASOLAR PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Sean N.; Armitage, Philip J.; Gorelick, Noel

    2010-03-10

    We develop an idealized dynamical model to predict the typical properties of outer extrasolar planetary systems, at radii comparable to the Jupiter-to-Neptune region of the solar system. The model is based upon the hypothesis that dynamical evolution in outer planetary systems is controlled by a combination of planet-planet scattering and planetary interactions with an exterior disk of small bodies ('planetesimals'). Our results are based on 5000 long duration N-body simulations that follow the evolution of three planets from a few to 10 AU, together with a planetesimal disk containing 50 M{sub +} from 10 to 20 AU. For large planet masses (M {approx}> M{sub Sat}), the model recovers the observed eccentricity distribution of extrasolar planets. For lower-mass planets, the range of outcomes in models with disks is far greater than that which is seen in isolated planet-planet scattering. Common outcomes include strong scattering among massive planets, sudden jumps in eccentricity due to resonance crossings driven by divergent migration, and re-circularization of scattered low-mass planets in the outer disk. We present the distributions of the eccentricity and inclination that result, and discuss how they vary with planet mass and initial system architecture. In agreement with other studies, we find that the currently observed eccentricity distribution (derived primarily from planets at a {approx}< 3 AU) is consistent with isolated planet-planet scattering. We explain the observed mass dependence-which is in the opposite sense from that predicted by the simplest scattering models-as a consequence of strong correlations between planet masses in the same system. At somewhat larger radii, initial planetary mass correlations and disk effects can yield similar modest changes to the eccentricity distribution. Nonetheless, strong damping of eccentricity for low-mass planets at large radii appears to be a secure signature of the dynamical influence of disks. Radial velocity

  16. Phenomenology of Neptune's radio emissions observed by the Voyager planetary radio astronomy experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, B. M.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Aubier, M. G.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Neptune flyby in 1989 added a new planet to the known number of magnetized planets generating nonthermal radio emissions. We review the Neptunian radio emission morphology as observed by the planetary radio astronomy experiment on board Voyager 2 during a few weeks before and after closest approach. We present the characteristics of the two observed recurrent main components of the Neptunian kilometric radiation, i.e., the 'smooth' and the 'bursty' emissions, and we describe the many specific features of the radio spectrum during closest approach.

  17. The planetary data system educational CD-ROM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinness, E. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Martin, M.; Dueck, S.

    1993-01-01

    The Planetary Data System (PDS) is producing a special educational CD-ROM that contains samples of PDS datasets and is expected to be released in 1993. The CD-ROM will provide university-level instructors with PDS-compatible materials and information that can be used to construct student problem sets using real datasets. The main purposes of the CD-ROM are to facilitate wide use of planetary data and to introduce a large community to the PDS. To meet these objectives the Educational CD-ROM will also contain software to manipulate the data, background discussions about scientific questions that can be addressed with the data, and a suite of exercises that illustrate analysis techniques. Students will also be introduced to the SPICE concept, which is a new way of maintaining geometry and instrument information. The exercises will be presented at the freshman through graduate student levels. With simplification, some of the material should also be of use at the high school level.

  18. Planetary-scale wave structures of the earth's atmosphere revealed from the COSMIC observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisetty, S. K. A. V. Prasad Rao; Brahmanandam, P. S.; Uma, G.; Babu, A. Narendra; Huang, Ching-Yuang; Kumar, G. Anil; Ram, S. Tulasi; Wang, Hsiao-Lan; Chu, Yen-Hsyang

    2014-02-01

    GPS radio occultation (GPS RO) method, an active satellite-to-satellite remote sensing technique, is capable of producing accurate, all-weather, round the clock, global refractive index, density, pressure, and temperature profiles of the troposphere and stratosphere. This study presents planetary-scale equatorially trapped Kelvin waves in temperature profiles retrieved using COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate) satellites during 2006-2009 and their interactions with background atmospheric conditions. It is found that the Kelvin waves are not only associated with wave periods of higher than 10 days (slow Kelvin waves) with higher zonal wave numbers (either 1 or 2), but also possessing downward phase progression, giving evidence that the source regions of them are located at lower altitudes. A thorough verification of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) reveals that deep convection activity has developed regularly over the Indonesian region, suggesting that the Kelvin waves are driven by the convective activity. The derived Kelvin waves show enhanced (diminished) tendencies during westward (eastward) phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in zonal winds, implying a mutual relation between both of them. The El Niño and Southern Oscillation (ENSO) below 18 km and the QBO features between 18 and 27 km in temperature profiles are observed during May 2006-May 2010 with the help of an adaptive data analysis technique known as Hilbert Huang Transform (HHT). Further, temperature anomalies computed using COSMIC retrieved temperatures are critically evaluated during different phases of ENSO, which has revealed interesting results and are discussed in light of available literature.

  19. Can The Periods of Some Extra-Solar Planetary Systems be Quantized?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Fady Morcos, Abd

    A simple formula was derived before by Morcos (2013 ), to relate the quantum numbers of planetary systems and their periods. This formula is applicable perfectly for the solar system planets, and some extra-solar planets , of stars of approximately the same masses like the Sun. This formula has been used to estimate the periods of some extra-solar planet of known quantum numbers. The used quantum numbers were calculated previously by other authors. A comparison between the observed and estimated periods, from the given formula has been done. The differences between the observed and calculated periods for the extra-solar systems have been calculated and tabulated. It is found that there is an error of the range of 10% The same formula has been also used to find the quantum numbers, of some known periods, exo-planet. Keywords: Quantization; Periods; Extra-Planetary; Extra-Solar Planet REFERENCES [1] Agnese, A. G. and Festa, R. “Discretization on the Cosmic Scale Inspirred from the Old Quantum Mechanics,” 1998. http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/9807186 [2] Agnese, A. G. and Festa, R. “Discretizing ups-Andro- medae Planetary System,” 1999. http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/9910534. [3] Barnothy, J. M. “The Stability of the Solar Systemand of Small Stellar Systems,” Proceedings of the IAU Sympo-sium 62, Warsaw, 5-8 September 1973, pp. 23-31. [4] Morcos, A.B. , “Confrontation between Quantized Periods of Some Extra-Solar Planetary Systems and Observations”, International Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 2013, 3, 28-32. [5] Nottale, L. “Fractal Space-Time and Microphysics, To-wards a Theory of Scale Relativity,” World Scientific, London, 1994. [6] Nottale , L., “Scale-Relativity and Quantization of Extra- Solar Planetary Systems,” Astronomy & Astrophysics, Vol. 315, 1996, pp. L9-L12 [7] Nottale, L., Schumacher, G. and Gay, J. “Scale-Relativity and Quantization of the Solar Systems,” Astronomy & Astrophysics letters, Vol. 322, 1997, pp. 1018-10 [8

  20. The effect of latent heat release on synoptic-to-planetary wave interactions and its implication for satellite observations: Theoretical modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branscome, Lee E.; Bleck, Rainer

    1989-01-01

    Simple models are being developed to simulate interaction of planetary and synoptic-scale waves incorporating the effects of large-scale topography; eddy heat and momentum fluxes (or nonlinear dynamics); radiative heating/cooling; and latent heat release (precipitation) in synoptic-scale waves. The importance of latent heat release is determined in oceanic storm tracks for temporal variability and time-mean behavior of planetary waves. The model results were compared with available observations of planetary and synoptic-scale wave variability and time-mean circulation. The usefulness of monitoring precipitation in oceanic storm tracks by satellite observing systems was ascertained. The modeling effort includes two different low-order quasi-geostrophic models-time-dependent version and climatological mean version. The modeling also includes a low-order primitive equation model. A time-dependent, multi-level version will be used to validate the two-level Q-G models and examine effects of spherical geometry.

  1. Theoretical models of planetary system formation: mass vs. semi-major axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibert, Y.; Carron, F.; Fortier, A.; Pfyffer, S.; Benz, W.; Mordasini, C.; Swoboda, D.

    2013-10-01

    Context. Planet formation models have been developed during the past years to try to reproduce what has been observed of both the solar system and the extrasolar planets. Some of these models have partially succeeded, but they focus on massive planets and, for the sake of simplicity, exclude planets belonging to planetary systems. However, more and more planets are now found in planetary systems. This tendency, which is a result of radial velocity, transit, and direct imaging surveys, seems to be even more pronounced for low-mass planets. These new observations require improving planet formation models, including new physics, and considering the formation of systems. Aims: In a recent series of papers, we have presented some improvements in the physics of our models, focussing in particular on the internal structure of forming planets, and on the computation of the excitation state of planetesimals and their resulting accretion rate. In this paper, we focus on the concurrent effect of the formation of more than one planet in the same protoplanetary disc and show the effect, in terms of architecture and composition of this multiplicity. Methods: We used an N-body calculation including collision detection to compute the orbital evolution of a planetary system. Moreover, we describe the effect of competition for accretion of gas and solids, as well as the effect of gravitational interactions between planets. Results: We show that the masses and semi-major axes of planets are modified by both the effect of competition and gravitational interactions. We also present the effect of the assumed number of forming planets in the same system (a free parameter of the model), as well as the effect of the inclination and eccentricity damping. We find that the fraction of ejected planets increases from nearly 0 to 8% as we change the number of embryos we seed the system with from 2 to 20 planetary embryos. Moreover, our calculations show that, when considering planets more

  2. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session 'Outer Solar System" inlcuded:Monte Carlo Modeling of [O I] 630 nm Auroral Emission on Io; The Detection of Iron Sulfide on Io; Io and Loki in 2003 as Seen from the Infrared Telescope Facility Using Mutual Satellite and Jupiter Occultations; Mapping of the Zamama-Thor Region of Io; First Solar System Results of the Spitzer Space Telescope; Mapping the Surface of Pluto with the Hubble Space Telescope; Experimental Study on Fischer-Tropsch Catalysis in the Circum-Saturnian Subnebula; New High-Pressure Phases of Ammonia Dihydrate; Gas Hydrate Stability at Low Temperatures and High Pressures with Applications to Mars and Europa; Laboratory UV Photolysis of Planetary Ice Analogs Containing H2O + CO2 (1:1); The OH Stretch Infrared Band of Water Ice and Its Temperature and Radiation Dependence; Band Position Variations in Reflectance Spectra of the Jovian Satellite Ganymede; Comparison of Porosity and Radar Models for Europa s Near Surface; Combined Effects of Diurnal and Nonsynchronous Surface Stresses on Europa; Europa s Northern Trailing Hemisphere: Lineament Stratigraphic Framework; Europa at the Highest Resolution: Implications for Surface Processes and Landing Sites; Comparison of Methods to Determine Furrow System Centers on Ganymede and Callisto; Resurfacing of Ganymede by Liquid-Water Volcanism; Layered Ejecta Craters on Ganymede: Comparisons with Martian Analogs; Evaluation of the Possible Presence of CO2-Clathrates in Europa s Icy Shell or Seafloor; Geosciences at Jupiter s Icy Moons: The Midas Touch; Planetary Remote Sensing Science Enabled by MIDAS (Multiple Instrument Distributed Aperture Sensor); and In Situ Surveying of Saturn s Rings.

  3. 55 CANCRI: A COPLANAR PLANETARY SYSTEM THAT IS LIKELY MISALIGNED WITH ITS STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Kaib, Nathan A.; Duncan, Martin J.; Raymond, Sean N.

    2011-12-15

    Although the 55 Cnc system contains multiple, closely packed planets that are presumably in a coplanar configuration, we use numerical simulations to demonstrate that they are likely to be highly inclined to their parent star's spin axis. Due to perturbations from its distant binary companion, this planetary system precesses like a rigid body about its parent star. Consequently, the parent star's spin axis and the planetary orbit normal likely diverged long ago. Because only the projected separation of the binary is known, we study this effect statistically, assuming an isotropic distribution for wide binary orbits. We find that the most likely projected spin-orbit angle is {approx}50 Degree-Sign , with a {approx}30% chance of a retrograde configuration. Transit observations of the innermost planet-55 Cnc e-may be used to verify these findings via the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. 55 Cancri may thus represent a new class of planetary systems with well-ordered, coplanar orbits that are inclined with respect to the stellar equator.

  4. Evolution of Planetary Ice-Ocean Systems: Effects of Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allu Peddinti, D.; McNamara, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Planetary oceanography is enjoying renewed attention thanks to not only the detection of several exoplanetary ocean worlds but also due to the expanding family of ocean worlds within our own star system. Our solar system is now believed to host about nine ocean worlds including Earth, some dwarf planets and few moons of Jupiter and Saturn. Amongst them, Europa, like Earth is thought to have an ice Ih-liquid water system. However, the thickness of the Europan ice-ocean system is much larger than that of the Earth. The evolution of this system would determine the individual thicknesses of the ice shell and the ocean. In turn, these thicknesses can alter the course of evolution of the system. In a pure H2O system, the thickness of the ice shell would govern if heat loss occurs entirely by conduction or if the shell begins to convect as it attains a threshold thickness. This switch between conduction-convection regimes could determine the longevity of the subsurface ocean and hence define the astrobiological potential of the planetary body at any given time. In reality, however, the system is not pure water ice. The detected induced magnetic field infers a saline ocean layer. Salts are expected to act as an anti-freeze allowing a subsurface ocean to persist over long periods but the amount of salts would determine the extent of that effect. In our current study, we use geodynamic models to examine the effect of salinity on the evolution of ice-ocean system. An initial ocean with different salinities is allowed to evolve. The effect of salinity on thickness of the two layers at any time is examined. We also track how salinity controls the switch between conductive-convective modes. The study shows that for a given time period, larger salinities can maintain a thick vigorously convecting ocean while the smaller salinities behave similar to a pure H2O system leading to a thick convecting ice-shell. A range of salinities identified can potentially predict the current state

  5. Collisions Between Small Bodies In A Planetary System: Disruption Regime At High Impact Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, P.; Benz, W.; Tanga, P.; Richardson, D. C.

    Collisions play a major role in the formation of planetary systems, since planetary growth occurs by collisional accretion of small bodies at low relative velocities. How- ever, once the masses of planetesimals are high enough, their relative velocities in- crease due to their mutual perturbations and eventually, collisions occur at high impact speed. In this regime, the planetary growth is prevented and a disruptive phase begins, like in the current asteroid belt of our Solar System, and probably in other systems. Here, we present new simulations of high speed collisions between small bodies which take into account the production of gravitationally reaccumulated bodies. We have de- velopped a procedure which divides the process into two phases. Using a 3D SPH hydrocode, the fragmentation of the solid target through crack propagation is first computed. Then the simulation of the gravitational evolution and possible reaccumu- lation of the resulting new fragments is performed using the parallel N-body code pkdgrav. Our first simulations succeeded in reproducing fundamental properties of some well-identified asteroid families, showing the reliability of our method. We have now made some improvements by including the possibility of fragments bouncing (in- stead of strictly merging) when collisions occur at high speed during the gravitational phase. We present thus new simulations in three different impact regimes, from highly catastrophic to barely disruptive, and compare them with previous ones in which col- lisions between fragments resulted always in their merger. This comparison shows for each regime that the fundamental outcome properties remain statistically unchanged. We also observe the natural production of satellite systems around some fragments. We plan to continue our investigations using this procedure, and to improve upon the modelling of fundamental physical effects during collisions. We will then also inves- tigate the efficiency of planetary accretion

  6. Constraining Planetary Migration Mechanisms in Systems of Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Rebekah I.; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.; Johnson, John Asher

    2014-01-01

    It was once widely believed that planets formed peacefully in situ in their proto-planetary disks and subsequently remain in place. Instead, growing evidence suggests that many giant planets undergo dynamical rearrangement that results in planets migrating inward in the disk, far from their birthplaces. However, it remains debated whether this migration is caused by smooth planet-disk interactions or violent multi-body interactions. Both classes of model can produce Jupiter-mass planets orbiting within 0.1 AU of their host stars, also known as hot Jupiters. In the latter class of model, another planet or star in the system perturbs the Jupiter onto a highly eccentric orbit, which tidal dissipation subsequently shrinks and circularizes during close passages to the star. We assess the prevalence of smooth vs. violent migration through two studies. First, motivated by the predictions of Socrates et al. (2012), we search for super-eccentric hot Jupiter progenitors by using the ``photoeccentric effect'' to measure the eccentricities of Kepler giant planet candidates from their transit light curves. We find a significant lack of super- eccentric proto-hot Jupiters compared to the number expected, allowing us to place an upper limit on the fraction of hot Jupiters created by stellar binaries. Second, if both planet-disk and multi-body interactions commonly cause giant planet migration, physical properties of the proto-planetary environment may determine which is triggered. We identify three trends in which giant planets orbiting metal rich stars show signatures of planet-planet interactions: (1) gas giants orbiting within 1 AU of metal-rich stars have a range of eccentricities, whereas those orbiting metal- poor stars are restricted to lower eccentricities; (2) metal-rich stars host most eccentric proto-hot Jupiters undergoing tidal circularization; and (3) the pile-up of short-period giant planets, missing in the Kepler sample, is a feature of metal-rich stars and is

  7. Enviromnental Control and Life Support Systems for Mars Missions - Issues and Concerns for Planetary Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Anderson, Molly S.; Lange, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Planetary protection represents an additional set of requirements that generally have not been considered by developers of technologies for Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS). Planetary protection guidelines will affect the kind of operations, processes, and functions that can take place during future human planetary exploration missions. Ultimately, there will be an effect on mission costs, including the mission trade space when planetary protection requirements begin to drive vehicle deisgn in a concrete way. Planetary protection requirements need to be considered early in technology development and mission programs in order to estimate these impacts and push back on requirements or find efficient ways to perform necessary functions. It is expected that planetary protection will be a significant factor during technology selection and system architecture design for future missions.

  8. Probing Nearby Planetary Systems by Debris Disk Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapelfeldt, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Many main-sequence stars possess tenuous circumstellar dust clouds believed to trace extrasolar analogs of the Sun's asteroidand Kuiper Belts. While most of these "debris disks" are known only from far-infrared photometry, a growing number of them are now spatially resolved. In this talk, I'll review what is currently known about the structure of debris disks. Using images from the Hubble, Spitzer, and Herschel Space Telescopes, I will show how modeling of these resolved systems can place strong constraints on dust particle properties in the disks. Some of the disks show disturbed structures suggestive of planetary perturbations: specific cases will be discussed where directly-imaged exoplanets are clearly affecting debris disk structure. I'll conclude with thoughts on the future of high contrast exoplanet imaging.

  9. Detection of the water reservoir in a forming planetary system.

    PubMed

    Hogerheijde, Michiel R; Bergin, Edwin A; Brinch, Christian; Cleeves, L Ilsedore; Fogel, Jeffrey K J; Blake, Geoffrey A; Dominik, Carsten; Lis, Dariusz C; Melnick, Gary; Neufeld, David; Panić, Olja; Pearson, John C; Kristensen, Lars; Yildiz, Umut A; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2011-10-21

    Icy bodies may have delivered the oceans to the early Earth, yet little is known about water in the ice-dominated regions of extrasolar planet-forming disks. The Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared on board the Herschel Space Observatory has detected emission lines from both spin isomers of cold water vapor from the disk around the young star TW Hydrae. This water vapor likely originates from ice-coated solids near the disk surface, hinting at a water ice reservoir equivalent to several thousand Earth oceans in mass. The water's ortho-to-para ratio falls well below that of solar system comets, suggesting that comets contain heterogeneous ice mixtures collected across the entire solar nebula during the early stages of planetary birth. PMID:22021851

  10. Isotopic enrichment of forming planetary systems from supernova pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberg, Tim; Parker, Richard J.; Meyer, Michael R.

    2016-08-01

    Heating by short-lived radioisotopes (SLRs) such as 26Al and 60Fe fundamentally shaped the thermal history and interior structure of Solar System planetesimals during the early stages of planetary formation. The subsequent thermo-mechanical evolution, such as internal differentiation or rapid volatile degassing, yields important implications for the final structure, composition and evolution of terrestrial planets. SLR-driven heating in the Solar System is sensitive to the absolute abundance and homogeneity of SLRs within the protoplanetary disk present during the condensation of the first solids. In order to explain the diverse compositions found for extrasolar planets, it is important to understand the distribution of SLRs in active planet formation regions (star clusters) during their first few Myr of evolution. By constraining the range of possible effects, we show how the imprint of SLRs can be extrapolated to exoplanetary systems and derive statistical predictions for the distribution of 26Al and 60Fe based on N-body simulations of typical to large clusters (103-104 stars) with a range of initial conditions. We quantify the pollution of protoplanetary disks by supernova ejecta and show that the likelihood of enrichment levels similar to or higher than the Solar System can vary considerably, depending on the cluster morphology. Furthermore, many enriched systems show an excess in radiogenic heating compared to Solar System levels, which implies that the formation and evolution of planetesimals could vary significantly depending on the birth environment of their host stars.

  11. The search for other planetary systems - Progress to date and future prospects (The Rudolph Pesek Lecture)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, David C.

    1991-01-01

    The notion is addressed which links the formation of stars and the existence of planets, and the lack of supporting observational data is discussed in relation to a NASA astrometric project. The program cited is called Towards Other Planetary Systems (TOPS) and includes ground-based astrometric and radial-velocity studies for both direct and indirect scrutiny of unknown planets. The TOPS program also envisages space-based astrometric systems that can operate with an accuracy of not less than 10 microarcseconds, and the possibility is mentioned of a moon-based astrometric platform.

  12. Model/observational data cross analysis in planetary plasma sciences with IMPEx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genot, V. N.; Khodachenko, M.; Kallio, E. J.; Al-Ubaidi, T.; Alexeev, I. I.; Gangloff, M.; Bourrel, N.; andre, N.; Modolo, R.; Hess, S.; Topf, F.; Perez-Suarez, D.; Belenkaya, E. S.; Kalegaev, V. V.; Hakkinen, L. V.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation details how the FP7 IMPEx (http://impex-fp7.oeaw.ac.at/) infrastructure helps scientists in inter-comparing observational and model data in planetary plasma sciences. Within the project, data originate from multiple sources : large observational databases (CDAWeb, AMDA at CDPP, CLWeb at IRAP), simulation databases for hybrid and MHD codes (FMI, LATMOS), planetary magnetic field models database and online services (SINP). To navigate in this large data ensemble, IMPEx offers a distributed framework in which these data may be visualized, analyzed, and shared thanks to a set of interoperable tools (AMDA, 3DView, CLWeb). A simulation data model, based on SPASE, has been designed to ease data exchange within the infrastructure. On the communication point of view, the Virtual Observatory paradigm is followed and the architecture is based on web services and the IVOA protocol SAMP. These choices enabled a high level versatility with the goal to allow other model or data providers to distribute their own resources via the IMPEx infrastructure. A detailed use case based on Mars data and hybrid models will be proposed showing how the tools may be operated synchronously to manipulate heterogeneous data sets. Facilitating the analysis of the future MAVEN observations is one possible application of the IMPEx infrastructure.

  13. IMPEx : enabling model/observational data comparison in planetary plasma sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génot, V.; Khodachenko, M.; Kallio, E. J.; Al-Ubaidi, T.; Alexeev, I. I.; Topf, F.; Gangloff, M.; André, N.; Bourrel, N.; Modolo, R.; Hess, S.; Perez-Suarez, D.; Belenkaya, E. S.; Kalegaev, V.

    2013-09-01

    The FP7 IMPEx infrastructure, whose general goal is to encourage and facilitate inter-comparison between observational and model data in planetary plasma sciences, is now established for 2 years. This presentation will focus on a tour of the different achievements which occurred during this period. Within the project, data originate from multiple sources : large observational databases (CDAWeb, AMDA at CDPP, CLWeb at IRAP), simulation databases for hybrid and MHD codes (FMI, LATMOS), planetary magnetic field models database and online services (SINP). Each of these databases proposes dedicated access to their models and runs (HWA@FMI, LATHYS@LATMOS, SMDC@SINP). To gather this large data ensemble, IMPEx offers a distributed framework in which these data may be visualized, analyzed, and shared thanks to interoperable tools; they comprise of AMDA - an online space physics analysis tool -, 3DView - a tool for data visualization in 3D planetary context -, and CLWeb - an online space physics visualization tool. A simulation data model, based on SPASE, has been designed to ease data exchange within the infrastructure. On the communication point of view, the VO paradigm has been retained and the architecture is based on web services and the IVOA protocol SAMP. The presentation will focus on how the tools may be operated synchronously to manipulate these heterogeneous data sets. Use cases based on in-flight missions and associated model runs will be proposed for the demonstration. Finally the motivation and functionalities of the future IMPEx portal will be exposed. As requirements to and potentialities of joining the IMPEx infrastructure will be shown, the presentation could be seen as an invitation to other modeling teams in the community which may be interested to promote their results via IMPEx.

  14. Revised planetary protection policy for solar system exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincenzi, D. L.; Stabekis, P. D.

    1984-01-01

    In order to control contamination of planets by terrestrial microorganisms and organic constituents, U.S. planetary missions have been governed by a planetary protection (or planetary quarantine) policy which has changed little since 1972. This policy has recently been reviewed in light of new information obtained from planetary exploration during the past decade and because of changes to, or uncertainties in, some parameters used in the existing quantitative approach. On the basis of this analysis, a revised planetary protection policy with the following key features is proposed: deemphasizing the use of mathematical models and quantitative analyses; establishing requirements for target planet/mission type (i.e., Orbiter, Lander, etc.) combinations; considering sample return missions a separate category; simplifying documentation; and imposing implementing procedures (i.e., trajectory biasing, cleanroom assembly, spacecraft sterilization, etc.) by exception, i.e., only if the planet/mission combination warrants such controls.

  15. Chaotic diffusion in the Gliese-876 planetary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí, J. G.; Cincotta, P. M.; Beaugé, C.

    2016-07-01

    Chaotic diffusion is supposed to be responsible for orbital instabilities in planetary systems after the dissipation of the protoplanetary disc, and a natural consequence of irregular motion. In this paper, we show that resonant multiplanetary systems, despite being highly chaotic, not necessarily exhibit significant diffusion in phase space, and may still survive virtually unchanged over time-scales comparable to their age. Using the GJ-876 system as an example, we analyse the chaotic diffusion of the outermost (and less massive) planet. We construct a set of stability maps in the surrounding regions of the Laplace resonance. We numerically integrate ensembles of close initial conditions, compute Poincaré maps and estimate the chaotic diffusion present in this system. Our results show that, the Laplace resonance contains two different regions: an inner domain characterized by low chaoticity and slow diffusion, and an outer one displaying larger values of dynamical indicators. In the outer resonant domain, the stochastic borders of the Laplace resonance seem to prevent the complete destruction of the system. We characterize the diffusion for small ensembles along the parameters of the outermost planet. Finally, we perform a stability analysis of the inherent chaotic, albeit stable Laplace resonance, by linking the behaviour of the resonant variables of the configurations to the different sub-structures inside the three-body resonance.

  16. An Assessment of Ground-Based Techniques for Detecting Other Planetary Systems. Volume 2: Position papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.; Brunk, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    The capabilities of several astronomical interferomenter system concepts are assessed and the effects of the Earth's atmosphere on astrometric precision are examined in detail. Included is an examination of the use of small aperture interferometry to detect planets in binary star systems. It is estimated that, for differential astrometric observation, an amplitude interferometer having two separate telescopes should permit observations of stars as faint as 14th magnitude and a positional accuracy of 0.00005 arc-sec. Instrumental, atmospheric, and photon noise errors that apply to interferometric observation are examined. It is suggested that the effects of atmospheric turbulence may be eliminated with the use of two color refractometer systems. Several sites for future telescopes dedicated to the search for planetary systems are identified.

  17. Variability of Elemental Abundances in the Local Neighborhood and its Effect on Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Michael D.; Young, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    Does a true range of elemental compositions amongst local stars exist? How does this variation effect possible planetary systems around these stars? Through calculating and analyzing the variation in elemental abundances of nearby stars, the actual range in stellar abundances can be determined using statistical methods. This research emphasizes the improvement needed within the field of stellar abundance determination, both by the ease of measuring and by standardization. An intrinsic variation has been found to exist for almost all of the elements studied by most abundance-finding groups. Specifically, this research determines abundances for our own set of F, G, and K stars 400 stars) from spectroscopic planet hunting surveys for 27 elements, including: C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr, Mo, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Eu, and Hf, where some elements are not measured in all stars. Abundances of the elements in many known exosolar planet host stars are calculated for the purpose of hypothesizing new ways to visualize how stellar abundances could affect planetary systems, planetary formation, and mineralogy. For example, the emphasis on the unusual stellar abundances of Tau Ceti is being heavily analyzed. Tau Ceti is theorized to have 5 planets of Super-Earth masses orbiting in near habitable zone distances(Tuomi, M. et al. 2013). Spectroscopic analysis finds that the Mg/Si ratio is extremely high 2) for this star, which could lead to alterations in planetary properties. Tau Ceti's low metallicity and Oxygen abundance leads to changes in the location of the traditional habitable zone. In addition, the abundance results of a spectroscopic survey of around 400 stars will be presented. This is completed by observing mineralogical ratios, such as Mg/Si and C/O, as well as constructing other useful ratios for determining the effects of individual stellar abundances.

  18. International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite observations of seven high-excitation planetary nebulae.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Keyes, C D

    1980-03-01

    Observations of seven high-excitation planetary nebulae secured with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite were combined with extensive ground-based data to obtain electron densities, gas kinetic temperatures, and ionic concentrations. We then employed a network of theoretical model nebulae to estimate the factors by which observed ionic concentrations must be multiplied to obtain elemental abundances. Comparison with a large sample of nebulae for which extensive ground-based observations have been obtained shows nitrogen to be markedly enhanced in some of these objects. Possibly most, if not all, high-excitation nebulae evolve from stars that have higher masses than progenitors of nebulae of low-to-moderate excitation. PMID:16592781

  19. Observations and models of deuterated H3+ in proto-planetary disks.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Dominik, Carsten

    2006-11-15

    Young, gas-rich proto-planetary disks orbiting around solar-type young stars represent a crucial phase in disk evolution and planetary formation. Of particular relevance is to observationally track the evolution of the gas, which governs the overall evolution of the disk and is eventually dispersed. However, the bulk of the mass resides in the plane, which is so cold and dense that virtually all heavy-element-bearing molecules freeze out onto the dust grains and disappear from the gas phase. In this paper, we show that the ground-state ortho-H2D+ transition is the best, if not the only, tracer of the disk-plane gas. We report the theoretical models of the chemical structure of the plane of the disk, where the deuterated forms of H3+, including H2D+, play a major role. We also compare the theoretical predictions with the observations obtained towards the disk of the young star DM Tau and show that the ionization rate is probably enhanced there, perhaps owing to the penetration of X-rays from the central object through the disk plane. We conclude by remarking that the ground-state ortho-H2D+ transition is such a powerful diagnostic that it may also reveal the matter in the dark halos of external galaxies, if it is hidden in cold, dense and small clouds, as several theories predict. PMID:17015395

  20. Hubble Space Telescope observations of planetary nebulae in the magellanic clouds. 2: SMP 85, a young planetary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Vassiliadis, Emanuel; Meatheringham, Stephen J.; Ford, Holland C.; Bohlin, Ralph; Wood, Peter R.; Stecher, Theodore P.; Maran, Stephen P.; Harrington, J. Patrick

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained Hubble Space Telescope Planetary Camera images in the (O III) lambda 5007 A emission line, and Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) UV spectrophotometry of the low-excitation planetary nebula SMP 85 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. By combining these results with existing optical spectrophotometry, absolute flux measurements, and dynamical and density information, we have been able to construct a fully self-consistent nebular model. This proves that SMP 85 is a dense, young, carbon-rich object which started to be ionized about 500-1000 years ago, and which contains a substantial inner reservoir of atomic or molecular gas, probably in the form of many small cloudlets. These cloudlets have been ejected at a velocity not exceeding 6 km/s, a result which, together with the morphology is an important clue to mass loss during late asymptotic giant branch (AGB) evolution. We have directly detected the central star through its UV continuum emission, and from both Zanstra techniques and nebular modeling derive a stellar temperature of 46000 +/- 2000 K, a stellar luminosity of 7300 +/- 700 solar luminosity, and a core mass of 0.63-0.67 solar mass. The nebular analysis also demonstrates that there is severe depletion of the nebular gases onto dust grains, most likely of the calcium magnesium silicate variety; a surprising result in view of the carbon-rich nature of the ionized nebula.

  1. Planetary Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  2. Planetary System Formation in the Protoplanetary Disk around HL Tauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Eiji; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Hayashi, Masahiko; Iguchi, Satoru

    2016-02-01

    We reprocess the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) long-baseline science verification data taken toward HL Tauri. Assuming the observed gaps are opened up by currently forming, unseen bodies, we estimate the mass of such hypothetical bodies based on the following two approaches: the Hill radius analysis and a more elaborate approach developed from the angular momentum transfer analysis in gas disks. For the former, the measured gap widths are used for estimating the mass of the bodies, while for the latter, the measured gap depths are utilized. We show that their masses are comparable to or less than the mass of Jovian planets. By evaluating Toomre’s gravitational instability (GI) condition and cooling effect, we find that the GI might be a mechanism to form the bodies in the outer region of the disk. As the disk might be gravitationally unstable only in the outer region of the disk, inward planetary migration would be needed to construct the current architecture of the observed disk. We estimate the gap-opening mass and show that type II migration might be able to play such a role. Combining GIs with inward migration, we conjecture that all of the observed gaps may be a consequence of bodies that might have originally formed at the outer part of the disk, and have subsequently migrated to the current locations. While ALMA’s unprecedented high spatial resolution observations can revolutionize our picture of planet formation, more dedicated observational and theoretical studies are needed to fully understand the HL Tauri images.

  3. On the Dynamical State of the HD 82943 Planetary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xianyu; Lee, M. H.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Johnson, J. A.; Wright, J. T.

    2012-05-01

    We present new results from an analysis of radial velocity data of the HD 82943 planetary system based on 10 years of measurements obtained with the Keck telescope. Previous study has shown that the HD 82943 system has two planets that are likely in 2:1 mean-motion resonance (MMR), with the orbital periods about 220 and 440 days (Lee et al. 2006). However, alternative fits that are qualitatively different have also been suggested, with the two planets in 1:1 resonance or the addition of a third planet possibly in a Laplace 4:2:1 resonance with the other two (Gozdziewski & Konacki 2006; Beague et al. 2008). Here we use the chi-square minimization method combined with parameter grid search to investigate the orbital parameters and dynamical states of the qualitatively different types of fits. Our results tend to support the 2:1 MMR configuration for this system. The fits of coplanar 2:1 MMR show a chi-square minimum at 20 degree inclination that is dynamically stable with both resonant angles librating around 0 degree. The fits of 1:1 resonance and 3-planet Laplace resonance are ruled out according to chi-square statistic and dynamical instability. This work is supported in part by Hong Kong RGC grant HKU 7034/09P.

  4. PLANETARY PHASE VARIATIONS OF THE 55 CANCRI SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Stephen R.; Gelino, Dawn M.; Ciardi, David R.; Dragomir, Diana; Von Braun, Kaspar

    2011-10-20

    Characterization of the composition, surface properties, and atmospheric conditions of exoplanets is a rapidly progressing field as the data to study such aspects become more accessible. Bright targets, such as the multi-planet 55 Cancri system, allow an opportunity to achieve high signal-to-noise for the detection of photometric phase variations to constrain the planetary albedos. The recent discovery that innermost planet, 55 Cancri e, transits the host star introduces new prospects for studying this system. Here we calculate photometric phase curves at optical wavelengths for the system with varying assumptions for the surface and atmospheric properties of 55 Cancri e. We show that the large differences in geometric albedo allows one to distinguish between various surface models, that the scattering phase function cannot be constrained with foreseeable data, and that planet b will contribute significantly to the phase variation, depending upon the surface of planet e. We discuss detection limits and how these models may be used with future instrumentation to further characterize these planets and distinguish between various assumptions regarding surface conditions.

  5. Physical properties of the planetary systems WASP-45 and WASP-46 from simultaneous multiband photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciceri, S.; Mancini, L.; Southworth, J.; Lendl, M.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Brahm, R.; Chen, G.; D'Ago, G.; Dominik, M.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Galianni, P.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Juncher, D.; Korhonen, H.; Liebig, C.; Rabus, M.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bott, K.; Henning, Th.; Jordán, A.; Sozzetti, A.; Alsubai, K. A.; Andersen, J. M.; Bajek, D.; Bozza, V.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Calchi Novati, S.; Damerdji, Y.; Diehl, C.; Elyiv, A.; Giannini, E.; Gu, S.-H.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Penny, M.; Popovas, A.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Schmidt, R. W.; Skottfelt, J.; Snodgrass, C.; Surdej, J.; Vilela, C.; Wang, X.-B.; Wertz, O.

    2016-02-01

    Accurate measurements of the physical characteristics of a large number of exoplanets are useful to strongly constrain theoretical models of planet formation and evolution, which lead to the large variety of exoplanets and planetary-system configurations that have been observed. We present a study of the planetary systems WASP-45 and WASP-46, both composed of a main-sequence star and a close-in hot Jupiter, based on 29 new high-quality light curves of transits events. In particular, one transit of WASP-45 b and four of WASP-46 b were simultaneously observed in four optical filters, while one transit of WASP-46 b was observed with the NTT obtaining a precision of 0.30 mmag with a cadence of roughly 3 min. We also obtained five new spectra of WASP-45 with the FEROS spectrograph. We improved by a factor of 4 the measurement of the radius of the planet WASP-45 b, and found that WASP-46 b is slightly less massive and smaller than previously reported. Both planets now have a more accurate measurement of the density (0.959 ± 0.077 ρJup instead of 0.64 ± 0.30 ρJup for WASP-45 b, and 1.103 ± 0.052 ρJup instead of 0.94 ± 0.11 ρJup for WASP-46 b). We tentatively detected radius variations with wavelength for both planets, in particular in the case of WASP-45 b we found a slightly larger absorption in the redder bands than in the bluer ones. No hints for the presence of an additional planetary companion in the two systems were found either from the photometric or radial velocity measurements.

  6. Jupiter System Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senske, Dave; Kwok, Johnny

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the proposed mission for the Jupiter System Observer. The presentation also includes overviews of the mission timeline, science goals, and spacecraftspecifications for the satellite.

  7. The Astrometric Imaging Telescope: Detection of planetary systems with imaging and astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, Steven H.; Terrile, Richard J.; Ftaclas, Christ; Gatewood, George D.; Levy, Eugene H.

    1994-01-01

    The Astrometric Imaging Telescope (AIT) is a proposed spaceborne observatory whose primary goal is the detecton and study of extra-solar planetary systems. It contains two instruments that use complementary techniques to address the goal. The first instrument, the Coronagraphic Imager, takes direct images of nearby stars and Jupiter-size planets. It uses a telescope with scattering-compensated optics and a high-efficiency coronagraph to separate reflected planet light from the central star light. Planet detections take hours; confirmations occur in months. With a program duration of about 2 years, about 50 stars are observed. The second instrument, the Astrometric Photometer, shares the same telescope and focal plane. It uses a Ronchi ruling that is translated across the focal plane to simultaneously measure the positions of each target star and about 25 reference stars with sufficient accuracy to detect Uranus-mass planets around hundreds of stars. Enough stars of several spectral types are observed to obtain a statistically significant measurement of the prevalence of planetary systems. This observing program takes about 10 years to complete. The combination of both instruments in a single telescope system results from a number of innovative solutions that are described in this paper.

  8. Antarctic Polar Descent and Planetary Wave Activity Observed in ISAMS CO from April to July 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, D. R.; Stanford, J. L.; Nakamura, N.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Taylor, F. W.; Remedios, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    Antarctic polar descent and planetary wave activity in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere are observed in ISAMS CO data from April to July 1992. CO-derived mean April-to-May upper stratosphere descent rates of 15 K/day (0.25 km/day) at 60 S and 20 K/day (0.33 km/day) at 80 S are compared with descent rates from diabatic trajectory analyses. At 60 S there is excellent agreement, while at 80 S the trajectory-derived descent is significantly larger in early April. Zonal wavenumber 1 enhancement of CO is observed on 9 and 28 May, coincident with enhanced wave 1 in UKMO geopotential height. The 9 May event extends from 40 to 70 km and shows westward phase tilt with height, while the 28 May event extends from 40 to 50 km and shows virtually no phase tilt with height.

  9. Radio Jupiter after Voyager: An overview of the Planetary Radio Astronomy observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boischot, A.; Lecacheux, A.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Alexander, J. K.; Warwick, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Jupiter's low frequency radio emission morphology as observed by the Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) instrument onboard the Voyager spacecraft is reviewed. The PRA measurement capabilities and limitations are summarized following over two years of experience with the instrument. As a direct consequence of the PRA spacecraft observations, unprecedented in terms of their sensitivity and frequency coverage, at least three previous unrecognized emission components were discovered: broadband and narrow band kilometric emission and the lesser arc decametric emission. Their properties are reviewed. In addition, the fundamental structure of the decameter and hectometer wavelength emission, which is believed to be almost exclusively in the form of complex but repeating arc structures in the frequency time domain, is described. Dramatic changes in the emission morphology of some components as a function of Sun-Jupiter-spacecraft angle (local time) are described. Finally, the PRA in suit measurements of the Io plasma torus hot to cold electron density and temperature ratios are summarized.

  10. Observations of planetary mixed Rossby-gravity waves in the upper stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randel, William J.; Boville, Byron A.; Gille, John C.

    1990-01-01

    Observational evidence is presented for planetary scale (zonal wave number 1-2) mixed Rossby-gravity (MRG) waves in the equatorial upper stratosphere (35-50 km). These waves are detected in LIMS measurements as coherently propagating temperature maxima of amplitude 0.1-0.3 K, which are antisymmetric (out of phase) about the equator, centered near 10-15 deg north and south latitude. These features have vertical wavelengths of order 10-15 km, periods near 2-3 days, and zonal phase velocities close to 200 m/s. Both eastward and westward propagating waves are found, and the observed vertical wavelengths and meridional structures are in good agreement with the MRG dispersion relation. Theoretical estimates of the zonal accelerations attributable to these waves suggest they do not contribute substantially to the zonal momentum balance in the middle atmosphere.

  11. Far-infrared line observations of planetary nebulae. 1: The O 3 spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinerstein, H. L.; Lester, D. F.; Werner, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of the far-infrared fine structure lines of O III have been obtained for six planetary nebulae. The infrared measurements are combined with optical O III line fluxes to probe physical conditions in the gas. From the observed line intensity ratios, a simultaneous solution was obtained for electron temperature and density, as well as means of evaluating the importance of inhomogeneities. Densities determined from the far-infrared O III lines agree well density diagnostics from other ions, indicating a fairly homogeneous density in the emitting gas. Temperatures are determined separately from the O III 4363/5007 A and 5007 A/52 micron intensity ratios and compared. Systematically higher values are derived from the former ratio, which is expected from a nebula which is not isothermal. Allowance for the presence of temperature variations within these nebulae raises their derived oxygen abundances, determinations to be reconciled with the solar value.

  12. Far-infrared line observations of planetary nebulae. I - The forbidden O III spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinerstein, H. L.; Lester, D. F.; Werner, M. W.

    1985-04-01

    Observations of the far-infrared fine structure lines of O III have been obtained for six planetary nebulae. The infrared measurements are combined with optical O III line fluxes to probe physical conditions in the gas. From the observed line intensity ratios, a simultaneous solution was obtained for electron temperature and density, as well as means of evaluating the importance of inhomogeneities. Densities determined from the far-infrared O III lines agree well with density diagnostics from other ions, indicating a fairly homogeneous density in the emitting gas. Temperatures are determined separately from the O III 4363/5007 A and 5007 A/52 micron intensity ratios and compared. Systematically higher values are derived from the former ratio, which is expected from a nebula which is not isothermal. Allowance for the presence of temperature variations within these nebulae raises their derived oxygen abundances, determinations to be reconciled with the solar value.

  13. Mechanisms and observations for isotope fractionation of molecular species in planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    Chemcial and physical processes which may give rise to isotope fractionation of molecular species in the atmospheres of both earth and other planets are reviewed, along with observations of isotopically substituted molecules in planetary atmospheres. Mechanisms for production of isotope fractionation considered include atmospheric escape and the effect of isotope substitution on equilibrium constants (including those of phase changes), photolysis rates, and chemical reaction rates. The isotopes considered for compounds in the terrestrial atmosphere include D, T, C-13, C-14, N-15, O-18, and S-34. Compounds for which data about isotopic composition in the terrestrial atmosphere are summarized include CO, CO2, O3, N2O, NH3, SO2, H2S, H2O, H, H2, and CH4. Planetary atmospheres discussed include those of Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Titan; isotopes reviewed are D, C-13, N-15, and O-18. Suggestions for additional research in the area of isotopically substituted molecules in atmospheres are offered.

  14. Dynamics of Convergent Migration and Mean Motion Resonances in Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketchum, Jacob A.

    Recent observations of solar systems orbiting other stars show that exoplanets display an enormous range of physical properties and that planetary systems display a diverse set of architectures, which motivate further studies in planetary dynamics. Part of the richness of this dynamical problem arises from the intrinsic complexity of N-body systems, even in the absence of additional forces. The realm of physical behavior experienced by such systems is enormous, and includes mean motion resonances (MMR), secular interactions, and sensitive dependence on the initial conditions (chaos). Additional complications arise from other forces that are often present: During the early stages of evolution, circumstellar disks provide torques that influence orbital elements, and turbulent fluctuations act on young planets. Over longer time scales, solar systems are affected by tidal forces from both stars and planets, and by general relativistic corrections that lead to orbital precession. This thesis addresses a subset of these dynamical problems, including the capture rates of planets into MMR, collision probabilities for migrating rocky planets interacting with Jovian planets, and the exploration of the ``nodding'' phenomenon (where systems move in and out of MMR). This latter effect can have important implications for interpreting transit timing variations (TTV), a method to detect smaller planets due to their interaction with larger transiting bodies.

  15. Insights into Planet Formation from Debris Disks - II. Giant Impacts in Extrasolar Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Mark C.; Jackson, Alan P.

    2016-03-01

    Giant impacts refer to collisions between two objects each of which is massive enough to be considered at least a planetary embryo. The putative collision suffered by the proto-Earth that created the Moon is a prime example, though most Solar System bodies bear signatures of such collisions. Current planet formation models predict that an epoch of giant impacts may be inevitable, and observations of debris around other stars are providing mounting evidence that giant impacts feature in the evolution of many planetary systems. This chapter reviews giant impacts, focussing on what we can learn about planet formation by studying debris around other stars. Giant impact debris evolves through mutual collisions and dynamical interactions with planets. General aspects of this evolution are outlined, noting the importance of the collision-point geometry. The detectability of the debris is discussed using the example of the Moon-forming impact. Such debris could be detectable around another star up to 10 Myr post-impact, but model uncertainties could reduce detectability to a few 100 yr window. Nevertheless the 3 % of young stars with debris at levels expected during terrestrial planet formation provide valuable constraints on formation models; implications for super-Earth formation are also discussed. Variability recently observed in some bright disks promises to illuminate the evolution during the earliest phases when vapour condensates may be optically thick and acutely affected by the collision-point geometry. The outer reaches of planetary systems may also exhibit signatures of giant impacts, such as the clumpy debris structures seen around some stars.

  16. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF THE 0.94-DAY PERIOD TRANSITING PLANETARY SYSTEM WASP-18

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, John; Anderson, D. R.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Hinse, T. C.; Dominik, M.; Mathiasen, M.; Browne, P.; Glitrup, M.; Joergensen, U. G.; Harpsoee, K.; Liebig, C.; Maier, G.; Bozza, V.; Calchi Novati, S.; Mancini, L.; Burgdorf, M.; Dreizler, S.; Hessman, F.; Hundertmark, M.; Finet, F.

    2009-12-10

    We present high-precision photometry of five consecutive transits of WASP-18, an extrasolar planetary system with one of the shortest orbital periods known. Through the use of telescope defocusing we achieve a photometric precision of 0.47-0.83 mmag per observation over complete transit events. The data are analyzed using the JKTEBOP code and three different sets of stellar evolutionary models. We find the mass and radius of the planet to be M {sub b} = 10.43 +- 0.30 +- 0.24 M {sub Jup} and R {sub b} = 1.165 +- 0.055 +- 0.014 R {sub Jup} (statistical and systematic errors), respectively. The systematic errors in the orbital separation and the stellar and planetary masses, arising from the use of theoretical predictions, are of a similar size to the statistical errors and set a limit on our understanding of the WASP-18 system. We point out that seven of the nine known massive transiting planets (M {sub b} > 3 M {sub Jup}) have eccentric orbits, whereas significant orbital eccentricity has been detected for only four of the 46 less-massive planets. This may indicate that there are two different populations of transiting planets, but could also be explained by observational biases. Further radial velocity observations of low-mass planets will make it possible to choose between these two scenarios.

  17. Carrier-less, anti-backlash planetary drive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a carrier-less, anti-backlash planetary gear system that has an input sun gear, a force-balancing and planet-alignment 'speeder' gear above the sun gear, a split ring gear that has a fixed lower ring gear coaxial with the sun gear and a rotating upper ring gear also coaxial with the sun gear. A preload bolt is used for securing the split ring gears together. Within the split ring gear is an even number of planet gears between the split ring gear and the sun gear. Each planet gear consists of an upper planet gear, and lower planet gear with the upper and lower planet gears splined together and pushed apart by a spring which causes separation and relative twist between the upper and lower planet gears. The lower planet gear meshes with the input sun gear and the fixed ring gear while the upper planet gear is driven by the lower planet gear and meshes with the rotating ring gear.

  18. Planetary Airplane Extraction System Development and Subscale Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teter, John E., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The Aerial Regional-scale Environmental Survey (ARES) project employs an airplane as the science platform from which to collect science data in the previously inaccessible, thin atmosphere of Mars. In order for the airplane to arrive safely in the Martian atmosphere a number of sequences must occur. A critical element in the entry sequence at Mars is an extraction maneuver to separate the airplane quickly (in less than a second) from its protective backshell to reduce the possibility of re-contact, potentially leading to mission failure. This paper describes the development, testing, and lessons learned from building a 1/3 scale model of this airplane extraction system. This design, based on the successful Mars Exploration Rover (MER) extraction mechanism, employs a series of trucks rolling along tracks located on the surface of the central parachute can. Numerous tests using high speed video were conducted at the Langley Research Center (LaRC) to validate this concept. One area of concern was that that although the airplane released cleanly, a pitching moment could be introduced. While targeted for a Mars mission, this concept will enable environmental surveys by aircraft in other planetary bodies with a sensible atmosphere such as Venus or Saturn s moon, Titan.

  19. Planetary Airplane Extraction System Development and Subscale Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teter, John E., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The Aerial Regional-scale Environmental Survey (ARES) project will employ an airplane as the science platform from which to collect science data in the previously inaccessible, thin atmosphere of Mars. In order for the airplane to arrive safely in the Martian atmosphere, a number of sequences must occur. A critical element in the entry sequence at Mars is an extraction maneuver to separate the airplane quickly (in less than a second) from its protective backshell to reduce the possibility of re-contact, potentially leading to mission failure. This paper describes the development, testing, and lessons learned from building a 1/3 scale model of this airplane extraction system. This design, based on the successful Mars Exploration Rover (MER) extraction mechanism, employs a series of trucks rolling along tracks located on the surface of the central parachute can. Numerous tests using high speed video were conducted at the Langley Research Center to validate this concept. One area of concern was that that although the airplane released cleanly, a pitching moment could be introduced. While targeted for a Mars mission, this concept will enable environmental surveys by aircraft in other planetary bodies with a sensible atmosphere such as Venus or Saturn's moon, Titan.

  20. The GAPS programme with HARPS-N at TNG. IV. A planetary system around XO-2S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desidera, S.; Bonomo, A. S.; Claudi, R. U.; Damasso, M.; Biazzo, K.; Sozzetti, A.; Marzari, F.; Benatti, S.; Gandolfi, D.; Gratton, R.; Lanza, A. F.; Nascimbeni, V.; Andreuzzi, G.; Affer, L.; Barbieri, M.; Bedin, L. R.; Bignamini, A.; Bonavita, M.; Borsa, F.; Calcidese, P.; Christille, J. M.; Cosentino, R.; Covino, E.; Esposito, M.; Giacobbe, P.; Harutyunyan, A.; Latham, D.; Lattanzi, M.; Leto, G.; Lodato, G.; Lovis, C.; Maggio, A.; Malavolta, L.; Mancini, L.; Martinez Fiorenzano, A. F.; Micela, G.; Molinari, E.; Mordasini, C.; Munari, U.; Pagano, I.; Pedani, M.; Pepe, F.; Piotto, G.; Poretti, E.; Rainer, M.; Ribas, I.; Santos, N. C.; Scandariato, G.; Silvotti, R.; Southworth, J.; Zanmar Sanchez, R.

    2014-07-01

    We performed an intensive radial velocity monitoring of XO-2S, the wide companion of the transiting planet-host XO-2N, using HARPS-N at TNG in the framework of the GAPS programme. The radial velocity measurements indicate the presence of a new planetary system formed by a planet that is slightly more massive than Jupiter at 0.48 au and a Saturn-mass planet at 0.13 au. Both planetary orbits are moderately eccentric and were found to be dynamically stable. There are also indications of a long-term trend in the radial velocities. This is the first confirmed case of a wide binary whose components both host planets, one of which is transiting, which makes the XO-2 system a unique laboratory for understanding the diversity of planetary systems. Based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Fundacion Galileo Galilei of the INAF at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the IAC as part of the programme Global Architecture of Planetary Systems (GAPS), and on observations made at Asiago, Serra La Nave, and Valle D'Aosta observatories.Table 2 and Fig. 3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Use of a multimission system for cost effective support of planetary science data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, William B.

    1994-01-01

    JPL's Multimission Operations Systems Office (MOSO) provides a multimission facility at JPL for processing science instrument data from NASA's planetary missions. This facility, the Multimission Image Processing System (MIPS), is developed and maintained by MOSO to meet requirements that span the NASA family of planetary missions. Although the word 'image' appears in the title, MIPS is used to process instrument data from a variety of science instruments. This paper describes the design of a new system architecture now being implemented within the MIPS to support future planetary mission activities at significantly reduced operations and maintenance cost.

  2. Passage of a ''Nemesis''-like object through the planetary system

    SciTech Connect

    Hills, J.G.

    1985-09-01

    The probability that passing stars could have perturbed the hypothetical stellar companion, Nemesis, into an orbit that penetrates the planetary system is about 15%. The planetary orbits crossed by Nemesis would become highly eccentric, and some would even become hyperbolic. If Nemesis ejects Jupiter from the solar system, the semimajor axis of the orbit of Nemesis would shrink down to a few hundred AU. The probability of any object in the inner edge of the Oort cloud at a semimajor axis of 2 x 10/sup 4/ AU having passed inside the orbit of Saturn is about 80%. The apparent lack of damage to the planetary orbits implies a low probability of there being any objects more massive than 0.02 M/sub sun/ in the inner edge of the Oort comet cloud. However, several objects less massive than 0.01 M/sub sun/ or 10 Jupiter masses could pass through the planetary system from the Oort cloud without causing any significant damage to the planetary orbits. The lack of damage to the planetary system also requires that no black dwarf more massive than 0.05 M/sub sun/ has entered the planetary system from interstellar space.

  3. Equatorial planetary waves in the mesosphere observed by airglow periodic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buriti, R. A.; Takahashi, H.; Lima, L. M.; Medeiros, A. F.

    Planetary scale waves in the equatorial upper mesosphere were studied by measuring the airglow OI557.7 nm, O 2b(0,1) and OH(6,2) emission intensities and OH rotational temperature at São João do Cariri (7.4°S; 36.5°W). From four years of data, 1998-2001, periodic oscillations of the airglow emissions were analyzed using the Lomb-Scargle spectral analysis. An oscillation of 3-4 days was frequently observed, which might be ultra-fast Kelvin waves. No seasonal dependency of the wave activity was found. On some occasions we found a quasi-5-day oscillation with a phase difference between the emissions, suggesting an upward energy flow. This is interpreted as a normal mode Rossby wave.

  4. Hubble space telescope observations and geometric models of compact multipolar planetary nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, Chih-Hao; Chau, Wayne; Zhang, Yong; Kwok, Sun E-mail: wwlljj1314@gmail.com E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk

    2014-05-20

    We report high angular resolution Hubble Space Telescope observations of 10 compact planetary nebulae (PNs). Many interesting internal structures, including multipolar lobes, arcs, two-dimensional rings, tori, and halos, are revealed for the first time. These results suggest that multipolar structures are common among PNs, and these structures develop early in their evolution. From three-dimensional geometric models, we have determined the intrinsic dimensions of the lobes. Assuming the lobes are the result of interactions between later-developed fast winds and previously ejected asymptotic giant branch winds, the geometric structures of these PNs suggest that there are multiple phases of fast winds separated by temporal variations and/or directional changes. A scenario of evolution from lobe-dominated to cavity-dominated stages is presented. The results reported here will provide serious constraints on any dynamical models of PNs.

  5. Light scattering by randomly oriented cubes and parallelepipeds. [for interpretation of observed data from planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, K. N.; Cai, Q.; Pollack, J. B.; Cuzzi, J. N.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, the geometric ray tracing theory for the scattering of light by hexagonal cylinders to cubes and parallelepipeds has been modified. Effects of the real and imaginary parts of the refractive index and aspect ratio of the particle on the scattering phase function and the degree of linear polarization are investigated. Causes of the physical features in the scattering polarization patterns are identified in terms of the scattering contribution due to geometric reflections and refractions. The single-scattering phase function and polarization data presented in this paper should be of some use for the interpretation of observed scattering and polarization data from planetary atmospheres and for the physical understanding of the transfer of radiation in an atmosphere containing nonspherical particles.

  6. Determination of hyperfine-induced transition rates from observations of a planetary nebula.

    PubMed

    Brage, Tomas; Judge, Philip G; Proffitt, Charles R

    2002-12-31

    Observations of the planetary nebula NGC3918 made with the STIS instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope reveal the first unambiguous detection of a hyperfine-induced transition 2s2p 3P(o)(0)-->2s2 1S0 in the berylliumlike emission line spectrum of N IV at 1487.89 A. A nebular model allows us to confirm a transition rate of 4x10(-4) sec(-1)+/-33% for this line. The measurement represents the first independent confirmation of the transition rate of hyperfine-induced lines in low ionization stages, and it provides support for the techniques used to compute these transitions for the determination of very low densities and isotope ratios. PMID:12513129

  7. Observations and morphological study of ring planetary nebulae in forbidden O III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louise, R.

    1982-03-01

    A photometric study is presented of the morphology of forbidden O III emission from 10 ring planetary nebulae. Observations were made in a narrowband interference filter centered at 5007 A for the objects NGC 40, 1514, 2392, 6543, 6781, 6826, 7354, 7048, 7009 and 7662, and used to obtain values for the major axis, the distance separating two successive maxima of the photometric profile, the ring/center intensity ratio and eccentricity. These parameters are found to be consistent with a shell model for most of the nebulae, although it is noted that the model only applies to the O III distribution. Fine structure is also found in certain nebulae, indicating the presence of more complex structures to which the shell model is only a first approximation.

  8. Volcanic water flows could have flooded Ganymede's planetary rift system

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.; Clifford, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Global expansion on Ganymede of only 1 or 2% created a planetary rift system which was resurfaced over a significant period of the planet's history creating bright, grooved terrain. The most reasonable model entails flooding of grabens by water or slush magmas which rose to the surface along normal faults in the rift system. Various models exist for the origin of the water magmas including isostatic rise of freezing ice I or diapirs of unstable ice III. A model considering the heat balance at the surface of an ice-covered water flow is constructed with the simplifying assumption that both laminar flow and a solid ice cover are achieved relatively soon after eruption. The ice cover will thicken until the underlying flowing water is entirely frozen. Energy into the system comes from solar radiation and the latent heat of freezing. Energy lost will be by evaporative and radiative cooling at the ice surface and by conduction into the substratum. Solving the heat balance allows a prediction for the volume of magma that can flood the surface. For example a flow 5 m thick will take tens of days to freeze, so that discharge rates equal to that of average terrestrial basalt flows could flood relatively large areas of the surface before freezing. Volcanic flooding is therefore a physically viable mechanism for the origin of bright terrain. During freezing the water/ice volume increases, lifting and fracturing the ice cover. These fractures may localize continued tectonic forces producing large displacements and creating the present grooved terrain.

  9. Multiple mean motion resonances in the HR 8799 planetary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goździewski, Krzysztof; Migaszewski, Cezary

    2014-06-01

    HR 8799 is a nearby star hosting at least four ˜10 mJup planets in wide orbits up to ˜70 au, detected through the direct, high-contrast infrared imaging. Large companions and debris discs reported interior to ˜10 au, and exterior to ˜100 au indicate massive protoplanetary disc in the past. The dynamical state of the HR 8799 system is not yet fully resolved, due to limited astrometric data covering tiny orbital arcs. We construct a new orbital model of the HR 8799 system, assuming rapid migration of the planets after their formation in wider orbits. We found that the HR 8799 planets are likely involved in double Laplace resonance, 1e:2d:4c:8b MMR. Quasi-circular planetary orbits are coplanar with the stellar equator and inclined by ˜25° to the sky plane. This best-fitting orbital configuration matches astrometry, debris disc models, and mass estimates from cooling models. The multiple mean motion resonance (MMR) is stable for the age of the star ˜160 Myr, for at least 1 Gyr unless significant perturbations to the N-body dynamics are present. We predict four configurations with the fifth hypothetical innermost planet HR 8799f in ˜9.7 au, or ˜7.5 au orbit, extending the MMR chain to triple Laplace resonance 1f:2e:4d:8c:16b MMR or to the 1f:3e:6d:12c:24b MMR, respectively. Our findings may establish strong boundary conditions for the system formation and its early history.

  10. A Pacific Teacher Enhancement Program - Toward Other Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meech, Karen; Slater, T. F.; Mattei, J. A.; Kadooka, M. A.

    The NSF has funded a 5-year program of Teacher Enhancement based on the theme of ``Toward Other Planetary Systems'' to be held on the big island of Hawaii from 1999-2004. The purpose of the workshop is to help local and US-affiliated Pacific teachers acquire basic astronomy content and gain insight into exciting research activities in contemporary astronomy. Instructional skills will be strengthened by providing the teachers with new materials, evaluation techniques, resources and extensive follow-up. There will also be a vigorous student component to the program where students will be provided an exciting introduction to careers in astronomy, technology, and the sciences. Discussions of how astronomers are using the telescopes on Mauna Kea, around the world, and in space to search for evidence of planet formation in other solar systems - origins - and to search for life elsewhere will open up a new awareness of the forefront of astronomical research in Hawaii and around the world. The first program will be held from June 13-July 1, 1999, and this talk will highlight the program activities. The program is unique in that it combines the modern astronomical exploration in searching for new worlds with an exploration of the ancient polynesian and Hawaiian techniques of astronomical navigation. Cultural astronomy in Hawaii is a relatively new discipline, with remarkable discoveries into the ancienet polynesian navigational / astronomical system being made. This science has exceptional motivational potential for a large fraction of Hawaiian students. This program is a collaboration between the AAVSO, the Montana State University NASA CERES project, the Bishop Museum, the Pacific Regional Educational Lab, the Hawaii Department of Education, the Institute for Astronomy, and the Hawaii Astronomical Association.

  11. THE DYNAMICS OF STELLAR CORONAE HARBORING HOT JUPITERS. I. A TIME-DEPENDENT MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION OF THE INTERPLANETARY ENVIRONMENT IN THE HD 189733 PLANETARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, O.; Kashyap, V. L.; Drake, J. J.; Garraffo, C.; Sokolov, I. V.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2011-05-20

    We carry out the first time-dependent numerical magnetohydrodynamic modeling of an extrasolar planetary system to study the interaction of the stellar magnetic field and wind with the planetary magnetosphere and outflow. We base our model on the parameters of the HD 189733 system, which harbors a close-in giant planet. Our simulation reveals a highly structured stellar corona characterized by sectors with different plasma properties. The star-planet interaction (SPI) varies in magnitude and complexity, depending on the planetary phase, planetary magnetic field strength, and the relative orientation of the stellar and planetary fields. It also reveals a long, comet-like tail which is a result of the wrapping of the planetary magnetospheric tail by its fast orbital motion. A reconnection event occurs at a specific orbital phase, causing mass loss from the planetary magnetosphere that can generate a hot spot on the stellar surface. The simulation also shows that the system has sufficient energy to produce hot spots observed in Ca II lines in giant planet hosting stars. However, the short duration of the reconnection event suggests that such SPI cannot be observed persistently.

  12. Observations of the Natural Planetary Satellites for Dynamical and Physical Purpose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlot, J. E.; Thuillot, W.; Fienga, A.; Bec-Borsenberger, A.; Baron, N.; Berthier, J.; Colas, F.; Descamps, P.

    1999-12-01

    At the Institut de mecanique celeste-Bureau des longitudes, we started several programs of observation of the natural planetary satellites. First, we took the opportunity of the transit of the Earth and the Sun in the equatorial plane of Jupiter to observe the mutual phenomena of the Galilean satellites. These observations provide astrometric data of high accuracy useful for dynamical studies of the motions of the satellites and photometric data allowing to characterize the surfaces of the satellites. A campaign was organized leading to 400 light curves made throughout the world in about 40 countries. Second, we started astrometric CCD observations of the faint satellites of Jupiter JVI to JXIII and of the satellite of Saturn Phoebe (SIX) for dynamical purpose at Observatoire de Haute Provence using the 120cm-telescope. PPM, Hipparcos and USNO A.2 catalogue were used for calibration in order to get absolute J2000 R.A. and declination of these objects. In August and December, 1998, CCD observations provided 43 absolute positions of JVI, 23 of JVII, 53 of JVIII, 35 of JIX, 29 of JX, 27 of JXI, 18 of JXII, 16 of JXIII and 135 of SIX (Phoebe). A campaign will also take place in 1999.

  13. Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 Observations of Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Two groups have recently used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC 2) to acquire new high-resolution images of the planet Neptune. Members of the WFPC-2 Science Team, lead by John Trauger, acquired the first series of images on 27 through 29 June 1994. These were the highest resolution images of Neptune taken since the Voyager-2 flyby in August of 1989. A more comprehensive program is currently being conducted by Heidi Hammel and Wes Lockwood. These two sets of observations are providing a wealth of new information about the structure, composition, and meteorology of this distant planet's atmosphere.

    Neptune is currently the most distant planet from the sun, with an orbital radius of 4.5 billion kilometers (2.8 billion miles, or 30 Astronomical Units). Even though its diameter is about four times that of the Earth (49,420 vs. 12,742 km), ground-based telescopes reveal a tiny blue disk that subtends less than 1/1200 of a degree (2.3 arc-seconds). Neptune has therefore been a particularly challenging object to study from the ground because its disk is badly blurred by the Earth's atmosphere. In spite of this, ground-based astronomers had learned a great deal about this planet since its position was first predicted by John C. Adams and Urbain Leverrier in 1845. For example, they had determined that Neptune was composed primarily of hydrogen and helium gas, and that its blue color caused by the presence of trace amounts of the gas methane, which absorbs red light. They had also detected bright cloud features whose brightness changed with time, and tracked these clouds to infer a rotation period between 17 and 22 hours.

    When the Voyager-2 spacecraft flew past the Neptune in 1989, its instruments revealed a surprising array of meteorological phenomena, including strong winds, bright, high-altitude clouds, and two large dark spots attributed to long-lived giant storm systems. These bright clouds and dark spots were tracked as they

  14. Management Observation System (MOS)

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Baker; Robert Bryant; Teresa Childs

    2006-01-01

    The Management Observation System (MOS) was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to improve the overall safety of the Laboratory. The MOS provides a tool to document management observations, records time spent in the field conducting observations, and the results of those observations. It also documents if there are lessons learned from a particular observation or if follow-up actions are needed to correct issues or deficiencies identified. Management has found this a very useful tool to use as a proactive approach to identifying and/or correcting potential problems before they become safety related issues.

  15. Pebble Accretion and the Diversity of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, J. E.

    2016-07-01

    This paper examines the standard model of planet formation, including pebble accretion, using numerical simulations. Planetary embryos that are large enough to become giant planets do not form beyond the ice line within a typical disk lifetime unless icy pebbles stick at higher speeds than in experiments using rocky pebbles. Systems like the solar system (small inner planets and giant outer planets) can form if icy pebbles are stickier than rocky pebbles, and if the planetesimal formation efficiency increases with pebble size, which prevents the formation of massive terrestrial planets. Growth beyond the ice line is dominated by pebble accretion. Most growth occurs early, when the surface density of the pebbles is high due to inward drift of the pebbles from the outer disk. Growth is much slower after the outer disk is depleted. The outcome is sensitive to the disk radius and turbulence level, which control the lifetime and maximum size of pebbles. The outcome is sensitive to the size of the largest planetesimals because there is a threshold mass for the onset of pebble accretion. The planetesimal formation rate is unimportant, provided that some large planetesimals form while the pebbles remain abundant. Two outcomes are seen, depending on whether pebble accretion begins while the pebbles are still abundant. Either multiple gas-giant planets form beyond the ice line, small planets form close to the star, and a Kuiper-belt-like disk of bodies is scattered outward by the giant planets; or no giants form and the bodies remain an Earth-mass or smaller.

  16. Observing System Simulation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prive, Nikki

    2015-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). The components of an OSSE are described, along with discussion of the process for validating, calibrating, and performing experiments. a.

  17. Dynamical stability of imaged planetary systems in formation: Application to HL Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayo, Daniel; Triaud, Amaury H. M. J.; Menou, Kristen; Rein, Hanno

    2015-05-01

    A recent ALMA image revealed several concentric gaps in the protoplanetary disk surrounding the young star HL Tau. We consider the hypothesis that these gaps are carved by planets, and present a general framework for understanding the dynamical stability of such systems over typical disk lifetimes, providing estimates for the maximum planetary masses. We argue that the locations of resonances should be significantly shifted in disks as massive as estimated for HL Tau, and that theoretical uncertainties in the exact offset, together with observational errors, imply a large uncertainty in the dynamical state and stability in such disks. An important observational avenue to breaking this degeneracy is to search for eccentric gaps, which could implicate resonantly interacting planets. Unfortunately, massive disks should also induce swift pericenter precession that would smear out any such eccentric features of planetary origin. This motivates pushing toward more typical, less massive disks. For a nominal non-resonant model of the HL Tau system with five planets, we find a maximum mass for the outer three bodies of approximately 2 Neptune masses. In a resonant configuration, these planets can reach at least the mass of Saturn. The inner two planets' masses are unconstrained by dynamical stability arguments.

  18. Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 Observations of Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Two groups have recently used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC 2) to acquire new high-resolution images of the planet Neptune. Members of the WFPC-2 Science Team, lead by John Trauger, acquired the first series of images on 27 through 29 June 1994. These were the highest resolution images of Neptune taken since the Voyager-2 flyby in August of 1989. A more comprehensive program is currently being conducted by Heidi Hammel and Wes Lockwood. These two sets of observations are providing a wealth of new information about the structure, composition, and meteorology of this distant planet's atmosphere.

    Neptune is currently the most distant planet from the sun, with an orbital radius of 4.5 billion kilometers (2.8 billion miles, or 30 Astronomical Units). Even though its diameter is about four times that of the Earth (49,420 vs. 12,742 km), ground-based telescopes reveal a tiny blue disk that subtends less than 1/1200 of a degree (2.3 arc-seconds). Neptune has therefore been a particularly challenging object to study from the ground because its disk is badly blurred by the Earth's atmosphere. In spite of this, ground-based astronomers had learned a great deal about this planet since its position was first predicted by John C. Adams and Urbain Leverrier in 1845. For example, they had determined that Neptune was composed primarily of hydrogen and helium gas, and that its blue color caused by the presence of trace amounts of the gas methane, which absorbs red light. They had also detected bright cloud features whose brightness changed with time, and tracked these clouds to infer a rotation period between 17 and 22 hours.

    When the Voyager-2 spacecraft flew past the Neptune in 1989, its instruments revealed a surprising array of meteorological phenomena, including strong winds, bright, high-altitude clouds, and two large dark spots attributed to long-lived giant storm systems. These bright clouds and dark spots were tracked as they

  19. THE LINK BETWEEN PLANETARY SYSTEMS, DUSTY WHITE DWARFS, AND METAL-POLLUTED WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Debes, John H.; Walsh, Kevin J.; Stark, Christopher

    2012-03-10

    It has long been suspected that metal-polluted white dwarfs (types DAZ, DBZ, and DZ) and white dwarfs with dusty disks possess planetary systems, but a specific physical mechanism by which planetesimals are perturbed close to a white dwarf has not yet been fully posited. In this paper, we demonstrate that mass loss from a central star during post-main-sequence evolution can sweep planetesimals into interior mean motion resonances with a single giant planet. These planetesimals are slowly removed through chaotic excursions of eccentricity that in time create radial orbits capable of tidally disrupting the planetesimal. Numerical N-body simulations of the solar system show that a sufficient number of planetesimals are perturbed to explain white dwarfs with both dust and metal pollution, provided other white dwarfs have more massive relic asteroid belts. Our scenario requires only one Jupiter-sized planet and a sufficient number of asteroids near its 2:1 interior mean motion resonance. Finally, we show that once a planetesimal is perturbed into a tidal crossing orbit, it will become disrupted after the first pass of the white dwarf, where a highly eccentric stream of debris forms the main reservoir for dust-producing collisions. These simulations, in concert with observations of white dwarfs, place interesting limits on the frequency of planetary systems around main-sequence stars, the frequency of planetesimal belts, and the probability that dust may obscure future terrestrial planet finding missions.

  20. The ionization structure of planetary nebulae. VII. New observations of the Ring Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Timothy

    1987-01-01

    New optical spectrophotometric observations of emission-line intensities have been made in eight positions in the Ring Nebula corresponding to those observed previously with the Ultraviolet Explorer satellite; the total coverage is therefore 1400 to 7200 A. The intensities are in generally good agreement with those found previously in corresponding positions. The Oand Balmer continuum electron temperatures agree well on the average and, like the Nelectron temperatures, decrease with increasing distance from the central star. As found previously for the Ring Nebula and for other planetaries in this series, the lambda 4267 C 2 line intensity near the central star implies a Cabundance that is higher than that determined from the lambda 1906, 1909 C 3 lines. The discrepancy again decreases with increasing distance from the central star and vanishes from the outermost positions, again suggesting that the excitation mechanism from the lambda 4267 line is not understood. Standard equations used to correct for the existence of elements in other than the optically observable ionization stages give results that are consistent and in appropriate agreement with abundances calculated using UV lines. The rather high abundances of O, N, and C, and, to some extent N, indicate that some mixing of CNO processed material into the nebular shell may have occurred in the Ring Nebula.

  1. SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF PLANETARY NEBULAE IN THE NORTHERN SPUR OF M31

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, X.; Liu, X.-W.; Zhang, Y.; Garcia-Benito, R.

    2013-09-10

    We present spectroscopy of three planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Northern Spur of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) obtained with the Double Spectrograph on the 5.1 m Hale Telescope at the Palomar Observatory. The samples were selected from the observations of Merrett et al. Our purpose is to investigate the formation of the substructures of M31 using PNe as a tracer of chemical abundances. The [O III] {lambda}4363 line is detected in the spectra of two objects, enabling temperature determinations. Ionic abundances are derived from the observed collisionally excited lines, and elemental abundances of nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulfur, and argon are estimated. We study the correlations between oxygen and the {alpha}-element abundance ratios using our sample and the M31 disk and bulge PNe from the literature. In one of the three PNe, we observed a relatively higher oxygen abundance compared to the disk sample of M31 at similar galactocentric distances. The results of at least one of the three Northern Spur PNe might be in line with the proposed possible origin of the Northern Spur substructure of M31, i.e., the Northern Spur is connected to the Southern Stream and both substructures comprise the tidal debris of the satellite galaxies of M31.

  2. New Submillimeter Limits on Dust in the 55 Cancri Planetary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardhana, Ray; Holland, Wayne S.; Kalas, Paul; Greaves, Jane S.; Dent, William R. F.; Wyatt, Mark C.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2002-05-01

    We present new, high-sensitivity submillimeter observations toward 55 Cancri, a nearby G8 star with one, or possibly two, known planetary companion(s). Our 850 μm map, obtained with the Submillimeter Common-User Bolometric Array on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, shows three peaks of emission at the 2.5 mJy level in the vicinity of the star's position. However, the observed peaks are 25"-40" away from the star, and a deep R-band optical image reveals faint point sources that coincide with two of the submillimeter peaks. Thus, we do not find evidence of dust emission spatially associated with 55 Cancri. The excess 60 μm emission detected with the Infrared Space Observatory may originate from one or more of the 850 μm peaks that we attribute to background sources. Our new results, together with the Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS coronagraphic images in the near-infrared, place stringent limits on the amount of dust in this planetary system and argue against the existence of a detectable circumstellar dust disk around 55 Cnc.

  3. Planetary volcanism - A study of volcanic activity in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattermole, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The nature of volcanic activity, theoretical models of its role in planetary evolution, and the evidence for volcanism on the planets and planetary satellites are examined in an introductory overview for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Chapters are devoted to volcanism as a planetary process, the generation and evolution of magmas, magma ascent and eruption, the properties and behavior of volcanic flows, volcanic landforms, the distribution of volcanic rocks in the solar system, and volcanic plains and their development. Consideration is given to lunar volcanism, shield volcanoes and paterae, volcanism on Io, volcanism on icy satellites, and the rheological analysis of volcanic flows.

  4. Planetary Magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.

    2007-01-01

    The chapter on Planetary Magnetism by Connerney describes the magnetic fields of the planets, from Mercury to Neptune, including the large satellites (Moon, Ganymede) that have or once had active dynamos. The chapter describes the spacecraft missions and observations that, along with select remote observations, form the basis of our knowledge of planetary magnetic fields. Connerney describes the methods of analysis used to characterize planetary magnetic fields, and the models used to represent the main field (due to dynamo action in the planet's interior) and/or remnant magnetic fields locked in the planet's crust, where appropriate. These observations provide valuable insights into dynamo generation of magnetic fields, the structure and composition of planetary interiors, and the evolution of planets.

  5. A planetary nervous system for social mining and collective awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannotti, F.; Pedreschi, D.; Pentland, A.; Lukowicz, P.; Kossmann, D.; Crowley, J.; Helbing, D.

    2012-11-01

    We present a research roadmap of a Planetary Nervous System (PNS), capable of sensing and mining the digital breadcrumbs of human activities and unveiling the knowledge hidden in the big data for addressing the big questions about social complexity. We envision the PNS as a globally distributed, self-organizing, techno-social system for answering analytical questions about the status of world-wide society, based on three pillars: social sensing, social mining and the idea of trust networks and privacy-aware social mining. We discuss the ingredients of a science and a technology necessary to build the PNS upon the three mentioned pillars, beyond the limitations of their respective state-of-art. Social sensing is aimed at developing better methods for harvesting the big data from the techno-social ecosystem and make them available for mining, learning and analysis at a properly high abstraction level. Social mining is the problem of discovering patterns and models of human behaviour from the sensed data across the various social dimensions by data mining, machine learning and social network analysis. Trusted networks and privacy-aware social mining is aimed at creating a new deal around the questions of privacy and data ownership empowering individual persons with full awareness and control on own personal data, so that users may allow access and use of their data for their own good and the common good. The PNS will provide a goal-oriented knowledge discovery framework, made of technology and people, able to configure itself to the aim of answering questions about the pulse of global society. Given an analytical request, the PNS activates a process composed by a variety of interconnected tasks exploiting the social sensing and mining methods within the transparent ecosystem provided by the trusted network. The PNS we foresee is the key tool for individual and collective awareness for the knowledge society. We need such a tool for everyone to become fully aware of how

  6. Dynamical Stability of Imaged Planetary Systems in Formation: Application to HL Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayo, D.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Menou, K.; Rein, H.

    2015-06-01

    A recent Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array image revealed several concentric gaps in the protoplanetary disk surrounding the young star HL Tau. We consider the hypothesis that these gaps are carved by planets, and present a general framework for understanding the dynamical stability of such systems over typical disk lifetimes, providing estimates for the maximum planetary masses. We collect these easily evaluated constraints into a workflow that can help guide the design and interpretation of new observational campaigns and numerical simulations of gap opening in such systems. We argue that the locations of resonances should be significantly shifted in massive disks like HL Tau, and that theoretical uncertainties in the exact offset, together with observational errors, imply a large uncertainty in the dynamical state and stability in such disks. This presents an important barrier to using systems like HL Tau as a proxy for the initial conditions following planet formation. An important observational avenue to breaking this degeneracy is to search for eccentric gaps, which could implicate resonantly interacting planets. Unfortunately, massive disks like HL Tau should induce swift pericenter precession that would smear out any such eccentric features of planetary origin. This motivates pushing toward more typical, less massive disks. For a nominal non-resonant model of the HL Tau system with five planets, we find a maximum mass for the outer three bodies of approximately 2 Neptune masses. In a resonant configuration, these planets can reach at least the mass of Saturn. The inner two planets’ masses are unconstrained by dynamical stability arguments.

  7. FUSE Observations of Neutron-Capture Elements in Wolf-Rayet Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinerstein, H.

    We propose to obtain FUSE observations of planetary nebula central stars of the WC Wolf-Rayet ([WC]) class, in order to search for the products of neutron-capture processes in these stars and provide constraints on their evolutionary status. Although the origin of the [WC]'s is controversial, their H-deficient, C-rich surface compositions indicate that they have experienced a high degree of mixing and/or mass loss. Thus one might expect the nebulae they produce to show enhanced concentrations of He-burning and other nuclear products, such as nuclei produced by slow neutron capture during the AGB phase. We have already detected an absorption line from one such element, Germanium (Sterling, Dinerstein, & Bowers 2002), while conducting a search for H2 absorption from nebular molecular material FUSE GI programs A085 and B069). Since the strongest Ge enhancements were found in PNe with [WC] central stars, we propose to enlarge the sample of such objects observed by FUSE. THIS TEMPORARY AND PARTIAL SCRIPT COVERS ONE TARGET, HE 2-99, AND REQUESTS AN EXPOSURE TIME OF 15 KSEC. PHASE 2 INFORMATION FOR THE REMAINDER OF THE PROGRAM'S TOTAL TIME ALLOCATION OF 60 KSEC WILL BE SUBMITTED AT A LATER TIME.

  8. Radio Jupiter after Voyager - An overview of the planetary radio astronomy observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boischot, A.; Lecacheux, A.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Alexander, J. K.; Warwick, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    An overview of Jupiter's low-frequency radio emission morphology as observed by the planetary radio astronomy (PRA) instrument onboard the Voyager spacecraft is presented. The PRA measurement capabilities and limitations are summarized, based on over two years of experience with the instrument. As a direct consequence of the PRA spacecraft observations, unprecedented in terms of their sensitivity and frequency coverage, at least three previously-unrecognized emission components have been discovered: broadband and narrow-band kilometric emission, and the lesser-arc decametric emission. Their properties are reviewed. In addition, the fundamental structure of the decameter wavelength and hectometer wavelength emission, now believed to be almost exclusively in the form of complex but repeating arc structures in the frequencytime domain, is described. Dramatic changes in the emission morphology of some components as a function of the sun-Jupiter-spacecraft angle (local time) are described. Finally, the PRA in situ measurements of the Io plasma torus hot-to-cold electron density and temperature ratios are summarized.

  9. Human Planetary Landing System (HPLS) Capability Roadmap NRC Progress Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Rob; Schmitt, Harrison H.; Graves, Claude

    2005-01-01

    Capability Roadmap Team. Capability Description, Scope and Capability Breakdown Structure. Benefits of the HPLS. Roadmap Process and Approach. Current State-of-the-Art, Assumptions and Key Requirements. Top Level HPLS Roadmap. Capability Presentations by Leads. Mission Drivers Requirements. "AEDL" System Engineering. Communication & Navigation Systems. Hypersonic Systems. Super to Subsonic Decelerator Systems. Terminal Descent and Landing Systems. A Priori In-Situ Mars Observations. AEDL Analysis, Test and Validation Infrastructure. Capability Technical Challenges. Capability Connection Points to other Roadmaps/Crosswalks. Summary of Top Level Capability. Forward Work.

  10. Doppler Monitoring of Five K2 Transiting Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Fei; Winn, Joshua N.; Albrecht, Simon; Arriagada, Pamela; Bieryla, Allyson; Butler, R. Paul; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Hirano, Teriyaki; Johnson, John Asher; Kiilerich, Amanda; Latham, David W.; Narita, Norio; Nowak, Grzegorz; Palle, Enric; Ribas, Ignasi; Rogers, Leslie A.; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Shectman, Stephen A.; Teske, Johanna K.; Thompson, Ian B.; Van Eylen, Vincent; Vanderburg, Andrew; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Yu, Liang

    2016-06-01

    In an effort to measure the masses of planets discovered by the NASA K2 mission, we have conducted precise Doppler observations of five stars with transiting planets. We present the results of a joint analysis of these new data and previously published Doppler data. The first star, an M dwarf known as K2-3 or EPIC 201367065, has three transiting planets (“b,” with radius 2.1 {R}\\oplus ; “c,” 1.7 {R}\\oplus ; and “d,” 1.5 {R}\\oplus ). Our analysis leads to the mass constraints: {M}b={8.1}-1.9+2.0 {M}\\oplus and M c < 4.2 M ⊕ (95% confidence). The mass of planet d is poorly constrained because its orbital period is close to the stellar rotation period, making it difficult to disentangle the planetary signal from spurious Doppler shifts due to stellar activity. The second star, a G dwarf known as K2-19 or EPIC 201505350, has two planets (“b,” 7.7 R ⊕ and “c,” 4.9 R ⊕) in a 3:2 mean-motion resonance, as well as a shorter-period planet (“d,” 1.1 R ⊕). We find M b = {28.5}-5.0+5.4 {M}\\oplus , M c = {25.6}-7.1+7.1 {M}\\oplus and M d < 14.0 M ⊕ (95% conf.). The third star, a G dwarf known as K2-24 or EPIC 203771098, hosts two transiting planets (“b,” 5.7 R ⊕ and “c,” 7.8 R ⊕) with orbital periods in a nearly 2:1 ratio. We find M b = {19.8}-4.4+4.5 {M}\\oplus and M c = {26.0}-6.1+5.8 {M}\\oplus . The fourth star, a G dwarf known as EPIC 204129699, hosts a hot Jupiter for which we measured the mass to be {1.857}-0.081+0.081 {M}{Jup}. The fifth star, a G dwarf known as EPIC 205071984, contains three transiting planets (“b,” 5.4 R ⊕ “c,” 3.5 R ⊕ and “d,” 3.8 R ⊕), the outer two of which have a nearly 2:1 period ratio. We find M b = {21.1}-5.9+5.9 {M}\\oplus , M c < 8.1 {M}\\oplus (95% conf.) and M d < 35 M ⊕ (95% conf.).

  11. Dynamical reference frames in the planetary and earth-moon systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standish, E. M.; Williams, G.

    1990-01-01

    Estimates of the accuracies of the ephemerides are reviewed using data for planetary and lunar systems to determine the efficacy of the inherent dynamical reference frame. The varied observational data are listed and given with special attention given to ephemeris improvements. The importance of ranging data is discussed with respect to the inner four planets and the moon, and the discrepancy of 1 arcsec/century between mean motions determined by optical observations versus ranging data is addressed. The Viking mission data provide inertial mean motions for the earth and Mars of 0.003 arcsec/century which will deteriorate to 0.01 arcsec after about 10 years. Uncertainties for other planets and the moon are found to correspond to approximately the same level of degradation. In general the data measurements and error estimates are improving the ephemerides, although refitting the data cannot account for changes in mean motion.

  12. The occurrence of Jovian planets and the habitability of planetary systems.

    PubMed

    Lunine, J

    2001-01-30

    Planets of mass comparable to or larger than Jupiter's have been detected around over 50 stars, and for one such object a definitive test of its nature as a gas giant has been accomplished with data from an observed planetary transit. By virtue of their strong gravitational pull, giant planets define the dynamical and collisional environment within which terrestrial planets form. In our solar system, the position and timing of the formation of Jupiter determined the amount and source of the volatiles from which Earth's oceans and the source elements for life were derived. This paper reviews and brings together diverse observational and modeling results to infer the frequency and distribution of giant planets around solar-type stars and to assess implications for the habitability of terrestrial planets. PMID:11158551

  13. The occurrence of Jovian planets and the habitability of planetary systems

    PubMed Central

    Lunine, Jonathan I.

    2001-01-01

    Planets of mass comparable to or larger than Jupiter's have been detected around over 50 stars, and for one such object a definitive test of its nature as a gas giant has been accomplished with data from an observed planetary transit. By virtue of their strong gravitational pull, giant planets define the dynamical and collisional environment within which terrestrial planets form. In our solar system, the position and timing of the formation of Jupiter determined the amount and source of the volatiles from which Earth's oceans and the source elements for life were derived. This paper reviews and brings together diverse observational and modeling results to infer the frequency and distribution of giant planets around solar-type stars and to assess implications for the habitability of terrestrial planets. PMID:11158551

  14. Evolution of planetary systems with time-dependent stellar mass-loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Fred C.; Anderson, Kassandra R.; Bloch, Anthony M.

    2013-06-01

    Observations indicate that intermediate-mass stars, binary stars and stellar remnants often host planets; a complete explanation of these systems requires an understanding of how planetary orbits evolve as their central stars lose mass. Motivated by these dynamical systems, this paper generalizes in two directions previous studies of orbital evolution in planetary systems with stellar mass-loss: (1) many previous treatments focus on constant mass-loss rates and much of this work is carried out numerically. Here, we study a class of single planet systems where the stellar mass-loss rate is time dependent. The mass-loss rate can be increasing or decreasing, but the stellar mass always decreases monotonically. For this class of models, we develop analytic approximations to specify the final orbital elements for planets that remain bound after the epoch of mass-loss, and find the conditions required for the planets to become unbound. We also show that for some mass-loss functions, planets become unbound only in the asymptotic limit where the stellar mass vanishes. (2) We consider the chaotic evolution for two planet systems with stellar mass-loss. Here, we focus on a model consisting of analogues of Jupiter, Saturn and the Sun. By monitoring the divergence of initially similar trajectories through time, we calculate the Lyapunov exponents of the system. This analogue Solar system is chaotic in the absence of mass-loss with Lyapunov time τly ≈ 5-10 Myr; we find that the Lyapunov time decreases with increasing stellar mass-loss rate, with a nearly linear relationship between the two time-scales. Taken together, the results of this paper help provide an explanation for a wide range of dynamical evolution that occurs in Solar systems with stellar mass-loss.

  15. The circumstellar gas surrounding 51 Ophiuchi - A candidate proto-planetary system similar to Beta Pictoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, C. A.; Silvis, J. M. S.

    1993-01-01

    Combined archival and recent International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observations of the star, 51 Oph, reveal the presence of variable, accreting gas with velocities as large as + 100 km/s relative to the system. The electron number density of the circumstellar gas is comparable to that observed around the candidate proto-planetary system, Beta Pic. In addition to the cooler gas, absorption from Al III, Si IV, and C IV is present over the velocity range of the accreting gas. The presence of Si IV and C IV in the spectrum of a B9.5 star provides evidence for collisional ionization of the circumstellar gas like that observed in Beta Pic. The combination of H-alpha profiles with double emission peaks to comparable strength, together with detection of transient mass ejection events similar to those observed in other Be stars, suggests that the inclination of the 51 Oph system is within 10-15 deg of the equatorial plane. Collectively these data imply that the 51 Oph system is similar to Beta Pic in both system constituents and orientation, and may be in a similar evolutionary state.

  16. The spatial distribution of planetary ion fluxes near Mars observed by MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brain, D. A.; McFadden, J. P.; Halekas, J. S.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Bougher, S. W.; Curry, S.; Dong, C. F.; Dong, Y.; Eparvier, F.; Fang, X.; Fortier, K.; Hara, T.; Harada, Y.; Jakosky, B. M.; Lillis, R. J.; Livi, R.; Luhmann, J. G.; Ma, Y.; Modolo, R.; Seki, K.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of an initial effort to statistically map the fluxes of planetary ions on a closed surface around Mars. Choosing a spherical shell ~1000 km above the planet, we map both outgoing and incoming ion fluxes (with energies >25 eV) over a 4 month period. The results show net escape of planetary ions behind Mars and strong fluxes of escaping ions from the northern hemisphere with respect to the solar wind convection electric field. Planetary ions also travel toward the planet, and return fluxes are particularly strong in the southern electric field hemisphere. We obtain a lower bound estimate for planetary ion escape of ~3 × 1024 s-1, accounting for the ~10% of ions that return toward the planet and assuming that the ~70% of the surface covered so far is representative of the regions not yet visited by Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN).

  17. Radio Search for Water in Exo-Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosmovici, C.; Pluchino, S.; Salerno, E.; Montebugnoli, S.; Zoni, L.; Bartolini, M.

    By using a fast multichannel spectrometer coupled to the 32 m radiotelescope at Medicina (Bologna, Italy) we started 1999 the search for the water MASER line at 22 GHz (1.35 cm) on exoplanets. Up to now 32 exoplanetary systems have been observed and suspect transient emissions have been identified in some cases. In order to confirm the observations improving the detection limits a new challenging multichannel spectrometer (SPECTRA-1) was developed.

  18. Uranus. [Scientific study of planetary structure, ring systems, and magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstralh, J.T.

    1987-03-01

    Observations and theoretical investigations of the Uranus (U) system from the period 1983-1986 are reviewed, with an emphasis on the Voyager 2 encounter with U on January 26, 1986. Topics addressed include the bulk U composition, structure, and heat flux; the U atmospheric composition, structure, and circulation; the U rings; the major and minor U satellites; the U magnetosphere; and the Lyman-alpha 'electroglow' observed on the sunlit hemisphere of U. 191 references.

  19. Using the ABLE facility to observe urbanization effects on planetary boundary layer processes

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, R.L.; Klazura, J.; Lesht, B.M.; Shannon, J.D.; Sisterson, D.L.; Wesely, M.L.

    1998-12-31

    The Argonne Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) facility, located in south central Kansas, east of Wichita, is devoted primarily to investigations of and within the planetary boundary layer (PBL), including the dynamics of the mixed layer during both day and night; effects of varying land use and landform; the interactive role of precipitation, runoff, and soil moisture; storm development; and energy budgets on scales of 10 to 100 km. With an expected lifetime of 10--15 years, the facility is well situated to observe the effects of gradual urbanization on PBL dynamics and structure as the Wichita urban area expands to the east and several small municipalities located within the study area expand. Combining the continuous measurements of ABLE with (1) ancillary continuous measurements of, for example, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program and the Global Energy Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) programs and with (2) shorter, more intensive studies within ABLE, such as the Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Studies (CASES) Program, allows hypothesized features of urbanization, including heat island effects, precipitation enhancement, and modification of the surface energy budget partitioning, to be studied.

  20. Eclipsing time variations in close binary systems: Planetary hypothesis vs. Applegate mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völschow, M.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Perdelwitz, V.; Banerjee, R.

    2016-03-01

    The observed eclipsing time variations in post-common-envelope binaries (PCEBs) can be interpreted as potential evidence for massive Jupiter-like planets, or as a result of magnetic activity, leading to quasi-periodic changes in the quadrupole moment of the secondary star. The latter is commonly referred to as the Applegate mechanism. We employ an improved version of Applegate's model including the angular momentum exchange between a finite shell and the core of the star. The framework is employed to derive the general conditions under which the Applegate mechanism can work, and is subsequently applied to a sample of 16 close binary systems with potential planets, including eleven PCEBs. Further, we present a detailed derivation and study of analytical models that allow for an straightforward extension to other systems. Using our full numerical framework, we show that the Applegate mechanism can clearly explain the observed eclipsing time variations in four of the systems, while the required energy to produce the quadrupole moment variations is too high in at least eight systems. In the remaining four systems, the required energy is comparable to the available energy produced by the stars, which we consider borderline cases. Therefore, the Applegate mechanism cannot uniquely explain the observed period time variations for this entire population. Even in systems where the required energy is too high, the Applegate mechanism may provide an additional scatter, which needs to be considered in the derivation and analysis of planetary models.

  1. The Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, Lisa Robock

    1992-01-01

    The restructuring of the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS), designed to provide comprehensive long term observations from space of changes occurring on the Earth from natural and human causes in order to have a sound scientific basis for policy decisions on protection of the future, is reported. In response to several factors, the original program approved in the fiscal year 1991 budget was restructured and somewhat reduced in scope. The resulting program uses three different sized launch vehicles to put six different spacecraft in orbit in the first phase, followed by two replacement launches for each of five of the six satellites to maintain a long term observing capability to meet the needs of global climate change research and other science objectives. The EOS system, including the space observatories, the data and information system, and the interdisciplinary global change research effort, are approved and proceeding. Elements of EOS are already in place, such as the research investigations and initial data system capabilities. The flights of precursor satellite and Shuttle missions, the ongoing data analysis, and the evolutionary enhancements to the integrated Earth science data management capabilities are all important building blocks to the full EOS program.

  2. A planetary system as the origin of structure in Fomalhaut's dust belt.

    PubMed

    Kalas, Paul; Graham, James R; Clampin, Mark

    2005-06-23

    The Sun and >15 per cent of nearby stars are surrounded by dusty disks that must be collisionally replenished by asteroids and comets, as the dust would otherwise be depleted on timescales <10(7) years (ref. 1). Theoretical studies show that the structure of a dusty disk can be modified by the gravitational influence of planets, but the observational evidence is incomplete, at least in part because maps of the thermal infrared emission from the disks have low linear resolution (35 au in the best case). Optical images provide higher resolution, but the closest examples (AU Mic and beta Pic) are edge-on, preventing the direct measurement of the azimuthal and radial disk structure that is required for fitting theoretical models of planetary perturbations. Here we report the detection of optical light reflected from the dust grains orbiting Fomalhaut (HD 216956). The system is inclined 24 degrees away from edge-on, enabling the measurement of disk structure around its entire circumference, at a linear resolution of 0.5 au. The dust is distributed in a belt 25 au wide, with a very sharp inner edge at a radial distance of 133 au, and we measure an offset of 15 au between the belt's geometric centre and Fomalhaut. Taken together, the sharp inner edge and offset demonstrate the presence of planetary-mass objects orbiting Fomalhaut. PMID:15973402

  3. Nucleosynthesis Predictions for Intermediate-Mass AGB Stars: Comparison to Observations of Type I Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karakas, Amanda I.; vanRaai, Mark A.; Lugaro, Maria; Sterling, Nicholas C.; Dinerstein, Harriet L.

    2008-01-01

    Type I planetary nebulae (PNe) have high He/H and N/O ratios and are thought to be descendants of stars with initial masses of approx. 3-8 Stellar Mass. These characteristics indicate that the progenitor stars experienced proton-capture nucleosynthesis at the base of the convective envelope, in addition to the slow neutron capture process operating in the He-shell (the s-process). We compare the predicted abundances of elements up to Sr from models of intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to measured abundances in Type I PNe. In particular, we compare predictions and observations for the light trans-iron elements Se and Kr, in order to constrain convective mixing and the s-process in these stars. A partial mixing zone is included in selected models to explore the effect of a C-13 pocket on the s-process yields. The solar-metallicity models produce enrichments of [(Se, Kr)/Fe] less than or approx. 0.6, consistent with Galactic Type I PNe where the observed enhancements are typically less than or approx. 0.3 dex, while lower metallicity models predict larger enrichments of C, N, Se, and Kr. O destruction occurs in the most massive models but it is not efficient enough to account for the greater than or approx. 0.3 dex O depletions observed in some Type I PNe. It is not possible to reach firm conclusions regarding the neutron source operating in massive AGB stars from Se and Kr abundances in Type I PNe; abundances for more s-process elements may help to distinguish between the two neutron sources. We predict that only the most massive (M grester than or approx.5 Stellar Mass) models would evolve into Type I PNe, indicating that extra-mixing processes are active in lower-mass stars (3-4 Stellar Mass), if these stars are to evolve into Type I PNe.

  4. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry

    2014-03-01

    Preface: a personal view of planetary rings; 1. Introduction: the allure of the ringed planets; 2. Studies of planetary rings 1610-2013; 3. Diversity of planetary rings; 4. Individual ring particles and their collisions; 5. Large-scale ring evolution; 6. Moons confine and sculpt rings; 7. Explaining ring phenomena; 8. N-body simulations; 9. Stochastic models; 10. Age and evolution of rings; 11. Saturn's mysterious F ring; 12. Uranus' rings and moons; 13. Neptune's partial rings; 14. Jupiter's ring-moon system after Galileo and New Horizons; 15. Ring photometry; 16. Dusty rings; 17. Concluding remarks; Afterword; Glossary; References; Index.

  5. Infrared sensor system using robotics technology for inter-planetary mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hihara, Hiroki; Takano, Yousuke; Sano, Junpei; Iwase, Kaori; Kawakami, Satoko; Otake, Hisashi; Okada, Tatsuaki; Funase, Ryu; Takada, Jun; Masuda, Tetsuya

    2015-09-01

    Infrared sensor system is a major concern for inter-planetary missions in order to investigate the nature and the formation processes of planets and asteroids. Since it takes long time for the communication of inter-planetary probes, automatic and autonomous functions are essential for provisioning observation sequence including the setup procedures of peripheral equipment. Robotics technology which has been adopted on HAYABUSA2 asteroid probe provides functions for setting up onboard equipment, sensor signal calibration, and post signal processing. HAYABUSA2 was launched successfully in 2014 for the exploration of C class near-Earth asteroid 162173 (1999JU3). An optical navigation camera with telephoto lens (ONC-T), a thermal-infrared imager (TIR), and a near infrared spectrometer (NIRS3) have been developed for the observation of geology, thermo-physical properties, and organic or hydrated materials on the asteroid. ONC-T and TIR are used for those scientific purposes as well as assessment of landing site selection and safe descent operation onto the asteroid surface for sample acquisition. NIRS3 is used to characterize the mineralogy of the asteroid surface by observing the 3-micron band, where the particular diagnostic absorption features due to hydrated minerals appear. Modifications were required in order to apply robotics technology for the probe due to the difference of operation on satellites from robot operation environment. The major difference is time line consideration, because the standardized robotics operation software development system is based on event driven framework. The consistency between the framework of time line and event driven scheme was established for the automatic and autonomous operation for HAYABUSA2.

  6. Chaotic exchange of solid material between planetary systems: implications for lithopanspermia.

    PubMed

    Belbruno, Edward; Moro-Martín, Amaya; Malhotra, Renu; Savransky, Dmitry

    2012-08-01

    We examined a low-energy mechanism for the transfer of meteoroids between two planetary systems embedded in a star cluster using quasi-parabolic orbits of minimal energy. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we found that the exchange of meteoroids could have been significantly more efficient than previously estimated. Our study is relevant to astrobiology, as it addresses whether life on Earth could have been transferred to other planetary systems in the Solar System's birth cluster and whether life on Earth could have been transferred from beyond the Solar System. In the Solar System, the timescale over which solid material was delivered to the region from where it could be transferred via this mechanism likely extended to several hundred million years (as indicated by the 3.8-4.0 Ga epoch of the Late Heavy Bombardment). This timescale could have overlapped with the lifetime of the Solar birth cluster (∼100-500 Myr). Therefore, we conclude that lithopanspermia is an open possibility if life had an early start. Adopting parameters from the minimum mass solar nebula, considering a range of planetesimal size distributions derived from observations of asteroids and Kuiper Belt objects and theoretical coagulation models, and taking into account Oort Cloud formation models, we discerned that the expected number of bodies with mass>10 kg that could have been transferred between the Sun and its nearest cluster neighbor could be of the order of 10(14) to 3·10(16), with transfer timescales of tens of millions of years. We estimate that of the order of 3·10(8)·l (km) could potentially be life-bearing, where l is the depth of Earth's crust in kilometers that was ejected as the result of the early bombardment. PMID:22897115

  7. Chaotic Exchange of Solid Material Between Planetary Systems: Implications for Lithopanspermia

    PubMed Central

    Belbruno, Edward; Malhotra, Renu; Savransky, Dmitry

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We examined a low-energy mechanism for the transfer of meteoroids between two planetary systems embedded in a star cluster using quasi-parabolic orbits of minimal energy. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we found that the exchange of meteoroids could have been significantly more efficient than previously estimated. Our study is relevant to astrobiology, as it addresses whether life on Earth could have been transferred to other planetary systems in the Solar System's birth cluster and whether life on Earth could have been transferred from beyond the Solar System. In the Solar System, the timescale over which solid material was delivered to the region from where it could be transferred via this mechanism likely extended to several hundred million years (as indicated by the 3.8–4.0 Ga epoch of the Late Heavy Bombardment). This timescale could have overlapped with the lifetime of the Solar birth cluster (∼100–500 Myr). Therefore, we conclude that lithopanspermia is an open possibility if life had an early start. Adopting parameters from the minimum mass solar nebula, considering a range of planetesimal size distributions derived from observations of asteroids and Kuiper Belt objects and theoretical coagulation models, and taking into account Oort Cloud formation models, we discerned that the expected number of bodies with mass>10 kg that could have been transferred between the Sun and its nearest cluster neighbor could be of the order of 1014 to 3·1016, with transfer timescales of tens of millions of years. We estimate that of the order of 3·108·l (km) could potentially be life-bearing, where l is the depth of Earth's crust in kilometers that was ejected as the result of the early bombardment. Key Words: Extrasolar planets—Interplanetary dust—Interstellar meteorites—Lithopanspermia. Astrobiology 12, 754–774. PMID:22897115

  8. Disks around stars and the growth of planetary systems.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Jane S

    2005-01-01

    Circumstellar disks play a vital evolutionary role, providing a way to move gas inward and onto a young star. The outward transfer of angular momentum allows the star to contract without breaking up, and the remnant disk of gas and particles is the reservoir for forming planets. High-resolution spectroscopy is uncovering planetary dynamics and motion within the remnant disk, and imaging at infrared to millimeter wavelengths resolves disk structure over billions of years of evolution. Most stars are born with a disk, and models of planet formation need to form such bodies from the disk material within the disk's 10-million-year life-span. PMID:15637266

  9. High-contrast near-infrared studies of planetary systems and their circumstellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodigas, Timothy John

    Planets are thought to form in circumstellar disks, leaving behind planetesimals that collide to produce dusty debris disks. Characterizing the architectures of planetary systems, along with the structures and compositions of debris disks, can therefore help answer questions about how planets form. In this thesis, I present the results of five papers (three published, two in preparation) concerning the properties of extrasolar planetary systems and their circumstellar environments. Chapters 2 and 3 are studies of radial velocity (RV) exoplanetary systems. For years astronomers have been puzzled about the large number of RV-detected planets that have eccentric orbits (e > 0.1). In Chapter 2 I show that this problem can partially be explained by showing that two circular-orbit planets can masquerade as a single planet on an eccentric orbit. I use this finding to predict that planets with mildly eccentric orbits are the most likely to have massive companions on wide orbits, potentially detectable by future direct imaging observations. Chapter 3 presents such a direct imaging study of the 14 Her planetary system. I significantly constrain the phase space of the putative candidate 14 Her c and demonstrate the power of direct imaging/RV overlap. Chapters 4 and 5 are high-contrast 2-4 micron imaging studies of the edge-on debris disks around HD 15115 and HD 32297. HD 15115's color is found to be gray, implying large grains 1-10 microns in size reside in stable orbits in the disk. HD 32297's disk color is red from 1-4 microns. Cometary material (carbon, silicates, and porous water ice) are a good match at 1-2 microns but not at L'. Tholins, organic material that is found in outer solar system bodies, or small silicates can explain the disk's red color but not the short wavelength data. Chapter 6 presents a dynamical study of dust grains in the presence of massive planets. I show that the width of a debris disk increases proportionally with the mass of its shepherding

  10. Observing Infrared Emission Lines of Neutron-Capture Species in Planetary Nebulae: New Detections with IGRINS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Sterling, N. C.; Kaplan, Kyle F.; Bautista, Manuel A.

    2015-08-01

    As the former envelopes of evolved stars, planetary nebulae (PNe) present an opportunity to study slow neutron-capture reactions (the “s-process”) during the AGB. Such studies differ from those of AGB stars in two ways. First, PNe represent the end point of self-enrichment and dredge-up in the star and most of its mass return to the ISM, enabling us to infer the nucleosynthetic yield of a specific element. Second, some s-process products are observable in PNe but difficult or impossible to observe in cool stars. These include some species with nuclear charge Z in the 30’s for which the major synthesis sites are uncertain. Optical emission lines of trans-iron species have been observed in some PNe, but are faint and can suffer from blending with lines of more abundant elements (Péquignot & Baluteau 1994, A&A, 283, 593; Sharpee et al. 2007, ApJ, 659, 1265). Observing infrared transitions from low energy states has proven to be a fruitful alternate approach. We used K-band lines of Se (Z=34) and Kr (Z=36) to study the demographics of their abundances in a large sample of Milky Way PNe (Dinerstein 2001, ApJ, 550, L223; Sterling & Dinerstein 2008, ApJ, 174, 158; Sterling, Porter, & Dinerstein 2015, submitted). An L-band emission line of Zn identified by Dinerstein & Geballe (2001, ApJ, 562, 515) and further observed by Smith, Zijlstra, & Dinerstein 2014 (MNRAS, 441, 3161), can be used as a tracer of the Fe-group, enabling determinations of the key stellar population diagnostic ratio [alpha/Fe] in PNe (see poster by Dinerstein et al., Focus Meeting 4). Using IGRINS, a high spectral resolution H and K band spectrometer (Park & Jaffe et al. 2014, Proc SPIE, 9147), we have discovered several new lines not previously reported in any astronomical object. Our detection of an H-band line of Rb (Z=37) confirms previous claims of optical Rb detections and indicates enrichment by a factor of ~4 in the PN NGC 7027 (Sterling, Dinerstein, Kaplan, & Bautista, in preparation

  11. ECHOES OF A DECAYING PLANETARY SYSTEM: THE GASEOUS AND DUSTY DISKS SURROUNDING THREE WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Melis, C.; Jura, M.; Klein, B.; Zuckerman, B.; Albert, L.

    2010-10-20

    We have performed a comprehensive ground-based observational program aimed at characterizing the circumstellar material orbiting three single white dwarf stars previously known to possess gaseous disks. Near-infrared imaging unambiguously detects excess infrared emission toward Ton 345 and allows us to refine models for the circumstellar dust around two of the three white dwarf stars. We find that each white dwarf hosts gaseous and dusty disks that are roughly spatially coincident, a result that is consistent with a scenario in which dusty and gaseous material has its origin in remnant parent bodies of the white dwarfs' planetary systems. We briefly describe a new model for the gas disk heating mechanism in which the gaseous material behaves like a 'Z II' region. In this Z II region, gas primarily composed of metals is photoionized by ultraviolet light and cools through optically thick allowed Ca II-line emission.

  12. Field geologic observation and sample collection strategies for planetary surface exploration: Insights from the 2010 Desert RATS geologist crewmembers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtado, José M.; Young, Kelsey; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Garry, W. Brent; Rice, James W.

    2013-10-01

    Observation is the primary role of all field geologists, and geologic observations put into an evolving conceptual context will be the most important data stream that will be relayed to Earth during a planetary exploration mission. Sample collection is also an important planetary field activity, and its success is closely tied to the quality of contextual observations. To test protocols for doing effective planetary geologic fieldwork, the Desert RATS (Research and Technology Studies) project deployed two prototype rovers for two weeks of simulated exploratory traverses in the San Francisco volcanic field of northern Arizona. The authors of this paper represent the geologist crewmembers who participated in the 2010 field test. We document the procedures adopted for Desert RATS 2010 and report on our experiences regarding these protocols. Careful consideration must be made of various issues that impact the interplay between field geologic observations and sample collection, including time management; strategies related to duplication of samples and observations; logistical constraints on the volume and mass of samples and the volume/transfer of data collected; and paradigms for evaluation of mission success. We find that the 2010 field protocols brought to light important aspects of each of these issues, and we recommend best practices and modifications to training and operational protocols to address them. Underlying our recommendations is the recognition that the capacity of the crew to "flexibly execute" their activities is paramount. Careful design of mission parameters, especially field geologic protocols, is critical for enabling the crews to successfully meet their science objectives.

  13. Suzaku Observations of Charge Exchange Emission from Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ezoe, Y.; Fujimoto, R.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Ohashi, T.; Ishikawa, K.; Oishi, S.; Miyoshi, Y; Terada, N.; Futaana, Y.; Porter, F. S.; Brown, G. V.

    2012-01-01

    Recent results of charge exchange emission from solar system objects observed with the Japanese Suzaku satellite are reviewed. Suzaku is of great importance to investigate diffuse X-ray emission like the charge exchange from planetary exospheres and comets. The Suzaku studies of Earth's exosphere, Martian exosphere, Jupiter's aurorae, and comets are overviewed.

  14. Torsional vibrations and dynamic loads in a basic planetary gear system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    August, R.; Kasuba, R.

    1986-01-01

    An iterative method has been developed for analyzing dynamic loads in a light weight basic planetary gear system. The effects of fixed, semi-floating, and fully-floating sun gear conditions have been emphasized. The load dependent variable gear mesh stiffness were incorporated into a practical torsional dynamic model of a planetary gear system. The dynamic model consists of input and output units, shafts, and a planetary train. In this model, the sun gear has three degrees of freedom; two transverse and one rotational. The planets, ring gear, and the input and output units have one degree of freedom, (rotation) thus giving a total of nine degrees of freedoms for the basic system. The ring gear has a continuous radial support. The results indicate that the fixed sun gear arrangement with accurate or errorless gearing offers in general better performance than the floating sun gear system.

  15. Mesospheric CO2 ice clouds on Mars observed by Planetary Fourier Spectrometer onboard Mars Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Shohei; Giuranna, Marco; Sato, Yuki; Nakagawa, Hiromu; Sato, Takao M.; Wolkenberg, Paulina; Murata, Isao; Kasaba, Yasumasa

    2016-04-01

    We investigate mesospheric CO2 ice clouds on Mars detected by the Planetary Fourier Spectrometer (PFS) onboard Mars Express (MEx). The relatively high spectral resolution of PFS allows firm identification of the clouds' reflection spike. A total of 279 occurrences of the CO2 ice clouds features has been detected at the bottom of 4.3 μm CO2 band from the MEx/PFS data during the period from MY27 to MY32. 115 occurrences out of them are also confirmed by simultaneous observations by MEx/OMEGA imaging spectrometer. The spatial and seasonal distributions of the CO2 ice clouds observed by PFS are consistent with the previous studies: the CO2 ice clouds are only observed between Ls=0° and 140° at distinct longitudinal corridors around the equatorial region (±20°N). The CO2 ice clouds are preferentially detected at local time between 15-17h. The relatively high spectral resolution of PFS allows us to investigate the spectral shape of the CO2 ice clouds features. The CO2 ice clouds reflection spike is peaked between 4.24 and 4.29 μm, with no evidence of the secondary peak at 4.32-4.34 μm observed by MEx/OMEGA (Määttänen et al., 2010). In most of the cases (about 75%), the peak is present between 4.245 and 4.255 μm. Moreover, small secondary peaks are found around 4.28 μm (about 15 occurrences). These spectral features cannot be reproduced by the synthetic spectra with the assumption of a spherical particle shape in our radiative transfer model (DISORT). This can be due to the fact that the available CO2 ice reflective indexes are either inaccurate or inappropriate for the mesospheric temperatures, or that the particle shape is not spherical. Accurate measurements of the reflective index depending on temperature and detailed comparison with the model taking into account non-spherical shapes will give a clue to solve this issue.

  16. Observing Dynamics in Large-Scale Birkeland Currents with the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Waters, C. L.; Barnes, R. J.; Olson, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) provides continuous global observations of the magnetic perturbations that predominantly reflect Birkeland currents. The data are acquired by avionics magnetometers of the Iridium satellites and allow measurements from 66 satellites in near-polar circular, low altitude orbits. The configuration of the Iridium satellite constellation determines the longitude sampling spacing of ~ 2 hours and the re-sampling cadence of the system which is 9 minutes. From 2008 to 2013 the AMPERE system was developed which included new flight software on the Iridium satellites to allow telemetry of higher rate data to the ground and the Science Data Center to derive Birkeland current perturbations from the data and invert these signals to derive the global distributions of the currents using data windows of ten minutes. There were many challenges in developing AMPERE including automating inter-calibration between satellites and the baseline determination and removals. The results of AMPERE provide stunning confirmation of many of the statistical estimates for the distribution of currents but more significantly open a new window to understand their instantaneous distribution and dynamics. Examples of new features of the currents and their dynamics revealed by AMPERE are presented. In addition, prospects for new data products and increased data quality anticipated from AMPERE-NEXT to be implemented on the Iridium-NEXT generation of satellites are discussed.

  17. Seasonal analysis of the planetary boundary-layer afternoon and evening transition through observational measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre, Mariano; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Yagüe, Carlos; Arrillaga, Jon A.; Maqueda, Gregorio

    2016-04-01

    From a typically convective diurnal situation to a stably stratified nocturnal one, the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) experiences the so-called afternoon and evening transition. This period is complex to study due to the presence of many different forcings, usually weak and opposite [1]. In this work, the transitional processes are studied by using 6-year data from permanent instrumentation at CIBA, a research center located in the Spanish Northern plateau. These measurements include particulate matter (PM) and turbulent records. Certain variables display a twin pattern in their time evolution for all the seasons, only differing in their absolute values. On the contrary, the air specific humidity behaves differently for each season, which is distinct to the results from a previous study at a different location [2]. Besides, a common pattern of increasing PM values near sunset is found, with a number of influences playing a role in PM concentrations: stability, turbulence and ABL thickness among others. In particular, the competing thermal and mechanical turbulent effects result in PM concentration reduction (settling on the ground or being advected) or increase, depending in each case on the specific season and particle group. Furthermore, the relative importance of the bigger PM (between 2.5 and 10 μm) is linked to the wind minimum around sunset, especially during summer. [1] Lothon, M. and coauthors (2014): The BLLAST field experiment: Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 10931-10960. [2] Wingo, S. M. and Knupp, K. R. (2015): Multi-platform observations characterizing the afternoon-to-evening transition of the planetary boundary layer in Northern Alabama, USA, Boundary-Layer Meteorol., 155, 29-53.

  18. The location of planetary bow shocks: A critical overview of theory and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.

    1995-01-01

    A bow shock (BS has been observed in the collisionless solar wind upstream of every planet except Pluto, which has yet to be visited by a spacecraft. They are all of similar character, but their size relative to the planet varies widely, e.g., the planeto-centric distance to the BS nose ranges from about 1.4 R(sub V) for Venus to 88 R(sub J) or more for Jupiter. Comparisons are reviewed that show its location may be represented satisfactorily by a gasdynamic (GD) model, provided the properties of the solar wind and planetary magnetic field and ionosphere are known and used as input in the application. Factors that determine the location are discussed, and examples are presented to illustrate effects of their variation, including which part of a BS is influenced by a local variation of the magneto/ionopause (MIP) shape. The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) has no influence on the BS location in the GD model, but is shown to have a small effect in corresponding solutions of the basic MHD model from which the GD model is derived as the limit for weak IMF. Nearly all GD and MHD solutions are for steady flow, but a solution for unsteady flow associated with the passage of an interplanetary shock is also presented. It shows that the BS moves rapidly from its initial to final location, e.g., in about minute for the earth. Since many changes in the solar wind occur over longer intervals, these results help explain the success of quasi-stationary solutions in modeling the BS in time-varying solar wind flows.

  19. Observations of planetary waves in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere during stratospheric warming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stray, N. H.; Orsolini, Y. J.; Espy, P. J.; Limpasuvan, V.; Hibbins, R. E.

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the effect of stratospheric sudden warmings (SSWs) on planetary wave (PW) activity in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT). PW activity near 95 km is derived from meteor wind data using a chain of eight SuperDARN radars at high northern latitudes that span longitudes from 150° W to 25° E and latitudes from 51 to 66° N. Zonal wave number 1 and 2 components were extracted from the meridional wind for the years 2000-2008. The observed wintertime PW activity shows common features associated with the stratospheric wind reversals and the accompanying stratospheric warming events. Onset dates for seven SSW events accompanied by an elevated stratopause (ES) were identified during this time period using the Specified Dynamics Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (SD-WACCM). For the seven events, a significant enhancement in wave number 1 and 2 PW amplitudes near 95 km was found to occur after the wind reversed at 50 km, with amplitudes maximizing approximately 5 days after the onset of the wind reversal. This PW enhancement in the MLT after the event was confirmed using SD-WACCM. When all cases of polar cap wind reversals at 50 km were considered, a significant, albeit moderate, correlation of 0.4 was found between PW amplitudes near 95 km and westward polar-cap stratospheric winds at 50 km, with the maximum correlation occurring ∼ 3 days after the maximum westward wind. These results indicate that the enhancement of PW amplitudes near 95 km is a common feature of SSWs irrespective of the strength of the wind reversal.

  20. Field Geologic Observation and Sample Collection Strategies for Planetary Surface Exploration: Insights from the 2010 Desert RATS Geologist Crewmembers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurtado, Jose M., Jr.; Young, Kelsey; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Garry, W. Brent; Rice, James W., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Observation is the primary role of all field geologists, and geologic observations put into an evolving conceptual context will be the most important data stream that will be relayed to Earth during a planetary exploration mission. Sample collection is also an important planetary field activity, and its success is closely tied to the quality of contextual observations. To test protocols for doing effective planetary geologic field- work, the Desert RATS(Research and Technology Studies) project deployed two prototype rovers for two weeks of simulated exploratory traverses in the San Francisco volcanic field of northern Arizona. The authors of this paper represent the geologist crew members who participated in the 2010 field test.We document the procedures adopted for Desert RATS 2010 and report on our experiences regarding these protocols. Careful consideration must be made of various issues that impact the interplay between field geologic observations and sample collection, including time management; strategies relatedtoduplicationofsamplesandobservations;logisticalconstraintson the volume and mass of samples and the volume/transfer of data collected; and paradigms for evaluation of mission success. We find that the 2010 field protocols brought to light important aspects of each of these issues, and we recommend best practices and modifications to training and operational protocols to address them. Underlying our recommendations is the recognition that the capacity of the crew to flexibly execute their activities is paramount. Careful design of mission parameters, especially field geologic protocols, is critical for enabling the crews to successfully meet their science objectives.

  1. PLATO: PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of Stars The exoplanetary system explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catala, Claude

    2010-05-01

    PLATO is a space mission under definition study at ESA, as one of the medium-class candidates of the Cosmic Vision programme. Its objective is to characterize exoplanets and their host stars in the solar neighbourhood. While it builds on the heritage from CoRoT and KEPLER, the major breakthrough will come from its strong focus on bright targets. The PLATO targets will include a large number of very bright and nearby stars. The prime science goals of PLATO are: (i) the detection and characterization of exoplanetary systems of all kinds, including both the planets and their host stars, reaching down to small, terrestrial planets in the habitable zone; (ii) the identification of suitable targets for future, more detailed characterization, including a spectroscopic search for bio-markers in nearby habitable exoplanets. These ambitious goals will be reached by ultra-high precision, long (few years), uninterrupted photometric monitoring in the visible of very large samples of bright stars, which can only be done from space. The resulting high quality light curves will be used on the one hand to detect planetary transits, as well as to measure their characteristics, and on the other hand to provide a seismic analysis of the host stars of the detected planets, from which precise measurements of their radii, masses, and ages will be derived. The PLATO space-based data will be complemented by ground-based follow-up observations, in particular very precise radial velocity monitoring, which will be used to confirm the planetary nature of the detected events and to measure the planet masses. The full set of parameters of exoplanetary systems will thus be measured, including all characteristics of the host stars and the orbits, radii, masses, and ages of the planets, allowing us to derive planet mean densities, and estimate their temperature and radiation environment. Finally, the knowledge of the age of the exoplanetary systems will allow us to put them in an evolutionary

  2. Mass outflow in the nearby proto-planetary system, Beta Pictoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruhweiler, Frederick C.; Grady, C. A.; Kondo, Yoji

    1991-01-01

    Previous spectral studies of circumstallar dust around the nearby, candidate proto-planetary system, Beta Pictoris, has detected only infalling gas. The lack of detectable mass outflow has been critical in the interpretation of the origin of the circumstellar gas and in our understanding of the evolutionary status of the Beta Pictoris system. IUE high-dispersion spectra are presented which show, in addition to infall, the presence of mass outflow, with a maximum observed outflow velocity of -60 km/s, and a corresponding instantaneous outflow rate of 1.1 x 10 to the -14th solar mass/yr, or 1.1 x 10 to the -11th Jupiter mass/yr. This mass outflow rate and terminal velocity are comparable to the magnitudes of mass infall rates and terminal velocities observed from late 1986 through early 1988. The implications of these observations on our understanding of the mechanisms producing infall from the surrounding circumstellar disk are discussed, as are the implications for our understanding of the evolutionary status of the Beta Pic system.

  3. Lyapunov Exponent Criterion for Stability of Planetary Orbits in Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musielak, Zdzislaw E.; Quarles, B.; Eberle, J.; Cuntz, M.

    2011-01-01

    The existence of planets in stellar binary systems is now well-confirmed by many observations. Stability of planetary orbits in these systems has extensively been studied and some attempts have been made to establish stringent stability criteria for the orbits. In this paper, we contribute to the ongoing work on the stability criteria in binary systems by introducing a Lyapunov exponent criterion. We have computed the Lyapunov exponents, the Lyapunov dimension and the time series spectra for planets in binary system. The obtained results demonstrate when a system becomes unstable by orbital energy criterion and the method of Lyapunov exponents provides a quantitative classification scale to characterize the instability. By applying the maximum Lyapunov exponent to the parameter space, which covers mass and distance ratios for the considered binary systems, we determined regions of stability and used the time series spectra and the Lyapunov dimension to illustrate the reasons behind the stability. Specific applications of the criterion to binary systems with known planets will also be discussed.

  4. A Path to Planetary Protection Requirements for Human Exploration: A Literary Analysis and Systems Engineering Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, James; Conley, Catharine; Siegel, Bette

    As systems, technologies, and plans for the human exploration of Mars and other destinations beyond low Earth orbit begin to coalesce, it is imperative that frequent and early consideration is given to how planetary protection practices and policy will be upheld. While the development of formal planetary protection requirements for future human space systems and operations may still be a few years from fruition, guidance to appropriately influence mission and system design will be needed soon to avoid costly design and operational changes. The path to constructing such requirements is a journey that espouses key systems engineering practices of understanding shared goals, objectives and concerns, identifying key stakeholders, and iterating a draft requirement set to gain community consensus. This paper traces through each of these practices, beginning with a literary analysis of nearly three decades of publications addressing planetary protection concerns with respect to human exploration. Key goals, objectives and concerns, particularly with respect to notional requirements, required studies and research, and technology development needs have been compiled and categorized to provide a current ‘state of knowledge’. This information, combined with the identification of key stakeholders in upholding planetary protection concerns for human missions, has yielded a draft requirement set that might feed future iteration among space system designers, exploration scientists, and the mission operations community. Combining the information collected with a proposed forward path will hopefully yield a mutually agreeable set of timely, verifiable, and practical requirements for human space exploration that will uphold international commitment to planetary protection. Keywords: planetary protection, human spaceflight requirements, human space exploration, human space operations, systems engineering, literature analysis

  5. Structural and Control Concepts for Variable Geometry Planetary Entry Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco; Boussalis, Dhemetrios; Davis, Gregory; Kwok, Kawai; Pellegrino, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    The results presented in this paper apply to a generic vehicle entering a planetary atmosphere which makes use of a variable geometry change to modulate the heat, drag, and acceleration loads. Two structural concepts for implementing the cone angle variation, namely a segmented shell and a corrugated shell, are presented. A structural analysis of these proposed structural configuration shows that the stress levels are tolerable during entry. The analytic expressions of the longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients are also derived, and guidance laws that track reference heat flux, drag, and aerodynamic acceleration loads are also proposed. These guidance laws have been tested in an integrated simulation environment, and the results indicate that use of variable geometry is feasible to track specific profiles of dynamic load conditions during reentry.

  6. Structural and Trajectory Control of Variable Geometry Planetary Entry Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco; Kwok, Kawai; Pellegrino, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    The results presented in this paper apply to a generic vehicle entering a planetary atmosphere which makes use of a variable geometry change to modulate the heat, drag, and acceleration loads. Two structural concepts for implementing the cone angle variation, namely a segmented shell and a corrugated shell, are presented. A structural analysis of these proposed structural configuration shows that the stress levels are tolerable during entry. The analytic expressions of the longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients are also derived, and guidance laws that track reference heat flux, drag, and aerodynamic acceleration loads are also proposed. These guidance laws have been tested in an integrated simulation environment, and the results indicate that use of variable geometry is feasible to track specific profiles of dynamic load conditions during reentry.

  7. Application of hybrid propulsion systems to planetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Don, J. P.; Phen, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    The feasibility and application of hybrid rocket propulsion to outer-planet orbiter missions is assessed in this study and guidelines regarding future development are provided. A Jupiter Orbiter Mission was selected for evaluation because it is the earliest planetary mission which may require advanced chemical propulsion. Mission and spacecraft characteristics which affect the selection and design of propulsion subsystems are presented. Alternative propulsion subsystems, including space-storable bipropellant liquids, a solid/monopropellant vernier, and a hybrid, are compared on the basis of performance, reliability, and cost. Cost-effectiveness comparisons are made for a range of assumptions including variation in (1) the level of need for spacecraft performance (determined in part by launch vehicle injected mass capability), and (2) achievable reliability at corresponding costs. The results indicated that the hybrid and space-storable bipropellant mechanizations are competitive.

  8. Connection between the spherical albedo and the observable characteristics of a planetary atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Fomin, N.N.; Yanovitskii, E.G.

    1986-07-01

    Semiempirical dependences of the geometrical albedo and the reflection coefficient at the center of a planetary disk on the spherical albedo are found. The nonsteady analogs of these quantities are studied on the basis of the approximate equations obtained. These analogs can be used in the analysis of radiation transfer in forbidden molecular absorption bands.

  9. Planetary Science Enabled by High Power Ion Propulsion Systems from NASA's Prometheus Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, John

    2004-11-01

    NASA's Prometheus program seeks to develop new generations of spacecraft nuclear-power and ion propulsion systems for applications to future planetary missions. The Science Definition Team for the first mission in the Prometheus series, the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), has defined science objectives for in-situ orbital exploration of the icy Galilean moons (Europa, Ganymede, Callisto) and the Jovian magnetosphere along with remote observations of Jupiter's atmosphere and aurorae, the volcanic moon Io, and other elements of the Jovian system. Important to this forum is that JIMO power and propulsion systems will need to be designed to minimize magnetic, radio, neutral gas, and plasma backgrounds that might otherwise interfere with achievement of mission science objectives. Another potential Prometheus mission of high science interest would be an extended tour of primitive bodies in the solar system, including asteroids, Jupiter family comets, Centaurs, and Kuiper Belt Objects (KBO). The final landed phase of this mission might include an active keplerian experiment for detectable (via downlink radio doppler shift) acceleration of a small kilometer-size Centaur or KBO object, likely the satellite of a larger object observable from Earth. This would have obvious application to testing of mitigation techniques for Earth impact hazards.

  10. Periastron precession measurements in transiting extrasolar planetary systems at the level of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pál, András; Kocsis, Bence

    2008-09-01

    Transiting exoplanetary systems are surpassingly important among the planetary systems since they provide the widest spectrum of information for both the planet and the host star. If a transiting planet is on an eccentric orbit, the duration of transits TD is sensitive to the orientation of the orbital ellipse relative to the line of sight. The precession of the orbit results in a systematic variation in both the duration of individual transit events and the observed period between successive transits, Pobs. The periastron of the ellipse slowly precesses due to general relativity and possibly the presence of other planets in the system. This secular precession can be detected through the long-term change in Pobs (transit timing variations, TTV) or in TD (transit duration variations, TDV). We estimate the corresponding precession measurement precision for repeated future observations of the known eccentric transiting exoplanetary systems (XO-3b, HD 147506b, GJ 436b and HD 17156b) using existing or planned space-borne instruments. The TDV measurement improves the precession detection sensitivity by orders of magnitude over the TTV measurement. We find that TDV measurements over a approximately 4yr period can typically detect the precession rate to a precision well exceeding the level predicted by general relativity.

  11. The ExoMars Entry & Descent system: an enabler for European planetary science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebleu, D.; Monier, J.; Marchand, B.; Squillaci, J.-R.; Lubrano, G.; Capus, P.; Laurenti, P.; Poncy, J.; Couzin, P.

    2013-09-01

    After HUYGENS and thanks to the ExoMars Entry and Descent System, Europe will confirm the capacity to land on planetary bodies. This presentation reports the development status of ExoMars EDM Entry & Descent system. All development tests are performed, and the subsystems flight models manufacturing are in progress.

  12. Observing Planetary Rings and Small Satellites with the James Webb Space Telescope: Science Justification and Observation Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.; Showalter, Mark R.; French, Richard G.; Burns, Joseph A.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; de Pater, Imke; Hamilton, Douglas P.; Hedman, Matthew M.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Tamayo, Daniel; Verbiscer, Anne J.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Stansberry, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will provide unprecedented opportunities to observe the rings and small satellites in our Solar System, accomplishing three primary objectives: (1) discovering new rings and moons, (2) unprecedented spectroscopy, and (3) time-domain observations. We give details on these science objectives and describe requirements that JWST must fulfill in order to accomplish the science objectives.

  13. Argus: A concept study for an Io observer mission from the 2014 NASA/JPL Planetary Science Summer School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, Patricio; Holstein-Rathlou, Christina; Hays, Lindsay E.; Keane, James T.; Neveu, Marc; Basu, Ko; Davis, Byron; Mendez-Ramos, Eugina; Nelessen, Adam; Fox, Valerie; Herman, Jonathan F.; Parrish, Nathan L.; Hughes, Andrea C.; Marcucci, Emma; Scheinberg, Aaron; Wrobel, Jonathan S.

    2014-11-01

    Jupiter’s moon Io is the ideal target to study extreme tidal heating and volcanism, two major processes shaping the formation and evolution of planetary bodies. In response to the 2009 New Frontiers Announcement of Opportunity, we propose an Io Observer mission concept named Argus (after the mythical watchman of Io). This concept was developed by the students of the August 2014 session of NASA’s Planetary Science Summer School, together with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Team X.The science objectives of our mission are: (1) study the physical process of tidal heating and its implications for habitability in the Solar System and beyond; (2) investigate active lava flows on Io as an analog for volcanism on early Earth; (3) analyze the interaction between Io and the Jovian system via material exchange and magnetospheric activity; (4) study Io’s chemistry and geologic history to gain insight into the formation and evolution of the Galilean satellites. Our mission consists of a Jupiter-orbiting spacecraft performing ten close flybys of Io. The orbital inclination of ~31 degrees minimizes the total radiation dose received, at the cost of having to perform fast flybys (13 km/s).The instrument payload includes: (1) IGLOO, a multi-band camera for regional (500 m/pixel) and high-resolution (50 m/pixel) imaging; (2) IoLA, a laser altimeter to measure the triaxial shape and diurnal tidal deformation, and topographic profiles of individual surface features; (3) IGNITERS, a thermal emission radiometer/spectrometer to map nighttime temperatures, thermal inertia, and characterize Io’s atmosphere; (4) IoNIS, a near-infrared spectrometer to map global (10 km/pixel) and local (2 km/pixel) surface composition; (5) IoFLEX, a magnetometer and (6) IoPEX, a plasma particle analyzer to characterize the magnetic environment and understand the nature of Io’s induced and possible intrinsic magnetic fields; (7) IRAGE, a gravity science experiment to probe Io’s interior

  14. The Prospects for Earth-Like Planets within Known Extrasolar Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehman, Curtis S.; Adams, Fred C.; Laughlin, Gregory

    1996-11-01

    We consider the possible existence of habitable Earth-like planets in four recently discovered extrasolar planetary systems. Such prospective planets must have orbits that are (1) dynamically stable, and (2) allow for surface temperatures compatible with liquid water. We find that three of the four new systems (51 Peg, rho^1 Cnc, and 47 UMa) are easily capable of supporting habitable planets. The fourth (70 Vir) is capable of having a habitable planet only under rather extreme circumstances. To obtain these results, we develop a probabilistic formulation for the coupled problem of orbital stability and planetary habitability. (SECTION: Extrasolar Planets)

  15. Planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The radar astronomy activities supported by the Deep Space Network during June, July, and August 1980 are reported. The planetary bodies observed were Venus, Mercury, and the asteroid Toro. Data were obtained at both S and X band, and the observations were considered successful.

  16. Stellar rotation-planetary orbit period commensurability in the HAT-P-11 system

    SciTech Connect

    Béky, Bence; Holman, Matthew J.; Noyes, Robert W.; Kipping, David M.

    2014-06-10

    A number of planet host stars have been observed to rotate with a period equal to an integer multiple of the orbital period of their close planet. We expand this list by analyzing Kepler data of HAT-P-11 and finding a period ratio of 6:1. In particular, we present evidence for a long-lived spot on the stellar surface that is eclipsed by the planet in the same position four times, every sixth transit. We also identify minima in the out-of-transit light curve and confirm that their phase with respect to the stellar rotation is mostly stationary for the 48 month time frame of the observations, confirming the proposed rotation period. For comparison, we apply our methods to Kepler-17 and confirm the findings of Bonomo and Lanza that the period ratio is not exactly 8:1 in that system. Finally, we provide a hypothesis on how interactions between a star and its planet could possibly result in an observed commensurability for systems where the stellar differential rotation profile happens to include a period at some latitude that is commensurable to the planetary orbit.

  17. How do giant planetary cores shape the dust disk?. HL Tauri system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picogna, Giovanni; Kley, Wilhelm

    2015-12-01

    Context. We have been observing, thanks to ALMA, the dust distribution in the region of active planet formation around young stars. This is a powerful tool that can be used to connect observations with theoretical models and improve our understanding of the processes at play. Aims: We want to test how a multiplanetary system shapes its birth disk and to study the influence of the planetary masses and particle sizes on the final dust distribution. Moreover, we apply our model to the HL Tau system in order to obtain some insights on the physical parameters of the planets that are able to create the observed features. Methods: We follow the evolution of a population of dust particles, treated as Lagrangian particles, in two-dimensional locally isothermal disks where two equal-mass planets are present. The planets are kept in fixed orbits and they do not accrete mass. Results: The outer planet plays a major role in removing the dust particles in the co-orbital region of the inner planet and in forming a particle ring which have a steeper density gradient close to the gap edge respect to the single-planet scenario, promoting the development of vortices. The ring and gap width depend strongly on the planetary mass and particle stopping times, and for the more massive cases on the ring clumps in few stable points that are able to collect a high mass fraction. The features observed in the HL Tau system can be explained through the presence of several massive cores that shape the dust disk where the inner planet(s) have a mass of the order of 0.07 MJup and the outer one(s) of the order of 0.35 MJup. These values can be significantly lower if the disk mass turns out to be less than previously estimated. By decreasing the disk mass by a factor of 10, we obtain similar gap widths for planets with a mass of 10 M⊕ and 20 M⊕ for the inner and outer planets, respectively. Although the particle gaps are prominent, the expected gaseous gaps are barely visible.

  18. SIM Lite Detection of Habitable Planets in P-Type Binary-Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Xiaopei; Shao, Michael; Shaklan, Stuart; Goullioud, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    Close binary stars like spectroscopic binaries create a completely different environment than single stars for the evolution of a protoplanetary disk. Dynamical interactions between one star and protoplanets in such systems provide more challenges for theorists to model giant planet migration and formation of multiple planets. For habitable planets the majority of host stars are in binary star systems. So far only a small amount of Jupiter-size planets have been discovered in binary stars, whose minimum separations are 20 AU and the median value is about 1000 AU (because of difficulties in radial velocity measurements). The SIM Lite mission, a space-based astrometric observatory, has a unique capability to detect habitable planets in binary star systems. This work analyzed responses of the optical system to the field stop for companion stars and demonstrated that SIM Lite can observe exoplanets in visual binaries with small angular separations. In particular we investigated the issues for the search for terrestrial planets in P-type binary-planetary systems, where the planets move around both stars in a relatively distant orbit.

  19. SIM-Lite detection of habitable planets in P-type binary-planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaopei; Shao, Michael; Shaklan, Stuart; Goullioud, Renaud

    2010-07-01

    Close binary stars like spectroscopic binaries create a completely different environment than single stars for the evolution of a protoplanetary disk. Dynamical interactions between one star and protoplanets in such systems provide more challenges for theorists to model giant planet migration and formation of multiple planets. For habitable planets the majority of host stars are in binary star systems. So far only a small amount of Jupiter-size planets have been discovered in binary stars, whose minimum separations are 20 AU and the median value is about 1000 AU (because of difficulties in radial velocity measurements). The SIM Lite mission, a space-based astrometric observatory, has a unique capability to detect habitable planets in binary star systems. This work analyzed responses of the optical system to the field stop for companion stars and demonstrated that SIM Lite can observe exoplanets in visual binaries with small angular separations. In particular we investigated the issues for the search for terrestrial planets in P-type binary-planetary systems, where the planets move around both stars in a relatively distant orbit.

  20. Helium 584 Å and H Lyman-α Airglow in Giant Planetary Atmospheres: Modeling, Observations, and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Christopher; Esposito, Larry W.

    2016-07-01

    The atmosphere of the outer planets is mainly composed of H2 and neutral atomic helium. The study of He 584 Å and H Lyman-α brightnesses is interesting as the EUV and FUV (Extreme and Far Ultraviolet) planetary airglow have the potential to yield useful information about mixing and other important parameters in their thermospheres. Time variation, asymmetries, and polar enhancement of the airglow are also possible and analysis of the public archived NASA mission data sets (i.e. Voyager and Cassini) can help solve some of the outstanding problems associated with these phenomena. The comparison of observations with results from sophisticated photochemical and radiative transfer models can also help ameliorate unexplained differences in the dynamical processes operating within planetary upper atmospheres. Powerful analysis techniques allow us to extract information on atmospheric mixing, temperatures, and temporal changes due to the solar and seasonal cycles from the variations in distribution and intensity of airglow emissions that result. The presentation will discuss the implications of interpretations from comparison of modeling and observations in giant planetary atmospheres.

  1. The Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrograph Sounding Rocket Payload: Recent Modifications for Planetary Observations in the EUV/FUV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Stern, S. Alan; Scherrer, John; Cash, Webster; Green, James C.; Wilkinson, Erik

    1995-01-01

    We report on the status of modifications to an existing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) telescope/spectrograph sounding rocket payload for planetary observations in the 800 - 1200 A wavelength band. The instrument is composed of an existing Wolter Type 2 grazing incidence telescope, a newly built 0.4-m normal incidence Rowland Circle spectrograph, and an open-structure resistive-anode microchannel plate detector. The modified payload has successfully completed three NASA sounding rocket flights within 1994-1995. Future flights are anticipated for additional studies of planetary and cometary atmospheres and interstellar absorption. A detailed description of the payload, along with the performance characteristics of the integrated instrument are presented. In addition, some preliminary flight results from the above three missions are also presented.

  2. Absorbing Gas around the WASP-12 Planetary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, L.; Ayres, T. R.; Haswell, C. A.; Bohlender, D.; Kochukhov, O.; Flöer, L.

    2013-04-01

    Near-UV observations of the planet host star WASP-12 uncovered the apparent absence of the normally conspicuous core emission of the Mg II h and k resonance lines. This anomaly could be due either to (1) a lack of stellar activity, which would be unprecedented for a solar-like star of the imputed age of WASP-12 or (2) extrinsic absorption, from the intervening interstellar medium (ISM) or from material within the WASP-12 system itself, presumably ablated from the extreme hot Jupiter WASP-12 b. HIRES archival spectra of the Ca II H and K lines of WASP-12 show broad depressions in the line cores, deeper than those of other inactive and similarly distant stars and similar to WASP-12's Mg II h and k line profiles. We took high-resolution ESPaDOnS and FIES spectra of three early-type stars within 20' of WASP-12 and at similar distances, which show the ISM column is insufficient to produce the broad Ca II depression observed in WASP-12. The EBHIS H I column density map supports and strengthens this conclusion. Extrinsic absorption by material local to the WASP-12 system is therefore the most likely cause of the line core anomalies. Gas escaping from the heavily irradiated planet could form a stable and thick circumstellar disk/cloud. The anomalously low stellar activity index (log R^{{\\prime }}_{HK}) of WASP-12 is evidently a direct consequence of the extra core absorption, so similar HK index deficiencies might signal the presence of translucent circumstellar gas around other stars hosting evaporating planets. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Rechereche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del

  3. Swarm-NG: A CUDA library for Parallel n-body Integrations with focus on simulations of planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dindar, Saleh; Ford, Eric B.; Juric, Mario; Yeo, Young In; Gao, Jianwei; Boley, Aaron C.; Nelson, Benjamin; Peters, Jörg

    2013-10-01

    We present Swarm-NG, a C++ library for the efficient direct integration of many n-body systems using a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), such as NVIDIA's Tesla T10 and M2070 GPUs. While previous studies have demonstrated the benefit of GPUs for n-body simulations with thousands to millions of bodies, Swarm-NG focuses on many few-body systems, e.g., thousands of systems with 3…15 bodies each, as is typical for the study of planetary systems. Swarm-NG parallelizes the simulation, including both the numerical integration of the equations of motion and the evaluation of forces using NVIDIA's "Compute Unified Device Architecture" (CUDA) on the GPU. Swarm-NG includes optimized implementations of 4th order time-symmetrized Hermite integration and mixed variable symplectic integration, as well as several sample codes for other algorithms to illustrate how non-CUDA-savvy users may themselves introduce customized integrators into the Swarm-NG framework. To optimize performance, we analyze the effect of GPU-specific parameters on performance under double precision. For an ensemble of 131072 planetary systems, each containing three bodies, the NVIDIA Tesla M2070 GPU outperforms a 6-core Intel Xeon X5675 CPU by a factor of ˜2.75. Thus, we conclude that modern GPUs offer an attractive alternative to a cluster of CPUs for the integration of an ensemble of many few-body systems. Applications of Swarm-NG include studying the late stages of planet formation, testing the stability of planetary systems and evaluating the goodness-of-fit between many planetary system models and observations of extrasolar planet host stars (e.g., radial velocity, astrometry, transit timing). While Swarm-NG focuses on the parallel integration of many planetary systems, the underlying integrators could be applied to a wide variety of problems that require repeatedly integrating a set of ordinary differential equations many times using different initial conditions and/or parameter values.

  4. Planetary nebulae as observational constraints in chemical evolution models for NGC 6822

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Martínez, L.; Carigi, L.; Peña, M.; Peimbert, M.

    2011-11-01

    Aims: Chemical evolution models are useful for understanding the formation and evolution of stars and galaxies. Model predictions will be more robust when more observational constraints are used. We present chemical evolution models for the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822 using chemical abundances of old and young planetary nebulae (PNe) and H ii regions as observational constraints. We use two sets of chemical abundances, one derived from collisionally excited lines (CELs) and one from recombination lines (RLs). We use our models as a tool to distinguish between both procedures for abundance determinations. Methods: In our chemical evolution code the chemical contribution of low and intermediate mass stars is time-delayed, while for the massive stars the chemical contribution follows the instantaneous recycling approximation. Our models have two main free parameters: the mass-loss rate of a well-mixed outflow and the upper mass limit, Mup, of the initial mass function (IMF). To reproduce the gaseous mass and the present-day O/H value we need to vary the outflow rate and the Mup value. Results: We calculate two models with different Mup values that reproduce the constraints adequately. The abundances of old PNe agree with our models and support the star-formation history derived independently from photometric data. Both require an early well-mixed wind, lasting 5.3 Gyr, to reproduce the observed gaseous mass in the galaxy. In addition, by assuming a fraction of binaries producing SNIa of 1%, the models fit the Fe/H abundance ratio as derived from A supergiants. The first model (M4C), which assumes Mup = 40 M⊙, fits within errors smaller than 2σ the O/H, Ne/H, S/H, Ar/H and Cl/H abundances obtained from CELs for old and young PNe and H ii regions. The second model (M1R), which adopts Mup = 80 M⊙, reproduces within 2σ errors the O/H, C/H, Ne/H and S/H abundances adopted from RLs. Both models reproduce the increase of the O, Ne, S, and Ar elements during the

  5. Ultraviolet observations of close-binary and pulsating nuclei of planetary nebulae; Winds and shells around low-mass supergiants; The close-binary nucleus of the planetary nebula HFG-1; A search for binary nuclei of planetary nebulae; UV monitoring of irregularly variable planetary nuclei; and The pulsating nucleus of the planetary nebula Lo 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Howard E.

    1992-01-01

    A brief summary of the research highlights is presented. The topics covered include the following: binary nuclei of planetary nebulae; other variable planetary nuclei; low-mass supergiants; and other IUE-related research.

  6. Delivery of Volatiles to Habitable Planets in Extrasolar Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, John E.; Kress, Monika E.; Bell, K. Robbins; Cash, Michele; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Earth can support life because: (1) its orbit lies in the Sun's habitable zone', and (2) it contains enough volatile material (e.g. water and organics) for life to flourish. However, it seems likely that the Earth was drier when it formed because it accreted in a part of the Sun's protoplanetary nebula that was too hot for volatiles to condense. If this is correct, water and organics must have been delivered to the habitable zone, after dissipation of the solar nebula, from a 'wet zone' in the asteroid belt or the outer solar system, where the nebula was cool enough for volatiles to condense. Material from the wet zone would have been delivered to the Earth by Jupiter and Saturn. Gravitational perturbations from these giant planets made much of the wet zone unstable, scattering volatile-rich planetesimals and protoplanets across the Solar System. Some of these objects ultimately collided with the inner Planets which themselves lie in a stable part of the Solar System. Giant planets are now being discovered orbiting other sunlike stars. To date, these planets have orbits and masses very different from Jupiter and Saturn, such that few if any of these systems is likely to have terrestrial planets in the star's habitable zone. However, new discoveries are anticipated due to improved detector sensitivity and the increase in the timespan of observations. Here we present numerical experiments examining the range of giant-planet characteristics that: (1) allow stable terrestrial Planets to exist in a star's habitable zone, and (2) make a large part of the star's wet zone weakly unstable, thus delivering volatiles to the terrestrial planets over an extended period of time after the dissipation of the solar nebula.

  7. ABSORBING GAS AROUND THE WASP-12 PLANETARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Fossati, L.; Floeer, L.; Ayres, T. R.; Haswell, C. A.; Bohlender, D.; Kochukhov, O. E-mail: lfloeer@astro.uni-bonn.de E-mail: C.A.Haswell@open.ac.uk E-mail: oleg.kochukhov@physics.uu.se

    2013-04-01

    Near-UV observations of the planet host star WASP-12 uncovered the apparent absence of the normally conspicuous core emission of the Mg II h and k resonance lines. This anomaly could be due either to (1) a lack of stellar activity, which would be unprecedented for a solar-like star of the imputed age of WASP-12 or (2) extrinsic absorption, from the intervening interstellar medium (ISM) or from material within the WASP-12 system itself, presumably ablated from the extreme hot Jupiter WASP-12 b. HIRES archival spectra of the Ca II H and K lines of WASP-12 show broad depressions in the line cores, deeper than those of other inactive and similarly distant stars and similar to WASP-12's Mg II h and k line profiles. We took high-resolution ESPaDOnS and FIES spectra of three early-type stars within 20' of WASP-12 and at similar distances, which show the ISM column is insufficient to produce the broad Ca II depression observed in WASP-12. The EBHIS H I column density map supports and strengthens this conclusion. Extrinsic absorption by material local to the WASP-12 system is therefore the most likely cause of the line core anomalies. Gas escaping from the heavily irradiated planet could form a stable and thick circumstellar disk/cloud. The anomalously low stellar activity index ( log R{sup '}{sub HK}) of WASP-12 is evidently a direct consequence of the extra core absorption, so similar HK index deficiencies might signal the presence of translucent circumstellar gas around other stars hosting evaporating planets.

  8. Surface Telerobotics: Development and Testing of a Crew Controlled Planetary Rover System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bualat, Maria G.; Fong, Terrence; Allan, Mark; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Cohen, Tamar; Kobayashi, Linda

    2013-01-01

    In planning for future exploration missions, architecture and study teams have made numerous assumptions about how crew can be telepresent on a planetary surface by remotely operating surface robots from space (i.e. from a flight vehicle or deep space habitat). These assumptions include estimates of technology maturity, existing technology gaps, and operational risks. These assumptions, however, have not been grounded by experimental data. Moreover, to date, no crew-controlled surface telerobot has been fully tested in a high-fidelity manner. To address these issues, we developed the "Surface Telerobotics" tests to do three things: 1) Demonstrate interactive crew control of a mobile surface telerobot in the presence of short communications delay. 2) Characterize a concept of operations for a single astronaut remotely operating a planetary rover with limited support from ground control. 3) Characterize system utilization and operator work-load for a single astronaut remotely operating a planetary rover with limited support from ground control.

  9. Orbital resonances and planetary accretion in the early solar system evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbett, M. V.

    1982-03-01

    The solar system, in its early evolution, is thought to have consisted of an accretion disk around a growing central protostar. The accretion disk from which the planets ultimately formed can play a significant role in the processes of planetary and solar formation. As well as leading, by thermalization of orbital motions in the disk, to bipolar flows in the T Tauri stage of stellar evolution, the disk can influence the course of planetary accumulation. By virtue of its essentially solar composition, Jupiter was formed before the accretion disk was removed. This first formed planet then gravitationally imposed a harmonic structure on the planetesimal swarm through its commensurability resonances. Accelerated growth of planetesimals in orbital resonance with Jupiter resulted in runaway growth producing planetary embryos. These embryos accelerated growth at their own resonances in a process that propagation inward and outward forming a resonant configuration of embryos.

  10. Analysis of Sel-Gravitating Planetary Satellites in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasenev, S. O.

    As of today there have been more than 180 planetary satellites discovered in the Solar system, and the number of outer moons found continues to grow. Most of those natural satellites have insufficient mass and are able to retain their shape only due to the strength of the electromagnetic force. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the moons' physical properties. The analysis of planetary satellites as self-gravitating bodies, i.e. celestial bodies which rely on the weight of their own mass and resulting gravitational force to maintain their shape and tend to bring it closer to the hydrostatic equilibrium, was performed.

  11. Observations of the planetary nebula RWT 152 with OSIRIS/GTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, A.; Miranda, L. F.; Olguín, L.; Solano, E.; Ulla, A.

    2016-08-01

    RWT 152 is one of the few known planetary nebulae with an sdO central star. We present subarcsecond red tunable filter Hα imaging and intermediate-resolution, long-slit spectroscopy of RWT 152 obtained with OSIRIS/GTC with the goal of analyzing its properties. The Hα image reveals a bipolar nebula with a bright equatorial region and multiple bubbles in the main lobes. A faint circular halo surrounds the main nebula. The nebular spectra reveal a very low-excitation nebula with weak emission lines from H+, He+, and double-ionized metals, and absence of emission lines from neutral and single-ionized metals, except for an extremely faint [N II] λ6584 emission line. These spectra may be explained if RWT 152 is a density-bounded planetary nebula. Low nebular chemical abundances of S, O, Ar, N, and Ne are obtained in RWT 152, which, together with the derived high peculiar velocity (˜ 92-131 km s-1), indicate that this object is a halo planetary nebula. The available data are consistent with RWT 152 evolving from a low-mass progenitor (˜ 1 M⊙) formed in a metal-poor environment.

  12. A study of the selection of microcomputer architectures to automate planetary spacecraft power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nauda, A.

    1982-01-01

    Performance and reliability models of alternate microcomputer architectures as a methodology for optimizing system design were examined. A methodology for selecting an optimum microcomputer architecture for autonomous operation of planetary spacecraft power systems was developed. Various microcomputer system architectures are analyzed to determine their application to spacecraft power systems. It is suggested that no standardization formula or common set of guidelines exists which provides an optimum configuration for a given set of specifications.

  13. On possible circumbinary configurations of the planetary systems of α Centauri and EZ Aquarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E. A.; Shevchenko, I. I.

    2016-04-01

    Possible configurations of the planetary systems of the binary stars α Cen A-BandEZAqr A-C are analyzed. The P-type orbits—circumbinary ones, i.e., the orbits around both stars of the binary, are studied. The choice of these systems is dictated by the fact that α Cen is closest to us in the Galaxy, while EZ Aqr is the closest system whose circumbinary planets, as it turns out, may reside in the "habitability zone." The analysis has been performed within the framework of the planar restricted three-body problem. The stability diagrams of circumbinary motion have been constructed: on representative sets of initial data (in the pericentric distance-eccentricity plane), we have computed the Lyapunov spectra of planetary motion and identified the domains of regular and chaotic motion through their statistical analysis. Based on present views of the dynamics and architecture of circumbinary planetary systems, we have determined the most probable planetary orbits to be at the centers of the main resonance cells, at the boundary of the dynamical chaos domain around the parent binary star, which allows the semimajor axes of the orbits to be predicted. In the case of EZ Aqr, the orbit of the circumbinary planet is near the habitability zone and, given that the boundary of this zone is uncertain, may belong to it.

  14. Planetary astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, David; Hunten, Donald; Ahearn, Michael F.; Belton, Michael J. S.; Black, David; Brown, Robert A.; Brown, Robert Hamilton; Cochran, Anita L.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Depater, Imke

    1991-01-01

    The authors profile the field of astronomy, identify some of the key scientific questions that can be addressed during the decade of the 1990's, and recommend several facilities that are critically important for answering these questions. Scientific opportunities for the 1990' are discussed. Areas discussed include protoplanetary disks, an inventory of the solar system, primitive material in the solar system, the dynamics of planetary atmospheres, planetary rings and ring dynamics, the composition and structure of the atmospheres of giant planets, the volcanoes of IO, and the mineralogy of the Martian surface. Critical technology developments, proposed projects and facilities, and recommendations for research and facilities are discussed.

  15. Planetary Systems and the Formation of Habitable Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Rudolf; Maindl, Thomas I.; Burger, Christoph; Schäfer, Christoph; Speith, Roland

    2015-09-01

    As part of a national scientific network 'Pathways to Habitability' the formation of planets and the delivery of water onto these planets is a key question as water is essential for the development of life. In the first part of the paper we summarize the state of the art of planet formation - which is still under debate in the astronomical community - before we show our results on this topic. The outcome of our numerical simulations depends a lot on the choice of the initial distribution of planetesimals and planetary embryos after gas disappeared in the protoplanetary disk. We also take into account that some of these planetesimals of sizes in the order of the mass of the Moon already contained water; the quantity depends on the distance from the Sun - close-by bodies are dry, but starting from a distance of about 2 AU they can contain substantial amounts of water. We assume that the gas giants and terrestrial planets are already formed when we check the collisions of the small bodies containing water (in the order of a few percent) with the terrestrial planets. We thus are able to give an estimate of the respective contribution to the actual water content (of some Earth-oceans) in the mantle, in the crust and on the surface of Earth. In the second part we discuss in more detail how the formation of larger bodies after a collision may happen as the outcome depends on parameters like collision velocity, impact angle, and the materials involved. We present results obtained by SPH (Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics) simulations. We briefly describe this method and show different scenarios with respect to the formed bodies, possible fragmentation and the water content before and after the collision. In an appendix we discuss detection methods for extrasolar planets (close to 2000 such objects have been discovered so far).

  16. Planetary Radar Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, Steven J.

    1993-01-01

    Radar is a powerful technique that has furnished otherwise unavailable information about solar system bodies for three decades. The advantages of radar in planetary astronomy result from: (1) the observer's control of all the attributes of the coherent signal used to illuminate the target, especially the wave form's time/frequency modulation and polarization; (2) the ability of radar to resolve objects spatially via measurements of the distribution of echo power in time delay and Doppler frequency; (3) the pronounced degree to which delay-Doppler measurements constrain orbits and spin vectors; and (4) centimeter-to-meter wavelengths, which easily penetrate optically opaque planetary clouds and cometary comae, permit investigation of near-surface macrostructure and bulk density, and are sensitive to high concentrations of metal or, in certain situations, ice. Planetary radar astronomy has primarily involved observations with Earth-based radar telescopes, but also includes some experiments with a spaceborne transmitter or receiver. In addition to providing a wealth of information about the geological and dynamical properties of asteroids, comets, the inner planets, and natural satellites, radar experiments have established the scale of the solar system, have contributed significantly to the accuracy of planetary ephemerides, and have helped to constrain theories of gravitation. This review outlines radar astronomical techniques and describes principal observational results.

  17. The effect of latent heat release on synoptic-to-planetary wave interactions and its implication for satellite observations: Theoretical modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branscome, Lee E.; Bleck, Rainer; Obrien, Enda

    1990-01-01

    The project objectives are to develop process models to investigate the interaction of planetary and synoptic-scale waves including the effects of latent heat release (precipitation), nonlinear dynamics, physical and boundary-layer processes, and large-scale topography; to determine the importance of latent heat release for temporal variability and time-mean behavior of planetary and synoptic-scale waves; to compare the model results with available observations of planetary and synoptic wave variability; and to assess the implications of the results for monitoring precipitation in oceanic-storm tracks by satellite observing systems. Researchers have utilized two different models for this project: a two-level quasi-geostrophic model to study intraseasonal variability, anomalous circulations and the seasonal cycle, and a 10-level, multi-wave primitive equation model to validate the two-level Q-G model and examine effects of convection, surface processes, and spherical geometry. It explicitly resolves several planetary and synoptic waves and includes specific humidity (as a predicted variable), moist convection, and large-scale precipitation. In the past year researchers have concentrated on experiments with the multi-level primitive equation model. The dynamical part of that model is similar to the spectral model used by the National Meteorological Center for medium-range forecasts. The model includes parameterizations of large-scale condensation and moist convection. To test the validity of results regarding the influence of convective precipitation, researchers can use either one of two different convective schemes in the model, a Kuo convective scheme or a modified Arakawa-Schubert scheme which includes downdrafts. By choosing one or the other scheme, they can evaluate the impact of the convective parameterization on the circulation. In the past year researchers performed a variety of initial-value experiments with the primitive-equation model. Using initial

  18. Solar System Observations with the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norwood, James; Hammel, Heidi; Milam, Stefanie; Stansberry, John; Lunine, Jonathan; Chanover, Nancy; Hines, Dean; Sonneborn, George; Tiscareno, Matthew; Brown, Michael; Ferruit, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will enable a wealth of new scientific investigations in the near- and mid-infrared, with sensitivity and spatial/spectral resolution greatly surpassing its predecessors. In this paper, we focus upon Solar System science facilitated by JWST, discussing the most current information available concerning JWST instrument properties and observing techniques relevant to planetary science. We also present numerous example observing scenarios for a wide variety of Solar System targets to illustrate the potential of JWST science to the Solar System community. This paper updates and supersedes the Solar System white paper published by the JWST Project in 2010. It is based both on that paper and on a workshop held at the annual meeting of the Division for Planetary Sciences in Reno, NV, in 2012.

  19. Implementation of cartographic symbols for planetary mapping in geographic information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nass, A.; van Gasselt, S.; Jaumann, R.; Asche, H.

    2011-09-01

    The steadily growing international interest in the exploration of planets in our Solar System and many advances in the development of space-sensor technology have led to the launch of a multitude of planetary missions to Mercury, Venus, the Earth's moon, Mars and various Outer-Solar System objects, such as the Jovian and Saturnian satellites. Camera instruments carried along on these missions image surfaces in different wavelength ranges and under different viewing angles, permitting additional data to be derived, such as spectral data or digital terrain models. Such data enable researchers to explore and investigate the development of planetary surfaces by analyzing and interpreting the inventory of surface units and structures. Results of such work are commonly abstracted and represented in thematic, mostly geological and geomorphological, maps. In order to facilitate efficient collaboration among different planetary research disciplines, mapping results need to be prepared, described, managed, archived, and visualized in a uniform way. These tasks have been increasingly carried out by means of computer-based geographic information systems (GIS or GI systems) which have come to be widely employed in the field of planetary research since the last two decades. In this paper we focus on the simplification of mapping processes, putting specific emphasis on a cartographically correct visualization of planetary mapping data using GIS-based environments. We present and discuss the implementation of a set of standardized cartographic symbols for planetary mapping based on the Digital Cartographic Standard for Geologic Map Symbolization as prepared by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) for the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC). Furthermore, we discuss various options to integrate this symbol catalog into generic GI systems, and more specifically into the Environmental Systems Research Institute's (ESRI) ArcGIS environment, and focus on requirements for

  20. COSPAR Workshop on Planetary Protection for Outer Planet Satellites and Small Solar System Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Rummel, John; Peter, Nicolas

    The COSPAR Panel on Planetary Protection (PPP) held a COSPAR Workshop to consider the planetary protection status of Outer Planet satellites and other small Solar System bodies, and the measures that should be taken (or not) to protect them from Earth-sourced biological and organic contamination. The starting point for the 2009 COSPAR Planetary Protection Workshop at the European Space Policy Institute (ESPI) in Vienna was to consider the prob-abilistic approach in place in the COSPAR Planetary Protection Policy for the protection of Europa. The participants of this Workshop discussed the application of the approach and the associated formulation and parameterization to other Outer Planet satellites and small bodies. This application, as well as other considerations brought forward by the group, resulted in a full consideration of the various Outer Planet satellites and other Small Solar system bodies. The report on this workshop contains recommendations for the categorization of missions that may encounter or closely study the Outer Solar System in the future. Subsequently, the Work-shop also reviewed the consequences of applying these recommendations to the Outer Planets Flagship missions that have been under consideration by ESA, NASA, and their cooperating partners. A further workshop, concentrating on the specifics of Titan and Ganymede missions, was proposed by the group.

  1. Science requirements for PRoViScout, a robotics vision system for planetary exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauber, E.; Pullan, D.; Griffiths, A.; Paar, G.

    2011-10-01

    The robotic exploration of planetary surfaces, including missions of interest for geobiology (e.g., ExoMars), will be the precursor of human missions within the next few decades. Such exploration will require platforms which are much more self-reliant and capable of exploring long distances with limited ground support in order to advance planetary science objectives in a timely manner. The key to this objective is the development of planetary robotic onboard vision processing systems, which will enable the autonomous on-site selection of scientific and mission-strategic targets, and the access thereto. The EU-funded research project PRoViScout (Planetary Robotics Vision Scout) is designed to develop a unified and generic approach for robotic vision onboard processing, namely the combination of navigation and scientific target selection. Any such system needs to be "trained", i.e. it needs (a) scientific requirements which the system needs to address, and (b) a data base of scientifically representative target scenarios which can be analysed. We present our preliminary list of science requirements, based on previous experience from landed Mars missions.

  2. Observation Scheduling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve A.; Tran, Daniel Q.; Rabideau, Gregg R.; Schaffer, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    Software has been designed to schedule remote sensing with the Earth Observing One spacecraft. The software attempts to satisfy as many observation requests as possible considering each against spacecraft operation constraints such as data volume, thermal, pointing maneuvers, and others. More complex constraints such as temperature are approximated to enable efficient reasoning while keeping the spacecraft within safe limits. Other constraints are checked using an external software library. For example, an attitude control library is used to determine the feasibility of maneuvering between pairs of observations. This innovation can deal with a wide range of spacecraft constraints and solve large scale scheduling problems like hundreds of observations and thousands of combinations of observation sequences.

  3. Outer-planet scattering can gently tilt an inner planetary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratia, Pierre; Fabrycky, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Chaotic dynamics are expected during and after planet formation, and a leading mechanism to explain large eccentricities of gas giant exoplanets is planet-planet gravitational scattering. The same scattering has been invoked to explain misalignments of planetary orbital planes with respect to their host star's spin. However, an observational puzzle is presented by Kepler-56, which has two inner planets (b and c) that are nearly coplanar with each other, yet are more than 45 degrees inclined to their star's equator. Thus the spin-orbit misalignment might be primordial. Instead, we further develop the hypothesis in the discovery paper, that planets on wider orbits generated misalignment through scattering, and as a result gently torqued the inner planets away from the equator plane of the star. We integrated the equations of motion for Kepler-56 b and c along with an unstable outer system initialized with either two or three Jupiter-mass planets. We address here whether the violent scattering that generates large mutual inclinations can leave the inner system intact, tilting it gently. In almost all of the cases initially with two outer planets, either the inner planets remain nearly coplanar with each other in the star's equator plane, or they are scattered violently to high mutual inclination and high spin-orbit misalignment. On the contrary, of the systems with three unstable outer planets, a spin-orbit misalignment large enough to explain the observations is generated 28% of the time for coplanar inner planets, which is consistent with the observed frequency of this phenomenon reported so far. We conclude that multiple-planet scattering in the outer parts of the system may account for this new population of coplanar planets hosted by oblique stars.

  4. Diversity of planetary systems in low-mass disks. Terrestrial-type planet formation and water delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronco, M. P.; de Elía, G. C.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Several studies, observational and theoretical, suggest that planetary systems with only rocky planets are the most common in the Universe. Aims: We study the diversity of planetary systems that might form around Sun-like stars in low-mass disks without gas-giant planets. We focus especially on the formation process of terrestrial planets in the habitable zone (HZ) and analyze their water contents with the goal to determine systems of astrobiological interest. In addition, we study the formation of planets on wide orbits because they can be detected with the microlensing technique. Methods: N-body simulations of high resolution were developed for a wide range of surface density profiles. A bimodal distribution of planetesimals and planetary embryos with different physical and orbital configurations was used to simulate the planetary accretion process. The surface density profile combines a power law for the inside of the disk of the form r-γ, with an exponential decay to the outside. We performed simulations adopting a disk of 0.03 M⊙ and values of γ = 0.5, 1 and 1.5. Results: All our simulations form planets in the HZ with different masses and final water contents depending on the three different profiles. For γ = 0.5, our simulations produce three planets in the HZ with masses ranging from 0.03 M⊕ to 0.1 M⊕ and water contents between 0.2 and 16 Earth oceans (1 Earth ocean =2.8 × 10-4 M⊕). For γ = 1, three planets form in the HZ with masses between 0.18 M⊕ and 0.52 M⊕ and water contents from 34 to 167 Earth oceans. Finally, for γ = 1.5, we find four planets in the HZ with masses ranging from 0.66 M⊕ to 2.21 M⊕ and water contents between 192 and 2326 Earth oceans. This profile shows distinctive results because it is the only one of those studied here that leads to the formation of water worlds. Conclusions: Since planetary systems with γ = 1 and 1.5 present planets in the HZ with suitable masses to retain a long-lived atmosphere and

  5. Disk-planet interactions: Implications for planetary systems formation and evolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Wm. R.

    2000-10-01

    The coherent wavelike response of disk systems to perturbations from nearby or embedded gravitating objects is a subject of vigorous study. The internal disk forces accounting for the organized behavior can be either pressure (resulting in acoustic or short waves) or self-gravity (producing gravity or long waves). In addition to their well-known applications to stellar and planetary ring systems, wave phenomena have relevance to protoplanet interactions with their precursor gaseous nebula and with any residual planetesimal disk. The disk exchanges angular momentum with a perturber via resonant torques. In the absence of collective behavior, only a thin annulus of disk material at each resonance participates in the exchange and can saturate quickly, driving the torque to zero. However, a key trait of waves is their ability to transport angular momentum. Wave action can prevent saturation by transporting angular momentum away from the resonance zone to more distant parts of the disk; this results in a sustained torque that can significantly modify the perturber's orbit. This talk will review recent changes in the cosmogonic paradigm brought about by ongoing efforts to incorporate disk-planet interactions into models of planetary formation. One dramatic development has been the realization that massive, planet-sized bodies may exhibit a substantial degree of mobility in the presence of their precursor nebula. Not only does this relate to accretion timescales and the provenance of planetary material, but it also has important implications for the origin of close stellar companions and the ultimate survival of planetary systems. Wave action can also manifest itself in the planetesimal disk, even after the dissipation of the nebula. The long-term evolution of residual populations such as the Kuiper and asteroid belts may have been strongly influence by this mechanism. We will outline some of the outstanding problems that have yet to be explored concerning this important

  6. Richest Planetary System Discovered - Up to seven planets orbiting a Sun-like star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-08-01

    seven planets orbiting HD 10180: probing the architecture of low-mass planetary systems" by C. Lovis et al.). The team is composed of C. Lovis, D. Ségransan, M. Mayor, S. Udry, F. Pepe, and D. Queloz (Observatoire de Genève, Université de Genève, Switzerland), W. Benz (Universität Bern, Switzerland), F. Bouchy (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, France), C. Mordasini (Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Heidelberg, Germany), N. C. Santos (Universidade do Porto, Portugal), J. Laskar (Observatoire de Paris, France), A. Correia (Universidade de Aveiro, Portugal), and J.-L. Bertaux (Université Versailles Saint-Quentin, France) and G. Lo Curto (ESO). ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world's most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory and VISTA, the world's largest survey telescope. ESO is the European partner of a revolutionary astronomical telescope ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence. ESO is currently planning a 42-metre European Extremely Large optical/near-infrared Telescope, the E-ELT, which will become "the world's biggest eye on the sky".

  7. Overview of a Proposed Flight Validation of Aerocapture System Technology for Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Hall, Jeffery L.; Oh, David; Munk, Michelle M.

    2006-01-01

    Aerocapture System Technology for Planetary Missions is being proposed to NASA's New Millennium Program for flight aboard the Space Technology 9 (ST9) flight opportunity. The proposed ST9 aerocapture mission is a system-level flight validation of the aerocapture maneuver as performed by an instrumented, high-fidelity flight vehicle within a true in-space and atmospheric environment. Successful validation of the aerocapture maneuver will be enabled through the flight validation of an advanced guidance, navigation, and control system as developed by Ball Aerospace and two advanced Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials, Silicon Refined Ablative Material-20 (SRAM-20) and SRAM-14, as developed by Applied Research Associates (ARA) Ablatives Laboratory. The ST9 aerocapture flight validation will be sufficient for immediate infusion of these technologies into NASA science missions being proposed for flight to a variety of Solar System destinations possessing a significant planetary atmosphere.

  8. Multi-Year Radar Observations of Planetary Waves at High Conjugate Latitudes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritts, D. C.; Iimura, H.; Janches, D.; Mitchell, N. J.; Singer, W.

    2013-12-01

    Meteor radars at nearly conjugate latitudes from ~54o to 68o S and N are enabling multi-year studies of planetary wave (PW) structure and seasonal, interannual, and inter-hemispheric variability. The various PWs exhibit dramatically different seasonal and inter-hemispheric variability, strongly variable amplitude and phase structures with altitude, latitude, and time, and episodic maxima in E-P flux components. This talk will review these features defined with meteor radars at Rothera Station and Ferraz Base (62 and 68 S), on Tierra del Fuego (54 S), and at Juliusruh, Germany and Esrange, Sweden (55 and 68 N).

  9. Planetary Protection Concerns During Pre-Launch Radioisotope Power System Final Integration Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Fei; McKay, Terri; Spry, James A.; Colozza, Anthony J.; DiStefano, Salvador

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) is a next-generation radioisotope-based power system that is currently being developed as an alternative to the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG). Power sources such as these may be needed for proposed missions to solar system planets and bodies that have challenging Planetary Protection (PP) requirements (e.g. Mars, Europa, Enceladus) that may support NASA s search for life, remnants of past life, and the precursors of life. One concern is that the heat from the ASRG could potentially create a region in which liquid water may occur. As advised by the NASA Planetary Protection Officer, when deploying an ASRG to Mars, the current COSPAR/NASA PP policy should be followed for Category IVc mission. Thus, sterilization processing of the ASRG to achieve bioburden reduction would be essential to meet the Planetary Protection requirements. Due to thermal constraints and associated low temperature limits of elements of the ASRG, vapor hydrogen peroxide (VHP) was suggested as a candidate alternative sterilization process to complement dry heat microbial reduction (DHMR) for the assembled ASRG. The following proposed sterilization plan for the ASRG anticipates a mission Category IVc level of cleanliness. This plan provides a scenario in which VHP is used as the final sterilization process. Keywords: Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), Planetary Protection (PP), Vapor hydrogen peroxide (VHP) sterilization.

  10. Implementation the NASA Planetary Data System PDS4 Providing Access to LADEE Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beebe, Reta F.; Huber , Lyle; Neakrase, Lynn; Reese, Shannon; Crichton, Daniel; Hardman, Sean; Delory, Gregory; Neese, Carol

    2014-11-01

    The NASA Planetary Data System (PDS) is responsible for archiving all planetary data acquired by robotic missions, and observational campaigns with ground/space-based observatories. PDS has moved to version 4 of its archive system. PDS4 uses XML to enhance search and retrieval capabilities. Although the efforts are system wide, the Atmospheres Node has acted as the lead node and is presenting a preliminary users interface for retrieval of LADEE data. LADEE provides the first opportunity to test out the end-to-end process of archiving data from an active mission into the new PDS4 architecture. The limited number of instruments, with simple data structures, is an ideal test of PDS4. XML uses schema (analogous to blueprints) to control the structure of the corresponding XML labels. In the case of PDS4, these schemas allow management of the labels and their content by forcing validation dictated by the underlying Information Model (IM). The use of a central IM is a vast improvement over PDS3 because of the uniformity it provides across all nodes. PDS4 has implemented a product-centric approach for archiving data and supplemental documentation. Another major change involves the Central Registry, where all products are registered and accessible to search engines. Under PDS4, documents, data, and other ancillary data are all products that are registered in the system. Together with the XML implementation, the Registry allows the search routines to be more complex and inclusive than they have been in the past. For LADEE, the PDS nodes and LADEE instrument teams worked together to identify data products that LADEE would produce. Documentation describing instruments and data products were produced by the teams and peer reviewed by PDS. XML label templates were developed by the PDS and provided to the instrument teams to integrate into their pipelines. Data from the primary mission (100 days) have been certified and harvested into the registry and are accessible through the

  11. Planetary magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    Planetary spacecraft have now probed the magnetic fields of all the terrestrial planets, the moon, Jupiter, and Saturn. These measurements reveal that dynamos are active in at least four of the planets, Mercury, the earth, Jupiter, and Saturn but that Venus and Mars appear to have at most only very weak planetary magnetic fields. The moon may have once possessed an internal dynamo, for the surface rocks are magnetized. The large satellites of the outer solar system are candidates for dynamo action in addition to the large planets themselves. Of these satellites the one most likely to generate its own internal magnetic field is Io.

  12. Planetary transit observations at the University Observatory Jena: TrES-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raetz, St.; Mugrauer, M.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Roell, T.; Eisenbeiss, T.; Hohle, M. M.; Koeltzsch, A.; Vaňko, M.; Ginski, Ch.; Marka, C.; Moualla, M.; Tetzlaff, N.; Seifahrt, A.; Broeg, Ch.; Koppenhoefer, J.; Raetz, M.; Neuhäuser, R.

    2009-05-01

    We report on observations of several transit events of the transiting planet TrES-2 obtained with the Cassegrain-Teleskop-Kamera at the University Observatory Jena. Between March 2007 and November 2008 ten different transits and almost a complete orbital period were observed. Overall, in 40 nights of observation 4291 exposures (in total 71.52 h of observation) of the TrES-2 parent star were taken. With the transit timings for TrES-2 from the 34 events published by the TrES-network, the Transit Light Curve project and the Exoplanet Transit Database plus our own ten transits, we find that the orbital period is P=(2.470614± 0.000001) d, a slight change by ˜ 0.6 s compared to the previously published period. We present new ephemeris for this transiting planet. Furthermore, we found a second dip after the transit which could either be due to a blended variable star or occultation of a second star or even an additional object in the system. Our observations will be useful for future investigations of timing variations caused by additional perturbing planets and/or stellar spots and/or moons. Based on observations obtained with telescopes of the University Observatory Jena, which is operated by the Astrophysical Institute of the Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena and the 80cm telescope of the Wendelstein Observatory of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich.

  13. A secular model for efficient exploration of mutually-inclined planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deitrick, Russell; Barnes, Rory

    2015-01-01

    Dynamical studies of exoplanets largely assume coplanarity because of the lack of inclination information in many cases. However, the multiplanet system Upsilon Andromedae has orbital planes inclined by 30 degrees, models of planet-planet scattering predict large mutual inclinations, and astrometry missions such as Gaia have the power to reveal the 3 dimensional architecture of planetary systems. As the dynamics of systems with non-planar orbits will be key to understanding origins, and ultimately habitability where applicable, we present a computationally efficient model for the orbital evolution of planetary systems with modest inclinations and eccentricities which are not in a mean motion resonance. Specifically, our model is based on the disturbing function and extends to 4th order in eccentricity and inclination. We present comparisons to N-body models for known systems, such as the Solar System and Upsilon Andromedae, and hypothetical systems with a range of orbital configurations. We describe the eccentricity and inclination conditions under which the model is valid. We further calculate the rotational evolution of planets based on the orbital evolution and the stellar torque and find a wide range of obliquity evolution is possible. As obliquity is a key driver of planetary climate, Earth-like planets in non-planar systems may have climates dominated by their orbital evolution.

  14. Searching for a gas cloud surrounding the WASP-18 planetary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, L.; Ayres, T. R.; Haswell, C. A.; Jenkins, J. S.; Bisikalo, D.; Bohlender, D.; Flöer, L.; Kochukhov, O.

    2014-11-01

    Near-UV (NUV) Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the extreme hot-Jupiter WASP-12b revealed the presence of diffuse exospheric gas extending beyond the planet's Roche lobe. Furthermore the NUV observations showed a complete lack of the normally bright core emission of the Mg ii h&k resonance lines, in agreement with the measured anomalously low stellar activity index (log R' HK ). Comparisons with other distant and inactive stars, and the analysis of radio and optical measurements of the intervening interstellar medium (ISM), led us to the conclusion that the system is surrounded by a circumstellar gas cloud, likely formed of material lost by the planet. Similar anomalous log R' HK index deficiencies might therefore signal the presence of translucent circumstellar gas around other stars hosting evaporating planets; we identified five such systems and WASP-18 is one of them. Both radio and optical observations of the region surrounding WASP-18 point towards a negligible ISM absorption along the WASP-18 line of sight. Excluding the unlikely possibility of an intrinsic anomalously low stellar activity, we conclude that the system is probably surrounded by a circumstellar gas cloud, presumably formed of material lost by the planet. Nevertheless only a far-UV spectrum of the star would provide a definite answer. Theoretical modelling suggests WASP-18b undergoes negligible mass loss, in contrast to the probable presence of a circumstellar gas cloud formed of material lost by the planet. The solution might be the presence either of an extra energy source driving mass loss (e.g., the reconnection of the stellar and planetary magnetic fields inside the planet atmosphere) or of an evaporating third body (e.g., moon).

  15. A model of the planetary nebula NGC 2392 determined from velocity observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odell, C. R.; Ball, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    High-resolution slit spectra are combined with published photometric and velocity data to develop a model of the double-ring planetary nebula NGC 2392. The inner ring is due to an incomplete, prolate spheroid shell with most of the material concentrated near the minor axis circumference. The spheroid is seen almost pole-on, open at the sharp ends, and the formal velocity of expansion (93 km/s) at the ends is a record high for planetary nebulae. The outer ring is a nearly round spheroid of approximately 16 km/s expansion velocity and a different tilt angle than the inner shell. It is surrounded by rapidly expanding material with velocities of at least 75 km/s. A high-velocity stream of material is formed at the open ends of the inner shell and is accelerated by the central star's stellar wind to velocities of at least + or - 190 km/s, providing the first direct evidence for the kinematic role of a strong stellar wind. The inner shell age is approximately 800 yr, arguing that the shell material was preferentially ejected from the equator of the parent star, in contradiction with the usual predictions of theory.

  16. CLOSE STELLAR ENCOUNTERS IN YOUNG, SUBSTRUCTURED, DISSOLVING STAR CLUSTERS: STATISTICS AND EFFECTS ON PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Jonathan; Krumholz, Mark R.

    2013-06-01

    Both simulations and observations indicate that stars form in filamentary, hierarchically clustered associations, most of which disperse into their galactic field once feedback destroys their parent clouds. However, during their early evolution in these substructured environments, stars can undergo close encounters with one another that might have significant impacts on their protoplanetary disks or young planetary systems. We perform N-body simulations of the early evolution of dissolving, substructured clusters with a wide range of properties, with the aim of quantifying the expected number and orbital element distributions of encounters as a function of cluster properties. We show that the presence of substructure both boosts the encounter rate and modifies the distribution of encounter velocities compared to what would be expected for a dynamically relaxed cluster. However, the boost only lasts for a dynamical time, and as a result the overall number of encounters expected remains low enough that gravitational stripping is unlikely to be a significant effect for the vast majority of star-forming environments in the Galaxy. We briefly discuss the implications of this result for models of the origin of the solar system, and of free-floating planets. We also provide tabulated encounter rates and orbital element distributions suitable for inclusion in population synthesis models of planet formation in a clustered environment.

  17. Eccentricity Evolution of Extrasolar Multiple Planetary Systems Due to the Depletion of Nascent Protostellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, M.; Lin, D. N. C.; Ida, S.

    2003-04-01

    Most extrasolar planets are observed to have eccentricities much larger than those in the solar system. Some of these planets have sibling planets, with comparable masses, orbiting around the same host stars. In these multiple planetary systems, eccentricity is modulated by the planets' mutual secular interaction as a consequence of angular momentum exchange between them. For mature planets, the eigenfrequencies of this modulation are determined by their mass and semimajor axis ratios. However, prior to the disk depletion, self-gravity of the planets' nascent disks dominates the precession eigenfrequencies. We examine here the initial evolution of young planets' eccentricity due to the apsidal libration or circulation induced by both the secular interaction between them and the self-gravity of their nascent disks. We show that as the latter effect declines adiabatically with disk depletion, the modulation amplitude of the planets' relative phase of periapsis is approximately invariant despite the time-asymmetrical exchange of angular momentum between planets. However, as the young planets' orbits pass through a state of secular resonance, their mean eccentricities undergo systematic quantitative changes. For applications, we analyze the eccentricity evolution of planets around υ Andromedae and HD 168443 during the epoch of protostellar disk depletion. We find that the disk depletion can change the planets' eccentricity ratio. However, the relatively large amplitude of the planets' eccentricity cannot be excited if all the planets had small initial eccentricities.

  18. Constraints on the Architecture of the HD 95086 Planetary System with the Gemini Planet Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rameau, Julien; Nielsen, Eric L.; De Rosa, Robert J.; Blunt, Sarah C.; Patience, Jenny; Doyon, René; Graham, James R.; Lafrenière, David; Macintosh, Bruce; Marchis, Franck; Bailey, Vanessa; Chilcote, Jeffrey K.; Duchene, Gaspard; Esposito, Thomas M.; Hung, Li-Wei; Konopacky, Quinn M.; Maire, Jérôme; Marois, Christian; Metchev, Stanimir; Perrin, Marshall D.; Pueyo, Laurent; Rajan, Abhijith; Savransky, Dmitry; Wang, Jason J.; Ward-Duong, Kimberly; Wolff, Schuyler G.; Ammons, S. Mark; Hibon, Pascale; Ingraham, Patrick; Kalas, Paul; Morzinski, Katie M.; Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Rantakyearö, Fredrik T.; Thomas, Sandrine

    2016-05-01

    We present astrometric monitoring of the young exoplanet HD 95086 b obtained with the Gemini Planet Imager between 2013 and 2016. A small but significant position angle change is detected at constant separation; the orbital motion is confirmed with literature measurements. Efficient Monte Carlo techniques place preliminary constraints on the orbital parameters of HD 95086 b. With 68% confidence, a semimajor axis of {61.7}-8.4+20.7 au and an inclination of 153\\fdg {0}-13.5+9.7 are favored, with eccentricity less than 0.21. Under the assumption of a coplanar planet–disk system, the periastron of HD 95086 b is beyond 51 au with 68% confidence. Therefore, HD 95086 b cannot carve the entire gap inferred from the measured infrared excess in the SED of HD 95086. We use our sensitivity to additional planets to discuss specific scenarios presented in the literature to explain the geometry of the debris belts. We suggest that either two planets on moderately eccentric orbits or three to four planets with inhomogeneous masses and orbital properties are possible. The sensitivity to additional planetary companions within the observations presented in this study can be used to help further constrain future dynamical simulations of the planet–disk system.

  19. Physical properties and transmission spectrum of the WASP-80 planetary system from multi-colour photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Southworth, J.; Ciceri, S.; Dominik, M.; Henning, Th.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Lanza, A. F.; Rabus, M.; Snodgrass, C.; Vilela, C.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Bramich, D. M.; Calchi Novati, S.; D'Ago, G.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Galianni, P.; Gu, S.-H.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T.; Hundertmark, M.; Juncher, D.; Kains, N.; Korhonen, H.; Popovas, A.; Rahvar, S.; Skottfelt, J.; Street, R.; Surdej, J.; Tsapras, Y.; Wang, X.-B.; Wertz, O.

    2014-02-01

    WASP-80 is one of only two systems known to contain a hot Jupiter which transits its M-dwarf host star. We present eight light curves of one transit event, obtained simultaneously using two defocussed telescopes. These data were taken through the Bessell I, Sloan g'r'i'z' and near-infrared JHK passbands. We use our data to search for opacity-induced changes in the planetary radius, but find that all values agree with each other. Our data are therefore consistent with a flat transmission spectrum to within the observational uncertainties. We also measure an activity index of the host star of log R 'HK = -4.495, meaning that WASP-80 A shows strong chromospheric activity. The non-detection of starspots implies that, if they exist, they must be small and symmetrically distributed on the stellar surface. We model all available optical transit light curves and obtain improved physical properties and orbital ephemerides for the system. Full Table 2 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/562/A126

  20. Secondary aerosol formation in the planetary boundary layer: observations on board on a Zeppelin and analysis by back plume approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanas, Konstantinos; Rubach, Florian; Tillmann, Ralf; Mentel, Thomas; Elbern, Hendrik; Wahner, Andreas; Zeppelin Pegasos-Team 2012

    2014-05-01

    The airship Zeppelin NT is an airborne platform capable of flying at low speed throughout the entire planetary boundary layer (PBL), thus the Zeppelin is an ideal platform to study regional processes in the lowest layers of the atmosphere with high spatial resolution. Atmospheric aerosol as a medium long lived tracer substance is of particular interest due to its influence on the global radiation budget. Due to its lifetime of up to several days secondary aerosol at a certain location can result from local production or from transport processes. Flight patterns during the PEGASOS campaign 2012 in the Po Valley included vertical profiles and transects through regions of interest We analysed one flight with North-South transects between the Apennin and San Pietro Capofiume and one flight with vertical profiles near the supersite San Pietro Capofiume to shed light on local production and transport processes. Model analyses were performed by using 12 hour back plumes for selected points of measurements to determine the regions which contributed to the air mass under observation. This analysis was done using the EURopean Air pollution Dispersion and Inverse Modelling (EURAD-IM) system. As a novel method, adjoint (backward) plumes are applied to identify the spread of originating air masses in terms of horizontal and vertical extension, and the influence of precursor species. Flight patterns include 5 points of measurement along the transect on 21.06.2012 and the lowest (ca. 80m), highest (ca. 708m), and medium height (299 to 464m) of 7 vertical profiles on the 20.06.2012.

  1. GG Tau: the ringworld and beyond. Mass accretion and planetary formation in young multiple stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutrey, Anne; Di Folco, Emmanuel; Beck, Tracy; Guilloteau, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    In binary stellar systems, exoplanet searches have revealed planetary mass companions orbiting both in circumstellar and in circumbinary orbits. Modelling studies suggest increased dynamical complexity around the young stars that form such systems. Circumstellar and circumbinary disks likely exhibit different physical conditions for planet formation, which also depends on the stellar separation. Although binaries and higher order multiple stars are relatively common in nearby star-forming regions, surprisingly few systems with circumbinary distributions of proto-planetary material have been found. With its spectacular ring of dust and gas encircling the central triple star, one such system, GG Tau A, has become a unique laboratory for investigating the physics of circumsystem gas and dust evolution. We review here its physical properties.

  2. The (Un)Lonely Planet Guide: Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems from a ``Blue Dots'' Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M. R.

    2010-10-01

    In this contribution I summarize some recent successes, and focus on remaining challenges, in understanding the formation and evolution of planetary systems in the context of the Blue Dots initiative. Because our understanding is incomplete, we cannot yet articulate a design reference mission engineering matrix suitable for an exploration mission where success is defined as obtaining a spectrum of a potentially habitable world around a nearby star. However, as progress accelerates, we can identify observational programs that would address fundamental scientific questions through hypothesis testing such that the null result is interesting.

  3. Quantifying planetary limits of Earth system processes relevant to human activity using a thermodynamic view of the whole Earth system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidon, Axel

    2014-05-01

    Food, water, and energy play, obviously, a central role in maintaining human activity. In this contribution, I derive estimates for the fundamental limits on the rates by which these resources are provided by Earth system processes and the levels at which these can be used sustainably. The key idea here is that these resources are, directly or indirectly, generated out of the energy associated with the absorption of sunlight, and that the energy conversions from sunlight to other forms ultimately limit the generation of these resources. In order to derive these conversion limits, we need to trace the links between the processes that generate food, water and energy to the absorption of sunlight. The resource "food" results from biomass production by photosynthesis, which requires light and a sufficient magnitude of gas exchange of carbon dioxide at the surface, which is maintained by atmospheric motion which in turn is generated out of differential radiative heating and cooling. The resource "water" is linked to hydrologic cycling, with its magnitude being linked to the latent heat flux of the surface energy balance and water vapor transport in the atmosphere which is also driven by differential radiative heating and cooling. The availability of (renewable) energy is directly related to the generation of different forms of energy of climate system processes, such as the kinetic energy of atmospheric motion, which, again, relates to radiative heating differences. I use thermodynamics and its limits as a basis to establish the planetary limits of these processes and use a simple model to derive first-order estimates. These estimates compare quite well with observations, suggesting that this thermodynamic view of the whole Earth system provides an objective, physical basis to define and quantify planetary boundaries as well as the factors that shape these boundaries.

  4. THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL ARCHITECTURE OF THE υ ANDROMEDAE PLANETARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Deitrick, Russell; Barnes, Rory; Quinn, Thomas R.; Luger, Rodrigo; Antonsen, Adrienne; McArthur, Barbara; Fritz Benedict, G.

    2015-01-01

    The υ Andromedae system is the first exoplanetary system to have the relative inclination of two planets' orbital planes directly measured, and therefore offers our first window into the three-dimensional configurations of planetary systems. We present, for the first time, full three-dimensional, dynamically stable configurations for the three planets of the system consistent with all observational constraints. While the outer two planets, c and d, are inclined by ∼30°, the inner planet's orbital plane has not been detected. We use N-body simulations to search for stable three-planet configurations that are consistent with the combined radial velocity and astrometric solution. We find that only 10 trials out of 1000 are robustly stable on 100 Myr timescales, or ∼8 billion orbits of planet b. Planet b's orbit must lie near the invariable plane of planets c and d, but can be either prograde or retrograde. These solutions predict that b's mass is in the range of 2-9 M {sub Jup} and has an inclination angle from the sky plane of less than 25°. Combined with brightness variations in the combined star/planet light curve ({sup p}hase curve{sup )}, our results imply that planet b's radius is ∼1.8 R {sub Jup}, relatively large for a planet of its age. However, the eccentricity of b in several of our stable solutions reaches >0.1, generating upward of 10{sup 19} W in the interior of the planet via tidal dissipation, possibly inflating the radius to an amount consistent with phase curve observations.

  5. Channel coding and data compression system considerations for efficient communication of planetary imaging data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    End-to-end system considerations involving channel coding and data compression are reported which could drastically improve the efficiency in communicating pictorial information from future planetary spacecraft. In addition to presenting new and potentially significant system considerations, this report attempts to fill a need for a comprehensive tutorial which makes much of this very subject accessible to readers whose disciplines lie outside of communication theory.

  6. International Ultraviolet Explorer observations of the white dwarf nucleus of the very old, diffuse planetary nebula, IW-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruhweiler, F. C.; Feibelman, Walter A.

    1993-01-01

    UV low-dispersion spectra of the central star of the faint planetary nebula, IW-2, were obtained with the IUE. The apparent large diameter of the very diffuse nebula, about half that of the moon, as seen on the Palomar Sky Survey plates by Ishida and Weinberger (1987), indicates this object to be potentially quite evolved, and nearby. The IUE spectra clearly reveal a hot stellar continuum extending over the entire wavelength range of the short-wavelength prime camera (1200-2000 A). This object with V = 17.7 +/- 0.4 is definitely one of the faintest stars ever successfully observed with the IUE. Comparisons of the IUE observed fluxes with those from white dwarf model atmospheres suggest extinction near E(B - V) = 0.45 for a white dwarf of T(eff) roughly 100,000 K. Constraints from estimates of the nebular emission measure and observed visual magnitude also argue for a white dwarf of T(eff) roughly 100,000 K at a distance of 300 to 350 pc. The nucleus of IW-2 is one of the most evolved stars to be identified with a planetary nebula.

  7. The APIS service : a tool for accessing value-added HST planetary auroral observations over 1997-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, L.; Henry, F.; Prangé, R.; Le Sidaner, P.

    2015-10-01

    The Auroral Planetary Imaging and Spectroscopy (APIS) service http://obspm.fr/apis/ provides an open and interactive access to processed auroral observations of the outer planets and their satellites. Such observations are of interest for a wide community at the interface between planetology, magnetospheric and heliospheric physics. APIS consists of (i) a high level database, built from planetary auroral observations acquired by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) since 1997 with its mostly used Far-Ultraviolet spectro- imagers, (ii) a dedicated search interface aimed at browsing efficiently this database through relevant conditional search criteria (Figure 1) and (iii) the ability to interactively work with the data online through plotting tools developed by the Virtual Observatory (VO) community, such as Aladin and Specview. This service is VO compliant and can therefore also been queried by external search tools of the VO community. The diversity of available data and the capability to sort them out by relevant physical criteria shall in particular facilitate statistical studies, on long-term scales and/or multi-instrumental multispectral combined analysis [1,2]. We will present the updated capabilities of APIS with several examples. Several tutorials are available online.

  8. Combined Gamma-Ray Spectrometer and Pulsed Neutron Generator System for In-Situ Planetary Geochemical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, R. D.; Evans, L. G.; Parsons, A. M.; Akkurt, Hatice; Floyd, H.; Wraight, P.; Ziegler, W.; Schweitzer, J.

    2007-01-01

    A combined pulsed neutron/gamma-ray system can be used on planetary surfaces to provide valuable geochemical analysis of surface materials to depths of {approx}1 m. We describe experimental results that demonstrate the capabilities of such a system.

  9. Observations of a two-layer soil moisture influence on surface energy dynamics and planetary boundary layer characteristics in a semiarid shrubland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Mejia, Zulia Mayari; Papuga, Shirley A.

    2014-01-01

    We present an observational analysis examining soil moisture control on surface energy dynamics and planetary boundary layer characteristics. Understanding soil moisture control on land-atmosphere interactions will become increasingly important as climate change continues to alter water availability. In this study, we analyzed 4 years of data from the Santa Rita Creosote Ameriflux site. We categorized our data independently in two ways: (1) wet or dry seasons and (2) one of the four cases within a two-layer soil moisture framework for the root zone based on the presence or absence of moisture in shallow (0-20 cm) and deep (20-60 cm) soil layers. Using these categorizations, we quantified the soil moisture control on surface energy dynamics and planetary boundary layer characteristics using both average responses and linear regression. Our results highlight the importance of deep soil moisture in land-atmosphere interactions. The presence of deep soil moisture decreased albedo by about 10%, and significant differences were observed in evaporative fraction even in the absence of shallow moisture. The planetary boundary layer height (PBLh) was largest when the whole soil profile was dry, decreasing by about 1 km when the whole profile was wet. Even when shallow moisture was absent but deep moisture was present the PBLh was significantly lower than when the entire profile was dry. The importance of deep moisture is likely site-specific and modulated through vegetation. Therefore, understanding these relationships also provides important insights into feedbacks between vegetation and the hydrologic cycle and their consequent influence on the climate system.

  10. Options for Affordable Planetary Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Mike; Gaddis, Steve; Porter, Ron; VanDyke, Melissa; Martin, Jim; Godfroy, Tom; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Garber, Anne; Pearson, Boise

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear fission systems could serve as "workhorse" power plants for the Vision for Space Exploration. In this context, the "workhorse" power plant is defined as a system that could provide power anywhere on the surface of the moon or Mars, land on the moon using a Robotic Lunar Exploration Program (RLEP)-developed lander, and would be a viable, affordable option once power requirements exceed that which can be provided by existing energy systems.

  11. Comparative Understanding of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, D. L.; Atreya, S. K.; Bolton, S. J.; Bougher, S. W.; Coustenis, A.; Edgington, S. G.; Friedson, A. J.; Griffith, C. A.; Guberman, S. L.; Hammel, H. B.; Lunine, J. I.; Mendillo, M.; Moses, J.; Mueller-Wodarg, I.; Orton, G. S.; Rages, K. A.; Slanger, T. G.; Titov, D. V.; Yelle, R.

    2001-11-01

    Observing, characterizing, and understanding planetary atmospheres are key components of solar system exploration. A planet's atmosphere is the interface between the surface and external energy and mass sources. Understanding how atmospheres are formed, evolve, and respond to perturbations is essential for addressing the long-range science objectives of identifying the conditions that are favorable for producing and supporting biological activity, managing the effects of human activity on the Earth's atmosphere, and planning and evaluating observations of extra-solar planets. Our current knowledge, based on very few observations, indicates that the planets and moons in the solar system have diverse atmospheres with a number of shared characteristics. Comparing and contrasting solar system atmospheres provides the best means of addressing the broad scientific goals. Additional space missions with specific atmospheric objectives are required. At the same time, investment of additional resources is needed in the infrastructure of observation and interpretation of planetary atmospheres. The Planetary Atmospheres Community Panel is considering and prioritizing potential recommendations in two broad categories. Possible recommendations that apply to multiple planets include creation of a new Comparative Planetary Atmospheres program, establishing a mechanism for secure funding for analysis and interpretation of mission data, creation of a new "Super-Discovery" program for more ambitious planetary missions, enhancement of laboratory and theory research, and deployment of space- or ground-based telescopes dedicated to planetary observations. Possible recommendations for specific planetary missions with atmospheric goals include deep-penetration multiprobes to determine elemental compositions of giant planet atmospheres, Venus and Mars atmospheric explorer missions, and a Post-Cassini atmospheric/surface mission to Titan.

  12. Planetary Protection: X-ray Super-Flares Aid Formation of "Solar Systems"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-05-01

    New results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory imply that X-ray super-flares torched the young Solar System. Such flares likely affected the planet-forming disk around the early Sun, and may have enhanced the survival chances of Earth. By focusing on the Orion Nebula almost continuously for 13 days, a team of scientists used Chandra to obtain the deepest X-ray observation ever taken of this or any star cluster. The Orion Nebula is the nearest rich stellar nursery, located just 1,500 light years away. These data provide an unparalleled view of 1400 young stars, 30 of which are prototypes of the early Sun. The scientists discovered that these young suns erupt in enormous flares that dwarf - in energy, size, and frequency -- anything seen from the Sun today. Illustration of Large Flares Illustration of Large Flares "We don't have a time machine to see how the young Sun behaved, but the next best thing is to observe Sun-like stars in Orion," said Scott Wolk of Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. "We are getting a unique look at stars between one and 10 million years old - a time when planets form." A key result is that the more violent stars produce flares that are a hundred times as energetic as the more docile ones. This difference may specifically affect the fate of planets that are relatively small and rocky, like the Earth. "Big X-ray flares could lead to planetary systems like ours where Earth is a safe distance from the Sun," said Eric Feigelson of Penn State University in University Park, and principal investigator for the international Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project. "Stars with smaller flares, on the other hand, might end up with Earth-like planets plummeting into the star." Animation of X-ray Flares from a Young Sun Animation of X-ray Flares from a "Young Sun" According to recent theoretical work, X-ray flares can create turbulence when they strike planet-forming disks, and this affects the position of rocky planets as they

  13. Two Eyes on the Prize: Revealing the Complete Architectures of Planetary Systems through Transit Timing with Kepler and Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrycky, Daniel; Stevenson, Kevin; Ballard, Sarah; Agol, Eric; Holman, Matthew; Bean, Jacob; Ragozzine, Darin

    2013-11-01

    The transit timing variation (TTV) technique has recently become a crucial method for determining the complete architectures (i.e., planet masses, orbital eccentricities, inclinations, and resonant properties) of extrasolar planetary systems. This technique has blossomed because of the Kepler mission's discovery of systems with multiple transiting planets and individual planets exhibiting very large TTVs. All of Kepler's results in this area so far have been for relatively short-period planets, but Kepler has also discovered dynamically-interacting systems with planets that have longer periods, similar to those of the Solar System. However, the ill-timed failure of the Kepler telescope has left us with an incomplete picture of these systems due to a lack of the required time baseline. Fortunately, Spitzer is positioned to leverage the unique potential that these planets offer, by extending the time baseline of transit observations. We propose to observe transits of seven Kepler-discovered planets in four particularly compelling systems to precisely determine their transit times. Combining the legacy Kepler transit times with the new times from Spitzer will give us the baseline that is needed to confirm and characterize these dynamically interacting systems of planets. This information will allow us to assess the complete architectures of these systems -- we will discover planets that do not transit and determine the masses and orbital properties of all the planets. For 6 planets in these systems, the TTVs will allow us to measure the planetary masses to better than 20%, which will approximately double the number of cool giant planets with known masses and radii. Several of the systems have mean-motion resonances between the planets, and characterizing these interactions yields information on the formation and migration of giant planets. The required precision and duration of these observations render Spitzer the only remaining instrument capable of such study.

  14. The development of the human exploration demonstration project (HEDP), a planetary systems testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevers, Edward S.; Korsmeyer, David J.

    1993-01-01

    The Human Exploration Demonstration Project (HEDP) is an ongoing task at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Ames Research Center to address the advanced technology requirements necessary to implement an integrated working and living environment for a planetary surface habitat. The integrated environment will consist of life support systems, physiological monitoring of project crew, a virtual environment workstation, and centralized data acquisition and habitat systems health monitoring. There will be several robotic systems on a simulated planetary landscape external to the habitat environment to provide representative work loads for the crew. This paper describes the status of the HEDP after one year, the major facilities composing the HEDP, the project's role as an Ames Research Center testbed, and the types of demonstration scenarios that will be run to showcase the technologies.

  15. Global Architecture of Planetary Systems (GAPS), a project for the whole Italian Community.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poretti, E.; Boccato, C.; Claudi, R.; Cosentino, R.; Covino, E.; Desidera, S.; Gratton, R.; Lanza, A. F.; Maggio, A.; Micela, G.; Molinari, E.; Pagano, I.; Piotto, G.; Smareglia, R.; Sozzetti, A.; GAPS Collaboration

    The GAPS project is running since 2012 with the goal to optimize the science return of the HARPS-N instrument mounted at Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. A large number of astronomers is working together to allow the Italian community to gain an international position adequate to the HARPS-N capabilities in the exoplanetary researches. Relevant scientific results are being obtained on both the main guidelines of the collaboration, i.e., the discovery surveys and the characterization studies. The planetary system discovered around the southern component of the binary XO-2 and its characterization together with that of the system orbiting the northern component are a good example of the completeness of the topics matched by the GAPS project. The dynamics of some planetary systems are investigated by studying the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, while host stars are characterized by means of asteroseismology and star-planet interaction.

  16. Earth Observing System, Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Much is known about the Earth, but the unifying concepts are still only beginning to be established. An exposition of the key issues in Earth science is neither simple or concise. From the scientific questions at hand there are many interconnections among them and the view of the Earth as a system is essential to their solution. The Earth science goals for the 1990's are presented for the following areas: hydrologic cycle; biogeochemical cycles; climatological processes; geophysical processes; oceanography; and solid earth.

  17. FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF PLANETARY SYSTEMS: PROPERTIES OF DEBRIS DUST AROUND SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, John M.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Bouwman, Jeroen; Henning, Thomas; Wolf, Sebastian; Mamajek, Eric E.; Meyer, Michael R.; Kim, Jinyoung Serena; Pascucci, Ilaria; Backman, Dana E.; Hollenbach, David; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Silverstone, Murray D.; Stauffer, John R.

    2009-03-15

    We present Spitzer photometric (IRAC and MIPS) and spectroscopic (IRS low resolution) observations for 314 stars in the Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems Legacy program. These data are used to investigate the properties and evolution of circumstellar dust around solar-type stars spanning ages from approximately 3 Myr-3 Gyr. We identify 46 sources that exhibit excess infrared emission above the stellar photosphere at 24 {mu}m, and 21 sources with excesses at 70 {mu}m. Five sources with an infrared excess have characteristics of optically thick primordial disks, while the remaining sources have properties akin to debris systems. The fraction of systems exhibiting a 24 {mu}m excess greater than 10.2% above the photosphere is 15% for ages < 300 Myr and declines to 2.7% for older ages. The upper envelope to the 70 {mu}m fractional luminosity appears to decline over a similar age range. The characteristic temperature of the debris inferred from the IRS spectra range between 60 and 180 K, with evidence for the presence of cooler dust to account for the strength of the 70 {mu}m excess emission. No strong correlation is found between dust temperature and stellar age. Comparison of the observational data with disk models containing a power-law distribution of silicate grains suggests that the typical inner-disk radius is {approx}> 10 AU. Although the interpretation is not unique, the lack of excess emission shortward of 16 {mu}m and the relatively flat distribution of the 24 {mu}m excess for ages {approx}< 300 Myr is consistent with steady-state collisional models.

  18. Evolving the Technical Infrastructure of the Planetary Data System for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, Reta F.; Crichton, D.; Hughes, S.; Grayzeck, E.

    2010-01-01

    The Planetary Data System (PDS) was established in 1989 as a distributed system to assure scientific oversight. Initially the PDS followed guidelines recommended by the National Academies Committee on Data Management and Computation (CODMAC, 1982) and placed emphasis on archiving validated datasets. But overtime user demands, supported by increased computing capabilities and communication methods, have placed increasing demands on the PDS. The PDS must add additional services to better enable scientific analysis within distributed environments and to ensure that those services integrate with existing systems and data. To face these challenges the Planetary Data System (PDS) must modernize its architecture and technical implementation. The PDS 2010 project addresses these challenges. As part of this project, the PDS has three fundamental project goals that include: (1) Providing more efficient client delivery of data by data providers to the PDS (2) Enabling a stable, long-term usable planetary science data archive (3) Enabling services for the data consumer to find, access and use the data they require in contemporary data formats. In order to achieve these goals, the PDS 2010 project is upgrading both the technical infrastructure and the data standards to support increased efficiency in data delivery as well as usability of the PDS. Efforts are underway to interface with missions as early as possible and to streamline the preparation and delivery of data to the PDS. Likewise, the PDS is working to define and plan for data services that will help researchers to perform analysis in cost-constrained environments. This presentation will cover the PDS 2010 project including the goals, data standards and technical implementation plans that are underway within the Planetary Data System. It will discuss the plans for moving from the current system, version PDS 3, to version PDS 4.

  19. ANCIENT PLANETARY SYSTEMS ARE ORBITING A LARGE FRACTION OF WHITE DWARF STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Zuckerman, B.; Melis, C.; Klein, B.; Jura, M.; Koester, D. E-mail: cmelis@ucsd.ed E-mail: jura@astro.ucla.ed

    2010-10-10

    Infrared studies have revealed debris likely related to planet formation in orbit around {approx}30% of youthful, intermediate mass, main-sequence stars. We present evidence, based on atmospheric pollution by various elements heavier than helium, that a comparable fraction of the white dwarf descendants of such main-sequence stars are orbited by planetary systems. These systems have survived, at least in part, through all stages of stellar evolution that precede the white dwarf. During the time interval ({approx}200 million years) that a typical polluted white dwarf in our sample has been cooling it has accreted from its planetary system the mass of one of the largest asteroids in our solar system (e.g., Vesta or Ceres). Usually, this accreted mass will be only a fraction of the total mass of rocky material that orbits these white dwarfs; for plausible planetary system configurations we estimate that this total mass is likely to be at least equal to that of the Sun's asteroid belt, and perhaps much larger. We report abundances of a suite of eight elements detected in the little studied star G241-6 that we find to be among the most heavily polluted of all moderately bright white dwarfs.

  20. Space Weathering Impact on Solar System Surfaces and Planetary Mission Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.

    2011-01-01

    We often look "through a glass, darkly" at solar system bodies with tenuous atmospheres and direct surface exposure to the local space environment. Space weathering exposure acts via universal space-surface interaction processes to produce a thin patina of outer material covering, potentially obscuring endogenic surface materials of greatest interest for understanding origins and interior evolution. Examples of obscuring exogenic layers are radiation crusts on cometary nuclei and iogenic components of sulfate hydrate deposits on the trailing hemisphere of Europa. Weathering processes include plasma ion implantation into surfaces, sputtering by charged particles and solar ultraviolet photons, photolytic chemistry driven by UV irradiation, and radiolytic chemistry evolving from products of charged particle irradiation. Regolith structure from impacts, and underlying deeper structures from internal evolution, affects efficacy of certain surface interactions, e.g. sputtering as affected by porosity and surface irradiation dosage as partly attenuated by local topographic shielding. These processes should be regarded for mission science planning as potentially enabling, e.g. since direct surface sputtering, and resultant surface-bound exospheres, can provide in-situ samples of surface composition to ion and neutral mass spectrometers on orbital spacecraft. Sample return for highest sensitivity compOSitional and structural analyses at Earth will usually be precluded by limited range of surface sampling, long times for return, and high cost. Targeted advancements in instrument technology would be more cost efficient for local remote and in-situ sample analysis. More realistic laboratory simulations, e.g. for bulk samples, are needed to interpret mission science observations of weathered surfaces. Space environment effects on mission spacecraft and science operations must also be specified and mitigated from the hourly to monthly changes in space weather and from longer