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Sample records for observed significantly higher

  1. Competitive Intelligence: Significance in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    Historically noncompetitive, the higher education sector is now having to adjust dramatically to new and increasing demands on numerous levels. To remain successfully operational within the higher educational market universities today must consider all relevant forces which can impact present and future planning. Those institutions that were…

  2. Direct observation of ligand binding to membrane proteins in living cells by a saturation transfer double difference (STDD) NMR spectroscopy method shows a significantly higher affinity of integrin alpha(IIb)beta3 in native platelets than in liposomes.

    PubMed

    Claasen, Birgit; Axmann, Marco; Meinecke, Robert; Meyer, Bernd

    2005-01-26

    About 30% of the proteins in mammalian systems are membrane bound or integrated (e.g., GPCRs). It is inherently difficult to investigate receptor-ligand interactions on a molecular level in their natural membrane environment. Here, we present a new method based on saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR to characterize at an atomic level binding interactions of cell surface proteins in living cells. Implemented as a double difference technique, STD NMR allows the direct observation of binding events and the definition of the binding epitopes of ligands. The binding of the pentapeptide cyclo(RGDfV) to the surface glycoprotein integrin alpha(IIb)beta3 of intact human blood platelets can be detected by saturation transfer double difference (STDD) NMR in less than an hour. A 5-fold higher STD response reflects a significantly higher affinity of integrin alpha(IIb)beta3 in native platelets than in liposomes, which demonstrates the importance of studying membrane proteins in their natural environment. Also, the binding mode of cyclo(RGDfV) in the arginine glycine region is slightly different when interacting with native integrin in platelets compared to integrin reintegrated into liposomes. PMID:15656629

  3. Reported Significant Observation (RSO) studies. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Eicher, R.W.

    1992-12-01

    The Reported Significant Observation (RSO) study used in the field of safety is an information-gathering technique where employee-participants describe situations they have personally witnessed involving good and bad practices and safe and unsafe conditions. This information is useful in the risk assessment process because it focuses on hazards and thereby facilitates their elimination. However, RSO cannot be the only component in a risk assessment program. Used by the Air Force in their aviation psychology program and further developed by John C. Flanagan, RSO is more commonly known as the ``Critical Incident Technique.`` However, the words ``Critical`` and ``Incident`` had other connotations in nuclear safety, prompting early users within the Aerojet Nuclear Company to coin the more fitting title of ``Reported Significant Observations.`` The technique spread slowly in the safety field primarily because the majority of users were researchers interested in after-the-fact data, with application to everyday problems and behavioral factors. RSO was formally recognized as a significant hazard reduction tool during the development of the Management Oversight and Risk Tree (MORT) program for the US Atomic Energy Commission. The Department of Energy (DOE) has, in turn, adopted MORT for its system safety program, and this has resulted in RSO being a modern and viable technique for DOE contractor safety programs.

  4. Earth observations and photography experiment: Summary of significant results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Baz, F.

    1978-01-01

    Observation and photographic data from the Apollo Soyuz Test Project are analyzed. The discussion is structured according to the fields of investigation including: geology, desert studies, oceanography, hydrology, and meteorology. The data were obtained by: (1) visual observations of selected Earth features, (2) hand-held camera photography to document observations, and (3) stereo mapping photography of areas of significant scientific interest.

  5. Astronaut observations from lunar orbit and their geologic significance.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Baz, F.; Worden, A. M.; Brand, V. D.

    1972-01-01

    To supplement orbital photography and other remotely sensed data, visual observations were made of 15 lunar surface targets during Apollo mission 15. Among the significant results are (1) characterization of the floor material of Tsiolkovsky as no darker than the average (Eratosthenian) mare material, and interpretration of the lineated unit on the crater rim as a rock avalanche; (2) identification of layers on the wall of the crater Picard, which is probably volcanic in origin, (3) explanation of the ray-excluded zone of the crater Proclus as the result of structurally controlled ray shadowing; (4) observation of cinder cones in the Littrow area with dark haloes that probably are composed of pyroclastic deposits; and (5) recognition that the termini of numerous sinuous rilles in Oceanus Procellarum are flooded with younger mare materials that may have covered older terminal deposits.

  6. Has the Sun Significantly Impacted Recent Voyager Observations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Sun, W.; Detman, T. R.; Dryer, Ph. D., M.; Deehr, C. S.; Intriligator, J.; Webber, W. R.

    2013-12-01

    Using our models HAFSS (HAF Source Surface) and HHMS-PI (Hybrid Heliospheric Modeling System with Pickup Protons) we have been analyzing some of the recent (e.g., July 2012, etc.) solar events to determine if the effects of the events might be seen in the outer heliosphere, heliosheath, etc. Our analyses provide insights into the phenomena in these regions. Both models are three-dimensional (3D) time dependent simulations that use solar observations as input. HAFSS is a kinematic model. HHMS-PI is a numerical magnetohydrodynamic solar wind (SW) simulation model. Both HHMS-PI and HAFSS are ideally suited for these analyses since starting from the Sun they model the slowly evolving background SW and the impulsive, time-dependent events associated with solar activity (e.g., coronal mass ejections (CMEs). HHMS-PI/HAFSS make it possible to track interplanetary shocks as they propagate, interact, and evolve en route to various spacecraft (s/c) where they are observed. Our models have been used to reproduce s/c data from ACE to Ulysses, Cassini, and Voyagers 1 and 2. Our published results in refereed scientific journals showed that: a.) Our models naturally reproduce dynamic 3D spatially asymmetric effects observed throughout the heliosphere. b.) Pre-existing SW background conditions have a strong influence on the propagation of shock waves from solar events. c.) Time-dependence is a crucial aspect of interpreting s/c data. d.) Shock interactions resulting from multiple solar events lead to complicated time-series observations at individual s/c. We believe the answer to the question in the title of this abstract is: Yes, we do think the Sun has significantly impacted recent Voyager observations.

  7. Circumnutation observed without a significant gravitational force in spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. H.; Chapman, D. K.

    1984-01-01

    For over half a century and especially since the 1960's a number of plant physiologists, seeking to explain the impressively ubiquitous mechanism that drives and regulates circumnutation in all growing plant organs, have been unable to agree on whether the differential growth process that leads to circumnutational oscillations is gravity dependent. There has been fairly general agreement that the question might be answered, if test plants could be deprived of all significant gravitational stimuli as would be possible in the near weightlessness or free fall environment of satellite orbit. Such an experiment was carried out during the Spacelab 1 mission. Circumnutational oscillations were observed which demonstrated that a protracted input of gravitational information from the environment was not required for initiation or maintenance of circumnutation in sunflower hypocotyls.

  8. The Significance of Australian Vocational Education Institutions in Opening Access to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodie, Gavin; Wheelahan, Leesa

    2009-01-01

    Vocational education provides an educational but not a social ladder of opportunity to Australian higher education. The five dual-sector universities with significant enrolments in both vocational and higher education admit about twice the proportion of students transferring from vocational education as other universities. However, since the…

  9. Academic Entrepreneurship (Re)defined: Significance and Implications for the Scholarship of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mars, Matthew M.; Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Over the past several decades higher education scholars have conducted a significant amount of research aimed at understanding the implications of enhanced interactions between the academy and the private marketplace. Accordingly, a voluminous literature that includes conceptualizations and discussions of "academic entrepreneurship" has emerged.

  10. Academic Entrepreneurship (Re)defined: Significance and Implications for the Scholarship of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mars, Matthew M.; Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Over the past several decades higher education scholars have conducted a significant amount of research aimed at understanding the implications of enhanced interactions between the academy and the private marketplace. Accordingly, a voluminous literature that includes conceptualizations and discussions of "academic entrepreneurship" has emerged.…

  11. Higher topological invariants of magnetic field lines: observational aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illarionov, Egor; Smirnov, Alexander; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Sokoloff, Dmitry; Akhmet'ev, Peter

    Topology of magnetic field lines is directly involved in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theorems and equations. Being an invariant of motion in ideal MHD conditions, the magnetic field-line topology is a natural obstacle to the relaxation of magnetic field into a current-free (potential) field and contrariwise limits a dynamo generation. Usage of these conservational laws and writing of numerical relations require a quantification of topology. One of the simplest existing measures of magnetic topology is the mutual magnetic helicity, that expresses the combined action of interaction and linkage between different magnetic field lines. For practical purposes there exists the revised concept of relative magnetic helicity, that allows to estimate the complexity of field-line topology in case of open volume, i.e. when magnetic lines cross the boundaries of given 3D region. At the same time this concept remains a simple interpretation of linkage number in terms of individual lines. Our point however is that magnetic helicity is far from being unique or comprehensive quantification of magnetic field-line topology. To improve the situation we introduce a set of higher invariants which extends the idea of relative helicity and provides a new means to describe the magnetic field-line topology. To practically study the possibility of implementation of higher topological invariants we reconstruct several moments of mutual helicity from observed solar vector magnetograms with extrapolated magnetic field above the photosphere and discuss to what extent such knowledge could be instructive for understanding of the solar magnetic field evolution.

  12. Significantly higher polybrominated diphenyl ether levels in young U.S. children than in their mothers.

    PubMed

    Lunder, Sonya; Hovander, Lotta; Athanassiadis, Ioannis; Bergman, Ake

    2010-07-01

    While young children are rarely included in biomonitoring studies, they are presumed to be at greater risk of ingesting environmental contaminants-particularly those that accumulate in foods or shed from consumer products. The widely used fire retardants polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are ubiquitous contaminants in the indoor environment and are widely detected at higher levels in Americans than in individuals from other countries. However, there are only three studies of PBDEs in U.S. children. We hypothesized that PBDEs are present in higher concentrations in young children than their mothers. PBDEs were assessed in blood samples collected concurrently from 20 mothers and their children, ages 1.5 to 4 years. The chemical analyses were performed by GC/MS applying selected ion monitoring. The samples were analyzed for 20 PBDE congeners; 11 were detected. SigmaPBDEs for children were typically 2.8 times higher than for mothers, with median child:mother ratios varying from 2 to 4 for individual congeners. In 19 of 20 families studied, children had higher SigmaPBDE concentrations than their mothers with significant (p < 0.01) concentration differences for five of the PBDE congeners. Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) was quantitated in 13 children and 9 mothers. Other studies indicate PBDEs are not elevated at birth, suggesting that early life is an intense period of PBDE intake. Children's increased hand-to-mouth activity, dietary preferences, and exposures from breast milk may result in greater ingestion of PBDEs than adults. These findings suggest that measurements from adults likely do not reflect exposures to young children despite sharing homes and similar diets. PMID:20540541

  13. Observation of higher stiffness in nanopolycrystal diamond than monocrystal diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigaki, Kenichi; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Kusakabe, Koichi; Nakamura, Nobutomo; Hirao, Masahiko; Ledbetter, Hassel

    2013-08-01

    Diamond is the stiffest known material. Here we report that nanopolycrystal diamond synthesized by direct-conversion method from graphite is stiffer than natural and synthesized monocrystal diamonds. This observation departs from the usual thinking that nanocrystalline materials are softer than their monocrystals because of a large volume fraction of soft grain-boundary region. The direct conversion causes the nondiffusional phase transformation to cubic diamond, producing many twins inside diamond grains. We give an ab initio-calculation twinned model that confirms the stiffening. We find that shorter interplane bonds along [111] are significantly strengthened near the twinned region, from which the superstiff structure originates. Our discovery provides a novel step forward in the search for superstiff materials.

  14. Lower uncarboxylated osteocalcin and higher sclerostin levels are significantly associated with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Lim, Soo; Moon, Jae Hoon; Jin, Hyunjin; Jung, Kyong Yeun; Shin, Chan Soo; Park, Kyong Soo; Jang, Hak Chul; Choi, Sung Hee

    2016-02-01

    Systemic roles for bone-derived proteins have emerged from recent studies. In particular, the serum concentration of osteocalcin (OCN) or sclerostin was found to be associated with altered glucose metabolism or atherosclerosis. The aims of this study were to evaluate OCN and sclerostin levels in subjects who underwent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery compared with those in normal controls and to analyze their relationships with atherosclerosis. This was an age- and sex-matched case-control study that included 61 male subjects who underwent CABG and 61 controls. Forty-six subjects (37.7%) with diabetes and 62 hypertensive subjects (50.8%) were included. Serum sclerostin, uncarboxylated OCN (ucOCN) and carboxylated OCN (cOCN) were measured. Coronary artery calcium (CAC) score was calculated according to Agatston's method, using a 64-slice multi-detector computed tomography scanner. The levels of serum ucOCN were significantly lower and sclerostin concentrations were higher in the CABG group than in the controls (p<0.05 for both), and these significances were maintained after adjusting for atherosclerotic risk factors in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients (p<0.05 in both groups). However, there was no difference in cOCN levels between CABG patients and controls. The group with abnormal CAC scores (CAC scores ?100) had significantly higher levels of serum sclerostin (p<0.05). In multiple logistic regression analysis, both lower ucOCN and higher sclerostin levels were independently associated with CABG (odds ratio [OR] 0.43, 95% CI 0.22-0.84, p<0.05 for log(ucOCN); and OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.08-4.05, p<0.05 for log(sclerostin)). In subjects with CAD who underwent CABG, the serum ucOCN level was decreased and the sclerostin level was increased compared with those in the controls, regardless of diabetic status. Longitudinal studies are warranted to establish the precise roles of ucOCN and sclerostin in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:26576474

  15. Significance of Pre-Radiographic MRI Lesions in Persons at Higher Risk for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Leena; Chmiel, Joan S.; Almagor, Orit; Dunlop, Dorothy; Guermazi, Ali; Bathon, Joan; Eaton, Charles; Hochberg, Marc; Jackson, Rebecca; Kwoh, Kent; Mysiw, W. Jerry; Crema, Michel; Roemer, Frank; Nevitt, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective Little is known about early knee osteoarthritis (OA). The significance of MRI lesions in older persons without radiographic OA is unclear. Our objectives were to determine extent of tissue pathology by MRI and evaluate its significance by testing the hypotheses: cartilage damage, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), and meniscal damage are associated with prevalent frequent knee symptoms and incident persistent symptoms; BMLs and meniscal damage are associated with incident tibiofemoral cartilage damage; BMLs are associated with incident patellofemoral cartilage damage. Methods In a cohort study of 849 OAI (Osteoarthritis Initiative) participants who had bilateral K/L 0, we assessed cartilage, BMLs, and meniscal damage using MOAKS, as well as prevalent frequent knee symptoms, incident persistent symptoms, and incident cartilage damage. Multiple logistic regression (one knee/person) was used to evaluate associations between MRI lesions and each of these outcomes. Results 76% had cartilage damage, 61% BMLs, 21% meniscal tears, and 14% meniscal extrusion. Cartilage damage (any; tibiofemoral and patellofemoral), BMLs (any; tibiofemoral and patellofemoral), meniscal extrusion, and BMI were associated with prevalent frequent symptoms. Cartilage damage (isolated patellofemoral; tibiofemoral and patellofemoral), BMLs (any; isolated patellofemoral; tibiofemoral and patellofemoral), meniscal tears, and BMI were associated with incident persistent symptoms. Hand OA but no individual lesion type was associated with incident tibiofemoral cartilage damage, and BMLs (any; any patellofemoral) with incident patellofemoral damage. Having more lesion types was associated with a greater risk of outcomes. Conclusions MRI-detected lesions are not incidental and may represent early disease in persons at higher risk for knee OA. PMID:24974824

  16. Higher resolution stimulus facilitates depth perception: MT+ plays a significant role in monocular depth perception

    PubMed Central

    Tsushima, Yoshiaki; Komine, Kazuteru; Sawahata, Yasuhito; Hiruma, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Today, we human beings are facing with high-quality virtual world of a completely new nature. For example, we have a digital display consisting of a high enough resolution that we cannot distinguish from the real world. However, little is known how such high-quality representation contributes to the sense of realness, especially to depth perception. What is the neural mechanism of processing such fine but virtual representation? Here, we psychophysically and physiologically examined the relationship between stimulus resolution and depth perception, with using luminance-contrast (shading) as a monocular depth cue. As a result, we found that a higher resolution stimulus facilitates depth perception even when the stimulus resolution difference is undetectable. This finding is against the traditional cognitive hierarchy of visual information processing that visual input is processed continuously in a bottom-up cascade of cortical regions that analyze increasingly complex information such as depth information. In addition, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) results reveal that the human middle temporal (MT+) plays a significant role in monocular depth perception. These results might provide us with not only the new insight of our neural mechanism of depth perception but also the future progress of our neural system accompanied by state-of- the-art technologies. PMID:25327168

  17. Seasonal climate forecasts significantly affected by observational uncertainty of Arctic sea ice concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunzel, Felix; Notz, Dirk; Baehr, Johanna; Müller, Wolfgang A.; Fröhlich, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    We investigate how observational uncertainty in satellite-retrieved sea ice concentrations affects seasonal climate predictions. To do so, we initialize hindcast simulations with the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model every 1 May and 1 November from 1981 to 2011 with two different sea ice concentration data sets, one based on the NASA Team and one on the Bootstrap algorithm. For hindcasts started in November, initial differences in Arctic sea ice area and surface temperature decrease rapidly throughout the freezing period. For hindcasts started in May, initial differences in sea ice area increase over time. By the end of the melting period, this causes significant differences in 2 meter air temperature of regionally more than 3°C. Hindcast skill for surface temperatures over Europe and North America is higher with Bootstrap initialization during summer and with NASA Team initialization during winter. This implies that the observational uncertainty also affects forecasts of teleconnections that depend on northern hemispheric climate indices.

  18. Higher Education Financing in the Fifty States: Significance for the 'Adams' States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budig, Jeanne E.; Khan, Anwar

    Findings of a study on higher education financing in the states are summarized with specific reference for the states covered by the 1977 Adams versus Richardson decision. The study, "Higher Education Financing in the Fifty States: Interstate Comparisons" (Marilyn McCoy, D. Kent Halstead), was jointly issued by the National Center for Higher…

  19. Significantly Higher Cytokine and Chemokine Levels in Patients with Japanese Spotted Fever than in Those with Tsutsugamushi Disease

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Hiromichi; Ikegaya, Satoshi; Takada, Nobuhiro; Tamaki, Yukiko; Tabara, Kenji; Ueda, Takanori

    2014-01-01

    Tetracyclines are administered to cure Japanese spotted fever (JSF) and tsutsugamushi disease (TD). It is generally said that the clinical course of JSF is worse than that of TD despite antibiotic treatment. The precise mechanism underlying the more severe clinical course of JSF is not fully understood. We therefore examined whether the differential cytokine profile between these two infectious diseases contributes to the difference in clinical severity. The serum concentrations of various cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-?], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and gamma interferon [IFN-?]) and chemokines (IL-8, interferon-inducible protein 10 [IP-10], monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], macrophage inflammatory protein 1? [MIP-1?], MIP-1?, and eotaxin) were measured in 32 TD and 21 JSF patients. The results showed that serum levels of TNF-? in the acute phases of TD and JSF were significantly increased, with a higher concentration of TNF-? in patients with JSF (mean, 39.9 pg/ml) than in those with TD (mean, 13.8 pg/ml). Comparatively higher levels of other cytokines and chemokines (IL-6, IFN-?, IL-8, IP-10, MCP-1, MIP-1?, and MIP-1?) were also observed in the acute phase of JSF. The clinical severity score (3.67 1.71) of JSF patients was higher than that of TD patients (1.47 0.77). Our findings revealed that the cytokine and chemokine levels in the acute phase of JSF were significantly higher than those in the acute phase of TD. The differential cytokine levels may be related to the difference in clinical severity between JSF and TD. PMID:24671792

  20. The Significance of Blackstone's Understanding of Sovereign Immunity for America's Public Institutions of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Brian A.; Thro, William E.

    2001-01-01

    Asserts that from the perspective of America's public institutions of higher education, Blackstone's greatest legacy is his understanding of sovereign immunity. Explores the similarities between Blackstone's understanding of sovereign immunity and the current jurisprudence of the U.S. Supreme Court. (EV)

  1. The Significance of the African Historical Contribution and Foreign Language Study in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Shirley

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of incorporating African-Caribbean contributions to U.S. history and culture at the level of higher education, such as promoting global interconnectedness, correcting misinformation about African Americans, recognizing and profiting from knowledge acquired by ancient civilizations, and strengthening economic competitiveness.…

  2. Significance of two distinct types of tryptophan synthase beta chain in Bacteria, Archaea and higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Gary; Forst, Christian; Bonner, Carol; Jensen, Roy A

    2002-01-01

    Background Tryptophan synthase consists of two subunits, α and β. Two distinct subgroups of β chain exist. The major group (TrpEb_1) includes the well-studied β chain of Salmonella typhimurium. The minor group of β chain (TrpEb_2) is most frequently found in the Archaea. Most of the amino-acid residues important for catalysis are highly conserved between both TrpE subfamilies. Results Conserved amino-acid residues of TrpEb_1 that make allosteric contact with the TrpEa subunit (the α chain) are absent in TrpEb_2. Representatives of Archaea, Bacteria and higher plants all exist that possess both TrpEb_1 and TrpEb_2. In those prokaryotes where two trpEb genes coexist, one is usually trpEb_1 and is adjacent to trpEa, whereas the second is trpEb_2 and is usually unlinked with other tryptophan-pathway genes. Conclusions TrpEb_1 is nearly always partnered with TrpEa in the tryptophan synthase reaction. However, by default at least six lineages of the Archaea are likely to use TrpEb_2 as the functional β chain, as TrpEb_1 is absent. The six lineages show a distinctive divergence within the overall TrpEa phylogenetic tree, consistent with the lack of selection for amino-acid residues in TrpEa that are otherwise conserved for interfacing with TrpEb_1. We suggest that the standalone function of TrpEb_2 might be to catalyze the serine deaminase reaction, an established catalytic capability of tryptophan synthase β chains. A coincident finding of interest is that the Archaea seem to use the citramalate pathway, rather than threonine deaminase (IlvA), to initiate the pathway of isoleucine biosynthesis. PMID:11806827

  3. Significant food interactions observed with a nifedipine modified-release formulation marketed in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Wonnemann, M; Schug, B; Schmücker, K; Brendel, E; van Zwieten, P A; Blume, H

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the rate and extent of nifedipine bioavailability after single dose administration of Adalat OROS 30 (Reference) and Nifedipine Sandoz retard 30 tablets (Test). Both modified release formulations are marketed in Member States of the European Union. Prior to the clinical study the in vitro dissolution characteristics were investigated. There was a significant pH dependency observed with the Test product but drug release with the Reference product was almost independent of the experimental conditions used. In the subsequent open, randomized, controlled, 4-way crossover study both pharmaceutical products were administered to 28 healthy male volunteers, either after fasting overnight or immediately after a high-fat American breakfast. Blood sampling was performed over 48 hours post-dose for the determination of pharmacokinetic profiles of nifedipine. Considerable differences were observed between the two formulations when administered to fasted subjects where maximum nifedipine plasma concentration (C(max)) were higher in the case of the Test formulation. Differences were even more pronounced after a high-fat American breakfast. Under these conditions a significant food interaction was detected in the case of Nifedipine Sandoz retard 30 with a three-fold increase in the mean C(max) when compared to values obtained in fasting subjects. In contrast, food intake had no clinically relevant effect on bioavailability of nifedipine (rate and extent) in the case of Adalat OROS 30. The pharmacokinetic findings in this study were reflected in the adverse event pattern which indicated a potential tolerability problem in the case of Nifedipine Sandoz retard 30. The results confirm the relationship between the in vitro dissolution profile results and the effects of the drug in vivo. Dose dumping after intake of a high-fat meal could be shown. Nifedipine Sandoz retard 30 is not bioequivalent to Adalat OROS 30 and produced highly variable and poorly predictable nifedipine plasma concentrations. The differences observed between the two products investigated may have direct therapeutic relevance when switching from one formulation to the other and, in particular, when administration conditions change i.e. administration in the fasting state and administration with a meal, since the pharmacological and therapeutic actions of nifedipine are closely associated with the concentration. PMID:16425970

  4. Risk and prognostic significance of tuberculosis in patients from The TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background To assess the risk and the prognostic significance of tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis in patients from The TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database, a multi-centre prospective cohort of HIV-infected patients receiving HIV care in the Asia-Pacific region. Methods The risk of TB diagnosis after recruitment was assessed in patients with prospective follow-up. TB diagnosis was fitted as a time-dependent variable in assessing overall survival. Results At baseline, 22% of patients were diagnosed with TB. TB incidence was 1.98 per 100 person-years during follow up, with predictors including younger age, lower recent CD4 count, duration of antiretroviral treatment, and living in high TB burden countries. Among 3279 patients during 6968 person-years, 142 died (2.04 per 100 person-years). Compared to patients with CDC category A or B illness only, mortality was marginally higher in patients with single Non-TB AIDS defining illness (ADI), or TB only (adjusted HR 1.35, p = 0.173) and highest in patients with multiple non-TB AIDS or both TB and other ADI (adjusted HR 2.21, p < 0.001). Conclusion The risk of TB diagnosis was associated with increasing immunodeficiency and partly reduced by antiretroviral treatment. The prognosis of developing TB appeared to be similar to that following a diagnosis of other non-TB ADI. PMID:19383122

  5. Prognostic Significance of Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio in Patients with Sepsis: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuan; Shen, Yong; Wang, Hairong; Ge, Qinmin; Fei, Aihua; Pan, Shuming

    2016-01-01

    Background. The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is an easily accessible biological marker that has been reported to represent disease severity. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between NLR and mortality in patients with sepsis. Methods. A total of 333 consecutive adult patients with sepsis were screened for eligibility in this prospective, observational study cohort. Severity scores and leukocyte counts were prospectively recorded upon entry to the intensive care unit (ICU). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and binary logistic regression models were used to assess the performance of NLR in predicting unfavorable outcome. Correlations between variables and disease severity were analyzed through Spearman correlation tests. Results. Median NLR levels were significantly higher in patients who died than in survivors. NLR had a modest power for predicting poor outcome as suggested by area under the curve (AUC) of 0.695 ± 0.036. Multivariate linear regression indicated that increased NLR levels were related to unfavorable outcome independently of the effect of possible confounders. Spearman correlation tests showed that there was a positive correlation between NLR levels and disease severity. Conclusions. Increased NLR levels were independently associated with unfavorable clinical prognosis in patients with sepsis. Further investigation is required to increase understanding of the pathophysiology of this relationship. PMID:27110067

  6. 'Carriers of variant luteinizing hormone (V-LH) among 1593 Baltic men have significantly higher serum LH'.

    PubMed

    Punab, A M; Grigorova, M; Punab, M; Adler, M; Kuura, T; Poolamets, O; Vihljajev, V; Žilaitienė, B; Erenpreiss, J; Matulevičius, V; Laan, M

    2015-05-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) is a pituitary heterodimeric glycoprotein essential in male and female reproduction. Its functional polymorphic variant (V-LH) is determined by two missense mutations (rs1800447, A/G, Trp8Arg; rs34349826, A/G, Ile15Thr) in the LH β-subunit encoding gene (LHB; 19q13.3; 1111 bp; 3 exons). Among women, V-LH has been associated with higher circulating LH and reduced fertility, but the knowledge of its effect on male reproductive parameters has been inconclusive. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of V-LH on hormonal, seminal and testicular parameters in the Baltic young men cohort (n = 986; age: 20.1 ± 2.1 years) and Estonian idiopathic infertility patients (n = 607; 35.1 ± 5.9 years). V-LH was detected by genotyping of the underlying DNA polymorphisms using PCR-RFLP combined with resequencing of a random subset of subjects. Genetic associations were tested using linear regression under additive model and results were combined in meta-analysis. No significant difference was detected between young men and infertility patients for the V-LH allele frequency (11.0 vs. 9.3%, respectively). V-LH was associated with higher serum LH in both, the young men cohort (p = 0.022, allelic effect = 0.26 IU/L) and the idiopathic infertility group (p = 0.008, effect = 0.59 IU/L). In meta-analysis, the statistical significance was enhanced (p = 0.0007, resistant to Bonferroni correction for multiple testing; effect = 0.33 IU/L). The detected significant association of V-LH with increased serum LH remained unchanged after additional adjustment for the SNPs previously demonstrated to affect LH levels (FSHB -211G/T, FSHR Asn680Ser, FSHR -29A/G). Additionally, a suggestive trend for association with reduced testicular volume was observed among young men, and with lower serum FSH among infertility patients. The V-LH carrier status did not affect sperm parameters and other circulating reproductive hormones. For the first time, we show a conclusive contribution of V-LH to the natural variance in male serum LH levels. Its downstream clinical consequences are still to be learned. PMID:25820123

  7. Coping with the Sluggish Economy: State Responses to Revenue Shortfalls and Their Significance for Public Schools and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Gale

    Responses of southern states to revenue shortfalls and their significance for public schools and higher education are examined in this report. Many different actions have been take to address state fiscal problems: most strategies require changes in revenue polices that increase taxes and fees or reallocate funds, and many have mandated spending…

  8. A likelihood ratio test to assess the significance of source detections in imaging observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nievas-Rosillo, M.; Contreras, J. L.

    2015-05-01

    A new method to estimate the significance of point source observations carried out by Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes is presented. It is based on a likelihood ratio test procedure under the assumption of a well-known PSF and a smooth background. The method is tested with Monte Carlo simulations based on real observations and its sensitivity is compared to standard methods widely used in IACT Astronomy which do not incorporate PSF information.

  9. Sodium lidar observed gravity wave breaking event and its associated significant sodium sporadic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, C.; Li, T.; Fang, X.; Dou, X.; Xiong, J.; Russell, J. M., III; Wu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    On the night of July 29th, 2013 (UT day 13210), the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) sodium temperature/wind lidar, located at Hefei, China (31N, 117E), observed a significant zonal wind shear of -60 m/s/km near ~100 km between 13:15 and 13:30UT, accompanied with a significant cooling near 96-100 km lasting for 1 hr (13:30-14:30 UT). This suggested a significant gravity wave breaking possibly induced by the dynamic instability. The lidar zonal wind is compared with the wind observed by a meteor radar located at Wuhan, ~200 km west of lidar site, and the lidar temperature is compared with SABER temperature, the results further confirmed this possible significant gravity wave breaking event. After the wave breaking, the sodium density was suddenly enhanced by 10-12 times near 94km. Unlike most sporadic sodium layer (SSL) reported in the literatures, this SSL propagated upward, and passed the west lidar beam around 2min earlier than the east lidar beam (~ 50 km separated in the MLT region). The propagate direction of SSL is agreed with enhanced meridional wind observed by Wuhan meteor radar, indicating that this enhanced sodium layer is likely transported from the north of Hefei.

  10. Observation of a significant excess of pi0pi0 events in B meson decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Shen, B C; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; Van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Biasini, M; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Pioppi, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; De La Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2003-12-12

    We present a study of the decay B0-->pi(0)pi(0) based on a sample of 124 x 10(6) BB pairs recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. We observe 46+/-13+/-3 events, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, corresponding to a significance of 4.2 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties. We measure the branching fraction B(B0-->pi(0)pi(0))=(2.1+/-0.6+/-0.3)x10(-6), averaged over B0 and B(0) decays. PMID:14683107

  11. Serum concentration of alpha-1 antitrypsin is significantly higher in colorectal cancer patients than in healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The association between alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency and colorectal cancer (CRC) is currently controversial. The present study compares AAT serum concentrations and gene frequencies between a group of CRC patients and a control group of healthy unrelated people (HUP). Methods 267 CRC subjects (63% males, 72 ± 10 years old) were enlisted from a Hospital Clinic setting in Asturias, Spain. The HUP group comprised 327 subjects (67% males, mean age 70 ± 7.5 years old) from the same geographical region. Outcome measures were AAT serum concentrations measured by nephelometry, and AAT phenotyping characterization by isoelectric focusing. Results Significantly higher serum concentrations were found among CRC (208 ± 60) than in HUP individuals (144 ± 20.5) (p = 0.0001). No differences were found in the phenotypic distribution of the Pi*S and Pi*Z allelic frequencies (p = 0.639), although the frequency of Pi*Z was higher in CRC (21%) than in HUP subjects (15%). Conclusions The only statistically significant finding in this study was the markedly higher AAT serum concentrations found in CRC subjects compared with HUP controls, irrespective of whether their Pi* phenotype was normal (Pi*MM) or deficient (Pi*MS, Pi*MZ and Pi*SZ). Although there was a trend towards the more deficient Pi* phenotype the more advanced the tumor, the results were inconclusive due to the small sample size. Consequently, more powerful studies are needed to reach firmer conclusions on this matter. PMID:24886427

  12. Tracking Public Funding for Higher Education More Vital as State Budgets Become Strained. "Fact Book" Bulletin: Reporting Significant Trends Affecting Higher Education in the SREB States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This Bulletin focuses on comparing and tracking funding levels for higher education and serves as a complement to the "Fact Book on Higher Education" published by the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB). When appropriations for higher education were adjusted for inflation, they decreased in 23 states between the 2000-2001 and 2001-2002 budget…

  13. Utilizing dimensional analysis with observed data to determine the significance of hydrodynamic solutions in coastal hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Eric D.; Decker, Jeremy D.; Hughes, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the authors present an analysis of the magnitude of the temporal and spatial acceleration (inertial) terms in the surface-water flow equations and determine the conditions under which these inertial terms have sufficient magnitude to be required in the computations. Data from two South Florida field sites are examined and the relative magnitudes of temporal acceleration, spatial acceleration, and the gravity and friction terms are compared. Parameters are derived by using dimensionless numbers and applied to quantify the significance of the hydrodynamic effects. The time series of the ratio of the inertial and gravity terms from field sites are presented and compared with both a simplified indicator parameter and a more complex parameter called the Hydrodynamic Significance Number (HSN). Two test-case models were developed by using the SWIFT2D hydrodynamic simulator to examine flow behavior with and without the inertial terms and compute the HSN. The first model represented one of the previously-mentioned field sites during gate operations of a structure-managed coastal canal. The second model was a synthetic test case illustrating the drainage of water down a sloped surface from an initial stage while under constant flow. The analyses indicate that the times of substantial hydrodynamic effects are sporadic but significant. The simplified indicator parameter correlates much better with the hydrodynamic effect magnitude for a constant width channel such as Miami Canal than at the non-uniform North River. Higher HSN values indicate flow situations where the inertial terms are large and need to be taken into account.

  14. The H3 antagonist ABT-288 is tolerated at significantly higher exposures in subjects with schizophrenia than in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Ahmed A; Haig, George; Florian, Hana; Locke, Charles; Gertsik, Lev; Dutta, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Aims ABT-288 is a potent and selective H3 receptor antagonist with procognitive effects in several preclinical models. In previous studies, 3 mg once daily was the maximal tolerated dose in healthy volunteers. This study characterized the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of ABT-288 in stable subjects with schizophrenia. Methods This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalating study of ABT-288 (10 dose levels, from 1 to 60 mg once daily for 14 days) in stable subjects with schizophrenia treated with an atypical antipsychotic. In each dose group, five to seven and two to three participants were assigned to ABT-288 and placebo, respectively. Results Of the 67 participants enrolled, nine participants (on ABT-288) were prematurely discontinued, in seven of these due to adverse events. ABT-288 was generally safe and tolerated at doses up to 45 mg once daily. The most common adverse events, in decreasing frequency (from 31 to 5%), were abnormal dreams, headache, insomnia, dizziness, somnolence, dysgeusia, dry mouth, psychotic disorder, parosmia and tachycardia. Adverse events causing early termination were psychotic events (four) and increased creatine phosphokinase, pyrexia and insomnia (one each). The half-life of ABT-288 ranged from 28 to 51 h, and steady state was achieved by day 12 of dosing. At comparable multiple doses, ABT-288 exposure in subjects with schizophrenia was 45% lower than that previously observed in healthy subjects. At trough, ABT-288 cerebrospinal fluid concentrations were 40% of the total plasma concentrations. Conclusions ABT-288 was tolerated at a 15-fold higher dose and 12-fold higher exposures in subjects with schizophrenia than previously observed in healthy volunteers. The greater ABT-288 tolerability was not due to limited brain uptake. PMID:24215171

  15. Is indirect exposure a significant contributor to the burden of perfluorinated acids observed in humans?

    PubMed

    D'eon, Jessica C; Mabury, Scott A

    2011-10-01

    In comparison to other persistent organic pollutants, human fluorochemical contamination is relatively complicated. This complication arises at least in part from a disparity between the chemicals used commercially and those measured in the environment and humans. Commercial fluorochemical products are dominated by fluorinated polymers used in textile or carpet applications, or fluorosurfactants used in applications ranging from personal care products, leveling and wetting agents, to greaseproofing food-contact materials. Investigations into environmental and human fluorochemical contamination have focused on perfluorinated acids (PFAs), either the perfluorinated carboxylates (PFCAs) or sulfonates (PFSAs). In this review we will present an overview of data related to human fluorochemical exposure including a discussion of fluorochemical production, concentrations in exposure media, biotransformation processes producing PFAs, and trends in human sera. These data will be presented in the context of how they can inform sources of human PFA contamination, specifically whether the contamination results from direct PFA exposure or indirect exposure via the biotransformation of commercial fluorochemicals or their residuals. Concentrations of both perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) began to decrease in human sera around the year 2000, a change that mirrored the 2000-2002 phase-out of perfluorooctane sulfonyl fluoride (POSF) production. These temporal trends suggest exposure to current-use POSF-based materials was a significant source of PFOA and PFOS exposure prior to 2000. Relatively slow PFOA elimination and increasing concentrations of the C9 and C10 PFCAs in human sera suggest continued PFCA exposure, without similar exposure to PFOS, which is consistent with indirect exposure via the biotransformation of fluorotelomer-based materials. Conversely, human exposure models have suggested direct exposure to PFAs present in food items is the major source of human contamination. The data set presented here cannot unequivocally delineate between direct and indirect human exposure, however temporal trends in human sera and exposure media are consistent with indirect exposure representing a significant portion of observed human PFA contamination. PMID:21630688

  16. Judgments of learning are significantly higher following feedback on relatively good versus relatively poor trials despite no actual learning differences.

    PubMed

    Carter, Michael J; Smith, Victoria; Ste-Marie, Diane M

    2016-02-01

    Studies have consistently shown that prospective metacognitive judgments of learning are often inaccurate because humans mistakenly interpret current performance levels as valid indices of learning. These metacognitive discrepancies are strongly related to conditions of practice. Here, we examined how the type of feedback (after good versus poor trials) received during practice and awareness (aware versus unaware) of this manipulation affected judgments of learning and actual learning. After each six-trial block, participants received feedback on their three best trials or three worst trials and half of the participants were made explicitly aware of the type of feedback they received while the other half were unaware. Judgments of learning were made at the end of each six-trial block and before the 24-h retention test. Results indicated no motor performance differences between groups in practice or retention; however, receiving feedback on relatively good compared to relatively poor trials resulted in significantly higher judgments of learning in practice and retention, irrespective of awareness. These results suggest that KR on relatively good versus relatively poor trials can have dissociable effects on judgments of learning in the absence of actual learning differences, even when participants are made aware of their feedback manipulation. PMID:26599371

  17. What Does "Peer" Mean in Teaching Observation for the Professional Development of Higher Education Lecturers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, Saranne

    2009-01-01

    The observation of teaching remains an integral process for the enhancement of practice as part of academic continuing professional development in higher education in the UK. This paper argues that failure to recognise the potential for peer-orientated development to reinforce restrictive norms of practice will be detrimental to the project of…

  18. Tribes and Territories in the 21st Century: Rethinking the Significance of Disciplines in Higher Education. International Studies in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trowler, Paul, Ed.; Saunders, Murray, Ed.; Bamber, Veronica, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The "tribes and territories" metaphor for the cultures of academic disciplines and their roots in different knowledge characteristics has been used by those interested in university life and work since the early 1990s. This book draws together research, data and theory to show how higher education has gone through major change since then and how…

  19. Geophysical Observations Supporting Significant Variation in ice Thickness of Western Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. S.; Luyendyk, B. P.; Sorlien, C. C.; Stone, J.

    2001-12-01

    Several glacially carved troughs with depths exceeding 1 km below sea level have been mapped using sonar in the continental shelf offshore from western Marie Byrd Land. Additional troughs are inferred from gravity anomalies mapped by airborne geophysics over the Sulzberger Ice Shelf. Especially significant is a trough under the northern Sulzberger Ice Shelf, continuing downstream from the Hammond Glacier, with modeled maximum depths of 2.1-2.4 km. Modern ice near most of these troughs is not thick enough for ice to ground at their deepest points by simple lowering of sea level. Because many of these troughs are carved in crystalline basement, many glacial advance/retreat cycles are required to carve the troughs to their observed depths, and ice thickness over most of the drainage areas must have repeatedly been many hundreds of meters greater than the present thickness. Other evidence indicates substantial change in erosion style over the Neogene. Using airborne radar, we have mapped a smooth plateau in the bedrock surface under grounded ice of the Shirase Coast at depths mostly 300-400 m below sea level. Our coverage shows this plateau is 50-75 km wide and extends at least 250 km from near the end of Ice Stream E at 143W to Prestrud Inlet at 156W. We mapped a similar plateau in the Ross Sea southwest of Cape Colbeck. Seismic data in the Ross Sea show the plateau surface eroded into units as young as 19-24 Ma glacial marine sediments, identified by correlation to DSDP Site 270. One possible interpretation is that the plateau was beveled by an earlier form of Ice Stream E, before incision of its present bed 200-400 m lower. A speculative alternative interpretation is that the plateau surface formed by subaerial and wave-base erosion at a fairly ice-free time, probably during Middle Miocene time.

  20. The significance of some observations on African ocular onchocerciasis described by Jean Hissette (1888-1965).

    PubMed

    Kluxen, G; Hoerauf, A

    2008-01-01

    One of the most significant contributions to tropical medicine and ophthalmology was made by Jean Hissette: African ocular onchocerciasis. During his extensive investigations in the Babindi country, he found numerous adults with river blindness. Their eye disease was caused by the filaria Onchocerca volvulus Leuckart. He noticed the signs of interstitial keratitis and band keratopathy, faint iritis or iridocyclitis, posterior synechiae and often a downward distortion of the pupil. He was the first to describe chorioretinal scarring of the fundus, what became known as the Hissette-Ridley fundus. People reported to him their entoptic phenomena which he unequivocally interpreted to be the images of microfilariae in the patient's own eye. During his stay in Belgium in 1932, he elucidated the pathogenesis of blindness since he was able to provide histological proof of the presence of microfilariae in various ocular tissues of an enucleated eye from a patient living near the Sankuru river. Like other serious health impairments, the severe inflammatory lesions in the eye occurred only after the microfilariae had died. Hence he realized that dying microfilariae play a key role in the mechanisms leading to blindness. Hissette's precise descriptions were the logical fruit of his outstanding observational abilities and enabled him as a man of great intuition to speculate about causal relationships. He evidently benefited from the fact that he took the native Africans seriously and asked them their opinion. In 1933, his friend and teacher Dr. De Mets in Antwerp already wrote on Hissette's discovery in the Belgian Congo: "This study is of exceptional value to specialists which is not only a tribute to its author, but to our common native country (Belgium)." PMID:18546927

  1. Antibody treatment against pulmonary exposure to abrin confers significantly higher levels of protection than treatment against ricin intoxication.

    PubMed

    Sabo, Tamar; Gal, Yoav; Elhanany, Eitan; Sapoznikov, Anita; Falach, Reut; Mazor, Ohad; Kronman, Chanoch

    2015-09-01

    Abrin, a potent plant-derived toxin bearing strong resemblance to ricin, irreversibly inactivates ribosomes by site-specific depurination, thereby precipitating cessation of protein synthesis in cells. Due to its high availability and ease of preparation, abrin is considered a biological threat, especially in context of bioterror warfare. To date, there is no established therapeutic countermeasure against abrin intoxication. In the present study, we examined the progress of pulmonary abrin intoxication in mice, evaluated the protective effect of antibody-based post-exposure therapy, and compared these findings to those observed for ricin intoxication and therapy. Salient features of abrin intoxication were found to be similar to those of ricin and include massive recruitment of neutrophils to the lungs, high levels of pro-inflammatory markers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and damage of the alveolar-capillary barrier. In contrast, the protective effect of anti-abrin antibody treatment was found to differ significantly from that of anti-ricin treatment. While anti-ricin treatment efficiency was quite limited even at 24h post-exposure (34% protection), administration of polyclonal anti-abrin antibodies even as late as 72h post-exposure, conferred exceedingly high-level protection (>70%). While both anti-toxin antibody treatments caused neutrophil and macrophage levels in the lungs to revert to normal, only anti-abrin treatment brought about a significant decline in the pulmonary levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. The differential ability of the anti-toxin treatments to dampen inflammation caused by the two similar toxins, abrin and ricin, could explain the radically different levels of protection achieved following antibody treatment. PMID:26051443

  2. Significance of preoperatively observed detrusor overactivity as a predictor of continence status early after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yanagiuchi, Akihiro; Miyake, Hideaki; Tanaka, Kazushi; Fujisawa, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Several recent studies have reported the involvement of bladder dysfunction in the delayed recovery of urinary continence following radical prostatectomy (RP). The objective of this study was to investigate the significance of detrusor overactivity (DO) as a predictor of the early continence status following robot-assisted RP (RARP). This study included 84 consecutive patients with prostate cancer undergoing RARP. Urodynamic studies, including filling cystometry, pressure flow study, electromyogram of the external urethral sphincter and urethral pressure profile, were performed in these patients before surgery. Urinary continence was defined as the use of either no or one pad per day as a precaution only. DO was preoperatively observed in 30 patients (35.7%), and 55 (65.5%) and 34 (40.5%) were judged to be incontinent 1 and 3 months after RARP, respectively. At both 1 and 3 months after RARP, the incidences of incontinence in patients with DO were significantly higher than in those without DO. Of several demographic and urodynamic parameters, univariate analyses identified DO and maximal urethral closure pressure (MUCP) as significant predictors of the continence status at both 1 and 3 months after RARP. Furthermore, DO and MUCP appeared to be independently associated with the continence at both 1 and 3 months after RARP on multivariate analysis. These findings suggest that preoperatively observed DO could be a significant predictor of urinary incontinence early after RARP; therefore, it is recommended to perform urodynamic studies for patients who are scheduled to undergo RARP in order to comprehensively evaluate their preoperative vesicourethral functions. PMID:25038181

  3. 48 CFR 1553.216-70 - EPA Form 1900-41A, CPAF Contract Summary of Significant Performance Observation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Contract Summary of Significant Performance Observation. 1553.216-70 Section 1553.216-70 Federal... 1553.216-70 EPA Form 1900-41A, CPAF Contract Summary of Significant Performance Observation. As prescribed in 1516.404-278, EPA Form 1900-41A shall be used to document significant performance...

  4. 48 CFR 1553.216-70 - EPA Form 1900-41A, CPAF Contract Summary of Significant Performance Observation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Contract Summary of Significant Performance Observation. 1553.216-70 Section 1553.216-70 Federal... 1553.216-70 EPA Form 1900-41A, CPAF Contract Summary of Significant Performance Observation. As prescribed in 1516.404-278, EPA Form 1900-41A shall be used to document significant performance...

  5. 48 CFR 1553.216-70 - EPA Form 1900-41A, CPAF Contract Summary of Significant Performance Observation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Contract Summary of Significant Performance Observation. 1553.216-70 Section 1553.216-70 Federal... 1553.216-70 EPA Form 1900-41A, CPAF Contract Summary of Significant Performance Observation. As prescribed in 1516.404-278, EPA Form 1900-41A shall be used to document significant performance...

  6. 48 CFR 1553.216-70 - EPA Form 1900-41A, CPAF Contract Summary of Significant Performance Observation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Contract Summary of Significant Performance Observation. 1553.216-70 Section 1553.216-70 Federal... 1553.216-70 EPA Form 1900-41A, CPAF Contract Summary of Significant Performance Observation. As prescribed in 1516.404-278, EPA Form 1900-41A shall be used to document significant performance...

  7. 48 CFR 1553.216-70 - EPA Form 1900-41A, CPAF Contract Summary of Significant Performance Observation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Contract Summary of Significant Performance Observation. 1553.216-70 Section 1553.216-70 Federal... 1553.216-70 EPA Form 1900-41A, CPAF Contract Summary of Significant Performance Observation. As prescribed in 1516.404-278, EPA Form 1900-41A shall be used to document significant performance...

  8. How Different Are Higher Education Institutions in the UK, US and Australia? The Significance of Government Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodie, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Governments in the UK and many other countries have long sought to promote the diversity of their higher education institutions. However, diversity is hard to define, harder to measure and even more difficult to compare between countries. Most empirical analyses of the diversity of higher education systems use categorical variables, which shape…

  9. How Different Are Higher Education Institutions in the UK, US and Australia? The Significance of Government Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodie, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Governments in the UK and many other countries have long sought to promote the diversity of their higher education institutions. However, diversity is hard to define, harder to measure and even more difficult to compare between countries. Most empirical analyses of the diversity of higher education systems use categorical variables, which shape

  10. Observation of warm, higher energy electrons transiting a double layer in a helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Yung-Ta Li, Yan; Scharer, John E.

    2015-03-15

    Measurements of an inductive RF helicon argon plasma double layer with two temperature electron distributions including a fast (>80 eV) tail are observed at 0.17 mTorr Ar pressure. The fast, untrapped electrons observed downstream of the double layer have a higher temperature (13 eV) than the trapped (T{sub e} = 4 eV) electrons. The reduction of plasma potential and density observed in the double layer region would require an upstream temperature ten times the measured 4 eV if occurring via Boltzmann ambipolar expansion. The experimental observation in Madison helicon experiment indicates that fast electrons with substantial density fractions can be created at low helicon operating pressures.

  11. Image enhancement filters significantly improve reading performance for low vision observers.

    PubMed

    Lawton, T B

    1992-04-01

    As people age, so do their photoreceptors; many photoreceptors in central vision stop functioning when a person reaches their late sixties or early seventies. Low vision observers with losses in central vision, those with age-related maculopathies, were studied. Low vision observers no longer see high spatial frequencies, being unable to resolve fine edge detail. We developed image enhancement filters to compensate for the low vision observer's losses in contrast sensitivity to intermediate and high spatial frequencies. The filters work by boosting the amplitude of the less visible intermediate spatial frequencies. The lower spatial frequencies. These image enhancement filters not only reduce the magnification needed for reading by up to 70%, but they also increase the observer's reading speed by 2-4 times. A summary of this research is presented. PMID:1408172

  12. Image enhancement filters significantly improve reading performance for low vision observers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, T. B.

    1992-01-01

    As people age, so do their photoreceptors; many photoreceptors in central vision stop functioning when a person reaches their late sixties or early seventies. Low vision observers with losses in central vision, those with age-related maculopathies, were studied. Low vision observers no longer see high spatial frequencies, being unable to resolve fine edge detail. We developed image enhancement filters to compensate for the low vision observer's losses in contrast sensitivity to intermediate and high spatial frequencies. The filters work by boosting the amplitude of the less visible intermediate spatial frequencies. The lower spatial frequencies. These image enhancement filters not only reduce the magnification needed for reading by up to 70 percent, but they also increase the observer's reading speed by 2-4 times. A summary of this research is presented.

  13. Patient Age Is Significantly Related to the Progression of Papillary Microcarcinoma of the Thyroid Under Observation

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yasuhiro; Kihara, Minoru; Higashiyama, Takuya; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Miya, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    Background: We showed previously that subclinical low-risk papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) could be observed without immediate surgery. Patient age is an important prognostic factor of clinical papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). In this study, we investigated how patient age influences the observation of low-risk PTMC. Methods: Between 1993 and 2011, 1235 patients with low-risk PTMC chose observation without immediate surgery. They were followed periodically with ultrasound examinations. These patients were enrolled in this study. We divided them into three subsets based on age at the beginning of observation: young (<40 years), middle-aged (40–59 years), and old patients (≥60 years). Observation periods ranged from 18 to 227 months (average 75 months). Results: We set three parameters for the evaluation of PTMC progression: (i) size enlargement, (ii) novel appearance of lymph-node metastasis, and (iii) progression to clinical disease (tumor size reaching 12 mm or larger, or novel appearance of nodal metastasis). The proportion of patients with PTMC progression was lowest in the old patients and highest in the young patients. On multivariate analysis, young age was an independent predictor of PTMC progression. However, none of the 1235 patients showed distant metastasis or died of PTC during observation. Although only 51 patients (4%) underwent thyrotropin (TSH) suppression based on physician preference, the PTMC of all patients enrolled in this TSH suppression study, except one, were clinically stable. To date, 191 patients underwent surgery for various reasons after observation. None showed recurrence except for one in the residual thyroid, and none died of PTC after surgery. Conclusions: Old patients with subclinical low-risk PTMC may be the best candidates for observation. Although PTMC in young patients may be more progressive than in older patients, it might not be too late to perform surgery after subclinical PTMC has progressed to clinical disease, regardless of patient age. PMID:24001104

  14. No significant independent relationships with cardiometabolic biomarkers were detected in the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg study population☆

    PubMed Central

    Alkerwi, Ala'a; Shivappa, Nitin; Crichton, Georgina; Hébert, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been an influx of research interest regarding the anti-inflammatory role that diet has in chronic and metabolic diseases. A literature-based dietary inflammatory index (DII) that can be used to characterize the inflammation-modulating capacity of individuals’ diets has even been developed and validated in an American population. We hypothesized that the DII could predict levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), which is an important inflammatory marker, as well as metabolic measures that include the metabolic syndrome and its components in European adults. This hypothesis was tested according to data from 1352 participants from the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg study, a nationwide, cross-sectional survey based in Luxembourg. Statistical methods consisted of descriptive and multivariable logistic regression analyses. The DII ranged from a minimum of −4.02 (most anti-inflammatory) to a maximum of 4.00 points, with a mean value of −0.41. Participants with higher DII score were significantly younger and had lower body mass index, waist circumferences, and systolic blood pressure levels. Other cardiovascular biomarkers including diastolic blood pressure, CRP, lipids, and glycemic biomarkers did not vary significantly across DII tertiles. Participants with proinflammatory (>1) DII scores had increased adjusted odds (odds ratio, 1.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-2.13) of having a low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, compared with those with anti-inflammatory scores (DII ≤1). There were no significant relationships between high-sensitivity CRP and the DII. This study, which tested the inflammatory capacity of the DII outside the United States, did not detect a significant independent relationship with cardiometabolic biomarkers, by using Food Frequency Questionnaire–collected data. These results are informative and representative of a relevant step in directing future research for nutrition and diet quality. PMID:25190219

  15. Observation of Significant Quantum Efficiency Enhancement from a Polarized Photocathode with Distributed Brag Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shukui; Poelker, Matthew; Stutzman, Marcy L.; Chen, Yiqiao; Moy, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    Polarized photocathodes with higher Quantum efficiency (QE) would help to reduce the technological challenge associated with producing polarized beams at milliampere levels, because less laser light would be required, which simplifies photocathode cooling requirements. And for a given amount of available laser power, higher QE would extend the photogun operating lifetime. The distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) concept was proposed to enhance the QE of strained-superlattice photocathodes by increasing the absorption of the incident photons using a Fabry-Perot cavity formed between the front surface of the photocathode and the substrate that includes a DBR, without compromising electron polarization. Here we present recent results showing QE enhancement of a GaAs/GaAsP strained-superlattice photocathode made with a DBR structure. Typically, a GaAs/GaAsP strained-superlattice photocathode without DBR provides a QE of 1%, at a laser wavelength corresponding to peak polarization. In comparison, the GaAs/GaAsP strained-superlattice photocathodes with DBR exhibited an enhancement of over 2 when the incident laser wavelength was tuned to meet the resonant condition for the Fabry-Perot resonator.

  16. Teenagers' Significant Experiences in Aesthetic Areas: Some Empirical Observations Regarding the Role of Dramatic Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnas, Leif

    2008-01-01

    Fifteen sixteen-year-old Fenno-Swedish compulsory school pupils' descriptions and evaluations of significant, i.e. more or less "strong", experiences relating to dramatic art (film, theatre) were analysed and compared with reported experiences in other aesthetic areas (music, nature etc.). The drama area was represented in many experiences, but…

  17. Observational constraints on mixed-phase clouds imply higher climate sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ivy; Storelvmo, Trude; Zelinka, Mark D.

    2016-04-01

    Global climate model (GCM) estimates of the equilibrium global mean surface temperature response to a doubling of atmospheric CO2, measured by the equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS), range from 2.0° to 4.6°C. Clouds are among the leading causes of this uncertainty. Here we show that the ECS can be up to 1.3°C higher in simulations where mixed-phase clouds consisting of ice crystals and supercooled liquid droplets are constrained by global satellite observations. The higher ECS estimates are directly linked to a weakened cloud-phase feedback arising from a decreased cloud glaciation rate in a warmer climate. We point out the need for realistic representations of the supercooled liquid fraction in mixed-phase clouds in GCMs, given the sensitivity of the ECS to the cloud-phase feedback.

  18. Observational constraints on mixed-phase clouds imply higher climate sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ivy; Storelvmo, Trude; Zelinka, Mark D

    2016-04-01

    Global climate model (GCM) estimates of the equilibrium global mean surface temperature response to a doubling of atmospheric CO2, measured by the equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS), range from 2.0° to 4.6°C. Clouds are among the leading causes of this uncertainty. Here we show that the ECS can be up to 1.3°C higher in simulations where mixed-phase clouds consisting of ice crystals and supercooled liquid droplets are constrained by global satellite observations. The higher ECS estimates are directly linked to a weakened cloud-phase feedback arising from a decreased cloud glaciation rate in a warmer climate. We point out the need for realistic representations of the supercooled liquid fraction in mixed-phase clouds in GCMs, given the sensitivity of the ECS to the cloud-phase feedback. PMID:27124459

  19. Ecological observations on the molluscs of significance in the transmission of bilharziasis in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Teesdale, C.

    1962-01-01

    Further knowledge of the bionomics of bilharziasis vectors is necessary before more effective measures can be taken to control them. Such knowledge, acquired from long-term observations in a variety of habitats, should help to fill some of the gaps in knowledge of molluscan ecology. The present studies were conducted over a period of three to five years and included observations on the proved and suspected vectors of bilharziasis in Kenya. Records were kept of seasonal and regional distribution of the snails, population dynamics and infection rates. Seasonal distribution normally conformed to a definite pattern but was often so influenced by unseasonable weather and interference by man as to render it unrecognizable. Temperature, water fluctuations, types and amount of vegetation, dissolved oxygen and other physical and chemical characteristics of the water were recorded and an attempt was made to assess the importance of the changes in such environmental factors on the prevalence of the snails studied. No correlation could be found between vegetational changes in the habitat and the number of snails present, but complete coverage of the water surface with horizontal vegetation tended to an absence of snails. Except for torrential floods, water fluctuations seemed to have no effect on snail numbers and the chemical and physical properties of the water of negative habitats appeared to be within the range of tolerance of the species observed. It was not found possible to assess the effects of small temperature changes on reproduction in snails; it is suggested that further trials are justified. There was no obvious effect on numbers when snails were found with predators in the same habitat. Many otherwise adequate habitats were unintentionally rendered unsuitable for vector snails by direct interference by man. PMID:13980432

  20. Sediments of deep canadian shield lakes: observations of gross structure and biological significance.

    PubMed

    Emery, A R

    1973-08-17

    Sediments of deep Canadian shield lakes have a firm mud-water interface and an intricately structured, oxygenated surface. Surface relief is not uniform, but is broken by small ridges and upright chironomid tubes. The sedimentary material behaves like a weak jelly and becomes flocculent only when violently disturbed. Sculpins were observed to rest on and, when started, to hide in the oxygenated layers. Sequestering of nutrients in the bottom sediments is enhanced by the structuring of the substrate surface below 10 meters, and may inhibit nutrient recycling at overturn. PMID:17736979

  1. Avoidance tests with earthworms and springtails: defining the minimum exposure time to observe a significant response.

    PubMed

    Natal-da-Luz, Tiago; Amorim, Mnica J B; Rmbke, Jrg; Sousa, Jos Paulo

    2008-10-01

    Based on the ability of organisms to avoid contaminated soils, avoidance tests have a great potential as early screening tools in lower tier levels of ERA schemes. Aiming at their standardization, the definition of the minimum exposure time necessary to observe an avoidance response to a contaminant is needed. To fill this gap, avoidance tests with earthworms (Eisenia andrei) and springtails (Folsomia candida), comparing distinct time periods (from 1-7 to 1-14 days, respectively), were performed using the artificial OECD soil and reference chemicals for each test organism. Results showed that for both organisms a clear response within 24 h of exposure can be obtained. This rapid response enhances the utility of the test for "on site" analysis to evaluate contaminated sites. PMID:18006058

  2. Experimental Observations on the Biological Significance of Hydrogen Sulfide in Carotid Body Chemoreception.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Martin, T; Agapito, T; Ramirez, M; Olea, E; Yubero, S; Rocher, A; Gomez-Niño, A; Obeso, A; Gonzalez, C

    2015-01-01

    The cascade of transduction of hypoxia and hypercapnia, the natural stimuli to chemoreceptor cells, is incompletely understood. A particular gap in that knowledge is the role played by second messengers, or in a most ample term, of modulators. A recently described modulator of chemoreceptor cell responses is the gaseous transmitter hydrogen sulfide, which has been proposed as a specific activator of the hypoxic responses in the carotid body, both at the level of the chemoreceptor cell response or at the level of the global output of the organ. Since sulfide behaves in this regard as cAMP, we explored the possibility that sulfide effects were mediated by the more classical messenger. Data indicate that exogenous and endogenous sulfide inhibits adenyl cyclase finding additionally that inhibition of adenylyl cyclase does not modify chemoreceptor cell responses elicited by sulfide. We have also observed that transient receptor potential cation channels A1 (TRPA1) are not regulated by sulfide in chemoreceptor cells. PMID:26303462

  3. Random walker in temporally deforming higher-order potential forces observed in a financial crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kota; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

    2009-11-01

    Basic peculiarities of market price fluctuations are known to be well described by a recently developed random-walk model in a temporally deforming quadratic potential force whose center is given by a moving average of past price traces [M. Takayasu, T. Mizuno, and H. Takayasu, Physica A 370, 91 (2006)]. By analyzing high-frequency financial time series of exceptional events, such as bubbles and crashes, we confirm the appearance of higher-order potential force in the markets. We show statistical significance of its existence by applying the information criterion. This time series analysis is expected to be applied widely for detecting a nonstationary symptom in random phenomena.

  4. Neuroacanthocytosis: Observations, Theories and Perspectives on the Origin and Significance of Acanthocytes

    PubMed Central

    Adjobo-Hermans, Merel J. W.; Cluitmans, Judith C. A.; Bosman, Giel J. C. G. M.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of acanthocytes in the blood is characteristic of patients suffering from neuroacanthocytosis (NA). Recent studies have described abnormal phosphorylation of the proteins involved in connecting the membrane and cytoskeleton in patient-derived erythrocytes. The involvement of lipids in the underlying signaling pathways and recent reports on in vitro disease-associated lipid alterations support renewed research into lipid composition, signal transduction, and metabolism in patient erythrocytes. In addition to morphology, changes in membrane organization affect erythrocyte function and survival. Patient erythrocytes may have a decreased ability to deform, and this may contribute to accelerated erythrocyte removal and a decreased oxygen supply, especially in vulnerable brain regions. The presently available data indicate that acanthocytes are likely to originate in the bone marrow, making erythropoiesis an obvious new focus in NA research. Moreover, new, detailed morphological observations indicate that acanthocytes may be the tip of the iceberg with regard to misshapen erythrocytes in the circulation of patients with NA. A systematic assessment of patient erythrocyte morphology, deformability, oxygen delivery, and metabolism will be instrumental in determining the putative contribution of erythrocyte function to NA clinical symptoms. PMID:26317043

  5. Significant reduction in arc frequency biased solar cells: Observations, diagnostics, and mitigation technique(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upschulte, B. L.; Weyl, G. M.; Marinelli, W. J.; Aifer, E.; Hastings, D.; Snyder, D.

    1991-01-01

    A variety of experiments were performed which identify key factors contributing to the arcing of negatively biased high voltage solar cells. These efforts have led to reduction of greater than a factor of 100 in the arc frequency of a single cell following proper remediation procedures. Experiments naturally lead to and focussed on the adhesive/encapsulant that is used to bond the protective cover slip to the solar cell. An image-intensified charge coupled device (CCD) camera system recorded UV emission from arc events which occurred exclusively along the interfacial edge between the cover slip and the solar cell. Microscopic inspection of this interfacial region showed a bead of encapsulant along this entire edge. Elimination of this encapsulant bead reduced the arc frequency by two orders of magnitude. Water contamination was also identified as a key contributor which enhances arcing of the encapsulant bead along the solar cell edge. Spectrally resolved measurements of the observable UV light shows a feature assignable to OH(A-X) electronic emission, which is common for water contaminated discharges. Experiments in which the solar cell temperature was raised to 85 C showed a reduced arcing frequency, suggesting desorption of H2O. Exposing the solar cell to water vapor was shown to increase the arcing frequency. Clean dry gases such as O2, N2, and Ar show no enhancement of the arcing rate. Elimination of the exposed encapsulant eliminates any measurable sensitivity to H2O vapor.

  6. Significantly higher occurrence of Cryptosporidium infection in Roma children compared with non-Roma children in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Hasajová, A; Valenčáková, A; Malčeková, B; Danišová, O; Halán, M; Goldová, M; Sak, B; Květoňová, D; Kváč, M; Halánová, M

    2014-08-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is considered to be a widespread world zoonosis. The occurrence of Cryptosporidium species was investigated in Roma children in a district of Eastern Slovakia and, at the same time, also in children of non-Roma parents. In total, 103 children (54 boys and 49 girls) between 0 and 14 years of age were involved in this study. Fifty-three were Roma children and 50 children represented a non-Roma control group. Fecal samples were examined: immunologically [enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test to prove antigen in the feces] and by molecular analysis [nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR)]. After the sequencing of the PCR, the products were identified as species of Cryptosporidium muris. Based on the results, the relative risk (RR) of the Cryptosporidium infection occurrence was calculated and we came to the conclusion that the risk of Cryptosporidium infection was almost 12 times higher in the Roma children compared to the non-Roma children. PMID:24619113

  7. Ecohydrological significance of observed power-law distributions of tree canopy cluster sizes for savanna vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, T. M.; Caylor, K. K.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.

    2004-05-01

    Savanna ecosystems are characterized by sparse tree cover, the pattern of which can provide insight into the processes by which these systems are shaped and maintained. Since water is often considered to be the limiting factor for savanna vegetation, we used mean wet season rainfall (MWSR) as the basis for the selection of six sites along the Kalahari Transect, a north-south aridity gradient in southern Africa. MWSR ranged from 879 mm to 216 mm from the wettest to most arid site, and the corresponding fractional tree cover ranged from 0.65 to 0.04. IKONOS satellite images, having a resolution of 4m in the multi-spectral bands, were acquired for each of these sites and tree canopies were identified by merging the remotely-sensed normalized difference vegetation index data with information taken from ground-based surveys. Analysis of the tree canopy cluster size distributions showed the wettest site to deviate from a power-law distribution as a result of the fractional cover being above the four-neighbor percolation threshold for a square lattice. Four of the five other sites, however, were characterized by distinct power-law distributions, despite having substantially disparate fractional covers. Simple random neutral models were insufficient in describing the tree clustering patterns of the observed savanna landscape, leading us to seek fundamental interactions that could explain the consistent spatial organization. In particular, our cellular automata approach focuses on water use by the savanna vegetation, and how annual variability in this limiting resource can lead to emergent pattern formation.

  8. Kimberlite-Clan-Rocks in India: Significance of new VGP, T, and GP Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggerty, S. E.

    2005-05-01

    Although India is acknowledged for the first description of diamond some 2000 BCE, it should also rightfully be credited for the 17th C recognition that diamond is a product of volcanism. With this extraordinary background, it is surprising that the host rocks remain controversial, being neither archetypical kimberlites, nor classic lamproites. Lacking affinities to micro-diamond-bearing UHPT metamorphic rocks and being unequivocally volcanic, the term Kimberlite-Clan-Rock (KCR) is applied. Over 200 KCR pipes and dikes, many of which are richly mineralized, have recently been discovered in the Diamond Corridor (1000 x 200 km) of the Eastern Dharwar Craton, and in adjoining cratons to the N and NE. From 32 absolute age determinations on KCRs, the remaining intrusions, in comparable stratigraphic settings, are assumed to be 1.1 Ga, equivalent to the Argyle lamproite (Australia, highest diamond grade), and the Premier kimberlite (RSA, largest known diamond). India has the largest number of known Proterozoic KCR intrusions that over the centuries have produced a wealth of famous diamonds. The primary source of these extraordinary stones, however, remains unknown, possibly because the unusual host rocks defy conventional exploration protocols. Six new observations make the setting even more unusual: (1) Coeval, large scale magmatism in the Kalahari (>2 m sq km) and Laurentian (>300 k cub km) Cratons at 1085-1112 Ma, during assembly of Rodinia, confirms the relation between and among KCR volcanism, LIPs, and supercontinents; Proterozoic Rodinia, into which the India KCRs, Argyle and Premier were intruded, was constructive, whereas the other, globally-wide, diamond-intrusive event, that occurred during the Mesozoic (80-120 Ma), was related to the breakup of Pangea and the dispersion of Gondwana; both events occurred during long period geomagnetic chrons implying a core relation, and superplume activity from the CMB. (2)The transcontinental Mumbai-Chennai gravity lineament that separates diamond (North) from barren (South) KCRs is interpreted as a sub-lithospheric, architectural discontinuity, with a shallow keel to the N and deeper penertration to the S. (3)An intrusive carbonatite stock into one KCR, and intensely carbonatized xenoliths in another, has rekindled the unsettled VGP debate of kimberlite-carbonatite relations; the new discoveries strongly support a kinship. (4) An eclogite xenolith from Kaliandurg has euhedral inclusions of re-equilibrated majorite in garnet; the assemblage has important implications for depths of origin (in or close to the TZ), and the controversial issue of Archean ocean crust recycling, recognizing that there are other ways to generate mantle eclogites. (5) Heterogeneities in the source regions of KCRs, and in the degrees of mantle melting, metasomatism and mixing, are well displayed in the Chigicherla KCR cluster; CC5 has unprecedented 2-10cm diameter autoliths (ol + cc + sp + perv), that are partially to totally assimilated in closely associated bodies, or are absent in others; (6)Groundmass olivine in KCRs from Naryanpet (non-diamond) and Wajrakur (diamond-bearing) have densely packed, crystal-oriented laths of rutile in association with blebs of metal + sulfide; these intergrowths bear on the unresolved solubility of Ti in olivine and its appeal to super high P-T conditions in diamond and coesite-bearing metamorphic terrains; the KCR settings, however, imply crystallization of olivine at low P, coupled with or followed by Ti metasomatism. With increased activities in diamond exploration many more VGP, T and GP mantle revelations are expected from this geologically classic and historically important part of the sub-continent.

  9. Low Carbon Rice Farming Practices in the Mekong Delta Yield Significantly Higher Profits and Lower Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudek, J.; Van Sanh, N.; Tinh, T. K.; Tin, H. Q.; Thu Ha, T.; Pha, D. N.; Cui, T. Q.; Tin, N. H.; Son, N. N.; Thanh, H. H.; Kien, H. T.; Kritee, K.; Ahuja, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Vietnam Low-Carbon Rice Project (VLCRP) seeks to significantly reduce GHG emissions from rice cultivation, an activity responsible for more than 30% of Vietnam's overall GHG emissions, while improving livelihoods for the rice farmer community by decreasing costs and enhancing yield as well as providing supplemental farmer income through the sale of carbon credits. The Mekong Delta makes up 12% of Vietnam's land area, but produces more than 50% of the country's rice, including more than 90% of the rice for export. Rice cultivation is the main source of income for 80% of farmers in the Mekong Delta. VLCRP was launched in late 2012 in the Mekong Delta in two major rice production provinces, Kien Giang and An Giang. To date, VLCRP has completed 11 crop seasons (in Kien Giang and An Giang combined), training over 400 farmer households in applying VLCRP's package of practices (known as 1 Must - 6 Reductions) and building technical capacity to its key stakeholders and rice farmer community leaders. By adopting the 1 Must- 6 Reductions practices (including reduced seeding density, reduced fertilizer and pesticide application, and alternative wetting and drying water management), rice farmers reduce their input costs while maintaining or improving yields, and decreasing greenhouse gas emissions. The VLCRP package of practices also deliver other environmental and social co-benefits, such as reduced water pollution, improved habitat for fishery resources and reduced health risks for farmers through the reduction of agri-chemicals. VLCRP farmers use significantly less inputs (50% reduction in seed, 30% reduction in fertilizer, 40-50% reduction in water) while improving yields 5-10%, leading to an increase in profit from 10% to as high as 60% per hectare. Preliminary results indicate that the 1 Must- 6 Reductions practices have led to approximately 40-65% reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, equivalent to 4 tons of CO2e/ha/yr in An Giang and 35 tons of CO2e/ha/yr in KienGiang. The greenhouse gas reductions in Kien Giang are the highest reductions we have been able to find in the literature. Both methane and nitrous oxide emissions were measured using chambers, on a weekly basis for methane and for 5 or more days for nitrous oxide following critical events, such as fertilizer application or soil dry down periods.

  10. Acetic acid dimers in a nitrogen matrix: Observation of structures containing the higher-energy conformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Susy; Domanskaya, Alexandra V.; Räsänen, Markku; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Fausto, Rui

    2015-09-01

    Acetic acid (AA) dimers are studied experimentally by infrared spectroscopy in a N2 matrix and theoretically at the MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) level of approximation. This work is focused on the first preparation and characterization of structures containing the higher-energy (cis) conformer of AA. Nine trans-trans, fourteen trans-cis, and six cis-cis dimers are theoretically predicted. Five trans-trans and a number of trans-cis dimers are identified in the experiments, but no indication of cis-cis dimers is found. Two trans-trans dimers and the trans-cis dimers are reported for the first time. One trans-cis dimer is prepared by selective vibrational excitation of the structurally related trans-trans dimer, which converts one of the trans subunits to the cis form. Several trans-cis dimers are obtained by annealing of a matrix containing both trans and cis monomers of AA. Tunneling-induced conversion of the trans-cis dimers into trans-trans forms (including two new trans-trans forms) is observed at low temperatures.

  11. Observer-based higher order sliding mode control for large optical astronomical telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wangping; Ye, Xiaoling; Guo, Wei; Wu, Zhonghua

    2009-05-01

    In order to study more remote universe and the detailed structures of near stars, large-scale astronomical telescopes are very needed with the development of astronomy and astrophysics. In this trend, astronomical telescope becomes more and more huge, which leads its driving system to bear heavy nonlinear disturbances. The increased nonlinear disturbances especially caused by friction torque in the control system can easily bring tingle and stick-slip phenomena when the telescope tracks an object with an ultra-low velocity. However, conventional control approaches are difficult to realize high-precision controls and can decrease the quality of a telescope's observations. Therefore, it will be of significance in theory and in practice to develop an advanced new control method to restrain nonlinear disturbance and improve telescope's observation performance. Sliding mode approach has been applied in many other mechanical control systems since it is invariable to various disturbances. However, conventional sliding mode approach may cause dangerous high-frequency vibrations in corresponding control system, which may influence control performance or even lead the system unstable. To counteract the effect of above nuisance, a high-order sliding mode (HOSM) controller of third-order has been suggested in the large telescope's drive system through theoretic deduction and analysis. On account of that the HOSM approach needs all system states available, a sliding mode observer has then been designed in order to get the acceleration state of the drive system. Simulation results show that this approach can obtain high control precision and may satisfy the requirements of a telescope for a nicely ultra-low velocity.

  12. The UNESCO-CEPES Jubilee: An Opportune Event for Some Observations about Higher Education in Romania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nastase, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    Romania's prime minister evokes the role of UNESCO-CEPES as a forum for discussion of the principal issues of higher education. The pre-1989 activities of the Centre are compared to the post-1989 ones and to the role of the Centre in supporting the general reform of higher education in Central and Eastern Europe. (EV)

  13. Using Teaching Observations to Reflect Upon and Improve Teaching Practice in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Douglas J.; Bolt, Susan

    2010-01-01

    In order to improve teaching and learning within a faculty, an action research intervention involving peer observation of teaching staff via an expert was designed and implemented. A total of ten staff (including the first author) were observed over the year. The process consisted of observation at class, a written report, discussion between…

  14. The Globalization of Higher Education: Some Observations Regarding the Free Market and the National Interest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alderman, Geoffrey

    2001-01-01

    Explores how the globalization of higher education, for example through electronic delivery or franchising, has given rise to concerns, particularly about quality, but including cultural, economic, and political factors. Describes how some countries have made such efforts to regulate transnational offerings that they have created questionable

  15. Significant geomagnetic differences in both phase and amplitude observed at "conjugate" polar latitudes near the December 1903 Solstice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Alv; Deehr, Charles

    2014-05-01

    During Roald Amundsen's exploration of the Northwest Passage (1903-1906) he conducted systematic measurements of diurnal and seasonal variations of the north magnetic dip pole (NMDP) at Gjøahavn (~ 68 N, 95 E). The NMDP variations have been largely interpreted as indicating control by the polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF); the Svalgard-Mansurov (S-M) effect. In Sir Robert Scott's Discovery expedition, geomagnetic observations were made in 1903 from Cape Armitage, Antarctica (~78 S, 168 E). Unwittingly, the measurements of Amundsen and Scott were acquired near conjugate ends of the same magnetic field lines. While their separation in solar local time is ~ 5 hours, they differ in magnetic local time less than 1/2 hour. However, up to this time no direct comparison of the two sets of magnetic observations has ever been made. This presentation contains an analysis of magnetic perturbations observed at both locations for comparison with contemporary and present day monthly-averaged diurnal variations, even if the overlap in data among these expeditions is somewhat limited. The near magnetic conjugacy of Gjøahavn- Cape Armitage locations makes these measurements valuable. Our analysis shows: (1) While similar variations appeared at both ends of the joining magnetic field they manifest significant differences in both phase and amplitude, (2) present day NMDP variations appear consistent with the S-M effect analyses when compared with satellite measurements of solar wind/IMF measurements, (3) differences at the "conjugate" locations cannot be explained in terms of the S-M effect alone. The roles of lobe cell and ionospheric conductance at polar magnetically "conjugate" locations are used to explain the observed phase and amplitude differences.

  16. Observation of magnetoreceptive behavior in a multicellular magnetotactic prokaryote in higher than geomagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Michael; Canter, Karl; Mahler, Inga; Tornheim, Adam

    2005-02-01

    The magnetotactic multicellular prokaryote (MMP), a motile aggregate of bacterial cells, is known to exhibit an unusual "ping-pong" motility in magnetic fields greater than the earth's field. This motility is characterized by rapid excursions, opposite the direction of an applied magnetic field, and slower returns along the direction of the magnetic field. We have carried out detailed observations of the time and spatial dependence of the ping-pong motility and find 1), the outward and return excursions exhibit a uniform deceleration and acceleration, respectively; 2), the probability per unit time of an MMP undergoing a ping-pong excursion increases monotonically with the field strength; and 3), the outward excursions exhibit a very unusual distance distribution which is dependent on the magnetic field strength. At any given field strength, a characteristic distance is observed, below which very few excursions occur. Beyond this distance, there is a rapid increase in the number of excursions with an exponentially decaying distribution. These observations cannot be explained by conventional magnetotaxis, i.e., a physical directing torque on the organism, and suggest a magnetoreceptive capability of the MMP. PMID:15556984

  17. Shifting goals: effects of active and observational experience on infants understanding of higher order goals

    PubMed Central

    Gerson, Sarah A.; Mahajan, Neha; Sommerville, Jessica A.; Matz, Lauren; Woodward, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Action perception links have been argued to support the emergence of action understanding, but their role in infants perception of distal goals has not been fully investigated. The current experiments address this issue. During the development of means-end actions, infants shift their focus from the means of the action to the distal goal. In Experiment One, we evaluated whether this same shift in attention (from the means to the distal goal) when learning to produce multi-step actions is reflected in infants perception of others means-end actions. Eight-months-old infants underwent active training in means-end action production and their subsequent analysis of an observed means-end action was assessed in a visual habituation paradigm. Infants degree of success in the training paradigm was related to their subsequent interpretation of the observed action as directed at the means versus the distal goal. In Experiment Two, observational and control manipulations provided evidence that these effects depended on the infants active engagement in the means-end actions. These results suggest that the processes that give rise to means-end structure in infants motor behavior also support the emergence of means-end structure in their analysis of others goals. PMID:25852622

  18. Shifting goals: effects of active and observational experience on infants' understanding of higher order goals.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Sarah A; Mahajan, Neha; Sommerville, Jessica A; Matz, Lauren; Woodward, Amanda L

    2015-01-01

    Action perception links have been argued to support the emergence of action understanding, but their role in infants' perception of distal goals has not been fully investigated. The current experiments address this issue. During the development of means-end actions, infants shift their focus from the means of the action to the distal goal. In Experiment One, we evaluated whether this same shift in attention (from the means to the distal goal) when learning to produce multi-step actions is reflected in infants' perception of others' means-end actions. Eight-months-old infants underwent active training in means-end action production and their subsequent analysis of an observed means-end action was assessed in a visual habituation paradigm. Infants' degree of success in the training paradigm was related to their subsequent interpretation of the observed action as directed at the means versus the distal goal. In Experiment Two, observational and control manipulations provided evidence that these effects depended on the infants' active engagement in the means-end actions. These results suggest that the processes that give rise to means-end structure in infants' motor behavior also support the emergence of means-end structure in their analysis of others' goals. PMID:25852622

  19. Observation of a significant influence of Earth's motion on the velocity of photons in our terrestrial laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Múnera, Héctor A.; Hernández-Deckers, Daniel; Arenas, Germán; Alfonso, Edgar

    2007-08-01

    The paper reports the positive results obtained with a stationary Michelson-Morley interferometer operating during two consecutive years (2003-2005) in Bogota, Colombia. After subtracting the environmental periodical effects, there is still a periodic residual that is no longer correlated to the environmental variables. There is, however, a significant correlation between the daily fringe-shift residuals for each month and the velocity of motion of the earth relative to the center of our galaxy at that particular time. This hints to a possible dependence of the velocity of light in our terrestrial laboratory and the velocity of the earth. This result is contrary to the current model for the photon that postulates a constant speed of light. From our data we have calculated the solar velocity consistent with our observations: 500 km/s, right ascension 16h-40 min, declination -75°.

  20. Higher Maternal Prenatal Cortisol and Younger Age Predict Greater Infant Reactivity to Novelty at 4 Months: An Observation Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Elizabeth; Zhao, Yihong; Evans, Lynn; Kinsella, Michael; Kurzius, Laura; Altincatal, Arman; McDonough, Laraine; Monk, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Objective Distress–linked activation of the maternal HPA–axis is considered a pathway by which affect regulation impacts the fetal milieu and neurodevelopment. There is little direct evidence for this conceptual model. Methods In 103 women (mean age 27.45 (±5.65) years) at 36 – 38 weeks gestation, salivary cortisol was measured before/after stress tasks; distress questionnaires were completed. At 18.49 (±1.83) weeks, infants underwent the Harvard Infant Behavioral Reactivity Protocol assessing cry/motor responses to novelty; women reported on infant behavior and postnatal distress. Results Prenatal cortisol and distress were not significantly correlated (all ps >.10). Proportional odds logistic regressions showed that neither prenatal nor postnatal distress was associated with infant responses to the Harvard Protocol yet pre–stress cortisol and maternal age were: The odds of being classified as High Reactive were 1.60 times higher [95% CI: 1.04, 2.46] for each unit of added cortisol and 0.90 times lower [95% CI: 0.82, 0.99] for every additional year in maternal age. No associations were found between cortisol or prenatal distress and mother–rated infant behavior; postnatal distress was positively associated with mother–rated infant negative behavior (p = .03). Observer and mother–rated infant behavior were not associated (all ps > .05). Conclusions Based on independent observations of infants in contrast to maternal perceptions, these results lend support to the hypothesis that pregnant women’s HPA–axis activity influences infant behavior. The impact of maternal distress was not supported, except in so far as postnatal distress may increase the likelihood of making negative judgments about infant behavior. PMID:22778036

  1. Validation of SARAL/AltiKa significant wave height and wind speed observations over the North Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, U. Mahesh; Swain, D.; Sasamal, S. K.; Reddy, N. Narendra; Ramanjappa, T.

    2015-12-01

    SARAL/AltiKa, a joint Ka-band altimetry mission of the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) was successfully launched on February 25, 2013. The main purpose of this mission is to explore the ocean surface topography. As it is a Ka-band altimeter mission unlike other altimeters which were primarily in Ku-band, it is essential to calibrate and validate AltiKa data products before using the data for oceanographic applications. With this objective, two important geophysical parameters, Significant Wave Height (SWH) and Wind Speed (WS) from SARAL/AltiKa are inter-compared with those from 18 moored buoy stations in the North Indian Ocean (NIO) for a two year period from March 2013 to March 2015. SARAL/AltiKa GDR-T patch-2 version products are collocated with moored buoy observations with a collocation criteria of spatio-temporal window of 50 km radius about the buoy location and 30 min time for all the altimeter measurements. Following this, linear regression relations are developed and statistical analyses carried out to assess the performance of SARAL/AltiKa. The correlation between SARAL/AltiKa derived SWHs and those from moored buoys is 0.98 m with a bias of -0.02 m and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 0.15 m at 95% confidence level. The WSs derived from SARAL/AltiKa Ka-band correlates reasonably well with buoy observations with a correlation coefficient of 0.91, bias of -0.28 m/s and RMSE of 1.13 m/s. The inter-comparison results are found to be interesting with a good agreement between SARAL/AltiKa and moored buoys observations of SWH and WS in the NIO where SWHs are less than ∼4 m and WS are less than ∼13 m/s during the entire analysis period.

  2. Observational Study: Familial Relevance and Oncological Significance of Revised Bethesda Guidelines in Colorectal Patients That Have Undergone Curative Resection

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Won Beom; Kim, Chan Wook; Yoon, Yong Sik; Park, In Ja; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Amsterdam criteria for the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) exclude most suspect cases of possible hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC). By contrast, revised Bethesda guidelines excessively broaden the disease spectrum. The aim of this study is to retrospectively evaluate the cliniciopathilogical characteristics of patients fulfilling the revised Bethesda guidelines and to review the efficacy and limitations of the revised guidelines. This retrospective study enrolled 3609 patients who underwent curative surgery for primary CRC. Patients were classified into the Bethesda group or the control group according to whether they fulfilled the revised Bethesda guidelines. Patients were further categorized when they fulfilled a minimum of 2 items of the revised guidelines. Individual items were analyzed for deficient mismatch repair (d-MMR). The median follow-up was 82.9 (interquartile range, 72–101) months. Patients in the Bethesda group were younger and had a higher rate of reduced mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression, microsatellite instability, and right colonic involvement (all P < 0.001) than the control group. As a predictor of d-MMR, the revised Bethesda guidelines showed a sensitivity of 63.0% and a specificity of 72.6%. Items 1 and 2, respectively, or the item pair 1 and 2, were independent predictors of d-MMR (all P < 0.001). Patients fulfilling the Bethesda guidelines showed clinicopathological features of HNPCC. The revised Bethesda guidelines appear to be a competent predictor of d-MMR. Specifically, items 1 and 2 are significant predictors of d-MMR and may be relevant to the application of the revised Bethesda guidelines. PMID:26871811

  3. Protected Graft Copolymer Excipient Leads to a Higher Acute Maximum Tolerated Dose and Extends Residence Time of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Significantly Better than Sterically Stabilized Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Reichstetter, Sandra; Castillo, Gerardo M.; Rubinstein, Israel; Nishimoto-Ashfield, Akiko; Lai, ManShun; Jones, Cynthia C.; Banjeree, Aryamitra; Lyubimov, Alex; Bloedow, Duane C.; Bogdanov, Alexei; Bolotin, Elijah M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine and compare pharmacokinetics and toxicity of two nanoformulations of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP). Methods VIP was formulated using a micellar (Sterically Stabilized Micelles, SSM) and a polymer-based (Protected Graft Copolymer, PGC) nanocarrier at various loading percentages. VIP binding to the nanocarriers, pharmacokinetics, blood pressure, blood chemistry, and acute maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of the formulations after injection into BALB/c mice were determined. Results Both formulations significantly extend in vivo residence time compared to unformulated VIP. Formulation toxicity is dependent on loading percentage, showing major differences between the two carrier types. Both formulations increase in vivo potency of unformulated VIP and show acute MTDs at least 140 times lower than unformulated VIP, but still at least 100 times higher than the anticipated highest human dose, 1–5 μg/kg. These nanocarriers prevented a significant drop in arterial blood pressure compared to unformulated VIP. Conclusions While both carriers enhance in vivo residence time compared to unformulated VIP and reduce the drop in blood pressure immediately after injection, PGC is the excipient of choice to extend residence time and improve the safety of potent therapeutic peptides such as VIP. PMID:23224976

  4. Observation of Higher-Harmonic Helical Spin-Resonance Modes in the Chromium Spinel CdCr2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, S.; Hagiwara, M.; Ueda, H.; Narumi, Y.; Kindo, K.; Yashiro, H.; Kashiwagi, T.; Takagi, H.

    2006-12-01

    High frequency ESR measurements on the chromium spinel compound CdCr2O4 have been performed. The observed ESR modes below Hc'≈5.7T can be explained well by the calculated resonance modes based on a molecular field theory assuming a helical spin structure. Other than the fundamental ones, we have succeeded in observing the higher-harmonic modes for the first time. A large change of the ESR modes above Hc' indicate that a variation of the spin structure from the helical to the four-sublattice canted one takes place around Hc'.

  5. A puzzle form of a non-verbal intelligence test gives significantly higher performance measures in children with severe intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Katrina D; Goharpey, Nahal; Crewther, Sheila G; Crewther, David P

    2008-01-01

    Background Assessment of 'potential intellectual ability' of children with severe intellectual disability (ID) is limited, as current tests designed for normal children do not maintain their interest. Thus a manual puzzle version of the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (RCPM) was devised to appeal to the attentional and sensory preferences and language limitations of children with ID. It was hypothesized that performance on the book and manual puzzle forms would not differ for typically developing children but that children with ID would perform better on the puzzle form. Methods The first study assessed the validity of this puzzle form of the RCPM for 76 typically developing children in a test-retest crossover design, with a 3 week interval between tests. A second study tested performance and completion rate for the puzzle form compared to the book form in a sample of 164 children with ID. Results In the first study, no significant difference was found between performance on the puzzle and book forms in typically developing children, irrespective of the order of completion. The second study demonstrated a significantly higher performance and completion rate for the puzzle form compared to the book form in the ID population. Conclusion Similar performance on book and puzzle forms of the RCPM by typically developing children suggests that both forms measure the same construct. These findings suggest that the puzzle form does not require greater cognitive ability but demands sensory-motor attention and limits distraction in children with severe ID. Thus, we suggest the puzzle form of the RCPM is a more reliable measure of the non-verbal mentation of children with severe ID than the book form. PMID:18671882

  6. Open heavy-flavor observables at the LHC and the importance of higher-order flow harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahrgang, Marlene; Aichelin, Jörg; Gossiaux, Pol Bernard; Werner, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Heavy-quark dynamics in the quark-gluon plasma provide information about the medium properties and the details of the heavy-quark-medium interaction. Traditional observables like the nuclear modification factor and the elliptic flow of D mesons have shown suppression at intermediate and high momenta and collective flow at low momenta. Thanks to the improving accuracy of the experimental data a combined analysis of these two observables starts to have discriminating power between different heavy-quark transport coefficients or features of the energy-loss models. In this overview, we summarize the modern strategy of describing heavy-quark dynamics and show how recent advances to include more differential observables such as azimuthal correlations and higher-order flow harmonics can help us understand the properties of heavy-flavor transport.

  7. Prognostic significance of 25-hydroxivitamin D entirely explained by a higher comorbidity burden: experience from a South-Eastern European Dialysis Cohort.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Adalbert; Apetrii, Mugurel; Onofriescu, Mihai; Siriopol, Dimitrie; Veisa, Gabriel; Schiller, Oana; Bob, Flaviu; Timar, Romulus; Mihaescu, Adelina; Kanbay, Mehmet; Covic, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is still a common problem particularly in the elderly and in individuals with various degrees of renal impairment. The present study aimed to evaluate the association between plasma concentrations of 25(OH)D and death in a large cohort of prevalent patients on hemodialysis (HD) from south-east Romania, a typical Balkan region. This is an observational prospective study that included a total of 570 patients on maintenance HD. Study patients were classified into three groups by baseline 25(OH)D levels: (1) sufficient 25(OH)D--i.e., >30?ng/mL; (2) insufficient 25(OH)D--i.e., between 10 and 29?ng/mL; and (3) deficient 25(OH)D--i.e., <10?ng/mL. During the follow-up period of 14 months, 68 patients (11.9%) died, the Kaplan-Meier analysis showing significant differences in all-cause mortality for chronic kidney disease patients in different 25(OH)D groups (P?=?0.002). Unadjusted Cox regression analysis also showed significant differences in survival. The multivariate Cox regression model showed no significant differences in survival according to vitamin D levels. Hazard ratio for death in the "<10?ng/mL" group was 1.619 (P?=?0.190) and in the "10-30?ng/mL" group was 0.837 (P?=?0.609). In our dialysis population with a high comorbidity burden, low 25(OH)D concentration was not associated with mortality in the adjusted Cox model, suggesting that vitamin D deficiency could represent only a non-specific marker for a poor health status, with less impact on mortality. PMID:25251168

  8. Low-altitude ISIS 1 observations of auroral radio emissions and their significance to the cyclotron maser instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Wong, H. K.

    1987-01-01

    Low-altitude ISIS 1 observations are presented which support the cyclotron maser instability as the generation mechanism of most, but not all, auroral radio emissions. The observations confirm the ability of the mechanism to generate different wave modes and harmonics as the ratio of the plasma frequency to gyrofrequency f(N)/f(H) increases depending on the form of the energetic electron distribution function. The present observations correspond to conditions where f(N)/F(H) is always larger than 0.2 and is typically about 1.0. The observations and instability growth rate calculations indicate that second harmonic radiation in the extraordinary and the Z modes is directly generated at low altitudes. By far the most common signals observed near ISIS 1 perigee, however, are in the fundamental Z and whistler modes. The observations and calculations in the case of the Z mode suggest that the pertinent process involves a maser that does not saturate, i.e., that group velocity effects are important. The whistler mode is the most intense signal observed at low altitudes. Since the cyclotron maser generated whistler mode waves have peak growth rates for downward field-aligned propagation, they should be able to penetrate the ionosphere. This process may provide the explanation of occasional reports, dating back to the International Geophysical Year time period, of ground level detection of radio noise associated with the aurora.

  9. Significance of the sexual openings and supplementary structures on the phylogeny of brachyuran crabs (Crustacea, Decapoda, Brachyura), with new nomina for higher-ranked podotreme taxa.

    PubMed

    Guinot, Danièle; Tavares, Marcos; Castro, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The patterns of complexity of the male and female sexual openings in Brachyura, which have been the source of uncertainties and conflicting opinions, are documented, together with a study of the morphologies of the coxal and sternal gonopores in both sexes, penises, spermathecae, and gonopods. The vulvae, male gonopores and penises are described among selected taxa of Eubrachyura, and their function and evolution examined in the context of a wide variety of mating behaviours. The location of female and male gonopores, the condition of the penis (coxal and sternal openings and modalities of protection), and related configurations of thoracic sternites 7 and 8, which are modified by the intercalation of a wide sternal part (thoracic sternites 7 and 8) during carcinisation, show evidence of deep homology. They represent taxonomic criteria at all ranks of the family-series and may be used to test lineages. Of particular significance are the consequences of the posterior expansion of the thoracic sternum, which influences the condition, shape, and sclerotisation of the penis, and its emergence from coxal (heterotreme) to coxo-sternal, which is actually still coxal (heterotreme), in contrast to a sternal emergence (thoracotreme). The heterotreme-thoracotreme distinction results from two different trajectories of the vas deferens and its ejaculatory duct via the P5 coxa (Heterotremata) or through the thoracic sternum (Thoracotremata). Dissections of males of several families have demonstrated that this major difference not only affects the external surface (perforation of the coxa or the sternum by the ejaculatory duct) but also the internal anatomy. There is no evidence for an ejaculatory duct passing through the articular membrane between the P5 coxa and the thoracic sternum in any Brachyura, even when the sternal male gonopore is very close to the P5 coxa. Trends towards the coxo-sternal condition are exemplified by multistate characters, varying from a shallow depression to a long groove along expanded sternites 7 and 8, and ultimately their complete, extended junction typifying the most derived coxo-sternal condition. The coxo-sternal condition is indicative of a long evolutionary history, as evidenced by the presence of multistate characters (e.g., Dorippidae, Goneplacoidea) or by a single, well-established condition (e.g., Chasmocarcinidae, Ethusidae, Panopeidae Eucratopsinae, Rhizopidae, Scalopidiidae). The penial area proves to be an essential diagnostic feature in Brachyura, with a value comparable to that of the gonopods. Penis protection is ubiquitous in Brachyura irrespective of length, and several modalities of protection prevail, which necessitate different modifications of associated structures. A long penis in a gutter developed from a partial invagination of sternite 8 induces the formation of a new "suture" at the same level as the preceding suture 6/7. Such a "supplementary suture 7/8" exists among unrelated heterotreme families (e.g., Ethusidae, Panopeidae Eucratopsinae, Pseudorhombilidae, Rhizopidae). A fully protected penis, concealed in a groove within a complete invagination of sternite 8 in the form of two contiguous plates, evolved independently (homoplasy) in Palicoidea and Chasmocarcinidae (Goneplacoidea), with sternite 8 present as a single plate in females. In condylar protection, described for the first time and occurring in several heterotreme families, the penis emerges from the extremity of the P5 coxo-sternal condyle or from its anterior border instead of from the coxa itself. A penis precisely lodged in a small excavation on sternite 8, which is lined by a row of stiff setae, is unique to Brachyura, and represents a new synapomorphy of the Homoloidea. Five modalities of penis protection are recognised in Podotremata, eight in Eubrachyura (six in Heterotremata and two in Thoracotremata). Special attention has been paid to Dorippoidea (Dorippidae and Ethusidae), which shows transformation series from coxal to coxo-sternal conditions. The coxo-sternal condition is not an intermediate towards the thoracotreme organisation, and a step in heterotreme evolution is the adoption of the coxo-sternal condition. An extreme carcinisition may also result in the sternal arrangement of male gonopores in the form of a "sternitreme" disposition, as in the case of Hymenosomatoidea, which displays a broad thoracic sternum and true sternal male gonopores (as in thoracotremes) together with several plesiomorphic traits that are assumed to represent an old, deeply-rooted heterotreme clade. A sternitreme condition evolved independently in the most ancestral heterotreme clades (such as Hymenosomatoidea) and in Thoracotremata. The older the lineage of a heterotreme is, the higher the possibility of having evolved carcinisation. Evidence that "derived" traits may be the consequence of a strong carcinisation, rather than being recently acquired, necessitates reconsidering certain character states in Brachyura. Eubrachyurans can only evolve either the heterotreme or the thoracotreme arrangement, the consistency of the inferred ancestral characters states providing a useful criterion for evaluating ancestral trait reconstructions. A widened thoracic sternum together with sternal gonopores may be present in carcinised heterotremes such as hymenosomatoids. The thoracic sternum provides a reliable complex of characters that must be carefully interpreted. The hypothesis of a coxo-sternal disposition in Cryptochiroidea and Pinnotheroidea, generally considered thoracotremes, is rejected, and an alternative interpretation of their status is discussed. A new interpretation of the phylogeny of Cryptochiroidea is outlined, but the origin of Pinnotheroidea remains puzzling. The sella turcica, frequently regarded a synapomorphy of Eubrachyura, is redefined as the structure formed by the endosternal intertagmal phragma that connects the tagma/thorax and the tagma/abdomen to thoracic interosternite 7/8. It is here termed the "brachyuran sella turcica" and is shown to be synapomorphic to all Brachyura. The Eubrachyura synapomorphically shares the fusion of the thoracic interopleurite 7/8 with the brachyuran sella turcica, forming the "eubrachyuran sella turcica". In contrast, some Podotremata (Cyclodorippoidea and Raninoidea) share a connection between the sella turcica and the thoracic interosternite 6/7. Six main patterns of the thoracic sternum in relation to variations in sutures 4/5-7/8 are recognised in Eubrachyura, whereas several subpatterns that include variations in the median line are distinguished. The evolution of the thoracic sternum and axial skeleton is reassessed in Podotremata and Eubrachyura. A posteriormost location of the male gonopore (coxal or sternal) in relation to sternite 8 characterises many brachyurans (Cryptochiroidea, Hymenosomatoidea, Majoidea, Matutidae, Menippidae, Orithyioidea, Parthenopoidea, Ucididae, Grapsoidea--including Percnidae, Plagusiidae, Varunidae), in contrast to a location close to suture 7/8 in other groups. The thoracic sternum/pterygostome junction, which has multistate characters, is shown to be a valuable taxonomic criterion. The shapes of the sterno-abdominal depression and sterno-abdominal cavity provide diagnostic features that are helpful in suprageneric assignments. The monophyly of Brachyura, Eubrachyura, and Thoracotremata is reaffirmed. The monophyly of Brachyura is supported by the interdependence of the two pairs of gonopods and penis. An abdomen permanently flexed and held by the pereopods and/or the homoloid press button (on sternite 4) or typical eubrachyuran press-button (on sternite 5) may be considered a synapomorphy of Brachyura, the absence of this condition considered a loss. The double abdominal-locking system ("double peg") on sternite 5, a device discovered in three families of the extinct Palaeocorystoidea from the Upper Aptian, is similar to the double hook present in living lyreidids, although it is lost in all other raninoid extant members. New evidence shows that the abdominal holding was an early occurrence for a brachyuran crab. The Raninoidea, sister to Palaeocorystoidea, is characterised by gymnopleurity, a condition that results from the lifting of the carapace and thus the exposure of several pleurites. The narrowing of the body and thoracic sternum, almost certainly associated with their burrowing behaviour, is a diagnostic feature of raninoid evolution, in contrast to the widening observed in the remaining Brachyura. The monophyly of Heterotremata is discussed. Although the correct assignment of the coxal male gonopore and sternal female gonopore (vulva) at the base of Decapoda and Eubrachyura, respectively, left no synapomorphies to support the Heterotremata, the group nevertheless should be regarded as the sister group to Thoracotremata. The controversial monophyly of Podotremata is discussed and arguments are presented against the suppression of this taxon. The distinction of Homoloidia from Dromioidia is argued, and a classification of Podotremata, which considers the fossil record whenever possible, is presented. The earliest brachyurans are re-examined, and a new interpretation of the phylogeny of several basal eubrachyuran groups (Dorippoidea, Inachoididae, Palicoidea, Retroplumoidea) is proposed. Stenorhynchus shares a number of characters with the Inachoididae that differentiate them from Inachidae, and also has some distinctive features that warrants its assignment to a separate inachoidid subfamily, Stenorhynchinae, which is resurrected. The concealment strategies among Brachyura are documented and discussed. Podotremes use carrying behaviour, often combined with burying and concealment under substrates, whereas living within a host, burying, and decoration are used by heterotremes, burrowing being essentially a thoracotreme strategy. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED) PMID:26401537

  10. Observation of Higher-Order Sideband Transitions and First-Order Sideband Rabi Oscillations in a Superconducting Flux Qubit Coupled to a SQUID Plasma Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Masaki; Okamura, Natsuki

    2013-07-01

    We report results of spectroscopic measurements and time-domain measurements of a superconducting flux qubit. The dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), used for readout of the qubit, and a shunt capacitor formed an LC resonator generating a SQUID plasma mode. Higher-order red and blue sidebands were observed in a simple measurement scheme because the resonant energy of the resonator, 600 MHz, was comparable to the thermal energy. We also observed Rabi oscillations on the carrier transition and the first-order sideband transitions. Because the qubit was coupled to a single arm of the dc SQUID, the qubit-SQUID coupling was significant at zero bias current, where these phenomena were observed. The ratios between the Rabi periods for the carrier transition and the sideband transitions are compared with those estimated from the coupling constant, which was separately determined. The result may be explained by assuming initial excitation of the resonator.

  11. Dysphoric students show higher use of the observer perspective in their retrieval of positive versus negative autobiographical memories.

    PubMed

    Nelis, Sabine; Debeer, Elise; Holmes, Emily A; Raes, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Autobiographical memories are retrieved as images from either a field perspective or an observer perspective. The observer perspective is thought to dull emotion. Positive affect is blunted in depressed mood. Consequently, are positive events recalled from an observer perspective in depressed mood? We investigated the relationship between memory vantage perspective and depressive symptoms in a student sample. Participants completed the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT; Williams & Broadbent, 1986) and assessed the perspective accompanying each memory. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II; Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996) and the Responses to Positive Affect questionnaire (RPA; Feldman, Joormann, & Johnson, 2008) were administered. The results showed a small positive association between depressive symptoms and the use of an observer perspective for positive autobiographical memories, but not for negative memories. Furthermore, comparing a subgroup with clinically significant symptom levels (dysphoric students) with non-dysphoric individuals revealed that dysphoric students used an observer perspective more for positive memories compared with negative memories. This was not the case for non-dysphoric students. The observer perspective in dysphorics was associated with a dampening cognitive style in response to positive experiences. PMID:23083015

  12. The Taxonomic Significance of Species That Have Only Been Observed Once: The Genus Gymnodinium (Dinoflagellata) as an Example

    PubMed Central

    Thessen, Anne E.; Patterson, David J.; Murray, Shauna A.

    2012-01-01

    Taxonomists have been tasked with cataloguing and quantifying the Earth’s biodiversity. Their progress is measured in code-compliant species descriptions that include text, images, type material and molecular sequences. It is from this material that other researchers are to identify individuals of the same species in future observations. It has been estimated that 13% to 22% (depending on taxonomic group) of described species have only ever been observed once. Species that have only been observed at the time and place of their original description are referred to as oncers. Oncers are important to our current understanding of biodiversity. They may be validly described species that are members of a rare biosphere, or they may indicate endemism, or that these species are limited to very constrained niches. Alternatively, they may reflect that taxonomic practices are too poor to allow the organism to be re-identified or that the descriptions are unknown to other researchers. If the latter are true, our current tally of species will not be an accurate indication of what we know. In order to investigate this phenomenon and its potential causes, we examined the microbial eukaryote genus Gymnodinium. This genus contains 268 extant species, 103 (38%) of which have not been observed since their original description. We report traits of the original descriptions and interpret them in respect to the status of the species. We conclude that the majority of oncers were poorly described and their identity is ambiguous. As a result, we argue that the genus Gymnodinium contains only 234 identifiable species. Species that have been observed multiple times tend to have longer descriptions, written in English. The styles of individual authors have a major effect, with a few authors describing a disproportionate number of oncers. The information about the taxonomy of Gymnodinium that is available via the internet is incomplete, and reliance on it will not give access to all necessary knowledge. Six new names are presented – Gymnodinium campbelli for the homonymous name Gymnodinium translucens Campbell 1973, Gymnodinium antarcticum for the homonymous name Gymnodinium frigidum Balech 1965, Gymnodinium manchuriensis for the homonymous name Gymnodinium autumnale Skvortzov 1968, Gymnodinium christenum for the homonymous name Gymnodinium irregulare Christen 1959, Gymnodinium conkufferi for the homonymous name Gymnodinium irregulare Conrad & Kufferath 1954 and Gymnodinium chinensis for the homonymous name Gymnodinium frigidum Skvortzov 1968. PMID:22952856

  13. Characteristics, distribution, origin, and significance of opaline silica observed by the Spirit rover in Gusev crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, Steven W.; Farmer, Jack D.; Calvin, Wendy M.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Morris, Richard V.; Rice, Melissa S.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Bell, James F., III; Christensen, Philip R.; Squyres, Steven W.

    2011-04-01

    The presence of outcrops and soil (regolith) rich in opaline silica (˜65-92 wt % SiO2) in association with volcanic materials adjacent to the “Home Plate” feature in Gusev crater is evidence for hydrothermal conditions. The Spirit rover has supplied a diverse set of observations that are used here to better understand the formation of silica and the activity, abundance, and fate of water in the first hydrothermal system to be explored in situ on Mars. We apply spectral, chemical, morphological, textural, and stratigraphic observations to assess whether the silica was produced by acid sulfate leaching of precursor rocks, by precipitation from silica-rich solutions, or by some combination. The apparent lack of S enrichment and the relatively low oxidation state of the Home Plate silica-rich materials appear inconsistent with the originally proposed Hawaiian analog for fumarolic acid sulfate leaching. The stratiform distribution of the silica-rich outcrops and their porous and brecciated microtextures are consistent with sinter produced by silica precipitation. There is no evidence for crystalline quartz phases among the silica occurrences, an indication of the lack of diagenetic maturation following the production of the amorphous opaline phase.

  14. A Significant Amount of Crystalline Silica in Returned Cometary Samples: Bridging the Gap between Astrophysical and Meteoritical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roskosz, Mathieu; Leroux, Hugues

    2015-03-01

    Crystalline silica (SiO2) is recurrently identified at the percent level in the infrared spectra of protoplanetary disks. By contrast, reports of crystalline silica in primitive meteorites are very unusual. This dichotomy illustrates the typical gap existing between astrophysical observations and meteoritical records of the first solids formed around young stars. The cometary samples returned by the Stardust mission in 2006 offer an opportunity to have a closer look at a silicate dust that experienced a very limited reprocessing since the accretion of the dust. Here, we provide the first extended study of silica materials in a large range of Stardust samples. We show that cristobalite is the dominant form. It was detected in 5 out of 25 samples. Crystalline silica is thus a common minor phase in Stardust samples. Furthermore, olivine is generally associated with this cristobalite, which put constraints on possible formation mechanisms. A low-temperature subsolidus solid-solid transformation of an amorphous precursor is most likely. This crystallization route favors the formation of olivine (at the expense of pyroxenes), and crystalline silica is the natural byproduct of this transformation. Conversely, direct condensation and partial melting are not expected to produce the observed mineral assemblages. Silica is preserved in cometary materials because they were less affected by thermal and aqueous alterations than their chondritic counterparts. The common occurrence of crystalline silica therefore makes the cometary material an important bridge between the IR-based mineralogy of distant protoplanetary disks and the mineralogy of the early solar system.

  15. Characteristics, distribution, origin, and significance of opaline silica observed by the Spirit rover in Gusev crater, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruff, S.W.; Farmer, J.D.; Calvin, W.M.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Morris, R.V.; Rice, M.S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J.F., III; Christensen, P.R.; Squyres, S. W.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of outcrops and soil (regolith) rich in opaline silica (???65-92 wt % SiO2) in association with volcanic materials adjacent to the "Home Plate" feature in Gusev crater is evidence for hydrothermal conditions. The Spirit rover has supplied a diverse set of observations that are used here to better understand the formation of silica and the activity, abundance, and fate of water in the first hydrothermal system to be explored in situ on Mars. We apply spectral, chemical, morphological, textural, and stratigraphic observations to assess whether the silica was produced by acid sulfate leaching of precursor rocks, by precipitation from silica-rich solutions, or by some combination. The apparent lack of S enrichment and the relatively low oxidation state of the Home Plate silica-rich materials appear inconsistent with the originally proposed Hawaiian analog for fumarolic acid sulfate leaching. The stratiform distribution of the silica-rich outcrops and their porous and brecciated microtextures are consistent with sinter produced by silica precipitation. There is no evidence for crystalline quartz phases among the silica occurrences, an indication of the lack of diagenetic maturation following the production of the amorphous opaline phase. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Significant Redistribution of Ce 4d Oscillator Strength Observed in Photoionization of Endohedral Ce-C{sub 82}{sup +} Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Habibi, M.; Esteves, D.; Wang, J. C.; Phaneuf, R. A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Aguilar, A.; Dunsch, L.

    2008-09-26

    Mass-selected beams of atomic Ce{sup q+} ions (q=2, 3, 4), of C{sub 82}{sup +} and of endohedral Ce-C{sub 82}{sup +} ions were employed to study photoionization of free and encaged cerium atoms. The Ce 4d inner-shell contributions to single and double ionization of the endohedral Ce-C{sub 82}{sup +} fullerene have been extracted from the data and compared with expectations based on theory and the experiments with atomic Ce ions. Dramatic reduction and redistribution of the ionization contributions to 4d photoabsorption is observed. More than half of the Ce 4d oscillator strength appears to be diverted to the additional decay channels opened by the fullerene cage surrounding the Ce atom.

  17. Analyzing Relationship Between Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS) with Different Types of Neuropathy: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Nabi, Shahzaib; Kahlon, Pushpinderdeep; Bozorgnia, Farshid; Arshad, Adeel; Saleem, Akmam; Kuriakose, Philip

    2016-06-01

    To analyze multiple variables, including immunoglobulin subtypes in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and different types of neuropathy. This was a retrospective, single center study done in a tertiary care hospital in the United States. The data was collected for years 2001-2011. Inclusion criteria were the presence of MGUS and neuropathy. Exclusion criteria were the presence of other factors such as diabetes, vitamin B12 deficiency, alcoholism etc. which can cause neuropathy. Patients with IgM MGUS were compared with patients having Non-IgM MGUS. A total of 281 patients were analyzed in this study. The average age at the time of diagnosis of MGUS and neuropathy was 68 years. The most common type of neuropathy was sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy (46 %). The most common location of neuropathy was the lower extremities (68 %). Among our patients, 52 % had their neuropathy symptoms for 1-5 years before presenting to the clinic. When IgM MGUS was compared with Non-IgM MGUS, a statistically significant difference was found in terms of race (White vs. Others, OR 4.43, 95 % CI 2.13, 9.19, p < 0.001) and survival status (OR 1.98, 95 % CI 1.01, 3.90, p = 0.046). Patients with MGUS are prone to develop different types of neuropathies. Caucasians are more likely to have IgM MGUS as compared to other races. IgM MGUS is generally related to worse outcomes as compared to Non-IgM MGUS. Medical therapies, including gabapentin and pregabalin are effective treatments and the response rate can be as high as 80-90 % with these medications. PMID:27065581

  18. SIGNIFICANT FOREGROUND UNRELATED NON-ACOUSTIC ANISOTROPY ON THE 1 DEGREE SCALE IN WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE 5-YEAR OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Bizhu; Zhang Shuangnan; Lieu, Richard; Wakker, Bart

    2010-01-01

    The spectral variation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as observed by WMAP was tested using foreground reduced WMAP5 data, by producing subtraction maps at the 1 deg. angular resolution between the two cosmological bands of V and W, for masked sky areas that avoid the Galactic disk. The resulting V - W map revealed a non-acoustic signal over and above the WMAP5 pixel noise, with two main properties. First, it possesses quadrupole power at the approx1 muK level which may be attributed to foreground residuals. Second, it fluctuates also at all values of l> 2, especially on the 1 deg. scale (200 approx< l approx< 300). The behavior is random and symmetrical about zero temperature with an rms approx7 muK, or 10% of the maximum CMB anisotropy, which would require a 'cosmic conspiracy' among the foreground components if it is a consequence of their existence. Both anomalies must be properly diagnosed and corrected if 'precision' cosmology is the claim. The second anomaly is, however, more interesting because it opens the question on whether the CMB anisotropy genuinely represents primordial density seeds.

  19. High-resolution satellite turbidity and sea surface temperature observations of river plume interactions during a significant flood event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brando, V. E.; Braga, F.; Zaggia, L.; Giardino, C.; Bresciani, M.; Matta, E.; Bellafiore, D.; Ferrarin, C.; Maicu, F.; Benetazzo, A.; Bonaldo, D.; Falcieri, F. M.; Coluccelli, A.; Russo, A.; Carniel, S.

    2015-11-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) and turbidity (T) derived from Landsat 8 (L8) imagery were used to characterize river plumes in the northern Adriatic Sea (NAS) during a significant flood event in November 2014. Circulation patterns and sea surface salinity (SSS) from an operational coupled ocean-wave model supported the interpretation of the plumes' interaction with the receiving waters and among them. There was a good agreement of the SSS, T, and SST fields at the sub-mesoscale and mesoscale delineation of the major river plumes. L8 30 m resolution also enabled the description of smaller plume structures. The different plumes' reflectance spectra were related to the lithological fingerprint of the sediments in the river catchments. Sharp fronts in T and SST delimited each single river plume. The isotherms and turbidity isolines' coupling varied among the plumes due to differences in particle loads and surface temperatures in the discharged waters. The surface expressions of all the river plumes occurring in NAS were classified based on the occurrence of the plume dynamical regions in the L8 30 m resolution imagery.

  20. Significant Efficacy of Tramadol/Acetaminophen in Elderly Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain Uncontrolled by NSAIDs: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) is a common condition and is generally treated using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID); however, chronic NSAID use can decrease renal function. Tramadol, a weak opioid agonist, may improve chronic LBP and disability, while avoiding adverse effects such as gastrointestinal and renal toxicity. However, few studies have evaluated the short-term efficacy of opioids in Asian patients with chronic LBP. In this study, 24 patients with chronic LBP unresponsive to NSAIDs (10 men, 14 women; mean age, 65.1 ± 12.1 years) were prescribed tramadol/acetaminophen (37.5 mg/325 mg; four tablets daily) for 1 month. Then, the following parameters were assessed at baseline and after 1 week and 1 month of treatment: leg pain and LBP (Visual Analog Score [VAS]); activity of daily life (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire [RDQ]); and disability (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI]). Leg pain resolved within 1 week (p = 0.00093); however, LBP was relieved only at 1 month (p = 0.00034). The mean RDQ (p = 0.015) and ODI (p = 0.0032) scores were improved at 1 month. A total 41.6% of patients reported nausea and floating sensation beginning tramadol/acetaminophen treatment, and 12.5% (four patients) discontinued treatment as a result. LBP did not improve in 25% of patients administered tramadol/acetaminophen. Because this was an observational study, rather than a comparative study, further investigation is needed to evaluate the long-term efficacy of tramadol/acetaminophen in elderly patients with chronic LBP unresponsive to NSAIDs. PMID:26157527

  1. Significant Labor and Employment Law Issues in Higher Education During the Past Decade and What to Look for Now: The Perspective of an Academician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodah, Matthew M.

    2000-01-01

    An academician explores major issues in higher education labor law during the 1990s: union organizing by graduate teaching assistants, bargaining and workload issues, developments concerning grievance arbitration, and rights of individual faculty members within unions. Issues likely to arise in the next decade include alternatives to tenure,…

  2. Significant Labor and Employment Law Issues in Higher Education During the Past Decade and What To Look for Now: A Union Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Rachel

    2000-01-01

    A union perspective of major issues in higher education labor law in the 1990s includes the 11th Circuit Court cases on whether Congress abrogated states' 11th Amendment immunity for suits under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) and under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Analyzes contract issues of protection around age…

  3. Significant Labor and Employment Law Issues in Higher Education During the Past Decade and What To Look for Now: A Management Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunsicker Jr., J. Freedley

    2000-01-01

    A management perspective of major issues in higher education labor law in the 1990s addresses: sexual harassment; the Civil Rights Act of 1991; diversity on campus, elimination of mandatory retirement for faculty; development of contingent work force; and unionization of residents, interns, and graduate assistants. Predicts alternatives to…

  4. Stages in the Making of the Competence Approach and Its Significance to Teaching Medical Disciplines at Institutions of Higher Medical Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayev, Igor V.; Dautova, Olga B.; Dicheva, Diana T.; Andreyev, Dmitry N.; Goncharenko, Aleksandra Yu.; Kucheryavy, Yury A.; Aleksandrova, Kseniya O.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the preconditions and origins of the competence approach and various approaches to apprehending the essence of competencies: personal, functional, and cognitive. The authors cover the major stages in the making of the competence approach at institutions of higher medical learning.

  5. Dynamics of Gal80p in the Gal80p-Gal3p complex differ significantly from the dynamics in the Gal80p-Gal1p complex: implications for the higher specificity of Gal3p.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Sanjay K

    2014-12-01

    The expression of the GAL gene in Sacharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by three proteins; Gal3p/Gal1p, Gal80p and Gal4p. Both Gal3p and Gal1p act as transcriptional inducers, though Gal3p has a higher activity than Gal1p. The difference in activity may depend on the strength of the interaction and dynamical behavior of these proteins during complex formation with the repressor protein Gal80p. To address these queries we have modeled the binding interface of the Gal1p-Gal80p and Gal3p-Gal80p complexes. The comparison of the dynamics of these proteins in the complex and in the Apo protein was carried out. It was observed that the binding of Gal3p with Gal80p induces significant flexibility in Gal80p on a surface different from the one involved in binding with Gal3p. Several other differences at the interface between the Gal3p-Gal80p and the Gal1p-Gal80p complex were observed, which might permit Gal3p to act as a transcriptional inducer with higher activity. Further, we have discussed the dynamical event and plausible mechanism of complex formation of Gal3p and Gal1p with Gal80p at the molecular level. PMID:25220841

  6. Primary bacteraemia is associated with a higher mortality risk compared with pulmonary and intra-abdominal infections in patients with sepsis: a prospective observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Mansur, Ashham; Klee, Yvonne; Popov, Aron Frederik; Erlenwein, Joachim; Ghadimi, Michael; Beissbarth, Tim; Bauer, Martin; Hinz, José

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether common infection foci (pulmonary, intra-abdominal and primary bacteraemia) are associated with variations in mortality risk in patients with sepsis. Design Prospective, observational cohort study. Setting Three surgical intensive care units (ICUs) at a university medical centre. Participants A total of 327 adult Caucasian patients with sepsis originating from pulmonary, intra-abdominal and primary bacteraemia participated in this study. Primary and secondary outcome measures The patients were followed for 90 days and mortality risk was recorded as the primary outcome variable. To monitor organ failure, sepsis-related organ failure assessment (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment, SOFA) scores were evaluated at the onset of sepsis and throughout the observational period as secondary outcome variables. Results A total of 327 critically ill patients with sepsis were enrolled in this study. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that the 90-day mortality risk was significantly higher among patients with primary bacteraemia than among those with pulmonary and intra-abdominal foci (58%, 35% and 32%, respectively; p=0.0208). To exclude the effects of several baseline variables, we performed multivariate Cox regression analysis. Primary bacteraemia remained a significant covariate for mortality in the multivariate analysis (HR 2.10; 95% CI 1.14 to 3.86; p=0.0166). During their stay in the ICU, the patients with primary bacteraemia presented significantly higher SOFA scores than those of the patients with pulmonary and intra-abdominal infection foci (8.5±4.7, 7.3±3.4 and 5.8±3.5, respectively). Patients with primary bacteraemia presented higher SOFA-renal score compared with the patients with other infection foci (1.6±1.4, 0.8±1.1 and 0.7±1.0, respectively); the patients with primary bacteraemia required significantly more renal replacement therapy than the patients in the other groups (29%, 11% and 12%, respectively). Conclusions These results indicate that patients with sepsis with primary bacteraemia present a higher mortality risk compared with patients with sepsis of pulmonary or intra-abdominal origins. These results should be assessed in patients with sepsis in larger, independent cohorts. PMID:25564146

  7. Direct observation of bulk Fermi surface at higher Brillouin zones in a heavily hole-doped cuprate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sawai, W.; Sakurai, Y.; Itou, M.; Barbiellini, B.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Markiewicz, R. S.; Kaprzyk, S.; Gillet, J.-M.; Wakimoto, S.; Fujita, M.; Basak, S.; Lin, H.; Bansil, A.; Yamada, K.

    2010-03-01

    We have observed the bulk Fermi surface (FS) in an overdoped (x=0.3) single crystal of La2-xSrxCuO4 by using Compton scattering. A 2-D momentum density reconstruction [1] from measured Compton profiles, yields a clear FS signature in a higher Brillouin zone centered at p=(1.5,1.5) a.u. The quantitative agreement with density functional theory (DFT) calculations [2] and momentum density experiment suggests that Fermi-liquid physics is restored in the overdoped regime. We have also measured the 2-D angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) [3] and noticed a similar quantitative agreement with the DFT simulations. However, 2D-ACAR does not give a clear signature of the FS in the extended momentum space in both theory and experiment. Work supported in part by the US DOE.[1] Y. Tanaka et al., Phys. Rev. B 63, 045120 (2001).[2] S. Sahrakorpi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 157601 (2005).[3] L. C. Smedskjaer et al., J. Phys. Chem. Solids 52, 1541 (1991).

  8. The significance of recruiting underrepresented minorities in medicine: an examination of the need for effective approaches used in admissions by higher education institutions

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Obed

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the significance of recruiting underrepresented minorities in medicine (URM). This would include African Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans. The research findings support the belief that URMs, upon graduating, are more likely to become practitioners in underserved communities, thereby becoming a resource that prompts us to find effective ways to help increase their college enrollments statewide. This paper analyzes the recruitment challenges for institutions, followed by a review of creative and effective approaches used by organizations and universities. The results have shown positive outcomes averaging a 50% increase in minority enrollments and retention. In other areas, such as cognitive development, modest gains were achieved in programs that were shorter in duration. The results nevertheless indicated steps in the right direction inspiring further program developments. PMID:25192970

  9. The significance of recruiting underrepresented minorities in medicine: an examination of the need for effective approaches used in admissions by higher education institutions.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Obed

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the significance of recruiting underrepresented minorities in medicine (URM). This would include African Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans. The research findings support the belief that URMs, upon graduating, are more likely to become practitioners in underserved communities, thereby becoming a resource that prompts us to find effective ways to help increase their college enrollments statewide. This paper analyzes the recruitment challenges for institutions, followed by a review of creative and effective approaches used by organizations and universities. The results have shown positive outcomes averaging a 50% increase in minority enrollments and retention. In other areas, such as cognitive development, modest gains were achieved in programs that were shorter in duration. The results nevertheless indicated steps in the right direction inspiring further program developments. PMID:25192970

  10. Treatment-associated polymorphisms in protease are significantly associated with higher viral load and lower CD4 count in newly diagnosed drug-naive HIV-1 infected patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The effect of drug resistance transmission on disease progression in the newly infected patient is not well understood. Major drug resistance mutations severely impair viral fitness in a drug free environment, and therefore are expected to revert quickly. Compensatory mutations, often already polymorphic in wild-type viruses, do not tend to revert after transmission. While compensatory mutations increase fitness during treatment, their presence may also modulate viral fitness and virulence in absence of therapy and major resistance mutations. We previously designed a modeling technique that quantifies genotypic footprints of in vivo treatment selective pressure, including both drug resistance mutations and polymorphic compensatory mutations, through the quantitative description of a fitness landscape from virus genetic sequences. Results Genotypic correlates of viral load and CD4 cell count were evaluated in subtype B sequences from recently diagnosed treatment-naive patients enrolled in the SPREAD programme. The association of surveillance drug resistance mutations, reported compensatory mutations and fitness estimated from drug selective pressure fitness landscapes with baseline viral load and CD4 cell count was evaluated using regression techniques. Protease genotypic variability estimated to increase fitness during treatment was associated with higher viral load and lower CD4 cell counts also in treatment-naive patients, which could primarily be attributed to well-known compensatory mutations at highly polymorphic positions. By contrast, treatment-related mutations in reverse transcriptase could not explain viral load or CD4 cell count variability. Conclusions These results suggest that polymorphic compensatory mutations in protease, reported to be selected during treatment, may improve the replicative capacity of HIV-1 even in absence of drug selective pressure or major resistance mutations. The presence of this polymorphic variation may either reflect a history of drug selective pressure, i.e. transmission from a treated patient, or merely be a result of diversity in wild-type virus. Our findings suggest that transmitted drug resistance has the potential to contribute to faster disease progression in the newly infected host and to shape the HIV-1 epidemic at a population level. PMID:23031662

  11. Low Vitamin D Levels Are Associated with Higher Opioid Dose in Palliative Cancer Patients – Results from an Observational Study in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Peter; Sperneder, Susanne; Höijer, Jonas; Bergqvist, Jenny; Björkhem-Bergman, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Background Vitamin D deficiency is common among palliative cancer patients and has been connected to an increased risk for pain, depressions and infections. Therefore we wanted to test the hypothesis that low 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels are associated with higher opioid dose, higher infectious burden and impaired quality of life in palliative cancer patients. The secondary aim was to investigate the association between 25OHD-levels and survival time. Method In this prospective, observational study in palliative cancer-patients (n = 100) we performed univariate and multiple linear regression analysis to assess the association of 25OHD levels with opioid dose, infectious burden (antibiotic consumption), quality of life (Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale, ESAS) and survival time, controlling for potential confounding factors. Results The median 25OHD level was 40 nmol/L (range 8-154 nmol/L). There was a significant association between 25OHD levels and opioid dose, beta coefficient -0.67; p=0.02; i.e. a low 25OHD level was associated with a higher opioid dose. This association remained significant after adjustment for stage of the cancer disease in a multivariate analysis, beta coefficient -0.66; p = 0.04. There was no association between 25OHD levels and antibiotic use or quality of life. Univariate cox regression analysis showed a weak correlation between survival time and 25OHD levels (p<0.05). However, decreased albumin levels and increased CRP levels were superior markers to predict survival time; p<0.001 for both analyses. Conclusion Low 25OHD-levels are associated with increased opioid consumption in palliative cancer patients. Future interventional studies are needed to investigate if pain can be reduced by vitamin D supplementation in these patients. In addition, this study confirms previous findings that low albumin and increased CRP levels are useful markers for survival time in palliative cancer patients. PMID:26018761

  12. The Barbarians at the Gate. Playing the Higher Education Game: Observations from the Periphery of the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahy, Sheila Marie

    2012-01-01

    Higher education is considered by some to be synonymous with learning gained in an institution named as a university. The credentials gained from learning in such locations allow the holders to enter into the elite, which reproduces social exclusion to the benefit of that elite. In England, policy reform has opened up access to higher education to…

  13. Higher Surface Ozone Concentrations Over the Chesapeake Bay than Over the Adjacent Land: Observations and Models from the DISCOVER-AQ and CBODAQ Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Daniel L.; Loughner, Christopher P.; Tzortziou, Maria; Stehr, Jeffrey W.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Marufu, Lackson T.; Dickerson, Russell R.

    2013-01-01

    Air quality models, such as the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, indicate decidedly higher ozone near the surface of large interior water bodies, such as the Great Lakes and Chesapeake Bay. In order to test the validity of the model output, we performed surface measurements of ozone (O3) and total reactive nitrogen (NOy) on the 26-m Delaware II NOAA Small Research Vessel experimental (SRVx), deployed in the Chesapeake Bay for 10 daytime cruises in July 2011 as part of NASA's GEO-CAPE CBODAQ oceanographic field campaign in conjunction with NASA's DISCOVER-AQ air quality field campaign. During this 10-day period, the EPA O3 regulatory standard of 75 ppbv averaged over an 8-h period was exceeded four times over water while ground stations in the area only exceeded the standard at most twice. This suggests that on days when the Baltimore/Washington region is in compliance with the EPA standard, air quality over the Chesapeake Bay might exceed the EPA standard. Ozone observations over the bay during the afternoon were consistently 10-20% higher than the closest upwind ground sites during the 10-day campaign; this pattern persisted during good and poor air quality days. A lower boundary layer, reduced cloud cover, slower dry deposition rates, and other lesser mechanisms, contribute to the local maximum of ozone over the Chesapeake Bay. Observations from this campaign were compared to a CMAQ simulation at 1.33 km resolution. The model is able to predict the regional maximum of ozone over the Chesapeake Bay accurately, but NOy concentrations are significantly overestimated. Explanations for the overestimation of NOy in the model simulations are also explored

  14. Higher surface ozone concentrations over the Chesapeake Bay than over the adjacent land: Observations and models from the DISCOVER-AQ and CBODAQ campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Daniel L.; Loughner, Christopher P.; Tzortziou, Maria; Stehr, Jeffrey W.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Marufu, Lackson T.; Dickerson, Russell R.

    2014-02-01

    Air quality models, such as the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, indicate decidedly higher ozone near the surface of large interior water bodies, such as the Great Lakes and Chesapeake Bay. In order to test the validity of the model output, we performed surface measurements of ozone (O3) and total reactive nitrogen (NOy) on the 26-m Delaware II NOAA Small Research Vessel experimental (SRVx), deployed in the Chesapeake Bay for 10 daytime cruises in July 2011 as part of NASA's GEO-CAPE CBODAQ oceanographic field campaign in conjunction with NASA's DISCOVER-AQ air quality field campaign. During this 10-day period, the EPA O3 regulatory standard of 75 ppbv averaged over an 8-h period was exceeded four times over water while ground stations in the area only exceeded the standard at most twice. This suggests that on days when the Baltimore/Washington region is in compliance with the EPA standard, air quality over the Chesapeake Bay might exceed the EPA standard. Ozone observations over the bay during the afternoon were consistently 10-20% higher than the closest upwind ground sites during the 10-day campaign; this pattern persisted during good and poor air quality days. A lower boundary layer, reduced cloud cover, slower dry deposition rates, and other lesser mechanisms, contribute to the local maximum of ozone over the Chesapeake Bay. Observations from this campaign were compared to a CMAQ simulation at 1.33 km resolution. The model is able to predict the regional maximum of ozone over the Chesapeake Bay accurately, but NOy concentrations are significantly overestimated. Explanations for the overestimation of NOy in the model simulations are also explored.

  15. Causal Attribution: Actor-Observer Bias in Academic Achievement among Students at an Institution of Higher Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mudhovozi, P.; Gumani, M.; Maunganidze, L.; Sodi, T.

    2010-01-01

    The study explores the attribution styles of in-group and out-group members. Eighty-four (42 female and 42 male) undergraduate students were randomly selected from the Faculty of Education at an institution of higher learning in Zimbabwe. A questionnaire was used to capture the opinions of the participants. The data was analysed using the…

  16. Higher Education in Bulgaria and Education for Peace, Disarmament, and the Observance of Human Rights and Freedoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihailov, Nikolaj

    1984-01-01

    Education for peace and human rights in Bulgaria is approached through interdisciplinary study and not as a separate discipline in higher education, emphasizing the broad social and cultural growth of the individual student at all levels of the university curriculum. (MSE)

  17. Sino-U.S. Transnational Education--"Buying" an American Higher Education Program: A Participant Observation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nix, Jerry Vincent

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the social, political, economic, and cultural dimensions of a U.S.-based transnational education (TNE) program in China. TNE refers to education programs provided by an institution located in another country, and this study focused on higher (tertiary) education. Six questions provided the focus for this study: (1) What are…

  18. Acetic acid-water complex: The first observation of structures containing the higher-energy acetic acid conformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Susy; Fausto, Rui; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2016-02-01

    Non-covalent interaction of acetic acid (AA) and water is studied experimentally by IR spectroscopy in a nitrogen matrix and theoretically at the MP2 and coupled-cluster with single and double and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)]/6-311++G(2d,2p) levels of theory. This work is focused on the first preparation and characterization of complexes of higher-energy (cis) conformer of AA with water. The calculations show three 1:1 structures for the trans-AA⋯H2O complexes and three 1:1 structures for the cis-AA⋯H2O complexes. Two trans-AA⋯H2O and two cis-AA⋯H2O complexes are found and structurally assigned in the experiments. The two cis-AA⋯ ṡ H2O complexes are obtained by annealing of a matrix containing water and cis-AA molecules prepared by selective vibrational excitation of the ground-state trans form. The less stable trans-AA⋯H2O complex is obtained by vibrational excitation of the less stable cis-AA⋯H2O complex. In addition, the 1:2 complexes of trans-AA and cis-AA with water molecules are studied computationally and the most stable forms of the 1:2 complexes are experimentally identified.

  19. High prevalence of asthma symptoms in Warao Amerindian children in Venezuela is significantly associated with open-fire cooking: a cross-sectional observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The International Study on Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) reported a prevalence of asthma symptoms in 17 centers in nine Latin American countries that was similar to prevalence rates reported in non-tropical countries. It has been proposed that the continuous exposure to infectious diseases in rural populations residing in tropical areas leads to a relatively low prevalence of asthma symptoms. As almost a quarter of Latin American people live in rural tropical areas, the encountered high prevalence of asthma symptoms is remarkable. Wood smoke exposure and environmental tobacco smoke have been identified as possible risk factors for having asthma symptoms. Methods We performed a cross-sectional observational study from June 1, 2012 to September 30, 2012 in which we interviewed parents and guardians of Warao Amerindian children from Venezuela. Asthma symptoms were defined according to the ISAAC definition as self-reported wheezing in the last 12 months. The associations between wood smoke exposure and environmental tobacco smoke and the prevalence of asthma symptoms were calculated by means of univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Results We included 630 children between two and ten years of age. Asthma symptoms were recorded in 164 of these children (26%). The prevalence of asthma symptoms was associated with the cooking method. Children exposed to the smoke produced by cooking on open wood fires were at higher risk of having asthma symptoms compared to children exposed to cooking with gas (AOR 2.12, 95% CI 1.18 - 3.84). Four percent of the children lived in a household where more than ten cigarettes were smoked per day and they had a higher risk of having asthma symptoms compared to children who were not exposed to cigarette smoke (AOR 2.69, 95% CI 1.11 - 6.48). Conclusion Our findings suggest that children living in rural settings in a household where wood is used for cooking or where more than ten cigarettes are smoked daily have a higher risk of having asthma symptoms. PMID:23870058

  20. Observations of a rapidly flowing and significantly retreated Jakobshavn Isbrae and the proglacial ice mélange from a ground based radar interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassotto, R. K.; Fahnestock, M. A.; Amundson, J. M.; Truffer, M.; de la Pena, S.; Joughin, I. R.

    2012-12-01

    Jakobshavn Isbrae has experienced several changes in seasonal behavior over the last decade. During the period of floating ice tongue loss and late summer grounded calving from 2000-2010, the calving front experienced a seasonally modulated ~5km advance and retreat as calving ceased during the winter and re-initiated in the spring. During that time the glacier doubled its speed and the terminus retreated ~14 km. The glacier entered a new seasonal pattern in 2010 when it continued to calve throughout the winter and subsequently failed to significantly re-advance. The glacier continues to evolve into 2012; it is now moving at a new maximum speed and the terminus has already reached a new minimum position in mid-summer, far earlier than in previous years. The calving style has changed from full glacier thick icebergs that calve as episodic events at one week to few week intervals to smaller sub-kilometer icebergs that calve more frequently. A two-week field campaign was conducted observing the terminus and proglacial ice mélange during in August 2012. A group of ground based radar interferometers were deployed to monitor changes in speed and surface deformation in response to calving events and tidal cycles, helping to illustrate the new style of calving, which leads to significantly smaller icebergs in the fjord. Observations are compared against GPS instruments deployed along the terminus as well as time-lapse photography and satellite data. The radars not only capture the motion of glacier ice, but are also well suited to document the response of the ice melange to calving events. The effects of atmospheric variability on ground based radar interferometry can be important.

  1. Tectonic activity as a significant source of crustal tetrafluoromethane emissions to the atmosphere: Observations in groundwaters along the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeds, Daniel A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Mühle, Jens; Weiss, Ray F.

    2015-02-01

    Tetrafluoromethane (CF4) concentrations were measured in 14 groundwater samples from the Cuyama Valley, Mil Potrero and Cuddy Valley aquifers along the Big Bend section of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) in California to assess whether tectonic activity in this region is a significant source of crustal CF4 to the atmosphere. Dissolved CF4 concentrations in all groundwater samples but one were elevated with respect to estimated recharge concentrations including entrainment of excess air during recharge (Cre; ∼30 fmol kg-1 H2O), indicating subsurface addition of CF4 to these groundwaters. Groundwaters in the Cuyama Valley contain small CF4 excesses (0.1-9 times Cre), which may be attributed to an in situ release from weathering and a minor addition of deep crustal CF4 introduced to the shallow groundwater through nearby faults. CF4 excesses in groundwaters within 200 m of the SAFS are larger (10-980 times Cre) and indicate the presence of a deep crustal flux of CF4 that is likely associated with the physical alteration of silicate minerals in the shear zone of the SAFS. Extrapolating CF4 flux rates observed in this study to the full extent of the SAFS (1300 km × 20-100 km) suggests that the SAFS potentially emits (0.3- 1) ×10-1 kg CF4 yr-1 to the Earth's surface. For comparison, the chemical weathering of ∼ 7.5 ×104km2 of granitic rock in California is estimated to release (0.019- 3.2) ×10-1 kg CF4 yr-1. Tectonic activity is likely an important, and potentially the dominant, driver of natural emissions of CF4 to the atmosphere. Variations in preindustrial atmospheric CF4 as observed in paleo-archives such as ice cores may therefore represent changes in both continental weathering and tectonic activity, including changes driven by variations in continental ice cover during glacial-interglacial transitions.

  2. Sediment grain size and surface textural observations of quartz grains in late quaternary lacustrine sediments from Schirmacher Oasis, East Antarctica: Paleoenvironmental significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrier, Anish Kumar; Pednekar, Hemant; Mahesh, B. S.; Mohan, Rahul; Gazi, Sahina

    2016-03-01

    In this study we report the sediment grain size parameters and surface textural observations (using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)) of quartz grains from sediments of Sandy Lake, Schirmacher Oasis, East Antarctica. The sediment core spans the last 43 cal ka B.P. The statistical parameters of grain size data (sorting, skewness, kurtosis, mean grain size, D10, D50, D90 and SPAN index) indicate that the sediments are primarily transported by melt-water streams and glaciers. However, during the last glacial period, sediments seem to be transported due to wind activity as evident by the good correlation between rounded quartz data and dust flux data from EPICA ice-core data. The mean grain size values are low during the last glacial period indicating colder climatic conditions and the values increase after the last glacial maximum suggesting an increase in the energy of the transporting medium, i.e., melt-water streams. The sediments are poorly sorted and finely skewed and show different modes of grain size distribution throughout the last 43 cal ka B.P. SEM studies of selected quartz grains and analyses of various surface textures indicate that glacigenic conditions must have prevailed at the time of their transport. Semi-quantitative analyses of mineral (quartz, feldspar, mica, garnet and rock fragments & other minerals) counts suggest a mixed population of minerals with quartz being the dominant mineral. Higher concentration of quartz grains over other minerals indicates that the sediments are compositionally mature. The study reveals the different types of physical weathering, erosive signatures, and chemical precipitation most of them characteristic of glacial environment which affected these quartz grains before final deposition as lake sediments. The palaeoclimatic signals obtained from this study show similarities with ice-core and lake sediment records from Schirmacher Oasis and other ice-free regions in East Antarctica.

  3. HIF-1α 1772 C/T and 1790 G/A Polymorphisms Are Significantly Associated with Higher Cancer Risk: An Updated Meta-Analysis from 34 Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Qin, Qin; Liu, Jia; Xu, Li-Ping; Zhao, Lian-Jun; Zhang, Qu; Cai, Jing; Ma, Jian-Xin; Cheng, Hong-Yan; Sun, Xin-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Background HIF-1 activates various genes in cancer progression and metastasis. HIF-1α 1772 C/T and 1790 G/A polymorphisms are reportedly associated with cancer risk; however, the results are inconclusive. Methodology/Principal Findings A meta-analysis of 34 studies that involved 7522 cases and 9847 controls for 1772 C/T and 24 studies that involved 4884 cases and 8154 controls for 1790 G/A was conducted to identify the association of C/T and G/A polymorphisms with cancer risk. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were used to assess the strength of association. HIF-1α 1772 C/T and 1790 G/A polymorphisms were associated with higher cancer risk in homozygote comparison (1772C/T: TT vs. CC: OR = 2.45, 95% CI: 1.52, 3.96; Pheterogeneity = 0.028; 1790G/A: AA vs. GG: OR=4.74, 95% CI: 1.78, 12.6; Pheterogeneity < 0.01), dominant model (1772C/T: TT/CT vs. CC: OR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.55; Pheterogeneity < 0.01, 1790G/A: AA/GA vs. GG: OR = 1.65, 95% CI: 1.05, 2.60; Pheterogeneity < 0.01), T allele versus C allele (T vs. C: OR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.18, 1.70; Pheterogeneity < 0.01), and A allele versus G allele (A vs. G: OR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.13, 2.96; Pheterogeneity < 0.01). On a subgroup analysis, the 1772 C/T polymorphism was significantly linked to higher risks for breast cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and cervical cancer, whereas the 1790 G/A polymorphism was significantly linked to higher risks for lung cancer and prostate cancer. A significantly increased cancer risk was found in both Asians and Caucasians for 1772C/T polymorphism, whereas a significantly increased cancer risk was found in Caucasians in the heterozygote comparison and recessive model for 1790G/A polymorphism. Conclusions HIF-1α 1772 C/T and 1790 G/A polymorphisms are significantly associated with higher cancer risk. PMID:24260383

  4. A significant decrease of the fundamental Schumann resonance frequency during the solar cycle minimum of 2008-9 as observed at Modra Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondrášková, Adriena; Ševčík, Sebastián; Kostecký, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    The Schumann resonances (SR) are electromagnetic eigenmodes of the resonator bounded by the Earth's surface and the lower ionosphere. The SR frequency variability has been studied for more than 4 decades. Using data from the period 1988 to 2002, Sátori et al. (2005) showed that the SR fundamental mode frequency decreased on the 11-year time scale by 0.07 - 0.2 Hz, depending on which component of the field was used for estimation and likely also on the location of the observer. A decrease by 0.30 Hz from the latest solar cycle maximum to the minimum of 2009 is found in data from Modra Observatory. This extraordinary fall of the fundamental mode frequency can be attributed to the unprecedented drop in the ionizing radiation in X-ray frequency band. Although the patterns of the daily and seasonal variations remain the same in the solar cycle minimum as in the solar cycle maximum, they are significantly shifted to lower frequencies during the minimum. Analysis of the daily frequency range suggests that the main thunderstorm regions during the north hemisphere summer are smaller in the solar cycle minimum than in the maximum.

  5. Tectonic activity as a significant source of crustal tetrafluoromethane emissions to the atmosphere: observations in groundwaters along the San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deeds, Daniel A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Muhle, Jens; Weiss, Ray F.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrafluoromethane (CF4) concentrations were measured in 14 groundwater samples from the Cuyama Valley, Mil Potrero and Cuddy Valley aquifers along the Big Bend section of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) in California to assess whether tectonic activity in this region is a significant source of crustal CF4 to the atmosphere. Dissolved CF4 concentrations in all groundwater samples but one were elevated with respect to estimated recharge concentrations including entrainment of excess air during recharge (CreCre; ?30 fmol?kg?1 H2O), indicating subsurface addition of CF4 to these groundwaters. Groundwaters in the Cuyama Valley contain small CF4 excesses (0.19 times CreCre), which may be attributed to an in situ release from weathering and a minor addition of deep crustal CF4 introduced to the shallow groundwater through nearby faults. CF4 excesses in groundwaters within 200 m of the SAFS are larger (10980 times CreCre) and indicate the presence of a deep crustal flux of CF4 that is likely associated with the physical alteration of silicate minerals in the shear zone of the SAFS. Extrapolating CF4 flux rates observed in this study to the full extent of the SAFS (1300 km 20100 km) suggests that the SAFS potentially emits (0.31)10?1 kg(0.31)10?1 kg CF4 yr?1 to the Earth's surface. For comparison, the chemical weathering of ?7.5104 km2?7.5104 km2 of granitic rock in California is estimated to release (0.0193.2)10?1 kg(0.0193.2)10?1 kg CF4 yr?1. Tectonic activity is likely an important, and potentially the dominant, driver of natural emissions of CF4 to the atmosphere. Variations in preindustrial atmospheric CF4 as observed in paleo-archives such as ice cores may therefore represent changes in both continental weathering and tectonic activity, including changes driven by variations in continental ice cover during glacialinterglacial transitions.

  6. Circulating levels of IL-18 are significantly influenced by the IL-18 +183 A/G polymorphism in coronary artery disease patients with diabetes type 2 and the metabolic syndrome: an Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased IL-18 serum levels have been associated with diabetes type 2, metabolic syndrome and the severity of atherosclerosis. The present study investigated the presence and influence of IL-18 genetic variants on gene- and protein expression in stable coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. Methods The +183 A/G (rs 5744292), -137 G/C (rs 187238) and -607 C/A (rs 1946518) polymorphisms were determined in 1001 patients with angiographically verified stable CAD, and in 204 healthy controls. IL-18 gene-expression was measured in circulating leukocytes in 240 randomly selected patients. Circulating IL-18 and IL-18 binding protein levels were measured immunologically in all patients. Results The +183 G-allele associated significantly with lower serum levels of IL-18 (p = 0.002, adjusted for age, glucose, body mass index and gender) and a 1.13- fold higher IL-18 gene-expression (p = 0.010). No influence was observed for the -137 G/C and -607 C/A polymorphisms. The IL-18 binding protein levels were not influenced by IL-18 genotypes. IL-18 levels were significantly higher in men as compared to women, and in patients with diabetes type 2 and metabolic syndrome compared to those without (p ≤ 0.001, all). The reduction in IL-18 levels according to the +183 G-allele was 3-4 fold more pronounced in diabetes and metabolic syndrome as compared to unaffected patients. Finally, the +183 AA genotype was more frequent in patients with hypertension (p = 0.042, adjusted for age, body mass index and gender). Conclusion The reduction in serum IL-18 levels across increasing numbers of +183G-alleles was especially apparent in patient with diabetes type 2 and metabolic syndrome, suggesting a beneficial GG genotype in relation to cardiovascular outcome in these patients. Clinical Trial Registration Number ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00222261 PMID:22141572

  7. Significant Networks and Meaningful Conversations Observed in the First-Round Applicants for the Teachers' Academy at a Research-Intensive University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyörälä, Eeva; Hirsto, Laura; Toom, Auli; Myyry, Liisa; Lindblom-Ylänne, Sari

    2015-01-01

    The University of Helsinki established a Teachers' Academy to reward excellence in teaching. This study focuses on teachers' significant networks and their meaningful conversations about teaching and learning before the establishment of the Teachers' Academy. The research data consisted of answers to open-ended questions, and were examined using…

  8. Review of the Observations which have Accumulated with regard to the Significance of Diphtheria Types in the Last Four Years (1931-1935)

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, K. E.; Happold, F. C.; McLeod, J. W.; De C. Woodcock, H. E.

    1936-01-01

    1. In a series of more than 6,000 cases of diphtheria gathered from many parts of the country and from Germany during the last five years, at least 95% of the strains have fallen within three principal types described in 1933 as Gravis, Intermediate, and Mitis. 2. Of these the Gravis strains have been found to be associated with the highest case death-rate and the greatest incidence of paralysis. The Intermediate strains are more nearly related to Gravis than to Mitis in respect of their case death-rate, and at least equal to Gravis in tending to produce hæmorrhagic phenomena. The “Mitis” strains are the most likely of all to produce lesions extending to the larynx and lungs, but apart from such complications are rarely the cause of death. 3. The suggested nomenclature for the types is further justified by observations on the incidence of diphtheria in the immunized and on diphtheria mortality in areas in which different types predominate. Also, it is justified though not so definitely by observations on animal pathogenicity. 4. Typical Gravis strains are so constantly pathogenic to animals that virulence tests with such strains are superfluous. 5. The stability of the types both in the animal and in the human body is marked although a number of observations are extant suggesting fluctuation of type in vitro. 6. It seems most probable, although open to question, that the fluctuations of type observed in many areas over a period of years are due to the waxing and waning of virulence of a number of independent races, rather than to mutations from one to another. 7. The discrepancy between the clinical severity of Gravis infections and their poor capacity to produce toxin in vitro has not yet received any adequate explanation. 8. The nasal carrier is the most important factor in the spread of diphtheria. 9. Clauberg's suggestion that the variants from the three well-defined types which are met may best be explained by rough to smooth variation within the types, the rougher strains representing the more virulent forms in each type, receives a good deal of support from a wide survey of the accumulated observations. A considerable group of freely growing and rough-non-starch fermenting forms which are non-pathogenic would form an exception to this rule as these would be classified as rough “Mitis.” These may, however, eventually prove with further investigation to be diphtheroid strains distinct from “Mitis.” PMID:19990761

  9. Is statistical significance always significant?

    PubMed

    Koretz, Ronald L

    2005-06-01

    One way in which we learn new information is to read the medical literature. Whether or not we do primary research, it is important to be able to read literature in a critical fashion. A seemingly simple concept in reading is to interpret p values. For most of us, if we find a p value that is <.05, we take the conclusion to heart and quote it at every opportunity. If the p value is >.05, we discard the paper and look elsewhere for useful information. Unfortunately, this is too simplistic an approach. The real utility of p values is to consider them within the context of the experiment being performed. Defects in study design can make an interpretation of a p value useless. One has to be wary of type I (seeing a "statistically significant" difference just because of chance) and type II (failing to see a difference that really exists) errors. Examples of the former are publication bias and the performance of multiple analyses; the latter refers to a trial that is too small to demonstrate the difference. Finding significant differences in surrogate or intermediate endpoints may not help us. We need to know if those endpoints reflect the behavior of clinical endpoints. Selectively citing significant differences and disregarding studies that do not find them is inappropriate. Small differences, even if they are statistically significant, may require too much resource expenditure to be clinically useful. This article explores these problems in depth and attempts to put p values in the context of studies. PMID:16207667

  10. Laboratory polarization and permittivity measurements to interpret dust polarimetric observations and in-situ radar studies. Significance for Rosetta mission at 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Brouet, Yann; Hadamcik, Edith; Heggy, Essam; Hines, Dean; Lasue, Jérémie; Renard, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-08-01

    Polarimetric astronomical observations on dust clouds and regolithic surfaces require laboratory simulations on samples to provide information on properties (size distribution, porosity, refractive index) of the scattering media. Similarly, in-situ radar investigations in the solar system require laboratory studies on samples to infer physical properties (e.g. porosity, ice/dust ratio) of sub-surfaces and interiors. Recent developments are illustrated with present studies related to the Rosetta mission, which begun its rendezvous with comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimeko (C-G) and landed the Philae module on its nucleus in 2014.We will summarize laboratory simulations with the PROGRA2 suite of instruments that study (in the visible to near IR domain) the polarimetric properties of dust samples in microgravity conditions or on surfaces [1], with emphasis on the interpretation of polarimetric observations of C-G, during its previous perihelion passages from Earth observatories, and currently from HST [2,3]. The presence of large dust particles in the pre-perihelion coma previously inferred from remote observations agrees with Rosetta ground truth [4]. We will also present measurements on the permittivity (in the millimeter to meter domain) of various dust samples, with emphasis on porous samples [5,6]. Results provide constraints on the properties of the subsurface and interior of C-G, as explored by MIRO on Rosetta and CONSERT on Philae.Such studies are relevant for the interpretation of polarimetric observations of other dust clouds (e.g. debris disks, interplanetary dust cloud, clouds in planetary atmospheres) and surfaces (e.g. planets, moons), as well as for those of other radar characterization studies (e.g. Mars, moons, asteroids).[1] Levasseur-Regourd et al. In Polarization of stars and planetary systems, Cambridge UP, in press 2015.[2] Hadamcik et al. A&A 517 2010.[3] Hines and Levasseur-Regourd, PSS submitted 2015.[4] Schulz et al. Nature 518 2015.[5] Heggy et al. 2012, Icarus 221 2012.[6] Brouet et al. A&A submitted 2015.

  11. Higher Body Iron Is Associated with Greater Depression Symptoms among Young Adult Men but not Women: Observational Data from the Daily Life Study

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Aimee C.; Heath, Anne-Louise M.; Haszard, Jillian J.; Polak, Maria A.; Houghton, Lisa A.; Conner, Tamlin S.

    2015-01-01

    Studies investigating possible associations between iron status and mood or depressive symptoms have reported inconsistent results. However, they have neither used body iron to measure iron status nor measured mood using daily measures. We investigated whether body iron was associated with depressive symptoms, daily mood, daily tiredness, difficulty concentrating, and stress in young adult women and men. Young adult (1725 years) women (n = 562) and men (n = 323) completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, then reported negative and positive mood, and other states daily for 13 days. Non-fasting venous blood was collected to determine hemoglobin, serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor (to calculate body iron), C-reactive protein, and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein concentration. Regression models tested linear associations between body iron and the outcome variables, controlling for possible confounders. No associations were found between body iron and the outcome variables in women. However, higher body iron was associated with more depressive symptoms in men (3.4% more per body iron mg/kg; 95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.8%, 5.9%). In young adult women, body iron is unlikely to be associated with significant deficits in mood or depressive symptoms. However, higher body iron may be associated with more depressive symptoms in young adult men. PMID:26213963

  12. Significantly Higher Peripheral Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Levels in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder or Bipolar Disorder Than in Healthy Controls: A Meta-Analysis and Review Under Guideline of PRISMA.

    PubMed

    Tu, Kun-Yu; Wu, Ming-Kung; Chen, Yen-Wen; Lin, Pao-Yen; Wang, Hung-Yu; Wu, Ching-Kuan; Tseng, Ping-Tao

    2016-01-01

    An increasing amount of research has focused on insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) because of multiple neurotrophic effects, including neurogenesis, remyelination, and synaptogenesis. In addition, IGF-1 can mediate an antidepressant effect in patients with major affective disorder, and its levels in the cerebrospinal fluid have been found to vary with antidepressant treatment. Furthermore, it has been proven to crossover the blood-brain barrier, with a reciprocal feedback loop being the central effect. However, recent studies have reported inconclusive findings about the role of IGF-1 in major affective disorder. The aim of the current study was to conduct a thorough meta-analysis of changes in peripheral IGF-1 levels in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) or bipolar disorder (BD). We conducted a thorough literature search and compared peripheral IGF-1 levels in patients with MDD or BD and in healthy controls, and investigated clinical variables through meta-regression. Electronic research was conducted through platform of PubMed. We used inclusion criteria as clinical trials discussing comparisons of peripheral IGF-1 protein levels in patients with MDD or BD and those in healthy controls. We analyzed the cases from 9 studies with the random-effect model. The main finding was that peripheral IGF-1 levels in the patients were significantly higher than in the healthy controls (P < 0.001), with a significant inverse association with duration of illness (P = 0.03). In meta-analysis comparing peripheral IGF-1 levels in patients with BD or MDD before and after treatment, there was no significant change in peripheral IGF-1 levels after treatment (P = 0.092). The small numbers of studies and lack of correlation data with growth hormone in current studies are the main limitations of this meta-analysis. Our results indicated that peripheral IGF-1 levels may not be an indicator of disease severity, but may be a disease trait marker or an indicator of cognition. However, further investigations on the correlation between cognitive function and peripheral IGF-1 levels are needed to explore the role of IGF-1 in the pathophysiology of MDD and BD. PMID:26825882

  13. Nipple discharge: is its significance as a risk factor for breast cancer fully understood? Observational study including 915 consecutive patients who underwent selective duct excision.

    PubMed

    Montroni, Isacco; Santini, Donatella; Zucchini, Giorgia; Fiacchi, Monica; Zanotti, Simone; Ugolini, Giampaolo; Manaresi, Alessio; Taffurelli, Mario

    2010-10-01

    Nipple discharge (ND) is a common symptom seen in breast cancer clinics. The primary aim of this study was to identify preoperative risk factors for breast cancer in patients with pathologic ND. The secondary aim was to assess the clinical and pathological effectiveness of physical examination, galactography, cytological examination of the discharge, selective duct excision and ductoscopy. All patients operated on between 1975 and 2008 who presented with ND as their only symptom was analyzed. Discharge's characteristics, cytological data and galactography reports were recorded. The relationship between each individual finding and the risk of breast cancer was calculated. For each diagnostic tool, the sensitivity, specificity and complication rates were calculated and compared. Nine-hundred-fifteen patients underwent selective duct excision. Two-hundred-nineteen patients (23.9%) were found to be affected by carcinoma. In 100/330 (30.3%) patients with bloody discharge and in 42/239 (17.6%) patients with serous secretion cancer was detected (P = 0.004, P = 0.013, respectively). Patients with sero-sanguinous or coloured discharge had the same risk of cancer as the population analyzed (23.9%, P = NS). Galactographic finding of irregular stenosis seemed to be associated with a higher risk of cancer (P = 0.0001). Cytological findings C5 and C4 were associated with cancer (P = 0.001). Selective duct excision showed highest sensitivity and specificity. In conclusion, the well established role of bloody secretion is confirmed. The supposed benign aetiology of serous, coloured or sero-sanguinous discharge is questionable. The high specificity of the cytological exam justifies routine examination of the ND. Selective duct excision can be considered as the diagnostic gold-standard. PMID:20354781

  14. Time to virological failure with atazanavir/ritonavir and lopinavir/ritonavir, with or without an H2-receptor blocker, not significantly different in HIV observational database study.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Philip H; Nassar, Naiel

    2008-08-01

    A retrospective electronic database study was conducted to determine any differences in time to virological failure and percent of virological failure among HIV-infected patients concurrently receiving H2-blockers versus patients not receiving these agents while receiving atazanavir (ATV)/ritonavir (r) or lopinavir (LPV)/r-containing antiretroviral treatment regimens. Data were culled from October 2003 (when ATV became commercially available) through February 2006. Virological failure was defined as (1) two plasma HIV-1 RNA levels >400 copies/mL after at least one HIV-1 RNA level below the level of detection or (2) failure to achieve an HIV-1 RNA <400 copies/mL within 24 weeks. Data from 267 ATV/r-treated patients who met the case definition were compared with data from 670 LPV/r-treated patients. Approximately 10% of the ATV/r group received concurrent H2-blockers when compared with 20% of the LPV/r group. Multivariate analysis showed no statistically significant differences regarding time to virological failure between or among the four subgroups, adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics (P = 0.79, log-rank test). At 750 days following treatment initiation, the proportion of patients not experiencing virological failure was 56% in the ATV/r-blocker subgroup, 48% in the ATV/r-alone subgroup, 45% in the LPV/r-alone subgroup and 42% in the LPV/r-blocker subgroup. PMID:18663047

  15. Ritonavir and efavirenz significantly alter the metabolism of erlotinib--an observation in primary cultures of human hepatocytes that is relevant to HIV patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Venkateswaran C; Venkataramanan, Raman; Parise, Robert A; Christner, Susan M; Gramignoli, Roberto; Strom, Stephen C; Rudek, Michelle A; Beumer, Jan H

    2013-10-01

    Erlotinib is approved for the treatment of non-small cell lung and pancreatic cancers, and is metabolized by CYP3A4. Inducers and inhibitors of CYP3A enzymes such as ritonavir and efavirenz, respectively, may be used as part of the highly active antiretroviral therapy drugs to treat patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). When HIV patients with a malignancy need treatment with erlotinib, there is a potential of as-yet-undefined drug-drug interaction. We evaluated these interactions using human hepatocytes benchmarked against the interaction of erlotinib with ketoconazole and rifampin, the archetype cytochrome P450 inhibitor and inducer, respectively. Hepatocytes were treated with vehicle [0.1% dimethylsulfoxide, ritonavir (10 μM)], ketoconazole (10 μM), efavirenz (10 μM), or rifampin (10 μM) for 4 days. On day 5, erlotinib (5 μM) was incubated with the above agents for another 24-48 hours. Concentrations of erlotinib and O-desmethyl erlotinib were quantitated in collected samples (combined lysate and medium) using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. The half-life (t(½)) of erlotinib increased from 10.6 ± 2.6 to 153 ± 80 and 23.9 ± 4.8 hours, respectively, upon treatment with ritonavir and ketoconazole. The apparent intrinsic clearance (C(Lint, app)) of erlotinib was lowered 16-fold by ritonavir and 1.9-fold by ketoconazole. Efavirenz and rifampin decreased t1/2 of erlotinib from 10.3 ± 1.1 to 5.0 ± 1.5 and 3.4 ± 0.2 hours, respectively. Efavirenz and rifampin increased the C(Lint, app) of erlotinib by 2.2- and 2-fold, respectively. Our results suggest that to achieve desired drug exposure, the clinically used dose (150 mg daily) of erlotinib may have to be significantly reduced (25 mg every other day) or increased (300 mg daily), respectively, when ritonavir or efavirenz is coadministered. PMID:23913028

  16. Solid Surface Combustion Experiment Yields Significant Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacksteder, Kurt R.; Koudelka, John M.; Vergilii, Franklin

    1999-01-01

    The spread of a flame over solid fuel is not only a fundamental textbook combustion phenomenon, but also the central element of destructive fires that cause tragic loss of life and property each year. Throughout history, practical measures to prevent and fight fires have been developed, but these have often been based on lessons learned in a costly fire. Since the 1960 s, scientists and engineers have employed powerful tools of scientific research to understand the details of flame spread and how a material can be rendered nonflammable. High-speed computers have enabled complex flame simulations, whereasand lasers have provided measurements of the chemical composition, temperature, and air velocities inside flames. The microgravity environment has emerged as the third great tool for these studies. Spreading flames are complex combinations of chemical reactions and several physical processes including the transport of oxygen and fuel vapor to the flame and the transfer of heat from the flame to fresh fuel and to the surroundings. Depending on its speed, air motion in the vicinity of the flame can affect the flame in substantially different ways. For example, consider the difference between blowing on a campfire and blowing out a match. On Earth, gravity induces air motion because of buoyancy (the familiar rising hot gases); this process cannot be controlled experimentally. For theoreticians, buoyant air motion complicates the problem modeling of flame spread beyond the capacity of modern computers to simulate. The microgravity environment provides experimental control of air motion near spreading flames, with results that can be compared with detailed theory. The Solid Surface Combustion Experiment (SSCE) was designed to obtain benchmark flame spreading data in quiescent test atmospheres--the limiting case of flames spreading. Professor Robert Altenkirch, Vice President for Research at Mississippi State University, proposed the experiment concept, and the NASA Lewis Research Center designed, built, and tested the SSCE hardware. It was the first microgravity science experiment built by Lewis for the space shuttle and the first combustion science experiment flown in space.

  17. Higher Education: Schools' Use of the Antitrust Exemption Has Not Significantly Affected College Affordability or Likelihood of Student Enrollment to Date. Report to Congressional Committees. GAO-06-963

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Cornelia M.

    2006-01-01

    In 1991 the U.S. Department of Justice sued nine colleges and universities, alleging that they had restrained competition by making collective financial aid determinations for students accepted to more than one of these schools. Against the backdrop of this litigation, Congress enacted a temporary exemption from antitrust laws for higher education…

  18. Significant Survival: A Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Thomas R.; Stewart, Clifford T.

    1975-01-01

    Five guidelines to increase significance and avoid simplistic solutions and reacting to enrollment and budgetary declines are suggested: develop system for alerting policy-makers to dangers, remember that quality attracts, look outside higher education for guidance, maintain a "pruning" mentality, and realize the need to work for significant…

  19. Observations on Boundary Spanning and Culture in Higher Education: An Exploratory Study of a Start-up Organization. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, David J.; Carchidi, Daniel M.

    This study examined an institution that is in the process of developing programs and organizations to meet the new challenges faced by higher education. It reviewed the evolution of a new, boundary-spanning organization at a major research university from the perspective of the persons involved. The study looked at the experiences of the people…

  20. Observations of Co4+ in a Higher Spin State and the Increase in the Seebeck Coefficient of Thermoelectric Ca3Co4O9

    SciTech Connect

    Klie, Robert F; Qiao, Q.; Paulauskas, T.; Gulec, A.; Rebola, A.; Ogut, Serdar; Prange, Micah P; Idrobo Tapia, Juan C; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Kolesnik, S.; Dabrowski, B.; Ozdemir, M.; Boyraz, C.; Mazumdar, Dipanjan; Gupta, Dr. Arunava

    2012-01-01

    Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9} has a unique structure that leads to exceptionally high thermoelectric transport. Here we report the achievement of a 27% increase in the room-temperature in-plane Seebeck coefficient of Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9} thin films. We combine aberration-corrected Z-contrast imaging, atomic-column resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and density-functional calculations to show that the increase is caused by stacking faults with Co4+-ions in a higher spin state compared to that of bulk Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9}. The higher Seebeck coefficient makes the Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9} system suitable for many high temperature waste-heat-recovery applications.

  1. The Differential Impact of Observational Learning and Practice-Based Learning on the Development of Oral Presentation Skills in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Grez, Luc; Valcke, Martin; Roozen, Irene

    2014-01-01

    The present study focuses on the design and evaluation of an innovative instructional approach to developing oral presentation skills. The intervention builds on the observational learning theoretical perspective. This perspective is contrasted with the traditional training and practice approach. Two sequencing approaches--learners starting with…

  2. Renal dysfunction in STEMI-patients undergoing primary angioplasty: higher prevalence but equal prognostic impact in female patients; an observational cohort study from the Belgian STEMI registry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mortality in female patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary angioplasty (pPCI) is higher than in men. We examined gender differences in the prevalence and prognostic performance of renal dysfunction at admission in this setting. Methods A multicenter retrospective sub-analysis of the Belgian STEMI-registry identified 1,638 patients (20.6% women, 79.4% men) treated with pPCI in 8 tertiary care hospitals (January 2007-February 2011). The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the CKD-EPI equation. Main outcome measure was in-hospital mortality. Results More women than men suffered from renal dysfunction at admission (42.3% vs. 25.3%, p < 0.001). Mortality in women was doubled as compared to men (9.5 vs. 4.7%, OR (95% CI) = 2.12 (1.36-3.32), p<0.001). In-hospital mortality for men and women with vs. without renal dysfunction was much higher (10.7 and 15.3 vs. 2.3 and 2.4%, p < 0.001). In a multivariable regression analysis, adjusting for age, gender, peripheral artery disease (PAD), coronary artery disease (CAD), hypertension, diabetes and low body weight (<67 kg), female gender was associated with renal dysfunction at admission (OR (95% CI) 1.65 (1.20-2.25), p = 0.002). In a multivariable model including TIMI risk score and renal dysfunction, renal dysfunction was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality in both men (OR (95% CI) = 2.39 (1.27-4.51), p = 0.007) and women (OR (95% CI) = 4.03 (1.26-12.92), p = 0.02), with a comparable impact for men and women (p for interaction = 0.69). Conclusions Female gender was independently associated with renal dysfunction at admission in pPCI treated patients. Renal dysfunction was equally associated with higher in-hospital mortality in both men and women. PMID:23506004

  3. Significant Developments in Continuing Higher Education. Occasional Paper Number 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liveright, A. A.; Goldman, Freda H.

    This paper, published in 1965, identifies contemporary developments in adult and continuing education in three categories: a new climate and milieu, institutional changes, and new program developments. The following evidence of a new climate and milieu is discussed: broader scope and wider acceptance of adult education; more federal activity in…

  4. Higher Education or Higher Skilling?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Steven

    1974-01-01

    Higher education may return to education for a minority, an unlikely course; concentrate on higher skilling, the road we are on today; or restore general education, the most attractive possibility, which can be implemented by restoring basic education in literacy, history, human biology, and language. (JH)

  5. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Robert M.; Gregory, Dennis E.

    Decisions made by federal and state courts during 1983 concerning higher education are reported in this chapter. Issues of employment and the treatment of students underlay the bulk of the litigation. Specific topics addressed in these and other cases included federal authority to enforce regulations against age discrimination and to revoke an…

  6. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Robert M.

    This eighth chapter of "The Yearbook of School Law, 1986" summarizes and analyzes over 330 state and federal court cases litigated in 1985 in which institutions of higher education were involved. Among the topics examined were relationships between postsecondary institutions and various governmental agencies; discrimination in the employment of…

  7. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Robert M.

    Higher education case law in 1990 is discussed in this chapter under nine major topics: (1) intergovernmental relations; (2) discrimination in employment; (3) faculty employment; (4) administrators and staff; (5) students; (6) liability; (7) antitrust; (8) patents; and (9) estates and wills. Questions of the authority of federal, state, and local…

  8. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Robert M.; Finnegan, Dorothy E.

    Themes in 1989 higher education case law reflect the difficulty in reducing the federal deficit, increased service demands on state budgets, and an economic condition of marginal growth. The interpretation of constitutional rights in relationships between the institution and students, employees, and communities continues to be heavily litigated.…

  9. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Robert M.; Finnegan, Dorothy E.

    The higher education case law in 1988 is extensive. Cases discussed in this chapter are organized under five major topics: (1) intergovernmental relations; (2) employees, involving discrimination claims, tenured and nontenured faculty, collective bargaining, and denial of employee benefits; (3) students, involving admissions, financial aid, First…

  10. Significant Tsunami Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, P. K.; Furtney, M.; McLean, S. J.; Sweeney, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    Tsunamis have inflicted death and destruction on the coastlines of the world throughout history. The occurrence of tsunamis and the resulting effects have been collected and studied as far back as the second millennium B.C. The knowledge gained from cataloging and examining these events has led to significant changes in our understanding of tsunamis, tsunami sources, and methods to mitigate the effects of tsunamis. The most significant, not surprisingly, are often the most devastating, such as the 2011 Tohoku, Japan earthquake and tsunami. The goal of this poster is to give a brief overview of the occurrence of tsunamis and then focus specifically on several significant tsunamis. There are various criteria to determine the most significant tsunamis: the number of deaths, amount of damage, maximum runup height, had a major impact on tsunami science or policy, etc. As a result, descriptions will include some of the most costly (2011 Tohoku, Japan), the most deadly (2004 Sumatra, 1883 Krakatau), and the highest runup ever observed (1958 Lituya Bay, Alaska). The discovery of the Cascadia subduction zone as the source of the 1700 Japanese "Orphan" tsunami and a future tsunami threat to the U.S. northwest coast, contributed to the decision to form the U.S. National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program. The great Lisbon earthquake of 1755 marked the beginning of the modern era of seismology. Knowledge gained from the 1964 Alaska earthquake and tsunami helped confirm the theory of plate tectonics. The 1946 Alaska, 1952 Kuril Islands, 1960 Chile, 1964 Alaska, and the 2004 Banda Aceh, tsunamis all resulted in warning centers or systems being established.The data descriptions on this poster were extracted from NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) global historical tsunami database. Additional information about these tsunamis, as well as water level data can be found by accessing the NGDC website www.ngdc.noaa.gov/hazard/

  11. Peripheral blood stem cell mobilization in multiple myeloma patients treat in the novel therapy-era with plerixafor and G-CSF has superior efficacy but significantly higher costs compared to mobilization with low-dose cyclophosphamide and G-CSF.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Lubna; Awan, Farrukh; Cumpston, Aaron; Leadmon, Sonia; Watkins, Kathy; Tse, William; Craig, Michael; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2013-10-01

    Studies comparing the efficacy and cost of peripheral blood stem and progenitor cells mobilization with low-dose cyclophosphamide (LD-CY) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) against plerixafor and G-CSF, in multiple myeloma (MM) patients treated in the novel therapy-era are not available. Herein, we report mobilization outcomes of 107 patients who underwent transplantation within 1-year of starting induction chemotherapy with novel agents. Patients undergoing mobilization with LD-CY (1.5 gm/m(2)) and G-CSF (n = 74) were compared against patients receiving plerixafor and G-CSF (n = 33). Compared to plerixafor, LD-CY was associated with a significantly lower median peak peripheral blood CD34+ cell count (68/µL vs. 36/µL, P = 0.048), and lower CD34+ cell yield on day 1 of collection (6.9 × 10(6)/kg vs. 2.4 × 10(6)/kg, P = 0.001). Six patients (8.1%) in the LD-CY group experienced mobilization failure, compared to none in the plerixafor group. The total CD34+ cell yield was significantly higher in the plerixafor group (median 11.6 × 10(6)/kg vs. 7 × 10(6)/kg; P-value = 0.001). Mobilization with LD-CY was associated with increased (albeit statistically non-significant) episodes of febrile neutropenia (5.4% vs. 0%; P = 0.24), higher use of intravenous antibiotics (6.7% vs. 3%; P = 0.45), and need for hospitalizations (9.4% vs. 3%; P = 0.24). The average total cost of mobilization in the plerixafor group was significantly higher compared to the LD-CY group ($28,980 vs. $19,626.5 P-value < 0.0001). In conclusion, in MM plerixafor-based mobilization has superior efficacy, but significantly higher mobilization costs compared to LD-CY mobilization. Our data caution against the use of LD-CY in MM patients for mobilization, especially after induction with lenalidomide-containing regimens. PMID:23765597

  12. The initial errors that induce a significant "spring predictability barrier" for El Niño events and their implications for target observation: results from an earth system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Wansuo; Hu, Junya

    2015-08-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Earth System Model is used to study the "spring predictability barrier" (SPB) problem for El Niño events from the perspective of initial error growth. By conducting perfect model predictability experiments, we obtain two types of initial sea temperature errors, which often exhibit obvious season-dependent evolution and cause a significant SPB when predicting the onset of El Niño events bestriding spring. One type of initial errors possesses a sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) pattern with negative anomalies in the central-eastern equatorial Pacific, plus a basin-wide dipolar subsurface temperature anomaly pattern with negative anomalies in the upper layers of the eastern equatorial Pacific and positive anomalies in the lower layers of the western equatorial Pacific. The other type consists of an SSTA component with positive anomalies over the southeastern equatorial Pacific, plus a large-scale zonal dipole pattern of the subsurface temperature anomaly with positive anomalies in the upper layers of the eastern equatorial Pacific and negative anomalies in the lower layers of the central-western equatorial Pacific. Both exhibit a La Niña-like evolving mode and cause an under-prediction for Niño-3 SSTA of El Niño events. For the former initial error type, the resultant prediction errors grow in a manner similar to the behavior of the growth phase of La Niña; while for the latter initial error type, they experience a process that is similar to El Niño decay and transition to a La Niña growth phase. Both two types of initial errors cause negative prediction errors of Niño-3 SSTA for El Niño events. The prediction errors for Niño-3 SSTA are mainly due to the contribution of initial sea temperature errors in the large-error-related regions in the upper layers of the eastern tropical Pacific and/or in the lower layers of the western tropical Pacific. These regions may represent ``sensitive areas'' for El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) predictions, thereby providing information for target observations to improve the forecasting skill of ENSO.

  13. Anthropological significance of phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Saugstad, L F

    1975-01-01

    The highest incidence rates of phenylketonuria (PKU) have been observed in Ireland and Scotlant. Parents heterozygous for PKU in Norway differ significantly from the general population in the Rhesus, Kell and PGM systems. The parents investigated showed an excess of Rh negative, Kell plus and PGM type 1 individuals, which makes them similar to the present populations in Ireland and Scotlant. It is postulated that the heterozygotes for PKU in Norway are descended from a completely assimilated sub-population of Celtic origin, who came or were brought here, 1ooo years ago. Bronze objects of Western European (Scottish, Irish) origin, found in Viking graves widely distributed in Norway, have been taken as evidence of Vikings returning with loot (including a number of Celts) from Western Viking settlements. The continuity of residence since the Viking age in most habitable parts of Norway, and what seems to be a nearly complete regional relationship between the sites where Viking graves contain western imported objects and the birthplaces of grandparents of PKUs identified in Norway, lend further support to the hypothesis that the heterozygotes for PKU in Norway are descended from a completely assimilated subpopulation. The remarkable resemblance between Iceland and Ireland, in respect of several genetic markers (including the Rhesus, PGM and Kell systems), is considered to be an expression of a similar proportion of people of Celtic origin in each of the two countries. Their identical, high incidence rates of PKU are regarded as further evidence of this. The significant decline in the incidence of PKU when one passes from Ireland, Scotland and Iceland, to Denmark and on to Norway and Sweden, is therefore explained as being related to a reduction in the proportion of inhabitants of Celtic extraction in the respective populations. PMID:803884

  14. Futurism in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, Linda S.

    1988-01-01

    The concept of "futurism" in higher education program planning, self-study and goal setting is taking on increasing significance. Two research techniques for "futures forecasting" are discussed: the Delphi and the Scenario. These techniques have been used successfully in institutional self-study and program evaluation. (Author/MLW)

  15. Trial sequential analysis may be insufficient to draw firm conclusions regarding statistically significant treatment differences using observed intervention effects: a case study of meta-analyses of multiple myeloma trials.

    PubMed

    Miladinovic, Branko; Kumar, Ambuj; Hozo, Iztok; Mahony, Helen; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2013-03-01

    Trial sequential analysis (TSA) has been proposed as a method to assess the risk of random error in cumulative meta-analysis (MA), which increases due to repeated significance testing. The aim of TSA is to assist researchers from wrongly concluding treatment differences in the absence of a benefit (i.e. true versus false positive). Similar to monitoring boundaries applied in individual randomized controlled trials, recent literature has advocated the use of TSA for assessing the conclusiveness of results from MAs to determine the requirement for future studies in case of true positive results. While this may be desirable, we present empirical evidence from a recent systematic review to demonstrate that the use of TSA may lead to a premature declaration of statistically significant treatment difference, when further accumulated evidence suggested otherwise. Using all apparently conclusive MAs in multiple-myeloma, we empirically studied under what thresholds for the risk ratio reduction and power a true positive result becomes false positive. We recommend that the conclusion of significant treatment differences in cumulative MA should be weighed against acceptable thresholds regarding the type I error, power and apriori specified clinically meaningful treatment difference. PMID:23274403

  16. Clinical significance of translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Van Leeuwen, P A; Boermeester, M A; Houdijk, A P; Ferwerda, C C; Cuesta, M A; Meyer, S; Wesdorp, R I

    1994-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, besides being the organ responsible for nutrient absorption, is also a metabolic and immunological system, functioning as an effective barrier against endotoxin and bacteria in the intestinal lumen. The passage of viable bacteria from the gastrointestinal tract through the epithelial mucosa is called bacterial translocation. Equally important may be the passage of bacterial endotoxin through the mucosal barrier. This article reviews the evidence that translocation of both endotoxin and bacteria is of clinical significance. It summarises recent published works indicating that translocation of endotoxin in minute amounts is a physiological important phenomenon to boost the reticuloendothelial system (RES), especially the Kupffer cells, in the liver. Breakdown of both the mucosal barrier and the RES capacity results in systemic endotoxaemia. Systemic endotoxaemia results in organ dysfunction, impairs the mucosal barrier, the clotting system, the immune system, and depresses Kupffer cell function. If natural defence mechanisms such as lipopolysaccharide binding protein, high density lipoprotein, in combination with the RES, do not respond properly, dysfunction of the gut barrier results in bacterial translocation. Extensive work on bacterial translocation has been performed in animal models and occurs notably in haemorrhagic shock, thermal injury, protein malnutrition, endotoxaemia, trauma, and intestinal obstruction. It is difficult to extrapolate these results to humans and its clinical significance is not clear. The available data show that the resultant infection remains important in the development of sepsis, especially in the critically ill patient. Uncontrolled infection is, however, neither necessary nor sufficient to account for the development of multiple organ failure. A more plausible sequelae is that bacterial translocation is a later phenomenon of multiple organ failure, and not its initiator. It is hypothesized that multiple organ failure is more probably triggered by the combination of tissue damage and systemic endotoxaemia. Endotoxaemia, as seen in trauma patients especially during the first 24 hours, in combination with tissue elicits a systemic inflammation, called Schwartzmann reaction. Interferon gamma, a T cell produced cytokine, is thought to play a pivotal part in the pathogenesis of this reaction. This reaction might occur only if the endotoxin induced cytokines like tumour necrosis factor and interleukin 1, act on target cells prepared by interferon gamma. After exposure to interferon gamma target cells become more sensitive to stimuli like endotoxin, thus boosting the inflammatory cycle. Clearly, following this line of reasoning, minor tissue damage or retroperitoneal haematoma combined with systemic endotoxaemia could elicit this reaction. The clinically observed failure of multiple organ systems might thus be explained by the interaction of tissue necrosis and high concentrations of endotoxin because of translocation. Future therapeutic strategies could therefore focus more on binding endotoxin in the gut before the triggering event, for example before major surgery. Such a strategy could be combined with the start of early enteral feeding, which has been shown in animal studies to have a beneficial effect on intestinal mucosal barrier function and in traumatized patients to reduce the incidence of septic complications. PMID:8125386

  17. Significant potential for lower costs.

    PubMed

    Renecle, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Switching to LED lighting has, specialist supplier of such technology, Exled maintains, 'proven to be one of the most significant cost-saving activities hospitals can undertake'. Alongside the financial gains, other benefits include higher levels of patient satisfaction with lighting 'quality' and ambience, and improved environmental credentials. Here Exled MD, Michael Renecle, discusses LED lighting in healthcare in some detail, offers useful pointers on specification, examines some of the 'significant savings and environmental improvements' available to those 'making the switch', and considers the positive experiences of a number of NHS Trusts who have done so. PMID:25282981

  18. Significance of Interleukin-6 in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kobawala, Toral P.; Trivedi, Trupti I.; Gajjar, Kinjal K.; Patel, Darshita H.; Patel, Girish H.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to reveal the significance of IL-6 in papillary thyroid carcinoma by determining its circulating levels, tumoral protein, and mRNA expressions. As compared to the healthy individuals, serum IL-6 was significantly higher in patients with benign thyroid diseases and PTC. Further, its level was significantly higher in PTC patients as compared to patients with benign thyroid diseases. ROC curves also confirmed a good discriminatory efficacy of serum IL-6 between healthy individuals and patients with benign thyroid diseases and PTC. The circulating IL-6 was significantly associated with poor overall survival in PTC patients. IL-6 immunoreactivity was significantly high in PTC patients as compared to the benign thyroid disease patients. Significantly higher IL-6 mRNA expression was also observed in the primary tumour tissues of PTC patients than the adjacent normal tissues. The protein expression of IL-6 at both the circulating and tissue level correlated with disease aggressiveness in PTC patients. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was observed between the IL-6 protein and mRNA expression in the primary tumours of PTC patients. Finally in conclusion, IL-6 has an important role in thyroid cancer progression. Thus targeting IL-6 signalling can help in clinical management of thyroid carcinoma patients. PMID:27034885

  19. Significant lexical relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, T.; Kayaalp, M.; Bruce, R.

    1996-12-31

    Statistical NLP inevitably deals with a large number of rare events. As a consequence, NLP data often violates the assumptions implicit in traditional statistical procedures such as significance testing. We describe a significance test, an exact conditional test, that is appropriate for NLP data and can be performed using freely available software. We apply this test to the study of lexical relationships and demonstrate that the results obtained using this test are both theoretically more reliable and different from the results obtained using previously applied tests.

  20. Earthquake Induced Site Effect in the Algiers-Boumerdes Region: Relation Between Spectral Ratios Higher Peaks and Observed Damage During the May 21st M w 6.8 Boumerdes Earthquake (Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laouami, Nasser; Slimani, Abdennasser

    2013-11-01

    The Algiers-Boumerdes regions were hit by an M w 6.8 destructive earthquake on May 21, 2003. The accelerometric and seismometric networks successfully recorded the main shock and many aftershocks at some locations where the damage was most extensive. A microtremor measurement was performed in the same locations; some of them are localized on the Mitidja basin. In this paper, we propose to analyze earthquake-induced site effect derived from horizontal to vertical spectral ratio from ambient noise (noise horizontal to vertical—NHV), or from very weak, weak, moderate and strong ( peak ground acceleration—PGA >10 % g) seismic motions (EHV), and transfer function evaluation from soil velocity profile data at four sites. H/V spectral ratios are computed by using both Fourier and response spectra. Compared to the transfer function, the obtained results show that in the case of soft soils, NHV as well as EHV give a good estimation of the soil's fundamental frequency, whereas the NHV underestimate the H/V amplitude and the EHV amplitude increase with the seismic motion intensity. In the case of firm soils, whereas the NHV gives flat curves synonymous for a rock site or a bump, the EHV is more appropriate as seen by identifying clear peaks with non negligible amplitude. In the case of soft sites as well as in the case of firm sites, strong peaks at frequencies higher than the fundamental one are found from EHV curves. Those peaks would not be found when looking at NHV ratios alone, are evidenced by the computed transfer function as well as by an analytical formulation, and are in agreement with the observed distribution of damage during the M w 6.8 2003 Boumerdes earthquake. Finally, the same analysis is performed by using response spectra rather than Fourier spectra and leads to the same conclusions. Moreover, the calculation of the response spectra is more easily compared with the smoothing operation of the Fourier spectra.

  1. Significant Attributes of Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Frances T.

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a method of finding the significant attributes of documents established during the course of research on the automatic classification of documents. The problem was first approached by examining the way in which an existing hierarchical classification system classifies things. The study of biological…

  2. ASCA Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.

    1998-01-01

    This recently expired grant has supported the work of the PI, his students, and his collaborators on a variety of ASCA projects over the past four years. Annual reports have summarized much of the work accomplished; here we provide a brief review of the work resulting from this effort, and a summary of the personnel who have benefited from the grant's support. Starburst Galaxies with Extreme X-ray Luminosities This project began as a careful examination of the claims of Boller et al. (1992) that there were dozens of "normal" galaxies in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey that had X-ray luminosities in excess of 1042 erg sec, higher than that seen in the hundreds of non-AGN galaxies observed with Einstein. If true, this suggested that X-ray emission associated with star formation activity might have a significant contribution to make to the still unexplained cosmic X-ray background (XRB). Since some of our earlier work with the Einstein Observatory Deep Surveys had suggested a similar possibility and several sets of authors over the years had modelled the starburst XRB contribution, these claims were worth pursuing. Our work expanded the examination beyond the RASS to include earlier claims of high-luminosity galaxies powered by starburst emission (selected in this case on the basis of the far-IR luminosities). The result of extensive followup observations under several programs using ROSAT, ASCA, and ground-based facilities was to show that nearly all of these objects in fact have hidden AGN at their cores, and that their luminosities are not in any way extraordinary.

  3. The significance of gamma ray observations for neutrino astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    Celestial gamma-rays and neutrinos are formed in some of the same astrophysical interactions, but have important different properties. Measurements of these radiations were used to study the presence and dynamic effects of energetic charged cosmic ray particles, element synthesis and particle acceleration. In addition, since gamma-rays in the energy range from several MeV to at least 10 to the 12th power eV and neutrinos both have very low interaction cross sections, they have a very high penetrating power and reach the earth from almost any part of the galaxy or universe. Therefore, they retain the detailed imprint of spectral, directional and temporal features imposed at their birth, even if they were born in regions opaque to visible light and X-rays.

  4. [Submitting studies without significant results].

    PubMed

    Texier, Gaëtan; Meynard, Jean-Baptiste; Michel, Rémy; Migliani, René; Boutin, Jean-Paul

    2007-03-01

    When a study finds that no exposure factor or therapy is significantly related to a given effect, researchers legitimately wonder if the results should be submitted for publication and to what journal. Clinical trials that report significant associations have a higher probability of publication, a phenomenon known as selective publication. The principal reasons of this selective publication include author self-censorship, peer-reviewing, trials not intended for publication, interpretation of the p value, cost of journal subscriptions, and policies. Subsequent reviews and meta-analyses are biased by the unavailability of nonsignificant results. Suggestions for preventing this risk include university training, trial registries, an international standard randomised controlled trial number (ISRCTN), Cochrane collaboration, and the gray literature. Journals (including electronic journals) interested in studies with nonsignificant results are listed. New technologies are changing the relations between publishers, libraries, authors and readers. PMID:17287106

  5. Disruptive Technologies in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flavin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the role of "disruptive" innovative technologies in higher education. In this country and elsewhere, Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) have invested significant sums in learning technologies, with Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) being more or less universal, but these technologies have not been universally adopted and…

  6. Women in Higher Education, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenniger, Mary Dee, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This document consists of the issues of a 1996 newsletter on women students, teachers, and administrators in higher education. Each issue includes feature articles, news on higher education, profiles of significant people in the field, and job announcements. The issues' main articles concern: (1) a successful campaign to increase female…

  7. Women in Higher Education, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenninger, Mary Dee, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This document consists of the 12 monthly issues of a newsletter on women students, teachers, and administrators in higher education, issued in 1994. Each issue includes feature articles, news on higher education, profiles of significant people in the field, and job announcements. The issues' main article topics are: (1) campuses's changing…

  8. Tort Litigation in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake, Peter F.

    2000-01-01

    Identifies the significant trends and notable decisions in tort litigation regarding higher education in 1999. Cases for this year show that litigation remains common in higher education, and that many cases challenged the traditional norms of education law. An unmistakable trend is the increasing tendency to see student and university…

  9. Significant Radionuclides Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Jo A. Ziegler

    2001-07-31

    The purpose of this calculation is to identify radionuclides that are significant to offsite doses from potential preclosure events for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste expected to be received at the potential Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). In this calculation, high-level radioactive waste is included in references to DOE SNF. A previous document, ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b), calculated the source terms and offsite doses for Department of Energy (DOE) and Naval SNF for use in design basis event analyses. This calculation reproduces only DOE SNF work (i.e., no naval SNF work is included in this calculation) created in ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' and expands the calculation to include DOE SNF expected to produce a high dose consequence (even though the quantity of the SNF is expected to be small) and SNF owned by commercial nuclear power producers. The calculation does not address any specific off-normal/DBE event scenarios for receiving, handling, or packaging of SNF. The results of this calculation are developed for comparative analysis to establish the important radionuclides and do not represent the final source terms to be used for license application. This calculation will be used as input to preclosure safety analyses and is performed in accordance with procedure AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'', and is subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2000) as determined by the activity evaluation contained in ''Technical Work Plan for: Preclosure Safety Analysis, TWP-MGR-SE-000010'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b) in accordance with procedure AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''.

  10. Fungi producing significant mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of microfungi that are known to cause sickness or death in humans or animals. Although many such toxic metabolites are known, it is generally agreed that only a few are significant in causing disease: aflatoxins, fumonisins, ochratoxin A, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, and ergot alkaloids. These toxins are produced by just a few species from the common genera Aspergillus, Penicillium, Fusarium, and Claviceps. All Aspergillus and Penicillium species either are commensals, growing in crops without obvious signs of pathogenicity, or invade crops after harvest and produce toxins during drying and storage. In contrast, the important Fusarium and Claviceps species infect crops before harvest. The most important Aspergillus species, occurring in warmer climates, are A. flavus and A. parasiticus, which produce aflatoxins in maize, groundnuts, tree nuts, and, less frequently, other commodities. The main ochratoxin A producers, A. ochraceus and A. carbonarius, commonly occur in grapes, dried vine fruits, wine, and coffee. Penicillium verrucosum also produces ochratoxin A but occurs only in cool temperate climates, where it infects small grains. F. verticillioides is ubiquitous in maize, with an endophytic nature, and produces fumonisins, which are generally more prevalent when crops are under drought stress or suffer excessive insect damage. It has recently been shown that Aspergillus niger also produces fumonisins, and several commodities may be affected. F. graminearum, which is the major producer of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone, is pathogenic on maize, wheat, and barley and produces these toxins whenever it infects these grains before harvest. Also included is a short section on Claviceps purpurea, which produces sclerotia among the seeds in grasses, including wheat, barley, and triticale. The main thrust of the chapter contains information on the identification of these fungi and their morphological characteristics, as well as factors influencing their growth and the various susceptible commodities that are contaminated. Finally, decision trees are included to assist the user in making informed choices about the likely mycotoxins present in the various crops. PMID:23477193

  11. Significance of Phi bodies in acute leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Cardullo, L de S; Morilla, R; Catovsky, D

    1981-01-01

    Material from 39 patients with acute leukaemia was investigated with the peroxidase cytochemical reaction using 3,3'diaminobenzidine (DAB) and other substrates in order to test their sensitivity in detecting myeloid differentiation. The proportion of positive blasts and of cases with Auer rods in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) was significantly greater with DAB than with benzidine. In addition, Phi bodies were demonstrated in AML blasts only when DAB was used; Phi bodies were also observed in two out of seven cases of chronic granulocytic leukaemia in "myeloid" blast crisis but were not seen in any case of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Phi bodies were more numerous when the reaction was carried out at pH 9.7, and their number was significantly reduced in the presence of 3-amino 1,2,4-triazole. Both findings suggest that the Phi bodies derive from catalase-containing granules (microperoxisomes) and are distinct from Auer rods, which derive from peroxidase-containing (primary) granules. Like Auer rods, Phi bodies appear to be characteristics of immature myeloid cells in leukaemia but are seen with a higher frequency than Auer rods in acute myeloid leukemia. Images p154-a PMID:6262384

  12. Opportunities and Barriers: Gendered Reality in Chinese Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Bohong; Li, Yani

    2010-01-01

    In the field of Chinese higher education, gender is still a significant issue, as is a general ignorance of gender discrimination against women. Issues related to gender can be observed throughout the process of education: at the time of entering an institution, during the educational process and as an outcome of education. The following seven…

  13. Opportunities and Barriers: Gendered Reality in Chinese Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Bohong; Li, Yani

    2010-01-01

    In the field of Chinese higher education, gender is still a significant issue, as is a general ignorance of gender discrimination against women. Issues related to gender can be observed throughout the process of education: at the time of entering an institution, during the educational process and as an outcome of education. The following seven

  14. Higher Education Exchange, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  15. Higher Education Exchange, 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The "Higher Education Exchange" is part of a movement to strengthen higher education's democratic mission and foster a more democratic culture throughout American society. Working in this tradition, the "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic…

  16. Higher Education Exchange, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The Higher Education Exchange is part of a movement to strengthen higher education's democratic mission and foster a more democratic culture throughout American society. Working in this tradition, the Higher Education Exchange publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic…

  17. Higher Education Exchange, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that not only does higher education not see the public; when the public, in turn, looks at higher education, it sees mostly malaise, inefficiencies, expense, and unfulfilled promises. Yet, the contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" tell of bright spots in higher education where experiments in working…

  18. Higher Education Exchange, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  19. Higher Education Exchange, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  20. How significant is nocturnal sap flow?

    PubMed

    Forster, Michael A

    2014-07-01

    Nocturnal sap flow (Qn) has been found to occur across many taxa, seasons and biomes. There is no general understanding as to how much Qn occurs and whether it is a significant contribution to total daily sap flow (Q). A synthesis of the literature and unpublished data was made to determine how significant is Qn, as a proportion of Q (%Qn), across seasons, biomes, phylogenetic groups and different thermometric sap flow methods. A total of 98 species were analysed to find that %Qn, on average, was 12.03% with the highest average dataset of 69.00%. There was significantly less %Qn in winter than in other temperate seasons, and significantly less %Qn in the wet season than in the dry season. The equatorial and tropical biomes had significantly higher %Qn than the warm temperate and nemoral biomes. The heat ratio method (HRM) and the thermal dissipation (TDP) method had significantly higher %Qn than the heat balance method. Additional analysis between HRM and TDP found HRM to have significantly higher %Qn in winter, wet season and various biomes. In all but one out of 246 cases Qn occurred, demonstrating that Qn is significant and needs to be carefully considered in sap flow and related studies. PMID:24990866

  1. Financing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shermenev, M. K.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses problems related to financing of higher education in the Soviet Union and concludes that further study of higher education expenses is necessary in order to work out the most rational financing system. (Author/DB)

  2. Reclaiming Our Soul: Democracy and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chickering, Arthur W.

    2003-01-01

    Explores how, as higher education faces new financial realities together with escalating demands for more accountability, a call to reclaim the soul of higher education and with it, the soul of democracy, will require significant institutional and personal transformations. (EV)

  3. The Hesburgh Papers: Higher Values in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesburgh, Theodore M.

    In this book the president of Notre Dame University responds to the critics who see the teaching of religion and values as a hindrance to institutions of higher learning, suggesting that no university is truly a university unless it is universal and moves every scholar to look to the total universe. The significance of values in education is…

  4. Disorders in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Clarence C.; Bolman, Frederick deW.

    Conditions affecting the moral and intellectual integrity of American colleges and universities are discussed in a series of papers collected from the 56th American Assembly on "The Integrity of Higher Education." An erosion of public confidence in higher education is noted and it is suggested that the expectations of higher education have not

  5. Higher Education Exchange, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" discuss the concept of growing public scholars; each contribution incorporates a student component. Articles include: (1) "Foreword"…

  6. The Higher Education Enterprise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottinger, Cecilia A.

    1991-01-01

    Higher education not only contributes to the development of the human resources and intellectual betterment of the nation but is also a major economic enterprise. This research brief reviews and highlights data on the size and growth of higher education and illustrates how higher education institutions are preparing the future labor force. It…

  7. Disability Discrimination in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Mark C.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews court cases in 1999 related to disability discrimination in higher education focusing on the Americans with Disabilities Act and section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The "Garrett" case regarding Eleventh Amendment immunity is the case most likely to be significant in the development of the law of disability discrimination. (SLD)

  8. Women in Higher Education, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenniger, Mary Dee Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document consists of the twelve consecutive numbers of the newsletter "Women in Education", published during 1998. This newsletter focus on issues concerned with women students, women faculty, and women administrators in higher education. Each issue includes feature articles, news items, and profiles of significant people. Feature articles…

  9. Employment Discrimination in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hustoles, Thomas P.; Griffin, Oren R.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews court decisions related to employment discrimination in higher education. The most significant development was a series of cases affirming that Eleventh Amendment immunity from private money damage claims brought pursuant to various federal employment discrimination statutes applied to state colleges and universities. (SLD)

  10. Women in Higher Education, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenniger, Mary Dee, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The 12 issues of this newsletter focus on issues concerned with women students, faculty, and administrators in higher education. Each issue includes feature articles, news items, and profiles of significant people. The issues' main articles address: women in athletics; leadership development for women; the first year in academic administration;…

  11. Prognostic Significance of Erythropoietin in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Verena; Giese, Thomas; Bergmann, Frank; Hinz, Ulf; Keleg, Shereen; Heller, Anette; Sipos, Bence; Klingmüller, Ursula; Büchler, Markus W.; Werner, Jens; Giese, Nathalia A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Erythropoietin (Epo) administration has been reported to have tumor-promoting effects in anemic cancer patients. We investigated the prognostic impact of endogenous Epo in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Methodology The clinico-pathological relevance of hemoglobin (Hb, n = 150), serum Epo (sEpo, n = 87) and tissue expression of Epo/Epo receptor (EpoR, n = 104) was analyzed in patients with PDAC. Epo/EpoR expression, signaling, growth, invasion and chemoresistance were studied in Epo-exposed PDAC cell lines. Results Compared to donors, median preoperative Hb levels were reduced by 15% in both chronic pancreatitis (CP, p<0.05) and PDAC (p<0.001), reaching anemic grade in one third of patients. While inversely correlating to Hb (r = −0.46), 95% of sEPO values lay within the normal range. The individual levels of compensation were adequate in CP (observed to predicted ratio, O/P = 0.99) but not in PDAC (O/P = 0.85). Strikingly, lower sEPO values yielding inadequate Epo responses were prominent in non-metastatic M0-patients, whereas these parameters were restored in metastatic M1-group (8 vs. 13 mU/mL; O/P = 0.82 vs. 0.96; p<0.01)—although Hb levels and the prevalence of anemia were comparable. Higher sEpo values (upper quartile ≥16 mU/ml) were not significantly different in M0 (20%) and M1 (30%) groups, but were an independent prognostic factor for shorter survival (HR 2.20, 10 vs. 17 months, p<0.05). The pattern of Epo expression in pancreas and liver suggested ectopic release of Epo by capillaries/vasa vasorum and hepatocytes, regulated by but not emanating from tumor cells. Epo could initiate PI3K/Akt signaling via EpoR in PDAC cells but failed to alter their functions, probably due to co-expression of the soluble EpoR isoform, known to antagonize Epo. Conclusion/Significance Higher sEPO levels counteract anemia but worsen outcome in PDAC patients. Further trials are required to clarify how overcoming a sEPO threshold ≥16 mU/ml by endogenous or exogenous means may predispose to or promote metastatic progression. PMID:21829709

  12. Hemodynamic significance of increased lung uptake of thallium-201

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, N.; Itoh, H.; Ishii, Y.; Yonekura, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Torizuka, K.; Konishi, Y.; Hikasa, Y.; Kambara, H.; Kawai, C.

    1982-02-01

    To determine the hemodynamic significance of increased lung thallium-201 uptake, resting thallium images in 23 normal subjects and 90 patients with various cardiac diseases were reviewed. Significant thallium uptake in the lung was observed in 60 cases and was especially frequently in mitral valvular disease (19 of 19 cases) and in myocardial infarction (25 of 37 cases). Chest radiographs of most of these patients showed pulmonary congestion or edema (50 or 69 cases). Pulmonary wedge pressure was measured in 25 of these patients and was significantly higher than in those of normal thallium uptake in the lung. Assessment of lung thallium uptake at the time of myocardial imaging can be used as a noninvasive means for evaluation of pulmonary venous hypertension.

  13. Statistically significant relational data mining :

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Jonathan W.; Leung, Vitus Joseph; Phillips, Cynthia Ann; Pinar, Ali; Robinson, David Gerald; Berger-Wolf, Tanya; Bhowmick, Sanjukta; Casleton, Emily; Kaiser, Mark; Nordman, Daniel J.; Wilson, Alyson G.

    2014-02-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under the project (3z(BStatitically significant relational data mining.(3y (BThe goal of the project was to add more statistical rigor to the fairly ad hoc area of data mining on graphs. Our goal was to develop better algorithms and better ways to evaluate algorithm quality. We concetrated on algorithms for community detection, approximate pattern matching, and graph similarity measures. Approximate pattern matching involves finding an instance of a relatively small pattern, expressed with tolerance, in a large graph of data observed with uncertainty. This report gathers the abstracts and references for the eight refereed publications that have appeared as part of this work. We then archive three pieces of research that have not yet been published. The first is theoretical and experimental evidence that a popular statistical measure for comparison of community assignments favors over-resolved communities over approximations to a ground truth. The second are statistically motivated methods for measuring the quality of an approximate match of a small pattern in a large graph. The third is a new probabilistic random graph model. Statisticians favor these models for graph analysis. The new local structure graph model overcomes some of the issues with popular models such as exponential random graph models and latent variable models.

  14. Significant biases affecting abundance determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, Roger

    2015-08-01

    I have developed two highly efficient codes to automate analyses of emission line nebulae. The tools place particular emphasis on the propagation of uncertainties. The first tool, ALFA, uses a genetic algorithm to rapidly optimise the parameters of gaussian fits to line profiles. It can fit emission line spectra of arbitrary resolution, wavelength range and depth, with no user input at all. It is well suited to highly multiplexed spectroscopy such as that now being carried out with instruments such as MUSE at the VLT. The second tool, NEAT, carries out a full analysis of emission line fluxes, robustly propagating uncertainties using a Monte Carlo technique.Using these tools, I have found that considerable biases can be introduced into abundance determinations if the uncertainty distribution of emission lines is not well characterised. For weak lines, normally distributed uncertainties are generally assumed, though it is incorrect to do so, and significant biases can result. I discuss observational evidence of these biases. The two new codes contain routines to correctly characterise the probability distributions, giving more reliable results in analyses of emission line nebulae.

  15. Determining Semantically Related Significant Genes.

    PubMed

    Taha, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    GO relation embodies some aspects of existence dependency. If GO term xis existence-dependent on GO term y, the presence of y implies the presence of x. Therefore, the genes annotated with the function of the GO term y are usually functionally and semantically related to the genes annotated with the function of the GO term x. A large number of gene set enrichment analysis methods have been developed in recent years for analyzing gene sets enrichment. However, most of these methods overlook the structural dependencies between GO terms in GO graph by not considering the concept of existence dependency. We propose in this paper a biological search engine called RSGSearch that identifies enriched sets of genes annotated with different functions using the concept of existence dependency. We observe that GO term xcannot be existence-dependent on GO term y, if x- and y- have the same specificity (biological characteristics). After encoding into a numeric format the contributions of GO terms annotating target genes to the semantics of their lowest common ancestors (LCAs), RSGSearch uses microarray experiment to identify the most significant LCA that annotates the result genes. We evaluated RSGSearch experimentally and compared it with five gene set enrichment systems. Results showed marked improvement. PMID:26357049

  16. Reinventing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Higher education institutions are in the battle of a lifetime as they are coping with political and economic uncertainties, threats to federal aid, declining state support, higher tuition rates and increased competition from for-profit institutions. Amid all these challenges, these institutions are pressed to keep up with technological demands,…

  17. Markets and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Gareth

    1991-01-01

    A discussion of experimentation with new and alternative funding mechanisms for higher education in other countries looks at the effects on the academic work of institutions. It is predicted that market approaches to funding higher education and the use of financial incentives rather than administrative intervention will continue indefinitely.…

  18. Consumerism in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Mark

    1973-01-01

    In considering consumerism in higher education, the student becomes the consumer,'' the university the corporation,'' and higher education the education industry.'' Other members of the education fraternity become investors, management, workers, direct consumers, and indirect consumers. This article proposes that it behooves the student to…

  19. Reinventing Continuing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walshok, Mary Lindenstein

    2012-01-01

    Re-inventing continuing higher education is about finding ways to be a more central player in a region's civic, cultural, and economic life as well as in the education of individuals for work and citizenship. Continuing higher education will require data gathering, analytical tools, convening authority, interpretive skills, new models of delivery,…

  20. Quality in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruben, Brent D., Ed.

    This volume contains 21 new and classic papers and readings on quality philosophies and concepts, first, as they have been applied in business and industry but primarily as they relate to and can be applied in higher education. The introduction is titled "The Quality Approach in Higher Education: Context and Concepts for Change" by Brent D. Ruben.…

  1. Reimagining Christian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulme, E. Eileen; Groom, David E., Jr.; Heltzel, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    The challenges facing higher education continue to mount. The shifting of the U.S. ethnic and racial demographics, the proliferation of advanced digital technologies and data, and the move from traditional degrees to continuous learning platforms have created an unstable environment to which Christian higher education must adapt in order to remain…

  2. Higher Education Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume begins with an essay by Noelle McAfee, a contributor who is familiar to readers of Higher Education Exchange (HEX). She reiterates Mathews' argument regarding the disconnect between higher education's sense of engagement and the public's sense of engagement, and suggests a way around the epistemological conundrum of "knowledge produced…

  3. Goals in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    This five-part essay sets out various achievement goals for higher education institutions and educators. The first paper, "Guidelines in Higher Education," lists the criteria for encouraging broad faculty participation in the decision-making process, improving the quality of human relations, encouraging scholarly pursuits among faculty members,…

  4. Gender and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bank, Barbara J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This comprehensive, encyclopedic review explores gender and its impact on American higher education across historical and cultural contexts. Challenging recent claims that gender inequities in U.S. higher education no longer exist, the contributors--leading experts in the field--reveal the many ways in which gender is embedded in the educational…

  5. Higher Education Exchange 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    A foreword and nine articles discuss issues on the role of institutions of higher education in the rebuilding of a public life involving citizens across the country. After the foreword by David Brown and Deborah Witte, the papers are: (1) "The Public and Its Colleges: Reflections on the History of American Higher Education (R. Claire Snyder),…

  6. Minorities in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justiz, Manuel J., Ed.; And Others

    This book presents 19 papers on efforts to increase the participation of members of minority groups in higher education. The papers are: (1) "Demographic Trends and the Challenges to American Higher Education" (Manuel Justiz); (2) "Three Realities: Minority Life in the United States--The Struggle for Economic Equity (adapted by Don M. Blandin);…

  7. Reinventing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Higher education institutions are in the battle of a lifetime as they are coping with political and economic uncertainties, threats to federal aid, declining state support, higher tuition rates and increased competition from for-profit institutions. Amid all these challenges, these institutions are pressed to keep up with technological demands,

  8. Higher Education Exchange 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Contributors to this issue of the Higher Education Exchange debate the issues around knowledge production, discuss the acquisition of deliberative skills for democracy, and examine how higher education prepares, or does not prepare, students for citizenship roles. Articles include: (1) "Foreword" (Deborah Witte); (2) "Knowledge, Judgment and…

  9. "Clinical" Significance: "Clinical" Significance and "Practical" Significance are NOT the Same Things

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Lisa S.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical significance is an important concept in research, particularly in education and the social sciences. The present article first compares clinical significance to other measures of "significance" in statistics. The major methods used to determine clinical significance are explained and the strengths and weaknesses of clinical significance…

  10. India's Higher Education Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G.

    2014-01-01

    India, with the world's second largest higher education system and a rapidly growing economy as one of the BRIC nations, faces significant challenges in building both capacity and excellence in higher education. India's higher education system is characterized by "islands of excellence in a sea of mediocrity." The mainstream

  11. India's Higher Education Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G.

    2014-01-01

    India, with the world's second largest higher education system and a rapidly growing economy as one of the BRIC nations, faces significant challenges in building both capacity and excellence in higher education. India's higher education system is characterized by "islands of excellence in a sea of mediocrity." The mainstream…

  12. Shared Leadership Transforms Higher Education IT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duin, Ann Hill; Cawley, Steve; Gulachek, Bernard; O'Sullivan, Douglas M.; Wollner, Diane

    2011-01-01

    Globalization, immersive research and learning environments, unlimited access to information and analytics, and fiscal realities continue to impact higher education--and higher education IT. Although IT organizations face immense pressure to meet significantly greater expectations at significantly less cost, with such pressure comes the…

  13. The trophic significance of Phaeocystis blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisse, T.; Tande, K.; Verity, P.; Hansen, F.; Gieskes, W.

    1994-04-01

    Both colonies and solitary cells of the prymnesiophyte Phaeocystis are ingested by a wide array of marine vertebrates. Grazers include protozoa, bivalves, amphipods, euphausiids and many copepod species. Common fish species such as mackerel ( Scomber scombrus) and flounder ( Pleuronectus flesus) have also been reported to feed upon Phaeocystis. While qualitative observations on the potential trophic significance of Phaeocystis exist for a long time, attempts to quantify feeding rates on Phaeocystis have begun only during the last decade. In feeding experiments, copepods have received most attention. Many copepod species appear to consume Phaeocystis colonies and solitary cells in the North Atlantic and in polar seas. Ingestion rates are highly variable depending on size and physiological state of Phaeocystis as well as on copepod species. Within the same species, large variations in individual feeding rates have been reported from different areas and investigators. When Phaeocystis co-occurs with larger amounts of diatoms, the latter seem to be preferred by some copepod species while others do not select against Phaeocystis. At present it is unclear whether this is primarily due to unsuitable size of Phaeocystis or because it is poor quality food. The relative nutritive value of Phaeocystis single cells and colonies should be investigated in more detail. Feeding of protozoa on Phaeocystis has been little studied. Ciliates and the giant dinoflagellate Noctiluca are known to consume Phaeocystis solitary cells. Protozoa might efficiently control Phaeocystis blooms during their initial phases when the share of solitary cells relative to total Phaeocystis biomass is higher than during later stages of the bloom. By switching their food preference towards heterotrophic food, copepods might benefit from enhanced protozoan biomass during Phaeocystis blooms. The potential succession of protozoan and metazoan grazers in the course of a Phaeocystis bloom awaits further research.

  14. Forecasting Higher Education's Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyken, Don; Buck, Tina S.; Kollie, Ellen; Przyborowski, Danielle; Rondinelli, Joseph A.; Hunter, Jeff; Hanna, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Offers predictions on trends in higher education to accommodate changing needs, lower budgets, and increased enrollment. They involve campus construction, security, administration, technology, interior design, athletics, and transportation. (EV)

  15. Marketing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brian, Edward J.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the 4 basic areas in which institutional marketing can be put to use in higher educational institutions: educational services offered, pricing (tuition), promotion to prospective students, and distribution (extension courses and courses that go to the student). (PG)

  16. Planning for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Caj-Gunnar

    1984-01-01

    Decision processes for strategic planning for higher education institutions are outlined using these parameters: institutional goals and power structure, organizational climate, leadership attitudes, specific problem type, and problem-solving conditions and alternatives. (MSE)

  17. Perspectives on Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayhew, Lewis B.

    1971-01-01

    A review of Human Resources and Higher Education: Staff Report of the Commission on Human Resources and Advanced Education (New York; Basic, 1970) by John K. Folger, Helen S. Astin, and Alan E. Bayer. (DB)

  18. Karyological observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.; O'Connor, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    Root tips prepared for metaphase chromosome analysis from seedlings germinated under microgravity on the Space Shuttle (oats and mung bean) or which were exposed to space flight as very young seedlings (sunflower) have been examined. Experimental constraints did not permit pre-fixation in space with a cytostatic agent but arrest was achieved in the first division cycle on Earth after recovery. The number of cells in division was significantly depressed in all three species. Several chromosomal abnormalities were encountered in flight material. Bridge formation was seen in sunflower, as was aneuploidy. Breakage and fracture of chromosomes was prevalent in oats. No aberrant features could be detected in the chromosomes of mung bean. These results, although preliminary, should serve to alert investigators of the need to assess carefully as many aspects of cell division in higher plants exposed to space flight conditions as possible.

  19. Karyological observations.

    PubMed

    Krikorian, A D; O'Connor, S A

    1984-11-01

    Root tips prepared for metaphase chromosome analysis from seedlings germinated under microgravity on the Space Shuttle (oats and mung bean) or which were exposed to space flight as very young seedlings (sunflower) have been examined. Experimental constraints did not permit pre-fixation in space with a cytostatic agent but arrest was achieved in the first division cycle on Earth after recovery. The number of cells in division was significantly depressed in all three species. Several chromosomal abnormalities were encountered in flight material. Bridge formation was seen in sunflower, as was aneuploidy. Breakage and fracture of chromosomes was prevalent in oats. No aberrant features could be detected in the chromosomes of mung bean. These results, although preliminary, should serve to alert investigators of the need to assess carefully as many aspects of cell division in higher plants exposed to space flight conditions as possible. PMID:11538823

  20. Boiling significantly promotes photodegradation of perfluorooctane sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Xian-Jin; Li, Wen-Wei; Lam, Paul K S; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-11-01

    The application of photochemical processes for perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) degradation has been limited by a low treatment efficiency. This study reports a significant acceleration of PFOS photodegradation under boiling condition compared with the non-boiling control. The PFOS decomposition rate increased with the increasing boiling intensity, but declined at a higher hydronium level or under oxygenation. These results suggest that the boiling state of solution resulted in higher effective concentrations of reactants at the gas-liquid interface and enhanced the interfacial mass transfer, thereby accelerating the PFOS decomposition. This study broadens our knowledge of PFOS photodegradation process and may have implications for development of efficient photodegradation technologies. PMID:26117498

  1. Significant role of estrogen in maintaining cardiac mitochondrial functions.

    PubMed

    Rattanasopa, Chutima; Phungphong, Sukanya; Wattanapermpool, Jonggonnee; Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas

    2015-03-01

    Increased susceptibility to stress-induced myocardial damage is a significant concern in addition to decreased cardiac performance in postmenopausal females. To determine the potential mechanisms underlying myocardial vulnerability after deprivation of female sex hormones, cardiac mitochondrial function is determined in 10-week ovariectomized rats (OVX). Significant mitochondrial swelling in the heart of OVX rats is observed. This structural alteration can be prevented with either estrogen or progesterone supplementation. Using an isolated mitochondrial preparation, a decrease in ATP synthesis by complex I activation in an OVX rat is completely restored by estrogen, but not progesterone. At basal activation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production from the mitochondria is not affected by the ovariectomy. However, after incubated in the presence of either high Ca(2+) or antimycin-A, there is a significantly higher mitochondrial ROS production in the OVX sample compared to the control. This increased stress-induced ROS production is not observed in the preparation isolated from the hearts of OVX rats with estrogen or progesterone supplementation. However, deprivation of female sex hormones has no effect on the protein expression of electron transport chain complexes, mitofusin 2, or superoxide dismutase 2. Taken together, these findings suggest that female sex hormones, estrogen and progesterone, play significant regulatory roles in maintaining normal mitochondrial properties by stabilizing the structural assembly of mitochondria as well as attenuating mitochondrial ROS production. Estrogen, but not progesterone, also plays an important role in modulating mitochondrial ATP synthesis. PMID:25448746

  2. Significance Testing; Necessary but Insufficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suen, Hoi K.

    1992-01-01

    This commentary on EC 603 695 argues that significance testing is a necessary but insufficient condition for positivistic research, that judgment-based assessment and single-subject research are not substitutes for significance testing, and that sampling fluctuation should be considered as one of numerous epistemological concerns in any…

  3. Children with Sickle Cell Disease Had Significantly Higher Medical Costs Than Those without SCD

    MedlinePlus

    ... source: Office of the Associate Director for Communication, Digital Media Branch, Division of Public Affairs Page maintained by: Office of the Associate Director for Communication, Digital Media Branch, Division of Public Affairs Follow CDC Email ...

  4. Significantly higher frequency of Helicobacter suis in patients with idiopathic parkinsonism than in control patients

    PubMed Central

    Blaecher, C; Smet, A; Flahou, B; Pasmans, F; Ducatelle, R; Taylor, D; Weller, C; Bjarnason, I; Charlett, A; Lawson, A J; Dobbs, R J; Dobbs, S M; Haesebrouck, F

    2013-01-01

    Background There is increased proportional mortality from Parkinson's disease amongst livestock farmers. The hypokinesia of Parkinson's disease has been linked to Helicobacter pylori. H. suis is the most common zoonotic helicobacter in man. Aim To compare the frequency of H. suis, relative to H. pylori, in gastric biopsies of patients with idiopathic parkinsonism (IP) and controls from gastroenterology services. Methods DNA extracts, archived at a Helicobacter Reference Laboratory, from IP patient and gastroenterology service biopsies were examined anonymously for H. suis, using species-specific RT-PCR. Results Relative risk of having H. suis in 60 IP patients compared with 256 controls was 10 times greater than that of having H. pylori. In patients with IP and controls, respectively, frequencies of H. suis were 27 (exact binomial 95% C.I. 15, 38) and 2 (0, 3)%, and of H. pylori, 28 (17, 40) and 16 (12, 21)%. Excess of H. suis in IP held when only the antral or corporal biopsy was considered. Of 16 IP patients with H. suis, 11 were from 19 with proven H. pylori eradication, 3 from 17 pre-H. pylori eradication, 2 from 24 H. pylori culture/PCR-negative. Frequency was different between groups (P = 0.001), greatest where H. pylori had been eradicated. Even without known exposure to anti-H. pylori therapy, H. suis was more frequent in IP patients (5/41) than in controls (1/155) (P = 0.002). Partial multilocus sequence typing confirmed that strains from IP patients (6) and control (1) differed from RT-PCR standard strain. Conclusions Greater frequency of H. suis in idiopathic parkinsonism appears exaggerated following H. pylori eradication. Multilocus sequence testing comparison with porcine strains may clarify whether transmission is from pigs/porcine products or of human-adapted, H. suis-like, bacteria. PMID:24117797

  5. Higher dimensional Hadamard matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlichta, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper defines higher dimensional Hadamard matrices and enumerates on some of the simplest three-, four-, and five-dimensional cases and procedures for generating them. Special emphasis is given to proper matrices that have a dimensional hierarchy of orthogonalities. It is determined that this property lends itself primarily to the application of higher dimensional Hadamard matrices to error-correcting codes. A list of derived statements for n-dimensional Hadamard matrices are given, as well as a definition of Hadamard matrix families, such as minimal, Petrie polygon, antipodal (n-2)-dimensional sections, and double proximity shells.

  6. Higher Spin Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chi-Ming

    This dissertation splits into two distinct halves. The first half is devoted to the study of the holography of higher spin gauge theory in AdS 3. We present a conjecture that the holographic dual of W N minimal model in a 't Hooft-like large N limit is an unusual "semi-local" higher spin gauge theory on AdS3 x 1. At each point on the S1 lives a copy of three-dimensional Vasiliev theory, that contains an infinite tower of higher spin gauge fields coupled to a single massive complex scalar propagating in AdS3. The Vasiliev theories at different points on the S1 are correlated only through the AdS3 boundary conditions on the massive scalars. All but one single tower of higher spin symmetries are broken by the boundary conditions. This conjecture is checked by comparing tree-level two- and three-point functions, and also one-loop partition functions on both side of the duality. The second half focuses on the holography of higher spin gauge theory in AdS 4. We demonstrate that a supersymmetric and parity violating version of Vasiliev's higher spin gauge theory in AdS4 admits boundary conditions that preserve N = 0,1,2,3,4 or 6 supersymmetries. In particular, we argue that the Vasiliev theory with U( M) Chan-Paton and N = 6 boundary condition is holographically dual to the 2+1 dimensional U(N) k x U(M) -k ABJ theory in the limit of large N, k and finite M. In this system all bulk higher spin fields transform in the adjoint of the U(M) gauge group, whose bulk t'Hooft coupling is M/N. Our picture suggests that the supersymmetric Vasiliev theory can be obtained as a limit of type IIA string theory in AdS4 x CP3, and that the non-Abelian Vasiliev theory at strong bulk 't Hooft coupling smoothly turn into a string field theory. The fundamental string is a singlet bound state of Vasiliev's higher spin particles held together by U(M) gauge interactions.

  7. Higher-Order Aberrations in Myopic Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Karimian, Farid; Feizi, Sepehr; Doozande, Azade

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the correlation between refractive error and higher-order aberrations (HOAs) in patients with myopic astigmatism. Methods HOAs were measured using the Zywave II aberrometer over a 6 mm pupil. Correlations between HOAs and myopia, astigmatism, and age were analyzed. Results One hundred and twenty-six eyes of 63 subjects with mean age of 26.4±5.9 years were studied. Mean spherical equivalent refractive error and refractive astigmatism were −4.94±1.63 D and 0.96±1.06 D, respectively. The most common higher-order aberration was primary horizontal trefoil with mean value of 0.069±0.152 μm followed by spherical aberration (−0.064±0.130 μm) and primary vertical coma (−0.038±0.148 μm). As the order of aberration increased from third to fifth, its contribution to total HOA decreased: 53.9% for third order, 31.9% for fourth order, and 14.2% for fifth order aberrations. Significant correlations were observed between spherical equivalent refractive error and primary horizontal coma (R=0.231, P=0.022), and root mean square (RMS) of spherical aberration (R=0.213, P=0.031); between astigmatism and RMS of total HOA (R=0.251, P=0.032), RMS of fourth order aberration (R=0.35, P<0.001), and primary horizontal coma (R=0.314, P=0.004). Spherical aberration (R=0.214, P=0.034) and secondary vertical coma (R=0.203, P=0.031) significantly increased with age. Conclusion Primary horizontal trefoil, spherical aberration and primary vertical coma are the predominant higher-order aberrations in eyes with myopic astigmatism. PMID:22737320

  8. Microcomputers in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Robert S., Ed.; McLean, Ruth W., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Some of the areas in which Ontario educators currently employ microcomputers in higher education are addressed in several articles, bibliographies, and book reviews. Various uses of computer-managed instruction and computer-assisted instruction (CAI) at Humber College of Applied Arts and Technology are outlined by Frank A. Ford. Microcomputer CAI

  9. Higher Education Exchange 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.

    Nine articles discuss the relationship between the higher education community and the public. The articles are: (1) "On a Certain Blindness in Teaching" by Michael S. Roth, who stresses the necessity of political citizenship education for a healthy democracy; (2) "Monocultural Perspectives and Campus Diversity" by Jane Fried, who explores the…

  10. Higher Education Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    This collection of 10 articles and stories highlights ongoing experiments in colleges and universities which address the relationship of higher education institutions and citizenship responsibility. Following a foreword by Deborah White, articles are: "The Civic Roots of Academic Social Science Scholarship in American" (R. Claire Snyder), which…

  11. Higher Education Exchange, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    This annual collection focuses on the obligation of higher education to democracy. Scholars from a variety if disciplines explore this question and related issues, such as the civic mission of the university, what it means to be an "engaged" university, and how a university can itself by a "good citizen." Following a foreword by Deborah Witte, the…

  12. Curriculum in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, A. I., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Four articles on higher education curriculum are presented. In "The Articulate Curriculum" an approach to curriculum description is presented that is designed to have minimal ambiguity concerning the intention, content, and processes of the curriculum and that will lead to questioning several discrete factors in the curriculum planning process. It…

  13. Benchmarking for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Norman, Ed.; Lund, Helen, Ed.

    The chapters in this collection explore the concept of benchmarking as it is being used and developed in higher education (HE). Case studies and reviews show how universities in the United Kingdom are using benchmarking to aid in self-regulation and self-improvement. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction to Benchmarking" (Norman Jackson and Helen

  14. Efficiency in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granzow, Hermann

    1979-01-01

    Discusses problems of economic management in higher education and suggests solutions indispensable for economic autonomy and independent planning. Changes in management methods include incentive systems, transparency in functional goals and performance, and more clarity, rationality, and fairness in appraisals. (Author/KC)

  15. Microcomputers in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Robert S., Ed.; McLean, Ruth W., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Some of the areas in which Ontario educators currently employ microcomputers in higher education are addressed in several articles, bibliographies, and book reviews. Various uses of computer-managed instruction and computer-assisted instruction (CAI) at Humber College of Applied Arts and Technology are outlined by Frank A. Ford. Microcomputer CAI…

  16. Workstations in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissman, Ronald F. E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Five articles discuss various aspects of workstations and their applications in higher education. Highlights include microcomputers and workstations; UNIX operating system; campus-wide networks; software; Project SOCRATES and the interdisciplinary aspect of engineering; mechanical system design and simulation; and the Creation Station, a…

  17. Higher Education Exchange, 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The Kettering Foundation's research has been focused on putting the public back into the public's business for more than thirty years. Some questions that have recently been useful to Kettering researchers as the foundation focuses on its work with institutional actors--especially higher education and its relationship with the public--have…

  18. Unraveling Higher Education's Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Gus; Charles, Maria

    1998-01-01

    The activity-based costing (ABC) method of analyzing institutional costs in higher education involves four procedures: determining the various discrete activities of the organization; calculating the cost of each; determining the cost drivers; tracing cost to the cost objective or consumer of each activity. Few American institutions have used the…

  19. Online Higher Education Commodity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chau, Paule

    2010-01-01

    This article analyzes the current trend towards online education. It examines some of the reasons for the trend and the ramifications it may have on students, faculty and institutions of higher learning. The success and profitability of online programs and institutions such as the University of Phoenix has helped to make the move towards online…

  20. Marketing in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalili, Farid

    The use of marketing activities by educational institutions and the transfer of marketing activities from business to higher education are considered. Market analysis helps colleges and universities determine what programs, scheduling, or services are strong and to which student market the institution should appeal. It is suggested that the…

  1. Higher Education Exchange 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.

    A foreword and 11 articles discuss the nature and structure of public scholarship. The contents include: "Foreword" (Deborah Witte); (1) "Public Scholarship: The Dissemination of Knowledge" (Jean Cameron) which maintains the public has claims on higher education as a creator and disseminator of knowledge; (2) "Daring to Be Unprofessional" (David…

  2. PLANNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FINCHER, CAMERON

    CENTRALIZED PLANNING AND COORDINATION ENABLE INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION TO MEET THEIR RESPONSIBILITIES. MOST EFFORTS AT CENTRALIZED PLANNING ARE PREDICATED ON TWO CONCEPTS--MANPOWER NEEDS AND PROJECTING CURRENT TRENDS. THE CONCEPT OF MANPOWER NEEDS IS THE MORE LOGICAL, BUT IS ALSO MORE DIFFICULT TO CARRY OUT. PLANNING IS NOT SYNONYMOUS WITH…

  3. Liberty and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Dennis F.

    1989-01-01

    John Stuart Mill's principle of liberty is discussed with the view that it needs to be revised to guide moral judgments in higher education. Three key elements need to be modified: the action that is constrained; the constraint on the action; and the agent whose action is constrained. (MLW)

  4. European Higher Education Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcal-Grilo, Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    In his paper, the author--an academic and former Minister of Education for Portugal--traces the origins of the Bologna Declaration of 1999 and its follow-up studies leading to the Prague Conference of Higher Education Ministers in May 2001. He summarises the outcomes of the Prague Conference, and draws conclusions on the crucial role of…

  5. Valuing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    The question of the value of higher education is today set in the context of an unprecedented banking and financial crisis. In this context of fundamental change and financial realignment, it is important that we as members of the university remake our case for why the university deserves to be considered alongside all those other worthy causes…

  6. Women in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Sheryl, Ed.; Shaver, Barbara, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Articles on women's studies and females in higher education are presented in this publication. A University of North Dakota project that sought to promote the integration of new research and scholarship results into the curriculum is described in "Women's Equity Committee Offers a Model Project," (Leola Furman, Robert Young). Historical…

  7. Entrepreneurship and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Jonathan, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Stimulating innovative and growth-oriented entrepreneurship is a key economic and societal challenge to which universities and colleges have much to contribute. This book examines the role that higher education institutions are currently playing through teaching entrepreneurship and transferring knowledge and innovation to enterprises and…

  8. Free Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Jr., Adolph; Szymanski, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    The crisis of affordability in higher education is intensifying. Illustrations of its resonance abound: from the frequent news articles describing and amplifying the crisis and its sources to legislators' and candidates' proposed responses. Republicans' responses tend to be mainly punitive toward institutions; Democrats' proposals are more…

  9. Corporatizing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Gerda

    2008-01-01

    The process of changing U.S. higher education institutions along a corporate model has been going on for several decades. It consists of changes, some open, some obscured, on various fronts: the erosion of tenure by attrition; the simultaneous increase in the use of contingent faculty; the rise in tuition; the dramatic decrease in federal and…

  10. Working in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuthbert, Rob, Ed.

    This collection contains 14 papers that focus on the work and workers in higher education (HE) from a British perspective for the purpose of encouraging further research, study and debate in the exploration of the dynamics within HE. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 addresses the workers, part 2 the work, and part 3 the work context.…

  11. Creativity in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaspar, Drazena; Mabic, Mirela

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents results of research related to perception of creativity in higher education made by the authors at the University of Mostar from Bosnia and Herzegovina. This research was based on a survey conducted among teachers and students at the University. The authors developed two types of questionnaires, one for teachers and the other…

  12. Higher Education Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    Eight papers, arising from a June 1998 seminar on the professions and public life, examine issues related to the practice of public scholarship and the new connections that institutions of higher education are forging with the public. Following a foreword by Deborah Witte, the papers are: (1) "The Academy and Public Life: Healing the Rift" (Scott…

  13. Networks for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Interuniversity Communications Council (EDUCOM), Princeton, NJ.

    EDUCOM, the Inter University Communications Council, Inc., planned its 1972 spring conference as a forum for presentations, discussions, and informal meetings to review the present state and the future possibilities of computer networks for higher education. Speeches presented were specifically related to: (1) the current status and future plans…

  14. Shell Higher Olefins Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    Shows how olefin isomerization and the exotic olefin metathesis reaction can be harnessed in industrial processes. Indicates that the Shell Higher Olefins Process makes use of organometallic catalysts to manufacture alpha-olefins and internal carbon-11 through carbon-14 alkenes in a flexible fashion that can be adjusted to market needs. (JN)

  15. NEXUS: Digitizing Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Camille

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of digital technology in the context of higher education planning considers how these technologies change teaching; the digital divide; the costs of information technology; hard wiring the campus; material consequences of information technology; digitally enabled crimes and misdemeanors; and libraries and scholarly publishing. Concludes…

  16. Benchmarking for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Norman, Ed.; Lund, Helen, Ed.

    The chapters in this collection explore the concept of benchmarking as it is being used and developed in higher education (HE). Case studies and reviews show how universities in the United Kingdom are using benchmarking to aid in self-regulation and self-improvement. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction to Benchmarking" (Norman Jackson and Helen…

  17. Marketing in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hockenberger, Susan J.

    Educational institutions must seek new approaches to institutional planning because of such factors as shrinking traditional college age populations, eroding grants, governmental and judicial incursion, the tightening economic belt, and concern over the relevance of education to modern day needs. The concept of marketing higher education is…

  18. Interdisciplinarity in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanisch, Thor Einar; Vollmann, Wolfgang, Ed.

    The advantages of an interdisciplinary approach to college instruction and research are examined, based in part on a 1983 symposium of the European Centre for Higher Education. Six case studies are also presented. It is noted that interdisciplinarity opens up possibilities of exchange between individual disciplines and encourages the development…

  19. Higher Education Interpreting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woll, Bencie; Porcari li Destri, Giulia

    This paper discusses issues related to the training and provision of interpreters for deaf students at institutions of higher education in the United Kingdom. Background information provided notes the increasing numbers of deaf and partially hearing students, the existence of funding to pay for interpreters, and trends in the availability of…

  20. Evaluation in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bognar, Branko; Bungic, Maja

    2014-01-01

    One of the means of transforming classroom experience is by conducting action research with students. This paper reports about the action research with university students. It has been carried out within a semester of the course "Methods of Upbringing". Its goal has been to improve evaluation of higher education teaching. Different forms…

  1. California's Future: Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Hans

    2015-01-01

    California's higher education system is not keeping up with the changing economy. Projections suggest that the state's economy will continue to need more highly educated workers. In 2025, if current trends persist, 41 percent of jobs will require at least a bachelor's degree and 36 percent will require some college education short of a bachelor's…

  2. Free Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Jr., Adolph; Szymanski, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    The crisis of affordability in higher education is intensifying. Illustrations of its resonance abound: from the frequent news articles describing and amplifying the crisis and its sources to legislators' and candidates' proposed responses. Republicans' responses tend to be mainly punitive toward institutions; Democrats' proposals are more

  3. Leadership in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robles, Harriett J.

    This paper examines leadership in higher education, specifically in community colleges. The first section reviews current definitions and theories of education, including transactional leadership (where there is an exchange between the leader and the follower) and transformational leadership (where the leader tries to change the framework itself…

  4. Higher spins and holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Per; Ross, Simon F.

    2013-05-01

    The principles of quantum mechanics and relativity impose rigid constraints on theories of massless particles with nonzero spin. Indeed, Yang-Mills theory and General Relativity are the unique solution in the case of spin-1 and spin-2. In asymptotically flat spacetime, there are fundamental obstacles to formulating fully consistent interacting theories of particles of spin greater than 2. However, indications are that such theories are just barely possible in asymptotically anti-de Sitter or de Sitter spacetimes, where the non-existence of an S-matrix provides an escape from the theorems restricting theories in Minkowski spacetime. These higher spin gravity theories are therefore of great intrinsic interest, since they, along with supergravity, provide the only known field theories generalizing the local invariance principles of Yang-Mills theory and General Relativity. While work on higher spin gravity goes back several decades, the subject has gained broader appeal in recent years due to its appearance in the AdS/CFT correspondence. In three and four spacetime dimensions, there exist duality proposals linking higher spin gravity theories to specific conformal field theories living in two and three dimensions respectively. The enlarged symmetry algebra of the conformal field theories renders them exactly soluble, which makes them excellent laboratories for understanding in detail the holographic mechanism behind AdS/CFT duality. Steady progress is also being made on better understanding the space of possible higher spin gravity theories and their physical content. This work includes classifying the possible field multiplets and their interactions, constructing exact solutions of the nonlinear field equations, and relating higher spin theories to string theory. A full understanding of these theories will involve coming to grips with the novel symmetry principles that enlarge those of General Relativity and Yang-Mills theory, and one can hope that this will provide some insight into the unification of gravity with the other forces of nature. Per Kraus and Simon F RossGuest Editors

  5. Significant Scales in Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    Traag, V. A.; Krings, G.; Van Dooren, P.

    2013-01-01

    Many complex networks show signs of modular structure, uncovered by community detection. Although many methods succeed in revealing various partitions, it remains difficult to detect at what scale some partition is significant. This problem shows foremost in multi-resolution methods. We here introduce an efficient method for scanning for resolutions in one such method. Additionally, we introduce the notion of “significance” of a partition, based on subgraph probabilities. Significance is independent of the exact method used, so could also be applied in other methods, and can be interpreted as the gain in encoding a graph by making use of a partition. Using significance, we can determine “good” resolution parameters, which we demonstrate on benchmark networks. Moreover, optimizing significance itself also shows excellent performance. We demonstrate our method on voting data from the European Parliament. Our analysis suggests the European Parliament has become increasingly ideologically divided and that nationality plays no role. PMID:24121597

  6. Significant Decisions in Labor Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monthly Labor Review, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Several significant court decisions involving labor cases are discussed including a series of decisions concerning constitutional protections afforded aliens; the First Amendment and national labor relations laws; and the bifurcated backpay rule. (BM)

  7. Astronomical Significance of Ancient Monuments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonia, I.

    2011-06-01

    Astronomical significance of Gokhnari megalithic monument (eastern Georgia) is considered. Possible connection of Amirani ancient legend with Gokhnari monument is discussed. Concepts of starry practicality and solar stations are proposed.

  8. SIGNIFICANT NATURAL HERITAGE AREAS (NC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Parks and Recreation, Natural Heritage Program in cooperation with the NC Center for Geographic Information & Analysis, developed the Significant Natural Heritage Areas digital data to determine the a...

  9. Human Races: Their Reality and Significance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsby, Richard A.

    1973-01-01

    A discussion of two questions is considered important: (1) why are there different races and how might they have come to be, and (2) given the observed biological differences among races, what, if any, is their significance for society. Discusses the race-IQ question and presents evidence to support environmental influence on IQ results. (DF)

  10. Statistical Significance vs. Practical Significance: An Exploration through Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Brittany L.; DeMaria, Andrea L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the differences between statistical and practical significance, including strengths and criticisms of both methods, as well as provide information surrounding the application of various effect sizes and confidence intervals within health education research. Provided are recommendations, explanations and…

  11. Generalized higher gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Patricia; Sämann, Christian; Schmidt, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    We study a generalization of higher gauge theory which makes use of generalized geometry and seems to be closely related to double field theory. The local kinematical data of this theory is captured by morphisms of graded manifolds between the canonical exact Courant Lie 2-algebroid T M ⊕ T ∗ M over some manifold M and a semistrict gauge Lie 2-algebra. We discuss generalized curvatures and infinitesimal gauge transformations. Finite gauge transformation as well as global kinematical data are then obtained from principal 2-bundles over 2-spaces. As dynamical principle, we consider first the canonical Chern-Simons action for such a gauge theory. We then show that a previously proposed 3-Lie algebra model for the six-dimensional (2,0) theory is very naturally interpreted as a generalized higher gauge theory.

  12. Higher spin dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, M.; García-Álvarez, D.

    2010-06-01

    We analyze the role of spin three gauge fields as dark matter candidates. The relevant feature of these higher spin fields is that they do not couple directly to Standard Model particles. Their only direct coupling is to the gravitational field which explains the very weak interactions with other fields and enhances their qualities as realistic candidates for dark matter. The mass of these particles is provided by a Higgs-like mechanism with the gravitational field playing the role of Higgs field.

  13. Prospects for European Integration: Turkish Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizikaci, Fatma

    2005-01-01

    The development of higher education and research constitutes a possible pathway to innovation and global competitiveness. Nation states, however, often seek the quickest adaptations, with minimum investment, ignoring essential political and structural changes. Turkey maintains its highly centralized system of higher education observing the…

  14. Prospects for European Integration: Turkish Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizikaci, Fatma

    2005-01-01

    The development of higher education and research constitutes a possible pathway to innovation and global competitiveness. Nation states, however, often seek the quickest adaptations, with minimum investment, ignoring essential political and structural changes. Turkey maintains its highly centralized system of higher education observing the

  15. Significant results: statistical or clinical?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The null hypothesis significance test method is popular in biological and medical research. Many researchers have used this method for their research without exact knowledge, though it has both merits and shortcomings. Readers will know its shortcomings, as well as several complementary or alternative methods, as such the estimated effect size and the confidence interval. PMID:27066201

  16. All Things Being Equal: Observing Australian Individual Academic Workloads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobele, Angela; Rundle-Thiele, Sharyn; Kopanidis, Foula; Steel, Marion

    2010-01-01

    The achievement of greater gender equity within Australian universities is a significant issue for both the quality and the strength of Australian higher education. This paper contributes to our knowledge of academic workloads, observing individual workloads in business faculties. A multiple case study method was employed to observe individual…

  17. The direct observation of cosmic ray composition in JACEE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Fuki, M.

    1989-01-01

    No significant changes in spectral index for protons up to 500 TeV and higher intensity for helium above 2 TeV were observed. For heavier elements, a general tendency of intensity enhancement of medium heavies in the relative abundance above about 10 TeV/amu was observed.

  18. Higher order Bezier circles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Jin

    1993-01-01

    Rational Bezier and B-spline representations of circles have been heavily publicized. However, all the literature assumes the rational Bezier segments in the homogeneous space are both planar and (equivalent to) quadratic. This creates the illusion that circles can only be achieved by planar and quadratic curves. Circles that are formed by higher order rational Bezier curves which are nonplanar in the homogeneous space are shown. The problem of whether it is possible to represent a complete circle with one Bezier curve is investigated. In addition, some other interesting properties of cubic Bezier arcs are discussed.

  19. [Significance of FGF23 measurement].

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Seiji

    2012-10-01

    Excess and deficient actions of FGF23 cause hypophosphatemic rickets/osteomalacia and hyperphosphatemic tumoral calcinosis, respectively. There are two kinds of assays for FGF23. Full-length assay detects only full-length FGF23 with biological activity. In contrast, C-terminal assay measures both full-length FGF23 and processed C-terminal fragment of FGF23. FGF23 measurement is useful for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with FGF23-related hypophosphatemic diseases. In addition, full-length assay can be used for the differential diagnosis of hypophosphatemic diseases. Furthermore, many epidemiological studies indicated the association between FGF23 levels and several adverse events including higher mortality, cardiovascular diseases and progression of CKD especially in patients with CKD. Therefore, it is possible that FGF23 can be a new marker in the risk assessment of patients with CKD. PMID:23023632

  20. Class Dismissed: Higher Education vs. Corrections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macallair, Dan; Taqi-Eddin, Khaled; Schiraldi, Vincent

    1999-01-01

    Examined California's spending patterns in higher education and corrections during the Wilson administration. Found that the prison population increased significantly, especially among people of color, while fees paid by California college students experienced their highest growth in 32 years. (EV)

  1. On higher spin partition functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccaria, Matteo; Tseytlin, Arkady A.

    2015-07-01

    We observe that the partition function of the set of all free massless higher spins s = 0, 1, 2, 3,... in flat space is equal to one: the ghost determinants cancel against the ‘physical’ ones or, equivalently, the (regularized) total number of degrees of freedom vanishes. This reflects large underlying gauge symmetry and suggests analogy with supersymmetric or topological theory. The Z = 1 property extends also to the AdS background, i.e. the 1-loop vacuum partition function of Vasiliev theory is equal to 1 (assuming a particular regularization of the sum over spins); this was noticed earlier as a consistency requirement for the vectorial AdS/CFT duality. We find that Z = 1 is true also in the conformal higher spin theory (with higher-derivative {\\partial }2s kinetic terms) expanded near flat or conformally flat S4 background. We also consider the partition function of free conformal theory of symmetric traceless rank s tensor field which has 2-derivative kinetic term but only scalar gauge invariance in flat 4d space. This non-unitary theory has Weyl-invariant action in curved background and it corresponds to ‘partially massless’ field in AdS5. We discuss in detail the special case of s = 2 (or ‘conformal graviton’), compute the corresponding conformal anomaly coefficients and compare them with previously found expressions for generic representations of conformal group in 4 dimensions.

  2. [Autoantibodies in vitiligo. Clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Morgan, M; Castells, A; Ramrez, A

    1986-01-01

    The occurrence of circulating autoantibodies was determined by indirect immunofluorescence in patients with vitiligo. In addition we determined the existence of anti-melanocytic antibodies by an immunofluorescence complement fixation technique, immunoglobulins in achromic and perilesional skin, complement (C3 and C4) and immunoglobulins in serum by immunoelectrophoresis. The results only indicate that a significant occurrence of circulating autoantibodies exists, especially antithyroid autoantibodies, which, moreover, are related to the vitiligos which affect important areas of the cutaneous surface (generalized vitiligo). PMID:3528710

  3. Technology Use in Higher Education Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elzarka, Sammy

    2012-01-01

    The significance of integrating technology use in higher education instruction is undeniable. The benefits include those related to access to instruction by underserved populations, adequately preparing students for future careers, capitalizing on best instructional practices, developing higher order thinking activities, and engaging students…

  4. Operations Research and Higher Education Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, T. C . E.

    1993-01-01

    Illustrates the uses of operations research (OR) in higher education administration by reviewing the higher education system's most significant operational problems: resource allocation, financial planning, budgeting, formation of student project groups, scheduling and classroom allocation, student registration, tuition and fee structure…

  5. Theorising Student Engagement in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    Student engagement has become problematic following the rise of mass and universal forms of higher education. Significant attention has been devoted to identifying factors that are associated with higher levels of engagement, but it remains the case that the underlying reasons for student engagement and, indeed, the notion itself of "student…

  6. Higher Spin Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Alfredo; Tempo, David; Troncoso, Ricardo

    We review some relevant results in the context of higher spin black holes in three-dimensional spacetimes, focusing on their asymptotic behaviour and thermodynamic properties. For simplicity, we mainly discuss the case of gravity nonminimally coupled to spin-three fields, being nonperturbatively described by a Chern-Simons theory of two independent {sl} (3, {R} ) gauge fields. Since the analysis is particularly transparent in the Hamiltonian formalism, we provide a concise discussion of their basic aspects in this context; and as a warming up exercise, we briefly analyze the asymptotic behaviour of pure gravity, as well as the BTZ black hole and its thermodynamics, exclusively in terms of gauge fields. The discussion is then extended to the case of black holes endowed with higher spin fields, briefly signaling the agreements and discrepancies found through different approaches. We conclude explaining how the puzzles become resolved once the fall off of the fields is precisely specified and extended to include chemical potentials, in a way that it is compatible with the asymptotic symmetries. Hence, the global charges become completely identified in an unambiguous way, so that different sets of asymptotic conditions turn out to contain inequivalent classes of black hole solutions being characterized by a different set of global charges.

  7. Higher than Everest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, Paul

    2001-08-01

    Tired of exploring planet Earth? Have you ever imagined what it would be like to explore the Moon? Ever wonder about the topography of Mars? In this unique guidebook all of your extraterrestrial wanderlust can be fulfilled as Paul Hodge takes you on a virtual tour of the most spectacular sites in the Solar System. Hodge includes the latest information about the Solar System into his vivid descriptions of imaginary, challenging expeditions. Imagine: -- Descending into a fabulous canyon on Mars, one that dwarfs the Earth's Grand Canyon; -- Trekking up Venus' precipitous and scorching Mt. Maxwell; -- Journeying through the snows of Saturn's rings and the incredibly high, icy cliff of Miranda, the moon closest to Uranus. A compelling, extensively illustrated introduction to such otherworldly environments, Higher than Everest makes you believe that someday these adventures may actually take place. Paul Hodge is Professor of Astronomy at the University of Washington, Seattle, and Editor-in-Chief of the Astronomical Journal. Higher than Everest is based on a popular undergraduate course on the planets that he has taught for many years. Hodge's research has spanned from interplanetary dust to the extragalactic distance scale and currently includes star-formation and galactic evolution, using the Hubble Space Telescope to investigate nearby galaxies. He has written several books, most recently Meteorite Craters and Impact Structures of the Earth (Cambridge 1994).

  8. Aspirations for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, P. G.; Western, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    The first phase of a longitudinal study of effects of social origins, schooling, perceived influence of significant others, and self-concept on college aspiration is more explanatory for men than women but shows parent, teacher, and peer influence to have a major impact for all. The social-psychological theory is criticized. (MSE)

  9. Teaching at higher levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-11-01

    Undergraduate physics programmes for the 21st century were under discussion at a recent event held in Arlington, USA, open to two or three members of the physics faculties of universities from across the whole country. The conference was organized by the American Association of Physics Teachers with co-sponsorship from the American Institute of Physics, the American Physical Society and Project Kaleidoscope. Among the various aims were to learn about physics departments that have successfully revitalized their undergraduate physics programmes with innovative introductory physics courses and multi-track majors programmes. Engineers and life scientists were to be asked directly how physics programmes can better serve their students, and business leaders would be speaking on how physics departments can help to prepare their students for the diverse careers that they will eventually follow. It was planned to highlight ways that departments could fulfil their responsibilities towards trainee teachers, to identify the resources needed for revitalizing a department's programme, and to develop guidelines and recommendations for a funding programme to support collaborative efforts among physics departments for carrying out the enhancements required. More details about the conference can be found on the AAPT website (see http://www.aapt.org/programs/rupc.html). Meanwhile the UK's Higher Education Funding Council has proposed a two-pronged approach to the promotion of high quality teaching and learning, as well as widening participation in higher education from 1999-2000. A total of £60m should be available to support these initiatives by the year 2001-2002. As part of this scheme the Council will invite bids from institutions to support individual academics in enhancing learning and teaching, as well as in recognition of individual excellence. As with research grants, such awards would enable staff to pursue activities such as the development of teaching materials, textbooks and technology applications, the improvement of delivery methods and work on curriculum and assessment practice. In addition, around half of the funding total will be set aside to widen participation for all students who can benefit from higher education, with assistance to ensure that those students succeed.

  10. Multiwavelength Observations of AB Doradus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slee, O. B.; Erkan, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Budding, E.

    2014-04-01

    We have observed the bright, magnetically active multiple star AB Doradus in a multiwavelength campaign centring around two large facility allocations in November 2006 and January, 2007. Our observations have covered at least three large flares. These flares were observed to produce significant hardening of the X-ray spectra during their very initial stages. We monitored flare-related effects using the Suzaku X-ray satellite and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) at 3.6 and 6 cm. Observations at 11 and 21 cm were also included, but they were compromised by interference. Optical monitoring was also provided by broadband B and V photometry and some high-dispersion spectrograms. From this multiwavelength coverage we find that the observed flare effects can be mainly associated with a large active region near longitude zero. The second major X-ray and microwave flare of Jan 8, 2007 was observed with a favourable geometry that allowed its initial high-energy impulsive phase to be observed in the higher frequency range of Suzaku's XIS detectors. The fractional circular polarisation (Stokes V/I) was measured in the uv data for the complete runs, for 25 min integrations and, at 4.80 GHz, for 5 min integrations, using the radio data of Nov 21 2006 and Jan 08 2007. Most of the full data sets showed V/I fractions from AB Dor B that were significant at greater than the 3σ level. In several of the 5 min integrations at 4.80 and 8.64 GHz this fraction reached a significance level between 3 and 9σ. Lack of angular resolution prevented identification of these high V/I values with one or other of the two low-mass red-dwarf components of AB Dor B.

  11. Quantifying Significance of MHC II Residues.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying; Lu, Ruoshui; Wang, Lusheng; Andreatta, Massimo; Li, Shuai Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC), a cell-surface protein mediating immune recognition, plays important roles in the immune response system of all higher vertebrates. MHC molecules are highly polymorphic and they are grouped into serotypes according to the specificity of the response. It is a common belief that a protein sequence determines its three dimensional structure and function. Hence, the protein sequence determines the serotype. Residues play different levels of importance. In this paper, we quantify the residue significance with the available serotype information. Knowing the significance of the residues will deepen our understanding of the MHC molecules and yield us a concise representation of the molecules. In this paper we propose a linear programming-based approach to find significant residue positions as well as quantifying their significance in MHC II DR molecules. Among all the residues in MHC II DR molecules, 18 positions are of particular significance, which is consistent with the literature on MHC binding sites, and succinct pseudo-sequences appear to be adequate to capture the whole sequence features. When the result is used for classification of MHC molecules with serotype assigned by WHO, a 98.4 percent prediction performance is achieved. The methods have been implemented in java (http://code.google.com/p/quassi/). PMID:26355503

  12. Evaluation of the significance of inverse oxidation for HTGR graphites

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.S.; Heiser, J. III; Sastre, C.

    1983-01-01

    The inverse oxidation refers to a higher mass loss inside the graphite than the outside. In 1980, Wichner et al reported this phenomenon (referred to as inside/out corrosion) observed in some H451 graphites, and offered an explanation that a catalyst (almost certainly Fe) is activated by the progressively increasing reducing conditions found in the graphite interior. Recently, Morgan and Thomas (1982) investigated this phenomenon is PGX graphites, and agreed on the existing mechanism to explain this pheomenon. They also called for attention to the possibility that this phenomenon may occur under HTGR (High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor) operating conditions. The purpose of this paper is to confirm the above mentioned explanation for this phenomenon and to evaluate the significance of this effect for HTGR graphites under realistic reactor conditions.

  13. Significant drug-nutrient interactions.

    PubMed

    Kirk, J K

    1995-04-01

    Many nutrients substantially interfere with pharmacotherapeutic goals. The presence of certain nutrients in the gastrointestinal tract affects the bioavailability and disposition of many oral medications. Drug-nutrient interactions can also have positive effects that result in increased drug absorption or reduced gastrointestinal irritation. Knowing the significant drug-nutrient interactions can help the clinician identify the nutrients to avoid with certain medications, as well as the therapeutic agents that should be administered with food. This information can be used to educate patients and optimize pharmacotherapy. PMID:7709893

  14. Where boosted significances come from

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plehn, Tilman; Schichtel, Peter; Wiegand, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    In an era of increasingly advanced experimental analysis techniques it is crucial to understand which phase space regions contribute a signal extraction from backgrounds. Based on the Neyman-Pearson lemma we compute the maximum significance for a signal extraction as an integral over phase space regions. We then study to what degree boosted Higgs strategies benefit ZH and tt¯H searches and which transverse momenta of the Higgs are most promising. We find that Higgs and top taggers are the appropriate tools, but would profit from a targeted optimization towards smaller transverse momenta. MadMax is available as an add-on to MadGraph 5.

  15. Clinical significance of neonatal menstruation.

    PubMed

    Brosens, Ivo; Benagiano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Past studies have clearly shown the existence of a spectrum of endometrial progesterone responses in neonatal endometrium, varying from proliferation to full decidualization with menstrual-like shedding. The bleedings represent, similar to what occurs in adult menstruation, a progesterone withdrawal bleeding. Today, the bleeding is completely neglected and considered an uneventful episode of no clinical significance. Yet clinical studies have linked the risk of bleeding to a series of events indicating fetal distress. The potential link between the progesterone response and major adolescent disorders requires to be investigated by prospective studies. PMID:26685798

  16. Public Health Significance of Neuroticism

    PubMed Central

    Lahey, Benjamin B.

    2009-01-01

    The personality trait of neuroticism refers to relatively stable tendencies to respond with negative emotions to threat, frustration, or loss. Individuals in the population vary markedly on this trait, ranging from frequent and intense emotional reactions to minor challenges to little emotional reaction even in the face of significant difficulties. Although not widely appreciated, there is growing evidence that neuroticism is a psychological trait of profound public health significance. Neuroticism is a robust correlate and predictor of many different mental and physical disorders, comorbidity among them, and the frequency of mental and general health service use. Indeed, neuroticism apparently is a predictor of the quality and longevity of our lives. Achieving a full understanding of the nature and origins of neuroticism, and the mechanisms through which neuroticism is linked to mental and physical disorders, should be a top priority for research. Knowing why neuroticism predicts such a wide variety of seemingly diverse outcomes should lead to improved understanding of commonalities among those outcomes and improved strategies for preventing them. PMID:19449983

  17. Significances of Multimedia Technologies Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fulei

    The use of multimedia technologies in education has enabled teachers to simulate final outcomes and assist s-tudents in applying knowledge learned from textbooks, thereby compensating for the deficiency of traditional teach- ing methods. It is important to examine how effective these technologies are in practical use. This study developed online learning-teaching resource platforms using Flash multimedia, providing interactive and integrated features in an easy-to-use user interface, in order to discuss Computer-Aided Drawing (CAD). The study utilized a teaching experiment with a non-equivalent pretest-posttest control group design to test and discuss students' professional cognition, operating skill cognition, and level of learning satisfaction during the learning process. No significant differences emerged between the groups in regards to professional cognition or operation skills cognition. However, a significant difference in learning satisfaction was noted, indicating that the coursework with multimedia Flash produced greater satisfaction than with traditional learning methods. Results are explained in detail and recommendations for further research provided.

  18. [Current significance of keratopathia neuroparalytica].

    PubMed

    Weidlich, R; Burkert, W

    1980-01-01

    Among the complications after surgical interventions carried out on the Ganglion semilunare because of a trigeminal neuralgia the reason why Keratopathia neuroparalytica plays a role is the fact that it very frequently leads to partial or total blindness of the affected eye. The pathogenesis of the keratopathy is still being disputed. The appraisal of the various surgical methods in trigeminal neuralgia always includes the frequent occurrence of a keratopathy. Among the 171 patients who were operated on in Halle because of trigeminal neuralgia in the last ten years no keratopathy was observed. In 12 cases a reduction or removal of the corneal reflex was brought about. On 8 patients a postganglionic intradural operation was carried out, all others received an electro-coagulation. The co-operation with the ophthalmologist is indispensable both prophylactically and therapeutically. PMID:6970469

  19. Yawning and its physiological significance

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sharat; Mittal, Shallu

    2013-01-01

    Although yawning is a commonly witnessed human behavior, yet it has not been taught in much detail in medical schools because, until the date, no particular physiological significance has been associated with it. It is characterized by opening up of mouth which is accompanied by a long inspiration, with a brief interruption of ventilation and followed by a short expiration. Since time immemorial, yawning has been associated with drowsiness and boredom. However, this age old belief is all set to change as the results of some newer studies have pointed out that yawning might be a way by which our body is trying to accomplish some more meaningful goals. In this review, we have tried to put together some of the important functions that have been proposed by a few authors, with the hope that this article will stimulate the interest of newer researchers in this hitherto unexplored field. PMID:23776833

  20. Yawning and its physiological significance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sharat; Mittal, Shallu

    2013-01-01

    Although yawning is a commonly witnessed human behavior, yet it has not been taught in much detail in medical schools because, until the date, no particular physiological significance has been associated with it. It is characterized by opening up of mouth which is accompanied by a long inspiration, with a brief interruption of ventilation and followed by a short expiration. Since time immemorial, yawning has been associated with drowsiness and boredom. However, this age old belief is all set to change as the results of some newer studies have pointed out that yawning might be a way by which our body is trying to accomplish some more meaningful goals. In this review, we have tried to put together some of the important functions that have been proposed by a few authors, with the hope that this article will stimulate the interest of newer researchers in this hitherto unexplored field. PMID:23776833

  1. Lumbosacral Transition Vertebra: Prevalence and Its Significance

    PubMed Central

    Amritanand, Rohit; Krishnan, Venkatesh; David, Kenny Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of radiological images. Purpose To determine the prevalence of lumbosacral transition vertebra (LSTV) and to study its significance with respect to clinically significant spinal symptoms, disc degeneration and herniation. Overview of Literature LSTV is the most common congenital anomaly of the lumbosacral spine. The prevalence has been debated to vary between 7% and 30%, and its relationship to back pain, disc degeneration and herniation has also not been established. Methods The study involved examining the radiological images of 3 groups of patients. Group A consisted of kidney urinary bladder (KUB) X-rays of patients attending urology outpatient clinic. Group B consisted of X-rays with or without magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of patients at-tending a spine outpatient clinic, and group C consisted of X-rays and MRI of patients who had undergone surgery for lumbar disc herniation. One thousand patients meeting the inclusion criteria were selected to be in each group. LSTV was classified by Castellvi's classification and disc degeneration was assessed by Pfirrmann's grading on MRI scans. Results The prevalence of LSTV among urology outpatients, spine outpatients and discectomy patients was 8.1%, 14%, and 16.9% respectively. LSTV patients showed a higher Pfirrmann's grade of degeneration of the last mobile disc. Results were found to be significant statistically. Conclusions The prevalence of LSTV in spinal outpatients and discectomy patients was significantly higher as compared to those attending the urology outpatient clinic. There was a definite causal relationship between the transitional vertebra and the degeneration of the disc immediately cephalad to it. PMID:24596605

  2. The energetic significance of cooking.

    PubMed

    Carmody, Rachel N; Wrangham, Richard W

    2009-10-01

    While cooking has long been argued to improve the diet, the nature of the improvement has not been well defined. As a result, the evolutionary significance of cooking has variously been proposed as being substantial or relatively trivial. In this paper, we evaluate the hypothesis that an important and consistent effect of cooking food is a rise in its net energy value. The pathways by which cooking influences net energy value differ for starch, protein, and lipid, and we therefore consider plant and animal foods separately. Evidence of compromised physiological performance among individuals on raw diets supports the hypothesis that cooked diets tend to provide energy. Mechanisms contributing to energy being gained from cooking include increased digestibility of starch and protein, reduced costs of digestion for cooked versus raw meat, and reduced energetic costs of detoxification and defence against pathogens. If cooking consistently improves the energetic value of foods through such mechanisms, its evolutionary impact depends partly on the relative energetic benefits of non-thermal processing methods used prior to cooking. We suggest that if non-thermal processing methods such as pounding were used by Lower Palaeolithic Homo, they likely provided an important increase in energy gain over unprocessed raw diets. However, cooking has critical effects not easily achievable by non-thermal processing, including the relatively complete gelatinisation of starch, efficient denaturing of proteins, and killing of food borne pathogens. This means that however sophisticated the non-thermal processing methods were, cooking would have conferred incremental energetic benefits. While much remains to be discovered, we conclude that the adoption of cooking would have led to an important rise in energy availability. For this reason, we predict that cooking had substantial evolutionary significance. PMID:19732938

  3. The functional significance of stereopsis.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Anna R; Birch, Eileen E; Anderson, Susan; Draper, Hayley

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. Development or restoration of binocular vision is one of the key goals of strabismus management; however, the functional impact of stereoacuity has largely been neglected. Methods. Subjects aged 10 to 30 years with normal, reduced, or nil stereoacuity performed three tasks: Purdue pegboard (measured how many pegs placed in 30 seconds), bead threading (with two sizes of bead, to increase the difficulty; measured time taken to thread a number of beads), and water pouring (measured both accuracy and time). All tests were undertaken both with and without occlusion of one eye. Results. One hundred forty-three subjects were recruited, 32.9% (n = 47) with a manifest deviation. Performances on the pegboard and bead tasks were significantly worse in the nil stereoacuity group when compared with that of the normal stereoacuity group. On the large and small bead tasks, those with reduced stereoacuity were better than those with nil stereoacuity (when the Preschool Randot Stereoacuity Test [Stereo Optical Co, Inc., Chicago, IL] results were used to determine stereoacuity levels). Comparison of the short-term monocular conditions (those with normal stereoacuity but occluded) with nil stereoacuity showed that, on all measures, the performance was best in the nil stereoacuity group and was statistically significant for the large and small beads task, irrespective of which test result was used to define the stereoacuity levels. Conclusions. Performance on motor skills tasks was related to stereoacuity, with subjects with normal stereoacuity performing best on all tests. This quantifiable degradation in performance on some motor skill tasks supports the need to implement management strategies to maximize development of high-grade stereoacuity. PMID:19933184

  4. Higher prices in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    1982-03-01

    Price increases in the Jamaica CSM program went into effect on August 31, 1981. The program began in 1975. While the need for higher prices has been under discussion for the past 3 years, this is the 1st time the requisite approval from the Jamaica Price Commission has been obtained. The Jamaica National Family Planning Board (JNFPB) reports that the Panther 3-pack (condom) is up US$0.15 to US$0.30. Each Perle package (oral contraceptive) was increased by US$0.20. Single cycle Perle now sells for US$0.50, and 3-pack Perle sells for US$1.10. The 6-year price stagnation experienced by the CSM program resulted in a decreasing operational budget as program costs continued to rise. Marketing costs alone during this period escalated by 100-300%. For example, Panther pop-up display cartons cost the project US 16U each in 1975. By 1979 the same product cost US 49U. Newspaper advertisements have increased from the 1975 cost of US$68.00 to nearly $200.00 per placement. The overall inflation rate in Jamaica during the last 5 years has averaged more than 20% annually. In the face of these rising costs, outlet expansion for Perle has been prevented, wholesaler margins have been unavailable, and new retailer training has been discontinued. It is projected that the new prices will result in an annual increased revenues of US$80,000 which will be used to reinstate these essential marketing activities. The JNFPB is also planning to introduce a Panther 12-pack and Panther strips to the CSM product line. According to Marketing Manager Aston Evans, "We believe the public is now ready for this type of packaging" which is scheduled to be available soon. Panther is presently only available in a 3-pack, but annual sales have been steady. The new 12-pack will be stocked on supermarket shelves to provide higher product visibility and wider distribution. The selling price has been set as US$1.20 and is expected to yield a 25% increase in sales during the 1st year. A complete sales promotion and advertising campaign will accompany the 12-pack introduction. The marketing plan for Panther strips emphasizes placement in government and private sector offices and factories throughout the country. In the deep rural areas the strips will be available for sale in shops, bars, nightclubs, and other distribution points. PMID:12264179

  5. Clinical significance of TMPRSS4 in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Guohai; Yang, Xiaoqun; Dai, Bo; Zhang, Hailiang; Shen, Yijun; Zhu, Yao; Zhu, Yiping; Xiao, Wenjun; Ma, Chunguang; Wen, Linguo; Qin, Xiaojian; Cao, Dalong; Ye, Dingwei

    2014-01-01

    Transmembrane protease serine 4 (TMPRSS4) is a type-II transmembrane serine protease that plays an important role in the migration of cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate both the expression of TMPRSS4 and its clinical significance in prostate cancer. The expression of TMPRSS4 was evaluated in 73 pairs of prostate cancer and adjacent non-cancerous tissues by immunohistochemistry. The level of TMPRSS4 in prostate cancer tissues was significantly higher than that in adjacent non-cancerous tissues. High TMPRSS4 expression was significantly associated with advanced TNM stage and LNM. No association between TMPRSS4 expression and progression-free survival was observed in all patients. Stratified analyses according to clinical features revealed that patients with low TMPRSS4 expression had poor prognosis compared with those with high TMPRSS4 expression in subjects not receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In conclusion, TMPRSS4 showed abnormal expression in prostate cancer tissues. TMPRSS4 may be a potential prognostic biomarker for prostate cancer patients who did not undergo neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:25550850

  6. Significance of blood pressure variability in patients with sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Nishant Raj; Bian, Yu-yao; Shou, Song-tao

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was undertaken to observe the characteristics of blood pressure variability (BPV) and sepsis and to investigate changes in blood pressure and its value on the severity of illness in patients with sepsis. METHODS: Blood parameters, APACHE II score, and 24-hour ambulatory BP were analyzed in 89 patients with sepsis. RESULTS: In patients with APACHE II score>19, the values of systolic blood pressure (SBPV), diasystolic blood pressure (DBPV), non-dipper percentage, cortisol (COR), lactate (LAC), platelet count (PLT) and glucose (GLU) were significantly higher than in those with APACHE II score ≤19 (P<0.05), whereas the values of procalcitonin (PCT), white blood cell (WBC), creatinine (Cr), PaO2, C-reactive protein (CRP), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Correlation analysis showed that APACHE II scores correlated significantly with SBPV and DBPV (P<0.01, r=0.732 and P<0.01, r=0.762). SBPV and DBPV were correlated with COR (P=0.018 and r=0.318; P=0.008 and r=0.353 respectively). However, SBPV and DBPV were not correlated with TNF-α, IL-10, and PCT (P>0.05). Logistic regression analysis of SBPV, DBPV, APACHE II score, and LAC was used to predict prognosis in terms of survival and non-survival rates. Receiver operating characteristics curve (ROC) showed that DBPV was a better predictor of survival rate with an AUC value of 0.890. However, AUC of SBPV, APACHE II score, and LAC was 0.746, 0.831 and 0.915, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The values of SBPV, DBPV and non-dipper percentage are higher in patients with sepsis. DBPV and SBPV can be used to predict the survival rate of patients with sepsis. PMID:25215146

  7. Astrobiological significance of chemolithoautotrophic acidophiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-02-01

    For more than a century (since Winogradsky discovered lithautotrophic bacteria) there has been a dilemma in microbiology about life that first inhabited the Earth. Which types of life forms first appeared in the primordial oceans during the earliest geological period on Earth as the primary ancestors of modern biological diversity? How did a metabolism of ancestors evolve: from lithoautotrophic to lithoheterotrophic and organoheterotrophic or from organoheterotrophic to organautotrophic and lithomixotrophic types? At the present time, it is known that chemolithoheterotrophic and chemolithoautotrophic metabolizing bacteria are wide spread in different ecosystems. On Earth the acidic ecosystems are associated with geysers, volcanic fumaroles, hot springs, deep sea hydrothermal vents, caves, acid mine drainage and other technogenic ecosystems. Bioleaching played a significant roel on a global geological scale during the Earth's formation. This important feature of bacteria has been successfully applied in industry. The lithoautotrophs include Bacteria and Archaea belonging to diverse genera containing thermophilic and mesophilic species. In this paper we discuss the lithotrophic microbial acidophiles and present some data with a description of new acidophilic iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacterium isolated from the Chena Hot Springs in Alaska. We also consider the possible relevance of microbial acidophiles to Venus, Io, and acidic inclusions in glaciers and icy moons.

  8. Polysaccharides: Occurrence, Significance, and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemiller, James N.

    Polysaccharides are properties present significance in all living organisms where they carry out one or more of their diverse functions. While there is no specific category or definition of a complex polysaccharide, most are structurally complex. Polysaccharides contain 1-5 different monosaccharide (sugar) units. The different sugar units may have different anomeric configurations and/or be joined by different glycosidic linkages. Polysaccharides may be linear or branched. Branches may be short saccharide units on a linear backbone or the molecule may have a branch-on-branch structure; in either case, the branches may be isolated or clustered. Polysaccharides may contain non-carbohydrate groups. Esters or cyclic acetal groups, when present, can be removed by appropriate treatments. All polysaccharides are polydisperse, i. e., are present in a range of molecular weights rather than having a single molecular weight. Most are polymolecular, i. e., differ in fine structure from molecule to molecule. So most polysaccharides can be said to be structurally complex. They may be attached to protein molecules or to other polysaccharide molecules. They are solvated by water. Most dissolve in aqueous systems, especially if they are alkaline. Polysaccharides can be depolymerized by acids and heat, specific enzymes, and high pH systems following oxidation. Their hydroxyl groups can be esterified (acylated), etherified (alkylated), and oxidized. Amino groups can be acylated (and deacylated). Carboxyl groups can be converted into esters, amides, and amines. Structural modification makes the molecules even more complex and polymolecular and, perhaps, polydisperse.

  9. Astrobiological Significance of Chemolithoautotrophic Acidophiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    For more than a century (since Winogradsky discovered lithoautotrophic bacteria) a dilemma in microbiology has concerned life that first inhabited the Earth. Which types of life forms first appeared in the primordial oceans during the earliest geological period on Earth as the primary ancestors of modem biological diversity? How did a metabolism of ancestors evolve: from lithoautotrophic to lithohetherotrophic and organoheterotrophic or from organoheterotrophic to organoautotrophic and lithomixotrophic types? At the present time, it is known that chemolithoheterotrophic and chemolithoautotrophic metabolizing bacteria are wide spread in different ecosystems. On Earth the acidic ecosystems are associated with geysers, volcanic fumaroles, hot springs, deep sea hydrothermal vents, caves, acid mine drainage and other technogenic ecosystems. Bioleaching played a significant role on a global geological scale during the Earth's formation. This important feature of bacteria has been successfully applied in industry. The lithoautotrophs include Bacteria and Archaea belonging to diverse genera containing thermophilic and mesophilic species. In this paper we discuss the lithotrophic microbial acidophiles and present some data with a description of new acidophilic iron- and sulfur- oxidizing bacterium isolated from the Chena Hot Springs in Alaska. We also consider the possible relevance of microbial acidophiles to Venus, Io, and acidic inclusions in glaciers and icy moons.

  10. [Sarcopenia: prevalence, detection, clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Bezdenezhnykh, A V; Sumin, A N

    2012-01-01

    Population aging is a most important demographic process in the recent decades. The elderly subjects constitute an increasingly greater fraction of the patients staying at multifield hospitals. They are characterized not only by having multiple pathologies but also by age-related changes in peripheral tissues. These physiological changes may considerably aggravate the clinical conditions of the patients. One of the processes accompanying aging is sarcopenia or the loss of muscular mass leading to deterioration of the quality of life and physical independence, disablement and a poor life prognosis. Sarcopenia has been extensively studied in recent decades with reference to it social and economic consequences. At the same time the efficacy of measures designed to control sarcopenia is impaired by concomitant diseases and age-related changes in the muscular tissue. The problem of sarcopenia is insufficiently dealt with in the Russian-language literature despite its clinical significance. This review is intended for a wide circle of clinicians dealing with aged patients in their practical work. PMID:23285756

  11. Tevatron higher energy testing

    SciTech Connect

    Theilacker, Jay; /Fermilab

    1995-10-01

    A cryogenic system upgrade was installed in 1993 to lower the temperature of the Tevatron in order to achieve higher operating energies. Centrifugal cold helium vapor compressors were used to lower the temperature of the two-phase circuit of the Tevatron. A cold compressor (CC) is used at each of the twenty-four satellite refrigerators, allowing each satellite to be individually tuned to the temperature necessary for the magnets. Initial testing took place in December, 1993 and January, 1994. During that time, they uniformly tuned the Tevatron for 11 psia (3.93 K) cold compressor operation. fifteen quenches were achieved. All of them were ramp-to-quench from either a 900 GeV ramp or the QBS test ramp. Approximately ten of the quenches appeared to be training quenches. The ultimate ramp-to-quench energy achieved was 998 GeV. The second major testing sequence took place in July, 1995, just prior to a two month shutdown. Again, the entire Tevatron was tuned for a uniform cold compressor temperature of 11 psia (3.93 K). Two changes were made compared to the 1993/94 testing. First, the helium flow in the magnets was kept constant when pumping down from the nominal 19 psia to 11 psia. During previous testing, the magnet JT valves were kept locked, resulting in considerably higher flows at 11 psia operation. Second, instead of ramp-to-quench testing, ramping at a lower energy was started and the flattop energy was increased 5 GeV after three successful ramps. These two changes resulted in a lower peak quench energy of 990 GeV. An attempt was made to uniformly tune the cold compressor temperatures down to 8.5 psia to investigate the increase in quench energy. A failure in a turbine at CHL cold box II put an end to the test prior to powering the Tevatron. Uniform operation at 8.5 psia (3.69 K) is not possible steady state due to capacity limits of CHL cold box II. During this test, they were slowly consuming liquid from storage in order to make up the difference. Previous testing in A sector showed that some magnet strings perform better at 11 psia operation than others perform at 8 psia. Individually tuning the temperature at each of the twenty-four satellites allows us to conserve CHL capacity for magnet strings that exhibit the poorest quench performance. As a result, the goal of the recent testing in October, 1995, was to determine the quench energy of the Tevatron while individually tuning the operating temperature of each satellite system until a lower temperature limit was reached in the quench limiting house.

  12. Polyesters in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Kolattukudy, P E

    2001-01-01

    Polyesters occur in higher plants as the structural component of the cuticle that covers the aerial parts of plants. This insoluble polymer, called cutin, attached to the epidermal cell walls is composed of interesterified hydroxy and hydroxy epoxy fatty acids. The most common chief monomers are 10,16-dihydroxy C16 acid, 18-hydroxy-9,10 epoxy C18 acid, and 9,10,18-trihydroxy C18 acid. These monomers are produced in the epidermal cells by omega hydroxylation, in-chain hydroxylation, epoxidation catalyzed by P450-type mixed function oxidase, and epoxide hydration. The monomer acyl groups are transferred to hydroxyl groups in the growing polymer at the extracellular location. The other type of polyester found in the plants is suberin, a polymeric material deposited in the cell walls of a layer or two of cells when a plant needs to erect a barrier as a result of physical or biological stress from the environment, or during development. Suberin is composed of aromatic domains derived from cinnamic acid, and aliphatic polyester domains derived from C16 and C18 cellular fatty acids and their elongation products. The polyesters can be hydrolyzed by pancreatic lipase and cutinase, a polyesterase produced by bacteria and fungi. Catalysis by cutinase involves the active serine catalytic triad. The major function of the polyester in plants is as a protective barrier against physical, chemical, and biological factors in the environment, including pathogens. Transcriptional regulation of cutinase gene in fungal pathogens is being elucidated at a molecular level. The polyesters present in agricultural waste may be used to produce high value polymers, and genetic engineering might be used to produce large quantities of such polymers in plants. PMID:11217409

  13. Inviting Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Spencer D.

    2010-01-01

    Monthly meetings and a peer-observation program help novice teachers overcome isolation and practice new skills that support improved student learning. Peer observation is not without its difficulties. Above all else, the point of the program is to make teachers more comfortable observing, sharing instructional ideas, and learning from one…

  14. Procalcitonin kinetics – prognostic and diagnostic significance in septic patients

    PubMed Central

    Mierzchała-Pasierb, Magdalena; Durek, Grażyna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Severe sepsis and septic shock are advanced clinical conditions representing the patient's response to infection and having a variable but high mortality rate. Early evaluation of sepsis stage and choice of adequate treatment are key factors for survival. Some study results suggest the necessity of daily procalcitonin (PCT) monitoring because of its prognostic and discriminative value. Material and methods An observational and prospective study was conducted to evaluate the prognostic and discriminative value of PCT kinetics in comparison to PCT absolute value measurements. In a group of 50 intensive care unit patients with diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock, serum PCT measurements were performed on admission, and on the 2nd, 3rd and 5th day of therapy. The level of PCT was determined with a commercially available test according to the manufacturer's protocol. Results The kinetics of PCT assessed by ΔPCT was statistically significant in the survivors vs. the non-survivors subgroup (ΔPCT3/1, p = 0.022; ΔPCT5/1, p = 0.021). ΔPCT has no statistical significance in the severe sepsis and septic shock subgroups for all analyzed days. Only the 5th day PCT level was significantly higher in the non-survivors vs. survivors group (p = 0.008). The 1st day PCT level in the severe sepsis vs. septic shock group has a discriminative impact (p = 0.009). Conclusions According to the results, single serum PCT measurement, regardless of absolute value, has a discriminative impact but no prognostic significance, during the first 2 days of therapy. The PCT kinetics is of prognostic value from the 3rd day and is of earlier prognostic significance in comparison to changes in the patient's clinical condition evaluated by SOFA score kinetics. PMID:26925126

  15. [Toxicological significance of biological markers].

    PubMed

    Manno, M; Sannolo, N

    2004-01-01

    Biological monitoring or, simply, biomonitoring (BM), refers to the periodic measurement of biological markers, or biomarkers (BMKs), in human fluids and tissues to assess the interaction (absorption, early health effects, susceptibility) between physical, chemical or biological agents and the human organism. The primary aim of BM in the workplace is to integrate environmental monitoring data and detect early, reversible biochemical or functional changes in workers exposed to chemicals before they become clinically relevant. BM also contributes to the assessment of chemical risk to workers, as individuals or as a group. Biomarkers are generally divided into three main types: biomarkers of exposure (BME), response/effect (BMR), and susceptibility (BMS). Other, more specific types of biomarkers are those of internal dose (BID), those of biologically effective dose (BED) and early biomarkers of disease (EBD). It is not always easy, however, to allocate a given BMK--such as the measurement of cytochrome P450 phenotype in subjects exposed to organic solvents--to one or the other type. Biomonitoring provides several advantages over environmental monitoring or health surveillance. For example, it allows an estimate of inter- and intra-individual variability in the absorption, distribution and excretion of chemicals. It also allows the detection of reversible changes before the appearance of a clinically relevant occupational impairment or disease. For these reasons, BM has become a routine procedure in occupational health practice throughout the world. Even the widely acknowledged, recently updated Code of Ethics for Occupational Health Professionals, a milestone in occupational health practice, only provides the basic ethical principles associated with biological monitoring. The aim of the present paper is to survey the various types of BMK available today with two main objectives: to discuss their toxicological significance and highlight the substantial differences that exist between their use in the practice of occupational health and in medical research. The development of new, more valid and reliable BMKs is strongly dependent on the understanding not only of the toxicokinetic and toxicodinamic mechanisms of chemicals, but also of the various susceptibility factors involved, whether genetic or environmental. It is hoped that the concurrent use of BMKs of different types may improve chemical risk assessment in workers, both individually and as a group. PMID:15584434

  16. Adaptive significance of root grafting in trees

    SciTech Connect

    Loehle, C.; Jones, R.

    1988-12-31

    Root grafting has long been observed in forest trees but the adaptive significance of this trait has not been fully explained. Various authors have proposed that root grafting between trees contributes to mechanical support by linking adjacent root systems. Keeley proposes that this trait would be of greatest advantage in swamps where soils provide poor mechanical support. He provides as evidence a greenhouse study of Nyssa sylvatica Marsh in which seedlings of swamp provenance formed between-individual root grafts more frequently than upland provenance seedlings. In agreement with this within-species study, Keeley observed that arid zone species rarely exhibit grafts. Keeley also demonstrated that vines graft less commonly than trees, and herbs never do. Since the need for mechanical support coincides with this trend, these data seem to support his model. In this paper, the authors explore the mechanisms and ecological significance of root grafting, leading to predictions of root grafting incidence. Some observations support and some contradict the mechanical support hypothesis.

  17. Astrobiological Significance of Microbial Extremophiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    The microflora of the cryosphere of planet Earth provides the best analogs for life forms that might be found in the permafrost or polar ice caps of Mars, near the surface of the cometary nuclei, or in the liquid water beneath and the ice crusts of icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn. The importance of study alkaliphilic microorganisms for astrobiology was enhanced by the findings of abundant carbonates and carbonate globules rimmed with possibly biogenic magnetites in association with the putative microfossils in the ALH84001 meteorite. Although the ALH84001 "nanofossils" were to small and simple to be unambiguously recognized as biogenic, they stimulated Astrobiology research and studies of microbial extremophiles and biomarkers in ancient rocks and meteorites. Recent studies of CI and CM carbonaceous meteorites have resulted in the detection of the well-preserved mineralized remains of coccoidal and filamentous microorganisms in cyanobacterial mats. Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis has shown anomalous biogenic element ratios clearly indicating they are not recent biological contaminants. This paper reviews microbial extremophiles in context of their significance to Astrobiology. The study of halophilic microorganisms was started from work with saline soils and lakes, and one of the record of good growth for Haloferax mediterranei was shown at 30 percent NaC1. Although alkali-tolerant nitrifying bacteria had previously been reported, the first described alkaliphilic microorganism was the bacterium Streptococcus faecalis. Halophilic and alkaliphilic forms are relevant to conditions that might be found in closed impact basins and craters on Mars filled with evaporite deposits. The first obligately acidophilic bacterium described was Acidithiobacillus ferrooxydans (formally Thiobacillus ferrooxidans). Later thermophilic lithotrophic acidophiles were found, and the hyperacidophilic moderately thermophilic species of the genus Picrophilus were found to grow at negative pH. The epoch of study of thermophilic microorganisms starts with the discovery of Thermus aquaticus, and presently the maximum temperature for growth at 113 C was found for Pyrolobus fumarii. The microorganisms capable of growth at high temperatures and in hyperacidic environments on Earth are good analogs for life that might be able to survive in hot acidic droplets in the upper regimes of the atmosphere of Venus. The study of barophiles was made possible by engineering achievements leading to the development of the submersible crafts used to study the Black Smokers of the Deep-sea Hydrothermal vents. The first described radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans can survive ionizing irradiation and other DNA-damaging assaults at doses that are lethal to all other organisms. These microbes are models for life that might endure high radiation environments in the ice near the surface of comets or on the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn and in the seafloor deep beneath icy crusts Europa and Enceladus. This paper presents ESEM and FESEM images showing intact microbes preserved in the deep ice cores extracted from just above Lake Vostok, Antarctica that are considered analogs for life forms that might survive on comets and icy moons.

  18. Higher levels of erythrocyte membrane microviscosity in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Baba, Y; Kai, M; Kamada, T; Setoyama, S; Otsuji, S

    1979-12-01

    Significantly higher levels of erythrocyte membrane microviscosity (MV) [n-: 5.22 +/- 0.17 (4.70--5.92), mean +/- SD (range), poise, N = 67, P less than 0.005] measured by fluorescence depolarization using 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene as a fluorescent probe were found in diabetic patients when compared with normal controls [5.05 +/- 0.15 (4.70--5.29), N = 22]. No significant differences in MV existed between males and females, nor was MV significantly correlated with diabetic age, duration of diabetes, plasma cholesterol, cholesterol/phsopholipid ratios, and plasma lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase activities. No significant difference in MV was observed between groups with or without diabetic retinopathy. There was, however, significantly higher MV [5.29 +/- 0.19 (5.00--5.92), N = 20, P less than 0.05] in the group with fasting blood glucose (FBG) greater than or equal to 140 mg/dl than that [5.19 +/- 0.15 (4.70--5.46), N = 47] in the group with FBG less than 140 mg/dl. The changes in erythrocyte membrane MV presented in this study appear to be related to the current metabolic control of diabetic patients and are considered to be one of the factors responsible for the reduced erythrocyte deformability in diabetes. PMID:510812

  19. Higher-level motor processes.

    PubMed

    Rumiati, Raffaella Ida; Papeo, Liuba; Corradi-Dell'Acqua, Corrado

    2010-03-01

    Traditionally the motor system was thought of as a movement output device that, after brain damage, can impede patients from correctly planning and executing an action. In the last 20 years neuropsychological observations have contributed to the development of a new view that attributes higher-level functions to this system. Rapidly, this area of investigation has grown very popular, with motor representations being considered critical for action and object recognition, imagery and even language understanding. At present, we can distinguish between embodied and disembodied theories. The former predominantly are built on associations of deficits in these abilities whereas the latter rely on dissociations between deficits. Neuroimaging research has also showed that different action-related functions activate either overlapping or discrete regions, thus sustaining either association-based or dissociation-based models. Although no convincing theory is, to date, available to explain both sets of observations, cognitive neuroscientists have begun to explore this intermediate hypothesis space. Here we suggest that concepts like strategy and simulation seem promising in explaining how the cognitive system alternates between action-related functions. PMID:20392283

  20. Inconsistent handers show higher psychopathy than consistent handers.

    PubMed

    Shobe, Elizabeth; Desimone, Kailey

    2016-01-01

    Three hundred and forty-two university students completed the Short Dark Triad (SD3) and the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory (EHI). Inconsistent handers showed higher psychopathy scores than consistent handers, and no handedness differences were observed for narcissism or Machiavellianism. Participants were further subdivided by quartile into low, moderately low, moderately high, and high psychopathy groups (non-clinical). Absolute EHI scores were equally distributed among low and moderate groups, but were significantly lower for the high psychopathy group. These findings suggest that inconsistent handedness is only associated with the upper quartile of psychopathy scores. Also, males showed significantly higher psychopathy scores than females, and the ratio of male to female inconsistent handers decreased as psychopathy score increased. No gender × handedness interaction indicated that both female and male inconsistent handers have higher psychopathy scores than consistent handers. Although significant, the effects were small and 99.6% of participants were not in the range of a potential clinical diagnosis. The reader, therefore, is strongly cautioned against equating inconsistent handedness with psychopathy. PMID:26430938

  1. Women in Virginia Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New University Conference, Hampton, VA. Peninsula Chapter.

    This document explores how Virginia higher education perpetuates stereotypic social roles, the evolution of sexually segregated schools, the current evidences of sexual discrimination towards faculty, staff and students, the State Council of Higher Education's 1967 plan for higher education, the status of Virginia higher education under the law…

  2. Significant Warming of the Antarctic Winter Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, J.; Lachlan-Cope, T. A.; Colwell, S.; Marshall, G. J.; Connolley, W. M.

    2006-03-01

    We report an undocumented major warming of the Antarctic winter troposphere that is larger than any previously identified regional tropospheric warming on Earth. This result has come to light through an analysis of recently digitized and rigorously quality controlled Antarctic radiosonde observations. The data show that regional midtropospheric temperatures have increased at a statistically significant rate of 0.5° to 0.7° Celcius per decade over the past 30 years. Analysis of the time series of radiosonde temperatures indicates that the data are temporally homogeneous. The available data do not allow us to unambiguously assign a cause to the tropospheric warming at this stage.

  3. Observation Station

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Heather

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how a teacher integrates science observations into the writing center. At the observation station, students explore new items with a science theme and use their notes and questions for class writings every day. Students are exposed to a variety of different topics and motivated to write in different styles all while…

  4. Transforming Higher Education: Implications for State Higher Education Finance Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Dewayne

    1998-01-01

    Examines how information technology is transforming higher education (asynchronous learning, distance education, customized program structure, customized delivery, outcome-based programs, collaboration, and competition) and discusses implications for state higher education finance policy (competition, student costs, collaboration, and…

  5. Korean Higher Education Reforms and Changes since the 1990s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Yun Suk

    2011-01-01

    Korean higher education has experienced significant changes since the 1990s. Terms like quality, excellence, competition, efficiency, restructuring, and accountability have become dominant in higher education discourse. These changes are integral parts of higher education reforms implemented by the South Korean government and higher educational…

  6. Higher Education and Work. Higher Education Policy Series 23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, John, Ed.; And Others

    The relationship between higher education and the world of work is examined in terms of the changing structures of higher education institutions and the effect of the relationship on curricula. An international perspective is provided on the changing nature of employment and the labor market; the increasing diversification of higher education…

  7. Higher Education in Norway. Monographs on Higher Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetveit, Anne-Marie, Comp.

    This monograph examines the state of higher education in Norway. Fifteen chapters cover: (1) "The Norwegian Background"; (2) "The Educational System"; (3) "Institutional Units of Higher Education"; (4) "The Financing of Higher Education"; (5) "The Administrative Structure"; (6) "The Teaching and Research Staff"; (7) "Structure and Content of…

  8. Advancing Diversity in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Caroline S.

    2013-01-01

    This special section of the "Journal of Diversity in Higher Education" ("JDHE") on "Advancing Diversity in Higher Education" emerged from the 2012 Association for the Study of Higher Education Council on Ethnic Participation (ASHE-CEP) Pre-Conference Forum. CEP, a standing committee of ASHE, partnered with the

  9. Higher Education Funding in Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Lori

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine perceptions of state legislators regarding funding of public higher education in the State of Missouri. To this end, I sought to determine how Missouri legislators perceive the purpose of higher education and the role the state government should play in funding it. The concept that higher

  10. Higher Education and Public Good

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marginson, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Policy debate about whether to maintain public subsidies for higher education has stimulated reconsideration of the public mission of higher education institutions, especially those that provide student places conferring private benefits. If the work of higher education institutions is defined simply as the aggregation of private interests, this…

  11. Higher Education and the Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Roger

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the author explores the answers to the following questions: (1) What does the "marketisation" of higher education mean? (2) What are the potential implications for United Kingdom higher education? and (3) How should everyone handle those implications? He also cites the three main reasons why higher education cannot simply be left to

  12. Higher Education Studies in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaneko, Motohisa

    2010-01-01

    The rapid development of higher education in the postwar period has given rise to various problems, and higher education studies in Japan have developed in response to them. What have been the major issues, and how did academic research respond to them, in postwar Japan? This article delineates an outline of higher education studies in general,…

  13. Higher Education and the Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Roger

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the author explores the answers to the following questions: (1) What does the "marketisation" of higher education mean? (2) What are the potential implications for United Kingdom higher education? and (3) How should everyone handle those implications? He also cites the three main reasons why higher education cannot simply be left to…

  14. Higher Education Finance Manual 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Douglas J.; Mertins, Paul J.

    The Higher Education Finance Manual (HEFM) is intended to serve as a guide to higher education planners and managers in their understanding and use of institutional finance data. It addresses higher education finance data from the layman's perspective. The document includes definitions of accounting terms and descriptions of generally accepted…

  15. Internationalization of Chinese Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Linhan; Huang, Danyan

    2013-01-01

    This paper probes into the development of internationalization of higher education in China from ancient times to modern times, including the emergence of international connections in Chinese higher education and the subsequent development of such connections, the further development of internationalization of Chinese higher education, and the…

  16. Advancing Diversity in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Caroline S.

    2013-01-01

    This special section of the "Journal of Diversity in Higher Education" ("JDHE") on "Advancing Diversity in Higher Education" emerged from the 2012 Association for the Study of Higher Education Council on Ethnic Participation (ASHE-CEP) Pre-Conference Forum. CEP, a standing committee of ASHE, partnered with the…

  17. Commitment to Higher Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imrie, Brad; And Others

    This publication is a history of the College of Higher Vocational Studies (CHVS) since it was established in 1991 and provides commentary on developments in higher vocational education in Hong Kong during a period of unprecedented change and development in the provision of the Higher Diploma. "Principal's Diary" (Bradford Imrie) describes the…

  18. Economic Trends and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottinger, Cecilia A.

    1992-01-01

    This research brief highlights current and projected economic trends that affect higher education and discusses some of their implications. The brief is organized into three sections: (1) national economic conditions affecting higher education, which presents data on gross national product, inflation, the Higher Education Price Index, the federal…

  19. Higher Education and Public Good

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marginson, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Policy debate about whether to maintain public subsidies for higher education has stimulated reconsideration of the public mission of higher education institutions, especially those that provide student places conferring private benefits. If the work of higher education institutions is defined simply as the aggregation of private interests, this

  20. A Tax for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    2012-01-01

    Higher education pays off handsomely for society. Yet on a nationwide basis, states' support for higher education per full-time-equivalent student has fallen to just $6,290, the lowest in 15 years. A dedicated source of funds for higher education is problematic. But what if state and federal lawmakers applied the impeccable logic of the gas tax to

  1. History of Higher Education, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    History of Higher Education, 1992

    1992-01-01

    This annual compilation offers six articles on the history of higher education. In the first article, "The Historical Matrix of American Higher Education," Roger L. Geiger provides an overview of the history of American higher education. Following it, E. D. Duryea, Jurgen Herbst, and W. Bruce Leslie comment on his hypothesis which identifies eight…

  2. The Political Dynamics of Higher Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dar, Luciana

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a framework informed by spatial models of politics to explain the dynamics of political competition in higher education policy and, in particular, the observed instability in the relationship between political variables and policy outcomes. To this end, I explore competing hypotheses for the relationship between government…

  3. Strategic Technology Planning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Frank; Frazee, James P.

    2009-01-01

    Higher education institutions struggle with planning for future needs, growth, and, sometimes, contraction. As student populations expand and as faculty members adopt new technologies, universities struggle to support these needs. To the casual observer, it may seem that the technology planning process is haphazard. This article details a process…

  4. Higher Education Vertical Infrastructure Maintenance Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidner, Theodore J.

    To assist higher education facility officers in documenting their financial needs for renewing and renovating existing physical facilities, this study examined the accuracy against observed conditions of the tools used to identify vertical infrastructure maintenance needs in a large public university. Data developed for U.S. Army facilities is…

  5. Quality Assurance in Higher Education in Zimbabwe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garwe, Evelyn Chiyevo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to furnish local and global stakeholders with detailed information regarding the development and current status of quality assurance in the Zimbabwean higher education sector. The study used document analysis, observation and interviews with key informants as sources of data. This paper addresses the dearth of…

  6. Higher Education: A Time for Triage?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1995-10-01

    Higher education faces unprecedented challenges. The confluence of changing economic and demographic tends; new patterns of federal and state spending; more explicit expectations by students and their families for affordable, accessible education; and heightened scrutiny by those who claim a legitimate interest in higher education is inescapably altering the environment in which this system operates. Higher education will never again be as it was before. Further, many believe that tinkering around the margins is no longer an adequate response to the new demands. Fundamental change is deemed necessary to meet the challenge of this melange of pressures. A number of commentators have observed that political and corporate America have responded to their challenges by instituting a fundamental restructuring of those institutions. The medical community is also in the midst of a similar basic restructuring of the health care delivery system in this country. Now its education's turn. People are questioning the historically expressed mission of higher education. They make the claim that we cost too much, spend carelessly, teach poorly, plan myopically, and when questioned, act defensively. Educational administrators, from department chairs up, are confronted with the task of simultaneously reforming and cutting back. They have no choice. They must establish politically sophisticated priority settings and effect a hard-nosed reallocation of resources in a social environment where competing public needs have equivalent--or stronger--emotional pulls. Triage in a medical context involves confronting an emergency in which the demand for attention far outstrips available assistance by establishing a sequence of care in which one key individual orchestrates the application of harsh priorities which have been designed to maximize the number of survivors. In recent years, the decisions that have been made in some centers of higher education bear a striking similarity. The literature is replete with descriptions of budget cuts and the resultant reallocation of monies. For example, as the budget cuts of the last decade accumulated, maintenance was deferred, and the funds saved were used to shore-up key existing parts of the educational process, such as faculty salaries. State budgets are generally smaller now than they were when the cuts were made, which means that preventive maintenance will continue to be deferred and other resources must be found for capital improvements. Triage often operates in an environment that does not permit promising possibilities to develop. For example, the promise of interactive digital technologies on the learning process may never be fully realized in many institutions if the associated capital and operating costs cannot be accommodated within the cost containment measures being adopted. In an effort to offset part of the lost state support, tuition and fees have been increased at public institutions at a rate that far exceeds growth of the cost of living index. All this is occurring in the face of an increasingly diverse student body and the beginning of "Tidal Wave II," as the surge of new students who are the children of the baby boomers has been called. These demands, along with the expectations for an historically, good American education, will have to be met with fewer dollars. Our ability to fund public higher education by the conventional mechanisms has been affected by a variety of tax reform initiatives. Although the details may vary locally, various kinds of initiatives, propositions, and referenda have severely limited the amount of revenue states can raise. Thus, caps on property taxes have transformed support patterns at the city and county levels. Initiatives, many of which have built-in escalators, that fix the percentages of state spending for various programs have created new kinds of budgetary entitlement groups. These mandates conspire to give government, i.e., governors and legislatures, less discretionary control over a dwindling portion of the state budget. Unfortunately, higher education often finds itself included in that ever-shrinking part of the budget. To keep businesses globally competitive there will be great pressure against raising corporate taxes. These pressures combined with the federal deficit and the growth in entitlements leave little hope for an infusion of the kinds of new public funds that have fueled previous changes in higher education. Some institutions have succeeded in deriving new resources through the establishment of public-private partnerships and vigorous fund raising, activities that have not played a significant role in funding public education in the past. Monies from private sources now account for more than 50% of the budget components in the case of some of the more successful state university initiatives. Successes of this kind raise some interesting questions. For example, how will the evolution of fiscal interactions with the state be affected? How will faculty work loads and compensation patterns be affected? It has become increasingly clear that a number of major issues need attention if we are to engage effectively in triage as a process to maximize what can--and should--be saved in higher education. The following list summarizes discussions that have appeared in a variety of disparate publications. Establish and prioritize the institution's educational goals. Establish value and reward systems for students and faculty that are consistent with the priority goals. Develop leverage and constraint mechanisms to effect change and improve student orientation to the new priorities. Establish a relationship between the price and cost of education and access to it, perhaps incorporating some sort of internal subsidy system. Develop a relationship between the demonstration of public accountability through the reallocation of resources and the measurement of tangible outcomes that justifies enhanced public and private investment. Devise a use of technology that improves productivity, which in turn requires the definition of productivity in an academic setting. Serious discussion of these issues and attempts to address them will undoubtedly prove uncomfortable, perhaps even threatening, to many in academia. Some may question whether the institutions of higher education that we now know as universities will still be "universities." But then, what is a university?

  7. Higher-order ionosphere modeling for CODE's next reprocessing activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, S.; Schaer, S.; Meindl, M.; Dach, R.; Steigenberger, P.

    2009-12-01

    CODE (the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe) is a joint venture between the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB, Bern, Switzerland), the Federal Office of Topography (swisstopo, Wabern, Switzerland), the Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy (BKG, Frankfurt am Main, Germany), and the Institut für Astronomische und Phsyikalische Geodäsie of the Technische Universität München (IAPG/TUM, Munich, Germany). It acts as one of the global analysis centers of the International GNSS Service (IGS) and participates in the first IGS reprocessing campaign, a full reanalysis of GPS data collected since 1994. For a future reanalyis of the IGS data it is planned to consider not only first-order but also higher-order ionosphere terms in the space geodetic observations. There are several works (e.g. Fritsche et al. 2005), which showed a significant and systematic influence of these effects on the analysis results. The development version of the Bernese Software used at CODE is expanded by the ability to assign additional (scaling) parameters to each considered higher-order ionosphere term. By this, each correction term can be switched on and off on normal-equation level and, moreover, the significance of each correction term may be verified on observation level for different ionosphere conditions.

  8. Numerical modeling of higher order magnetic moments in UXO discrimination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanchez, V.; Yaoguo, L.; Nabighian, M.N.; Wright, D.L.

    2008-01-01

    The surface magnetic anomaly observed in unexploded ordnance (UXO) clearance is mainly dipolar, and consequently, the dipole is the only magnetic moment regularly recovered in UXO discrimination. The dipole moment contains information about the intensity of magnetization but lacks information about the shape of the target. In contrast, higher order moments, such as quadrupole and octupole, encode asymmetry properties of the magnetization distribution within the buried targets. In order to improve our understanding of magnetization distribution within UXO and non-UXO objects and to show its potential utility in UXO clearance, we present a numerical modeling study of UXO and related metallic objects. The tool for the modeling is a nonlinear integral equation describing magnetization within isolated compact objects of high susceptibility. A solution for magnetization distribution then allows us to compute the magnetic multipole moments of the object, analyze their relationships, and provide a depiction of the anomaly produced by different moments within the object. Our modeling results show the presence of significant higher order moments for more asymmetric objects, and the fields of these higher order moments are well above the noise level of magnetic gradient data. The contribution from higher order moments may provide a practical tool for improved UXO discrimination. ?? 2008 IEEE.

  9. Outsourcing in Higher Education: An Empirical Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Atul; Herath, S. Kanthi; Mikouiza, Nathalie C.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To measure the degree of implementation and satisfaction level with the outsourcing initiatives from higher education institutions. Design/methodology/approach: Uses a survey questionnaire to measure the levels of satisfaction with the institutions' services and the questionnaire was based on six factors that are deemed significant in

  10. Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Teresa A., Ed.; Mackie, Christopher, Ed.; Massy, William F., Ed.; Sinha, Esha, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Higher education is a linchpin of the American economy and society: Teaching and research at colleges and universities contribute significantly to the nation's economic activity, both directly and through their impact on future growth; federal and state governments support teaching and research with billions of taxpayers' dollars; and individuals,

  11. Internationalization and Culture in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumby, Jacky; Foskett, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Internationalization has attained great significance in Higher Education, driven by both educational philosophy and commercial imperatives. Cultural change is implied as both a related process and as a goal. The article considers the multifaceted ways in which culture might be conceived and linked to different orientations to internationalization.

  12. Mark Edwards: Mission Impossible in Higher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santora, Joseph C.; Sarros, James C.

    2008-01-01

    This case chronicles some of the problems a corporate executive encountered on his transition from the private sector to the deanship of the College of Business in a university of higher education. His deanship, which resulted from the recent reorganization at State University, gave him significant responsibility for undergraduate and graduate…

  13. Asian American Giving to US Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsunoda, Kozue

    2010-01-01

    Asian Americans have had significant impacts on and within mainstream US society, and their great efforts and gifts in the name of charitable causes are no exception. This study aims to examine perceptions within American university development offices about Asian American giving to US higher education. The article begins with a literature review…

  14. A Statistical Portrait of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Seymour E.

    This document presents 700 key tables from the thousands of tabulations made by Government agencies, private surveys, and extensive research projects, comments on their significance to the history and economy of higher education, and provides guidance to their sources. The 28 chapters cover questions relating to undergraduate and graduate student…

  15. A Statistical Portrait of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Seymour E.

    This document presents 700 key tables from the thousands of tabulations made by Government agencies, private surveys, and extensive research projects, comments on their significance to the history and economy of higher education, and provides guidance to their sources. The 28 chapters cover questions relating to undergraduate and graduate student

  16. Staff Development Needs in Pakistan Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullah, Muhammad Hameed; Khan, Muhammad Naeem Ullah; Murtaza, Ali; Ud Din, Muhammad Naseer

    2011-01-01

    Staff development is very significant for the achievement of overall goals of higher education in Pakistan. The success of innovations depends largely upon the skills of instructors; but in Pakistan, the people with a simple masters degree (without any pedagogical training) are inducted as teaching staff at the university level, so it is time to…

  17. Internationalization and Culture in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumby, Jacky; Foskett, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Internationalization has attained great significance in Higher Education, driven by both educational philosophy and commercial imperatives. Cultural change is implied as both a related process and as a goal. The article considers the multifaceted ways in which culture might be conceived and linked to different orientations to internationalization.…

  18. Retrofitting the 5045 Klystron for Higher Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Aaron; Fazio, Michael; Haase, Andy; Jongewaard, Erik; Kemp, Mark; Neilson, Jeff

    2015-04-15

    The 5045 klystron has been in production and accelerating particles at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory for over 25 years. Although the design has undergone some changes there are still significant opportunities for improvement in performance. Retrofitting the 5045 for higher efficiencies and a more mono-energetic spent beam profile is presented.

  19. Higher Education for Sustainable Development in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niu, Dongjie; Jiang, Dahe; Li, Fengting

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse the significance of developments across Chinese higher education in the field of education and learning for sustainable development (SD) and to assess the relative impact of these initiatives. Design/methodology/approach: This is a review of policy and practice to examine developments, challenges,

  20. Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Teresa A., Ed.; Mackie, Christopher, Ed.; Massy, William F., Ed.; Sinha, Esha, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Higher education is a linchpin of the American economy and society: Teaching and research at colleges and universities contribute significantly to the nation's economic activity, both directly and through their impact on future growth; federal and state governments support teaching and research with billions of taxpayers' dollars; and individuals,…

  1. Higher Education for Sustainable Development in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niu, Dongjie; Jiang, Dahe; Li, Fengting

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse the significance of developments across Chinese higher education in the field of education and learning for sustainable development (SD) and to assess the relative impact of these initiatives. Design/methodology/approach: This is a review of policy and practice to examine developments, challenges,…

  2. Taking Stock: The Higher Education Professoriate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newell, L. Jackson; Kuh, George D.

    1989-01-01

    Data from 1972, 1980, and 1986 reveal changes in the age, activities, research methods, and professionals of professors of higher education. Some significant scholarly differences between newly appointed and female faculty and more senior, male counterparts foreshadow changes in the professoriate. (Author/MSE)

  3. Financing Higher Education: Lessons from China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fengliang, Li

    2012-01-01

    In China, debates about higher education finance led to the introduction of a cost-sharing model, whereby students were required to pay tuition fees, over a decade ago. However, there is still significant resistance towards such a system within the broader society. In order to share insights into the development of the cost-sharing policy in China…

  4. Dance History Matters in British Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    In response to concerns about the place and nature of dance history in British higher education curricula, a database was compiled of representative but significant examples of modules which focused directly on the teaching and learning of history, or had history as a key component. An analysis is presented of these modules in terms of the place…

  5. Personal Broadcasting: Applications in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Patricia D.

    2007-01-01

    Personal Broadcasting, which includes podcasting, vodcasting, phonecasting, Webcasting, blogging, and wikis, is one of the emerging technologies that will have a significant effect on education within the next five years. This article describes the techniques used in personal broadcasting, describes how they are being used in higher education,…

  6. The significance of vector magnetic field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of four flaring solar active regions, obtained during 1980-1986 with the NASA Marshall vector magnetograph (Hagyard et al., 1982 and 1985), are presented graphically and characterized in detail, with reference to nearly simultaneous Big Bear Solar Observatory and USAF ASW H-alpha images. It is shown that the flares occurred where local photospheric magnetic fields differed most from the potential field, with initial brightening on either side of a magnetic-neutral line near the point of maximum angular shear (rather than that of maximum magnetic-field strength, typically 1 kG or greater). Particular emphasis is placed on the fact that these significant nonpotential features were detected only by measuring all three components of the vector magnetic field.

  7. Babylonian observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D.

    Very few cuneiform records survive from Mesopotamia of datable astronomical observations made prior to the mid-eighth century BC. Those that do record occasional eclipses, and in one isolated case the dates of the heliacal rising and setting of Venus over a few years sometime in the first half of the second millennium BC. After the mid-eighth century BC the situation changes dramatically. Incomplete records of daily observations of astronomical and meteorological events are preserved from c. 747 BC until the Christian Period. These records are without accompanying ominous interpretation, although it is highly probable that they were compiled by diviners for astrological purposes. They include numerous observations of use to historical astronomers, such as the times of eclipses and occultations, and the dates of comet appearances and meteor showers. The question arises as to why such records do not survive from earlier times; celestial divination was employed as far back as the third millenium BC. It is surely not without importance that the earliest known accurate astronomical predictions accompany the later records, and that the mid-eighth century BC ushered in a period of centralised Assyrian control of Mesopotamia and the concomitant employment by the Assyrian ruler of large numbers of professional celestial diviners. The programme of daily observations evidently began when a high premium was first set on the accurate astronomical prediction of ominous events. It is in this light that we must approach this valuable source material for historical astronomy.

  8. Arab observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatoohi, L. J.

    There are two main medieval Arab sources of astronomical observations: chronicles and astronomical treatises. Medieval Arabs produced numerous chronicles many of which reported astronomical events that the chroniclers themselves observed or were witnessed by others. Astronomical phenomena that were recorded by chroniclers include solar and lunar eclipses, cometary apparitions, meteors, and meteor showers. Muslim astronomers produced many astronomical treatises known as zijes. Zijes include records of mainly predictable phenomena, such as eclipses of the Sun and Moon. Unlike chronicles, zijes usually ignore irregular phenomena such as the apparitions of comets and meteors, and meteor showers. Some zijes include astronomical observations, especially of eclipses. Not unexpectedly, records in zijes are in general more accurate than their counterparts in chronicles. However, research has shown that medieval Arab chronicles and zijes both contain some valuable astronomical observational data. Unfortunately, much of the heritage of medieval Arab chroniclers and astronomers is still in manuscript form. Moreover, most of the huge numbers of Arabic manuscripts that exist in various libraries, especially in Arab countries, are still uncatalogued. Until now there is only one catalogue of zijes which was compiled in the fifties and which includes brief comments on 200 zijes. There is a real need for systematic investigation of medieval Arab historical and astronomical manuscripts which exist in many libraries all over the world.

  9. Are Carotid Stent Fractures Clinically Significant?

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Toca, Manuel; Rodriguez, Heron E.; Naughton, Peter A.; Keeling, Aiofee; Phade, Sachin V.; Morasch, Mark D.; Kibbe, Melina R.; Eskandari, Mark K.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Late stent fatigue is a known complication after carotid artery stenting (CAS) for cervical carotid occlusive disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and clinical significance of carotid stent fractures. Materials and Methods: A single-center retrospective review of 253 carotid bifurcation lesions treated with CAS and mechanical embolic protection from April 2001 to December 2009 was performed. Stent integrity was analyzed by two independent observers using multiplanar cervical plain radiographs with fractures classified into the following types: type I = single strut fracture; type II = multiple strut fractures; type III = transverse fracture; and type IV = transverse fracture with dislocation. Mean follow-up was 32 months. Results: Follow-up imaging was completed on 106 self-expanding nitinol stents (26 closed-cell and 80 open-cell stents). Eight fractures (7.5%) were detected (type I n = 1, type II n = 6, and type III n = 1). Seven fractures were found in open-cell stents (Precise n = 3, ViVEXX n = 2, and Acculink n = 2), and 1 fracture was found in a closed-cell stent (Xact n = 1) (p = 0.67). Only a previous history of external beam neck irradiation was associated with fractures (p = 0.048). No associated clinical sequelae were observed among the patients with fractures, and only 1 patient had an associated significant restenosis ({>=}80%) requiring reintervention. Conclusions: Late stent fatigue after CAS is an uncommon event and rarely clinically relevant. Although cell design does not appear to influence the occurrence of fractures, lesion characteristics may be associated risk factors.

  10. Flare Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Arnold O.

    2008-02-01

    Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays at 100 MeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, and SOHO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s) of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting reconnection of magnetic field lines as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth's lower ionosphere. While flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  11. Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

    2014-02-28

    A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leachability indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited range of the factors in the test matrix hindered the identification of individual component effects. Future work should involve broader factor ranges to identify the roles played by each of the components in the mix via thermal analyses, analytical microscopy, and characterization of phase formation.

  12. Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K. M.; Edwards, T. A.; Roberts, K. B.

    2013-10-02

    A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited range of the factors in the test matrix hindered the identification of individual component effects. Future work should involve broader factor ranges to identify the roles played by each of the components in the mix via thermal analyses, analytical microscopy, and characterization of phase formation.

  13. Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

    2013-09-17

    A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited range of the factors in the test matrix hindered the identification of individual component effects. Future work should involve broader factor ranges to identify the roles played by each of the components in the mix via thermal analyses, analytical microscopy, and characterization of phase formation.

  14. Higher: Setting a Higher Bar for Higher Ed. 2013 Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council of Trustees and Alumni, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The American Council of Trustees and Alumni (ACTA) is leading the charge to return "higher" to higher education. We are challenging the status quo to restore academic freedom, academic rigor, and real accountability to higher education. And, we are doing so with an ever-widening network of supporters and partners.

  15. Standardized Observational Assessment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Combined and Predominantly Inattentive Subtypes. II. Classroom Observations

    PubMed Central

    McConaughy, Stephanie H.; Ivanova, Masha Y.; Antshel, Kevin; Eiraldi, Ricardo B.; Dumenci, Levent

    2010-01-01

    Trained classroom observers used the Direct Observation Form (DOF; McConaughy & Achenbach, 2009) to rate observations of 163 6- to 11-year-old children in their school classrooms. Participants were assigned to four groups based on a parent diagnostic interview and parent and teacher rating scales: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)—Combined type (n = 64); ADHD—Inattentive type (n = 22); clinically referred without ADHD (n = 51); and nonreferred control children (n = 26). The ADHD—Combined group scored significantly higher than the referred without ADHD group and controls on the DOF Intrusive and Oppositional syndromes, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Problems scale, Hyperactivity-Impulsivity subscale, and Total Problems; and significantly lower on the DOF On-Task score. The ADHD—Inattentive group scored significantly higher than controls on the DOF Sluggish Cognitive Tempo and Attention Problems syndromes, Inattention subscale, and Total Problems; and significantly lower on the DOF On-Task score. Implications are discussed regarding the discriminative validity of standardized classroom observations for identifying children with ADHD and differentiating between the two ADHD subtypes. PMID:20802813

  16. Significance of telomere capture in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Labib, Hany A; Elshorbagy, Sheren; Elantonuy, Neveen G

    2014-10-01

    Addition of telomeres to the ends of broken chromosomes has been observed in many malignant cells through the capture of the ends of other chromosomes as a result of nonreciprocal translocations. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the percentage of nuclei with telomere capture (TC%) as a prognostic marker in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients. This study included 45 newly diagnosed MDS patients, 36 cases with denovo MDS and 9 cases with therapy-related MDS, and another 35 apparently healthy volunteers as a control group. Telomere capture percentage was investigated with fluorescent in situ hybridization technique using a probe for 15qter. We found that median TC% rate was significantly increased in those with bad cytogenetic abnormalities, patients with blast cells>10% in BM, and patients categorized as high risk according to WHO and IPSS classification; also, there was a significant negative correlation with progression-free survival. Telomere capture serves as a useful marker for the assessment of MDS patient's risk, and also it had a clinical importance for the early detection of disease progression. PMID:25195039

  17. Alabama Commission on Higher Education. Occasional Papers on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

    Two papers on the funding formula of the Alabama Commission for Higher Education are presented. The first paper, by John F. Porter, Jr., "The Origins and Evolutions of the Funding Formula Model Utilized by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education, 1973-82," presents the historical antecedents for the existing formula elements and notes…

  18. Higher Education in the USSR. Monographs on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savelyev, A. Y.; And Others

    This monograph describes the system of higher education in the United Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). The preface points out that despite perestroika, two features of Soviet education persist, a high degree of unity and centralization and a close link between higher education and employers. Chapter 1, "Historical Overview," begins with 4th…

  19. Should Higher Education Have a Role in Higher Education Policy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Charles B., Jr.

    Federal legislation and court decisions over the past two decades have exerted a pervasive influence on the whole fabric of higher education in America. Increasing restrictions have been placed on the qualities of freedom and diversity, which this nation has historically valued in its institutions of higher education. But there is also a…

  20. "How to Strike the Right Balance between Quality Assurance and Quality Control in the Perceptions of Individual Lecturers": A Comparison of UK and Dutch Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teelken, Christine; Lomas, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the way lecturers observe, feel restrained by and cope with quality management systems that have been implemented in the higher education systems of the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. As two sides of the same coin, quality enhancement and quality control are of increased significance in European Higher Education

  1. "How to Strike the Right Balance between Quality Assurance and Quality Control in the Perceptions of Individual Lecturers": A Comparison of UK and Dutch Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teelken, Christine; Lomas, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the way lecturers observe, feel restrained by and cope with quality management systems that have been implemented in the higher education systems of the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. As two sides of the same coin, quality enhancement and quality control are of increased significance in European Higher Education…

  2. Significant risk factors in elective colorectal surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Kingston, R. D.; Walsh, S.; Robinson, C.; Jeacock, J.; Keeling, F.

    1995-01-01

    A prospective study of 618 patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery performed in a district general hospital over a 10-year period is reported. Multivariate analysis has been used in an attempt to identify risk factors. The risk of wound infection was increased if septicaemia, respiratory sepsis or faecal contamination was present, if the surgeon was a consultant and if increased risk of serious complications if the patient was male and of poor physical status. Operative mortality was significantly associated with poor physical status, respiratory sepsis and intra-abdominal abscess. Only three risk factors could be identified preoperatively: patient gender, physical status and seniority of surgeon. However, procedures low in the pelvis are more difficult and in this study group are also associated with a higher risk of wound infection. The majority of these procedures are performed by consultants. In addition, this study group has proportionally more female patients of poor physical status who are selectively being operated on by the consultant, seemingly indicating the 'consultant' as a risk factor. PMID:7486765

  3. Enzymatic DNA oxidation: mechanisms and biological significance

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guo-Liang; Walsh, Colum P.

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation at cytosines (5mC) is a major epigenetic modification involved in the regulation of multiple biological processes in mammals. How methylation is reversed was until recently poorly understood. The family of dioxygenases commonly known as Ten-eleven translocation (Tet) proteins are responsible for the oxidation of 5mC into three new forms, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC). Current models link Tet-mediated 5mC oxidation with active DNA demethylation. The higher oxidation products (5fC and 5caC) are recognized and excised by the DNA glycosylase TDG via the base excision repair pathway. Like DNA methyltransferases, Tet enzymes are important for embryonic development. We will examine the mechanism and biological significance of Tet-mediated 5mC oxidation in the context of pronuclear DNA demethylation in mouse early embryos. In contrast to its role in active demethylation in the germ cells and early embryo, a number of lines of evidence suggest that the intragenic 5hmC present in brain may act as a stable mark instead. This short review explores mechanistic aspects of TET oxidation activity, the impact Tet enzymes have on epigenome organization and their contribution to the regulation of early embryonic and neuronal development. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(11): 609-618] PMID:25341925

  4. Enzymatic DNA oxidation: mechanisms and biological significance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guo-Liang; Walsh, Colum P

    2014-11-01

    DNA methylation at cytosines (5mC) is a major epigenetic modification involved in the regulation of multiple biological processes in mammals. How methylation is reversed was until recently poorly understood. The family of dioxygenases commonly known as Ten-eleven translocation (Tet) proteins are responsible for the oxidation of 5mC into three new forms, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC). Current models link Tet-mediated 5mC oxidation with active DNA demethylation. The higher oxidation products (5fC and 5caC) are recognized and excised by the DNA glycosylase TDG via the base excision repair pathway. Like DNA methyltransferases, Tet enzymes are important for embryonic development. We will examine the mechanism and biological significance of Tet-mediated 5mC oxidation in the context of pronuclear DNA demethylation in mouse early embryos. In contrast to its role in active demethylation in the germ cells and early embryo, a number of lines of evidence suggest that the intragenic 5hmC present in brain may act as a stable mark instead. This short review explores mechanistic aspects of TET oxidation activity, the impact Tet enzymes have on epigenome organization and their contribution to the regulation of early embryonic and neuronal development. PMID:25341925

  5. Prognostic significance of pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis histologic score.

    PubMed

    Matsui, K; Beasley, M B; Nelson, W K; Barnes, P M; Bechtle, J; Falk, R; Ferrans, V J; Moss, J; Travis, W D

    2001-04-01

    Correlations were made between clinical and follow-up data and histopathologic findings in 105 women (mean age +/- standard deviation, 38.3 +/- 9.0 years) with pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM). The actuarial survival (to pulmonary transplantation or death) of the patients from the time of lung biopsy was 85.1% and 71.0% after 5 and 10 years respectively. The histologic severity of LAM, graded as a LAM histologic score (LHS), was determined on the basis of semiquantitative estimation of the percentage of tissue involvement by the two major features of LAM: the cystic lesions and the infiltration by abnormal smooth muscle cells (LAM cells) in each case: LHS-1, <25%; LHS-2, 25% to 50%; and LHS-3, >50%. Analysis using the Kaplan-Meier method revealed significant differences in survival for patients with LHS-1, -2, and -3 (p = 0.01). The 5-and 10-year survivals were 100% and 100% for LHS-1, 81.2% and 74.4% for LHS-2, and 62.8% and 52.4% for LHS-3. Increased degrees of accumulation of hemosiderin in macrophages also were associated with higher LHS scores (p = 0.029) and a worse prognosis (p = 0.0012). Thus, the current study suggests that the LHS may provide a basis for determining the prognosis of LAM. PMID:11257622

  6. Significance of the effect of mineral alteration of nuclide migration

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Takashi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Isobe, Hiroshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Yanase, Nobuyuki; Kimura, Hideo

    1994-12-31

    In order to clarify the effect of mineral alteration on nuclide migration, we examined the processes, mechanisms, and kinetics of chlorite weathering, and the uranium concentrations in minerals and rocks at Koongarra, Australia. The observed concentrations of uranium in rocks were compared to those calculated. The sequence of chlorite weathering may be simply expressed as a chlorite {yields} vermiculite {yields} kaolinite conversion. These minerals occur as a function of depth, which corresponds well to uranium concentrations on the meter scale. Iron minerals, closely related to the uranium redistribution, are released during the weathering. The first-order kinetic model of the weathering process suggests that the weathering rate is not constant but time-dependent. The uranium concentrations are qualitatively proportional to the extent of the weathering, the weathered part having higher uranium concentration. Uranium mainly occurs with iron minerals, and sub micron sized saleeite, a uranyl phosphate, is one of the most probable uranyl phases associated with the iron minerals. The uranium fixation mechanisms are probably saleeite microcrystal coprecipitation and sorption to the iron minerals. Our model, which describes uranium concentrations in rocks as a function of time, shows that the transition zone (a vermiculite dominant area) plays an important role in the uranium migration. We have established that weathering of chlorite has affected the redistribution of uranium for more than one million years. The present study demonstrates the significance of mineral alteration when we estimate nuclide migration for geologic time.

  7. The Nature of Work and the Stress of Higher Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schieman, Scott; Whitestone, Yuko Kurashina; Van Gundy, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Are occupational and work conditions associated with work-to-home conflict? If so, do those associations vary by gender? Among a sample of adults in Toronto, Canada, we found that men and women in higher-status occupations reported higher levels of work-to-home conflict than workers in lower-status jobs. In addition, we observed higher levels of…

  8. Observational Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Robert H.

    I discuss the classical cosmological tests, i.e., angular size-redshift, flux-redshift, and galaxy number counts, in the light of the cosmology prescribed by the interpretation of the CMB anisotropies. The discussion is somewhat of a primer for physicists, with emphasis upon the possible systematic uncertainties in the observations and their interpretation. Given the curious composition of the Universe inherent in the emerging cosmological model, I stress the value of searching for inconsistencies rather than concordance, and suggest that the prevailing mood of triumphalism in cosmology is premature.

  9. Alcohol intoxication in road traffic accidents leads to higher impact speed difference, higher ISS and MAIS, and higher preclinical mortality.

    PubMed

    Stübig, Timo; Petri, Maximilian; Zeckey, Christian; Brand, Stephan; Müller, Christian; Otte, Dietmar; Krettek, Christian; Haasper, Carl

    2012-11-01

    Alcohol is one of the most important personal risk factors for serious and fatal injuries, contributing to approximately one third of all deaths from accidents. It is also described that alcohol intoxication leads to a higher mortality in the clinical course. In this study, we hypothesized that alcohol intoxication leads to different accident kinematics, a higher ISS (Injury Severity Score), and higher preclinical mortality compared to sober patients. A technical and medical investigation of alcohol intoxicated road users was performed on the scene of the crash and at the primary admitting hospital. Alcohol testing was performed with either breath alcohol tests or measurement of blood alcohol concentration (BAC) in a standard laboratory test. Between 1999 and 2010, 37,635 road traffic accidents were evaluated by the Accident Research Unit. Overall 20,741 patients were injured, 2.3% of the patients were killed. Among the injured patients, 2.2% with negative BAC were killed, compared to 4.6% fatal injuries in patients with a positive BAC (p < 0.0001). Of the patients with a positive BAC, 8.0% were severely injured, compared to 3.6% in the BAC negative group (p < 0.0001). Regarding the relative speed at impact (Δv for motorized drivers, vehicle collision speed for pedestrians and bikers), there was a significant higher difference for BAC positive patients (30 ± 20) compared to the BAC negative patients (25 ± 19, p < 0.0001). Alcohol intoxication in trauma patients leads to higher preclinical mortality, higher impact speed difference, and higher injury severity. The subgroup analysis for different alcohol concentrations shows no difference in ISS, MAIS, and relative speed, but a correlation of increasing age of patients with higher alcohol concentrations. PMID:22819121

  10. "Accessions": Researching, Designing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    This brief viewpoint piece depicts educational (dis)engagements apparent in researching and (re)designing higher education in and through "Accessions". "Accessions", a collaborative research-design project, probed at how cultures, climates and conditions of higher education may be reproducing or reshaping social inequalities and divisions. Here,

  11. Innovations in Higher Education? Hah!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschner, Ann

    2012-01-01

    One can hardly mention higher education today without hearing the word "innovation," or its understudies "change," "reinvention," "transformation." Last summer the National Governors Association opened its meeting with a plenary session on higher education, innovation, and economic growth. But there is nothing funny about the need for innovation

  12. Minority Access to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    Blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans, and Asian Americans are entitled to equal access to all institutions of higher education. Ensuring greater access and participation by minorities in higher education is one of the most practical ways of moving America closer to the ideal of equal opportunity, which is the actualization of the American dream.

  13. Theorising Quality in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morley, Louise

    2004-01-01

    Britain now has the most heavily regulated higher education system in the world and institutions must deliver best educational value. This book explores the political and psychic economy of quality assurance in higher education and interrogates the discourse and practices associated with the audit culture in Britain. Following Acknowledgements and

  14. Higher Education: Open for Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilde, Christian, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This book addresses a problem in higher learning, which is newly recognized in the academic spotlight: the overcommercialization of higher education. The book asks that you, the reader, think about the following: Did you go to a Coke or Pepsi school? Do your children attend a Nike or Adidas school? Is the college in your town a Dell or Gateway…

  15. Higher Education: Open for Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilde, Christian, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This book addresses a problem in higher learning, which is newly recognized in the academic spotlight: the overcommercialization of higher education. The book asks that you, the reader, think about the following: Did you go to a Coke or Pepsi school? Do your children attend a Nike or Adidas school? Is the college in your town a Dell or Gateway

  16. Strategic Planning for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotler, Philip; Murphy, Patrick E.

    1981-01-01

    The framework necessary for achieving a strategic planning posture in higher education is outlined. The most important benefit of strategic planning for higher education decision makers is that it forces them to undertake a more market-oriented and systematic approach to long- range planning. (Author/MLW)

  17. Feminist Research in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ropers-Huilman, Rebecca; Winters, Kelly T.

    2011-01-01

    This essay provides an overview of feminist methodology and its potential to enhance the study of higher education. Foregrounding the multiple purposes and research relationships developed through feminist research, the essay urges higher education scholars to engage feminist theories, epistemologies, and methods to inform policy, research, and…

  18. The Economy and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Richard E.

    1988-01-01

    The macroeconomic trends shaping the United States economy and the effects of those trends on higher education are considered. Warning institutions of higher education about possible problems in the economy will place them in a better position to react if necessary. The economic environment is discussed in terms of productivity (goods and services…

  19. "Accessions": Researching, Designing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    This brief viewpoint piece depicts educational (dis)engagements apparent in researching and (re)designing higher education in and through "Accessions". "Accessions", a collaborative research-design project, probed at how cultures, climates and conditions of higher education may be reproducing or reshaping social inequalities and divisions. Here,…

  20. Exploring Higher Education Financing Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nkrumah-Young, Kofi K.; Powell, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Higher education can be financed privately, financed by governments, or shared. Given that the benefits of education accrue to the individual and the state, many governments opt for shared financing. This article examines the underpinnings of different options for financing higher education and develops a model to compare conditions to choices and…

  1. Higher Education, Employability and Competitiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlin, Samo; Svetlicic, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the relationship between competitiveness and higher education systems in Europe. It explores whether more competitive countries have developed more labour-market-oriented systems of higher education (HE) that thereby give their graduates greater short term employability potential. Based on and a large-scale survey among 45.000

  2. Assessment Issues in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, M. J.; And Others

    This report reviews assessment issues from a British perspective with particular regard to the implications that the National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) Framework will have for assessment in higher education. It considers assessment in relation to the various purposes of higher education and puts forward a number of practical suggestions for…

  3. Public Financing of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tax Foundation, Inc., New York, NY.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the major issues involved in governmental financing of, or assistance to, higher education. Of central concern was the overall size of governmental support and the justification for it. The study begins with a review of the needs and demands for higher education as shown by projections of enrollments and…

  4. Personnel Management in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millett, John D.; And Others

    This document on personnel management in higher education contains three papers that are designed to be used as guidelines for educational administrators. The first two papers, by John D. Millett, discuss the scope and problems of higher education administration and the problems associated with collective bargaining and tenure on college campuses.…

  5. Higher Education, Employability and Competitiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlin, Samo; Svetlicic, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the relationship between competitiveness and higher education systems in Europe. It explores whether more competitive countries have developed more labour-market-oriented systems of higher education (HE) that thereby give their graduates greater short term employability potential. Based on and a large-scale survey among 45.000…

  6. Higher Education, Poverty and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilak, Jandhyala B. G.

    2010-01-01

    There is a presumption among many policy makers that higher education is not necessary for economic growth and development; it is literacy and basic education and at best secondary education that are argued to be important. Estimates of internal rate of return contributed to strengthening of such a presumption. Accordingly, higher education has…

  7. Feminist Research in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ropers-Huilman, Rebecca; Winters, Kelly T.

    2011-01-01

    This essay provides an overview of feminist methodology and its potential to enhance the study of higher education. Foregrounding the multiple purposes and research relationships developed through feminist research, the essay urges higher education scholars to engage feminist theories, epistemologies, and methods to inform policy, research, and

  8. The Marketing of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooker, George; Noble, Michael

    1985-01-01

    Formal college and university marketing programs are challenging to develop and implement because of the complexity of the marketing mix, the perceived inappropriateness of a traditional marketing officer, the number of diverse groups with input, the uniqueness of higher education institutions, and the difficulty in identifying higher education…

  9. Innovation Processes in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Barbro; Ostergren, Bertil

    1979-01-01

    Innovation processes in the Swedish Higher Education System are described and related to a general theory of innovation. Using the theories of Kurt Lewin, characteristics of higher education as a social system and factors which determine the nature of the forces towards a certain type of change are defined. (JMF)

  10. Higher Education: A Closer Look

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gwen

    2009-01-01

    As the United States moves toward expanding programs for pre-kindergarten children, leaders in higher education are asking themselves some how-to questions about implementation. This article summarizes nine facts about higher education. One of these facts is the growing demand for teachers qualified with a bachelor's degree in Early Care and…

  11. Canuck-Do Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how, like Australia, Canadian higher education has experienced large-scale cuts in government funding, the deregulation of tuition and general cost shifting to students, inability to accommodate increased student demand, faculty "brain drain" and shortages, and an erosion of public policy toward viewing higher education as a business.…

  12. Unexploited Efficiencies in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyring, Henry C.

    2011-01-01

    In "Unexploited Efficiencies in Higher Education," Henry C. Eyring, a junior majoring in Economics at Brigham Young University-Idaho, argues that one way that the U.S. can compete globally in college attainment is to decrease cost-per-graduate. He explains how many stakeholders in higher education stand to benefit from unexploited…

  13. Innovations in Higher Education? Hah!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschner, Ann

    2012-01-01

    One can hardly mention higher education today without hearing the word "innovation," or its understudies "change," "reinvention," "transformation." Last summer the National Governors Association opened its meeting with a plenary session on higher education, innovation, and economic growth. But there is nothing funny about the need for innovation…

  14. Learning Entrepreneurship in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taatila, Vesa P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: There is a constant need to produce more entrepreneurial graduates from higher education institutions. This paper aims to present and discuss several successful cases of entrepreneurial learning environments in order to suggest some important aspects that higher education institutions should consider. Design/methodology/approach: The

  15. Institutional Change and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loomis, Steven; Rodriguez, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Institutional change includes the supplanting of the old model of production with a new one, the elimination of old markets and the emergence of new ones. As higher education around the world shifts from national markets to an integrated transnational market, and possibly toward a virtual market, Christian higher education, like other market…

  16. Developments in Polish Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterczuk, Anna M.

    1996-01-01

    Polish legislation concerning higher education since 1990 has focused on increasing institutional autonomy, but brought with it an unrealistic reliance on market mechanisms for positive change. This has resulted in a non-integrated system and inadequate public policy for science and higher education. It is the institutions themselves that have…

  17. Higher Education and Social Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasution, S.; Virasai, Banphot, Eds.

    The proceedings of the Regional Institute of Higher Education and Development's seminar and the meaning and implications of social commitment in higher education are reported. The welcoming address (S. Nasution) and the opening address (Y. B. Dato' Murad bin Mohd. Noor) welcome the participants and set the tone for the discussions to follow. The…

  18. The Dismantling of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, William K. S.

    1981-01-01

    In order to explain how the existing university system might be restructured, the educational services presently performed by centers of higher learning, the disadvantage of tying these services together, a mythical unbundled world of higher education, and some recent developments are discussed. (MLW)

  19. Theorising Quality in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morley, Louise

    2004-01-01

    Britain now has the most heavily regulated higher education system in the world and institutions must deliver best educational value. This book explores the political and psychic economy of quality assurance in higher education and interrogates the discourse and practices associated with the audit culture in Britain. Following Acknowledgements and…

  20. The Future of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dede, Christopher

    The likely alternative futures that higher education may face in the next decade are discussed, and suggestions for developing a strategic planning capability in response are offered. It is argued that major demographic, economic, and political disruptions are likely in the 1980s. Demographic trends that will have a major impact on higher

  1. Higher Education Marketing: A Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canterbury, Richard

    1999-01-01

    States that similarities between education and other services may not be sufficient to conclude that services marketing methods can be easily transferred to all markets in higher education. Article identifies and discusses why higher education marketing is a particular challenge. Suggests that understanding these challenges can help in making…

  2. Queering Transformation in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Msibi, Thabo

    2013-01-01

    Transformation in higher education has tended to focus on race and sex, at the expense of other forms of discrimination. This article addresses the silencing of "queer" issues in higher education. Using queer theory as a framework, and drawing on current literature, popular media reports, two personal critical incidents and a project…

  3. Higher Education, Poverty and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilak, Jandhyala B. G.

    2010-01-01

    There is a presumption among many policy makers that higher education is not necessary for economic growth and development; it is literacy and basic education and at best secondary education that are argued to be important. Estimates of internal rate of return contributed to strengthening of such a presumption. Accordingly, higher education has

  4. History of American Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Margaret Cain

    2011-01-01

    "History of American Higher Education" documents the fascinating evolution of American colleges and universities, touching on the historical events that shaped them, from the colonial era through the early twenty-first century. Throughout history, higher education has played an important role in the transmission of cultural identity from one…

  5. THE ECONOMICS OF HIGHER EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARTTER, ALLAN M.; AND OTHERS

    THIS PUBLICATION CONTAINS PAPERS PRESENTED AT A COLLOQUIUM HELD BY THE COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP SERVICE IN 1965. THE PAPERS DEAL BROADLY WITH THE QUESTION OF THE MOST EFFECTIVE METHODS OF FINANCING HIGHER EDUCATION, AND WITH THE ROLE AND PROBLEMS OF THE EDUCATIONAL CONSUMER. THE PAPERS DEAL WITH--(1) THE ECONOMICS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, (2) PRICING…

  6. Higher Still in European Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffe, David

    1997-01-01

    In 1999, Scotland's "Higher Still" will incorporate all upper-secondary academic and vocational courses in a unified curriculum and assessment system for postcompulsory education. Higher Still's objectives, strategies, and "system architecture" are compared to those of Austria, England, Finland, France, Germany, Norway, and Sweden, studied by the

  7. Tort Litigation in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Gerichten, Edward

    1999-01-01

    A survey of case law relating to tort litigation in 1998 does not reveal any watershed cases that change the legal landscape for institutions of higher education, but it does show that institutions of higher education continue to face a myriad of tort claims of a diverse nature from diverse and expanding constituencies. (SLD)

  8. Higher Education and the Masses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    The responsibility and relationship of the Asian system of higher education to the masses is the theme of these proceedings of the German Foundation for International Development (DSE) and the Regional Institute of Higher Education and Development (RIHED) joint conference. Objectives of the conference were the following: (1) to examine the…

  9. The Opening of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matkin, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    In a 1974 report presented to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), Martin Trow laid out a framework for understanding large-scale, worldwide changes in higher education. Trow's essay also pointed to the problems that "arise out of the transition from one phase to another in a broad pattern of development of higher

  10. The Marketing of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooker, George; Noble, Michael

    1985-01-01

    Formal college and university marketing programs are challenging to develop and implement because of the complexity of the marketing mix, the perceived inappropriateness of a traditional marketing officer, the number of diverse groups with input, the uniqueness of higher education institutions, and the difficulty in identifying higher education

  11. Effective Communication in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    The intent for this paper is to show that communication within the higher education field is a current problem. By looking first at the different styles, forms, and audiences for communication, the reader will hopefully gain perspective as to why this is such a problem in higher education today. Since the Millennial generation is the newest set of…

  12. Learning Entrepreneurship in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taatila, Vesa P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: There is a constant need to produce more entrepreneurial graduates from higher education institutions. This paper aims to present and discuss several successful cases of entrepreneurial learning environments in order to suggest some important aspects that higher education institutions should consider. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  13. Higher Education Management: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, T. H.

    After a brief mention of the financial uncertainty of colleges and universities in the 1970's and some speculation on hopeful trends in higher education, this document discusses some federal activities in higher education that are often overlooked. One such federal program is I-E-L (Federal Coordinator for Industry-Education-Labor) that brings…

  14. Fact Book on Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Joseph L.; Diaz, Alicia A.

    2009-01-01

    The "Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) Fact Book on Higher Education" is one of the nation's most comprehensive collections of comparative data on higher education. For decades, state leaders, policy-makers, researchers and journalists have used the "Fact Book" to find useful data quickly--and to learn more about long-term trends and…

  15. Prognostic significance of Versican expression in gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, X-H; Lin, W-R; Xu, M-D; Qi, P; Dong, L; Zhang, Q-Y; Ni, S-J; Weng, W-W; Tan, C; Huang, D; Ma, Y-Q; Zhang, W; Sheng, W-Q; Wang, Y-Q; Du, X

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the leading malignancy in the digestive system. Versican is a ubiquitous component of the extracellular matrix and has a role in tumor progression. We aim to examine the expression of Versican in GC and the relationship between Versican levels and patient survival. We detected the mRNA expression of Versican in tumorous pairs and adjacent normal tissues (ANTs) of 78 GC patients by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of Versican in 101 cases of matched GC and ANT, as well as in 27 intraepithelial neoplastic (IN) samples, was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. We analyzed the correlation between Versican levels and clinical outcomes. Finally, we performed CCK-8 cell counting assay and transwell assay in GC cell lines. Versican mRNA expression was significantly greater in tumor tissues (P<0.001) than in ANT. Versican was majorly expressed in the stroma surrounding tumor epithelium and minorly some areas of tumor epithelium. The Versican expression level was higher in GC than in ANT (P=0.004), but no significant difference was observed between ANT and IN (P=0.517). The Versican mRNA and protein levels were consistent in GC. High Versican mRNA and protein expression correlated with greater tumor invasion depth (P=0.030, P=0.027). Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that patients with high Versican mRNA expression exhibited poor disease-specific survival (P<0.001). In vitro experiments showed that Versican overexpression promoted cell proliferation and invasion. Our data indicate that Versican may be a novel prognostic indicator in GC and may be a potential target for clinical diagnosis. PMID:26619403

  16. Pesticides in the atmosphere in Minnesota: Partitioning, deposition, and significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin

    2000-11-01

    The atmosphere is recognized as an important pathway by which pesticides are transported and deposited in the areas far from their sources. The observations of pesticides in rain, air, and surface runoff in Minnesota (1993-1996) contribute to understand the significance of the atmospheric deposition. The vapor/particle partitioning of pesticides in the urban area of Minnesota elucidated a strong dependency on the subcooled liquid vapor pressure, but not the same as predicted by Junge's model. The air concentrations before and after a single 24-hour rain event indicated that rain scavenging is efficient for removing water-soluble herbicides. Concentrations of many herbicides in 43 sequential rain samples followed the same pattern: much higher concentration at the beginning of the rain than that in the rest of rain event. The most frequently detected pesticides were alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, metolachlor, and acetochlor. Concentration and fluxes of most pesticides in rain depicted a distinct seasonal pattern. The presence of agriculture pesticides in urban rain demonstrates that pesticides are being transported regionally through the atmosphere. The relatively consistent year-to-year flux of pesticides in Minneapolis indicates the regional background of pesticides in rain. The intensive row-crop agricultural area showed a significantly greater annual flux than the other four sampling sites that were in areas of either urbanization or less intensive agriculture. A multi-year paired study of pesticides in rain and storm runoff in three watersheds in Minnesota was conducted to compare the mass loadings from two pathways to aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Seven other larger watersheds were selected from previous research to perform the same assessment. The mass contributed from the rain was 40 to 200 times greater than the riverine load in the urban watershed and equal to five times greater in the two agricultural watersheds in Minnesota. The magnitude of mass in rain is similar, if is not greater than, to that in runoff, over many orders of magnitude differences in the sizes of watersheds.

  17. Gains in Life Expectancy Associated with Higher Education in Men

    PubMed Central

    Bijwaard, Govert E.; van Poppel, Frans; Ekamper, Peter; Lumey, L. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many studies show large differences in life expectancy across the range of education, intelligence, and socio-economic status. As educational attainment, intelligence, and socio-economic status are highly interrelated, appropriate methods are required to disentangle their separate effects. The aim of this paper is to present a novel method to estimate gains in life expectancy specifically associated with increased education. Our analysis is based on a structural model in which education level, IQ at age 18 and mortality all depend on (latent) intelligence. The model allows for (selective) educational choices based on observed factors and on an unobserved factor capturing intelligence. Our estimates are based on information from health examinations of military conscripts born in 1944–1947 in The Netherlands and their vital status through age 66 (n = 39,798). Results Our empirical results show that men with higher education have lower mortality. Using structural models to account for education choice, the estimated gain in life expectancy for men moving up one educational level ranges from 0.3 to 2 years. The estimated gain in months alive over the observational period ranges from -1.2 to 5.7 months. The selection effect is positive and amounts to a gain of one to two months. Decomposition of the selection effect shows that the gain from selection on (latent) intelligence is larger than the gain from selection on observed factors and amounts to 1.0 to 1.7 additional months alive. Conclusion Our findings confirm the strong selection into education based on socio-economic status and intelligence. They also show significant higher life expectancy among individuals with higher education after the selectivity of education choice has been taken into account. Based on these estimates, it is plausible therefore that increases in education could lead to increases in life expectancy. PMID:26496647

  18. Novalike cataclysmic variables are significant radio emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppejans, Deanne L.; Körding, Elmar G.; Miller-Jones, James C. A.; Rupen, Michael P.; Knigge, Christian; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Groot, Paul J.

    2015-08-01

    Radio emission from non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs, accreting white dwarfs) could allow detailed studies of outflows and possibly accretion flows in these nearby, numerous and non-relativistic compact accretors. Up to now, however, very few CVs have been detected in the radio. We have conducted a Very Large Array pilot survey of four close and optically bright novalike CVs at 6 GHz, detecting three, and thereby doubling the number of radio detections of these systems. TT Ari, RW Sex and the old nova V603 Aql were detected in both of the epochs, while V1084 Her was not detected (to a 3σ upper limit of 7.8 μ {Jy} {beam}^{-1}). These observations clearly show that the sensitivity of previous surveys was typically too low to detect these objects and that non-magnetic CVs can indeed be significant radio emitters. The three detected sources show a range of properties, including flaring and variability on both short (˜200 s) and longer term (days) time-scales, as well as circular polarization levels of up to 100 per cent. The spectral indices range from steep to inverted; TT Ari shows a spectral turnover at ˜6.5 GHz, while the spectral index of V603 Aql flattened from α = 0.54 ± 0.05 to 0.16 ± 0.08 (Fν ∝ να) in the week between observations. This range of properties suggests that more than one emission process can be responsible for the radio emission in non-magnetic CVs. In this sample we find that individual systems are consistent with optically thick synchrotron emission, gyrosynchrotron emission or cyclotron maser emission.

  19. [Caffeine plus analgesics-a significant combination.].

    PubMed

    Fox, J M

    1988-12-01

    Since the ban of phenacetin and barbiturates in analgesics, caffeine as a constituent of analgesics has recently more often been blamed for promoting the abuse of analgesics. The available relevant literature was reviewed to perform a benefit/risk analysis. The results were as follows. The capability of caffeine to potentiate analgesia was demonstrated in controlled clinical trials involving approximately 12000 patients. This effect does not mean that there is a stronger analgesic effect, but that the addition of caffeine allows to reduce the dose of analgesics significantly, while maintaining the same analgesic efficacy. A minimum single dose of 50 mg caffeine is required to achieve this potentiation. Furthermore, it was demonstrated in controlled clinical trials in about 2000 patients that the maximum analgesic effect is achieved after 30-45 min with caffeine-containing analgesics, but only after 60-90 min with monotherapy. This must be regarded as a great advantage in terms of cumulative toxicity, because additional or higher doses due to insufficienttimeliness of efficacy are thus avoided. Thus, the analgesic benefit of caffeine as a constituant of analgesic drugs can no longer be denied, even though some studies leave room for criticism. (It should be added that this beneficial effect was investigated only for acute treatment with acetylsalicylic acid plus caffeine or with paracetamol plus caffeine). Toxicity studies with combination drugs indicate that there are no risks beyond the known risks of the individual components. On the contrary, the studies suggest that there is a tendency towards underadditivity; with an equal analgesic efficacy, therefore, the toxicological risk of an analgesic plus caffeine tends to be lower than with the respective analgesic alone. With respect to the frequently postulated promotion of analgesic abuse by caffeine, the results of this review are best summarized by citing the statement of the Federal Drug Review Committee "Neurology/Psychiatry" at the Bundesgesundheitsamt (BGA): "There is no evidence showing that a possible potential for dependence in the case of analgesics, such as acetylsalicylic acid or paracetamol, is increased by caffeine. Even though this could be assumed in theory, based on the available data there is no proof of an additional abuse potential for caffeine in combination with analgesics" [11]. The question of whether combination analgesics containing caffeine ought to be sold only on prescription might better be answered in the negative; in Germany, the percentage of self-medication (i.e., without consulting the doctor) in the consumption of prescription analgesics reaches up to 40% (1). Furthermore one could even argue that by introducing prescription schedule for analgesics containing caffeine a higher consumption of analgesic substance might be induced (to achieve an analgesic efficacy equal to that of combination drugs). This however might cause a higher and unpredictable risk (e.g., gastrointestinal bleeding) with proper use in exchange for of a reduction in the predictable risk with misuse or abuse. This would raise major ethical and legal issues. Minimizing one special risk does not automatically reduce the overall risk. PMID:18415280

  20. Vitronectin significantly influences prognosis in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Kai; Lan, Rui-Long; Tao, Xuan; Wu, Chao-Yang; Hong, Hai-Feng; Lin, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Vitronectin (Vn), a multifunctional adhesive protein, is found in association with tumor progression, angiogenesis and metastasis in a variety of (human) tumors. But no studies concerning its correlation to osteosarcoma prognosis were found. Hence, we aimed to investigate the prognostic value of Vitronectin (Vn) in osteosarcoma. Here, we studied the expression of VN in the tumor tissues from 67 patients with osteosarcoma and 20 patients with osteochondroma using immunohistochemistry and estimated the effects of VN expression in osteosarcoma on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) using the Kaplan-Meier curve and COX proportional hazards regression model. Increased expression of VN in osteosarcoma tissue compared to no VN expression in osteochondroma tissue was shown in immunohistochemical assay. No associations were observed between VN expression and osteosarcoma patients’ gender (P = 0.675), age (P = 0.813), tumor size (P = 0.436), histologic subtype (P = 0.0.543) or tumor location (P = 0.456). Univariate survival analysis demonstrated significant correlations of high VN expression with shorter PFS (P = 0.002) and OS (P = 0.001); multivariate survival analysis revealed high VN expression as a significant independent prognostic indicator for shorter PFS (HR 2.788, P = 0.003) and OS (HR2.817, P = 0.003). In conclusion, the high expression of VN in tumor cells independently indicated poor clinical prognosis in patients with osteosarcoma, other than large tumor size and non-neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy, suggesting that VN may serve as a potential therapeutic target in osteosarcoma. PMID:26617861

  1. The Conditioning Role of State Higher Education Governance Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandberg, David A.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a study that examined whether the presence of a consolidated governing board for higher education conditions the impact various political factors have on state support for higher education. The existence of a consolidated governing board is shown to significantly alter the politics of the state higher education

  2. Access to Higher Education in China: Differences in Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Houxiong

    2011-01-01

    Access to higher education in China has opened up significantly in the move towards a mass higher education system. However, aggregate growth does not necessarily imply fair or reasonable distribution of opportunity. In fact, the expansion of higher education has a rather more complex influence on opportunity when admissions statistics are viewed…

  3. Internationalization of Higher Education in China and Its Development Direction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Dong

    2011-01-01

    The internationalization of higher education plays an important role in education, but from the perspective of the whole society, there is a higher level of significance. Combining with foreign experience, this paper holds that internationalization of higher education in China should be established to promote international education by…

  4. The Conditioning Role of State Higher Education Governance Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandberg, David A.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a study that examined whether the presence of a consolidated governing board for higher education conditions the impact various political factors have on state support for higher education. The existence of a consolidated governing board is shown to significantly alter the politics of the state higher education…

  5. Access and Equity in Higher Education in Antigua and Barbuda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewlett-Thomas, Elsie

    2009-01-01

    Across the international higher education spectrum access represents a significant issue. The literature is replete with analyses of access in various higher education systems. Low and inequitable patterns of participation in higher education are particularly prominent in developing countries. This dissertation is a case study of the higher…

  6. Costs and Difficulties on the Way to a Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mogil'chak, E. L.

    2012-01-01

    A higher education continues to be a significant value to young people; this is manifested clearly in the growth of the numbers enrolled in higher educational institutions of Russia. This article examines "the process by which young people achieve their goal"--obtaining a higher education--as a set of stages linked to specific kinds of costs. The…

  7. Higher order processes in random Raman lasing

    PubMed Central

    Hokr, Brett H.; Bixler, Joel N.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2014-01-01

    Random Raman lasers offer a unique opportunity to study many exciting dynamics of light propagation in turbid media. One of the most notable features observed to exist in the recently discovered random Raman laser are the presence of higher order stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) processes. The higher order Stokes generation likely comes from photons that have the longest pathlengths, thus have the most gain. This makes these photons particularly likely to offer interesting insight into wave propagation effects such as coherent backscattering and optical Anderson localization. In this work, we use Monte Carlo simulations to investigate how these higher order processes occur and what properties they are expected to exhibit when considering only transport equation dynamics. This knowledge will allow us to look for deviations from this theory in future experiments to determine if wavelike properties play an active role in random Raman lasing. PMID:25395737

  8. The prognostic significance of OCT4 expression in patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Takeo; Mikami, Shuji; Yoshimine, Shunsuke; Miyazaki, Yasumasa; Daimon, Tatsuaki; Kikuchi, Eiji; Miyajima, Akira; Oya, Mototsugu

    2016-05-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that OCT4 participates in tumorigenicity and malignancy in human cancers. However, the prognostic significance of OCT4 expression in prostate cancer (PCa) or predictive significance of OCT4 in docetaxel sensitivity in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of OCT4 expression in PCa. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical records and evaluated the OCT4 expression in 205 patients with PCa who underwent radical prostatectomy. We examined the change of OCT4 expression in 3 patients with CRPC who underwent transurethral resection for local progression before and after docetaxel chemotherapy. OCT4 expression was significantly associated with higher pathological T stage (P < .001). The 5-year prostate-specific antigen recurrence-free survival rate was 56.8% in patients with higher OCT4 expression and 90.6% in patients with lower OCT4 expression (P < .001). Multivariate analysis revealed that high OCT4 expression was an independent prognostic indicator of prostate-specific antigen recurrence (P < .001). Elevated strong OCT4 expression in residual CRPC cells after docetaxel chemotherapy was observed in all CRPC patients, compared with before chemotherapy in corresponding specimens. Higher OCT4 expression represents a clinically relevant predictor of patient prognosis in PCa and may be a new biomarker that will provide additional prognostic information in CRPC when treated with docetaxel. PMID:27067776

  9. Sedentary ghost poles in higher derivative gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, D. A.

    1988-02-01

    Following Antoniadis and Tomboulis [1] we consider the gauge behaviour of the massive spin-2 ghost pole that appears in the propagator of higher derivative gravity theories. In contradistinction to [1] we observe that the pair of complex conjugate poles that appear in the resummed propagator are gauge independent. They are sedentary, that is, under a change in the gauge parameter they do not move. We derive this result using the ubiquitous Nielsen identities [11].

  10. Family Background, Financial Constraints and Higher Education Attendance in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Wenli

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the 2004 China College Student Survey, conducted by the author, this paper finds that long-term factors such as scholastic ability and parental education are significantly correlated with higher education attendance. By contrast, short-term financial constraints are also significantly associated with higher education access, but to…

  11. The Demand for Higher Education in Turkey and Open Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cekerol, Kamil

    2012-01-01

    Failure to meet considerably high demand for higher education in Turkey has always been one of the most significant concerns of Turkish Higher Education System for many years. In this respect, Anadolu University Open Education Faculty has played a significant role in the attempts to overcome this problem in Turkey for the last three decades. In…

  12. Internationalization in Higher Education in China: A Practitioner's Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yibing

    2008-01-01

    Since higher education reforms were started in the mid-1980s, higher education in China has experienced significant transformations. Changes have not only been revealed by the increase in numbers of undergraduates, but also by a significant expansion in postgraduate education in mainland China. In order to enhance its global competitiveness, the…

  13. [The effects of the viewpoints and observers' traits on the observational learning of altruistic behavior].

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Y; Yonezawa, S; Sugiyama, K; Matsui, H; Sato, C

    1989-06-01

    This study was to examine the changes of altruistic responses through observational learning (OL) in elementary school children (4th graders) with the conditions of the different viewpoints and observers' traits. The OL was the symbolic modeling of altruistic behavior by presentation of pictures with narration. All the stories had the same situation, but differed whether the actor behaved himself in an altruistic fashion to the object, or not. Observers' viewpoints were determined by the instruction: they were told to observe the story as if they were one of the characters and to pay attention to emotional responses or behavior of the character. The emphasis of each story corresponded to the viewpoint. Out of these eight combined experimental conditions six were performed. Traits were concerned with observers' impression, empathy, and evaluation of the story. The response measure was the change of rating between pre- and post-questionnaires through observation. The effect of OL was higher significantly when the viewpoint directed to the characters' emotion. Observers who reacted strongly to empathy and impression items showed higher altruistic changes. PMID:2810951

  14. Change of Higher Education in Response to European Pressures: Conceptualization and Operationalization of Europeanization of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vukasovic, Martina

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on change in higher education in response to environmental pressures, more specifically pressures coming from European integration initiatives with respect to higher education, e.g. the Bologna Process. Significant research attention has so far been focused on the supposed impact of European initiatives on higher education

  15. Change of Higher Education in Response to European Pressures: Conceptualization and Operationalization of Europeanization of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vukasovic, Martina

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on change in higher education in response to environmental pressures, more specifically pressures coming from European integration initiatives with respect to higher education, e.g. the Bologna Process. Significant research attention has so far been focused on the supposed impact of European initiatives on higher education…

  16. Significance of TNF-α and the Adhesion Molecules: L-Selectin and VCAM-1 in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kobawala, Toral P.; Trivedi, Trupti I.; Gajjar, Kinjal K.; Patel, Darshita H.; Patel, Girish H.; Ghosh, Nandita R.

    2016-01-01

    Circulating levels of TNF-α and the adhesion molecules L-Selectin and VCAM-1 as well as their expression in the primary tumors of patients with benign thyroid diseases and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) have been determined in this study. The serum levels of TNF-α, L-Selectin, and VCAM-1 were significantly higher in patients with both benign thyroid diseases and PTC as compared to the healthy individuals. However, the levels of only TNF-α and L-Selectin, and not VCAM-1, were significantly higher in patients with PTC in comparison to those observed in patients with benign thyroid diseases. Further the expression of TNF-α and L-Selectin was also significantly higher in the primary tumors of PTC patients, relative to the benign thyroid diseases. The expression of L-Selectin and VCAM-1 significantly correlated with aggressive tumor behavior. In PTC patients, the circulating TNF-α levels significantly positively correlated with the levels of L-Selectin, while TNF-α immunoreactivity was significantly associated with VCAM-1 expression. Serum TNF-α was found to be a significant prognosticator for OS in PTC patients. Overall the results signify that the interaction between TNF-α and the adhesion molecules may have a role in thyroid carcinogenesis and understanding this complexity may offer potential therapeutic targets for better management of thyroid cancer. PMID:26881177

  17. No Significant Difference in Service Learning Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGorry, Sue Y.

    2012-01-01

    Institutions of higher education are realizing the importance of service learning initiatives in developing awareness of students' civic responsibilities, leadership and management skills, and social responsibility. These skills and responsibilities are the foundation of program outcomes in accredited higher education business programs at…

  18. Synthesis of higher monocarboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Taikov, B.F.; Novakovskii, E.M.; Zhelkovskaya, V.P.; Shadrova, V.N.; Shcherbik, P.K.

    1981-01-01

    Brown-coal and peat waxes contain higher monocarboxylic acids, alcohols and esters of them as their main components. In view of this, considerable interest is presented by the preparation of individual compounds among those mentioned above, which is particularly important in the study of the composition and development of the optimum variants of the chemical processing of the waxes. In laboratory practice, to obtain higher monocarboxylic acids use is generally made of electrosynthesis according to Kolbe which permits unbranched higher aliphatic acids with given lengths of the hydrocarbon chain to be obtained. The aim of the present work was to synthesize higher monocarboxylic acids: arachidic, behenic, lignoceric, pentacosanoic, erotic, heptacosanoic, montanic, nonacosanoic, melissic, dotriacontanoic and tetratriacontanoic, which are present in waxes. Characteristics of synthesized acids are tabulated. 20 refs.

  19. Differentiation of Higher Education Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cazenave, P.; Lapointe, S.

    1983-01-01

    Historical and political influences in the trend toward diversification in French universities are traced. Related issues discussed include institutional versus governmental preferences, institutional functions (curriculum, vocational training, research), and implications for the quality and democratization of higher education. (MSE)

  20. Pupal melanization is associated with higher fitness in Spodoptera exigua.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sisi; Wang, Mo; Li, Xianchun

    2015-01-01

    Melanism has long been thought to be a habitat adaptation with a fitness cost. Here we reported a homozygous melanic strain (SEM) of Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) (Insecta: Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) established with black pupae spontaneously occurring within a typical laboratory population (SEW). The melanization is expressed globally, and only in the pupal stage. After pupation, the melanic SEM pupae gradually accumulate melanin to become completely black within 6 hours, whereas the wild-type SEW pupae gradually turn yellow-brown. The melanic SEM strain exhibits faster development in all life stages, heavier pupa weight, more mating time, higher fecundity, and accordingly, higher net reproductive rate and population trend index. While no reproductive isolation was observed between the SEM and SEW strains, the mating times per female of the reciprocal crosses and the SEM intracrosses were significantly higher than those of the SEW intracrosses. This represents a rare case of melanization that has fitness gains, rather than costs. Analysis of the life-history traits of this case and 14 previously reported cases of insect melanism indicate that none of melanization origin, stage, space and variation type determining whether melanism will cause fitness gain or cost. PMID:26039886

  1. Astrolabe observations of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standish, E. M.; Debarbat, S.; Sanchez, M.

    1981-01-01

    A previously reported bias in the right ascension residuals of astrolabe observations of Mars is removed by correcting for equinox motion and relating the observations to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's planetary ephemeris, DE111. The remaining residuals show a 'phase effect', the magnitude of which is solved for and compared with that previously found for meridian transit observations. The final residuals reveal no significant offset in either right ascension or declination. In modifying the residuals, use is also made of Fricke's (1980) correction for the motion of the FK 4 equinox.

  2. Establishment of a rat model for osteoarthritis resulting from anterior cruciate ligament rupture and its significance

    PubMed Central

    OUYANG, XIAO; WANG, JIAN; HONG, SHI DONG; XIN, FENG; WANG, LIN; YANG, XIAO WEI; WANG, JING RONG; WANG, LI MING; WEI, BO; WANG, QING; CUI, WEI DING

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the establishment of a model concerned with osteoarthritis resulting from the anterior cruciate ligament rupture of rats and investigate the associated mechanism, as well as provide a theoretical basis for clinical treatment of the disease. Forty Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into two groups of 20 rats each and the anterior cruciate ligament transaction model and knee joint brake model were successfully established. Two rats in the anterior cruciate ligament transection group (10%) and 3 rats in the knee joint brake group (15.0%) died. The survival rate of the two groups was not statistically significant (χ2<0.001, P=1.000). Swelling of the knee joint and synovium of rats in the two experimental groups was aggravated. The Mankin score was significantly higher in the anterior cruciate ligament transection group than that in the experimental group and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). By contrast, no significant difference was observed for osteoarthritis severity for the two experimental groups (P>0.05). Analysis of the subgroups showed that the proportion of the anterior cruciate ligament in the experimental group was significantly higher than that of the knee joint brake group, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). By contrast, the difference was not statistically significant in the comparison of the medium and early proportion (P>0.05). The content of protein polysaccharide and II collagen fiber in the experimental group of the anterior cruciate ligament transection was lower than that of the knee joint brake group, and this difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Thus the mechanism of osteoarthritis may be associated with the decrease in the content of protein and II collagen fibers. PMID:26668592

  3. Investigating the Significance of VFR Visits to International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ruth; Shanka, Tekle; Pope, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    Higher education, particularly in the area of international education has exhibited significant growth since the mid-1980s. Whilst it is beginning to attract research from both educational and tourism industry perspectives, the current body of knowledge regarding this market is still quite limited. This is particularly the case in the area of…

  4. FINAL REPORT. DETERMINING SIGNIFICANT ENDPOINTS FOR ECOLOGICAL RISK ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research examines the ecological significance of radioactive and heavy metal contamination. Risks to non-human biota at higher levels of biological organization are assessed by using novel biological dosimeters in controlled, manipulative, dose/effects experiments, and by co...

  5. Higher Education Accounting Manual. Utah Coordinating Council of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Coordinating Council of Higher Education, Salt Lake City.

    Recognition of a critical need for accurate and detailed information to refine the process of budgeting funds for higher education in Utah led to the preparation of this accounting manual for universities and colleges in the state. The manual presents guidelines for the uniform accounting and reporting of financial and statistical data, and is…

  6. Revitalizing Higher Education. The Stanford Forum for Higher Education Futures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyerson, Joel W., Ed.; Massy, William F., Ed.

    This volume contains six essays on higher education which provide lessons and successful techniques for meeting the challenges of the future. The first essay, "Academic Renewal at Michigan" (James Duderstadt), describes the modern research university as a complex corporate conglomerate in danger of diluting its core business. The successful…

  7. Taxonomically significant color reactions of Brevibacterium linens.

    PubMed

    GRECZ, N; DACK, G M

    1961-08-01

    Grecz, Nicholas (University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.), and Gail M. Dack. Taxonomically significant color reactions of Brevibacterium linens. J. Bacteriol. 82:241-246. 1961.-Brevibacterium linens was observed to give characteristic color reactions with certain bases and acids. An intensive carmine-red color appeared immediately after addition of a drop of 5 n sodium hydroxide, 5 n potassium hydroxide, and saturated barium hydroxide. A light carmine-red was given by lithium hydroxide, and a light orange-red with a milky suspension of calcium hydroxide. No discernible color change was given with weak bases such as ammonium hydroxide, aniline, and pyridine.A characteristic salmon-pink color was produced when B. linens was rubbed with a glass rod in a drop of glacial acetic acid or filter paper; a brick-red color was produced with aniline under these conditions. With syrupy phosphoric acid a green color appeared within 3 to 4 min which turned blue after approximately 3 hr. The blue color was stable for several days. On the basis of these color reactions, B. linens could be distinguished from other microorganisms possessing yellow-orange pigmentation, i.e., Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Micrococcus flavus, Micrococcus citreus, Mycobacterium phlei, Sarcina lutea. Therefore, these color changes may be used for the identification of B. linens. Original isolates of B. linens from cheese were tested by these spot reactions and all presumptive identifications could be subsequently confirmed by conventional methods. Blue and green colors appeared in all yellow-orange chromogens treated with sulfuric, perchloric, and hydrochloric acids and hence these colors were not specific for B. linens. PMID:13708147

  8. Black Holes in Higher Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Gary T.

    2012-04-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Black holes in four dimensions Gary Horowitz; Part II. Five Dimensional Kaluza-Klein Theory: 2. The Gregory-Laflamme instability Ruth Gregory; 3. Final state of Gregory-Laflamme instability Luis Lehner and Frans Pretorius; 4. General black holes in Kaluza-Klein theory Gary Horowitz and Toby Wiseman; Part III. Higher Dimensional Solutions: 5. Myers-Perry black holes Rob Myers; 6. Black rings Roberto Emparan and Harvey Reall; Part IV. General Properties: 7. Constraints on the topology of higher dimensional black holes Greg Galloway; 8. Blackfolds Roberto Emparan; 9. Algebraically special solutions in higher dimensions Harvey Reall; 10. Numerical construction of static and stationary black holes Toby Wiseman; Part V. Advanced Topics: 11. Black holes and branes in supergravity Don Marolf; 12. The gauge/gravity duality Juan Maldacena; 13. The fluid/gravity correspondence Veronika Hubeny, Mukund Rangamani and Shiraz Minwalla; 14. Horizons, holography and condensed matter Sean Hartnoll; Index.

  9. Science Goal Driven Observing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koratkar, A.; Grosvenor, S.; Jones, J.; Wolf, K.

    In the coming decade, we will be forced to automate many of the scientific tasks that are done manually today because observatories will have to be managed in a fiscally tight environment. Thus, spacecraft autonomy will become a part of mission operations. In such an environment, observing campaigns of inherently variable targets and targets of opportunity will need flexible scheduling to focus observing time and data download on exposures that are scientifically interesting and useful. The ability to quickly recognize and react to such events by re-prioritizing the observing schedule will be an essential characteristic for maximizing scientific returns from the observatory. The science goal monitoring (SGM) system is a proof-of-concept effort to address these challenges. The SGM will have an interface to help capture higher level science goals from the scientists and translate them into a flexible observing strategy that SGM can execute and monitor. We are developing an interactive distributed system that will use on-board processing and storage combined with event-driven interfaces with ground-based processing and operations, to enable fast re-prioritization of observing schedules, and to minimize time spent on non-optimized observations.

  10. 40 CFR 1508.27 - Significantly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... short- and long-term effects are relevant. (b) Intensity. This refers to the severity of impact... significant impact on the environment. Significance cannot be avoided by terming an action temporary or...

  11. 40 CFR 1508.27 - Significantly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... short- and long-term effects are relevant. (b) Intensity. This refers to the severity of impact... significant impact on the environment. Significance cannot be avoided by terming an action temporary or...

  12. Multiple Comparisons of Observation Means--Are the Means Significantly Different?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahidy, T. Z.

    2009-01-01

    Several currently popular methods of ascertaining which treatment (population) means are different, via random samples obtained under each treatment, are briefly described and illustrated by evaluating catalyst performance in a chemical reactor.

  13. Magnetic transitions observed in sulfide minerals at elevated pressures and their geophysical significance.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, D J; Tossell, J A

    1973-01-26

    The magnetic behavior of iron in chalcopyrite (CuFeS(2)) and pyrrhotite (Fe(7)S(8)) in the pressure range from 1 atmosphere to 20 kilobars has been studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Both chalcopyrite and pyrrhotite exhibit transitions from magnetically ordered to disordered states over the range from 5 to 16 kilobars. Both transitions, particularly the loss of ferrimagnetism in pyrrhotite, have geophysical consequences. PMID:17843765

  14. Significant results from using earth observation satellites for mineral and energy resource exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, William D.

    1981-01-01

    Launched in June 1978, Seasat operated for only 100 days, but successfully acquired much information over both sea and land. The collection of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery and radar altimetry was particularly important to geologists. Although there are difficulties in processing and distributing these data in a timely manner, initial evaluations indicate that the radar imagery supplements Landsat data by increasing the spectral range and offering a different look angle. The radar altimeter provides accurate profiles over narrow strips of land (1 km wide) and has demonstrated usefulness in measuring icecap surfaces (Greenland, Iceland, and Antarctica). The Salar of Uyuni in southern Bolivia served as a calibration site for the altimeter and has enabled investigators to develop a land-based smoothing algorithm that is believed to increase the accuracy of the system to 10 cm. Data from the altimeter are currently being used to measure subsidence resulting from ground water withdrawal in the Phoenix-Tucson area.

  15. Amplification of the RARA gene in acute myeloid leukemia: significant finding or coincidental observation?

    PubMed

    Asleson, Anna D; Morgan, Vickie; Smith, Stephen; Velagaleti, Gopalrao V N

    2010-10-01

    Oncogene amplification resulting in aberrant expression, although common in solid tumors, is rare in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is mostly associated with amplification of MYC, RUNX1, and MLL genes. Retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) and other target sequences at 17p11.2 often represent the amplicons expressed in breast cancer, not in AML. We present a unique case of a 59-year-old female with a history of breast cancer, now presenting with pancytopenia and bilateral infiltration with effusion in nodules of the right upper lobe of the lung. She was diagnosed with AML-M5. Chromosome analysis demonstrated a hypodiploid clone with complex numerical/structural abnormalities including 5q deletion, monosomy 7, as well as structurally rearranged chromosome 11 and several marker chromosomes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis showed amplification of RARA, loss of 7q, monosomy 7, loss of DEK (6p23), and additional copies of NUP214 (9q34) and MLL (11q23). Additional FISH studies showed both ERBB2 and TOP2A genes, which were co-amplified on one of the marker chromosomes. The follow-up bone marrow did not yield any metaphases, but FISH was normal for all probes, including RARA. After a short remission, the patient relapsed and showed clonal evolution. Additional case reports are necessary to assess whether RARA amplification in hematologic malignancies serves as an independent prognostic factor. PMID:20804918

  16. Higher-order dielectrophoresis of nonspherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nili, Hossein; Green, Nicolas G.

    2014-06-01

    Higher-order terms of dielectrophoretic (DEP) force are commonly ignored by invoking the simplifying dipole approximation. Concurrently, the trend towards micro- and nano-electrode structures in DEP design is bringing about an increasing number of instances where the approximation is expected to lose reliability. The case is severe for nonspherical particles (the shape of many biological particles) due to the shape-dependent nature of dielectric polarization. However, there is a lack of analytical means to determine multipole moments of nonspherical particles, numerical calculations of the same are regarded as unreliable, and there is a prevalence for higher-order force considerations to be ignored. As a result, the dipole approximation is used and/or nonspherical particles are approximated as spheres. This work proves the inefficacy of current qualitative criteria for the reliability of the dipole approximation and presents a quantitative substitute, with verified accuracy, that enables precise determination of the extent to which the dipole approximation would be reliable, and if found unreliable, corrects the approximation by adding second- and third-order terms of the DEP force. The effects of field nonuniformity, electrode design, and particle shape and aspect ratio on the significance of higher-order DEP forces is quantitatively analyzed. The results show that higher-order DEP forces are indeed of substantially increased significance for nonspherical particles; in the cases examined in this work, multipolar terms are seen to constitute more than 40% of the total force on ellipsoidal and cylindrical particles. It is further shown that approximating nonspherical particles as spheres of similar dimensions is subject to substantial error. Last, the substantial importance of the electrode design in influencing higher-order forces is shown.

  17. Clinicopathological significance of c-KIT mutation in gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lin; Zou, Lei; Zhao, Wenhua; Wang, Yansen; Liu, Bo; Yao, Hongliang; Yu, Haihua

    2015-01-01

    Many types of KIT mutations have been observed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), but their prognostic and predictive significance are still unclear. A meta-analysis and literature review were conducted to estimate the contribution of KIT mutations in prognostic parameters and clinic-pathological significance of GISTs. A total of 18 relevant articles from PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science databases were included in this study. The frequency of KIT mutation was significantly increased in the GIST patients with higher mitosis (≥5/50 high-power fields (HPFs) and larger size (≥5 cm) of tumors than in those with lower MI (≤5/50HPFs) and smaller size (≤5 cm) of GISTs respectively. The rate of KIT mutation was not significantly changed between GISTs in stomachs and in small intestines. KIT mutational status has prognostic significance for patients’ outcome. GIST patients with KIT exon 9 mutations have higher risk of progression than those with exon 11 mutations. 5 year relapse-free survival (RFS) rate was significantly higher in patients with KIT exon 11 deletion than in those with other type of KIT exon 11 mutations. The deletion involving KIT exon 11, particularly codons 557–558, is a valuable predictor of prognosis for patients with GISTs. PMID:26349547

  18. 40 CFR 1508.27 - Significantly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Significantly. 1508.27 Section 1508.27 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY TERMINOLOGY AND INDEX § 1508.27 Significantly. Significantly as used in NEPA requires considerations of both context and intensity: (a) Context. This...

  19. 40 CFR 1508.27 - Significantly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Significantly. 1508.27 Section 1508.27 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY TERMINOLOGY AND INDEX § 1508.27 Significantly. Significantly as used in NEPA requires considerations of both context and intensity: (a) Context. This...

  20. Regions of Significance in Multiple Regression Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takane, Yoshio; Cramer, Elliott M.

    1975-01-01

    This paper considers the case of two predictor variables. Figures are obtained which show the regions of significance of joint regression coefficients, regression coefficients considered separately, and the multiple correlation. The intersection of these regions of significance and non-significance illustrates how the various apparent…

  1. Futures for Higher Education: Analysing Trends. Higher Education: Meeting the Challenges of the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Universities UK, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Higher education in the United Kingdom is undergoing a period of significant change. This is being driven by a number of factors: political, cultural, economic, and technological. The trends are global in their scope, and far reaching in their impact. They affect every aspect of university provision, the environment in which universities operate,…

  2. Local Knowledge and Wisdom in Higher Education. Issues in Higher Education Series, Volume 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teasdale, G. R., Ed.; Rhea, Zane Ma, Ed.

    Papers in this collection, derived from several sessions of the Commission for Indigenous Education, contain insightful accounts of the role of indigenous knowledge in higher education institutions across a variety of societies. The contributors examine the move to reaffirm the significance of local knowledge and wisdom and the resulting

  3. Local Knowledge and Wisdom in Higher Education. Issues in Higher Education Series, Volume 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teasdale, G. R., Ed.; Rhea, Zane Ma, Ed.

    Papers in this collection, derived from several sessions of the Commission for Indigenous Education, contain insightful accounts of the role of indigenous knowledge in higher education institutions across a variety of societies. The contributors examine the move to reaffirm the significance of local knowledge and wisdom and the resulting…

  4. On the Philosophy of Higher Education. Revised Edition. The Jossey-Bass Series in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brubacher, John S.

    Basic academic issues such as institutional objectives, educational ethics, and methods of academic decision-making are examined in light of significant new social, economic, legal, and educational developments in this revision of the 1977 edition of "On the Philosophy of Higher Education." Focus is on the tension between pure research and social…

  5. The Challenges of ICT in Higher Education: The Mirage in ICT Use in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okeiga, N. I. Obi; Okumu-Bigambo, W.; Masibo, P. F. Lumala

    2010-01-01

    The significance of ICT's influence as the epitome of information cannot be overemphasized. Globalization is multi-directional and interactive in nature masks ICT, and much of its content as a Western orientation and control over communication. The paper sets to show that there are imbalances in the use of ICT in higher education as used in Africa…

  6. The Physics of Magnetars and Its Astrophysical Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qiuhe

    2015-08-01

    We present the microscopic origin of the super strong magnetic fields in magnetars.The ultra-strong magnetic field of the magnetars originates really from the induced paramagnetic moment of the 3P2 superfluid with significant mass more than 0.1m⊙ in a condition when their interior temperature here is the energy gap of the neutron 3P2 Cooper pairs. In the case, a phase transition from paramagnetism to ferromagnetism due to the induced paramagnetic moment of 3P2 Cooper pairs in the presence of background magnetic field. The upper limit of the magnetic field for the magnetars is .2 We find that the electron Fermi energy, , increases with the magnetic field strength and it is proportional to . We note that this result is exactly the opposite of the popular idea that the electron Fermi energy decreases with the magnetic field. The key reason for the dilemma is that an incorrect formulae of the microscopic number of states for the electrons in intense magnetic field from some internationally well known popular textbooks on statistical physics has been repeatedly quoted by many authors.3. We propose a new mechanism for the production of the high soft X-ray luminosities of magnetars. In particular, the Fermi energy of the electrons is higher than 60MeV in ultra-strong magnetic fields, B>> Bcr (=4.414´1013 gauss), which is much higher than the Fermi energy of the neutrons. In this case, the process of electron capture (EC) by protons around the proton Femi surface would dominate in magnetars. The outgoing high-energy neutrons due to EC process can easily destroy the Cooper pairs through the nuclear strong interaction. When one Cooper pair is destroyed, the orderly magnetic energy would be released and transformed into disorder thermal energy, then it may be radiated as soft X-rays. The Energy is in the X-ray - soft g-ray range. The total magnetic energy of Cooper pairs can be estimated as . This energy can maintain over yrs for of per magnetar. We have also calculated the theoretical luminosities of magnetars, and our results compared very well with observations of magnetars.

  7. Gene copy number variation and its significance in cyanobacterial phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In eukaryotes, variation in gene copy numbers is often associated with deleterious effects, but may also have positive effects. For prokaryotes, studies on gene copy number variation are rare. Previous studies have suggested that high numbers of rRNA gene copies can be advantageous in environments with changing resource availability, but further association of gene copies and phenotypic traits are not documented. We used one of the morphologically most diverse prokaryotic phyla to test whether numbers of gene copies are associated with levels of cell differentiation. Results We implemented a search algorithm that identified 44 genes with highly conserved copies across 22 fully sequenced cyanobacterial taxa. For two very basal cyanobacterial species, Gloeobacter violaceus and a thermophilic Synechococcus species, distinct phylogenetic positions previously found were supported by identical protein coding gene copy numbers. Furthermore, we found that increased ribosomal gene copy numbers showed a strong correlation to cyanobacteria capable of terminal cell differentiation. Additionally, we detected extremely low variation of 16S rRNA sequence copies within the cyanobacteria. We compared our results for 16S rRNA to three other eubacterial phyla (Chroroflexi, Spirochaetes and Bacteroidetes). Based on Bayesian phylogenetic inference and the comparisons of genetic distances, we could confirm that cyanobacterial 16S rRNA paralogs and orthologs show significantly stronger conservation than found in other eubacterial phyla. Conclusions A higher number of ribosomal operons could potentially provide an advantage to terminally differentiated cyanobacteria. Furthermore, we suggest that 16S rRNA gene copies in cyanobacteria are homogenized by both concerted evolution and purifying selection. In addition, the small ribosomal subunit in cyanobacteria appears to evolve at extraordinary slow evolutionary rates, an observation that has been made previously for morphological characteristics of cyanobacteria. PMID:22894826

  8. Higher order variability properties of accreting black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccarone, Thomas J.; Coppi, Paolo S.

    2002-11-01

    To better constrain the emission mechanism underlying the hard state of galactic black hole candidates, we use high-time resolution RXTE light curves for Cyg X-1 and GX 339-4 to compute two higher order variability statistics for these objects, the skewness and the Fourier bispectrum. Similar analyses, in particular using the skewness measure, have been attempted previously, but the photon collection area of RXTE allows us to present results of much greater statistical significance. The results for the two objects are qualitatively similar, reinforcing the idea that the same basic mechanisms are at work in both. We find a significantly positive skewness for variability time-scales less than ~1 s, and a negative skewness for time-scales from 1 to 5 s. Such a skewness pattern cannot be reproduced by the simplest shot variability models where individual shots have a fixed profile and intensity and are uncorrelated in time. Further evidence against simple-shot models comes from the significant detection of a non-zero bicoherence for Fourier periods ~0.1-10 s, implying that significant coupling does exist between variations on these time-scales. We discuss how current popular models for variability in black hole systems can be modified to match these observations. Using simulated light curves, we suggest that the most likely way to reproduce this observed behaviour is to have the variability come in groups of many shots, with the number of shots per unit time fitting an envelope function that has a rapid rise and a slow decay, while the individual shots have a slow rise and a rapid decay. Invoking a finite-energy reservoir that is depleted by each shot is a natural way of producing the required shot correlations.

  9. State Budgeting for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenny, Lyman A.

    1976-01-01

    State government is and is expected to remain the chief source of funding for higher education. At the same time, the state is confronted with serious policy issues relating to support of research, public services, and adult education, to falling enrollments in some public institutions, to the probable closure of some private liberal arts colleges…

  10. Women in Higher Education Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commonwealth Secretariat, London (England).

    This volume contains 11 papers on the under-representation of women in higher education management in Bahrain, Finland, France, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Nigeria, Peru, the United States and Canada, the South Pacific and the West Indies. All papers were written by women vice-chancellors, presidents and senior managers of universities in those…

  11. Digital Storytelling in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLellan, Hilary

    2007-01-01

    Digital storytelling is a promising instructional strategy as well as an emerging field of study in higher education. Courses on digital storytelling are offered in communications and creative writing programs at a number of universities. However, the potential for digital storytelling extends far beyond the fields of communication and media…

  12. Project Management in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpert, Shannon Atkinson

    2011-01-01

    This study identified factors that influenced the use of project management in higher education research projects. Using a qualitative grounded theory approach that included in-depth interviews with assistant professors, the researcher examined how these individuals were using project management processes and tools and factors that enabled,

  13. Instructional Designers in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moskal, Tami Marie

    2012-01-01

    Research about the preparation and competencies of instructional designers in higher education has not been addressed. The purpose of this multiple case study was to explore individuals in this context by focusing on their employment and academic backgrounds, as well as their responsibilities, qualifications, and expectations as reported by their…

  14. History of Higher Education, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geiger, Robert L., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    The four papers in this annual volume on the history of higher education cover some of the changes that evolved over the years in various U.S. institutions. The first paper is: "The Harvard Tutors: The Beginning of an Academic Profession, 1690-1825" (John D. Burton), which discusses the shift from Harvard's original tutorship model to its modern…

  15. Electronic Assessment in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brink, Roelien; Lautenbach, Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    Assessment is an important cornerstone of education. A world trend in staying abreast of the latest developments in the field of information and communication technology (ICT) has led to an increased demand for electronic assessment in education circles. The critical need and responsibility for higher education to stay on par with the latest

  16. Higher Education: A Critical Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Ronald

    Current concepts of critical thinking need to be reconstrued into the much broader concept of "critical being" and applied to higher education. Under this construct, critical persons (students) become more than just critical thinkers; they engage critically with the world and with themselves; they not only reflect critically on knowledge, but also…

  17. Evaluating Teaching in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Bruce A.; Hashimoto, Masanori; Fleisher, Belton M.

    2009-01-01

    The authors develop an original measure of learning in higher education, based on grades in subsequent courses. Using this measure of learning, they show that student evaluations are positively related to current grades but unrelated to learning once current grades are controlled. They offer evidence that the weak relationship between learning and…

  18. Stakeholder Relationships in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettunen, Juha

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a stakeholder map to describe the most important stakeholders and the process of stakeholder relationships in higher education. According to the perspective of the balanced scorecard, the classification of stakeholders integrates stakeholders into strategic management. Stakeholder maps are essential in…

  19. 2011 Higher Education Sustainability Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Margo, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Looking through the lens of AASHE Bulletin stories in 2011, this year's review reveals an increased focus on higher education access, affordability, and success; more green building efforts than ever before; and growing campus-community engagement on food security, among many other achievements. Contributors include James Applegate (Lumina…

  20. Sustainability: Higher Education's New Fundamentalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Rachelle; Wood, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    "Sustainability" is a key idea on college campuses in the United States and the rest of the Western world. To the unsuspecting, sustainability is just a new name for environmentalism. This report is the first in-depth critical study of the sustainability movement in higher education. The focus of this study is on how the sustainability…