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Sample records for observing field lrc1

  1. Observations of galactic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields are enchored in gas clouds. Field lines are tangled in spiral arms, but highly regular between the arms. The similarity of pitch angles between gaseous and magnetic arms suggests a coupling between the density wave and the magnetic wave. Observations of large-scale patterns in Faraday rotation favour a dynamo origin of the regular fields. Fields in barred galaxies do not reveal the strong shearing shocks observed in the cold gas, but swing smoothly from the upstream region into the bar. Magnetic fields are important for the dynamcis of gas clouds, for the formation of spiral structures, bars and halos, and for mass and angular momentum transport in central regions.

  2. Hinode observations of polar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuneta, Saku

    The Sun's polar magnetic fields are the direct extension of the global poloidal field, which serves as seed fields for the toroidal fields forming active regions and sunspots. The polar regions are also the source of fast solar wind, and are the final destination of pole-ward meridional flows. We present spectro-polarimetric maps of the vector magnetic fields in the polar region of the Sun that are unprecedented in terms of high spatial resolution, large field of view, and polarimetric precision. These observations were carried out with the Solar Optical Telescope aboard Hinode. More than 100 canopy-like vertical magnetic structures as strong as 1-1.2 kG are scattered in heliographic latitude of 70-90o . They all have the same polarity, consistent with the global polar fields. The temporal-spatial evolution of these kG patches, which are crucial to understanding of their origin, will be reported. In addition to the vertical fields, the polar region appears to be covered with ubiquitous horizontal fields. Chromospheric observations with Hinode indicate that substantial amount of the horizontal fields reach chromosphere. Our observations describe the magnetic landscape of this poorly known region of the solar atmosphere. The polar regions are the source of the fast solar wind channelled along unipolar coronal-hole magnetic fields. We conjecture that the fast solar wind emanates only from the vertical flux tubes (canopies), which also seem to serve as efficient chimneys for Alfven waves to accelerate the solar wind.

  3. Observations of Mercury's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Whang, Y. C.

    1975-01-01

    Magnetic field data obtained by Mariner 10 during the third and final encounter with the planet Mercury on 16 March 1975 were studied. A well developed bow shock and modest magnetosphere, previously observed at first encounter on 29 March 1974, were again observed. In addition, a much stronger magnetic field near closest approach, 400 gamma versus 98 gamma, was observed at an altitude of 327 km and approximately 70 deg north Mercurian latitude. Spherical harmonic analysis of the data provide an estimate of the centered planetary magnetic dipole of 4.7 x 10 to the 22nd power Gauss/cu cm with the axis tilted 12 deg to the rotation axis and in the same sense as Earth's. The interplanetary field was sufficiently different between first and third encounters that in addition to the very large field magnitude observed, it argues strongly against a complex induction process generating the observed planetary field. While a possibility exists that Mercury possesses a remanent field due to magnetization early in its formation, a present day active dynamo seems to be a more likely candidate for its origin.

  4. Review of magnetic field observations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.

    1972-01-01

    Recent observations in previously unexplored regions of the magnetosphere, particularly in the polar-cusp region, compliment and reinforce emphasis on particle access to the plasma sheet via the polar neutral points. Significant distortions of the geomagnetic field in the polar-cusp region suggest field-aligned currents at large geocentric distances which can be related to low-altitude polar-cap phenomena. Studies of the microstructure of the field reversal region of the plasma sheet embedded in the geomagnetic tail suggest a periodic structure of more complexity than earlier assumed simplified single neutral-line models.

  5. Magnetic field observations in Comet Halley's coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedler, W.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Yeroshenko, Ye. G.; Styashkin, V. A.; Russell, C. T.

    1986-05-01

    During the encounter with Comet Halley, the magnetometer (MISCHA) aboard the Vega 1 spacecraft observed an increased level of magnetic field turbulence, resulting from an upstream bow wave. Both Vega spacecraft measured a peak field strength of 70-80 nT and observed draping of magnetic field lines around the cometary obstacle. An unexpected rotation of the magnetic field vector was observed, which may reflect either penetration of magnetic field lines into a diffuse layer related to the contact surface separating the solar-wind and cometary plasma, or the persistence of pre-existing interplanetary field structures.

  6. MMS Observations of Parallel Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergun, R.; Goodrich, K.; Wilder, F. D.; Sturner, A. P.; Holmes, J.; Stawarz, J. E.; Malaspina, D.; Usanova, M.; Torbert, R. B.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Burch, J. L.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Hesse, M.; Goldman, M. V.; Drake, J. F.; Phan, T.; Nakamura, R.

    2015-12-01

    Parallel electric fields are a necessary condition for magnetic reconnection with non-zero guide field and are ultimately accountable for topological reconfiguration of a magnetic field. Parallel electric fields also play a strong role in charged particle acceleration and turbulence. The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission targets these three universal plasma processes. The MMS satellites have an accurate three-dimensional electric field measurement, which can identify parallel electric fields as low as 1 mV/m at four adjacent locations. We present preliminary observations of parallel electric fields from MMS and provide an early interpretation of their impact on magnetic reconnection, in particular, where the topological change occurs. We also examine the role of parallel electric fields in particle acceleration. Direct particle acceleration by parallel electric fields is well established in the auroral region. Observations of double layers in by the Van Allan Probes suggest that acceleration by parallel electric fields may be significant in energizing some populations of the radiation belts. THEMIS observations also indicate that some of the largest parallel electric fields are found in regions of strong field-aligned currents associated with turbulence, suggesting a highly non-linear dissipation mechanism. We discuss how the MMS observations extend our understanding of the role of parallel electric fields in some of the most critical processes in the magnetosphere.

  7. Radio observations of the Jovian magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrow, C. H.; Carr, T. D.

    1992-01-01

    Radio observations of Jupiter are reviewed and discussed in relation to the planet's magnetic field. Early ground-based decameter- and decimeter-wave observations lead to a first estimate of the magnetic field strength which was subsequently confirmed by space-borne measurements. Decametric, hectometric and decimetric measurements of the Jovian rotation period offer the possibility of detecting a real change in the magnetic field structure within the next few decades. Solar wind control of the radio emission allows inferences to be made concerning the magnetic field and the emission regions at decametric, hectometric and kilometric frequencies. The decametric and the hectometric radiation may originate in hollow-cone emission sources at high (auroral) latitudes on Jupiter. The broad-band kilometric emission appears to originate at the outer edge of the Io torus.

  8. Observations of large transient magnetospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggson, T. L.; Heppner, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    Transient electric field events were observed with the long, double probe instrumentation carried by the IMP-6 satellite. Nine, clearly defined, exceptionally large amplitude events are presented here. The events are observed in the midnight sector at geocentric distances 3.5 to .5.5 R sub e at middle latitudes within a magnetic L-shell range of 4.8 to 7.5. They usually have a total duration of one to several minutes, with peak power spectra amplitudes occurring at a frequency of about 0.3 Hz. The events occur under magnetically disturbed conditions, and in most cases they can be associated with negative dH/dt excursions at magnetic observatories located near the foot of the magnetic field line intersecting IMP-6. The magnetospheric motions calculated for these electric fields indicated a quasi-stochastical diffusive process rather than the general inward magnetospheric collapsing motion expected during the expansive phases of auroral substorm activity.

  9. CCD observations of old nova fields

    SciTech Connect

    Downes, R.A.; Szkody, P.; Washington Uni., Seattle )

    1989-06-01

    The discovery of CK Vulpeculae (Nova 1670) has prompted a major review of ideas concerning the long-term development of novae. Unfortunately, there are very few recovered novae old enough to provide confirmation (or rejection) of the new hibernation scenario. CCD images of seven old nova fields, and R band photometry for four fields, have been obtained in an attempt to recover these objects in quiescence. A strong candidate for U Leonis, and a possible counterpart for T Bootis, are found. For three other fields, weak candidates have been found. Finding charts and colors are presented for the seven fields observed. The R light curves of U Leo, indicating an orbital period of 192.5 or 385.0 min, are shown. 14 refs.

  10. CCD observations of old nova fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downes, Ronald A.; Szkody, Paula

    1989-01-01

    The discovery of CK Vulpeculae (Nova 1670) has prompted a major review of ideas concerning the long-term development of novae. Unfortunately, there are very few recovered novae old enough to provide confirmation (or rejection) of the new 'hibernation' scenario. CCD images of seven old nova fields, and R band photometry for four fields, have been obtained in an attempt to recover these objects in quiescence. A strong candidate for U Leonis, and a possible counterpart for T Bootis, are found. For three other fields, weak candidates have been found. Finding charts and colors are presented for the seven fields observed. The R light curves of U Leo, indicating an orbital period of 192.5 or 385.0 min, are shown.

  11. LAMOST observations in the Kepler field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cat, P.; Fu, J. N.; Yang, X. H.; Ren, A. B.; Frasca, A.; Molenda-Żakowicz, J.; Catanzaro, G.; Gray, R. O.; Corbally, C. J.; Shi, J. R.; Zhang, H. T.; Luo, A. L.

    2015-09-01

    The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) at the Xinglong observatory in China is a new 4-m telescope equipped with 4,000 optical fibers. In 2010, we initiated the LAMOST-Kepler project. We requested to observe the full field-of-view of the nominal Kepler mission with the LAMOST to collect low-resolution spectra for as many objects from the KIC 10 catalogue as possible. So far, 12 of the 14 requested LAMOST fields have been observed resulting in more than 68,000 low-resolution spectra. Our preliminary results show that the stellar parameters derived from the LAMOST spectra are in good agreement with those found in the literature based on high-resolution spectroscopy. The LAMOST data allows to distinguish dwarfs from giants and can provide the projected rotational velocity for very fast rotators.

  12. Gravity Field Recovery with Simulated GOCE Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, J.; Bruinsma, S.; Balmino, G.; Abrikosov, O.; Foerste, C.; Rothacher, M.

    2005-12-01

    Numerical simulations of the gravity field parameter recovery using the direct method, with satellite positions as pseudo observations instead of simulated GPS Satellite-to-Satellite (SST) tracking data, and with gravity gradients (SGG data), were done and are ongoing in the framework of the European GOCE Gravity Consortium test and validation plan for GOCE mission data processing. This work shows the latest results from the CNES and GFZ software packages, GINS and EPOS, respectively. After the iterative least-squares orbit adjustment procedure has converged to the highest attainable precision level, the gravity field normal equations are computed in a subsequent step. These SST normal equations, representing the long wavelength gravity field signal, are then reduced for arc-dependent parameters (i.e. state vector at epoch, empirical parameters) and cumulated over the entire observation period. Secondly, the gravity gradient measurements (SGG) are processed, taking into account the coloured noise in these data, and yield (high resolution) normal equations. They are combined with the SST normal equations and the gravity field and gradiometer common mode calibration parameters are simultaneously estimated. The coloured noise in the SGG data is based on the latest and realistic gradiometer specifications. The precision in the measurement bandwidth is approximately 3-5 milliEotvos, but rapidly decreasing for lower frequencies. Due to this behaviour, the observation equations have to be filtered in order to obtain the most accurate recovery. The filter algorithm, design and results are presented to considerable detail since this particular step is the key element that will enable the achievement of the GOCE mission objectives from the ground segment point of view.

  13. Wide field camera observations of Baade's Window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holtzman, Jon A.; Light, R. M.; Baum, William A.; Worthey, Guy; Faber, S. M.; Hunter, Deidre A.; O'Neil, Earl J., Jr.; Kreidl, Tobias J.; Groth, E. J.; Westphal, James A.

    1993-01-01

    We have observed a field in Baade's Window using the Wide Field Camera (WFC) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and obtain V- and I-band photometry down to V approximately 22.5. These data go several magnitudes fainter than previously obtained from the ground. The location of the break in the luminosity function suggests that there are a significant number of intermediate age (less than 10 Gyr) stars in the Galactic bulge. This conclusion rests on the assumptions that the extinction towards our field is similar to that seen in other parts of Baade's Window, that the distance to the bulge is approximately 8 kpc, and that we can determine fairly accurate zero points for the HST photometry. Changes in any one of these assumptions could increase the inferred age, but a conspiracy of lower reddening, a shorter distance to the bulge, and/or photometric zero-point errors would be needed to imply a population entirely older than 10 Gyr. We infer an initial mass function slope for the main-sequence stars, and find that it is consistent with that measured in the solar neighborhood; unfortunately, the slope is poorly constrained because we sample only a narrow range of stellar mass and because of uncertainties in the observed luminosity function at the faint end.

  14. Observation of spin Hall effective field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xin; Wu, Jun; Chen, Yunpeng; Jerry, Matthew; Zhang, Huaiwu; Xiao, John

    2013-03-01

    Recent development in spin Hall driven spin transfer torque has attracted intensive interests1. Liu et. al. has shown that the spin transfer torque induced by the spin Hall effect in a normal metal-ferromagnetic metal bilayer can switch the magnetization of the ferromagnetic layer, which may be a potential candidate for magnetic random access memory2. The switching of the magnetization was primarily attributed to the Slonczewski torque3. We show that besides the Slonczewski torque, the spin Hall effect also produces an effective field that can also facilitate the magnetization reversal. This effective field persists even with a Cu spacer layer, and reduces quickly with the increase of the ferromagnetic layer thickness. The observation of the spin Hall effective field shall have ramification on the understanding of both spin transfer torque and spin Hall effect. 1. K. Ando et. al., Electric manipulation of spin relaxation using the spin Hall effect, Physical Review Letters, 101, 036601 (2008). 2. L. Liu et. al., Spin-Torque Switching with the Giant Spin Hall Effect of Tantalum. Science 336, 555-558 (2012). 3. J. Slonczewski, Current-driven excitation of magnetic multilayers. Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials, 159, L1-L7 (1996).

  15. Interpretation of Solar Magnetic Field Strength Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, R. K.; Bertello, L.; Boyden, J. E.; Webster, L.

    2009-03-01

    This study based on longitudinal Zeeman effect magnetograms and spectral line scans investigates the dependence of solar surface magnetic fields on the spectral line used and the way the line is sampled to estimate the magnetic flux emerging above the solar atmosphere and penetrating to the corona from magnetograms of the Mt. Wilson 150-foot tower synoptic program (MWO). We have compared the synoptic program λ5250 Å line of Fe i to the line of Fe i at λ5233 Å since this latter line has a broad shape with a profile that is nearly linear over a large portion of its wings. The present study uses five pairs of sampling points on the λ5233 Å line. Line profile observations show that the determination of the field strength from the Stokes V parameter or from line bisectors in the circularly polarized line profiles lead to similar dependencies on the spectral sampling of the lines, with the bisector method being the less sensitive. We recommend adoption of the field determined with the line bisector method as the best estimate of the emergent photospheric flux and further recommend the use of a sampling point as close to the line core as is practical. The combination of the line profile measurements and the cross-correlation of fields measured simultaneously with λ5250 Å and λ5233 Å yields a formula for the scale factor δ -1 that multiplies the MWO synoptic magnetic fields. By using ρ as the center-to-limb angle (CLA), a fit to this scale factor is δ -1=4.15-2.82sin 2( ρ). Previously δ -1=4.5-2.5sin 2( ρ) had been used. The new calibration shows that magnetic fields measured by the MDI system on the SOHO spacecraft are equal to 0.619±0.018 times the true value at a center-to-limb position 30°. Berger and Lites (2003, Solar Phys. 213, 213) found this factor to be 0.64±0.013 based on a comparison using the Advanced Stokes Polarimeter.

  16. Hazardous gas model evaluation with field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, S. R.; Chang, J. C.; Strimaitis, D. G.

    Fifteen hazardous gas models were evaluated using data from eight field experiments. The models include seven publicly available models (AFTOX, DEGADIS, HEGADAS, HGSYSTEM, INPUFF, OB/DG and SLAB), six proprietary models (AIRTOX, CHARM, FOCUS, GASTAR, PHAST and TRACE), and two "benchmark" analytical models (the Gaussian Plume Model and the analytical approximations to the Britter and McQuaid Workbook nomograms). The field data were divided into three groups—continuous dense gas releases (Burro LNG, Coyote LNG, Desert Tortoise NH 3-gas and aerosols, Goldfish HF-gas and aerosols, and Maplin Sands LNG), continuous passive gas releases (Prairie Grass and Hanford), and instantaneous dense gas releases (Thorney Island freon). The dense gas models that produced the most consistent predictions of plume centerline concentrations across the dense gas data sets are the Britter and McQuaid, CHARM, GASTAR, HEGADAS, HGSYSTEM, PHAST, SLAB and TRACE models, with relative mean biases of about ±30% or less and magnitudes of relative scatter that are about equal to the mean. The dense gas models tended to overpredict the plume widths and underpredict the plume depths by about a factor of two. All models except GASTAR, TRACE, and the area source version of DEGADIS perform fairly well with the continuous passive gas data sets. Some sensitivity studies were also carried out. It was found that three of the more widely used publicly-available dense gas models (DEGADIS, HGSYSTEM and SLAB) predicted increases in concentration of about 70% as roughness length decreased by an order of magnitude for the Desert Tortoise and Goldfish field studies. It was also found that none of the dense gas models that were considered came close to simulating the observed factor of two increase in peak concentrations as averaging time decreased from several minutes to 1 s. Because of their assumption that a concentrated dense gas core existed that was unaffected by variations in averaging time, the dense gas

  17. Balloon-borne radiometer profiler: Field observations

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, W.J.; Whiteman, C.D.; Anderson, G.A.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Hubbe, J.M.; Scott, K.A.

    1995-03-01

    This project involves the development of the capability of making routine soundings of broadband radiative fluxes and radiative flux divergences to heights of 1500m AGL. Described in this document are radiometers carried on a stabilized platform in a harness inserted in the tetherline of a tethered balloon meteriological sounding system. Field test results are given.

  18. Field Observations and Interpretations Given New Emphasis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Timothy D.; Buchwald, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    The quantity of available knowledge has expanded such that the teaching of processes is as important in geology education as the teaching of facts. Field trips must be modified also to conform to this shift in focus. A sample teaching unit at an outcrop illustrates the technique. (RE)

  19. Annotated Observations: Field Notes and Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas-Fair, Ursula

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this action research presentation is to invite discourse on the intersection of race, gender and instructional decisions in the classrooms of student teachers. The purpose of this study is to also examine the thoughts of a university supervisor during clinical observation with respect to her positionality as a woman of…

  20. Field Research: Learning through the Process of Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartlep, Nicholas Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the process of a participant observation. Its focus is its process, not on what was observed. This report provides the following: (1) an overview of this observation, (2) the purpose of this observation, (3) the site and situation of this observation, (4) two samples of reflective field notes from this observation, and (5) an…

  1. POLAR FIELD REVERSAL OBSERVATIONS WITH HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Shiota, D.; Tsuneta, S.; Shimojo, M.; Orozco Suarez, D.; Ishikawa, R.; Sako, N.

    2012-07-10

    We have been monitoring yearly variation in the Sun's polar magnetic fields with the Solar Optical Telescope aboard Hinode to record their evolution and expected reversal near the solar maximum. All magnetic patches in the magnetic flux maps are automatically identified to obtain the number density and magnetic flux density as a function of the total magnetic flux per patch. The detected magnetic flux per patch ranges over four orders of magnitude (10{sup 15}-10{sup 20} Mx). The higher end of the magnetic flux in the polar regions is about one order of magnitude larger than that of the quiet Sun, and nearly that of pores. Almost all large patches ({>=}10{sup 18} Mx) have the same polarity, while smaller patches have a fair balance of both polarities. The polarity of the polar region as a whole is consequently determined only by the large magnetic concentrations. A clear decrease in the net flux of the polar region is detected in the slow rising phase of the current solar cycle. The decrease is more rapid in the north polar region than in the south. The decrease in the net flux is caused by a decrease in the number and size of the large flux concentrations as well as the appearance of patches with opposite polarity at lower latitudes. In contrast, we do not see temporal change in the magnetic flux associated with the smaller patches (<10{sup 18} Mx) and that of the horizontal magnetic fields during the years 2008-2012.

  2. Multisatellite Observations of Interplanetary Field Enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Weimer, D. R.; Jian, L. K.; Lai, H. R.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2008-12-01

    Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs) are magnetic structures in the solar wind that have a cusp-shaped maximum in the field strength with a strong current sheet often near the central peak. These structures generally last an hour or more. They have a tendency to be seen more often at specific ecliptic longitudes, have been identified on occasion with particular small solar system bodies (asteroid 2201 Oljato and comet 122P/ De Vico) and attributed to the interaction of the solar wind with charged dust. On occasion they are detected nearly simultaneously by several spacecraft. Multispacecraft detection have been made with PVO, Venera-13 and Venera-14; with ISEE 1 and ISEE 3 and more recently with STEREO A and B, ACE and Wind. In this paper we use a delay matching algorithm developed by D. Weimer on the IFE of December 24, 2006 detected by 4 spacecraft. While the IFE is crossing the four spacecraft separated in Y by 90 Re and in X by 160 Re the measured delay was close to the calculated advection time. Along the apparent center line of the event the delay was close to 4 minutes. This event together with previous events are consistent with IFEs being magnetic structures that are convecting outward from the Sun with nearly, but slightly slower than, the solar wind velocity. We need to understand the occurrence rate of such structures and their physical cause because if this hypothesis is true, they may be responsible for accelerating dust out of the inner solar system.

  3. Seismological Field Observation of Mesoscopic Nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Gassenmeier, Martina; Eulenfeld, Tom; Tilmann, Frederik; Korn, Michael; Niederleithinger, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Noise based observations of seismic velocity changes have been made in various environments. We know of seasonal changes of velocities related to ground water or temperature changes, co-seismic changes originating from shaking or stress redistribution and changes related to volcanic activity. Is is often argued that a decrease of velocity is related to the opening of cracks while the closure of cracks leads to a velocity increase if permanent stress changes are invoked. In contrast shaking induced changes are often related to "damage" and subsequent "healing" of the material. The co-seismic decrease and transient recovery of seismic velocities can thus be explained with both - static stress changes or damage/healing processes. This results in ambiguous interpretations of the observations. Here we present the analysis of one particular seismic station in northern Chile that shows very strong and clear velocity changes associated with several earthquakes ranging from Mw=5.3 to Mw=8.1. The fact that we can observe the response to several events of various magnitudes from different directions offers the unique possibility to discern the two possible causative processes. We test the hypothesis, that the velocity changes are related to shaking rather than stress changes by developing an empirical model that is based on the local ground acceleration at the sensor site. The eight year of almost continuous observations of velocity changes are well modeled by a daily drop of the velocity followed by an exponential recovery. Both, the amplitude of the drop as well as the recovery time are proportional to the integrated acceleration at the seismic station. Effects of consecutive days are independent and superimposed resulting in strong changes after earthquakes and constantly increasing velocities during quiet days thereafter. This model describes the continuous observations of the velocity changes solely based on the acceleration time series without individually defined dates

  4. Interplanetary magnetic sector polarity inferred from polar geomagnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriss-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    With the use of a prediction technique it is shown that the polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field can be reliably inferred from observations of the polar geomagnetic field.

  5. Null fields in the outer Jovian magnetosphere: ULYSSES observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, P. L.; Balogh, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Southwood, D. J.; Fazakerley, A.

    1994-03-01

    This paper reports on a magnetic field phenomenon, hereafter referred to as null fields, which were discovered during the inbound pass of the recent flyby of Jupiter by the Ulysses spacecraft. These null fields which were observed in the outer dayside magnetosphere are characterised by brief but sharp decreases of the field magnitude to values less than 1 nT. The nulls are distinguished from the current sheet signatures characteristic of the middle magnetosphere by the fact that the field does not reverse across the event. A field configuration is suggested that accounts for the observed features of the events.

  6. Interplanetary magnetic sector polarity inferred from polar geomagnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    In order to infer the interplanetary sector polarity from polar geomagnetic field diurnal variations, measurements were carried out at Godhavn and Thule (Denmark) Geomagnetic Observatories. The inferred interplanetary sector polarity was compared with the polarity observed at the same time by Explorer 33 and 35 magnetometers. It is shown that the polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field can be reliably inferred from observations of the polar cap geomagnetic fields.

  7. Reconstructing magnetic fields of spiral galaxies from radiopolarimetric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, C.

    2015-12-01

    We live in a magnetic universe with magnetic fields spanning an enormous range of spatial and temporal scales. In particular, magnetic fields at the scale of a galaxy are known as galactic magnetic fields and are the focus of this PhD thesis. These galactic magnetic fields are very important since they affect the dynamics of the interstellar gas as well as the gas distribution. The presence of these magnetic fields induces a certain type of radiation to occur at radio frequencies known as synchrotron radiation. The observed polarization properties of this synchrotron radiation then serves to record the imprint of these magnetic fields. The goal of this thesis has been to infer the structure of the magnetic field across various spatial scales in our own Galaxy as well as the strength and structure of the magnetic field in other galaxies using radiopolarimetric observations.

  8. Rethinking Field Observations: Strengthening Teacher Education through INFORM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Kristin; Terantino, Joe

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces the Instructional Field Observation Rounds Model (INFORM), drawn from the medical profession where resident interns make rounds with experienced physicians, as an alternative approach for conducting classroom observations in pre-service teacher education methods courses. INFORM centers on structured group observations in…

  9. Computation of solar magnetic fields from photospheric observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannakam, L.; Gary, G. A.; Teuber, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The observational difficulties of obtaining the magnetic field distribution in the chromosphere and corona of the sun has led to methods of extending photospheric magnetic mesurements into the solar atmosphere by mathematical procedures. A new approach to this problem presented here is that a constant alpha force-free field can be uniquely determined from the tangential components of the measured photospheric flux alone. The vector magnetographs now provide measurements of both the solar photospheric tangential and the longitudinal magnetic field. This paper presents derivations for the computation of the solar magnetic field from these type of measurements. The fields considered are assumed to be a constant alpha force-free fields or equivalent, producing vanishing Lorentz forces. Consequently, magnetic field lines and currents are related by a constant and hence show an identical distribution. The magnetic field above simple solar regions are described from the solution of the field equations.

  10. Computation of solar magnetic fields from photospheric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannakam, L.; Gary, G. A.; Teuber, D. L.

    1984-09-01

    The observational difficulties of obtaining the magnetic field distribution in the chromosphere and corona of the sun has led to methods of extending photospheric magnetic mesurements into the solar atmosphere by mathematical procedures. A new approach to this problem presented here is that a constant alpha force-free field can be uniquely determined from the tangential components of the measured photospheric flux alone. The vector magnetographs now provide measurements of both the solar photospheric tangential and the longitudinal magnetic field. This paper presents derivations for the computation of the solar magnetic field from these type of measurements. The fields considered are assumed to be a constant alpha force-free fields or equivalent, producing vanishing Lorentz forces. Consequently, magnetic field lines and currents are related by a constant and hence show an identical distribution. The magnetic field above simple solar regions are described from the solution of the field equations.

  11. Observations of Strong Magnetic Fields in Nondegenerate Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Schöller, Markus

    2015-10-01

    We review magnetic-field measurements of nondegenerate stars across the Hertzprung-Russell diagram for main sequence, premain sequence, and postmain sequence stars. For stars with complex magnetic-field morphologies, which includes all G-M main sequence stars, the analysis of spectra obtained in polarized vs unpolarized light provides very different magnetic measurements because of the presence or absence of cancellation by oppositely directed magnetic fields within the instrument's spatial resolution. This cancellation can be severe, as indicated by the spatially averaged magnetic field of the Sun viewed as a star. These averaged fields are smaller by a factor of 1000 or more compared to spatially resolved magnetic-field strengths. We explain magnetic-field terms that characterize the fields obtained with different measurement techniques. Magnetic fields typically control the structure of stellar atmospheres in and above the photosphere, the heating rates of stellar chromospheres and coronae, mass and angular momentum loss through stellar winds, chemical peculiarity, and the emission of high energy photons, which is critically important for the evolution of protoplanetary disks and the habitability of exoplanets. Since these effects are governed by the star's magnetic energy, which is proportional to the magnetic-field strength squared and its fractional surface coverage, it is important to measure or reliably infer the true magnetic-field strength and filling factor across a stellar disk. We summarize magnetic-field measurements obtained with the different observing techniques for different types of stars and estimate the highest magnetic-field strengths. We also comment on the different field morphologies observed for stars across the H-R diagram, typically inferred from Zeeman-Doppler imaging and rotational modulation observations,

  12. The Asymmetric Polar Field Reversal - Long Term Observations from WSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    The Sun's polar field above 55 degrees in the northern hemisphere is reversing and the southern field may be beginning to weaken. This asymmetry is not unusual and is related to the poleward transport of flux that emerged in the active region bands earlier in the cycle. In the declining phase of Cycle 23 the poles were fairly equal, but the northern field began to decay in early 2009. Prior cycles have behaved differently, as observed by the Wilcox Solar Observatory and elsewhere.

  13. Low frequency radio observations of coronal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, R.; Kathiravan, C.

    2012-07-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in the dynamics as well as the formation of the structures in the solar corona. Despite its fundamental importance, only a few direct measurements of the coronal magnetic field are available. The existing direct estimates using optical/infrared and radio emissions are limited to the inner corona, i.e., r < 1.2 R , where R is the radius of the Sun. In the outer corona beyond r > 3 R , Faraday rotation observations are used to derive the magnetic field. But due to lack of observational techniques, measurements in the range 1.2 R < r > 3 R (middle corona) are not available until now. As the photosphere, chromosphere, and corona are coupled by the solar magnetic field, the magnetic field strength at these distances is generally obtained by mathematical extrapolation of the observed line-of-sight component of the photospheric magnetic field assuming a potential or force-free model. The Indian Institute of Astrophysics has recently commissioned a radio polarimeter (based on inteferometer techniques) for dedicated obervations of the polarized radio emission from the solar corona. The frequency range of observation is 120-30 MHz which corresponds to a radial distance range of about 1.2-1.8 R. Estimates of weak magnetic fields in the 'undisturbed' Sun (non-flaring sunspot active regions, coronal streamers, etc.) obtained from observations with the above instrument will be presented.

  14. The wireless networking system of Earthquake precursor mobile field observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Teng, Y.; Wang, X.; Fan, X.; Wang, X.

    2012-12-01

    The mobile field observation network could be real-time, reliably record and transmit large amounts of data, strengthen the physical signal observations in specific regions and specific period, it can improve the monitoring capacity and abnormal tracking capability. According to the features of scatter everywhere, a large number of current earthquake precursor observation measuring points, networking technology is based on wireless broadband accessing McWILL system, the communication system of earthquake precursor mobile field observation would real-time, reliably transmit large amounts of data to the monitoring center from measuring points through the connection about equipment and wireless accessing system, broadband wireless access system and precursor mobile observation management center system, thereby implementing remote instrument monitoring and data transmition. At present, the earthquake precursor field mobile observation network technology has been applied to fluxgate magnetometer array geomagnetic observations of Tianzhu, Xichang,and Xinjiang, it can be real-time monitoring the working status of the observational instruments of large area laid after the last two or three years, large scale field operation. Therefore, it can get geomagnetic field data of the local refinement regions and provide high-quality observational data for impending earthquake tracking forecast. Although, wireless networking technology is very suitable for mobile field observation with the features of simple, flexible networking etc, it also has the phenomenon of packet loss etc when transmitting a large number of observational data due to the wireless relatively weak signal and narrow bandwidth. In view of high sampling rate instruments, this project uses data compression and effectively solves the problem of data transmission packet loss; Control commands, status data and observational data transmission use different priorities and means, which control the packet loss rate within

  15. Observational testing of magnetospheric magnetic field models at geosynchronous orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, L.A.; Thomsen, M.F.; Reeves, G.D.; McComas, D.J.

    1996-09-01

    Empirical mode which estimate the magnetic field direction and magnitude at any point within the magnetosphere under a variety of conditions play an important role in space weather forecasting. We report here on a number of different studies aimed at quantitatively evaluating these models, and in particular the Tsyganenko T89a model. The models are evaluated in two basic ways: (1) by comparing the range of magnetic field tilt angles observed at geosynchronous orbit with the ranges predicted for the same locations by the models; and (2) by comparing the observed magnetic field mapping between the ionosphere and geosynchronous orbit (using two-satellite magnetic field conjunctions) with the model predictions at the same locations. We find that while the T89a model predicts reasonably well the basic variation in tilt angle with local time and permits a range of field inclinations adequate to encompass the majority of observed angles on the dawn, dusk, and night sides, it is unable to reproduce the range of inclinations on the dayside. The model also predicts a smaller magnetic latitude range of geosynchronous field line footpoints than the observed two-satellite mapping indicate. Together, these results suggest that the next generation of field models should allow a greater range of stretching, especially in local time sectors away from midnight. It is important to note, however, that any increased range should encompass less-stretched configurations: although there are certainly cases where the models are not sufficiently stretched, we find that on average all magnetic field models tested, including T89a, are too stretched. Finally, in investigating how well the observed degree of field stretch was ordered by various magnetospheric indices, we find that the tilt of the field at geosynchronous orbit is a promising candidate for the incorporation into future models.

  16. Direct observations of field-induced assemblies in magnetite ferrofluids

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, N. S. Susan

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of microstructures in magnetite-based ferrofluids with weak dipolar moments (particle size ≤ 10 nm) is studied with an emphasis on examining the effects of particle concentration (ϕ) and magnetic field strength (H) on the structures. Nanoparticles are dispersed in water at three different concentrations, ϕ = 0.15%, 0.48%, and 0.59% (w/v) [g/ml%] and exposed to uniform magnetic fields in the range of H = 0.05–0.42 T. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy is employed to provide in-situ observations of the field-induced assemblies in such systems. As the magnetic field increases, the Brownian colloids are observed to form randomly distributed chains aligned in the field direction, followed by head-to-tail chain aggregation and then lateral aggregation of chains termed as zippering. By increasing the field in low concentration samples, the number of chains increases, though their length does not change dramatically. Increasing concentration increases the length of the linear particle assemblies in the presence of a fixed external magnetic field. Thickening of the chains due to zippering is observed at relatively high fields. Through a systematic variation of concentration and magnetic field strength, this study shows that both magnetic field strength and change in concentration can strongly influence formation of microstructures even in weak dipolar systems. Additionally, the results of two commonly used support films on electron microscopy grids, continuous carbon and holey carbon films, are compared. Holey carbon film allows us to create local regions of high concentrations that further assist the development of field-induced assemblies. The experimental observations provide a validation of the zippering effect and can be utilized in the development of models for thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity. PMID:25829566

  17. Direct observations of field-induced assemblies in magnetite ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, N. S. Susan; Khapli, Sachin D.; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-03-01

    Evolution of microstructures in magnetite-based ferrofluids with weak dipolar moments (particle size ≤ 10 nm) is studied with an emphasis on examining the effects of particle concentration (ϕ) and magnetic field strength (H) on the structures. Nanoparticles are dispersed in water at three different concentrations, ϕ = 0.15%, 0.48%, and 0.59% (w/v) [g/ml%] and exposed to uniform magnetic fields in the range of H = 0.05-0.42 T. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy is employed to provide in-situ observations of the field-induced assemblies in such systems. As the magnetic field increases, the Brownian colloids are observed to form randomly distributed chains aligned in the field direction, followed by head-to-tail chain aggregation and then lateral aggregation of chains termed as zippering. By increasing the field in low concentration samples, the number of chains increases, though their length does not change dramatically. Increasing concentration increases the length of the linear particle assemblies in the presence of a fixed external magnetic field. Thickening of the chains due to zippering is observed at relatively high fields. Through a systematic variation of concentration and magnetic field strength, this study shows that both magnetic field strength and change in concentration can strongly influence formation of microstructures even in weak dipolar systems. Additionally, the results of two commonly used support films on electron microscopy grids, continuous carbon and holey carbon films, are compared. Holey carbon film allows us to create local regions of high concentrations that further assist the development of field-induced assemblies. The experimental observations provide a validation of the zippering effect and can be utilized in the development of models for thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity.

  18. Direct observations of field-induced assemblies in magnetite ferrofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Mousavi, N. S. Susan; Khapli, Sachin D.; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-03-14

    Evolution of microstructures in magnetite-based ferrofluids with weak dipolar moments (particle size ≤ 10 nm) is studied with an emphasis on examining the effects of particle concentration (ϕ) and magnetic field strength (H) on the structures. Nanoparticles are dispersed in water at three different concentrations, ϕ = 0.15%, 0.48%, and 0.59% (w/v) [g/ml%] and exposed to uniform magnetic fields in the range of H = 0.05–0.42 T. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy is employed to provide in-situ observations of the field-induced assemblies in such systems. As the magnetic field increases, the Brownian colloids are observed to form randomly distributed chains aligned in the field direction, followed by head-to-tail chain aggregation and then lateral aggregation of chains termed as zippering. By increasing the field in low concentration samples, the number of chains increases, though their length does not change dramatically. Increasing concentration increases the length of the linear particle assemblies in the presence of a fixed external magnetic field. Thickening of the chains due to zippering is observed at relatively high fields. Through a systematic variation of concentration and magnetic field strength, this study shows that both magnetic field strength and change in concentration can strongly influence formation of microstructures even in weak dipolar systems. Additionally, the results of two commonly used support films on electron microscopy grids, continuous carbon and holey carbon films, are compared. Holey carbon film allows us to create local regions of high concentrations that further assist the development of field-induced assemblies. The experimental observations provide a validation of the zippering effect and can be utilized in the development of models for thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity.

  19. Injun 5 observations of magnetospheric electric fields and plasma convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    Recent measurements of magnetospheric electric fields with the satellite Injun 5 have provided a comprehensive global survey of plasma convection at low altitudes in the magnetosphere. A persistent feature of these electric field observations is the occurrence of an abrupt reversal in the convection electric field at auroral zone latitudes. The plasma convection velocities associated with these reversals are generally directed east-west, away from the sun on the poleward side of the reversal, and toward the sun on the equatorward side of the reversal. Convection velocities over the polar cap region are normally less than those observed near the reversal region. The electric field reversal is observed to be coincident with the trapping boundary for electrons with energies E greater than 45 keV.

  20. The magnetic field of Saturn - Pioneer 11 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1980-01-01

    The Pioneer 11 high-field fluxgate magnetometer experiment consists of two biaxial fluxgate sensors assemblies and an associated electronics system that is designed to measure fields up to 10 gauss along three orthogonal axes. It was used to provide a higher upper range than that provided by the helium vector magnetometer whose maximum measureable field is only 1.4 gauss. Observations of the intrinsic magnetic field of Saturn measured by the high-field fluxgate magnetometer were found to be much weaker than expected. An analysis of preliminary data combined with the preliminary trajectory yield a model for the main planetary field which is a simple centered dipole. It was determined that the polarity of Saturn is opposite that of Earth, and that the tilt is small, within 2 deg plus or minus 1 deg.

  1. Vector magnetic field observations of flux tube emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Aulanier, G.; Pariat, E.; Georgoulis, M. K.; Rust, D. M.; Bernasconi, P. N.

    2002-10-01

    With Flare Genesis Experiment (FGE), a balloon borne Observatory high spatial and temporal resolution vector magnetograms have been obtained in an emerging active region. The comparison of the observations (FGE and TRACE) with a linear force-free field analysis of the region shows where the region is non-force-free. An analysis of the magnetic topology furnishes insights into the existence of "bald patches" regions (BPs are regions where the vector field is tangential to the boundary (photosphere) along an inversion line). Magnetic reconnection is possible and local heating of the chromopshere is predicted near the BPs. Ellerman bombs (EBs) were found to coincide with few BPs computed from a linear force-free extrapolation of the observed longitudinal field. But when the actual observations of transverse fields were used to identify BPs, then the correspondence with EB positions improved significantly. We conclude that linear force-free extrapolations must be done with the true observed vertical fields, which require the measurement of the three components of the magnetic field.

  2. Cosmic microwave background observables of small field models of inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Dayan, Ido; Brustein, Ram E-mail: ramyb@bgu.ac.il

    2010-09-01

    We construct a class of single small field models of inflation that can predict, contrary to popular wisdom, an observable gravitational wave signal in the cosmic microwave background anisotropies. The spectral index, its running, the tensor to scalar ratio and the number of e-folds can cover all the parameter space currently allowed by cosmological observations. A unique feature of models in this class is their ability to predict a negative spectral index running in accordance with recent cosmic microwave background observations. We discuss the new class of models from an effective field theory perspective and show that if the dimensionless trilinear coupling is small, as required for consistency, then the observed spectral index running implies a high scale of inflation and hence an observable gravitational wave signal. All the models share a distinct prediction of higher power at smaller scales, making them easy targets for detection.

  3. Magnetic Fields Around the Heliosphere: Theory vs Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelov, Nikolai

    2016-07-01

    Voyager in situ measurements of the magnetic field around the heliosphere are the source of invaluable information about the interface between the solar wind (SW) and local interstellar medium (LISM). On the other hand, they are quite challenging for theoretical analysis unless accompanied by remote observations of neutral atoms the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) and Ulysses missions. Of particular interest is the fine structure of the heliopause due to its instability and possible magnetic reconnection. Both phenomena may have contributed to the remarkable changes in the galactic and anomalous cosmic ray fluxes observed by Voyager 1 within a one-month period of 2012 after which the spacecraft penetrated into the LISM. Draping of the heliopause by the interstellar magnetic field affects the position of the bright ribbon of enhanced ENA flux observed by IBEX on the celestial sphere and 2-3 kHz radio emission caused by shock propagation through the outer heliosheath observed by Voyager 1. Interstellar magnetic field determines the structure of the bow wave in front of the heliopause. Moreover, magnetic fields define the orientation and shape of the heliotail, the features of which have been observed by IBEX. Recent numerical simulations show that the details of the large-scale interstellar magnetic field modification caused by the presence of the heliotail may be the source of the observed 1-10 TeV cosmic ray anisotropy studied in detail in numerous air shower measurements around the world. In this paper, an overview will be given of the recent theoretical and simulations results describing the magnetic field distribution around the heliosphere. The objective of the talk is to connect observational and theoretical results, and outline challenges that are going to inspire the heliospheric community in the coming years.

  4. Magnetic Field Observations near Mercury: Preliminary Results from Mariner 10.

    PubMed

    Ness, N F; Behannon, K W; Lepping, R P; Whang, Y C; Schatten, K H

    1974-07-12

    Results are presented from a preliminary analysis of data obtained near Mercury on 29 March 1974 by the NASA-GSFC magnetic field experiment on Mariner 10. Rather unexpectedly, a very well-developed, detached bow shock wave, which develops as the super-Alfvénic solar wind interacts with the planet, has been observed. In addition, a magnetosphere-like region, with maximum field strength of 98 gammas at closest approach (704 kilometers altitude), has been observed, contained within boundaries similar to the terrestrial magnetopause. The obstacle deflecting the solar wind flow is global in size, but the origin of the enhanced magnetic field has not yet been uniquely established. The field may be intrinsic to the planet and distorted by interaction with the solar wind. It may also be associated with a complex induction process whereby the planetary interior-atmosphere-ionosphere interacts with the solar wind flow to generate the observed field by a dynamo action. The complete body of data favors the preliminary conclusion that Mercury has an intrinsic magnetic field. If this is correct, it represents a major scientific discovery in planetary magnetism and will have considerable impact on studies of the origin of the solar system. PMID:17810508

  5. Evolution of the dipole geomagnetic field. Observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnyak, M. Yu.; Pavlov, V. E.

    2016-01-01

    The works on paleomagnetic observations of the dipole geomagnetic field, its variations, and reversals in the last 3.5 billion years have been reviewed. It was noted that characteristic field variations are related to the evolution of the convection processes in the liquid core due to the effect of magnetic convection and solid core growth. Works on the geochemistry and energy budget of the Earth's core, the effect of the solid core on convection and the generation of the magnetic field, dynamo models are also considered. We consider how core growth affects the magnetic dipole generation and variations, as well as the possibility of magnetic field generation up to the appearance of the solid core. We also pay attention to the fact that not only the magnetic field but also its configuration and time variations, which are caused by the convection evolution in the core on geological timescales, are important factors for the biosphere.

  6. Training field workers to observe hygiene-related behaviour.

    PubMed

    Oladepo, O; Oyejide, C O; Oke, E A

    1991-01-01

    A study is reported from Nigeria on the training of field workers in the making of structured observations on hygiene-related behaviour with a view to improving the control of diarrhoeal diseases. The programme led to a high degree of consistency in the perception and description of such behaviour by the participants. PMID:1821119

  7. Observations of ionospheric electric fields above atmospheric weather systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, W.M.; Aggson, T.L.; Rodgers, E.B.

    1994-10-01

    The authors report on the observations of a number of quasi-dc electric field events associated with large-scale atmospheric weather formations. The observations were made by the electric field experiment onboard the San Marco D satellite, operational in an equatorial orbit from May to December 1988. Several theoretical studies suggest that electric fields generated by thunderstorms are present at high altitudes in the ionosphere. In spite of such favorable predictions, weather-related events are not often observed since they are relatively weak. The authors report here on a set of likely E field candidates for atmosphere-ionosphere causality, these being observed over the Indonesian Basin, northern South America, and the west coast of Africa; all known sites of atmospheric activity. As they demonstrate, individual events can often be traced to specific active weather features. For example, a number of events were associated with spacecraft passages near Hurricane Joan in mid-October 1988. As a statistical set, the events appear to coincide with the most active regions of atmospheric weather. 31 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Screwworm ecology from field observations to satellite imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Screwworm fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), in its larval stage is a parasite of warm-blooded animals. Screwworm has been successfully eradicated from the United Sates and Central America using the sterile insect technique. Here we present how the field observations o...

  9. Implications of observing and writing field notes through different lenses

    PubMed Central

    Hellesø, Ragnhild; Melby, Line; Hauge, Solveig

    2015-01-01

    Background From a philosophy of science perspective, the literature has posited that different research approaches influence field studies. Studies addressing interdisciplinary research have focused on the challenges of organizing and running interdisciplinary teams, cultural differences between and within disciplines, and constraints in conducting interdisciplinary research. Studies exploring and discussing the process and outcome of transferring observations to notes from an interdisciplinary point of view are not identified. The aim of this paper is to explore the characteristics of field notes created by researchers representing different disciplines and experiences. Methods A case study using a modified dynamic observation method was employed. The analyses were initiated by a researcher who had not been involved in the data collection. The field notes were analyzed using three main steps. Results The structures of both researchers’ field notes were characterized by similarities in their descriptions, but the notes’ foci and analytical levels differed. Conclusion The findings contribute new insights concerning the execution of interdisciplinary observational studies. Our findings demonstrate that entering the field with different lenses produced richer and more varied data, providing a broader platform from which to discuss and interpret a study’s findings. From a theoretical point of view, the findings enable a more nuanced discussion and a conceptual elaboration regarding how observational approaches should be pursued in future studies. On a practical level, the findings show that even if the researchers agree on what the overall focus in the observations should be, differences can occur in both their focus and analytical level throughout the study. PMID:25914543

  10. ACS Flat Field Corrections from Observations of 47 Tucanae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, J.; Bohlin, R. C.; Gilliland, R. L.; van der Marel, R.; Blakeslee, J. P.; de Marchi, G.

    2002-12-01

    The uniformity of the WFC and HRC detector response has been assessed using multiple dithered pointings of 47 Tucanae. By placing the same stars over different portions of the detector and measuring relative changes in brightness, low frequency spatial variations in the response of each detector have been measured. The original WFC and HRC laboratory flat fields produce photometric errors of 5 to 18 percent from corner-to-corner. The required low-order correction (L-flat) has been applied to the lab flats, and new flat fields have been delivered for use in the calibration pipeline. Initial results suggest the photometric response for a given star is now the same to 1 for any position in the field of view. As a further test, the improved flat fields are compared with observations of the bright earth at UV wavelengths (F330W) and with skyflats from ERO data at long wavelengths (F775W).

  11. Observations of magnetic field dipolarization during auroral substorm onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Sigwarth, J. B.; Kokubun, S.

    2000-07-01

    The dynamical behavior of plasmas and magnetic fields in the vicinity of the equatorial crossing of magnetic field lines threading the onset auroral arc is examined for two substorms on November 26, 1997. The locations of the initial brightenings of the auroral arcs were determined with the cameras for visible and far-ultraviolet wavelengths on board the Polar spacecraft. The equatorial positions of the field lines were in the range of radial distances of 8-12RE as computed with models of Earth's global magnetic field. The radial distance of the Geotail spacecraft was 14 RE at a position in the premidnight sector that was 2RE below the current sheet. This spacecraft was embedded in a low-β plasma that was located adjacent to the central hot plasma sheet. For the first substorm, with onset at 1310 UT, no substantial effect was observed in the plasmas and magnetic fields, although the Geotail spacecraft was located only about 2 hours in magnetic local time from the field lines threading the onset auroral arc. For the second substorm onset, at 1354 UT, the spacecraft was positioned within tens of minutes in local time of the position of the magnetic field lines threading the onset auroral arc. This fortuitous spacecraft position in the relatively quiescent plasma and magnetic fields adjacent to the central plasma sheet and within several Earth radii of the position of the onset mechanism allowed determination of the beginning time of the dipolarization of the magnetic fields. This time was simultaneous with the onset brightening of the auroral arc within the approximately 1-min time resolution of the auroral images. The simultaneity of the initial brightening of the auroral arc and of the initiation of the dipolarization of the magnetic field, presumably due to diversion of current from the equatorial current sheet to the ionosphere, provides an important guideline for global dynamical MHD models of Earth's magnetosphere.

  12. THE 2012 HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD (UDF12): OBSERVATIONAL OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Koekemoer, Anton M.; Ellis, Richard S.; Schenker, Matthew A.; McLure, Ross J.; Dunlop, James S.; Bowler, Rebecca A. A.; Rogers, Alexander B.; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Cirasuolo, Michele; Wild, V.; Targett, T.; Robertson, Brant E.; Schneider, Evan; Stark, Daniel P.; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Charlot, Stephane; Furlanetto, Steven R.

    2013-11-01

    We present the 2012 Hubble Ultra Deep Field campaign (UDF12), a large 128 orbit Cycle 19 Hubble Space Telescope program aimed at extending previous Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3)/IR observations of the UDF by quadrupling the exposure time in the F105W filter, imaging in an additional F140W filter, and extending the F160W exposure time by 50%, as well as adding an extremely deep parallel field with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) in the F814W filter with a total exposure time of 128 orbits. The principal scientific goal of this project is to determine whether galaxies reionized the universe; our observations are designed to provide a robust determination of the star formation density at z ∼> 8, improve measurements of the ultraviolet continuum slope at z ∼ 7-8, facilitate the construction of new samples of z ∼ 9-10 candidates, and enable the detection of sources up to z ∼ 12. For this project we committed to combining these and other WFC3/IR imaging observations of the UDF area into a single homogeneous dataset to provide the deepest near-infrared observations of the sky. In this paper we present the observational overview of the project and describe the procedures used in reducing the data as well as the final products that were produced. We present the details of several special procedures that we implemented to correct calibration issues in the data for both the WFC3/IR observations of the main UDF field and our deep 128 orbit ACS/WFC F814W parallel field image, including treatment for persistence, correction for time-variable sky backgrounds, and astrometric alignment to an accuracy of a few milliarcseconds. We release the full, combined mosaics comprising a single, unified set of mosaics of the UDF, providing the deepest near-infrared blank-field view of the universe currently achievable, reaching magnitudes as deep as AB ∼ 30 mag in the near-infrared, and yielding a legacy dataset on this field.

  13. Possible observation of the isotope effect during field evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, O. L.; Blashenkov, N. M.

    2016-01-01

    The field evaporation of tungsten at high temperatures (T ~ 2000 K) has been studied using a magnetic mass spectrometer equipped with a field ion source. Only low-charge ions (W+2 and W+) have been observed in the course of evaporation for all tungsten isotopes. For singly charged ions only, the number of ions of the heaviest isotope, 186W+, was about one order of magnitude lower than that corresponding to the standard isotope ratio for natural tungsten. An explanation of this anomalous phenomenon is proposed.

  14. Recent Geodynamo Simulations and Observations of the Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Masaru; Roberts, Paul H.

    2002-12-01

    In 1995, two groups [, 1995; , 1995a, 1995b] reported results of numerical integrations of fully three-dimensional, fully nonlinear dynamos. Their papers were precursors of a stream of such models that have focused particularly on the geodynamo. They provide us, in unprecedented detail, with spectacular realizations of interesting geomagnetic field behaviors, such as secular variation and even polarity reversals. The proliferation of models has, however, created some confusion and apparently conflicting results. This can be partly attributed to the different ways in which different groups have modeled the core, normalized their equations, defined their dimensionless parameters, chosen their boundary conditions, and selected their energy sources. This has made it difficult to compare the results of different simulations directly. In this paper, we first try, as far as possible, to overcome this difficulty, so that all reported results can be compared on common ground. We then review the results, emphasizing three major topics: (1) onset and evolution of convection, (2) character of the magnetic field generated, and (3) comparison with the observed geomagnetic field. Although there are large differences in the way that the simulations are defined, the magnetic fields that they generate have some surprising similarities. The fields are dominated by the axial dipole. In some models they are most strongly generated in shear layers near the upper and lower boundaries and near the tangent cylinder, an imaginary surface touching the inner core on its equator. Convection rolls occur within which a type of the α effect distorts the toroidal field lines to create poloidal magnetic field. Some features of the models are found to strongly affect the fields that they produce. In particular, the boundary conditions defining the energy flow (e.g., an inhomogeneous heat flux or distribution of buoyancy sources) are very influential and have been extensively studied. They change

  15. An improved proton magnetometer for Earth's magnetic field observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chengyu; Zhang, Shuang; Guo, Xin; Fu, Haoyang

    2015-09-01

    As a precision instrument to measure the earth magnetic field, proton magnetometer is widely used in different fields such as geological survey, buried objects detection and earth field variations. Due to poor signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the system, proton magnetometer suffers from low sensitivity which directly affects the performance. In order to increase the sensitivity, we present an improved proton magnetometer. First, the effect of matching resistance on Q value is discussed to enhance SNR, and high matching resistance has been chosen to improve the Q value of the resonant circuit. Second, noise induced by pre-amplifier is investigated in order to obtain low noise signal, and we adopt the JFET with noise figure less than 0.5dB as the pre-amplifier. Third, by using band-pass filter, low-noise output signal is obtained. Fourth, the method of period measurement based on CPLD is employed to measure frequency of the square wave shaped from the output sinusoidal signal. High precision temperature compensate crystal oscillator (TCXO) has been used to improve the frequency measurement accuracy. Last, experimental data is obtained through field measurements. By calculating the standard deviation, the sensitivity of the improved proton magnetometer is 0.15nT for Earth's magnetic field observation. Experimental results show that the new magnetometer is sensitive to earth field measurement.

  16. Observation of Field-Emission Dependence on Stored Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Jiahang; Antipov, Sergey P.; Baryshev, Sergey V.; Chen, Huaibi; Conde, Manoel; Doran, Darrell S.; Gai, Wei; Jing, Chunguang; Liu, Wanming; Power, John; Qiu, Jiaqi; Shi, Jiaru; Wang, Dan; Wang, Faya; Whiteford, Charles E.; Wisniewski, Eric; Xiao, Liling

    2015-12-01

    Field emission from a solid metal surface has been continuously studied for a century over macroscopic to atomic scales. It is general knowledge that, other than the surface properties, the emitted current is governed solely by the applied electric field. A pin cathode has been used to study the dependence of field emission on stored energy in an L -band rf gun. The stored energy was changed by adjusting the axial position (distance between the cathode base and the gun back surface) of the cathode while the applied electric field on the cathode tip is kept constant. A very strong correlation of the field-emission current with the stored energy has been observed. While eliminating all possible interfering sources, an enhancement of the current by a factor of 5 was obtained as the stored energy was increased by a factor of 3. It implies that under certain circumstances a localized field emission may be significantly altered by the global parameters in a system.

  17. Observation of Field-Emission Dependence on Stored Energy.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jiahang; Antipov, Sergey P; Baryshev, Sergey V; Chen, Huaibi; Conde, Manoel; Doran, Darrell S; Gai, Wei; Jing, Chunguang; Liu, Wanming; Power, John; Qiu, Jiaqi; Shi, Jiaru; Wang, Dan; Wang, Faya; Whiteford, Charles E; Wisniewski, Eric; Xiao, Liling

    2015-12-31

    Field emission from a solid metal surface has been continuously studied for a century over macroscopic to atomic scales. It is general knowledge that, other than the surface properties, the emitted current is governed solely by the applied electric field. A pin cathode has been used to study the dependence of field emission on stored energy in an L-band rf gun. The stored energy was changed by adjusting the axial position (distance between the cathode base and the gun back surface) of the cathode while the applied electric field on the cathode tip is kept constant. A very strong correlation of the field-emission current with the stored energy has been observed. While eliminating all possible interfering sources, an enhancement of the current by a factor of 5 was obtained as the stored energy was increased by a factor of 3. It implies that under certain circumstances a localized field emission may be significantly altered by the global parameters in a system. PMID:26764996

  18. Observations of magnetic fields on solar-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcy, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    Magnetic-field observations were carried out for 29 G and K main-sequence stars. The area covering-factors of magnetic regions tends to be greater in the K dwarfs than in the G dwarfs. However, no spectral-type dependence is found for the field strengths, contrary to predictions that pressure equilibrium with the ambient photospheric gas pressure would determine the surface field strengths. Coronal soft X-ray fluxes from the G and K dwarfs correlate well with the fraction of the stellar surface covered by magnetic regions. The dependence of coronal soft X-ray fluxes on photospheric field strengths is consistent with Stein's predicted generation-rates for Alfven waves. These dependences are inconsistent with the one dynamo model for which a specific prediction is offered. Finally, time variability of magnetic fields is seen on the two active stars that have been extensively monitored. Significant changes in magnetic fields are seen to occur on timescales as short as one day.

  19. Probing the Earth's core with magnetic field observations from Swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, Christopher; Olsen, Nils; Kotsiaros, Stavros; Gillet, Nicolas; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    By far the largest part of the Earth's magnetic field is generated by motions taking place within our planet's liquid metal outer core. Variations of this core-generated field thus provide a unique means of probing the dynamics taking place in the deepest reaches of the Earth. In this contribution we present a new high resolution model of the core-generated magnetic field, and its recent time changes, derived from a dataset that includes more two years of observations from the Swarm mission. Resulting inferences regarding the underlying core flow, its dynamics, and the nature of the geodynamo process will be discussed. The CHAOS-6 geomagnetic field model, covering the interval 1999-2016, is derived from magnetic data collected by the three Swarm missions, as well as the earlier CHAMP and Oersted satellites, and monthly means data collected from 160 ground observatories. Advantage is taken of the constellation aspect of the Swarm mission by ingesting both scalar and vector field differences along-track and across track between the lower pair of Swarm satellites. The internal part of the model consists of a spherical harmonic (SH) expansion, time-dependent for degrees 20 and below. The model coefficients are estimated using a regularized, iteratively reweighted, least squares scheme involving Huber weights. At Earth's surface, CHAOS-6 shows evidence for positive acceleration of the field intensity in 2015 over a broad area around longitude 90deg E that is also seen at ground observatories such as Novosibirsk. At the core surface, we are able to map the secular variation (linear trend in the magnetic field) up to SH degree 16. The radial field acceleration at the core surface in 2015 is found be largest at low latitudes under the India-South East Asia region and under the region of northern South America, as well as at high northern latitudes under Alaska and Siberia. Surprisingly, there is also evidence for some acceleration in the central Pacific region, for example

  20. Mapping the Frontier Fields with Chandra X-ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Christine

    2015-08-01

    Chandra has observed both the clusters and the parallel fields in four of the Frontier Fields. These observations allow us to dramatically improve our understanding of cluster mergers through the detailed mapping of the hot cluster gas compared with high resolution mass maps and, by mapping the gas temperature and pressure, identify merger shocks. A comparison of the lensing maps and the Chandra images allows us to identify subclusters and determine if these have been stripped of their hot gas. In addition the HST images show unusual galaxies (e.g. jellyfish) whose morphologies may have resulted from interactions with the hot intracluster medium. Finally, we will report on any close pairs of AGN, which are candidates for gravitationally lensed QSOs.

  1. Plasma and field observations of a Pc 5 wave event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, J. H.; Gallagher, D. L.; Chappell, C. R.; Chandler, M. O.; Olsen, R. C.; Comfort, R. H.; Johnson, J. F. E.; Peterson, W. K.; Weimer, D.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    The particle detector and electric field data collected by the Dynamo Explorer 1 on the Pc 5 wave event encounter on July 14, 1982 are presented, yielding a nearly complete picture of the event. The overall structure of the Pc 5 seems to order the event into two distinct halves, suggesting a temporal or spatial variation of the micropulsation. Thermal plasma measurements showed that the dominant ion throughout both lobes was H(+). Significant quantities of He(+), O(+), N(+), and O(2+) were also observed to be present and rotating together in a plane normal to the magnetic field direction, due to the Pc5 E x B drift. The plasma parameters determined for the two lobes were used in theoretical calculations to predict the period of the observed resonance.

  2. Venus Express observations of magnetic field fluctuations in the magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Wang, C.; Zhang, T. L.; Volwerk, M.; Delva, M.; Baumjohann, W.

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic field fluctuations within a planetary magnetosheath play an important role in the solar wind interaction with the planet, since they can reconfigure the plasma flow and the magnetic field and transfer energy from the bow shock to the lower boundary. Many studies have been presented on the fluctuations in the terrestrial magnetosheath; however, hardly any studies have so far been carried out for Venusian magnetosheath fluctuations, except for Luhmann et al. [1983] and Vörös et al. [2008] who performed some case studies on the magnetosheath fluctuations at Venus. It was shown that the fluctuations are probably convected from the vicinity of the quasi-parallel bow shock along the streamlines. Based on the Venus Express observations in 2006 and 2007, we investigate the spatial distributions of magnetic field fluctuations in the Venus magnetosheath statistically.

  3. Magnetospheric observation of large sub-auroral electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Aggson, T. L.; Heppner, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    An example of large subauroral poleward electric fields similar to those observed on OGO-6, S3-2 and AE-C (SAID) has been found in the magnetosphere near L = 4 and 2300 MLT using ISEE-1 electric field data. The event is located adjacent to and outside the plasmapause and occurs 1 1/2 hours into a substorm. The event is accompaned by a significant penetration of the convection electric field inside the plasmasphere. Data from similar regions on the next orbit occurring near the beginning of a substorm did not exhibit these effects. Recent theoretical models predict SAID to occur in the trough regions, where substorm dynamics force currents to flow in regions of low conductivity. These models provide a first-order interpretation of this phenomena; however, the overal picture is more complex.

  4. MESSENGER observations of induced magnetic fields in Mercury's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Catherine L.; Philpott, Lydia C.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Hauck, Steven A.; Heyner, Daniel; Phillips, Roger J.; Winslow, Reka M.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-03-01

    Orbital data from the Magnetometer on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft allow investigation of magnetic fields induced at the top of Mercury's core by time-varying magnetospheric fields. We used 15 Mercury years of observations of the magnetopause position as well as the magnetic field inside the magnetosphere to establish the presence and magnitude of an annual induction signal. Our results indicate an annual change in the internal axial dipole term, g10, of 7.5 to 9.5 nT. For negligible mantle conductivity, the average annual induction signal provides an estimate of Mercury's core radius to within ±90 km, independent of geodetic results. Larger induction signals during extreme events are expected but are challenging to identify because of reconnection-driven erosion. Our results indicate that the magnetopause reaches the dayside planetary surface 1.5-4% of the time.

  5. The magnetic field of Mercury. [Mariner 10 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.

    1979-01-01

    Data from Mariner 10 observations of Mercury indicate that there exists an intrinsic magnetic field of the planet, sufficiently strong at present to deflect the solar wind flow around the planet and to form a detached bow shock wave in the super Alfvenic solar wind. Four methods used to analyze the magnetic field data and derive quantitative values for the description of the planetary field include (1) comparison of bow shock and magnetopause relative positions at Mercury to those at Earth; (2) direct spherical harmonic analysis of the data; (3) modeling of the magnetosphere by an image dipole and infinite 2-D current sheet in addition to the planetary field; and (4) scaling of a mathematical model for the terrestrial magnetosphere. The results obtained yield dipole moments ranging from 2.4 to 5.1x10 to the 22d power, with the lower values associated cw cm with certain models using partial quadrupole and octupole terms to improve the least squares fitting of models to observations.

  6. Net field-aligned currents observed by Triad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.; Potemra, T. A.

    1975-01-01

    From the Triad magnetometer observation of a step-like level shift in the east-west component of the magnetic field at 800 km altitude, the existence of a net current flowing into or away from the ionosphere in a current layer was inferred. The current direction is toward the ionosphere on the morning side and away from it on the afternoon side. The field aligned currents observed by Triad are considered as being an important element in the electro-dynamical coupling between the distant magnetosphere and the ionosphere. The current density integrated over the thickness of the layer increases with increasing magnetic activity, but the relation between the current density and Kp in individual cases is not a simple linear relation. An extrapolation of the statistical relation to Kp = 0 indicates existence of a sheet current of order 0.1 amp/m even at extremely quiet times. During periods of higher magnetic activity an integrated current of approximately 1 amp/m and average current density of order 0.000001 amp/sq m are observed. The location and the latitudinal width of the field aligned current layer carrying the net current very roughly agree with those of the region of high electron intensities in the trapping boundary.

  7. Magnetic fields in star-forming regions - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiles, Carl; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Mckee, Christopher F.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1993-01-01

    We review the observational aspects of magnetic fields in dense, star-forming regions. First we discuss ways to observe the field. These include direct methods, which consist of the measurement of both linear and circular polarization of spectral line and continuum radiation; and indirect methods, consisting of the angular distribution of H2O masers on the sky and the measurement of ambipolar diffusion. Next we discuss selected observational results, focusing on detailed discussions of a small number of points rather than a generalized discussion that covers the waterfront. We discuss the Orion/BN-KL region in detail, both on the small and large scales. Next we discuss the derivation of the complete magnetic vector, including both the systematic and fluctuating component, from a large sample of Zeeman and linear polarization measurements for the L204 dark cloud. We examine the virial theorem as it applies to dark clouds in general and one dark cloud, Barnard 1, in particular. We critically discuss the numerous claims for alignment of cloud structural features with the plane-of-the-sky component of the magnetic field, and find that many of these have not been definitively established.

  8. Model Jerks: Insights from Observations and Synthetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, William; Mound, Jonathan; Livermore, Philip; Gillet, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    The geomagnetic field is generated by the constant motion of the fluid outer core and varies on timescales from months to millions of years. Geomagnetic jerks are rapid changes in the secular variation of Earth's magnetic field, attributed primarily to changing flows near the surface of the outer core. Various generation mechanisms have been suggested for these rapid changes but none have conclusively explained the phenomena. Jerks can be seen in magnetic observatory records over the last 170 years and in satellite data of the last 15 years. This data coverage, spatially limited and/or temporally restricted, makes it difficult to interpret the true character of jerks at the surface or their origins in the core. This leads us to investigate what further insight we can gain from synthetic magnetic fields such as those which are described by modelling stochastic processes. Such fields are not restricted by the temporal smoothing of most magnetic field models and can better represent rapid variations such as jerks. We compare the characteristics of the synthetic fields with those of observatory and satellite data and hence, finding great similarity, study the presence of jerks in stochastic synthetic fields. Synthetic jerks are seen which resemble observed jerks, occurring frequently with regional periodic variations in amplitudes. These synthetic jerks occur without related features in the large scale secular acceleration power at the core-mantle boundary. The flexible spatial and temporal sampling of the models creates a means of validating the robustness of observed features in the real field, which suffer from limited sampling. Results suggest that the distribution of magnetic observatories is sufficient to accurately recover the large scale features of jerks. As such comparisons between jerks seen in observatory and satellite data may be drawn. We further investigate the spectral properties of jerks in the synthetic fields using spherical harmonic analysis with a

  9. Cosmological observables in multi-field inflation with a non-flat field space

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xin; Li, Tianjun; Shukla, Pramod E-mail: tli@itp.ac.cn

    2014-10-01

    Using δN formalism, in the context of a generic multi-field inflation driven on a non-flat field space background, we revisit the analytic expressions of the various cosmological observables such as scalar/tensor power spectra, scalar/tensor spectral tilts, non-Gaussianity parameters, tensor-to-scalar ratio, and the various runnings of these observables. In our backward formalism approach, the subsequent expressions of observables automatically include the terms beyond the leading order slow-roll expansion correcting many of the expression at subleading order. To connect our analysis properly with the earlier results, we rederive the (well) known (single field) expressions in the limiting cases of our generic formulae. Further, in the light of PLANCK results, we examine for the compatibility of the consistency relations within the slow-roll regime of a two-field roulette poly-instanton inflation realized in the context of large volume scenarios.

  10. Evolution of Auroral Electric Fields Observed By Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marklund, G.; Cluster Auroral Team

    Cluster observations on nightside auroral field lines are used to study the existence and temporal evolution of quasi-static electric field structures on time scales of min- utes. Results are presented for two events characterized by intense and narrow-scale divergent electric fields. These were encountered at the boundary between the Cen- tral Plasma Sheet and the Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer associated with a large-scale plasma density gradient and a downward field-aligned current. The structures main- tain their bipolar shape but increase in magnitude and width between the crossings by the four spacecraft, each separated by a few minutes in a plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. The perpendicular electric potential calculated for the first event in- creased for about 200 s, following closely the increase in the characteristic energy of the upgoing electron beam. At the time of the last satellite crossing the structure had faded, the energy of the beam was much reduced, and the downward current, main- taining a constant total value throughout the Cluster crossings, was distributed over a much wider region than initially. In this way access was given to a wide collection area of return current electrons. For the other event, the electric field increase was accompanied by a deepening of a density cavity superposed on a larger scale density gradient and a downward field-aligned current that remained roughly constant during the crossings. The divergent structures are likely to represent the high-altitude exten- sion of quasi-static positive potential structures developing on a time scale of several hundred seconds which is comparable to the evacuation time for the return current electrons in the E- and lower F-region. The evolving potential structure and associated hole formation represent a growing load in the return current leg of the auroral current circuit with possible direct impact on the aurora.

  11. Observations of field-aligned density microstructure near the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grall, R. R.; Coles, W. A.; Spangler, S. R.; Sakurai, T.; Harmon, J. K.

    1997-01-01

    Radio scattering observations made with multiple antennas provide a direct measure of the two-dimensional microstructure of the solar wind. Previous multiple antenna observations have shown that the microstructure at scales of the order of 10 km becomes highly field-aligned inside of 6 RS [e.g., Armstrong et al., 1990]. Single antenna observations, which can measure only a radial cut through the microstructure, have shown that scales larger than 1000 km have a Kolmogorov spectrum, whereas the smaller-scale structure has a flatter spectrum and is considerably enhanced above the Kolmogorov ``background'' [e.g., Coles et al., 1991]. Here we present new multiple antenna ``angular broadening'' observations made in 1990 and 1992. These confirm that the microstructure is highly field-aligned near the Sun, they show that it has elliptical symmetry, and they show that the axial ratio changes quite abruptly near 6 RS. We also present simultaneous measurements at 9 RS of the anisotropy on scales of 1 to 30 km and on scales of 200 to 3000 km. Significant anisotropy was seen on the smaller scales but not on the larger scales. This suggests that the process responsible for the anisotropic microstructure is distinct from the larger-scale, more isotropic structure.

  12. Direct observation of the field-stimulated exoemission sites at tungsten surfaces using field ion microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiota, T.; Umeno, M.; Dohkuni, K.; Tagawa, M.; Ohmae, N.

    2001-05-01

    The spatial distribution of the field-stimulated exoemission (FSEE) from the W tip surface annealed at 800 K for 600 s and the atomic arrangement of the emitting surface were correlated using field ion microscopy (FIM) and field emission microscopy. The FSEE was observed at around the (111) plane of the annealed W tip surface. FIM observation of the annealed W tip revealed the existence of a pyramid-like protrusion at the W(111) surface. From these experimental results, a new emission model of the FSEE was proposed relating to the field-assisted surface structural change. This model deals with the buildup/collapse of the pyramid-like protrusion at the W(111) surface under the effect of negative high electric field. The temperature dependence of the FSEE reported previously [Shiota et al., J. Appl. Phys. 85, 6811 (1999)] was qualitatively explained by this emission model.

  13. Coronal Magnetic Field Measurement Using CME-Driven Shock Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswarmy, Nat; Nitta, N.; Yashiro, S.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.; Akiyama, S.

    2012-01-01

    Collisionless shocks form ahead of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) when the CME speed exceeds the Alfven speed of the ambient plasma in the corona and interplanetary medium. The shock stands at a distance from the CME flux rope that depends on the shock Mach number, the geometry of the driver, and the adiabatic index. While the shock ahead of the CME has been observed for a long time in the in situ data, it has been identified recently near the Sun in the coronagraphic and EUV images. Unlike in situ observations, the imaging observations are two dimensional, so one can better discern the CME-shock relationship near the Sun. Gopalswamy and Yashiro demonstrated that the coronal magnetic field can be derived from the shock standoff distance measured in coronagraphic images. The method involves measuring the standoff distance, the radius of curvature of the flux rope, and assuming the value of the adiabatic index and deriving the Alfvenic Mach number. The next step is to derive the Alfvenic Mach number from the measured shock speed and an estimate of the local solar wind speed. The final step involves deriving the magnetic field from the Alfven speed by measuring the local plasma density either from coronagraphic (polarized brightness) images or from the band-splitting of type II radio bursts. In this paper, we derive the combined magnetic field profile from near the Sun to the edge of the LASCO field of view (1.5 to 30 solar radii) and compare it with the current model profiles.

  14. DMD-based programmable wide field spectrograph for Earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamkotsian, Frédéric; Lanzoni, Patrick; Liotard, Arnaud; Viard, Thierry; Costes, Vincent; Hébert, Philippe-Jean

    2015-03-01

    In Earth Observation, Universe Observation and Planet Exploration, scientific return could be optimized in future missions using MOEMS devices. In Earth Observation, we propose an innovative reconfigurable instrument, a programmable wide-field spectrograph where both the FOV and the spectrum could be tailored thanks to a 2D micromirror array (MMA). For a linear 1D field of view (FOV), the principle is to use a MMA to select the wavelengths by acting on intensity. This component is placed in the focal plane of a first grating. On the MMA surface, the spatial dimension is along one side of the device and for each spatial point, its spectrum is displayed along the perpendicular direction: each spatial and spectral feature of the 1D FOV is then fully adjustable dynamically and/or programmable. A second stage with an identical grating recomposes the beam after wavelengths selection, leading to an output tailored 1D image. A mock-up has been designed, fabricated and tested. The micromirror array is the largest DMD in 2048 x 1080 mirrors format, with a pitch of 13.68μm. A synthetic linear FOV is generated and typical images have been recorded o at the output focal plane of the instrument. By tailoring the DMD, we could modify successfully each pixel of the input image: for example, it is possible to remove bright objects or, for each spatial pixel, modify the spectral signature. The very promising results obtained on the mock-up of the programmable wide-field spectrograph reveal the efficiency of this new instrument concept for Earth Observation.

  15. Observational Features of Magnetotail Open Field Line Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Z.; Mishin, V.; Zhang, H.; Cao, X.; Fu, S.; Xiao, C.; Liu, Z.; Zong, Q.; Wang, X.; Ma, Z.; Lucek, E.; Reme, H.; Dunlop, M.; Escoubet, P.

    2006-12-01

    In the substorm NENL model (McPherron 1991, Baker et al. 1996) and the global synthesis paradigm (Pu et al. 1999, 2001), tail lobe reconnection (TLR) of open field lines is responsible for releasing magnetic energy in the tail to cause the major onset of a number of substorms. Study of the features of TLR in observations is thus of particular interest. This paper reports case studies of a few typical TLR events and statistical results of 39 events observed by Cluster from 2001 to 2003. To show the observational features of TLR, measurements of the magnetic field (B), plasma bulk velocity (V), temperature (T) and number density (N) onboard Cluster four spacecraft are analyzed, in comparison with the data from the world network of the ground-based magnetometers, with the usage of the magnetogram inversion technique MIT-2 (Mishin, 1991). In each event studied MR can be divided into two stages: foregoing plasma sheet MR (PSR) of closed field lines and following TLR. During PSR, the open flux in polar cap ? is continuously accumulated, and T and N remain essentially the same as in the plasma sheet, if spacecraft are not in the center of the plasma sheet. On the other hand, during TLR ? rapidly reduces, and T and N drop off to the level as low as in the lobes. It is seen that the ? starts to decrease almost simultaneously with the appearance of the TLR signatures in Cluster measurements. Quite often TLR occurs quasi-periodically with a period being approximately 2-3 hours. A comparison of observations with simulations is made to get better understanding of the TLR process. *This work is supported by the CNSF Project 40390152, 40536030 and Chinese Fundamental Research Project 2006CB806300.

  16. Field observations of a debris flow event in the Dolomites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berti, Matteo; Genevois, Rinaldo; Simoni, Alessandro; Tecca, Pia Rosella

    1999-09-01

    A debris flow event occurred in June 1997 in the Dolomites (Eastern Alps, Italy). The phenomenon was directly observed in the field and recorded by a video camera near its initiation area. The debris flow originated shortly after an intense rainstorm (25 mm in 30 min) whose runoff mobilised the loose coarse debris that filled the bottom of the channel in its upper part. The analysis of the steep headwater basin indicates a very short concentration time (9-14 min) that fits the quick hydrological response observed in the field. The debris flow mobilisation was not contemporaneous with the arrival of the peak water discharge in the initiation area probably due to the time required for the saturation of the highly conductive channel-bed material. Channel cross-section measurements taken along the flow channel indicate debris flow peak velocity and discharge ranging from 3.1 to 9.0 m/s and from 23 to 71 m 3/s, respectively. Samples collected immediately after deposition were used to determine the water content and bulk density of the material. Channel scouring, fines enrichment and transported volume increase testify erosion and entrainment of material along the flow channel. Field estimates of the rheological properties based on open channel flow of Bingham fluid indicate a yield strength of 5000±400 Pa and relatively low viscosity (60-326 Pa s), probably due to a high percentage of fines (approx. 30%).

  17. Electric earthquake precursors: from laboratory results to field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallianatos, Filippos; Triantis, Dimos; Tzanis, Andreas; Anastasiadis, Cimon; Stavrakas, Ilias

    The generation of transient electric potential prior to rupture has been demonstrated in a number of laboratory experiments involving both dry and wet rock specimens. Several different electrification effects are responsible for these observations, however, piezoelectricity cannot explain why quartz-free rocks can also generate precursory phenomena and electrokinetic phenomena are normally very weak to produce macro- and megascopic scale effects. Electrification is observed in dry, non-piezoelectric rocks meaning that additional, solid state mechanisms should be responsible. Herein we focus on a promising effect that is ubiquitous during brittle rock failure: the motion of charged edge dislocations (MCD) during crack opening and propagation (microfracturing). We report a series of laboratory experiments on dry marble samples and discuss their possible relationship to field observations of purported electric earthquake precursors (EEP). The experiments confirm the generation of pressure-stimulated currents (PSC) as expected by the MCD model. The PSC was linearly related to the stress rate, so long as the stressed material deformed elastically. Deviation from linearity arose when the applied stress drove the specimen into the plastic deformation range; this effect has been attributed to the dependence of the PSC on the stress rate and, ultimately, to the inverse of the changing (decreasing) Young's modulus. The emitted current appears very intense and non-linear just prior to failure, where massive crack propagation implies massive MCD processes. Repeated cycles of deformation are associated with progressively weaker current emission, indicating the strong dependence of electrification on the residual damage. Overall, the results are consistent with, and render support to the concept of electrification by MCD/microfracturing. Other mechanisms cannot be excluded of course but are rather considered to accompany and supplement the drastic MCD process. The experiments

  18. Observation of anomalous field penetration in collisional, cylindrical ICP discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, John D.; Chen, Francis F.; Arnush, Donald

    2000-10-01

    Measurements of the radial penetration of RF-generated B-fields are performed in a large diameter cylindrical ICP. A loop antenna surrounds a dome-shaped Pyrex top that sits on top of a magnetic bucket. Rtop=15cm height of top, Rbucket 18cm, bucket height 30cm, N 1011cm-3, Te 3eV, Prf < 1.4kW, Frf = 2-27.12MHz, Po 1-100mT. Field penetration (``skin") depths Lsd are measured in the outer plasma region (r > R/2) that are consistent with collisional skin depth theory. However, in the interior region (r < R/2), non-monotonic radial profiles and interference phenomena that resemble standing wave behavior (e.g. nodes) are observed, where no propagating waves are predicted to occur. Similar phenomena have been observed by other groups [1], but for chambers sizes such that R Lsd. Such observations were explained as manifestations of the anomalous skin effect (ASE), the electromagnetic analog of Debye shielding. However, these phenomena are more apparent as Po (and collisionality) is increased, in apparent contradiction to the predictions of ASE theory. Results of a detailed experimental investigation of interference phenomena under conditions that fall outside of the ASE regime will be presented, as well as a simple physical picture that resolves this apparent paradox. [1]. B. Joye and H. Schneider, Helv. Phys. Acta 51, 804 (1978).

  19. Swarm Observations of Field-Aligned Currents: Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Stolle, C.; Luhr, H.; Park, J.; Rauberg, J.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we report the results of a few case studies of multi-point magnetic field measurements of field-aligned currents (FACs) from Swarm constellation mission to understand their temporal and spatial characteristics. During the commissioning phase, the three Swarm spacecraft were in an identical polar orbit with a string-of-pearl configuration with small separations. During the science operational phase (since April, 2014), the three spacecraft were placed in slightly different polar orbits: one spacecraft in a higher altitude orbit (507km x 512km) and two side-by-side in lower altitude orbits (459km x 462km). We analyze a few FAC events in both orbital phases and during periods of active geomagnetic conditions. The multi-point observations enable us to examine the FACs' temporal evolution and separate their temporal and spatial variations.

  20. Multipoint observations of planar interplanetary magnetic field structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Lepping, R. P.; Dunlop, M. W.; Elliott, S.; Balogh, A.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Freeman, M. P.; Sibeck, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    IMF data made on November 1, 1984, by three spatially well-separated spacecraft in the solar wind are presented. The IMF measured by each of the spacecraft is found to consist of a multiplicity of structures within which the magnetic field varies in parallel planes. The orientations of these planes at the three spacecraft locations are similar. The planes are inclined at a large angle to the ecliptic, and they lie almost perpendicular to the nominal Parker spiral direction in the ecliptic. Intercomparisons of the measurements at the various spacecraft show that the IMF features at one spacecraft are clearly reproduced at another, with time delays required for signal propagation. From these time delays and the mutual separations of the spacecraft, it is inferred that the structures are convecting with the ambient flow. Simultaneous observations made downstream of the bow shock in the magnetosheath reveal that the magnetosheath magnetic field, too, is planar.

  1. Geomorphology: Perspectives on observation, history, and the field tradition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitek, John D.

    2013-10-01

    Other than a common interest in form and process, current geomorphologists have little in common with those who established the foundations of this science. Educated people who had an interest in Earth processes during the nineteenth century cannot be compared to the scholars who study geomorphology in the twenty-first century. Whereas Earth has undergone natural change from the beginning of time, the human record of observing and recording processes and changes in the surface Is but a recent phenomena. Observation is the only thread, however, that connects all practitioners of geomorphology through time. As people acquired knowledge related to all aspects of life, technological revolutions, such as the Iron Age, Bronze Age, agricultural revolution, the atomic age, and the digital age, shaped human existence and thought. Technology has greatly changed the power of human observation, including inward to the atomic scale and outward into the realm of space.Books and articles describe how to collect and analyze data but few references document the field experience. Each of us, however, has experienced unique circumstances during field work and we learned from various mentors how to observe. The surface of Earth on which we practice the vocation of geomorphology may not be much different from a hundred years ago but many things about how we collect data, analyze it and disseminate the results have changed. How we function in the field, including what we wear, what we eat, how we get there, and where we choose to collect data, clearly reflects the complexity of the human system on Earth and the processes and forms that arouse our interest. Computers, miniaturization of electronics, satellite communications and observation platforms in space provide access to data to aid in our quest to understand Earth surface processes. Once, people lived closer to nature in primitive shelters in contrast with life in urban environments. But as urban life continues to expand and people

  2. 2010 BLASTPol Observations of Magnetic Fields in Lupus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Tristan G.

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was created by adding polarimetric capability to the BLAST experiment that was flown in 2003, 2005, and 2006. BLASTPol inherited BLAST's 1.8 m primary and its Herschel/SPIRE heritage focal plane that allows simultaneous observation at 250, 350, and 500 mum. We flew BLASTPol in 2010 and again in 2012. Both were long duration Antarctic flights. The main result presented here is polarimetry of the nearby filamentary dark cloud Lupus I obtained during the 2010 flight. Despite limitations imposed by the effects of a damaged optical component, we were able to clearly detect submillimeter polarization on degree scales. We compare the resulting BLASTPol magnetic field map with a similar map made via optical polarimetry. (The optical data were published in 1998 by J. Rizzo and collaborators.) The two maps partially overlap and are reasonably consistent with one another. We compare these magnetic field maps to the orientations of filaments in Lupus I, and we find that the dominant filament in the cloud is approximately perpendicular to the large-scale field, while secondary filaments appear to run parallel to the magnetic fields in their vicinities. This is similar to what is observed in Serpens South via near-IR polarimetry, and consistent with what is seen in MHD simulations by F. Nakamura and Z. Li. We have performed a similar analysis for Lupus IV and present initial results. The Lupus IV cloud has no clear dominant filament and we make no attempts to interpret these initial findings. Finally, detailed discussions of two of the dominant sources of error in the 2010 data are presented.

  3. Seismostatistical characterization of microseismicity observed at geothermal fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, T.; Asanuma, H.; Adachi, M.; Saeki, K.; Aoyama, K.; Ozeki, H.; Häring, M. O.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, occurrence of felt earthquakes has been recognized as one of the most critical environmental burdens associated with geothermal development. We have taken seismostatistical approach to evaluate characteristics of the microseismicity at geothermal fields to establish realtime and automated monitoring techniques of the reservoir changes and risk assessment of the felt earthquakes. In this study, we have introduced the Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model (Ogata, JASA, 1988) to statistically model the time series of occurrences and the magnitude of microseismic events from hydrothermal and EGS fields. Here maximum likelihood estimation has been employed to estimate optimum parameters of the ETAS model. We analyzed microseismic events observed at Yanaizu Nishiyama, one of the largest hydrothermal fields in Japan. In this field, four felt earthquakes with local magnitude larger than 3.0 occurred during production operation since 1996, although no clear correlation between the occurrence of the felt earthquakes and operation to the reservoir has been observed (Asanuma et al., Trans. GRC, 2011). We found that the occurrence rate of primary fluid signals, which are the events triggered by external forcing and have been interpreted to be independent from a series of aftershocks (Hainzl and Ogata, JGR, 2005), correlated to the reinjection rate (Fig. 1). However, no significant change in the other parameters in the ETAS model has been observed. We also analyzed microseismic events observed at Basel EGS site in Switzerland, where some felt earthquakes occurred during and after hydraulic stimulation. The estimated ETAS model demonstrated that there is a correlation between the occurrence rate of primary fluid signals and injection rate. We, however, found that there is limitation to fit the ETAS model to the induced seismic events and new seismostatistical model is required for microseismic reservoir monitoring.ig. 1 A relation among production

  4. Field observations of dilution on the Ipanema Beach outfall.

    PubMed

    Roldão, J; Carvalho, J L; Roberts, P J

    2001-01-01

    Field observations of the Ipanema Beach, Rio de Janeiro, ocean sewage outfall are presented. Measurements of dilution and other wastefield characteristics were obtained by adding dye tracer to the effluent and measuring in-situ. Simultaneous measurements of oceanographic conditions were made by Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers, thermistor strings, and profiling instruments. Four experiments were performed, two during unstratified conditions when the plume was surfacing, and two during conditions of strong stratification when the plume was submerged. The minimum dilution varied from 30 to 130. The measurements reflect the worst case conditions as the campaigns were all made for weak currents. PMID:11443984

  5. {Interball-1 Plasma, Magnetic Field, and Energetic Particle Observations}

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, David G.

    1998-01-01

    Funding from NASA was received in two installments. The first installment supported research using Russian/Czech/Slovak/French Interball-1 plasma, magnetic field, and energetic particles observations in the vicinity of the magnetopause. The second installment provided salary support to review unsolicited proposals to NASA for data recovery and archiving, and also to survey ISTP data provision efforts. Two papers were published under the auspices of the grant. Sibeck et al. reported Interball-1 observations of a wave on the magnetopause with an amplitude in excess of 5 R(sub E), the largest ever reported to date. They attributed the wave to a hot flow anomaly striking the magnetopause and suggested that the hot flow anomaly itself formed during the interaction of an IMF discontinuity with the bow shock. Nemecek et al. used Interball-1's VDP Faraday cup to identify large transient increases in the magnetosheath density. They noted large variations in simultaneous Wind observations of the IMF cone angle, but were unable to establish any relationship between the cone angle variations at Wind and the density variations at Interball-1. Funds from the second installment were used to review over 20 proposals from various researchers in the scientific community who sought NASA support to restore or archive past observations. It also supported a survey of ISTP data provisions which was used as input to a Senior Review of ongoing NASA ISTP programs.

  6. Using Clocks and Atomic Interferometry for Gravity Field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    New technology developed in the frame of fundamental physics may lead to enhanced capabilities for geodetic applications such as refined observations of the Earth's gravity field. Here, we will present new sensor measurement concepts that apply atomic interferometry for gravimetry and clock measurements for observing potential values. In the first case, gravity anomalies can be determined by observing free-falling atoms (quantum gravimetry). In the second case, highly precise optical clocks can be used to measure differences of the gravity potential over long distances (relativistic geodesy). Principally, also inter-satellite ranging between test masses in space with nanometer accuracy belongs to these novel developments. We will show, how the new measurement concepts are connected to classical geodetic concepts, e.g. geopotential numbers and clock readings. We will illustrate the application of these new methods and their benefit for geodesy, where local and global mass variations can be observed with unforeseen accuracy and resolution, mass variations that reflect processes in the Earth system. We will present a few examples where geodesy will potentially benefit from these developments. Thus, the novel technologies might be applied for defining and realizing height systems in a new way, but also for fast local gravimetric surveys and exploration.

  7. A new approach to observe toroidal magnetic fields of magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, H.; Makishima, K.; Enoto, T.; Nakano, T.; Furuta, Y.; Nakazawa, K.

    2016-06-01

    Over the last decade, observational evidence has amounted that magnetars harbor enormous surface dipole magnetic fields (MFs) of B_{d} = 10^{14-15} {G}. Theoretically, we expect even stronger toroidal MFs B_{t} (e.g., Takiwaki+2009), which is observationally supported by a discovery of low-B_{d} magnetars (e.g., SGR 0418+5729; Rea+2013). Here, we will present a new approach to access B_{t} more directly. {Suzaku} allows us to simultaneously observe a soft thermal component and a distinct hard X-ray tail of magnetars. Extensively analyzing two magnetars, 4U 0142+61 and 1E 1547.0-5408, we found that their hard X-ray pulses suffered from slow phase modulations (Makishima+2014, 2015). This can be interpreted as a manifestation of free precession, under an axial deformation by ˜0.01%. If this effect is attributed to the magnetic stress, B_{t}˜10^{16} G is inferred. We further found that, within 6 years observation of 4U 0142+61, the modulation periods remained constant, while the amplitude gradually increased from < 0.4 to ˜1.3 sec. These results suggest the shift of the hard X-ray emission region (or direction).

  8. A new approach to observe toroidal magnetic fields of magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, H.; Makishima, K.; Enoto, T.; Nakano, T.; Furuta, Y.; Nakazawa, K.

    2016-06-01

    Over the last decade, observational evidence has amounted that magnetars harbor enormous surface dipole magnetic fields (MFs) of B_{d} = 10^{14-15} {G}. Theoretically, we expect even stronger toroidal MFs B_{t} (e.g., Takiwaki+2009), which is observationally supported by a discovery of low-B_{d} magnetars (e.g., SGR 0418+5729; Rea+2013). Here, we will present a new approach to access B_{t} more directly. Suzaku allows us to simultaneously observe a soft thermal component and a distinct hard X-ray tail of magnetars. Extensively analyzing two magnetars, 4U 0142+61 and 1E 1547.0-5408, we found that their hard X-ray pulses suffered from slow phase modulations (Makishima+2014, 2015). This can be interpreted as a manifestation of free precession, under an axial deformation by ˜0.01%. If this effect is attributed to the magnetic stress, B_{t}˜10^{16} G is inferred. We further found that, within 6 years observation of 4U 0142+61, the modulation periods remained constant, while the amplitude gradually increased from < 0.4 to ˜1.3 sec. These results suggest the shift of the hard X-ray emission region (or direction).

  9. Benefits of “Observer Effects”: Lessons from the Field

    PubMed Central

    Monahan, Torin; Fisher, Jill A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper responds to the criticism that “observer effects” in ethnographic research necessarily bias and therefore invalidate research findings. Instead of aspiring to distance and detachment, some of the greatest strengths of ethnographic research lie in cultivating close ties with others and collaboratively shaping discourses and practices in the field. Informants’ performances – however staged for or influenced by the observer – often reveal profound truths about social and/or cultural phenomena. To make this case, first we mobilize methodological insights from the field of science studies to illustrate the contingency and partiality of all knowledge and to challenge the notion that ethnography is less objective than other research methods. Second, we draw upon our ethnographic projects to illustrate the rich data that can be obtained from “staged performances” by informants. Finally, by detailing a few examples of questionable behavior on the part of informants, we challenge the fallacy that the presence of ethnographers will cause informants to self-censor. PMID:21297880

  10. Field experimental observations of highly graded sediment plumes.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jacob Hjelmager; Saremi, Sina; Jimenez, Carlos; Hadjioannou, Louis

    2015-06-15

    A field experiment in the waters off the south-eastern coast of Cyprus was carried out to study near-field formation of sediment plumes from dumping. Different loads of sediment were poured into calm and limpid waters one at the time from just above the sea surface. The associated plumes, gravitating towards the seafloor, were filmed simultaneously by four divers situated at different depths in the water column, and facing the plume at different angles. The processes were captured using GoPro-Hero-series cameras. The high-quality underwater footage from near-surface, mid-depth and near-bed positions gives unique insight into the dynamics of the descending plume and near-field dispersion processes, and enables good understanding of flow and sediment transport processes involved from-release-to-deposition of the load in a non-scaled environment. The high resolution images and footages are available through the link provided herein. Observations support the development of a detailed multi-fractional sediment plume model. PMID:25935811

  11. Multicolor Observations of the Hubble Deep Field South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanzella, Eros; Cristiani, Stefano; Saracco, Paolo; Arnouts, Stephane; Bianchi, Simone; D'Odorico, Sandro; Fontana, Adriano; Giallongo, Emanuele; Grazian, Andrea

    2001-11-01

    We present a deep multicolor (U, B, V, I, Js, H, Ks) catalog of galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field South, based on observations obtained with the HST WFPC2 in 1998 and VLT-ISAAC in 1999. The photometric procedures were tuned to derive a catalog optimized for the estimation of photometric redshifts. In particular we adopted a ``conservative'' detection threshold, which resulted in a list of 1611 objects. The behavior of the observed source counts is in general agreement with the previous results of Casertano et al. in the Hubble Deep Field South and Williams et al. in the Hubble Deep Field North, while the corresponding counts in the Hubble Deep Field North provided by Fernández-Soto, Lanzetta, & Yahil are systematically lower by a factor 1.5 beyond IAB=26. After correcting for the incompleteness of the source counts, the object surface density at IAB<=27.5 is estimated to be 220 arcmin-2, in agreement with the corresponding measure of Volonteri et al. and providing an estimate of the extragalactic background light in the I band consistent with the work of Madau & Pozzetti. The comparison between the median V-I color in the Hubble Deep Field North and South shows a significant difference around IAB~26, possibly due to the presence of large-scale structure at z~1 in the HDF-N. High-redshift galaxy candidates (90 U dropouts and 17 B dropouts) were selected by means of color diagrams, down to a magnitude IAB=27, with a surface density of (21+/-1) and (3.9+/-0.9) arcmin-2, respectively. Eleven extremely red objects [with (I-K)AB>2.7] were selected down to KAB=24, plus three objects whose upper limit to the Ks flux is still compatible with the selection criterion. The corresponding surface density of EROs is (2.5+/-0.8) arcmin-2 [(3.2+/-0.9) arcmin-2 if we include the three Ks upper limits]. They show a remarkably nonuniform spatial distribution and are classified with roughly equal fractions in the categories of elliptical and starburst galaxies.

  12. INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELDS OBSERVED BY VOYAGER 1 BEYOND THE HELIOPAUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F. E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com

    2014-11-01

    Voyager 1 (V1) was beyond the heliopause between 2013.00 and 2014.41, where it was making in situ observations of the interstellar magnetic field (ISMF). The average azimuthal angle and elevation angle of the magnetic field B were (λ) = 292.°5 ± 1.°4 and (δ) = 22.°1 ± 1.°2, respectively. The angles λ and δ varied linearly at (1.°4 ± 0.°1) yr{sup –1} and (–1.°1 ± 0.°1) yr{sup –1}, respectively, suggesting that V1 was measuring the draped ISMF around the heliopause. The distributions of hourly averages of λ and δ were Gaussian distributions, with most probable values 292.°5 and 22.°1, and standard deviations (SDs) 1.°3 and 1.°1, respectively. The small SD indicates little or no turbulence transverse to B . An abrupt decrease in B from 0.50 nT on 2013/129.9 to 0.46 nT on 2013/130.6 was observed, possibly associated with a weak reverse shock or magnetoacoustic pressure wave following a burst of electron plasma oscillations. Between 2013/130.6 and 2013/365.3, (B) = 0.464 ± 0.009 nT, (λ) = 292.°6 ± 0.°8, and (δ) = 22.°1 ± 1.°1. The corresponding distribution of hourly averages of B was Gaussian with the most probable value 0.464 nT and σ = 0.009 nT. Since the uncertainty σ corresponds to the instrument and digitization noise, these observations provided an upper limit to the turbulence in the ISMF. The distributions of the hourly increments of B were Gaussian distributions with σ = 0.05 nT, 0.°4, and 0.°4, respectively, indicating that the V1 did not detect evidence of ''intermittent bursts'' of interstellar turbulence.

  13. Field observations using an AOTF polarimetric imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Li-Jen; Hamilton, Mike; Mahoney, Colin; Reyes, George

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports preliminary results of recent field observations using a prototype acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) polarimetric imaging spectrometer. The data illustrate application potentials for geoscience. The operation principle of this instrument is different from that of current airborne multispectral imaging instruments, such as AVIRIS. The AOTF instrument takes two orthogonally polarized images at a desired wavelength at one time, whereas AVIRIS takes a spectrum over a predetermined wavelength range at one pixel at a time and the image is constructed later. AVIRIS does not have any polarization measuring capability. The AOTF instrument could be a complement tool to AVIRIS. Polarization measurement is a desired capability for many applications in remote sensing. It is well know that natural light is often polarized due to various scattering phenomena in the atmosphere. Also, scattered light from canopies is reported to have a polarized component. To characterize objects of interest correctly requires a remote sensing imaging spectrometer capable of measuring object signal and background radiation in both intensity and polarization so that the characteristics of the object can be determined. The AORF instrument has the capability to do so. The AOTF instrument has other unique properties. For example, it can provide spectral images immediately after the observation. The instrument can also allow observations to be tailored in real time to perform the desired experiments and to collect only required data. Consequently, the performance in each mission can be increased with minimal resources. The prototype instrument was completed in the beginning of this year. A number of outdoor field experiments were performed with the objective to evaluate the capability of this new technology for remote sensing applications and to determine issues for further improvements.

  14. Interplanetary Electric Field Control of Field-Aligned Currents: Polar Magnetometer Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, M.; Russell, C. T.

    2001-05-01

    ACE and Wind measurements of the solar wind velocity and interplanetary magnetic field have been used to calculate the interplanetary electric field during passages of the Polar spacecraft above the southern auroral oval. Periods of the quasi-steady interplanetary electric field have been identified when the Polar spacecraft was transiting the auroral and polar regions both just in front of the terminator above the lit ionosphere and just behind the terminator above the dark ionosphere. The east-west magnetic perturbation observed was then used as a measure of the local field-aligned current density and extrapolated to a common altitude. Independent of whether the interplanetary electric field (IEF) is from dawn to dusk or dusk to dawn a significant field-aligned current always exists. The magnitude of its perturbation field for dusk to dawn IEF is about 180 nT. For dawn to dusk IEF the magnetic perturbation is roughly proportional to the dawn-dusk component of the IEF. The strength of the field-aligned current does not depend on whether the ionosphere under the spacecraft is in sunlight or in darkness.

  15. Observation of synchronized atomic motions in the field ion microscope.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Fhm F; Notte, John A; Livengood, Richard H; Tan, Shida

    2013-03-01

    For over half a century, the field ion microscope (FIM) has been used to visualize atomic structures at the apex of a sharpened needle by way of the ion beams which are created at the most protruding atoms. In this paper we used a conventional FIM to study the emission characteristics of the neon ion beams produced within the FIM. The neon emission pattern is observed to be relatively short lived and subject to temporal and angular fluctuations. The nature of these fluctuations is complex, often with different parts of the emission pattern changing in a synchronized fashion over timescales spanning from milliseconds to a few tens of seconds. In this paper, we characterize the observed instability of the neon emission. We also offer a simple model of adsorbed atom mobility that explains much of these observations. And finally, we present a method by which the stability can be greatly improved so that the produced neon beam can be used effectively for nanomachining applications. PMID:23376401

  16. A magnetospheric field model incorporating the OGO 3 and 5 magnetic field observations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.; Poros, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    A magnetospheric field model is presented in which the usually assumed toroidal ring current is replaced by a circular disk current of finite thickness that extends from the tail to geocentric distances less than 3 earth radii. The drastic departure of this model from the concept of the conventional ring current lies in that the current is continuous from the tail to the inner magnetosphere. This conceptual change was required to account for the recent results of analysis of the OGO 3 and 5 magnetic field observations. In the present model the cross-tail current flows along circular arcs concentric with the earth and completes circuit via surface currents on the magnetopause. Apart from these return currents in the tail magnetopause, Mead's (1964) model is used for the field from the magnetopause current. The difference scalar field, Delta B, defined as the difference between the scalar field calculated from the present model and the magnitude of the dipole field, is found to be in gross agreement with the observed Delta B.

  17. Observations of field-aligned currents, waves, and electric fields at substorm onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, D. P.; Hughes, W. J.; Cattell, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    Substorm onsets, identified Pi 2 pulsations observed on the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory Magnetometer Network, are studied using magnetometer and electric field data from ISEE 1 as well as magnetometer data from the geosynchronous satellites GOES 2 and 3. The mid-latitude magnetometer data provides the means of both timing and locating the substorm onset so that the spacecraft locations with respect to the substorm current systems are known. During two intervals, each containing several onsets or intensifications, ISEE 1 observed field-aligned current signatures beginning simultaneously with the mid-latitude Pi 2 pulsation. Close to the earth broadband bursts of wave noise were observed in the electric field data whenever field-aligned currents were detected. One onset occurred when ISEE 1 and GOES 2 were on the same field line but in opposite hemispheres. During this onset ISEE 1 and GOES 2 saw magnetic signatures which appear to be due to conjugate field-aligned currents flowing out of the western end of the westward auroral electrojets. The ISEE 1 signature is of a line current moving westward past the spacecraft. During the other interval, ISEE 1 was in the near-tail region near the midnight meridian. Plasma data confirms that the plasma sheet thinned and subsequently expanded at onset. Electric field data shows that the plasma moved in the opposite direction to the plasma sheet boundary as the boundary expanded which implies that there must have been an abundant source of hot plasma present. The plasma motion was towards the center of the plasma sheet and earthwards and consisted of a series of pulses rather than a steady flow.

  18. C/NOFS Observations of AC Electric Field Fields Associated with Equatorial Spread-F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Liebrecht, C.

    2009-01-01

    The Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the C/NOFS equatorial satellite provides a unique data set in which to acquire detailed knowledge of irregularities associated with the equatorial ionosphere and in particular with spread-F depletions. We present vector AC electric field observations, primarily gathered within the ELF band (1 Hz to 250 Hz) on C/NOFS that address a variety of key questions regarding how plasma irregularities, from meter to kilometer scales, are created and evolve. The data will be used to explore the anisotropy/isotropy of the waves, their wavelength and phase velocity, as well as their spectral distributions. When analyzed in conjunction with the driving DC electric fields and detailed plasma number density measurements, the combined data reveal important information concerning the instability mechanisms themselves. We also present high resolution, vector measurements of intense lower hybrid waves that have been detected on numerous occasions by the VEFI burst memory VLF electric field channels.

  19. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS FROM ZEEMAN OBSERVATIONS: INFERENCE OF TOTAL FIELD STRENGTHS BY BAYESIAN ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Crutcher, Richard M.; Wandelt, Benjamin; Heiles, Carl; Falgarone, Edith

    2010-12-10

    The only direct measurements of interstellar magnetic field strengths depend on the Zeeman effect, which samples the line-of-sight component B{sub z} of the magnetic vector. In this paper, we use a Bayesian approach to analyze the observed probability density function (PDF) of B{sub z} from Zeeman surveys of H I, OH, and CN spectral lines in order to infer a density-dependent stochastic model of the total field strength B in diffuse and molecular clouds. We find that at n < 300 cm{sup -3} (in the diffuse interstellar medium sampled by H I lines), B does not scale with density. This suggests that diffuse clouds are assembled by flows along magnetic field lines, which would increase the density but not the magnetic field strength. We further find strong evidence for B in molecular clouds being randomly distributed between very small values and a maximum that scales with volume density n as B {proportional_to} n {sup 0.65} for n>300 cm{sup -3}, with an uncertainty at the 50% level in the power-law exponent of about {+-}0.05. This break-point density could be interpreted as the average density at which parsec-scale clouds become self-gravitating. Both the uniform PDF of total field strengths and the scaling with density suggest that magnetic fields in molecular clouds are often too weak to dominate the star formation process. The stochasticity of the total field strength B implies that many fields are so weak that the mass/flux ratio in many clouds must be significantly supercritical. A two-thirds power law comes from isotropic contraction of gas too weakly magnetized for the magnetic field to affect the morphology of the collapse. On the other hand, our study does not rule out some clouds having strong magnetic fields with critical mass/flux ratios.

  20. Comparison of St. Lawrence blue whale vocalizations with field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berchok, Catherine; Bradley, David; Gabrielson, Thomas; Sears, Richard

    2003-04-01

    During four field seasons from 1998-2001, vocalizations were recorded in the presence of St. Lawrence blue whales using a single omni-directional hydrophone. Both long duration infrasonic calls (~18 Hz, 5-20 s) as well as short duration higher frequency calls (85-25 Hz, ~2 s) were detected and compared with field observations. Two trends were noted. First, the long infrasonic call series were concentrated primarily in the deep (300 m) channel. These call series appear to compare well with blue whale vocalizations recorded by others in the deep open ocean. Second, the shorter audible calls were more evenly distributed over bathymetry and seem to be a form of short distance communication with at least one case occurring during an agonistic interaction. A comparison of these calls with biological parameters such as density of whales in the area, percentages of paired versus single whales, and numbers of males versus females will also be discussed. [Project supported by ARL/PSU, NSF, and the American Museum of Natural History.

  1. Photometric Observations of 6000 Stars in the Cygnus Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W.; Caldwell, D.; Koch, D.; Jenkins, J.; Ninkov, Z.

    1999-01-01

    A small photometer to detect transits by extrasolar planets has been assembled and is being tested at Lick Observatory on Mt. Hamilton, California. The Vulcan photometer is constructed from a 30 cm focal length, F/2.5 AeroEktar reconnaissance lens and Photometrics PXL16800 CCD camera. A spectral filter is used to confine the pass band from 480 to 763 mn. It simultaneously monitors 6000 stars brighter than 12th magnitude within a single star field in the galactic plane. When the data are folded and phased to discover low amplitude transits, the relative precision of one-hour samples is about 1 part per thousand (10 x l0(exp -3)) for many of the brighter stars. This precision is sufficient to find jovian-size planets orbiting solar-like stars, which have signal amplitudes from 5 to 30 x l0(exp -3) depending on the inflation of the planet and the size of the star. Based on the frequency of giant inner-planets discovered by Doppler-velocity method, one or two planets should be detectable in a rich star field. The goal of the observations is to obtain the sizes of giant extrasolar planets in short-period orbits and to combine these with masses determined from Doppler velocity measurements to determine the densities of these planets. A further goal is to compare the measured planetary diameters with those predicted from theoretical models. From August 10 through September 30 of 1998, a forty nine square degree field in the Cygnus constellation centered at RA and DEC of 19 hr 47 min, +36 deg 55 min was observed. Useful data were obtained on twenty-nine nights. Nearly fifty stars showed some evidence of transits with periods between 0.3 and 8 days. Most had amplitudes too large to be associated with planetary transits. However, several stars showed low amplitude transits. The data for several transits of each of these two stars have been folded and been folded into 30 minute periods. Only Cygl433 shows any evidence of a flattened bottom that is expected when a small object

  2. Field observations of aye-ayes (Daubentonia madagascariensis) in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Ancrenaz, M; Lackman-Ancrenaz, I; Mundy, N

    1994-01-01

    Data are presented from a field study of aye-ayes (Daubentonia madagascariensis) in an area of degraded secondary forest in northeast Madagascar. Animals were followed by radiotelemetry for 3 months during the cool dry season, when productivity of the forest is at a minimum. Population density was variable. Male home ranges were larger and overlapped the range of at least 1 female. Male ranges also overlapped, and areas of overlap could be occupied by 2 animals simultaneously. Most of the parties were solitary, but aggregations were observed at feeding sites. All activity was observed during darkness, and aye-ayes were always found to nest singly during the daytime. These patterns conform to those described for other nocturnal solitary prosimians. The aye-ayes showed versatility in their locomotor patterns, enabling them to use all types of supports and forest levels. Dietary diversity was high, although a preference for flower nectar was noted. These results suggest that, despite their anatomical specializations, aye-ayes are able to exploit a wide range of resources within recently degraded forest. This ability seems to allow aye-ayes to remain active throughout the year, unlike certain other nocturnal lemurs which become torpid during the dry season. PMID:7721206

  3. Determining degree-day thresholds from field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, R. L.; Spano, Donatella; Cesaraccio, Carla; Duce, Pierpaolo

    This paper compares several methods for determining degree-day (°D) threshold temperatures from field observations. Three of the methods use the mean developmental period temperature and simple equations to estimate: (1) the smallest standard deviation in °D, (2) the least standard deviation in days, and (3) a linear regression intercept. Two additional methods use iterations of cumulative °D and threshold temperatures to determine the smallest root mean square error (RMSE). One of the iteration methods uses a linear model and the other uses a single triangle °D calculation method. The method giving the best results was verified by comparing observed and predicted phenological periods using 7 years of kiwifruit data and 10 years of cherry tree data. In general, the iteration method using the single triangle method to calculate °D provided threshold temperatures with the smallest RMSE values. However, the iteration method using a linear °D model also worked well. Simply using a threshold of zero gave predictions that were nearly as good as those obtained using the other two methods. The smallest standard deviation in °D performed the worst. The least standard deviation in days and the regression methods did well sometimes; however, the threshold temperatures were sometimes negative, which does not support the idea that development rates are related to heat units.

  4. Geopotential Field Anomaly Continuation with Multi-Altitude Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jeong Woo; Kim, Hyung Rae; von Frese, Ralph; Taylor, Patrick; Rangelova, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Conventional gravity and magnetic anomaly continuation invokes the standard Poisson boundary condition of a zero anomaly at an infinite vertical distance from the observation surface. This simple continuation is limited, however, where multiple altitude slices of the anomaly field have been observed. Increasingly, areas are becoming available constrained by multiple boundary conditions from surface, airborne, and satellite surveys. This paper describes the implementation of continuation with multi-altitude boundary conditions in Cartesian and spherical coordinates and investigates the advantages and limitations of these applications. Continuations by EPS (Equivalent Point Source) inversion and the FT (Fourier Transform), as well as by SCHA (Spherical Cap Harmonic Analysis) are considered. These methods were selected because they are especially well suited for analyzing multi-altitude data over finite patches of the earth such as covered by the ADMAP database. In general, continuations constrained by multi-altitude data surfaces are invariably superior to those constrained by a single altitude data surface due to anomaly measurement errors and the non-uniqueness of continuation.

  5. Geopotential Field Anomaly Continuation with Multi-Altitude Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jeong Woo; Kim, Hyung Rae; vonFrese, Ralph; Taylor, Patrick; Rangelova, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Conventional gravity and magnetic anomaly continuation invokes the standard Poisson boundary condition of a zero anomaly at an infinite vertical distance from the observation surface. This simple continuation is limited, however, where multiple altitude slices of the anomaly field have been observed. Increasingly, areas are becoming available constrained by multiple boundary conditions from surface, airborne, and satellite surveys. This paper describes the implementation of continuation with multi-altitude boundary conditions in Cartesian and spherical coordinates and investigates the advantages and limitations of these applications. Continuations by EPS (Equivalent Point Source) inversion and the FT (Fourier Transform), as well as by SCHA (Spherical Cap Harmonic Analysis) are considered. These methods were selected because they are especially well suited for analyzing multi-altitude data over finite patches of the earth such as covered by the ADMAP database. In general, continuations constrained by multi-altitude data surfaces are invariably superior to those constrained by a single altitude data surface due to anomaly measurement errors and the non-uniqueness of continuation.

  6. Cloud atlas for the FIRE Cirrus Intensive Field Observation (IFO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arking, Albert; Childs, Jeffrey D.; Merritt, John H.; Williams, Sharen L.

    1990-01-01

    An Intensive Field Observation (IFO) of cirrus clouds was conducted over the mid-western U.S. during the period October 13 to November 2, 1986. This activity, part of the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE), included measurements made from specially deployed instruments on the ground, balloons, and aircraft as well as observations from existing operational and experimental satellites. One of the sets of satellite observations was the radiance measurements made with the 5-channel AVHRR radiometer on the NOAA 9 polar orbiting meteorological satellite. The ground resolution of the measurements at nadir is approx. 1 km. It is these measurements, made once each day at approximately 2:30 p.m. local time, that were used in determining the present cloud atlas. The area covered by the atlas is slightly larger than the area specified for the IFO, in order to be in alignment with the grid that will be used in a forthcoming atlas for the larger, ETO region. The atlas contains four pages of information for each satellite pass. The 1st page of each group shows the distribution of measured radiances in channel 1 (normalized to the incoming solar flux multiplied by the cosine of the solar zenith angle) and in channel 4 for the area as a whole and for each analysis box. The 2nd page shows the images in: channels 1 and 2, channel 3R; and channel 4. The 3rd page shows the retrieved parameters in graphical form for the region as a whole and for each analysis box, where cloud fraction appears as a contour plot with respect to optical thickness and cloudtop temperature. The 4th page provides a statistical summary of the retrieved parameters in numerical form for each analysis box.

  7. Storm time electric field penetration observed at mid-latitude

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Foster, J.C. ); Rich, F.J.; Swider, W. )

    1991-04-01

    During the height of the February 8-9, 1986, magnetic storm the Millstone Hill radar was in the evening local time sector (1600-2200 MLT). Radar observations indicate that high speed (>1,000 m s{sup {minus}1}) westward ion flow penetrated deeply below 50{degree} invariant latitude ({Lambda}) and persisted for 6 hours between 2100 UT on February 8 and 0300 UT on February 9. The double-peaked ion convection feature was pronounced throughout the period, and the separation in the dual maxima ranged from 4{degree} to 10{degree}. The latitude positions of the high-latitude ion drift peak and the convection reversal varied in unison. The low-latitude ion drift peak ({approximately}49{degree}{Lambda} or L =2.3) did not show significant universal time/magnetic local time (UT/MLT) variation in its latitude location but showed a decrease in magnitude during the initial recovery phase of the storm. Using simultaneous particle (30 eV-30 keV) precipitation data from the DMSP F6 and F7 satellites, the authors find the high-latitude ion drift peak to coincide with the boundary plasma sheet/central plasma sheet transition in the high ionospheric conductivity (>15 mho) region. The low-latitude ion drift peak lay between the equatorward edges of the electron and soft (< 1 keV) ion precipitation in the low conductivity region ({approximately}1 mho). A comparison between the low-altitude observations and simultaneous ring current observations from the high-altitude AMPTE satellite further suggests that the low-altitude ion drift peak is closely related to the maximum of the O{sup +} dominated ring current energy density in magnetic latitude. The low-latitude ion drift peak is the low-altitude signature of the electric field shielding effect associated with ring current penetration into the outer layer of the storm time plasmasphere.

  8. Earthquake Rupture Complexity Evidence from Field Observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudnut, K. W.; Fletcher, J. M.; Rockwell, T. K.; Gonzalez-Garcia, J. J.; Teran, O.; Akciz, S. O.

    2010-12-01

    Field observations provide strong evidence for four intriguing aspects of rupture process complexity for the 4 April 2010 El Mayor - Cucapah - Indiviso earthquake. First, the southern “fork” of the rupture exhibits two splays just to the northwest of the event epicenter, both with nearly pure right-lateral faulting. Teleseismic source modeling by others indicates normal slip on deep fault surface preceded the shallow strike-slip faulting, and our field observations from the fork area indicate that the earliest phase of strike-slip faulting did not involve a significant normal faulting component. Second, as rupture propagated to the northwest along the Pescadores fault, slip ended abruptly on this fault and transferred across a complex zone to the Borrego fault (although the Pescadores fault continues farther and would have seemed an easier route to follow). This stepover is called the Puerta Accommodation Zone (PAZ) which extends 11 km along-strike within an elevated portion of the Cucapah massif and accommodates a left step (transpressional) that measures less than 2 km across-strike. Though partly obscured by rockfalls in the steep terrain here, only discontinuous faulting of up to one meter reached the ground surface, yet imagery differencing by others indicates several meters of continuous subsurface slip throughout this section. This 11 km region of reduced and discontinuous slip is one of the longest surface rupture jumps ever observed, with lengthy and continuous surface faulting on either side. The SE end of the stepover coincides spatially with the Canon Rojo embayment where the M7.2 1892 surface rupture propagated onto a second fault forming an abrupt corner in its surface trace. Hence, the surface rupture and slip distribution pattern in 2010 appears to have been influenced by stress changes induced by the 1892 event. Thirdly, from the NW end of the transition section, the Borrego fault continues to the NNW with strong east-down slip obliquity. Along

  9. Field aligned current observations in the polar cusp ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledley, B. G.; Farthing, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    Vector magnetic field measurements made during a sounding rocket flight in the polar cusp ionosphere show field fluctuations in the lower F-region which are interpreted as being caused by the payload's passage through a structured field aligned current system. The field aligned currents have a characteristic horizontal scale size of one kilometer. Analysis of one large field fluctuation gives a current density of 0.0001 amp/m sq.

  10. Experimental evidence for seismoelectric observations at field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzhauer, Julia; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2010-05-01

    In the past decades, seismoelectric has concentrated a growing interest as a promising tool for hydrogeophysical studies. Resulting from an electrokinetic coupling in porous saturated media traversed by an acoustic wave, this method could ultimately offer a direct access to various hydraulic parameters ranging from porosity to permeability or fluids conductivity. In some other aspects it also occasionally showed some ability to thin-layer resolution. Within the development of the new test-site Schillerslage with typical north-German geology, consisting of two shallow quaternary aquifers separated by a till layer over cretaceous marl, we tested the observability of the seismoelectric signal along with various conventional (seismic, georadar, geoelectric) and unconventional (magnetic resonance sounding -MRS, spectral induced polarisation -SIP) geophysical methods as well as boreholes analysis. The special focus was on the converted seismoelectric signal, an electromagnetic wave acting as a vertical dipole which should theoretically display on the seismoelectrogram as a horizontal arrival. This converted wave appears when the incident acoustic wave meets a hydraulic discontinuity affecting the pore space in any geometrical or chemical manner. This electromagnetic signal fades out rapidly, due to its dipole nature and its weakness, so that its relevance is restricted to the near surface characterisation. In the given setting, such a wave could either initiate at the water table or originate from an abrupt transition from sand to till. Decision was made to record both seismic and seismoelectric signal concomitantly. To allow the detection of the later signal, the field layout was gradually adjusted. Considering the source, hammer-seismic was chosen for its precision in near surface application and automatic trigger-techniques producing major disturbances in the first 10 ms of the seismoelectrogram were abandoned in favour of manual triggering. To avoid any further noise

  11. Modeling the Jovian magnetic field and its secular variation using all available magnetic field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, Victoria A.; Holme, Richard

    2016-03-01

    We present new models of Jupiter's internal magnetic field and secular variation from all available direct measurements from three decades of spacecraft observation. A regularized minimum norm approach allows the creation of smooth, numerically stable models displaying a high degree of structure. External field from the magnetodisk is modeled iteratively for each orbit. Jupiter's inner magnetosphere is highly stable with time, with no evidence for variation with solar activity. We compare two spherical harmonic models, one assuming a field constant in time and a second allowing for linear time variation. Including secular variation improves data fit with fewer additional parameters than increasing field complexity. Our favored solution indicates a ˜0.012% yr-1 increase in Jupiter's dipole magnetic moment from 1973 to 2003; this value is roughly one quarter of that for Earth. Inaccuracies in determination of the planetary reference frame cannot explain all the observed secular variation. Should more structure be allowed in the solutions, we find the northern hemispherical configuration resembles recent models based on satellite auroral footprint locations, and there is also evidence of a possible patch of reversed polar flux seen at the expected depth of the dynamo region, resembling that found at Earth and with implications for the Jovian interior. Finally, using our preferred model, we infer flow dynamics at the top of Jupiter's dynamo source. Though highly speculative, the results produce several gyres with some symmetry about the equator, similar to those seen at Earth's core-mantle boundary, suggesting motion on cylinders aligned with the rotation axis.

  12. Extended field observations of cirrus clouds using a ground-based cloud observing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, Thomas P.

    1994-01-01

    The evolution of synoptic-scale dynamics associated with a middle and upper tropospheric cloud event that occurred on 26 November 1991 is examined. The case under consideration occurred during the FIRE CIRRUS-II Intensive Field Observing Period held in Coffeyville, KS during Nov. and Dec., 1991. Using data from the wind profiler demonstration network and a temporally and spatially augmented radiosonde array, emphasis is given to explaining the evolution of the kinematically-derived ageostrophic vertical circulations and correlating the circulation with the forcing of an extensively sampled cloud field. This is facilitated by decomposing the horizontal divergence into its component parts through a natural coordinate representation of the flow. Ageostrophic vertical circulations are inferred and compared to the circulation forcing arising from geostrophic confluence and shearing deformation derived from the Sawyer-Eliassen Equation. It is found that a thermodynamically indirect vertical circulation existed in association with a jet streak exit region. The circulation was displaced to the cyclonic side of the jet axis due to the orientation of the jet exit between a deepening diffluent trough and building ridge. The cloud line formed in the ascending branch of the vertical circulation with the most concentrated cloud development occurring in conjunction with the maximum large-scale vertical motion. The relationship between the large scale dynamics and the parameterization of middle and upper tropospheric clouds in large-scale models is discussed and an example of ice water contents derived from a parameterization forced by the diagnosed vertical motions and observed water vapor contents is presented.

  13. Neotectonic stresses in Fennoscandia: field observations and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    The present-day stress state of Fennoscandia is traditionally viewed as the combination of far field sources and residual glacial loading stresses. Investigations were conducted in different regions of Norway with the purpose of detecting and measuring stress-relief features and to derive from them valuable information on the crustal stress state. Stress-relief features are induced by blasting and sudden rock unloading in road construction and quarrying operations and are common in Norway and very likely in other regions of Fennoscandia. Stress relief at the Earth's surface is diagnostic of anomalously high stress levels at shallow depths in the crust and appears to be a characteristic of the formerly glaciated Baltic and Canadian Precambrian shields. The studied stress-relief features are, in general, indicative of NW-SE compression, suggesting ridge-push as the main source of stress. Our derived stress directions are also in excellent agreement with the ones derived from other kinds of stress indicators, including focal mechanisms from deep earthquakes, demonstrating that stress-relief features are valuable for neotectonic research. As a second step we applied numerical modelling techniques to simulate the neotectonic stress field in Fennoscandia with particular emphasis to southern Norway. A numerical method was used to reconstruct the structure of the Fennoscandian lithosphere. The numerical method involves classical steady-state heat equations to derive lithosphere thickness, geotherm and density distribution and, in addition, requires the studied lithosphere to be isostatically compensated at its base. The a priori crustal structure was derived from previous geophysical studies. Undulations of the geoid were used to calibrate the models. Once the density structure of the Fennoscandian lithosphere is reconstructed it is straightforward to quantify its stress state and compare modelling results with existing stress indicators. The modelling suggests that

  14. Field Observations of Soil Moisture Variability across Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Famiglietti, James S.; Ryu, Dongryeol; Berg, Aaron A.; Rodell, Matthew; Jackson, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, over 36,000 ground-based soil moisture measurements collected during the SGP97, SGP99, SMEX02, and SMEX03 field campaigns were analyzed to characterize the behavior of soil moisture variability across scales. The field campaigns were conducted in Oklahoma and Iowa in the central USA. The Oklahoma study region is sub-humid with moderately rolling topography, while the Iowa study region is humid with low-relief topography. The relationship of soil moisture standard deviation, skewness and the coefficient of variation versus mean moisture content was explored at six distinct extent scales, ranging from 2.5 m to 50 km. Results showed that variability generally increases with extent scale. The standard deviation increased from 0.036 cm3/cm3 at the 2.5-m scale to 0.071 cm3/cm3 at the 50-km scale. The log standard deviation of soil moisture increased linearly with the log extent scale, from 16 m to 1.6 km, indicative of fractal scaling. The soil moisture standard deviation versus mean moisture content exhibited a convex upward relationship at the 800-m and 50-km scales, with maximum values at mean moisture contents of roughly 0.17 cm3/cm3 and 0.19 cm3/cm3, respectively. An empirical model derived from the observed behavior of soil moisture variability was used to estimate uncertainty in the mean moisture content for a fixed number of samples at the 800-m and 50-km scales, as well as the number of ground-truth samples needed to achieve 0.05 cm3/cm3 and 0.03 cm3/cm3 accuracies. The empirical relationships can also be used to parameterize surface soil moisture variations in land surface and hydrological models across a range of scales. To our knowledge, this is the first study to document the behavior of soil moisture variability over this range of extent scales using ground-based measurements. Our results will contribute not only to efficient and reliable satellite validation, but also to better utilization of remotely sensed soil moisture products for

  15. The linear model and experimentally observed resonant field amplification in tokamaks and reversed field pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Pustovitov, V. D.

    2011-01-15

    A review is given of the experimentally observed effects related to the resonant field amplification (RFA) and the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) instability in tokamaks and reversed field pinches (RFPs). This includes the feedback rotation of RWM in RFX-mod RFP, dependence of the RWM growth rate on the plasma-wall separation observed in JT-60U, appearance of the slowly growing RWM precursors in JT-60U and similar phenomena in other devices. The experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions based on the model comprising the Maxwell equations, Ohm's law for the conducting wall, the boundary conditions and assumption of linear plasma response to the external magnetic perturbations. The model describes the plasma reaction to the error field as essentially depending on two factors: the plasma proximity to the RWM stability threshold and the natural rotation frequency of the plasma mode. The linear response means that these characteristics are determined by the plasma equilibrium parameters only. It is shown that the mentioned effects in different devices under different conditions can be described on a common basis with only assumption that the plasma behaves as a linear system. To extend the range of the model validation, some predictions are derived with proposals for experimental studies of the RFA dynamics.

  16. Coronal Magnetic Fields Derived from Simultaneous Microwave and EUV Observations and Comparison with the Potential Field Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyawaki, Shun; iwai, Kazumasa; Shibasaki, Kiyoto; Shiota, Daikou; Nozawa, Satoshi

    2016-02-01

    We estimated the accuracy of coronal magnetic fields derived from radio observations by comparing them to potential field calculations and the differential emission measure measurements using EUV observations. We derived line-of-sight components of the coronal magnetic field from polarization observations of the thermal bremsstrahlung in the NOAA active region 11150, observed around 3:00 UT on 2011 February 3 using the Nobeyama Radioheliograph at 17 GHz. Because the thermal bremsstrahlung intensity at 17 GHz includes both chromospheric and coronal components, we extracted only the coronal component by measuring the coronal emission measure in EUV observations. In addition, we derived only the radio polarization component of the corona by selecting the region of coronal loops and weak magnetic field strength in the chromosphere along the line of sight. The upper limits of the coronal longitudinal magnetic fields were determined as 100-210 G. We also calculated the coronal longitudinal magnetic fields from the potential field extrapolation using the photospheric magnetic field obtained from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. However, the calculated potential fields were certainly smaller than the observed coronal longitudinal magnetic field. This discrepancy between the potential and the observed magnetic field strengths can be explained consistently by two reasons: (1) the underestimation of the coronal emission measure resulting from the limitation of the temperature range of the EUV observations, and (2) the underestimation of the coronal magnetic field resulting from the potential field assumption.

  17. Field Observations of Supraglacial Streams on the Juneau Icefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zok, A.; Karlstrom, L.; Hood, E. W.; Manga, M.; Wenzel, R.; Kite, E. S.

    2010-12-01

    Each year during the summer, networks of meltwater streams form below the neve line on many glaciers as the ice surface ablates. This supraglacial network forms an integral part of the total glacial hydrologic system, and exhibits many features common to other fluvial systems despite marked differences in the mechanisms and timescales of erosional processes. Here, we discuss field observations of supraglacial streams on the Mendenhall and Llewellyn glaciers on the Juneau Icefield, taken in July and August, 2010. These sites, 960 m apart in elevation and on different sides of the continental divide, exist in different microclimates and are dominated by different terrain features. The Mendenhall site, near the terminus, receives a large yearly rainwater input and exhibits well-developed stream networks dominated by structural control of the underlying ice. In contrast, the Llewellyn site is much drier and near the neve line, with a dense network of streams whose incision dominates the sculpting of the glacial surface. Stream data includes temperature measurements taken with a Distributed Temperature Sensor and HOBO temperature loggers, velocity profiles taken with an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter, downstream meander migration rates, and the isotopic composition of water samples. We also document the dynamics of streams in the context of the broader supraglacial network by taking detailed GPS surveys of the beds and banks of streams, as well as measuring drainage density and subsurface flow. Finally, we relate these measurements to surface ablation rates and meteorological data gathered from each site. We find distinct diurnal variation in stream water temperature, discharge, and isotopic content. Distributed Temperature Sensor measurements and cross sectional temperature profiles reveal subtle variation in downstream and cross-stream water temperature. Water temperature generally increases downstream where channels tend to be large, and we investigate the contribution

  18. Application of relativistic mean field and effective field theory densities to scattering observables for Ca isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, M.; Panda, R. N.; Routray, T. R.; Patra, S. K.

    2010-12-01

    In the framework of relativistic mean field (RMF) theory, we have calculated the density distribution of protons and neutrons for Ca40,42,44,48 with NL3 and G2 parameter sets. The microscopic proton-nucleus optical potentials for p+Ca40,42,44,48 systems are evaluated from the Dirac nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude and the density of the target nucleus using relativistic-Love-Franey and McNeil-Ray-Wallace parametrizations. We have estimated the scattering observables, such as the elastic differential scattering cross section, analyzing power and the spin observables with the relativistic impulse approximation (RIA). The results have been compared with the experimental data for a few selective cases and we find that the use of density as well as the scattering matrix parametrizations are crucial for the theoretical prediction.

  19. Application of relativistic mean field and effective field theory densities to scattering observables for Ca isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuyan, M.; Panda, R. N.; Routray, T. R.; Patra, S. K.

    2010-12-15

    In the framework of relativistic mean field (RMF) theory, we have calculated the density distribution of protons and neutrons for {sup 40,42,44,48}Ca with NL3 and G2 parameter sets. The microscopic proton-nucleus optical potentials for p+{sup 40,42,44,48}Ca systems are evaluated from the Dirac nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude and the density of the target nucleus using relativistic-Love-Franey and McNeil-Ray-Wallace parametrizations. We have estimated the scattering observables, such as the elastic differential scattering cross section, analyzing power and the spin observables with the relativistic impulse approximation (RIA). The results have been compared with the experimental data for a few selective cases and we find that the use of density as well as the scattering matrix parametrizations are crucial for the theoretical prediction.

  20. Field observations of soil moisture variability across scales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, over 36,000 ground-based soil moisture measurements collected during the SGP97, SGP99, SMEX02, and SMEX03 field campaigns were analyzed to characterize the behavior of soil moisture variability across scales. The field campaigns were conducted in Oklahoma and Iowa in the central USA. ...

  1. Field Science Ethnography: Methods For Systematic Observation on an Expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Haughton-Mars expedition is a multidisciplinary project, exploring an impact crater in an extreme environment to determine how people might live and work on Mars. The expedition seeks to understand and field test Mars facilities, crew roles, operations, and computer tools. I combine an ethnographic approach to establish a baseline understanding of how scientists prefer to live and work when relatively unemcumbered, with a participatory design approach of experimenting with procedures and tools in the context of use. This paper focuses on field methods for systematically recording and analyzing the expedition's activities. Systematic photography and time-lapse video are combined with concept mapping to organize and present information. This hybrid approach is generally applicable to the study of modern field expeditions having a dozen or more multidisciplinary participants, spread over a large terrain during multiple field seasons.

  2. Mariner 10 magnetic field observations of the Venus wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Behannon, K. W.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetic field measurements made over a 21-hour interval during the Mariner 10 encounter with Venus were used to study the down-stream region of the solar wind-Venus interaction over a distance of approximately 100 R sub v. For most of the day before closest approach the spacecraft was located in a sheath-like region which was apparently bounded by planetary bow shock on the outer side and either a planetary wake boundary or transient boundary-like feature on the inner side. The spacecraft made multiple encounters with the wake-like boundary during the 21-hour interval with an increasing frequency as it approached the planet. Each pass into the wake boundary from the sheath region was consistently characterized by a slight decrease in magnetic field magnitude, a marked increase in the frequency and amplitude of field fluctuations, and a systematic clockwise rotation of the field direction when viewed from above the plane of the planet orbit.

  3. Service Learning and Participant Observation: Undergraduate Field Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Compares the service learning experience of college students to the traditional social science technique of participant observation. Suggests that service learning allows students to test theories through personal observation in a service setting and experience the logic and practice of social research. Uses examples from the Xavier University…

  4. Observations of interactions between interplanetary and geomagnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Magnetospheric effects associated with variations of the north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field are examined in light of recent recent experimental and theoretical results. Although the occurrence of magnetospheric substorms is statistically related to periods of southward interplanetary magnetic field, the details of the interaction are not understood. In particular, attempts to separate effects resulting directly from the interaction between the interplanetary and geomagnetic fields from those associated with substorms have produced conflicting results. The transfer of magnetic flux from the dayside to the nightside magnetosphere is evidenced by equatorward motion of the polar cusp and increases of the magnetic energy density in the lobes of the geomagnetic tail. The formation of a macroscopic X-type neutral line at tail distances less than 35 R sub E appears to be a substorm phenomenon.

  5. Microspacecraft and Earth observation: Electrical Field (ELF) measurement project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    There is a need for an inexpensive, extensive, long-lasting global electric field measurement system (ELF). The primary performance driver of this mission is the need to measure the attitude of each spacecraft in the Earth's electric field very accurately. In addition, it is necessary to know the electric charge generated by the satellite as it crosses the magnetic field lines (E equals V times B). In order to achieve the desired global coverage, a constellation of about 50 satellites in at least 18 different orbits will be used. To reduce the cost of each satellite, off-the-shelf, proven technology will be used whenever possible. Researchers have set a limit of $500,000 per satellite. Researchers expect the program cost, including the deployment of the entire constellation, to be less than $100 million. The minimum projected mission life is five years.

  6. Convective Systems Observed and Simulated During TRMM Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently completed TRMM field campaigns (TEFLUN1998, SCSMEX-1998, TRMM.LBA-1999, and KWAJEX 1999) have obtained direct measurements of microphysical data associated with convective systems from various geographical locations. These TRMM field experiments were designed to contribute to fundamental understanding of cloud dynamics and microphysics, as well as for validation,, testing assumptions and error estimates of cloud-resolving models, forward radiative transfer models, algorithms used to estimate rainfall statistics and vertical structure of precipitation and latent heating from both surface-based radar and satellites.

  7. Multi-point Magnetic Field Observations of Field-Aligned Currents from Swarm Constellation Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Guan; Chi, Peter; Lühr, Hermann; Gjerloev, Jesper; Stolle, Claudia; Park, Jaeheung; Rauberg, Jan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we report the results of case studies of multi-point magnetic field measurements of field-aligned currents (FACs) from Swarm constellation mission to understand their temporal characteristics and hemispheric asymmetry. For science operations (since April, 2014), the three spacecraft were placed in slightly different polar orbits: Swarm B spacecraft in a higher altitude orbit (507km x 512km) and Swarm A and C side-by-side in lower altitude orbits (459km x 462km). In the beginning of the science operational phase, the longitudinal separations of the orbital planes were small, and Swarm A/C pair and Swarm B were nearly out of phase in the orbit. This unique orbit configuration provides opportunities to study some new features of FACs. Specifically, the Swarm satellites make multiple crossings of a FAC region within a few hours. Such data enable us to study temporal variations in several time scales, from 1 minute up to about 3 hours. Furthermore, the three satellites make nearly simultaneous observations of FACs in northern and southern hemispheres, which provide us an opportunity to study the hemispheric asymmetry.

  8. Student Brinkmanship: Some Field Observations, Findings and Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Licata, Joseph W.

    The relationship between student brinkmanship, defined as an assertive student behavior which attempts to challenge school authority while avoiding negative sanctions, and classroom social structure in five secondary school classrooms was investigated through a field study. Subjects were 185 students in a small rural high school in Georgia.…

  9. The magnetic field of saturn: pioneer 11 observations.

    PubMed

    Acuña, M H; Ness, N F

    1980-01-25

    The intrinsic magnetic field of Saturn measured by the high-field fluxgate magnetometer is much weaker than expected. An analysis of preliminary data combined with the preliminary trajectory yield a model for the main planetary field which is a simple centered dipole of moment 0.20 +/- 0.01 gauss-Rs(3) = 4.3 +/- 0.2 x 10(28) gauss-cm(3) (1 Rs = 1 Saturn radius = 60,000 km). The polarity is opposite that of Earth, and, surprisingly, the tilt is small, within 2 degrees +/- 1 degrees of the rotation axis. The equatorial field intensity at the cloud tops is 0.2 gauss, and the polar intensity is 0.56 gauss. The unique moon Titan is expected to be located within the magnetosheath of Saturn or the interplanetary medium about 50 percent of the time because the average subsolar point distance to the magnetosphere is estimated to be 20 Rs, the orbital distance to Titan. PMID:17833558

  10. The radial component of the heliospheric magnetic field: Ulysses observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Balogh, A.; Lepping, R. P.

    1995-01-01

    The radial field component, B(sub R), has been monitored continuously since the Ulysses spacecraft left the ecliptic plane in February 1992 travelling toward the southern pole of the Sun. In order to separate spatial from temporal changes, the Ulysses measurements from 0 to 80 heliographic latitude were compared with in-ecliptic measurements of B(sub R) being made simultaneously by IMP-8. The data revealed essentially the same field strengths and time variations at both locations. The conclusion was drawn that there was no significant latitude gradient in B(sub R) and that the stronger polar cap coronal magnetic fields were being transported equatorward to yield a uniform field in the solar wind. The results contrasted with the predictions of the various source surface models which ignore magnetic stresses within 2.5 solar radii. Since the maximum south latitude was attained in September, 1994, Ulysses has traveled northward toward an ecliptic crossing in March 1995 and onward into the north solar hemisphere. The recent results will be presented and compared with those obtained in the southern hemisphere.

  11. The Value of Supplementing Panel Software Reviews with Field Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owston, Ronald D.; Wideman, Herbert H.

    1987-01-01

    Describes study that compared teacher panel reviews of educational software to field test reports to determine the levels of agreement between the two evaluation types. Methods of evaluation are discussed, the York Educational Software Evaluation Scales (YESES) are explained, and the results of the study of 36 software packages are presented.…

  12. Magnetic Field and Plasma Diagnostics from Coordinated Prominence Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Levens, P.; Dalmasse, K.; Mein, N.; Mein, P.; Lopez-Ariste, A.; Labrosse, N.; Heinzel, P.

    2016-04-01

    We study the magnetic field in prominences from a statistical point of view, by using THEMIS in the MTR mode, performing spectropolarimetry of the He I D3 line. Combining these measurements with spectroscopic data from IRIS, Hinode/EIS as well as ground-based telescopes, such as the Meudon Solar Tower, we infer the temperature, density, and flow velocities of the plasma. There are a number of open questions that we aim to answer: - What is the general direction of the magnetic field in prominences? Is the model using a single orientation of magnetic field always valid for atypical prominences? %- Does this depend on the location of the filament on the disk (visible in Hα, in He II 304 Å) over an inversion line between weak or strong network ? - Are prominences in a weak environment field dominated by gas pressure? - Measuring the Doppler shifts in Mg II lines (with IRIS) and in Hα can tell us if there are substantial velocities to maintain vertical rotating structures, as has been suggested for tornado-like prominences. We present here some results obtained with different ground-based and space-based instruments in this framework.

  13. Sensor Technology Performance Characteristics- Field and Laboratory Observations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Observed Intangible Performance Characteristics RH and temperature impacts may be significant for some devices Internal battery lifetimes range from 4 to 24 hoursSensor packaging can interfere with accurate measurements (reactivity)Wireless communication protocols are not foolpr...

  14. Space Technology 5 Observations of Auroral Field-Aligned Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James

    2008-01-01

    During its three month long technology validation mission, Space Technology 5 (ST-5) returned high quality multi-point measurements of the near-Earth magnetic field. Its three micro-satellites were launched into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn - dusk, sun synchronous orbit (inclination = 105.60) orbit with a period of 138 min by a Pegasus launch vehicle on March 22, 2006. The spacecraft were maintained in a "pearls on a sting" constellation with controlled spacings ranging from just over 5000 km down to under 50 km. The individual micro-satellites were 48 cm tall octagons with diameters of 50 cm. They were spin-stabilized at approximately 20 rpm at deployment and slowly spun-down to about 15 rpm by the end of the mission. Each spacecraft carried a miniature tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) provided by the University of California at Los Angeles mounted at the end of a ultra-low mass 72 cm boom. These data allow, for the first time, the separation of temporal and spatial variations in field-aligned current (FAC) perturbations measured in low-Earth orbit on time scales of 10 sec to 10 min. The constellation measurements are used to directly determine field-aligned current sheet motion, thickness. and current density. Two multi-point methods for the inference of FAC current density that have not previously been possible in low-Earth orbit are demonstrated: 1) the -standard method." based upon s/c velocity, but corrected for FAC current sheet motion. and 2) the "gradiometer method" which uses simultaneous magnetic field measurements at two points with known separation. Future studies will apply these methods to the entire ST-5 data sct and expand to include horizontal ionospheric currents. ULF waves and geomagnetic field gradient analyses.

  15. Space Technology 5 observations of auroral field-aligned currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, James

    During its three month long technology validation mission, Space Technology 5 (ST-5) returned high quality multi-point measurements of the near-Earth magnetic field. Its three micro-satellites were launched into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn - dusk, sun synchronous orbit (inclination = 105.6o) orbit with a period of 138 min by a Pegasus launch vehicle on March 22, 2006. The spacecraft were maintained in a "pearls on a sting" constellation with controlled spacings ranging from just over 5000 km down to under 50 km. The individual micro-satellites were 48 cm tall octagons with diameters of 50 cm. They were spin-stabilized at approximately 20 rpm at deployment and slowly spun-down to about 15 rpm by the end of the mission. Each spacecraft carried a miniature tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) provided by the University of California at Los Angeles mounted at the end of a ultra-low mass 72 cm boom. These data allow, for the first time, the separation of temporal and spatial variations in field-aligned current (FAC) perturbations measured in low-Earth orbit on time scales of 10 sec to 10 min. The constellation measurements are used to directly determine field-aligned current sheet motion, thickness, and current density. Two multi-point methods for the inference of FAC current density that have not previously been possible in low-Earth orbit are demonstrated: 1) the "standard method," based upon s/c velocity, but corrected for FAC current sheet motion, and 2) the "gradiometer method" which uses simultaneous magnetic field measurements at two points with known separation. Future studies will apply these methods to the entire ST-5 data set and expand to include horizontal ionospheric currents, ULF waves and geomagnetic field gradient analyses.

  16. Deep, wide-field, global VLBI observations of the Hubble deep field north (HDF-N) and flanking fields (HFF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, S.; Barthel, P. D.; Garrett, M. A.

    2013-02-01

    Context. Dust is commonly present in weakly radio emitting star-forming galaxies and this dust may obscure the signatures of accreting black holes in these objects. Aims: We aim to uncover weak active galactic nuclei, AGN, in the faint radio source population by means of deep high-resolution radio observations. Methods: VLBI observations with a world-wide array at unparallelled sensitivity are carried out to assess the nature of the faint radio source population in the Hubble deep field north and its flanking fields. Results: Images of twelve compact, AGN-driven radio sources are presented. These represent roughly one quarter of the detectable faint radio source sample. Most, but not all of these low power AGN have X-ray detections. Conclusions: The majority of the faint radio source population must be star-forming galaxies. Faint AGN occur in a variety of (distant) host galaxies, and these are often accompanied by a dust-obscured starburst. Deep, high-resolution VLBI is a unique, powerful technique to assess the occurrence of faint AGN.

  17. Observation of airplane flow fields by natural condensation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James F.; Chambers, Joseph R.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    1988-01-01

    In-flight condensation patterns can illustrate a variety of airplane flow fields, such as attached and separated flows, vortex flows, and expansion and shock waves. These patterns are a unique source of flow visualization that has not been utilized previously. Condensation patterns at full-scale Reynolds number can provide useful information for researchers experimenting in subscale tunnels. It is also shown that computed values of relative humidity in the local flow field provide an inexpensive way to analyze the qualitative features of the condensation pattern, although a more complete theoretical modeling is necessary to obtain details of the condensation process. Furthermore, the analysis revealed that relative humidity is more sensitive to changes in local static temperature than to changes in pressure.

  18. Microspacecraft and Earth observation: Electrical field (ELF) measurement project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Tanya; Elkington, Scot; Parker, Scott; Smith, Grover; Shumway, Andrew; Christensen, Craig; Parsa, Mehrdad; Larsen, Layne; Martinez, Ranae; Powell, George

    1990-01-01

    The Utah State University space system design project for 1989 to 1990 focuses on the design of a global electrical field sensing system to be deployed in a constellation of microspacecraft. The design includes the selection of the sensor and the design of the spacecraft, the sensor support subsystems, the launch vehicle interface structure, on board data storage and communications subsystems, and associated ground receiving stations. Optimization of satellite orbits and spacecraft attitude are critical to the overall mapping of the electrical field and, thus, are also included in the project. The spacecraft design incorporates a deployable sensor array (5 m booms) into a spinning oblate platform. Data is taken every 0.1 seconds by the electrical field sensors and stored on-board. An omni-directional antenna communicates with a ground station twice per day to down link the stored data. Wrap-around solar cells cover the exterior of the spacecraft to generate power. Nine Pegasus launches may be used to deploy fifty such satellites to orbits with inclinations greater than 45 deg. Piggyback deployment from other launch vehicles such as the DELTA 2 is also examined.

  19. Microspacecraft and Earth observation: Electrical field (ELF) measurement project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Tanya; Elkington, Scot; Parker, Scott; Smith, Grover; Shumway, Andrew; Christensen, Craig; Parsa, Mehrdad; Larsen, Layne; Martinez, Ranae; Powell, George

    The Utah State University space system design project for 1989 to 1990 focuses on the design of a global electrical field sensing system to be deployed in a constellation of microspacecraft. The design includes the selection of the sensor and the design of the spacecraft, the sensor support subsystems, the launch vehicle interface structure, on board data storage and communications subsystems, and associated ground receiving stations. Optimization of satellite orbits and spacecraft attitude are critical to the overall mapping of the electrical field and, thus, are also included in the project. The spacecraft design incorporates a deployable sensor array (5 m booms) into a spinning oblate platform. Data is taken every 0.1 seconds by the electrical field sensors and stored on-board. An omni-directional antenna communicates with a ground station twice per day to down link the stored data. Wrap-around solar cells cover the exterior of the spacecraft to generate power. Nine Pegasus launches may be used to deploy fifty such satellites to orbits with inclinations greater than 45 deg. Piggyback deployment from other launch vehicles such as the DELTA 2 is also examined.

  20. Laboratory observation of magnetic field growth driven by shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Intrator, T. P. Feng, Y.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Dorf, L.; Sun, X.

    2014-04-15

    Two magnetic flux ropes that collide and bounce have been characterized in the laboratory. We find screw pinch profiles that include ion flow v{sub i}, magnetic field B, current density J, and plasma pressure. The electron flow v{sub e} can be inferred, allowing the evaluation of the Hall J×B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm's Law. Flux ropes that are initially cylindrical are mutually attracted and compress each other, which distorts the cylindrical symmetry. Magnetic field is created via the ∇×v{sub e}×B induction term in Ohm's Law where in-plane (perpendicular) shear of parallel flow (along the flux rope) is the dominant feature, along with some dissipation and magnetic reconnection. We predict and measure the growth of a quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field δB{sub z}. This is a simple and coherent example of a shear flow driven dynamo. There is some similarity with two dimensional reconnection scenarios, which induce a current sheet and thus out-of-plane flow in the third dimension, despite the customary picture that considers flows only in the reconnection plane. These data illustrate a general and deterministic mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence.

  1. VOYAGER OBSERVATIONS OF THE DIFFUSE FAR-ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, Jayant; Henry, Richard Conn; Holberg, Jay B.

    2012-03-01

    The two Voyager spacecraft have completed their planetary exploration mission and are now probing the outer realms of the heliosphere. The Voyager ultraviolet spectrometers continued to operate well after the Voyager 2 Neptune encounter in 1989. We present a complete database of diffuse radiation observations made by both Voyagers: a total of 1943 spectra (500-1600 A) scattered throughout the sky. These include observations of dust-scattered starlight, emission lines from the hot interstellar medium, and a number of locations where no diffuse radiation was detected, with the very low upper limit of about 25 photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} A{sup -1}. Many of these observations were from late in the mission when there was significantly less contribution from interplanetary emission lines and thus less contamination of the interstellar signal.

  2. Nodding Syndrome in Uganda: Field Observations, Challenges and Research Agenda

    PubMed Central

    Feldmeier, Hermann; Komazawa, Osuke; Moji, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes observations made in Northern Uganda and a lecture given at the Nodding Syndrome Workshop in Nagasaki September 2013. The objective of the manuscript is to summarize the current knowledge on nodding syndrome and to provide an agenda for investigations into the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and care management of nodding syndrome in Uganda. PMID:25425959

  3. Nodding syndrome in Uganda: field observations, challenges and research agenda.

    PubMed

    Feldmeier, Hermann; Komazawa, Osuke; Moji, Kazuhiko

    2014-06-01

    This article summarizes observations made in Northern Uganda and a lecture given at the Nodding Syndrome Workshop in Nagasaki September 2013. The objective of the manuscript is to summarize the current knowledge on nodding syndrome and to provide an agenda for investigations into the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and care management of nodding syndrome in Uganda. PMID:25425959

  4. Programs for the Field Collection of Observational Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, William L.; Schill, Loreen G.

    The collection of observational data in natural settings and in real time requires equipment that is light and easily used, and programs that permit rapid and flexible encoding of data. This paper describes a set of four programs for collecting and analyzing continuous time sample, focal-individual data as described by J. Altmann (1974), using a…

  5. Quantifying solar superactive regions with vector magnetic field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. Q.; Wang, J. X.

    2012-07-01

    Context. The vector magnetic field characteristics of superactive regions (SARs) hold the key for understanding why SARs are extremely active and provide the guidance in space weather prediction. Aims: We aim to quantify the characteristics of SARs using the vector magnetograms taken by the Solar Magnetic Field Telescope at Huairou Solar Observatory Station. Methods: The vector magnetic field characteristics of 14 SARs in solar cycles 22 and 23 were analyzed using the following four parameters: 1) the magnetic flux imbalance between opposite polarities; 2) the total photospheric free magnetic energy; 3) the length of the magnetic neutral line with its steep horizontal magnetic gradient; and 4) the area with strong magnetic shear. Furthermore, we selected another eight large and inactive active regions (ARs), which are called fallow ARs (FARs), to compare them with the SARs. Results: We found that most of the SARs have a net magnetic flux higher than 7.0 × 1021 Mx, a total photospheric free magnetic energy higher than 1.0 × 1024 erg cm-1, a magnetic neutral line with a steep horizontal magnetic gradient (≥300 G Mm-1) longer than 30 Mm, and an area with strong magnetic shear (shear angle ≥ 80°) greater than 100 Mm2. In contrast, the values of these parameters for the FARs are mostly very low. The Pearson χ2 test was used to examine the significance of the difference between the SARs and FARs, and the results indicate that these two types of ARs can be fairly distinguished by each of these parameters. The significance levels are 99.55%, 99.98%, 99.98%, and 99.96%, respectively. However, no single parameter can distinguish them perfectly. Therefore we propose a composite index based on these parameters, and find that the distinction between the two types of ARs is also significant with a significance level of 99.96%. These results are useful for a better physical understanding of the SAR and FAR.

  6. Field observations of artificial sand and oil agglomerates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalyander, Patricia (Soupy); Long, Joseph W.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; McLaughlin, Molly R.; Mickey, Rangley C.

    2015-01-01

    Oil that comes into the surf zone following spills, such as occurred during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout, can mix with local sediment to form heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates (SOAs), at times in the form of mats a few centimeters thick and tens of meters long. Smaller agglomerates that form in situ or pieces that break off of larger mats, sometimes referred to as surface residual balls (SRBs), range in size from sand-sized grains to patty-shaped pieces several centimeters (cm) in diameter. These mobile SOAs can cause beach oiling for extended periods following the spill, on the scale of years as in the case of DWH. Limited research, including a prior effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigating SOA mobility, alongshore transport, and seafloor interaction using numerical model output, focused on the physical dynamics of SOAs. To address this data gap, we constructed artificial sand and oil agglomerates (aSOAs) with sand and paraffin wax to mimic the size and density of genuine SOAs. These aSOAs were deployed in the nearshore off the coast of St. Petersburg, Florida, during a field experiment to investigate their movement and seafloor interaction. This report presents the methodology for constructing aSOAs and describes the field experiment. Data acquired during the field campaign, including videos and images of aSOA movement in the nearshore (1.5-meter and 0.5-meter water depth) and in the swash zone, are also presented in this report.

  7. Time Series Vegetation Aerodynamic Roughness Fields Estimated from MODIS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borak, Jordan S.; Jasinski, Michael F.; Crago, Richard D.

    2005-01-01

    Most land surface models used today require estimates of aerodynamic roughness length in order to characterize momentum transfer between the surface and atmosphere. The most common method of prescribing roughness is through the use of empirical look-up tables based solely on land cover class. Theoretical approaches that employ satellite-based estimates of canopy density present an attractive alternative to current look-up table approaches based on vegetation cover type that do not account for within-class variability and are oftentimes simplistic with respect to temporal variability. The current research applies Raupach s formulation of momentum aerodynamic roughness to MODIS data on a regional scale in order to estimate seasonally variable roughness and zero-plane displacement height fields using bulk land cover parameters estimated by [Jasinski, M.F., Borak, J., Crago, R., 2005. Bulk surface momentum parameters for satellite-derived vegetation fields. Agric. For. Meteorol. 133, 55-68]. Results indicate promising advances over look-up approaches with respect to characterization of vegetation roughness variability in land surface and atmospheric circulation models.

  8. Relationships between field-aligned currents, electric fields and particle precipitation as observed by dynamics Explorer-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.; Iyemori, T.; Hoffman, R. A.; Maynard, N. C.; Burch, J. L.; Winningham, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The relationships between field-aligned currents, electric fields, and particle fluxes are determined using observations from the polar orbiting low-altitude satellite Dynamics Explorer-2. It is shown that the north-south electric field and the east-west magnetic field components are usually highly correlated in the field-aligned current regions. This proportionality observationally proves that the field-aligned current equals the divergence of the height-integrated ionospheric Pedersen current in the meridional plane to a high degree of approximation. As a general rule, in the evening sector the upward field-aligned currents flow in the boundary plasma sheet region and the downward currents flow in the central plasma sheet region. The current densities determined independently from the plasma and magnetic field measurements are compared. Although the current densities deduced from the two methods are in general agreement, the degree and extent of the agreement vary in individual cases.

  9. Relationships between field-aligned currents, electric fields, and particle precipitation as observed by Dynamics Explorer-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.; Iyemori, T.; Hoffman, R. A.; Maynard, N. C.; Burch, J. L.; Winningham, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The relationships between field-aligned currents, electric fields, and particle fluxes are determined using observations from the polar orbiting low-altitude satellite Dynamics Explorer-2. It is shown that the north-south electric field and the east-west magnetic field components are usually highly correlated in the field-aligned current regions. This proportionality observationally proves that the field-aligned current equals the divergence of the height-integrated ionospheric Pedersen current in the meridional plane to a high degree of approximation. As a general rule, in the evening sector the upward field-aligned currents flow in the boundary plasma sheet region and the downward currents flow in the central plasma sheet region. The current densities determined independently from the plasma and magnetic field measurements are compared. Although the current densities deduced from the two methods are in general agreement, the degree and extent of the agreement vary in individual cases.

  10. Field Observations of Canopy Flows over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Eleanor R.; Ross, Andrew N.; Gardiner, Barry A.; Mobbs, Stephen D.

    2015-08-01

    The investigation of airflow over and within forests in complex terrain has been, until recently, limited to a handful of modelling and laboratory studies. Here, we present an observational dataset of airflow measurements inside and above a forest situated on a ridge on the Isle of Arran, Scotland. The spatial coverage of the observations all the way across the ridge makes this a unique dataset. Two case studies of across-ridge flow under near-neutral conditions are presented and compared with recent idealized two-dimensional modelling studies. Changes in the canopy profiles of both mean wind and turbulent quantities across the ridge are broadly consistent with these idealized studies. Flow separation over the lee slope is seen as a ubiquitous feature of the flow. The three-dimensional nature of the terrain and the heterogeneous forest canopy does however lead to significant variations in the flow separation across the ridge, particularly over the less steep western slope. Furthermore, strong directional shear with height in regions of flow separation has a significant impact on the Reynolds stress terms and other turbulent statistics. Also observed is a decrease in the variability of the wind speed over the summit and lee slope, which has not been seen in previous studies. This dataset should provide a valuable resource for validating models of canopy flow over real, complex terrain.

  11. Field Observations of Meteotsunami in Kami-koshiki Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, T.; Yamashiro, T.; Nishimura, N.

    2012-12-01

    BACKGROUND Meteotsunami; atmospherically induced destructive ocean waves in the tsunami frequency band, are known in Japan by the local term "abiki", literally meaning "net-dragging waves" in Japanese. Large abiki occur in bays and harbors along the west coast of Kyushu almost every year during winter and early spring. On 24-25 February, 2009, Urauchi Bay, located on west coast of Kami-Koshiki Island on the southeast coast of Kyushu, was subjected to a destructive meteotsunami. In this event, a maximum sea surface height of 3.1 m was observed at the inner part of the bay. At least 18 boats capsized and eight houses were flooded. This event surpassed the previous record height for an abiki in Japan: 278 cm in Nagasaki Bay, also located west coast of Kyushu, in 1979. Generally, such an elongated inlet with narrow mouth as Urauchi bay provides calm water conditions even when offshore weather is stormy. Therefore, the area is regarded as a suitable place for the farming of large fish with a high market value. Possible damage to the extensive fish cage system as a result of meteotsunami events is of concern, especially because aquaculture is the main industry in the isolated islands. Forecasting of meteotsunami is a serious request from the local people. AIMS The objectives of the present study are to detect a meteotsunami event in Urauchi Bay and to clarify the meteorological and hydrodynamic conditions related to its occurrence. This work attempts to observe the whole process of a meteotsunami event: generation offshore, resonance while it propagates, and finally amplification in the bay. Observations were conducted over a period of 82 days; 12 January to 4 April, 2010, aiming to record large secondary oscillations. A comprehensive measuring system for sea level, current and barometric pressure fluctuations was deployed covering not only inside and near Urauchi Bay but also further offshore in the vicinity of Mejima in the East China Sea. MAIN RESULTS 1) Large

  12. Observations of vector magnetic fields with a magneto-optic filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cacciani, Alessandro; Varsik, John; Zirin, Harold

    1990-01-01

    The use of the magnetooptic filter to observe solar magnetic fields in the potassium line at 7699 A is described. The filter has been used in the Big Bear videomagnetograph since October 23. It gives a high sensitivity and dynamic range for longitudnal magnetic fields and enables measurement of transverse magnetic fields using the sigma component. Examples of the observations are presented.

  13. Snowfall Characterization by Field Observation and Atmospheric Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco, Dianna M.

    The snowfall rate is related to microphysical and dynamical processes in weather systems and is further specified by choice of measurement time, related to the statistics of individual falling ice crystals. A snowflake is definable as a single ice crystal having long range order in the crystal lattice or as a polycrystalline having a multitude of individual single crystals, frozen together as graupel or held together though interlocking shapes as an aggregate snowflake. Snowflakes are collected on a black cloth, next to a scale, and photographed using a macro magnification. Snowflakes captured at the surface are characterized by their appearance from the habit, shape, size, symmetry, thickness, concentration, and fall of the individual ice crystals and of aggregates. Individual ice crystals are identified, counted, and related to the snowfall rate for a calculation of ice crystal number flux. The snowfall rate is characterized as a concentration and an inferred flux of individual nucleation events, to be related to possible direct nucleation and secondary ice formation (such as rime splintering) aloft. Identifying the number of ice crystals requires a degree of persistence and skill, is not readily automated, and is capable of providing key information on the growth history of ice crystals, not obtainable by other means. Surface data is collected through a surface weather station within one mile of the Observation Site. Atmospheric soundings produced by the National Weather Service, less than two miles distance from the Observation Site, aids in the approximation of the ice crystal's life history.

  14. Integral field observations of damped Lyman-α galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, L.; Sánchez, S. F.; Jahnke, K.; Becker, T.; Kelz, A.; Wisotzki, L.; Roth, M. M.

    2004-02-01

    We report preliminary results from a targeted investigation on quasars containing damped Lyman-α absorption (DLA) lines as well strong metal absorption lines, carried out with the Potsdam Multi Aperture Spectrophotometer (PMAS). We search for line-emitting objects at the same redshift as the absorption lines and close to the line of sight of the QSOs. We have observed and detected the already confirmed absorbing galaxies in Q2233+131 (zabs=3.15) and Q0151+045 (zabs=0.168), while failing to find spectral signatures for the z=0.091 absorber in Q0738+313. From the Q2233+131 DLA galaxy, we have detected extended Lyα emission from an area of 3″×5″.

  15. Quantum gases. Observation of isolated monopoles in a quantum field.

    PubMed

    Ray, M W; Ruokokoski, E; Tiurev, K; Möttönen, M; Hall, D S

    2015-05-01

    Topological defects play important roles throughout nature, appearing in contexts as diverse as cosmology, particle physics, superfluidity, liquid crystals, and metallurgy. Point defects can arise naturally as magnetic monopoles resulting from symmetry breaking in grand unified theories. We devised an experiment to create and detect quantum mechanical analogs of such monopoles in a spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate. The defects, which were stable on the time scale of our experiments, were identified from spin-resolved images of the condensate density profile that exhibit a characteristic dependence on the choice of quantization axis. Our observations lay the foundation for experimental studies of the dynamics and stability of topological point defects in quantum systems. PMID:25931553

  16. An observation planning algorithm applied to multi-objective astronomical observations and its simulation in COSMOS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yi; Gu, Yonggang; Zhai, Chao

    2012-09-01

    Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic sky surveys are now booming, such as LAMOST already built by China, BIGBOSS project put forward by the U.S. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and GTC (Gran Telescopio Canarias) telescope developed by the United States, Mexico and Spain. They all use or will use this approach and each fiber can be moved within a certain area for one astrology target, so observation planning is particularly important for this Sky Surveys. One observation planning algorithm used in multi-objective astronomical observations is developed. It can avoid the collision and interference between the fiber positioning units in the focal plane during the observation in one field of view, and the interested objects can be ovserved in a limited round with the maximize efficiency. Also, the observation simulation can be made for wide field of view through multi-FOV observation. After the observation planning is built ,the simulation is made in COSMOS field using GTC telescope. Interested galaxies, stars and high-redshift LBG galaxies are selected after the removal of the mask area, which may be bright stars. Then 9 FOV simulation is completed and observation efficiency and fiber utilization ratio for every round are given. Otherwise,allocating a certain number of fibers for background sky, giving different weights for different objects and how to move the FOV to improve the overall observation efficiency are discussed.

  17. [Economic assessment, a field between clinical research and observational studies].

    PubMed

    Launois, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Health technology assessments propose to study the differential impact of health interventions in a complex care system which is characterised by the multitude of individual behaviours and the diverse nature of the institutions involved. Current systems for data collection lend themselves poorly to this rigorous analysis of efficacy of treatments in the actual situations where they are used. Randomised trials endeavour to neutralise any parasitic interference which could compromise testing for a causal relationship between the treatment administered and the result obtained. Their methodology which establishes the term ceteris paribus in the principle of good practice lends itself poorly to an analysis of individual behaviour. Observational studies are start from actual treatment situations to describe them as reliably as possible. By definition, however, these assume that the natural course of events is not deviated by any intervention. The absence of an experimental plan increases the likelihood of bias and makes it more difficult to test for causal relationships. They lend themselves poorly to testing for incremental efficacy. The two instruments to be preferred are decisional analysis and quasi-experimental studies. Decisional analysis help to avoid the problems of external validity associated with randomised clinical trials by associating parameters which are extracted from data obtained from everyday practice. Quasi-experimental studies or pragmatic trials are based on the reality of behaviour of the prescriber and his/her patients; their impact on efficacy, quality of life social costs of the disease and of treatments may be identified under normal conditions of use. PMID:12609811

  18. Action video game players and deaf observers have larger Goldmann visual fields.

    PubMed

    Buckley, David; Codina, Charlotte; Bhardwaj, Palvi; Pascalis, Olivier

    2010-03-01

    We used Goldmann kinetic perimetry to compare how training and congenital auditory deprivation may affect the size of the visual field. We measured the ability of action video game players and deaf observers to detect small moving lights at various locations in the central (around 30 degrees from fixation) and peripheral (around 60 degrees ) visual fields. Experiment 1 found that 10 habitual video game players showed significantly larger central and peripheral field areas than 10 controls. In Experiment 2 we found that 13 congenitally deaf observers had significantly larger visual fields than 13 hearing controls for both the peripheral and central fields. Here the greatest differences were found in the lower parts of the fields. Comparison of the two groups showed that whereas VGP players have a more uniform increase in field size in both central and peripheral fields deaf observers show non-uniform increases with greatest increases in lower parts of the visual field. PMID:19962395

  19. Snapshots from deep magma chambers: decoding field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Campos, Cristina P.

    2014-05-01

    mingling, between contrasting magmas generated from different sources and depths. When flow patterns from these plutonic structures are compared to those obtained from experiments and numerical modeling, vortex-like systems may be locally recognized with chaotic regions among concentric regular flow cells, separated by major flow shearing zones. These patterns may be in remarkable good agreement with less complex flow patterns obtained for simpler dynamic systems. Differences in the magma supply and flow regimes between distinct plutons, in time and space, depict frozen moments in their evolution and therefore may explain some of the discrepancies in the different hybridization degrees for different complexes. The combination of detailed mapping of flow patterns in the field, numerical modeling and experimental results using natural magmatic products as end-members may provide new insights into the dynamics of magma chambers, specially for shallow chambers in a volcanic environment. Due to high viscosities and non-Newtonian behavior during a long time-interval, the application of fluid dynamics to understanding magmatic processes, especially those taking place in the deep crust, is still a major challenge to Geosciences. Extrapolation for plutonic environments remains therefore a great defiance. This discussion aims to show that it is nevertheless worthwhile.

  20. Observations of Plasma Transient on the Lobe Field Line During the Substorm. Interball Tail Observations on October 3, 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avanov, L. A.; Smimov, V. N.; Chandler, M. O.

    2004-01-01

    On October 3, 1995 Interball Tail spacecraft was located on tail lobe field lines. Solar wind conditions monitored by WIND and Getail spacecraft were quiet stable. During the time of operation of SCA-1 plasma spectrometer typical plasma mantle is observed. However, at approx. 15:07 UT strong plasma transient with duration of approx. 10 minutes was detected. We found that magnetic field profile of this plasma transient correlates well with ground based H component of magnetic field measured by Tixie Bay station. Ground base data indicates that this transient is observed during strong substorm. We argue that this transient is probably more dense mantle plasma which can be observed at the Interball Tail location provided that the current on the magnetopause is depressed. This depression probably reflects response of the tail magnetopause to changing of the global current system of the magnetosphere caused by the substorm.

  1. On transient electric fields observed in chemical release experiments by rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marklund, G.; Brenning, N.; Holmgren, G.; Haerendel, G.

    1986-06-01

    A large amplitude electric field pulse of 200 mV/m was detected shortly after the explosion of a chemical release in the auroral ionosphere. The central part of the pulse is clearly correlated with an intense layer of swept up ambient particles behind a propagating shockfront. The field is directed towards the center of the expanding ionized cloud, indicative of a polarization electric field source. Expressions for this radial polarization field and the much weaker azimuthal induced electric field are derived from a simple cylindrical model for the field and the expanding neutral cloud. Time profiles of the radial electric field are shown to be in good agreement with observations.

  2. Observations of improved confinement in field reversed configurations sustained by antisymmetric rotating magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, H.Y.; Hoffman, A.L.; Steinhauer, L.C.

    2005-06-15

    Rotating magnetic fields (RMF) have been employed to both form and sustain currents in field reversed configurations (FRC). A major concern about this method has been the fear of opening up magnetic field lines with even small ratios of vacuum RMF B{sub {omega}} to external confinement field B{sub e}. A recently proposed innovation was to use an antisymmetric arrangement of RMF, but vacuum calculations with full RMF penetration showed that very low values of B{sub {omega}}/B{sub e} would still be required to provide field-line closure. Recent comparisons of symmetric and antisymmetric RMF drive on the translation, confinement, and sustainment (TCS) facility [A. L. Hoffman, H. Y. Guo, J. T. Slough et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 41, 92 (2002)] have shown strong improvements in the basic confinement properties of the FRCs when using antisymmetric drive, even with ratios of B{sub {omega}}/B{sub e} as high as 0.3. This is due to normal standard operation with only partial penetration of the RMF beyond the FRC separatrix. The uniform transverse RMF in vacuum is shielded by the conducting plasma, resulting in a mostly azimuthal field near the FRC separatrix with a very small radial component. Simple numerical calculations using analytical solutions for the partially penetrated antisymmetric RMF, superimposed on Grad-Shafranov solutions for the poloidal FRC fields, show good field-line closure for the TCS experimental conditions. The antisymmetric arrangement also leads to more efficient current drive and improved stabilization of rotational modes.

  3. Guided Field Observations: Variables Related to Preservice Teachers' Knowledge about Effective Primary Reading Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roehrig, Alysia D.; Guidry, Lisa O.; Bodur, Yasar; Guan, Qun; Guo, Ying; Pop, Margareta

    2008-01-01

    Relations between preservice teachers' guided field observations of primary literacy instruction and knowledge about effective beginning reading practices were explored. Preservice teachers (n = 48) participated in a Directed Field Experience course including instruction on and observations of exemplary teaching practices promoting student…

  4. Observation of magnetic field-induced contraction of fission yeast cells using optical projection microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Beckwith, Andrew; Miller, John; Wood, Lowell

    2004-12-01

    The charges in live cells interact with or produce electric fields, which results in enormous dielectric responses, flexoelectricity, and related phenomena. Here we report on a contraction of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast) cells induced by magnetic fields, as observed using a phase-sensitive projection imaging technique. Unlike electric fields, magnetic fields only act on moving charges. The observed behavior is therefore quite remarkable, and may result from a contractile Lorentz force acting on diamagnetic screening currents. This would indicate extremely high intracellular charge mobilities. Besides, we observed a large electro-optic response from fission yeast cells.

  5. Observation of magnetic field-induced contraction of fission yeast cells using optical projection microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Beckwith, A. W.

    2005-03-01

    The charges in live cells interact with or produce electric fields, which results in enormous dielectric responses, flexoelectricity, and related phenomena. Here we report on a contraction of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast) cells induced by magnetic fields, as observed using a phase-sensitive projection imaging technique. Unlike electric fields, magnetic fields only act on moving charges. The observed behavior is therefore quite remarkable, and may result from a contractile Lorentz force acting on diamagnetic screening currents. This would indicate extremely high intracellular charge mobilities. Besides, we observed a large electro-optic response from fission yeast cells.

  6. Correlation between magnetic and electric field perturbations in the field-aligned current regions deduced from DE 2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishii, M.; Sugiura, M.; Iyemori, T.; Slavin, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The satellite-observed high correlations between magnetic and electric field perturbations in the high-latitude field-aligned current regions are investigated by examining the dependence of the relationship between Delta-B and E on spatial scale, using the electric and magnetic field data obtained by DE 2 in the polar regions. The results are compared with the Pedersen conductivity inferred from the international reference ionosphere model and the Alfven wave velocity calculated from the in situ ion density and magnetic field measurements.

  7. Observations of the Ion Signatures of Double Merging and the Formation of Newly Closed Field Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Michael O.; Avanov, Levon A.; Craven, Paul D.

    2007-01-01

    Observations from the Polar spacecraft, taken during a period of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) show magnetosheath ions within the magnetosphere with velocity distributions resulting from multiple merging sites along the same field line. The observations from the TIDE instrument show two separate ion energy-time dispersions that are attributed to two widely separated (-20Re) merging sites. Estimates of the initial merging times show that they occurred nearly simultaneously (within 5 minutes.) Along with these populations, cold, ionospheric ions were observed counterstreaming along the field lines. The presence of such ions is evidence that these field lines are connected to the ionosphere on both ends. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that double merging can produce closed field lines populated by solar wind plasma. While the merging sites cannot be unambiguously located, the observations and analyses favor one site poleward of the northern cusp and a second site at low latitudes.

  8. Direct observation of electric field induced pattern formation and particle aggregation in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajnak, Michal; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Ivankov, Olexandr I.; Feoktystov, Artem; Dolnik, Bystrik; Kurimsky, Juraj; Kopcansky, Peter; Timko, Milan

    2015-08-01

    Ferrofluids typically respond to magnetic fields and can be manipulated by external magnetic fields. Here, we report on formation of visually observable patterns in a diluted low-polarity ferrofluid exposed to external electric fields. This presents a specific type of ferrofluid structure driven by a combined effect of electrohydrodynamics and electrical body forces. The free charge and permittivity variation are considered to play a key role in the observed phenomenon. The corresponding changes in the ferrofluid structure have been found at nanoscale as well. By small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we show that the magnetic nanoparticles aggregate in direct current (dc) electric field with a strong dependence on the field intensity. The anisotropic aggregates preferably orient in the direction of the applied electric field. Conducting SANS experiments with alternating current (ac) electric fields of various frequencies, we found a critical frequency triggering the aggregation process. Our experimental study could open future applications of ferrofluids based on insulating liquids.

  9. Direct observation of electric field induced pattern formation and particle aggregation in ferrofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Rajnak, Michal; Kopcansky, Peter; Timko, Milan; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Ivankov, Olexandr I.; Feoktystov, Artem; Dolnik, Bystrik; Kurimsky, Juraj

    2015-08-17

    Ferrofluids typically respond to magnetic fields and can be manipulated by external magnetic fields. Here, we report on formation of visually observable patterns in a diluted low-polarity ferrofluid exposed to external electric fields. This presents a specific type of ferrofluid structure driven by a combined effect of electrohydrodynamics and electrical body forces. The free charge and permittivity variation are considered to play a key role in the observed phenomenon. The corresponding changes in the ferrofluid structure have been found at nanoscale as well. By small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we show that the magnetic nanoparticles aggregate in direct current (dc) electric field with a strong dependence on the field intensity. The anisotropic aggregates preferably orient in the direction of the applied electric field. Conducting SANS experiments with alternating current (ac) electric fields of various frequencies, we found a critical frequency triggering the aggregation process. Our experimental study could open future applications of ferrofluids based on insulating liquids.

  10. Pioneer 7 observations of plasma flow and field reversal regions in the distant geomagnetic tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. C.; Lazarus, A. J.; Villante, U.

    1975-01-01

    The present paper gives the results of an extensive analysis of plasma and magnetic-field data from Pioneer 7 taken in the geomagnetic tail approximately 1000 earth radii downstream from earth. The principal observations are: (1) measurable fluxes of protons in the tail, flowing away from earth, sometimes with a double-peaked velocity distribution; (2) field reversal regions in which the field changes from radial to antiradial by a vector rotation in the north-south plane; and (3) general characteristics of the tail similar to those observed near earth with good correlation between taillike magnetic fields and plasma.

  11. Field-aligned currents associated with Pc 5 pulsations: STARE and TRIAD observations

    SciTech Connect

    Poulter, E.M.; Nielsen, E.; Potemra, T.A.

    1982-04-01

    The resonance theory for monochromatic Pc 5 micropulsations predicts that the toroidal mode resonance should be accompanied by field-aligned current systems. These currents close via Pedersen current in the ionosphere, and the drifting irregularities observed by the STARE radars are thought to be generated by the associated electric fields. Recent theoretical calculations by Walker (1980) are used to estimate the micropulsation current systems and accompanying magnetic perturbations. STARE radar observations of the pulsation electric field in the ionosphere are then compared with the corresponding magnetic perturbation observed with the TRIAD satellite magnetometer.

  12. Forcing a Global, Offline Land Surface Modeling System with Observation-Based Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Houser, Paul R.; Jambor, U.; Gottschalck, J.; Radakovich, J.; Arsenault, K.; Meng, C.-J.; Mitchell, K. E.

    2002-01-01

    The Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) drives multiple uncoupled land surface models in order to produce optimal output fields of surface states in near-real time, globally, at 1/4 degree spatial resolution. These fields are then made available for coupled atmospheric model initialization and further research. One of the unique aspects of GLDAS is its ability to ingest both modeled and observation-derived forcing for running global scale land surface models. This paper compares results of runs forced by modeled and observed precipitation and shortwave radiation fields. Differences are examined and the impact of the observations on model skill is assessed.

  13. Motion of observed structures calculated from multi-point magnetic field measurements: Application to Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Q. Q.; Shen, C.; Dunlop, M. W.; Pu, Z. Y.; Zong, Q.-G.; Liu, Z. X.; Lucek, E.; Balogh, A.

    2006-04-01

    A new method is described which calculates the velocity of observed, quasi-stationary structures at every moment in time from multi-point magnetic field measurements. Once the magnetic gradient tensor G = $\

  14. Nonoptically probing near-field microscopy for the observation of biological living specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Yoshimasa; Murakami, Manabu; Egami, Chikara; Sugihara, Okihiro; Okamoto, Naomichi; Tsuchimori, Masaaki; Watanabe, Osamu; Nakamura, Osamu

    2001-04-01

    We present the observation of living specimens with subwavelength resolution by using the nonoptically probing near-field microscopy we have developed recently. In the near-field microscope, the optical field distributions near the specimens are recorded as the surface topography of a photosensitive film, and the topographical distributions are readout with an atomic-force microscopy. Since the near-field microscope does not require the scanning of a probe tip for illumination or detection or scattering of light, it is possible to observe moving biological specimens and fast phenomena. We demonstrate the observation of a moving paramecium and euglena gracilis with subwavelength resolution. The observation of the nucleus inside a euglena cell was also demonstrated.

  15. Observational estimate of magnetic field and geodynamo parameters under the surface of the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starchenko, S. V.

    2015-09-01

    For the first time, estimates (averaged in latitude and longitude) of the radial derivatives of the vortex magnetic field hidden directly under the surface of the Earth's core were obtained on the basis of contemporary determinations of the electric conductivity and systematic observations of the geomagnetic dipole evolution, as well as Faraday's and Ohm's laws. This allows one to formulate the simplest, `almost dipole" model of the vortex field under the core surface and to estimate a characteristic scale of the field measurements, which determines the depth of the adequacy area of the proposed simplest model. According to this estimate, the spatial size of the field (around 60 km) is an order of magnitude less than its typical size, following from an extrapolation of the observable field to the mantle-core boundary. This agrees well with the modern theory of hydromagnetic dynamos of planets, making it possible to refine the typical values of the magnetic field, the convection rate, and specific power, together with other geodynamo parameters, on the basis of known scaling laws and observations. The proposed new approach to determining the surface characteristics of the vortex magnetic field hidden in the interior of a physical object from the observed evolution of the potential field may be used for both astrophysical and engineering objects with an inaccessible current system.

  16. Larmor electric field observed at the Earth's magnetopause by Polar satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, D. Gonzalez, W. D.; Silveira, M. V. D.; Mozer, F. S.; Cardoso, F. R.

    2014-10-15

    We present, for the first time, observational evidence of a kinetic electric field near the X-line associated with asymmetric reconnection at the Earth's dayside magnetopause using Polar observations. On March 29, 2003, Polar satellite detected an asymmetric collisionless reconnection event. This event shows a unipolar Hall electric field signature and a simple deviation from the guide field during the magnetopause crossing, with the absence of an ion plasma jet outflow indicating that the magnetopause crossing was near the X-line. As expected from particle-in-cell simulations by Malakit et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 135001 (2013)), an earthward pointing normal electric field appears in the magnetospheric side of the ion diffusion region. The electric field satisfies two necessary conditions for the existence of the finite ion Larmor radius effect: (1) the ion Larmor radius (r{sub g2}) is larger than the distance between the stagnation point and the edge of the ion diffusion region in the strong magnetic field side (δ{sub S2}) and (2) the spatial extent of the kinetic electric field (δ{sub EL}) is of the order of the ion Larmor radius. Furthermore, it is shown that the peak value of the Larmor electric field is comparable to the predicted value. The observation of the Larmor electric field can be valuable in other analyses to show that the crossing occurred near the X-line.

  17. Ulysses Observations of Tripolar Guide-Magnetic Field Perturbations Across Solar Wind Reconnection Exhausts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Peng, B.; Markidis, S.; Gosling, J. T.; McComas, D. J.; Lapenta, G.; Newman, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    We report observations from 15 solar wind reconnection exhausts encountered along the Ulysses orbit beyond 4 AU in 1996-1999 and 2002-2005. The events, which lasted between 17 and 45 min, were found at heliospheric latitudes between -36o and 21o with one event detected as high as 58o. All events shared a common characteristic of a tripolar guide-magnetic field perturbation being detected across the observed exhausts. The signature consists of an enhanced guide field magnitude within the exhaust center and two regions of significantly depressed guide-fields adjacent to the center region. The events displayed magnetic field shear angles as low as 37o with a mean of 89o. This corresponds to a strong external guide field relative to the anti-parallel reconnecting component of the magnetic field with a mean ratio of 1.3 and a maximum ratio of 3.1. A 2-D kinetic reconnection simulation for realistic solar wind conditions reveals that tripolar guide fields form at current sheets in the presence of multiple X-lines as two magnetic islands interact with one another for such strong guide fields. The Ulysses observations are also compared with the results of a 3-D kinetic simulation of multiple flux ropes in a strong guide field.

  18. DC Electric Fields and Associated Plasma Drifts Observed with the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Rowland, D.

    2009-01-01

    Initial DC electric field observations and associated plasma drifts are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite. We present statistical averages of the vector fields for the first year of operations that include both the zonal and radial components of the resulting E x B plasma flows at low latitudes. Magnetic field data from the VEFI science magnetometer are used to compute the plasma flows. The DC electric field detector reveals zonal and radial electric fields that undergo strong diurnal variations, typically displaying eastward and outward-directed fields during the day and westward and downward-directed fields at night. There is considerable variation in the large scale DC electric field data, in both the daytime and nighttime cases, with enhanced structures typically observed at night. In general, the measured zonal DC electric field amplitudes include excursions that extend within the 0.4 - 2 m V/m range, corresponding to E x B drifts of the order of 30-150 m/s. The average vertical or radial electric fields may exceed the zonal fields in amplitude by a factor of 1.5 to 2. Although the data compare well, in a general sense, with previous satellite observations and statistical patterns of vertical ion drifts, the E x B drifts we report from C/NOFS rarely show a pronounced pre-reversal enhancement after sunset. We attribute this to a combination of extreme solar minimum conditions and the fact that the C/NOFS orbit of 401 by 867 km carries the probes essentially above the lower altitude regions where the wind-driven dynamo might be expected to create enhanced upwards drifts in the early evening. Evidence for wavenumber 4 tidal effects and other longitudinal signatures have been detected and will be presented. We also discuss off-equatorial electric fields and their relation to the ambient plasma density.

  19. On transient electric fields observed in chemical release experiments by rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marklund, G.; Brenning, N.; Holmgren, G.; Haerendel, G.

    1987-05-01

    As a follow-up to the successful chemical release experiment Trigger in 1977, the Trigger Optimized Repetition rocket was launched on October 24, 1984. As in the Trigger experiment, a large-amplitude electric field pulse of 200 mV/m was detected shortly after the explosion. The central part of the pulse was found to be clearly correlated with an intense layer of swept up ambient particles behind a propagating shock front. The field was directed toward the center of the expanding ionized cloud, which is indicative of a polarization electric field source. Expressions for this radial polarization field and the much weaker azimuthal-induced electric field are derived from a simple cylindrical model for the field and the expanding neutral cloud. Time profiles of the radial electric field are shown to be in good agreement with observations.

  20. The magnetic field of Jupiter - A comparison of radio astronomy and spacecraft observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.; Gulkis, S.

    1979-01-01

    The inner magnetic field of Jupiter is characterized on the basis of Pioneer 10 and 11 measurements and earth-based decimetric radio observations. The dipole parameters derived from the two data sets are in good agreement. Problems in reconciling asymmetries observed in the earth-based data and the spacecraft data are discussed. Models of synchrotron emission from arbitrary magnetic field configurations and high-resolution maps of the Jovian radiation belts in all polarizations are needed to further understanding of Jupiter's magnetic field

  1. EXOS D observations of enhanced electric fields during the giant magnetic storm in March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, T.; Hayakawa, H.; Tsuruda, K.; Nishida, A.; Matsuoka, A.

    1993-09-01

    The authors report the observation of intense electric fields in the magnetosphere at altitudes of 2000 to 6000 km during and after the large magnetic storm on March 13-14, 1989. Such large fields are a manifestation of the inability of convecting plasma bodies from storms to penetrate to the earth. The measurements were made by two sets of double probes on the EXOS D satellite. A sharp peak in the poleward field was observed, with a magnitude of roughly 100 mV/m when projected to ionospheric heights.

  2. Pioneer Venus observations of plasma and field structure in the near wake of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.; Brace, L. H.; Knudsen, W. C.; Taylor, H. A.; Scarf, F. L.; Colburn, D. S.; Barnes, A.

    1982-01-01

    Ionospheric plasma density depletions or 'holes' are observed by the Pioneer Venus orbiter in association with radial magnetic fields in the near wake of Venus. This report presents examples of the collected observations of these unexpected features of the Venus nightside ionosphere obtained by the Langmuir probe, magnetometer, ion mass spectrometer, retarding potential analyzer, plasma analyzer, and electric field experiments. The connection between plasma density depletions and temperature changes, changes in ion composition, plasma wave emissions, and magnetic fields with a substantial radial component is illustrated. Mechanisms that may be responsible for the formation and maintenance of holes are suggested.

  3. Relationship of the interplanetary electric field to the high-latitude ionospheric electric field and currents Observations and model simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. R.; Banks, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    The electrical coupling between the solar wind, magnetosphere, and ionosphere is studied. The coupling is analyzed using observations of high-latitude ion convection measured by the Sondre Stromfjord radar in Greenland and a computer simulation. The computer simulation calculates the ionospheric electric potential distribution for a given configuration of field-aligned currents and conductivity distribution. The technique for measuring F-region in velocities at high time resolution over a large range of latitudes is described. Variations in the currents on ionospheric plasma convection are examined using a model of field-aligned currents linking the solar wind with the dayside, high-latitude ionosphere. The data reveal that high-latitude ionospheric convection patterns, electric fields, and field-aligned currents are dependent on IMF orientation; it is observed that the electric field, which drives the F-region plasma curve, responds within about 14 minutes to IMF variations in the magnetopause. Comparisons of the simulated plasma convection with the ion velocity measurements reveal good correlation between the data.

  4. Comparison of inferred and observed interplanetary magnetic field polarities, 1970-1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. M.; Svalgaard, L.; Hedgecock, P. C.

    1975-01-01

    The inferred polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field at earth using polar observations of the geomagnetic field has been compared with spacecraft observations. A list published by Svalgaard (1974) of the inferred field polarities in the period from 1970 to 1972 is found to be correct on 82% of the days. A near real-time (same day) method of inferring the polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field using geomagnetic observations at Vostok and Thule is in use at the NOAA Space Environment Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado. During 1972, this method is found to be correct on 87% of the days. A list of 'well-defined' sector boundaries at earth from 1970 to 1972 is given.

  5. Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust Observed by the Wind/WAVES Electric Field Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malaspina, David; Horanyi, M.; Zaslavsky, A.; Goetz, K.; Wilson, L. B., III; Kersten, K.

    2014-01-01

    Observations of hypervelocity dust particles impacting the Wind spacecraft are reported here for the first time using data from the WindWAVES electric field instrument. A unique combination of rotating spacecraft, amplitude-triggered high-cadence waveform collection, and electric field antenna configuration allow the first direct determination of dust impact direction by any spacecraft using electric field data. Dust flux and impact direction data indicate that the observed dust is approximately micron-sized with both interplanetary and interstellar populations. Nanometer radius dust is not detected by Wind during times when nanometer dust is observed on the STEREO spacecraft and both spacecraft are in close proximity. Determined impact directions suggest that interplanetary dust detected by electric field instruments at 1 AU is dominated by particles on bound trajectories crossing Earths orbit, rather than dust with hyperbolic orbits.

  6. Observations of large scale steady magnetic fields in the dayside Venus ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Elphic, R. C.; Russell, C. T.; Mihalov, J. D.; Wolfe, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Although the dayside ionosphere of Venus is often field-free except for fine-scale features, large-scale steady ionospheric magnetic fields with magnitudes sometimes exceeding 100 gammas are occasionally observed by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter magnetometer. These fields are mainly horizontal and can assume any angle in the horizontal plane. The orientation of the field may change along the spacecraft trajectory. The field magnitude in the upper ionosphere usually shows a distinct minimum near approximately 200 km altitude, but the altitude profile is otherwise arbitrary. With few exceptions, the observations of these large scale fields occur when periapsis is at solar zenith angles less than 50 deg. The occurrence of large-scale fields is often coincident with the observation of high solar wind dynamic pressures by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter plasma analyzer closely following the ionosphere encounter. However, the detection of this phenomenon even during some orbits for which the dynamic pressure is not extraordinarily high suggests that other factors, such as hysteresis effects, must also play a role in determining the occurrence frequency of large-scale magnetic fields in the dayside Venus ionosphere.

  7. Comparison of Electric Fields and Density structures Seen in Simulations and Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Deverapalli, C.; Khazanov, G.

    2005-01-01

    There are now clear observations of large parallel electric fields (E(sub ||)) from Polar and FAST in the auroral upward-current region (UCR). Such fields are associated with large perpendicular electric fields (E(sub perpendicular) and density cavities. The observed features of the fields and density are found to be compatible with their spatial structures seen in a simulated U-shaped potential structure (USPS), consisting of double layers (DL) with obliqueness ranging from zero to 90 degrees from the magnetic field. The spatial and temporal evolution of the USPS, its up and down motions and its striations into thin long potential structures, suggest a variety of signatures in the satellite detection of E(sub ||) and E(sub perpendicular)

  8. Field and thermal plasma observations of ULF pulsations during a magnetically disturbed interval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, N.; Engebretson, M. J.; Reinleitner, L. A.; Olson, J. V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Slavin, J. A.; Persoon, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    A ULF pulsation event is discussed on the basis of experimental observations of electric and magnetic field measurements as well as particle measurements from the DE 1 spacecraft. The observations were made near the magnetic equator in a space covering a large range of L shells and magnetic latitudes, and comparisons are made to ground observations. Azimuthal oscillations are observed following gradually decaying long-period compressional waves. Weak interaction between magnetic shells indicates that the source is probably weak, and ground data on magnetic pulsations showed strong signals that did not necessarily correspond to the quasisinusoidal pulsations observed in space. Azimuthal pulsations observed by the spacecraft indicate that there was a plasma density gradient beyond the plasmapause. The ULF pulsations were probably affected by changes in the magnetic field and solar-wind dynamic pressure, and their periods are found to be linked to geomagnetic latitude.

  9. Field-aligned currents observed in the vicinity of a moving auroral arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Bruening, K.

    1984-01-01

    The sounding rocket Porcupine F4 was launched into an auroral arc and the field aligned currents were independently deduced from magnetic field measurements; the horizontal current deduced from the electric field measurements and height integrated conductivity calculations; and measurements of electron fluxes. Above the arc the different methods agree. The magnetosphere acts as generator and the ionosphere as load. North of the arc, the first two methods disagree, possibly due to an Alfven wave carrying the observed magnetic field perturbation. The energy flow is out of the ionosphere. Here the ionosphere acts as generator and the magnetosphere as load.

  10. Field-aligned currents observed in the vicinity of a moving auroral arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Bruening, K.

    1984-09-01

    The sounding rocket Porcupine F4 was launched into an auroral arc and the field aligned currents were independently deduced from magnetic field measurements; the horizontal current deduced from the electric field measurements and height integrated conductivity calculations; and measurements of electron fluxes. Above the arc the different methods agree. The magnetosphere acts as generator and the ionosphere as load. North of the arc, the first two methods disagree, possibly due to an Alfven wave carrying the observed magnetic field perturbation. The energy flow is out of the ionosphere. Here the ionosphere acts as generator and the magnetosphere as load.

  11. Magnetic Fields in Low-Mass Stars: An Overview of Observational Biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiners, Ansgar

    2014-08-01

    Stellar magnetic dynamos are driven by rotation, rapidly rotating stars produce stronger magnetic fields than slowly rotating stars do. The Zeeman effect is the most important indicator of magnetic fields, but Zeeman broadening must be disentangled from other broadening mechanisms, mainly rotation. The relations between rotation and magnetic field generation, between Doppler and Zeeman line broadening, and between rotation, stellar radius, and angular momentum evolution introduce several observational biases that affect our picture of stellar magnetism. In this overview, a few of these relations are explicitly shown, and the currently known distribution of field measurements is presented.

  12. Imaging Analysis of Near-Field Recording Technique for Observation of Biological Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriguchi, Chihiro; Ohta, Akihiro; Egami, Chikara; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu; Tsuchimori, Masaaki; Watanabe, Osamu

    2006-07-01

    We present an analysis of the properties of an imaging based on a near-field recording technique in comparison with simulation results. In the system, the optical field distributions localized near the specimens are recorded as the surface topographic distributions of a photosensitive film. It is possible to observe both soft and moving specimens, because the system does not require a scanning probe to obtain the observed image. The imaging properties are evaluated using fine structures of paramecium, and we demonstrate that it is possible to observe minute differences of refractive indices.

  13. Solar wind proton reflection by lunar crustal magnetic fields observed at low altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, M. N.; Fujimoto, M.; Tsunakawa, H.; Saito, Y.; Yokota, S.; Shibuya, H.; Matsushima, M.; Shimizu, H.; Takahashi, F.

    2012-12-01

    We study interaction between the solar wind flow and lunar crustal magnetic fields observed at lower altitudes by SELENE (Kaguya), predominantly focusing on proton reflection above strong crustal fields. Several studies revealed interaction between the solar wind and the Moon, while detailed observation at low altitude including ion measurements has been hardly reported yet. Previous observations at higher altitude revealed that the solar wind protons are not reflected toward the sun but deflected downstream around the solar wind flow direction. Here we report detailed observations of solar wind proton reflection/deflection observed above South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin at low altitude (typically, lower than 30 km) and at several solar zenith angles. Above wide crustal fields inside the SPA basin, a large amount of incident solar wind protons are deflected and sometimes reflected to come back sunward; in particular, the sunward proton beams are observed at lower solar zenith angle regions. The reflected/deflected protons at times consist of two (or more-than-two) separate components that have been mirror-reflected at different crustal fields. Our result shows that the mirror reflection of incident protons takes place at the altitude much lower than the spacecraft orbit, and suggests that strong compression of the crustal fields at lower solar zenith angle and at lower altitude by the solar wind dynamic pressure is essential.

  14. Observations of the generation of eastward equatorial electric fields near dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Rodrigues, F. S.; Pfaff, R. F.; Klenzing, J.

    2014-09-01

    We report and discuss interesting observations of the variability of electric fields and ionospheric densities near sunrise in the equatorial ionosphere made by instruments onboard the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite over six consecutive orbits. Electric field measurements were made by the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI), and ionospheric plasma densities were measured by Planar Langmuir Probe (PLP). The data were obtained on 17 June 2008, a period of solar minimum conditions. Deep depletions in the equatorial plasma density were observed just before sunrise on three orbits, for which one of these depletions was accompanied by a very large eastward electric field associated with the density depletion, as previously described by de La Beaujardière et al. (2009), Su et al. (2009) and Burke et al. (2009). The origin of this large eastward field (positive upward/meridional drift), which occurred when that component of the field is usually small and westward, is thought to be due to a large-scale Rayleigh-Taylor process. On three subsequent orbits, however, a distinctly different, second type of relationship between the electric field and plasma density near dawn was observed. Enhancements of the eastward electric field were also detected, one of them peaking around 3 mV m-1, but they were found to the east (later local time) of pre-dawn density perturbations. These observations represent sunrise enhancements of vertical drifts accompanied by eastward drifts such as those observed by the San Marco satellite (Aggson et al., 1995). Like the San Marco measurements, the enhancements occurred during winter solstice and low solar flux conditions in the Pacific longitude sector. While the evening equatorial ionosphere is believed to present the most dramatic examples of variability, our observations exemplify that the dawn sector can be highly variable as well.

  15. Observational features of field line resonances excited by solar wind pressure variations on 4 September 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warnecke, J.; Luehr, H.; Takahashi, K.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to establish the most probable excitation mechanism of the magnetic storm occurred after an inverse sudden impulse on September 4, 1984. Geomagnetic pulsations in the Pc5-frequency range observed at magnetometer stations are evaluated. Attention is focused on two events of the enhanced activity: for the first one, conjugate observations on the ground are assessed and then compared with satellite-based observations on adjacent field lines; for the second event two hours later, data from an extended azimuthal range is employed. It is pointed out that the observations are consistent with the theory of filed-line resonance, and may be interpreted as excitations caused by pressure variations in the solar wind. Both magnetopause-surface waves and cavity resonances are excited; the cavity mode drives toroidal field-line oscillations at locations where its frequency matches the resonance frequency of the field lines.

  16. Magnetic fields around evolved stars: further observations of H2O maser polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Ferreira, M. L.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Kemball, A.; Amiri, N.

    2013-06-01

    Context. A low- or intermediate-mass star is believed to maintain a spherical shape throughout the evolution from the main sequence to the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. However, many post-AGB objects and planetary nebulae exhibit non-spherical symmetry. Several candidates have been suggested as factors that can play a role in this change of morphology, but the problem is still not well understood. Magnetic fields are one of these possible agents. Aims: We aim to detect the magnetic field and infer its properties around four AGB stars using H2O maser observations. The sample we observed consists of the following sources: the semi-regular variable RT Vir, and the Mira variables AP Lyn, IK Tau, and IRC+60370. Methods: We observed the 61,6 -52,3 H2O maser rotational transition in full-polarization mode to determine its linear and circular polarization. Based on the Zeeman effect, one can infer the properties of the magnetic field from the maser polarization analysis. Results: We detected a total of 238 maser features in three of the four observed sources. No masers were found toward AP Lyn. The observed masers are all located between 2.4 and 53.0 AU from the stars. Linear and circular polarization was found in 18 and 11 maser features, respectively. Conclusions: We more than doubled the number of AGB stars in which a magnetic field has been detected from H2O maser polarization. Our results confirm the presence of fields around IK Tau, RT Vir, and IRC+60370. The strength of the field along the line of sight is found to be between 47 and 331 mG in the H2O maser region. Extrapolating this result to the surface of the stars, assuming a toroidal field (∝ r-1), we find magnetic fields of 0.3-6.9 G on the stellar surfaces. If, instead of a toroidal field, we assume a poloidal field (∝ r-2), then the extrapolated magnetic field strength on the stellar surfaces are in the range between 2.2 and ~115 G. Finally, if a dipole field (∝ r-3) is assumed, the field

  17. The quiet Sun magnetic field observed with ZIMPOL on THEMIS. I. The probability density function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommier, V.; Martínez González, M.; Bianda, M.; Frisch, H.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Gelly, B.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, E.

    2009-11-01

    Context: The quiet Sun magnetic field probability density function (PDF) remains poorly known. Modeling this field also introduces a magnetic filling factor that is also poorly known. With these two quantities, PDF and filling factor, the statistical description of the quiet Sun magnetic field is complex and needs to be clarified. Aims: In the present paper, we propose a procedure that combines direct determinations and inversion results to derive the magnetic field vector and filling factor, and their PDFs. Methods: We used spectro-polarimetric observations taken with the ZIMPOL polarimeter mounted on the THEMIS telescope. The target was a quiet region at disk center. We analyzed the data by means of the UNNOFIT inversion code, with which we inferred the distribution of the mean magnetic field α B, α being the magnetic filling factor. The distribution of α was derived by an independent method, directly from the spectro-polarimetric data. The magnetic field PDF p(B) could then be inferred. By introducing a joint PDF for the filling factor and the magnetic field strength, we have clarified the definition of the PDF of the quiet Sun magnetic field when the latter is assumed not to be volume-filling. Results: The most frequent local average magnetic field strength is found to be 13 G. We find that the magnetic filling factor is related to the magnetic field strength by the simple law α = B_1/B with B1 = 15 G. This result is compatible with the Hanle weak-field determinations, as well as with the stronger field determinations from the Zeeman effect (kGauss field filling 1-2% of space). From linear fits, we obtain the analytical dependence of the magnetic field PDF. Our analysis has also revealed that the magnetic field in the quiet Sun is isotropically distributed in direction. Conclusions: We conclude that the quiet Sun is a complex medium where magnetic fields having different field strengths and filling factors coexist. Further observations with a better

  18. A Method for Observing Soil Re-Deposition and Soil Loss Rates in Large Field Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Y. P.; Bugna, G. C.; Nemours, D.

    2014-12-01

    The lack of quality soil erosion field data, which is required for the verification and calibration of soil erosion models, has been one of the serious problems in the soil conservation modeling today. Observing soil erosion of a relatively large field under truly unobstructed runoff conditions has rarely been done and doccumented. Report here is the results of our observation of soil erosion in a 7.3 ha peanut-cotton cropping system in the Mears Farm of Grand Ridge, FL. We used the mesh-pad method to quantify soil loss from the field and soil re-deposition in the field over the cropping season of 2010. The main slope (1-3 %) of the field is about 210 m long. We show that the amount of soil re-deposition was 50-150 times of the soil loss from the slope. The corresponding organic matter, nitrogen, phosphorous and silt and clay contents of the lost soil, however, were 20.9%, 21%, 17.6% and 14.2%, respectively, of the total amounts re-deposited on the slope. The amounts of soil loss predicted by a SWAT model was 10-20 times greater than our observed values. Soil erosion process was quite heterogeneous, as shown by the mesh-pad method, even on a seemingly uniform cultivated field. Soil erosion models need to be verified and calibrated by extensive quality field data in order to improve their performance.

  19. A comparison between maritime field observations and photosimulation for developing and validating visible signature evaluation tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culpepper, Joanne B.; Wheaton, Vivienne C.; Shao, Q. T.; Furnell, Alistair

    2015-10-01

    Over the past 50 years, the majority of detection models used to assess visible signatures have been developed and validated using static imagery. Some of these models are the German developed CAMAELEON (CAMou age Assessment by Evaluation of Local Energy Spatial Frequency and OrieNtation) model and the U.S. Army's Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) ACQUIRE and TTP (Targeting Task Performance) models. All these models gathered the necessary human observer data for development and validation from static images in photosimulation experiments. In this paper, we compare the results of a field observation trial to a static photosimulation experiment. The probability of detection obtained from the field observation trial was compared to the detection probability obtained from the static photosimulation trial. The comparison showed good correlation between the field trial and the static image photosimulation detection probabilities, where a Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.59 was calculated. The photosimulation detection task was found to be significantly harder than the field observation detection task, suggesting that to use static image photosimulation to develop and validate maritime visible signature evaluation tools may need correction to represent detection in field observations.

  20. Solar coronal and magnetic field observations near the time of the 1988 March 18 solar eclipse

    SciTech Connect

    Sime, D.G.; Fisher, R.R.; Mickey, D.L.

    1988-10-01

    Observations made during the interval March 1-31, 1988, are presented which were designed to provide a synoptic context in which data from the March 18, 1988, total solar eclipse can be interpreted. Daily observations made with the Mark III K-coronameter and the H-alpha prominence monitor at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory, along with photographic records of the Sun in H-alpha from the flare patrol at Mees Solar Observatory on Haleakala, Maui, are included. Observations of the longitudinal component of the photospheric magnetic field made at Mees Solar Observatory were also gathered around the period of the eclipse. Together with the white-light image of the corona at the eclipse, these coronal and magnetic field observations assembled into synoptic maps for this epoch, are presented. On the basis of these observations, an interpretation of the global density distribution of the corona at the time of the eclipse is constructed. 11 references.

  1. Solar coronal and magnetic field observations near the time of the 1988 March 18 solar eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sime, D. G.; Fisher, R. R.; Mickey, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    Observations made during the interval March 1-31, 1988, are presented which were designed to provide a synoptic context in which data from the March 18, 1988, total solar eclipse can be interpreted. Daily observations made with the Mark III K-coronameter and the H-alpha prominence monitor at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory, along with photographic records of the Sun in H-alpha from the flare patrol at Mees Solar Observatory on Haleakala, Maui, are included. Observations of the longitudinal component of the photospheric magnetic field made at Mees Solar Observatory were also gathered around the period of the eclipse. Together with the white-light image of the corona at the eclipse, these coronal and magnetic field observations assembled into synoptic maps for this epoch, are presented. On the basis of these observations, an interpretation of the global density distribution of the corona at the time of the eclipse is constructed.

  2. Airborne observations of electric fields around growing and decaying cumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giori, K. L.; Nanevicz, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    Airborne electric field data were gathered in an atmospheric electrification study near Cape Canaveral, FL. A Learjet 36A was instrumented with eight electric field meters (mills) and five different particle probes. The local electric field enhancements at each field mill site were determined under lab conditions and verified using in-flight data. The overdetermined system of eight equations (one for each field mill) was solved using a weighted least squares algorithm to compute the magnitude and direction of the ambient electric field. The signal processing system allowed the measured data to be expressed in terms of earth coordinates, regardless of the attitude of the aircraft. Thus, it was possible to take maximum advantage of the Learjet's speed and maneuverability in studying the electric field structure in the vicinity of the clouds. Data gathered while circling just outside the boundary of a growing cumulus cloud show a nonsymmetric pattern of electric field strength. Field intensity grew rapidly over a period of less than 10 minutes. The observed direction of the ambient electric field vector can be explained by an ascending motion of the charge centers of a classic tripole model of a thunderstorm.

  3. Magnetospheric Multiscale Observations of the Electron Diffusion Region of Large Guide Field Magnetic Reconnection.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, S; Wilder, F D; Ergun, R E; Schwartz, S J; Cassak, P A; Burch, J L; Chen, L-J; Torbert, R B; Phan, T D; Lavraud, B; Goodrich, K A; Holmes, J C; Stawarz, J E; Sturner, A P; Malaspina, D M; Usanova, M E; Trattner, K J; Strangeway, R J; Russell, C T; Pollock, C J; Giles, B L; Hesse, M; Lindqvist, P-A; Drake, J F; Shay, M A; Nakamura, R; Marklund, G T

    2016-07-01

    We report observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) satellites of a large guide field magnetic reconnection event. The observations suggest that two of the four MMS spacecraft sampled the electron diffusion region, whereas the other two spacecraft detected the exhaust jet from the event. The guide magnetic field amplitude is approximately 4 times that of the reconnecting field. The event is accompanied by a significant parallel electric field (E_{∥}) that is larger than predicted by simulations. The high-speed (∼300  km/s) crossing of the electron diffusion region limited the data set to one complete electron distribution inside of the electron diffusion region, which shows significant parallel heating. The data suggest that E_{∥} is balanced by a combination of electron inertia and a parallel gradient of the gyrotropic electron pressure. PMID:27419573

  4. Observation of Landau levels on nitrogen-doped flat graphite surfaces without external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Takahiro; Guo, Donghui; Shikano, Taishi; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Sakurai, Masataka; Okada, Susumu; Nakamura, Junji

    2015-11-01

    Under perpendicular external magnetic fields, two-dimensional carriers exhibit Landau levels (LLs). However, it has recently been reported that LLs have been observed on graphene and graphite surfaces without external magnetic fields being applied. These anomalous LLs have been ascribed primarily to a strain of graphene sheets, leading to in-plane hopping modulation of electrons. Here, we report the observation of the LLs of massive Dirac fermions on atomically flat areas of a nitrogen-doped graphite surface in the absence of external magnetic fields. The corresponding magnetic fields were estimated to be as much as approximately 100 T. The generation of the LLs at the area with negligible strain can be explained by inequivalent hopping of π electrons that takes place at the perimeter of high-potential domains surrounded by positively charged substituted graphitic-nitrogen atoms.

  5. Magnetic field observations as Voyager 1 entered the heliosheath depletion region.

    PubMed

    Burlaga, L F; Ness, N F; Stone, E C

    2013-07-12

    Magnetic fields measured by Voyager 1 (V1) show that the spacecraft crossed the boundary of an unexpected region five times between days 210 and ~238 in 2012. The magnetic field strength B increased across this boundary from ≈0.2 to ≈0.4 nanotesla, and B remained near 0.4 nanotesla until at least day 270, 2012. The strong magnetic fields were associated with unusually low counting rates of >0.5 mega-electron volt per nuclear particle. The direction of B did not change significantly across any of the five boundary crossings; it was very uniform and very close to the spiral magnetic field direction, which was observed throughout the heliosheath. The observations indicate that V1 entered a region of the heliosheath (the heliosheath depletion region), rather than the interstellar medium. PMID:23811226

  6. Observation of Landau levels on nitrogen-doped flat graphite surfaces without external magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Takahiro; Guo, Donghui; Shikano, Taishi; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Sakurai, Masataka; Okada, Susumu; Nakamura, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Under perpendicular external magnetic fields, two-dimensional carriers exhibit Landau levels (LLs). However, it has recently been reported that LLs have been observed on graphene and graphite surfaces without external magnetic fields being applied. These anomalous LLs have been ascribed primarily to a strain of graphene sheets, leading to in-plane hopping modulation of electrons. Here, we report the observation of the LLs of massive Dirac fermions on atomically flat areas of a nitrogen-doped graphite surface in the absence of external magnetic fields. The corresponding magnetic fields were estimated to be as much as approximately 100 T. The generation of the LLs at the area with negligible strain can be explained by inequivalent hopping of π electrons that takes place at the perimeter of high-potential domains surrounded by positively charged substituted graphitic-nitrogen atoms. PMID:26549618

  7. Magnetospheric Multiscale Observations of the Electron Diffusion Region of Large Guide Field Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Wilder, F. D.; Ergun, R. E.; Schwartz, S. J.; Cassak, P. A.; Burch, J. L.; Chen, L.-J.; Torbert, R. B.; Phan, T. D.; Lavraud, B.; Goodrich, K. A.; Holmes, J. C.; Stawarz, J. E.; Sturner, A. P.; Malaspina, D. M.; Usanova, M. E.; Trattner, K. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Hesse, M.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Drake, J. F.; Shay, M. A.; Nakamura, R.; Marklund, G. T.

    2016-07-01

    We report observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) satellites of a large guide field magnetic reconnection event. The observations suggest that two of the four MMS spacecraft sampled the electron diffusion region, whereas the other two spacecraft detected the exhaust jet from the event. The guide magnetic field amplitude is approximately 4 times that of the reconnecting field. The event is accompanied by a significant parallel electric field (E∥ ) that is larger than predicted by simulations. The high-speed (˜300 km /s ) crossing of the electron diffusion region limited the data set to one complete electron distribution inside of the electron diffusion region, which shows significant parallel heating. The data suggest that E∥ is balanced by a combination of electron inertia and a parallel gradient of the gyrotropic electron pressure.

  8. Electric and magnetic field observations during a substorm on February 24, 1970

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1974-01-01

    Description of a series of electric field measurements obtained from the Injun 5 satellite and simultaneous magnetic disturbances observed in the interplanetary medium and on the ground during a magnetic substorm. The substorm analyzed took place on Feb. 24, 1970. Prior to the onset of the substorm, a greatly enhanced antisunward plasma flow was observed over the polar cap. The enhanced plasma flow occurred about 30 minutes after a switch in the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field from northward to southward. The electric fields across the polar cap immediately before and during the substorm were essentially unchanged, and it is thus indicated that an enhancement in the ionospheric conductivity rather than the electric field must be responsible for the large increase in the auroral electrojet current during the substorm.

  9. Electric and magnetic field observations during a substorm of 24 February 1970

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Akasofu, S. I.

    1974-01-01

    A series of electric field measurements is reported which was obtained from the Injun 5 satellite along with a simultaneous magnetic disturbance observed in the interplanetary medium and on the ground during a magnetic substorm. The substorm analyzed took place on February 24, 1970. Prior to the onset of the substorm a greatly enhanced anti-sunward plasma flow was observed over the polar cap. The enhanced plasma flow occurred about 30 minutes after a switch in the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field from northward to southward. The electric fields across the polar cap immediately before and during the substorm were essentially unchanged indicating that an enhancement in the ionospheric conductivity rather than the electric field must be responsible for the large increase in the auroral electrojet current during the substorm.

  10. Analysis and Modeling of Coronal Holes Observed by CORONAS-1. 1; Morphology and Magnetic Field Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obridko, Vladmir; Formichev, Valery; Kharschiladze, A. F.; Zhitnik, Igor; Slemzin, Vladmir; Hathaway, David H.; Wu, Shi T.

    1998-01-01

    Two low-latitude coronal holes observed by CORONAS-1 in April and June 1994 are analyzed together with magnetic field measurements obtained from Wilcox and Kitt Peak Solar Observatories. To estimate the comparable temperature of these two coronal holes, the YOHKOH observations are also utilized. Using this information, we have constructed three-dimensional magnetic field lines to illustrate the geometrical configuration of these coronal holes. The calculated synoptic maps are used to determine the existence of closed and open field regions of the hole. Finally, we have correlated the characteristics of two coronal holes with observed solar wind speed. We found that the brighter coronal hole has high speed solar wind, and the dimmer coronal hole has low speed solar wind.

  11. Dynamics of Tachyon Fields and Inflation - Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Results with Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, M.; Dimitrijević, D. D.; Djordjević, G. S.; Stojanović, M. D.

    2016-06-01

    The role tachyon fields may play in evolution of early universe is discussed in this paper. We consider the evolution of a flat and homogeneous universe governed by a tachyon scalar field with the DBI-type action and calculate the slow-roll parameters of inflation, scalar spectral index (n), and tensor-scalar ratio (r) for the given potentials. We pay special attention to the inverse power potential, first of all to V(x)˜ x^{-4}, and compare the available results obtained by analytical and numerical methods with those obtained by observation. It is shown that the computed values of the observational parameters and the observed ones are in a good agreement for the high values of the constant X_0. The possibility that influence of the radion field can extend a range of the acceptable values of the constant X_0 to the string theory motivated sector of its values is briefly considered.

  12. A simple model for geomagnetic field excursions and inferences for palaeomagnetic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. C.; Korte, M.

    2016-05-01

    We explore simple excursion scenarios by imposing changes on the axial dipole component of the Holocene geomagnetic field model CALS10k.2 and investigate implications for our understanding of palaeomagnetic observations of excursions. Our findings indicate that globally observed directions of fully opposing polarity are only possible when the axial dipole reverses: linearly decaying the axial dipole to zero and then reestablishing it with the same sign produces a global intensity minimum, but does not produce fully reversed directions globally. Reversing the axial dipole term increases the intensity of the geomagnetic field observed at Earth's surface across the mid-point of the excursion, which results in a double-dip intensity structure during the excursion. Only a limited number of palaeomagnetic records of excursions contain such a double-dip intensity structure. Rather, the maximum directional change is coeval with a geomagnetic field intensity minimum.

  13. A target detection model predicting field observer performance in maritime scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culpepper, Joanne B.; Wheaton, Vivienne C.

    2014-10-01

    The U.S. Army's target acquisition models, the ACQUIRE and Target Task Performance (TTP) models, have been employed for many years to assess the performance of thermal infrared sensors. In recent years, ACQUIRE and the TTP models have been adapted to assess the performance of visible sensors. These adaptations have been primarily focused on the performance of an observer viewing a display device. This paper describes an implementation of the TTP model to predict field observer performance in maritime scenes. Predictions of the TTP model implementation were compared to observations of a small watercraft taken in a field trial. In this field trial 11 Australian Navy observers viewed a small watercraft in an open ocean scene. Comparisons of the observed probability of detection to predictions of the TTP model implementation showed the normalised RSS metric overestimated the probability of detection. The normalised Pixel Contrast using a literature value for V50 yielded a correlation of 0.58 between the predicted and observed probability of detection. With a measured value of N50 or V50 for the small watercraft used in this investigation, this implementation of the TTP model may yield stronger correlation with observed probability of detection.

  14. Interpolation of observed rainfall fields for flood forecasting in data poor areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogelis Prada, M. C.; Werner, M. G. F.

    2010-09-01

    Observed rainfall fields constitute a crucial input for operational flood forecasting, providing boundary conditions to hydrological models for prediction of flows and levels in relevant forecast points. Such observed fields are derived through interpolation from available observed data from rain gauges. The reliability of the derived rainfall field depends on the density of the gauge network within the basin, as well as on the variability of the rainfall itself, and the interpolation method. In this paper interpolation methods to estimate rainfall fields under data- poor environments are researched, with the derived rainfall fields being used in operational flood warnings. Methods are applied in a small catchment in Bogotá, Colombia. This catchment has a complex climatology, which is strongly influenced by the inter-tropical convergence zone and orographic enhancement. As is common in such catchments in developing countries, the rainfall gauging network is sparse, while the need for reliable rainfall in flood forecasting is high. The extensive high flood risk zones in the lower areas of the catchment, where urbanization processes are characterized by unplanned occupation of areas close to rivers, is common in developing countries. Results show the sensitivity of interpolated rainfall fields to the interpolation methods chosen, and the importance of the use of indicator variables for improving the spatial distribution of interpolated rainfall. The value of these methods in establishing optimal new gauging sites for augmenting the sparse gauge network is demonstrated.

  15. Future missions for observing Earth's changing gravity field: a closed-loop simulation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, P. N.

    2008-12-01

    The GRACE mission has successfully demonstrated the observation from space of the changing Earth's gravity field at length and time scales of typically 1000 km and 10-30 days, respectively. Many scientific communities strongly advertise the need for continuity of observing Earth's gravity field from space. Moreover, a strong interest is being expressed to have gravity missions that allow a more detailed sampling of the Earth's gravity field both in time and in space. Designing a gravity field mission for the future is a complicated process that involves making many trade-offs, such as trade-offs between spatial, temporal resolution and financial budget. Moreover, it involves the optimization of many parameters, such as orbital parameters (height, inclination), distinction between which gravity sources to observe or correct for (for example are gravity changes due to ocean currents a nuisance or a signal to be retrieved?), observation techniques (low-low satellite-to-satellite tracking, satellite gravity gradiometry, accelerometers), and satellite control systems (drag-free?). A comprehensive tool has been developed and implemented that allows the closed-loop simulation of gravity field retrievals for different satellite mission scenarios. This paper provides a description of this tool. Moreover, its capabilities are demonstrated by a few case studies. Acknowledgments. The research that is being done with the closed-loop simulation tool is partially funded by the European Space Agency (ESA). An important component of the tool is the GEODYN software, kindly provided by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

  16. Field trip report: Observations made at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Special report No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, C.A.

    1993-03-01

    A field trip was made to the Yucca Mountain area on December 5-9, 1992 by Jerry Frazier, Don Livingston, Christine Schluter, Russell Harmon, and Carol Hill. Forty-three separate stops were made and 275 lbs. of rocks were collected during the five days of the field trip. Key localities visited were the Bare Mountains, Yucca Mountain, Calico Hills, Busted Butte, Harper Valley, Red Cliff Gulch, Wahmonie Hills, Crater Flat, and Lathrop Wells Cone. This report only describes field observations made by Carol Hill. Drawings are used rather than photographs because cameras were not permitted on the Nevada Test Site during this trip.

  17. The distant bow shock and magnetotail of Venus - Magnetic field and plasma wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Elphic, R. C.; Scarf, F. L.

    1981-01-01

    An examination of the magnetic field and plasma wave data obtained by the Pioneer Venus orbiter in the wake region behind Venus discloses a well developed bow shock whose location is similar to that observed on previous missions in contrast to the dayside bow shock. Venus also has a well developed magnetotail in which the field strenght is enhanced over magnetosheath values and in which the magnetic field is aligned approximately with the solar wind direction. The boundary between magnetosheath and magnetotail is also marked by a change in the plasma wave spectrum.

  18. Magnetic fields in Venus nightside ionospheric holes - Collected Pioneer Venus Orbiter magnetometer observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    The magnetic fields detected by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) magnetometer within the electron density depletions called 'holes' in the nightside ionosphere are typically larger and more organized than the fields in the surrounding ionosphere. Moreover, they have substantial sunward/antisunward components which cause them to appear as near-radial fields near the antisolar point. The collection of observations presented here illustrate the variety of appearances of the fields in holes. Some new results which summarize their average properties, their dependence on solar wind conditions, and their lack of geographical control are aslo presented. These results are potentially pertinent to the interpretation of data from the PVO entry at the end of 1992 and from the impending Mars Obsever mission, which will probe the magnetic fields in the low-altitude wake of weakly magnetized Mars.

  19. Cardiovascular alterations in Macaca monkeys exposed to stationary magnetic fields: experimental observations and theoretical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.; Gaffey, C.T.; Moyer, B.R.; Budinger, T.F.

    1983-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements were made of the electrocardiogram (ECG) and the intraarterial blood pressure of adult male Macaca monkeys during acute exposure to homogeneous stationary magnetic fields ranging in strength up to 1.5 tesla. An instantaneous, field strength-dependent increase in the ECG signal amplitude at the locus of the T wave was observed in fields greater than 0.1 tesla. The temporal sequence of this signal in the ECG record and its reversibility following termination of the magnetic field exposure are consistent with an earlier suggestion that it arises from a magnetically induced aortic blood flow potential superimposed on the native T-wave signal. No measurable alterations in blood pressure resulted from exposure to fields up to 1.5 tesla. This experimental finding is in agreement with theoretical calculations of the magnetohydrodynamic effect on blood flow in the major arteries of the cardiovascular system. 27 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  20. Magnetospheric Multiscale Satellites Observations of Parallel Electric Fields Associated with Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergun, R. E.; Goodrich, K. A.; Wilder, F. D.; Holmes, J. C.; Stawarz, J. E.; Eriksson, S.; Sturner, A. P.; Malaspina, D. M.; Usanova, M. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Khotyaintsev, Y.; Burch, J. L.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Hesse, M.; Chen, L. J.; Lapenta, G.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.; Schwartz, S. J.; Eastwood, J. P.; Phan, T. D.; Mozer, F. S.; Drake, J.; Shay, M. A.; Cassak, P. A.; Nakamura, R.; Marklund, G.

    2016-06-01

    We report observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale satellites of parallel electric fields (E∥ ) associated with magnetic reconnection in the subsolar region of the Earth's magnetopause. E∥ events near the electron diffusion region have amplitudes on the order of 100 mV /m , which are significantly larger than those predicted for an antiparallel reconnection electric field. This Letter addresses specific types of E∥ events, which appear as large-amplitude, near unipolar spikes that are associated with tangled, reconnected magnetic fields. These E∥ events are primarily in or near a current layer near the separatrix and are interpreted to be double layers that may be responsible for secondary reconnection in tangled magnetic fields or flux ropes. These results are telling of the three-dimensional nature of magnetopause reconnection and indicate that magnetopause reconnection may be often patchy and/or drive turbulence along the separatrix that results in flux ropes and/or tangled magnetic fields.

  1. Simultaneous observation of the quantization and the interference pattern of a plasmonic near-field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Piazza, L.; Lummen, T. T. A.; Quiñonez, E.; Murooka, Y.; Reed, B. W.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2015-03-02

    Surface plasmon polaritons can confine electromagnetic fields in subwavelength spaces and are of interest for photonics, optical data storage devices and biosensing applications. In analogy to photons, they exhibit wave–particle duality, whose different aspects have recently been observed in separate tailored experiments. Here we demonstrate the ability of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy to simultaneously image both the spatial interference and the quantization of such confined plasmonic fields. Our experiments are accomplished by spatiotemporally overlapping electron and light pulses on a single nanowire suspended on a graphene film. The resulting energy exchange between single electrons and the quanta of the photoinducedmore » near-field is imaged synchronously with its spatial interference pattern. In conclusion, this methodology enables the control and visualization of plasmonic fields at the nanoscale, providing a promising tool for understanding the fundamental properties of confined electromagnetic fields and the development of advanced photonic circuits.« less

  2. Simultaneous observation of the quantization and the interference pattern of a plasmonic near-field

    SciTech Connect

    Piazza, L.; Lummen, T. T. A.; Quiñonez, E.; Murooka, Y.; Reed, B. W.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2015-03-02

    Surface plasmon polaritons can confine electromagnetic fields in subwavelength spaces and are of interest for photonics, optical data storage devices and biosensing applications. In analogy to photons, they exhibit wave–particle duality, whose different aspects have recently been observed in separate tailored experiments. Here we demonstrate the ability of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy to simultaneously image both the spatial interference and the quantization of such confined plasmonic fields. Our experiments are accomplished by spatiotemporally overlapping electron and light pulses on a single nanowire suspended on a graphene film. The resulting energy exchange between single electrons and the quanta of the photoinduced near-field is imaged synchronously with its spatial interference pattern. In conclusion, this methodology enables the control and visualization of plasmonic fields at the nanoscale, providing a promising tool for understanding the fundamental properties of confined electromagnetic fields and the development of advanced photonic circuits.

  3. Satellite-borne study of seismic phenomena by low frequency magnetic field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Magnes, Werner; Xuhui, Shen; Wang, Jindong; Pollinger, Andreas; Hagen, Christian; Prattes, Gustav; Eichelberger, Hans-Ulrich; Wolbang, Daniel; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Besser, Bruno P.; Rozhnoi, Alexander A.; Zhang, Tielong

    2015-04-01

    A combined scalar-vector magnetic field experiment will be flown on the upcoming CSES mission (China Seismo-Electromagnetic Satellite). Magnetic field data from DC to 30 Hz will be measured with an accuracy of about 10 pT. A fluxgate instrument will provide the 3 magnetic field components and a new type of an optically pumped magnetometer [see Pollinger, 2010] will measure the magnitude of the ambient magnetic field. The satellite will operate in a Sun synchronous polar orbit at an altitude of about 500 km and with an inclination of 97°. We present a model of magnetic field fluctuations in the upper ionosphere based on previous satellite observations and on a model of the lithospheric-atmospheric-ionospheric coupling. Pollinger et al., CDSM-a new scalar magnetometer, EGU General Assembly 2010

  4. A quantitative study relating observed shear in photospheric magnetic fields to repeated flaring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Teuber, D.; West, E. A.; Smith, J. B.

    1984-03-01

    In this paper a quantitative evaluation of the shear in the magnetic field along the neutral line in an active region during an epoch of flare activity is presented. Shear is defined as the angular difference in the photosphere between the potential magnetic field, which fits the boundary conditions imposed by the observed line-of-sight field, and the observed magnetic field. For the active region studied, this angular difference (shear) is non-uniform along the neutral line with maxima occurring at the locations of repeated flare onsets. It is suggested that continued magnetic evolution causes the field's maximum shear to exceed a critical value of shear, resulting in a flare around the site of maximum shear. Evidently, the field at the site of the flare must relax to a state of shear somewhat below the critical value (but still far from potential), with subsequent evolution returning the field to the critical threshold. This inference is drawn because several flares occured at sites of maximum photospheric shear which were persistent in location.

  5. A quantitative study relating observed shear in photospheric magnetic fields to repeated flaring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Teuber, D.; West, E. A.; Smith, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper a quantitative evaluation of the shear in the magnetic field along the neutral line in an active region during an epoch of flare activity is presented. Shear is defined as the angular difference in the photosphere between the potential magnetic field, which fits the boundary conditions imposed by the observed line-of-sight field, and the observed magnetic field. For the active region studied, this angular difference (shear) is non-uniform along the neutral line with maxima occurring at the locations of repeated flare onsets. It is suggested that continued magnetic evolution causes the field's maximum shear to exceed a critical value of shear, resulting in a flare around the site of maximum shear. Evidently, the field at the site of the flare must relax to a state of shear somewhat below the critical value (but still far from potential), with subsequent evolution returning the field to the critical threshold. This inference is drawn because several flares occured at sites of maximum photospheric shear which were persistent in location.

  6. The characteristics of quasistatic electric field perturbations observed by DEMETER satellite before large earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Shen, X.; Zhao, S.; Yao, Lu; Ouyang, X.; Qian, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents new results after processing the ULF electric field (DC-15 Hz) observed by DEMETER satellite (h = 660-710 km). Typical perturbations were picked up in quasistatic electric field around some large earthquakes in 2010 at first. And then, 27 earthquakes were selected to be analyzed on quasistatic electric field in two seismic regions of Indonesia and Chile at equatorial and middle latitude area respectively. Three-component electric field data related to earthquakes were collected along all the up-orbits (in local nighttime) in a limited distance of 2000 km to the epicenters during 9 days with 7 days before and 1 day after those cases, and totally 57 perturbations were found around them. All the results show that the amplitude of quasistatic electric field perturbations varies from 1.5 to 16 mV/m in the upper ionosphere, mostly smaller than 10 mV/m. And the perturbations were mainly located just over the epicentral area or at the end of seismic faults constructed by a series of earthquakes where electromagnetic emissions may be easily formed during preparation and development processes of seismic sequences. Among all 27 cases, there are 10 earthquakes with perturbations occurring just one day before, which demonstrates the close correlation in time domain between quasistatic electric field in ionosphere and large earthquakes. Finally, combined with in situ observation of plasma parameters, the coupling mechanism of quasistatic electric field in different earth spheres was discussed.

  7. Interaction of solar wind with Mercury and its magnetic field. [as observed by Mariner 10 space probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Whang, Y. C.

    1976-01-01

    A brief review is presented of magnetic field and solar wind electron observations by Mariner 10 spacecraft. The intrinsic magnetic field of the planet Mercury and the implications of such a field for the planetary interior are also discussed.

  8. Merged interaction regions and large-scale magnetic field fluctuations during 1991: Voyager 2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1994-01-01

    This paper analyzes Voyager 2 observations of the magnetic field between 33.6 AU and 36.2 AU during 1991 when extraordinary events were observed on the Sun and in the heliosphere. The magnetic field strength signal B(t) has the unusual form of two large transient merged interaction regions (MIRs) on a fluctuating background. The two MIRs moved past the spacecraft in 32 days and 18 days, respectively. The mean field strength in each transient MIR was approx. equals 2.6 times the mean field during the remaining part of the year (0.11 nT). Each of the MIRs is related to a fast stream. The magnetic field is strong throughout each stream, suggesting that the strong fields are carried by the streams as well as produced by shock and stream compression. The fluctuations in B(t) during 1991 are not multifractal, and the MIRs cannot be approximated as multifractal clusters of intense magnetic fields. The distribution of the hour-averaged magnetic field strengths is approximately lognormal over 90% of its intermediate range, and it has an exponential tail for B greater than the average magnetic field strength. The elevation angles of B have a normal distribution with a standard deviation of 16 deg +/- 4 deg. The distributions of the azimuthal angles of B in the ranges 1 deg - 180 deg and 180 deg - 360 deg are approximately normal over a more limited range, and non-Gaussian tails associated with nearly radial magnetic fields; the standard deviations are approx. equal to 40 deg. Individual sectors are present throughout most of the interval, even in the MIRs, but there is no recurrent sector pattern. A model of the large-scale fluctuations in 1991 will have to include both determinaistic and statistical factors.

  9. Modular model for Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field confined within the average observed magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, Haje; Tsyganenko, Nikolai A.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Philpott, Lydia C.; Anderson, Brian J.; Al Asad, Manar M.; Solomon, Sean C.; McNutt, Ralph L.

    2015-06-01

    Accurate knowledge of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field is required to understand the sources of the planet's internal field. We present the first model of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field confined within a magnetopause shape derived from Magnetometer observations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging spacecraft. The field of internal origin is approximated by a dipole of magnitude 190 nT RM3, where RM is Mercury's radius, offset northward by 479 km along the spin axis. External field sources include currents flowing on the magnetopause boundary and in the cross-tail current sheet. The cross-tail current is described by a disk-shaped current near the planet and a sheet current at larger (≳ 5 RM) antisunward distances. The tail currents are constrained by minimizing the root-mean-square (RMS) residual between the model and the magnetic field observed within the magnetosphere. The magnetopause current contributions are derived by shielding the field of each module external to the magnetopause by minimizing the RMS normal component of the magnetic field at the magnetopause. The new model yields improvements over the previously developed paraboloid model in regions that are close to the magnetopause and the nightside magnetic equatorial plane. Magnetic field residuals remain that are distributed systematically over large areas and vary monotonically with magnetic activity. Further advances in empirical descriptions of Mercury's magnetospheric external field will need to account for the dependence of the tail and magnetopause currents on magnetic activity and additional sources within the magnetosphere associated with Birkeland currents and plasma distributions near the dayside magnetopause.

  10. OBSERVATION OF A NON-RADIAL PENUMBRA IN A FLUX EMERGING REGION UNDER CHROMOSPHERIC CANOPY FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Goode, Philip; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2013-05-20

    The presence of a penumbra is one of the main properties of a mature sunspot, but its formation mechanism has been elusive due to a lack of observations that fully cover the formation process. Utilizing the New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory, we observed the formation of a partial penumbra for about 7 hr simultaneously at the photospheric (TiO; 7057 A) and the chromospheric (H{alpha} - 1 A) spectral lines with high spatial and temporal resolution. From this uninterrupted, long observing sequence, we found that the formation of the observed penumbra was closely associated with flux emergence under the pre-existing chromospheric canopy fields. Based on this finding, we suggest a possible scenario for penumbra formation in which a penumbra forms when the emerging flux is constrained from continuing to emerge, but rather is trapped at the photospheric level by the overlying chromospheric canopy fields.

  11. Connecting Coronal Holes and Open Magnetic Field via Numerical Modeling and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowder, Chris; Qui, Jiong; sLeamon, Robert J.; Longcope, Dana

    2015-04-01

    Coronal holes are regions of the Sun's surface that map the footprints of open magnetic field lines traced down from the corona and heliosphere beyond. Without the ability to directly and easily observe coronal magnetic field line structure, mapping their footprint 'dance' throughout the solar cycle is crucial for understanding this open field contribution to space weather. Coronal holes provide just this proxy.Using a combination of SOHO:EIT, SDO:AIA, and STEREO:EUVI A/B extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations from 1996-2014, coronal holes are automatically detected and characterized throughout this span, enabling long-term solar-cycle-timescale study. In particular, the combination of SDO:AIA and STEREO:EUVI A/B data provides a new viewpoint on understanding coronal hole evolution. As the two STEREO spacecraft drift ahead and behind of the Earth in their orbit, respectively, they are able to peek around the corner and closer to the poles, providing the ability to image nearly the entire solar surface in EUV wavelengths, using SDO data in conjunction. A flux transport model driven by observed bipole data allows for the study and comparison of far-side magnetic field evolution. By combining our numerical models of solar open magnetic field evolution with coronal hole observations, comparison of far-side and polar dynamics becomes possible. Model constraints and boundary conditions are more easily fine-tuned with these global observations. Understanding the dynamics of boundary changes and distribution throughout the solar cycle yields important insight into connecting models of open magnetic field.

  12. Electric field measurements at the magnetopause. I Observation of large convective velocities at rotational magnetopause discontinuities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggson, T. L.; Maynard, N. C.; Gambardella, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    Large convective electric fields of the order of 10 mV/m (sometimes as high as 22 mV/m) are observed at rotational magnetopause discontinuities. These observations were made with the long cylindrical (179-m base line) probes carried on the ISEE 1 satellite. These electric field observations yield convective velocity magnitudes (equal to the cross product of the vector E and the vector B, the latter divided by the square of the magnitude of B) of the order of 150 km/s. In this format for the convective velocity magnitudes, some of these observations are similar to the high speed plasma velocity observations that were made at the magnetopause with the plasma experiment carried on the ISEE 1 satellite. It is shown that, for many of these magnetopause crossings, there exists a special moving coordinate system where the observed electric fields vanish. Such a unique reference system is often used in theoretical studies of magnetic discontinuities. This special coordinate system does not move at the local plasma velocity but moves instead at a velocity intermediate between the convective velocity and the local Alfven velocity. It is used here as a diagnostic tool for the experimental investigation of rotational discontinuities at the magnetopause.

  13. Radial profile of the inner heliospheric magnetic field as deduced from Faraday rotation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, S.; Garzelli, M. V.

    2013-05-01

    Faraday rotation measures (RMs) of the polarized emission from extragalactic radio sources occulted by the coronal plasma were used to infer the radial profile of the inner heliospheric magnetic field near the solar minimum. By inverting LASCO/SOHO polarized brightness (pB) data taken during the observations in May 1997, we retrieved the electron density distribution along the lines of sight to the sources, which allowed us to separate the two plasma properties that contribute to the observed RMs. By comparing the observed RM values with those theoretically predicted by a power law model of the radial component of the coronal magnetic field using a best-fitting procedure, we found that the radial component of the inner heliospheric magnetic field can be nicely approximated by a power law of the form Br = 3.76 r-2.29 G in a range of heights from about 5 to 14 R⊙. Finally, our analysis suggests that the radial computation of the potential field source surface model from the Wilcox Solar Observatory is the preferred choice near solar minimum assuming a radial field in the photosphere and a source surface located at Rss = 2.5 R⊙.

  14. Constraining magnetic fields morphologies using mid-IR polarization: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Han; Li, Dan; Pantin, Eric; Telesco, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Polarization arises from aligned dust grains in magnetic fields, and thus the direction of polarization can trace the direction of B fields. We present the mid-IR imaging and spectropolarimetry observations made with the GTC's CanariCam of the Herbig Ae star WL 16. WL 16 is embedded in/behind the ρ Ophiuchus molecular cloud with visual extinction of ~31 mag. It exhibits large and extended (~900 AU) emission, which is believed to come from the emission of PAHs and very small dust grains. Uniform polarization vectors from imaging polarization and the absorption-dominated polarization profile from spectropolarimetry consistently indicate a uniform foreground magnetic field oriented at about 30 deg from the North.We also model the predicted polarization patterns expected to arise from different magnetic field morphologies, which can be distinguished by high-resolution observations. As an example, we present the mid-IR polarization modeling of AB Aur, a well-studied Herbig Ae star. We incorporate polarization from dichroic absorption, emission and scattering in the modeling. The observed polarization structures are well reproduced by two components: emissive polarization arising from a poloidal B field and scattering polarization by 0.01-1 μm dust grains.

  15. Modeling electron density, temperature distribution in the solar corona based on solar surface magnetic field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, A.; Rodríguez, J. M.; Vieira, L.; Coelho Stekel, T. R.; Costa, J. E. R.; Pinto, T. S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic fields constitute a natural link between the Sun, the Earth and the Heliosphere in general. The solar dynamo action maintains and strengthens the magnetic field in the solar interior. The structure of the solar corona is mostly determined by the configuration and evolution of the magnetic field. While open magnetic field lines carry plasma into the heliosphere, closed field lines confine plasma. Additionally, key physical processes that impact the evolution of Earth's atmosphere on time-scale from days to millennia, such as the soft X-ray and EUV emission, are also determined by the solar magnetic field. However, observations of the solar spectral irradiance are restricted to the last few solar cycles and are subject to large uncertainties. Here we present a physics-based model to reconstruct in near-real time the evolution of the solar EUV emission based on the configuration of the magnetic field imprinted on the solar surface and assuming that the emission lines are optically thin. The structure of the coronal magnetic field is estimated employing a potential field source surface extrapolation based on the synoptic charts. The coronal plasma temperature and density are described by a hydrostatic model. The emission is estimated to employ the CHIANTI database. The performance of the model is compared to the emission observed by EVE instrument on board SDO spacecraft. The preliminary results and uncertainties are discussed in details. Furthermore, we examine the possibility of delivery the reconstruction of the solar spectral irradiance in near-real time using the infrastructure provided by the Brazilian Space weather program (EMBRACE/INPE). This work is partially supported by CNPq/Brazil under the grant agreement no. 140779/2015-9.

  16. High-resolution observations of the polar magnetic fields of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, H.; Varsik, J.; Zirin, H.

    1994-01-01

    High-resolution magnetograms of the solar polar region were used for the study of the polar magnetic field. In contrast to low-resolution magnetograph observations which measure the polar magnetic field averaged over a large area, we focused our efforts on the properties of the small magnetic elements in the polar region. Evolution of the filling factor (the ratio of the area occupied by the magnetic elements to the total area) of these magnetic elements, as well as the average magnetic field strength, were studied during the maximum and declining phase of solar cycle 22, from early 1991 to mid-1993. We found that during the sunspot maximum period, the polar regions were occupied by about equal numbers of positive and negative magnetic elements, with equal average field strength. As the solar cycle progresses toward sunspot minimum, the magnetic field elements in the polar region become predominantly of one polarity. The average magnetic field of the dominant polarity elements also increases with the filling factor. In the meanwhile, both the filling factor and the average field strength of the non-dominant polarity elements decrease. The combined effects of the changing filling factors and average field strength produce the observed evolution of the integrated polar flux over the solar cycle. We compared the evolutionary histories of both filling factor and average field strength, for regions of high (70-80 deg) and low (60-70 deg) latitudes. For the south pole, we found no significant evidence of difference in the time of reversal. However, the low-latitude region of the north pole did reverse polarity much earlier than the high-latitude region. It later showed an oscillatory behavior. We suggest this may be caused by the poleward migration of flux from a large active region in 1989 with highly imbalanced flux.

  17. Viking magnetic and electric field observations of periodic Pc 1 waves: Pearl pulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Erlandson, R.E.; Anderson, B.J.; Zanetti, L.J.

    1992-10-01

    Pearl pulsations, with an average repetition period of 60 s, were recorded using the magnetic and electric field experiments on the polar-orbiting Viking satellite. The wave event occurred on September 30, 1986, during Viking orbit 1212 at 1030 MLT, from L=3.6 to L=4.1, and at an altitude of 13,500 km. Electron density observations obtained from Viking show that the waves were generated at the plasmapause and at lower amplitudes in the plasmasphere. The wave Poynting flux, calculated using the magnetic and electric field, indicated that the waves generally were propagating downward toward the ionosphere, although upward Poynting fluxes were observed. Clear evidence of upward propagating waves, associated with downward propagating waves reflected at the ionosphere, was not observed. Linear convective growth rates suggest that the anisotropic ions which provide the free energy have a perpendicular temperature around 15 keV. The repetition period, calculated using the measured electron density and magnetic field strength at Viking, is consistent with the double-hop transit time for ion cyclotron waves which propagate along field lines from one hemisphere to the other. However, the absence of upward propagating waves packets implies that the upper limit of the wave ionospheric reflection coefficient is on the order of 10 to 20%. Alternative mechanism for producing the observed repetition are also investigated and include a periodic generation model of pearl pulsations at the ion bounce period. 42 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Observations of the longitudinal magnetic field in the transition region and photosphere of a sunspot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henze, W., Jr.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Hagyard, M. J.; West, E. A.; Woodgate, B. E.; Shine, R. A.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, M.; Hyder, C. L.; West, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter on the Solar Maximum Mission spacraft has observed for the first time the longitudinal component of the magnetic field by means of the Zeeman effect in the transition region above a sunspot. The data presented here were obtained on three days in one sunspot, have spatial resolutions of 10 arcsec and 3 arcsec, and yield maximum field strengths greater than 1000 G above the umbrae in the spot. The method of analysis, including a line-width calibration feature used during some of the observations, is described in some detail in an appendix; the line width is required for the determination of the longitudinal magnetic field from the observed circular polarization. The transition region data for one day are compared with photospheric magnetograms from the Marshall Space Flight Center. Vertical gradients of the magnetic field are compared from the two sets of data; the maximum gradients of 0.41 to 0.62 G/km occur above the umbra and agree with or are smaller than values observed previously in the photosphere and low chromosphere.

  19. Observer Role and Field Study Knowledge--An Essay Review of Usable Knowledge and SAFARI I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Louis M.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A synthesis is presented of the work of Lindblom and Cohen, MacDonald and Walker, and the current authors. The synthesis considers issues in the usefulness of social science theory and research, and how observer roles in qualitative field studies yield multiple kinds of usable knowledge to a variety of audiences. (Author/BW)

  20. Observations of ferrofluid flow under a uniform rotating magnetic field in a spherical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Díaz, Isaac; Rinaldi, Carlos; Khushrushahi, Shahriar; Zahn, Markus

    2012-04-01

    Flow of a ferrofluid in spherical and cylindrical geometries were measured under the influence of a uniform rotating magnetic field produced by two perpendicular spherical coils, a so-called fluxball, excited by quadrature currents. Using an ultrasound velocity profile technique and a commercial oil based ferrofluid (EFH1, Ferrotec) we observed rotational flow around the z-axis. In comparison, the radial component of the flow was found to be negligible. Results show that the magnitude of the azimuthal velocity profile increases as the applied magnetic field amplitude increases. This behavior is also observed for ferrofluid in a cylindrical container placed inside the fluxball cavity and inside a two-pole stator winding. These results indicate that inhomogeneities in the magnetic field produced by slots and finite height of the stator winding used in prior experiments are not the source of previously observed flows produced by a two pole stator winding. The experiments reported here either point to the existence of non-uniform demagnetizing magnetic fields due to the finite height of the cylindrical container, the existence of couple stresses and spin viscosity in ferrofluids, or to the need to develop alternate governing and constitutive equations capable of describing the experimental observations.

  1. FIELD OBSERVATIONS OF THE ECOLOGY AND HABITS OF MANGROVE RIVULUS (RIVULUS MARMORATUS) IN BELIZE AND FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report provides a synopsis of field studies of Rivulus marmaratus from two population surveys of mangrove islands adjacent to the Belize barrier reef and observations made over fifteen years at several sites in south Florida. his small, cryptically colored killifish is the o...

  2. Horizontal flow fields observed in Hinode G-band images. II. Flow fields in the final stages of sunspot decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M.; Balthasar, H.; Deng, N.; Liu, C.; Shimizu, T.; Wang, H.; Denker, C.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Generation and dissipation of magnetic fields is a fundamental physical process on the Sun. In comparison to flux emergence and the initial stages of sunspot formation, the demise of sunspots still lacks a comprehensive description. Aims: The evolution of sunspots is most commonly discussed in terms of their intensity and magnetic field. Here, we present additional information about the three-dimensional flow field in the vicinity of sunspots towards the end of their existence. Methods: We present a subset of multi-wavelengths observations obtained with the Japanese Hinode mission, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain during the time period 2010 November 18-23. Horizontal proper motions were derived from G-band and Ca ii H images, whereas line-of-sight velocities were extracted from VTT echelle Hα λ656.28 nm spectra and Fe i λ630.25 nm spectral data of the Hinode/Spectro-Polarimeter, which also provided three-dimensional magnetic field information. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board SDO provided continuum images and line-of-sight magnetograms, in addition to the high-resolution observations for the entire disk passage of the active region. Results: We perform a quantitative study of photospheric and chromospheric flow fields in and around decaying sunspots. In one of the trailing sunspots of active region NOAA 11126, we observe moat flow and moving magnetic features (MMFs), even after its penumbra had decayed. We also detect a superpenumbral structure around this pore. We find that MMFs follow well-defined, radial paths from the spot all the way to the border of a supergranular cell surrounding the spot. In contrast, flux emergence near the other sunspot prevents the establishment of similar well ordered flow patterns, which could be discerned around a tiny pore of merely 2 Mm diameter. After the disappearance of the sunspots/pores, a coherent patch of abnormal

  3. Direct Observation of Solar Coronal Magnetic Fields by Vector Tomography of the Coronal Emission Line Polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramar, M.; Lin, H.; Tomczyk, S.

    2016-03-01

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments.

  4. Modeling of the coseismic electromagnetic fields observed during the 2004 Mw 6.0 Parkfield earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yongxin; Harris, Jerry M.; Wen, Jian; Huang, Yihe; Twardzik, Cedric; Chen, Xiaofei; Hu, Hengshan

    2016-01-01

    The coseismic electromagnetic signals observed during the 2004 Mw 6 Parkfield earthquake are simulated using electrokinetic theory. By using a finite fault source model obtained via kinematic inversion, we calculate the electric and magnetic responses to the earthquake rupture. The result shows that the synthetic electric signals agree with the observed data for both amplitude and wave shape, especially for early portions of the records (first 9 s) after the earthquake, supporting the electrokinetic effect as the reasonable mechanism for the generation of the coseismic electric fields. More work is needed to explain the magnetic fields and the later portions of the electric fields. Analysis shows that the coseismic electromagnetic (EM) signals are sensitive to both the material properties at the location of the EM sensors and the electrochemical heterogeneity in the vicinity of the EM sensors and can be used to characterize the underground electrochemical properties.

  5. Rocket-borne particle, field, and plasma observations in the cleft region. [ionospheric sounding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungstrup, E.; Bahnsen, A.; Olesen, J. K.; Primdahl, F.; Spangslev, F.; Heikkila, W. J.; Klumpar, D. M.; Winningham, J. D.; Fahleson, U.; Falthammar, C.-G.

    1975-01-01

    Results are reported for comprehensive observations of magnetic and electric fields together with ambient and suprathermal plasmas above the dayside auroral oval with rocket-borne instrumentation which penetrated the cleft region. Measurements were also obtained equatorward and poleward of the cleft. Convection velocities as inferred from electric-field measurements were generally toward noon equatorward of the cleft and were antisunward over the polar cap. Observations of electron temperatures, electric fields, and low-frequency electrostatic noise provide strong evidence of a plasma instability (Farley-Buneman) in the E-layer associated with the appearance of the 'slant E condition' identified in ground-acquired ionograms. The positions of these measurements relative to that of the cleft were firmly established via the determination of the plasma environment with an electrostatic analyzer.

  6. Multisensor Observation and Simulation of Snowfall During the 2003 Wakasa Bay Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Benjamin T.; Petty, Grant W.; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Wang, James W.

    2005-01-01

    This research seeks to assess and improve the accuracy of microphysical assumptions used in satellite passive microwave radiative transfer models and retrieval algorithms by exploiting complementary observations from satellite radiometers, such as TRMM/AMSR-E/GPM, and coincident aircraft instruments, such as the next generation precipitation radar (PR-2). We focus in particular on aircraft data obtained during the Wakasa Bay field experiment, Japan 2003, pertaining to surface snowfall events. The observations of vertical profiles of reflectivity and Doppler-derived fall speeds are used in conjunction with the radiometric measurements to identify 1-D profiles of precipitation particle types, sizes, and concentrations that are consistent with the observations.

  7. Coronal structures deduced from photospheric magnetic field and He I lambda 10830 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Karen L.

    1995-01-01

    The National Solar Observatory synoptic program provides an extensive and unique data base of high-resolution full-disk observations of the line-of-sight photospheric magnetic fields and of the He I lambda 10830 equivalent width. These data have been taken nearly daily for more than 21 years since 1974 and provide the opportunity to investigate the behavior of the magnetic fields in the photosphere and those inferred for the corona spanning on the time scales of a day to that of a solar cycle. The intensity of structures observed in He I lambda 10830 are strongly modulated by overlying coronal radiation; areas with low coronal emission are generally brighter in He I lambda 10830, while areas with high coronal emission are darker. For this reason, He I lambda 10830 was selected in the mid-1970's as way to identify and monitor coronal holes, magnetic fields with an open configuration, and the sources of high-speed solar wind streams. The He I lambda 10830 spectroheliograms also show a wide variety of other structures from small-scale, short-lived dark points (less than 30 arc-sec, hours) to the large-scale, long-lived two 'ribbon' flare events that follow the filament eruptions (1000 arc-sec, days). Such structures provide clues about the connections and changes in the large-scale coronal magnetic fields that are rooted in concentrations of magnetic network and active regions in the photosphere. In this paper, what observations of the photospheric magnetic field and He I lambda 10830 can tell us about the short- and long-term evolution of the coronal magnetic fields will be discussed, focussing on the quiet Sun and coronal holes. These data and what we infer from them will be compared with direct observations of the coronal structure from the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope.

  8. Cone of Darkness: Finding Blank-sky Positions for Multi-object Wide-field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, N. P. F.

    2014-05-01

    We present the Cone of Darkness, an application to automatically configure blank-sky positions for a series of stacked, wide-field observations, such as those carried out by the SAMI instrument on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT). The Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) uses a plug-plate to mount its 13×61 core imaging fibre bundles (hexabundles) in the optical plane at the telescope's prime focus. To make the most efficient use of each plug-plate, several observing fields are typically stacked to produce a single plate. When choosing blank-sky positions for the observations it is most effective to select these such that one set of 26 holes gives valid sky positions for all fields on the plate. However, when carried out manually this selection process is tedious and includes a significant risk of error. The Cone of Darkness software aims to provide uniform blank-sky position coverage over the field of observation, within the limits set by the distribution of target positions and the chosen input catalogs. This will then facilitate the production of the best representative median sky spectrum for use in sky subtraction. The application, written in C++, is configurable, making it usable for a range of instruments. Given the plate characteristics and the positions of target holes, the software segments the unallocated space on the plate and determines the position which best fits the uniform distribution requirement. This position is checked, for each field, against the selected catalog using a TAP ADQL search. The process is then repeated until the desired number of sky positions is attained.

  9. EVIDENCE FOR QUASI-ISOTROPIC MAGNETIC FIELDS FROM HINODE QUIET-SUN OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Asensio Ramos, A.

    2009-08-20

    Some recent investigations of spectropolarimetric observations of the Zeeman effect in the Fe I lines at 630 nm carried out with the Hinode solar space telescope have concluded that the strength of the magnetic field vector in the internetwork regions of the quiet Sun is in the hG regime and that its inclination is predominantly horizontal. We critically reconsider the analysis of such observations and carry out a complete Bayesian analysis with the aim of extracting as much information as possible from them, including error bars. We apply the recently developed BAYES-ME code that carries out a complete Bayesian inference for Milne-Eddington atmospheres. The sampling of the posterior distribution function is obtained with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo scheme and the marginal distributions are analyzed in detail. The Kullback-Leibler divergence is used to study the extent to which the observations introduce new information in the inference process resulting in sufficiently constrained parameters. Our analysis clearly shows that only upper limits to the magnetic field strength can be inferred, with fields in the kG regime completely discarded. Furthermore, the noise level present in the analyzed Hinode observations induces a substantial loss of information for constraining the azimuth of the magnetic field. Concerning the inclination of the field, we demonstrate that some information is available to constrain it for those pixels with the largest polarimetric signal. The results also point out that the field in pixels with small polarimetric signals can be nicely reproduced in terms of a quasi-isotropic distribution.

  10. High-latitude dayside electric fields and currents during strong northward interplanetary magnetic field - Observations and model simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. Robert; Friis-Christensen, Eigil

    1988-01-01

    On July 23, 1983 the IMF turned strongly northward, becoming about 22 nT for several hours. Using a combined data set of ionospheric convection measurements made by the Sondre Stromfjord incoherent scatter radar and convection inferred from Greenland magnetometer measurements, the onset of the reconfiguration of the high-latitude ionospheric currents is found to occur about 3 min after the northward IMF encounters the magnetopause. The large-scale reconfiguration of currents, however, appears to evolve over a period of about 22 min. These observations and the results of numerical simulations indicate that the dayside polar-cap electric field observed during strong northward IMF is produced by a direct electrical current coupling with the solar wind.