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Sample records for observing system satellites

  1. Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, A.; Cerezo, F.; Fernandez, M.; Lomba, J.; Lopez, M.; Moreno, J.; Neira, A.; Quintana, C.; Torres, J.; Trigo, R.; Urena, J.; Vega, E.; Vez, E.

    2010-12-01

    The Spanish Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade (MITyC) and the Ministry of Defense (MoD) signed an agreement in 2007 for the development of a "Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System" based, in first instance, on two satellites: a high resolution optical satellite, called SEOSAT/Ingenio, and a radar satellite based on SAR technology, called SEOSAR/Paz. SEOSAT/Ingenio is managed by MITyC through the Centre for the Development of Industrial Technology (CDTI), with technical and contractual support from the European Space Agency (ESA). HISDESA T together with the Spanish Instituto Nacional de Tcnica Aeroespacial (INTA, National Institute for Aerospace Technology) will be responsible for the in-orbit operation and the commercial operation of both satellites, and for the technical management of SEOSAR/Paz on behalf of the MoD. In both cases EADS CASA Espacio (ECE) is the prime contractor leading the industrial consortia. The ground segment development will be assigned to a Spanish consortium. This system is the most important contribution of Spain to the European Programme Global Monitoring for Environment and Security, GMES. This paper presents the Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System focusing on SEOSA T/Ingenio Programme and with special emphasis in the potential contribution to the ESA Third Party Missions Programme and to the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security initiative (GMES) Data Access.

  2. On the development of earth observation satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Subsequent to the launching of the first LANDSAT by NASA, Japan has recognized the importance of data from earth observation satellites, has conducted studies, and is preparing to develop an independent system. The first ocean observation satellite will be launched in 1983, the second in 1985. The first land observation satellite is scheduled to be launched in 1987 and by 1990 Japan intends to have both land and ocean observation systems in regular operation. The association reception and data processing systems are being developed.

  3. The Earth Phenomena Observing System: Intelligent Autonomy for Satellite Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricard, Michael; Abramson, Mark; Carter, David; Kolitz, Stephan

    2003-01-01

    Earth monitoring systems of the future may include large numbers of inexpensive small satellites, tasked in a coordinated fashion to observe both long term and transient targets. For best performance, a tool which helps operators optimally assign targets to satellites will be required. We present the design of algorithms developed for real-time optimized autonomous planning of large numbers of small single-sensor Earth observation satellites. The algorithms will reduce requirements on the human operators of such a system of satellites, ensure good utilization of system resources, and provide the capability to dynamically respond to temporal terrestrial phenomena. Our initial real-time system model consists of approximately 100 satellites and large number of points of interest on Earth (e.g., hurricanes, volcanoes, and forest fires) with the objective to maximize the total science value of observations over time. Several options for calculating the science value of observations include the following: 1) total observation time, 2) number of observations, and the 3) quality (a function of e.g., sensor type, range, slant angle) of the observations. An integrated approach using integer programming, optimization and astrodynamics is used to calculate optimized observation and sensor tasking plans.

  4. System definition of SEASAT-A, an ocean observation satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, J. R.; Mccandless, S. W.

    1975-01-01

    SEASAT will be an earth-satellite system designed to monitor and observe ocean dynamics in order to provide data for real-time use and predictive purposes. SEASAT-A will be a prototype satellite which will provide experience for system development and some operational demonstration capability. The SEASAT-A will use passive and active visible, infrared, and microwave sensing techniques. The payload will include a scanning radiometer (SR) and a scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR), which are passive sensors, a short-pulse altimeter, a scatterometer, and a synthetic aperture radar, which are active. The major functional elements considered in the definition-phase studies are the sensors, data handling, communications, attitude control, power, orbit adjust, thermal control, structures, and mechanical design. An existing satellite bus, with sensors and sensor modules to be developed, is to be used on SEASAT-A.

  5. Satellite Observation Systems for Polar Climate Change Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Josefino C.

    2012-01-01

    The key observational tools for detecting large scale changes of various parameters in the polar regions have been satellite sensors. The sensors include passive and active satellite systems in the visible, infrared and microwave frequencies. The monitoring started with Tiros and Nimbus research satellites series in the 1970s but during the period, not much data was stored digitally because of limitations and cost of the needed storage systems. Continuous global data came about starting with the launch of ocean color, passive microwave, and thermal infrared sensors on board Nimbus-7 and Synthetic Aperture Radar, Radar Altimeter and Scatterometer on board SeaSat satellite both launched in 1978. The Nimbus-7 lasted longer than expected and provided about 9 years of useful data while SeaSat quit working after 3 months but provided very useful data that became the baseline for follow-up systems with similar capabilities. Over the years, many new sensors were launched, some from Japan Aeronautics and Space Agency (JAXA), some from the European Space Agency (ESA) and more recently, from RuSSia, China, Korea, Canada and India. For polar studies, among the most useful sensors has been the passive microwave sensor which provides day/night and almost all weather observation of the surface. The sensor provide sea surface temperature, precipitation, wind, water vapor and sea ice concentration data that have been very useful in monitoring the climate of the region. More than 30 years of such data are now available, starting with the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) on board the Nimbus-7, the Special Scanning Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) on board a Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on board the EOS/ Aqua satellite. The techniques that have been developed to derive geophysical parameters from data provided by these and other sensors and associated instrumental and algorithm errors and validation techniques will be discussed. An important issue is the organization and storage of hundreds of terabytes of data collected by even just a few of these satellite sensors. Advances in mass storage and computer technology have made it possible to overcome many of the collection and archival problems and the availability of comprehensive satellite data sets put together by NASA's Earth Observing System project will be discussed.

  6. Sensor system for Greenhouse Gas Observing Satellite (GOSAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamazaki, Takashi; Kuze, Akihiko; Kondo, Kayoko

    2004-11-01

    Global warming has become a very serious issue for human beings. In 1997, the Kyoto Protocol was adopted at the Third Session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP3), making it mandatory for developed nations to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by six (6) to eight (8) per cent of their total emissions in 1990, and to meet this goal sometime between 2008 and 2012. The Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) is design to monitor the global distribution of carbon dioxide (CO2) from orbit. GOSAT is a joint project of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the Ministry of Environment (MOE), and the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES). JAXA is responsible for the satellite and instrument development, MOE is involved in the instrument development, and NIES is responsible for the satellite data retrieval. The satellite is scheduled to be launched in 2008. In order to detect the CO2 variation of boundary layers, both the technique to measure the column density and the retrieval algorithm to remove cloud and aerosol contamination are investigated. Main mission sensor of the GOSAT is a Fourier Transform Spectrometer with high optical throughput, spectral resolution and wide spectral coverage, and a cloud-aerosol detecting imager attached to the satellite. The paper presents the mission sensor system of the GOSAT together with the results of performance demonstration with proto-type instrument aboard an aircraft.

  7. Observing system simulations for small satellite formations estimating bidirectional reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Sreeja; Gatebe, Charles K.; Weck, Olivier de

    2015-12-01

    The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) gives the reflectance of a target as a function of illumination geometry and viewing geometry, hence carries information about the anisotropy of the surface. BRDF is needed in remote sensing for the correction of view and illumination angle effects (for example in image standardization and mosaicing), for deriving albedo, for land cover classification, for cloud detection, for atmospheric correction, and other applications. However, current spaceborne instruments provide sparse angular sampling of BRDF and airborne instruments are limited in the spatial and temporal coverage. To fill the gaps in angular coverage within spatial, spectral and temporal requirements, we propose a new measurement technique: use of small satellites in formation flight, each satellite with a VNIR (visible and near infrared) imaging spectrometer, to make multi-spectral, near-simultaneous measurements of every ground spot in the swath at multiple angles. This paper describes an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) to evaluate the proposed concept and select the optimal formation architecture that minimizes BRDF uncertainties. The variables of the OSSE are identified; number of satellites, measurement spread in the view zenith and relative azimuth with respect to solar plane, solar zenith angle, BRDF models and wavelength of reflection. Analyzing the sensitivity of BRDF estimation errors to the variables allow simplification of the OSSE, to enable its use to rapidly evaluate formation architectures. A 6-satellite formation is shown to produce lower BRDF estimation errors, purely in terms of angular sampling as evaluated by the OSSE, than a single spacecraft with 9 forward-aft sensors. We demonstrate the ability to use OSSEs to design small satellite formations as complements to flagship mission data. The formations can fill angular sampling gaps and enable better BRDF products than currently possible.

  8. Observing System Simulations for Small Satellite Formations Estimating Bidirectional Reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nag, Sreeja; Gatebe, Charles K.; de Weck, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) gives the reflectance of a target as a function of illumination geometry and viewing geometry, hence carries information about the anisotropy of the surface. BRDF is needed in remote sensing for the correction of view and illumination angle effects (for example in image standardization and mosaicing), for deriving albedo, for land cover classification, for cloud detection, for atmospheric correction, and other applications. However, current spaceborne instruments provide sparse angular sampling of BRDF and airborne instruments are limited in the spatial and temporal coverage. To fill the gaps in angular coverage within spatial, spectral and temporal requirements, we propose a new measurement technique: Use of small satellites in formation flight, each satellite with a VNIR (visible and near infrared) imaging spectrometer, to make multi-spectral, near-simultaneous measurements of every ground spot in the swath at multiple angles. This paper describes an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) to evaluate the proposed concept and select the optimal formation architecture that minimizes BRDF uncertainties. The variables of the OSSE are identified; number of satellites, measurement spread in the view zenith and relative azimuth with respect to solar plane, solar zenith angle, BRDF models and wavelength of reflection. Analyzing the sensitivity of BRDF estimation errors to the variables allow simplification of the OSSE, to enable its use to rapidly evaluate formation architectures. A 6-satellite formation is shown to produce lower BRDF estimation errors, purely in terms of angular sampling as evaluated by the OSSE, than a single spacecraft with 9 forward-aft sensors. We demonstrate the ability to use OSSEs to design small satellite formations as complements to flagship mission data. The formations can fill angular sampling gaps and enable better BRDF products than currently possible.

  9. A view finder control system for an earth observation satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyn, H.

    2004-11-01

    A real time TV view finder is used on-board a low earth orbiting (LEO) satellite to manually select targets for imaging from a ground station within the communication footprint of the satellite. The attitude control system on the satellite is used to steer the satellite using commands from the groundstation and a television camera onboard the satellite will then downlink a television signal in real time to a monitor screen in the ground station. The operator in the feedback loop will be able to manually steer the boresight of the satellite's main imager towards interested target areas e.g. to avoid clouds or correct for any attitude pointing errors. Due to a substantial delay (in the order of a second) in the view finding feedback loop and the narrow field of view of the main imager, the operator has to be assisted by the onboard attitude control system to stabilise and track the target area visible on the monitor screen. This paper will present the extended Kalman filter used to estimate the satellite's attitude angles using quaternions and the bias vector component of the 3-axis inertial rate sensors (gyros). Absolute attitude sensors (i.e. sun, horizon and magnetic) are used to supply the measurement vectors to correct the filter states during the view finder manoeuvres. The target tracking and rate steering reaction wheel controllers to accurately point and stabilise the satellite will be presented. The reference generator for the satellite to target attitude and rate vectors as used by the reaction wheel controllers will be derived.

  10. Satellite Altimetry for a Global Ocean Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng

    2000-01-01

    Space-age technologies have made satellite remote sensing a powerful new tool to study the Earth on a global scale. However, the opacity of the ocean to electromagnetic sensing has limited spaceborne measurements to the properties of the surface layer of the ocean (such as sea surface temperature and color). The radar altimetric measurement of the height of the sea surface relative to the geoid, the dynamic topography of the ocean, is a very useful quantity for studying the circulation of the ocean. The ability of measuring dynamic topography from space makes satellite altimetry a uniquely useful remote sensing technique because dynamic topography reflects oceanic processes not only at the surface but at depths as well. A simple analysis shows that a one centimeter tilt in the dynamic topography is associated with a mass transport of 1-7 Sv (1Sv= 1 million tons per second) in the open ocean depending on the vertical distribution of current velocity. Such a magnitude is an appreciable fraction of the transport of the Florida Current (circa 30 Sv), for instance. TOPEX/POSEIDON has demonstrated the capability of measuring the time variation of sea level with accuracy approaching to 2 cm when the data are averaged over boxes with several hundred kilometers on each side. The data set has been used for studying ocean circulation phenomena with a wide range of scales, ranging from fast-changing barotropic variability to seasonal and interannual variability such as El Nino and La Nina. The long record of precise measurement of global sea level has also showed great promise for monitoring the variation of mean sea level, an effective indicator of global climate change. Continuation of satellite altimetry missions with capability matching or better than that of TOPEX/POSEIDON should be included as a key component of a Global Ocean Observing System. NASA and CNES have committed to continuing the measurement of TOPEX/POSEIDON with a series of follow-on missions called Jason. The first of the series, Jason-1, is scheduled for launch in May, 2000. Such a series of missions will provide a key data stream for both research and practical applications and benefit the objectives of global programs such as CLIVAR and GODAE.

  11. NASDA's earth observation satellite data archive policy for the earth observation data and information system (EOIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobue, Shin-ichi; Yoshida, Fumiyoshi; Ochiai, Osamu

    1996-01-01

    NASDA's new Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) is scheduled for launch in August, 1996. ADEOS carries 8 sensors to observe earth environmental phenomena and sends their data to NASDA, NASA, and other foreign ground stations around the world. The downlink data bit rate for ADEOS is 126 MB/s and the total volume of data is about 100 GB per day. To archive and manage such a large quantity of data with high reliability and easy accessibility it was necessary to develop a new mass storage system with a catalogue information database using advanced database management technology. The data will be archived and maintained in the Master Data Storage Subsystem (MDSS) which is one subsystem in NASDA's new Earth Observation data and Information System (EOIS). The MDSS is based on a SONY ID1 digital tape robotics system. This paper provides an overview of the EOIS system, with a focus on the Master Data Storage Subsystem and the NASDA Earth Observation Center (EOC) archive policy for earth observation satellite data.

  12. Earth observing satellite: Understanding the Earth as a system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, Gerald

    1990-01-01

    There is now a plan for global studies which include two very large efforts. One is the International Geosphere/Biosphere Program (IGBP) sponsored by the International Council of Scientific Unions. The other initiative is Mission to Planet Earth, an unbrella program for doing three kinds of space missions. The major one is the Earth Observation Satellite (EOS). EOS is large polar orbiting satellites with heavy payloads. Two will be placed in orbit by NASA, one by the Japanese and one or two by ESA. The overall mission measurement objectives of EOS are summarized: (1) the global distribution of energy input to and energy output from the Earth; (2) the structure, state variables, composition, and dynamics of the atmosphere from the ground to the mesopause; (3) the physical and biological structure, state, composition, and dynamics of the land surface, including terrestrial and inland water ecosystems; (4) the rates, important sources and sinks, and key components and processes of the Earth's biogeochemical cycles; (5) the circulation, surface temperature, wind stress, sea state, and the biological activity of the oceans; (6) the extent, type, state, elevation, roughness, and dynamics of glaciers, ice sheets, snow and sea ice, and the liquid equivalent of snow in the global cryosphere; (7) the global rates, amounts, and distribution of precipitation; and (8) the dynamic motions of the Earth (geophysics) as a whole, including both rotational dynamics and the kinematic motions of the tectonic plates.

  13. Photometric Observations of Mutual Events in Saturn's System of Regular Satellites in 1995

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devyatkin, A. V.; Miroshnichenko, A. S.

    2001-03-01

    We carried out observations of mutual events in Saturn's system of satellites as part of the PHESAT95 International Program. Three light curves of these events were obtained. We developed a technique of allowance for the influence of the law of light reflection from the surfaces of Saturn's satellites, photometric nonuniformity of their surfaces, the phase effect, and the illumination distribution in the satellite penumbra (given the brightness distribution over the solar disk) on the light curve of an occultation or eclipse of one satellite by another. This technique is used to interpret our observations of these events and to determine the minimum separations between satellites or between a satellite and the shadow center of another satellite and the corresponding timings.

  14. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) for the Earth Observing System (EOS) CHEM Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, R.; Glavich, T.; Rider, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an imaging infrared Fourier transform spectrometer scheduled to be launched into polar sun-synchronous orbit on the Earth Observing System (EOS) CHEM satellite in December 2002.

  15. Parachute satellites for earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massonnet, Didier

    2008-07-01

    The "parachute" concept presented here is a generic definition for earth observation systems essentially made of a reflector under which a detector associated with a telemetry antenna is suspended [D. Massonnet, (Applicant), Satellite, method and a fleet of satellites for observing a celestial body, Patent 0509-1112, 2006. [1]; D. Massonnet, (Déposant), Satellite, procédé et flotte de satellites d'observation d'un corps céleste, Priorité 04-04327, 2004. [2

  16. Satellite signatures in SLR observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, G. M.

    1993-01-01

    We examine the evidence for the detection of satellite-dependent signatures in the laser range observations obtained by the UK single-photon Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) System models of the expected observation distributions from Ajisai and Lageos are developed from the published satellite spread functions and from the characteristics of the SLR System and compared with the observations. The effects of varying return strengths are discussed using the models and by experimental observations of Ajisai, during which a range of return levels from single to multiple photons is achieved. The implications of these results for system-dependent center for mass corrections are discussed.

  17. The state of the atmosphere as inferred from the FGGE satellite observing systems during SOP-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halem, M.; Kalnay, E.; Baker, W. E.; Atlas, R.

    1981-01-01

    Data assimilation experiments were performed to test the influence of different elements of the satellite observing systems. Results from some of the experiments are presented. These findings show that the FGGE satellite systems are able to infer the three-dimensional motion field and improve the representation of the large-scale state of the atmosphere. Preliminary results of the forecast impact of the FGGE data sets are also presented.

  18. Candidate configuration trade study, Stellar-inertial Measurement Systems (SIMS) for an Earth Observation Satellite (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogletree, G.; Coccoli, J.; Mckern, R.; Smith, M.; White, R.

    1972-01-01

    The results of analytical and simulation studies of the stellar-inertial measurement system (SIMS) for an earth observation satellite are presented. Subsystem design analyses and sensor design trades are reported. Three candidate systems are considered: (1) structure-mounted gyros with structure-mounted star mapper, (2) structure-mounted gyros with gimbaled star tracker, and (3) gimbaled gyros with structure-mounted star mapper. The purpose of the study is to facilitate the decisions pertaining to gimbaled versus structure-mounted gyros and star sensors, and combinations of systems suitable for the EOS satellite.

  19. Stereoscopic observations from meteorological satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasler, A. F.; Mack, R.; Negri, A.

    The capability of making stereoscopic observations of clouds from meteorological satellites is a new basic analysis tool with a broad spectrum of applications. Stereoscopic observations from satellites were first made using the early vidicon tube weather satellites (e.g., Ondrejka and Conover [1]). However, the only high quality meteorological stereoscopy from low orbit has been done from Apollo and Skylab, (e.g., Shenk et al. [2] and Black [3], [4]). Stereoscopy from geosynchronous satellites was proposed by Shenk [5] and Bristor and Pichel [6] in 1974 which allowed Minzner et al. [7] to demonstrate the first quantitative cloud height analysis. In 1978 Bryson [8] and desJardins [9] independently developed digital processing techniques to remap stereo images which made possible precision height measurement and spectacular display of stereograms (Hasler et al. [10], and Hasler [11]). In 1980 the Japanese Geosynchronous Satellite (GMS) and the U.S. GOES-West satellite were synchronized to obtain stereo over the central Pacific as described by Fujita and Dodge [12] and in this paper. Recently the authors have remapped images from a Low Earth Orbiter (LEO) to the coordinate system of a Geosynchronous Earth Orbiter (GEO) and obtained stereoscopic cloud height measurements which promise to have quality comparable to previous all GEO stereo. It has also been determined that the north-south imaging scan rate of some GEOs can be slowed or reversed. Therefore the feasibility of obtaining stereoscopic observations world wide from combinations of operational GEO and LEO satellites has been demonstrated. Stereoscopy from satellites has many advantages over infrared techniques for the observation of cloud structure because it depends only on basic geometric relationships. Digital remapping of GEO and LEO satellite images is imperative for precision stereo height measurement and high quality displays because of the curvature of the earth and the large angular separation of the two satellites. A general solution for accurate height computation depends on precise navigation of the two satellites. Validation of the geosynchronous satellite stereo using high altitude mountain lakes and vertically pointing aircraft lidar leads to a height accuracy estimate of +/- 500 m for typical clouds which have been studied. Applications of the satellite stereo include: 1) cloud top and base height measurements, 2) cloud-wind height assignment, 3) vertical motion estimates for convective clouds (Mack et al. [13], [14]), 4) temperature vs. height measurements when stereo is used together with infrared observations and 5) cloud emissivity measurements when stereo, infrared and temperature sounding are used together (see Szejwach et al. [15]). When true satellite stereo image pairs are not available, synthetic stereo may be generated. The combination of multispectral satellite data using computer produced stereo image pairs is a dramatic example of synthetic stereoscopic display. The classic case uses the combination of infrared and visible data as first demonstrated by Pichel et al. [16]. Hasler et at. [17], Mosher and Young [18] and Lorenz [19], have expanded this concept to display many channels of data from various radiometers as well as real and simulated data fields. A future system of stereoscopic satellites would be comprised of both low orbiters (as suggested by Lorenz and Schmidt [20], [19]) and a global system of geosynchronous satellites. The low earth orbiters would provide stereo coverage day and night and include the poles. An optimum global system of stereoscopic geosynchronous satellites would require international standarization of scan rate and direction, and scan times (synchronization) and resolution of at least 1 km in all imaging channels. A stereoscopic satellite system as suggested here would make an extremely important contribution to the understanding and prediction of the atmosphere.

  20. Application of OSSEs to Improved Observing System Design and Enhanced Satellite Data Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlas, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) are an important tool for evaluating the potential impact of proposed new observing systems, as well as for evaluating trade-offs in observing system design, and in developing and assessing improved methodology for assimilating new observations. Extensive OSSEs have been conducted at NASA/ GSFC and NOAA/AOML over the last three decades. These OSSEs determined correctly the quantitative potential for several proposed satellite observing systems to improve weather analysis and prediction prior to their launch, evaluated trade-offs in orbits, coverage and accuracy for space-based wind lidars, and were used in the development of the methodology that led to the first beneficial impacts of satellite surface winds on numerical weather prediction. At the present time, we are expanding the application of OSSE methodology to severe storm, air quality, and ocean studies. In this paper, we summarize early applications of global OSSEs, and new experiments using both global and regional models (with a special emphasis on atmosphere and ocean analysis, numerical weather prediction and hurricane forecasting). These experiments are aimed at determining (1) the relative impact of alternative concepts for space-based lidar winds, (2) the potential impact of new GNSS RO satellites, (3) the potential impact of a geostationary microwave sounder, and (4) the relative impact of alternative concepts for polar and geostationary hyperspectral sounders.

  1. Stereoscopic observations from meteorological satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.; Negri, A.; Mack, R.

    1982-01-01

    Stereo cloud top height measurements, accurate to within + or - 500 m, have been performed using operational weather satellites. The stereo has been demonstrated using various combinations of GEO and LEO satellites, and the use of synthetic stereo was considered. Stereo can be done over most of the earth (60 deg S to 60 deg N) during the day; at higher latitudes and at night, stereo can be done using two LEOs if the proper coincidences occur. The usefulness of stereo cloud top height measurements has been demonstrated by many studies of convective storm cloud systems. Recommendations relating to short, medium, and long term planning regarding stereo observations from meteorological satellites are outlined.

  2. Ionospheric Simulation System for Satellite Observations and Global Assimilative Model Experiments - ISOGAME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pi, Xiaoqing; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Verkhoglyadova, Olga; Stephens, Philip; Iijima, Bryron A.

    2013-01-01

    Modeling and imaging the Earth's ionosphere as well as understanding its structures, inhomogeneities, and disturbances is a key part of NASA's Heliophysics Directorate science roadmap. This invention provides a design tool for scientific missions focused on the ionosphere. It is a scientifically important and technologically challenging task to assess the impact of a new observation system quantitatively on our capability of imaging and modeling the ionosphere. This question is often raised whenever a new satellite system is proposed, a new type of data is emerging, or a new modeling technique is developed. The proposed constellation would be part of a new observation system with more low-Earth orbiters tracking more radio occultation signals broadcast by Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) than those offered by the current GPS and COSMIC observation system. A simulation system was developed to fulfill this task. The system is composed of a suite of software that combines the Global Assimilative Ionospheric Model (GAIM) including first-principles and empirical ionospheric models, a multiple- dipole geomagnetic field model, data assimilation modules, observation simulator, visualization software, and orbit design, simulation, and optimization software.

  3. Observing system simulation experiments to assess the potential impact of proposed satellite instruments on hurricane prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlas, Robert; Pagano, Thomas S.

    2014-09-01

    Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) are an important tool for evaluating the potential impact of proposed new observing systems, as well as for evaluating trade-offs in observing system design, and in developing and assessing improved methodology for assimilating new observations. Extensive OSSEs have been conducted at NASA/ GSFC and NOAA/AOML over the last three decades. These OSSEs determined correctly the quantitative potential for several proposed satellite observing systems to improve weather analysis and prediction prior to their launch, evaluated trade-offs in orbits, coverage and accuracy for space-based wind lidars, and were used in the development of the methodology that led to the first beneficial impacts of satellite surface winds on numerical weather prediction. In this paper, we summarize early applications of global OSSEs to hurricane track forecasting and new experiments using both global and regional models. These experiments are aimed at determining (1) the potential impact of unmanned aerial systems, (2) the relative impact of alternative concepts for space-based lidar winds, and (3) the relative impact of alternative concepts for polar and geostationary hyperspectral sounders.

  4. An analysis of the upper atmospheric wind observed by LOGACS. [satellite Low-G Accelerometer Calibration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Matsushita, S.; Devries, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    Wind velocities at 140 to 200 km altitude were observed by a low-g accelerometer calibration system (LOGACS) flown on an Agena satellite during a geomagnetic storm. An interesting wind reversal observed by the satellite at auroral latitudes is satisfactorily explained by the neutral air motion caused by the E x B drift deduced from the ground-based geomagnetic data recorded at stations near the meridian of the satellite orbit.

  5. Data Dissemination System Status and Plan for Jaxa's Earth Observation Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuda, M.; Miura, S.

    2012-12-01

    1. INTRODUCTION JAXA is Japan's national aerospace agency and responsible for research, technology development and the launch of satellites into orbit, and is involved in many more advanced missions, such as asteroid exploration and possible manned exploration of the Moon. Since 1978, JAXA started to disseminate earth observation data acquired by satellites to researchers and those data scene became more than two Million scenes in 2011. This paper focuses on the status and future plan for JAXA's Data Dissemination System for those data. 2. STATUS JAXA is Japan's national aerospace agency and responsible for research, technology development and the launch of satellites into orbit. In October 1978, JAXA opened the Earth Observation Center (EOC) and started to archive and disseminate earth observation data acquired by multiple satellites. 2.1. Target data Currently, the disseminated data includes "JAXA's satellite/sensor data" and "non-JAXA's satellite/sensor data", as shown in Table 2-1. In 2011, the total disseminated data scene became more than two Million scenes. 2.2. Data Dissemination Guideline The JAXA basic data dissemination guideline is a free for researchers and specific agencies. JAXA has two approaches for dissemination. One is that the data is distributed for specific agencies by Mission Operation Systems (MOS). Each project has its own MOS, for example, GCOM-W1 has a GCOM-W1 MOS. Another is that the data is disseminated for many researchers by Data Distribution Systems. Now JAXA has three Data Distribution systems, EOIS, AUIG and GCOM-W1DPSS. Table 2-1 : Disseminated earth observation data from JAXA's facility Satellite Sensor Processing Level ALOS AVNIR-2 Level 1 PRISM Level 1 PALSAR Level 1 TRMM PR Level 1, 2, 3 CMB Level 1, 2, 3 TMI Level 1, 2, 3 VIR Level 1, 2, 3 Aqua AMSR-E Level 1, 2, 3 ADEOS-II AMSR Level 1, 2, 3 GLI-1km Level 1, 2, 3 GLI-250m Level 1, 2, 3 JERS-1 OSW Level 0, 1, 2 OVN Level 0, 1, 2, 5 SAR Level 1, 2 ADEOS AVNIR Level 1 OCTS Level 1, 2, 3 MOS-1b, -1 MES Level 0, 1, 2 VTI Level 0, 1, 2 GOSAT TANSO Level 1, 2, 3, 4 3. FUTURE PLAN For global earth observation spacecrafts, JAXA is now developing two dissemination systems, G-Portal and CATS-I. G-Portal will replace the EOIS and GCOM-W1DPSS including ALOS catalogue in AUIG. Users will be able to get the products of several spacecrafts in one stop service. G-Portal will be main dissemination system of the products for researches in GPM, GCOM-C1 and EarthCARE era. Other hand, CATS-I will disseminate Earth Observation product's catalogue for Japanese domestic key agencies, for example, Cabinet Office. CATS-I will also disseminate the catalogue for world key agencies and harvest the catalogue from other agencies with Catalogue Service for Web (CSW). JAXA will enlarge these G-Portal and CATS-I for future earth observation spacecrafts and these systems will be meet the demands of future users.

  6. Marine Stratus Cloud Objects Simulated by a Cloud-Resolving Model and Observed by Earth Observing System Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Xu, K.

    2005-05-01

    Using a new approach proposed by Xu et al. (2005), 2162 stratus cloud objects are diagnosed using the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Single Scanner Footprint (SSF) product on board the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite during January-August 1998 at three regions of east Pacific: north subtropical, east equatorial, and south subtropical. A cloud object is identified as a contiguous region of the Earth composed of individual satellite footprints within a single dominant cloud-system type. To be identified as a stratus cloud object, the cloud top height must be less than 3 km and cloud fraction is 0.99-1.00. The probability density functions (PDFs) of several observed and retrieved fields from the CERES SSF product are found to be different among the three regions. Two versions of a cloud-resolving model (CRM), which includes either a two-moment or a one-moment microphysics scheme, are used to simulate a number of the observed marine stratus cloud objects. Number concentrations of cloud droplets and rain drops, in addition to their mixing ratios, are predicted by the CRM version with the two-moment microphysics scheme while they are not predicted by the CRM version with the one-moment microphysics scheme. ECMWF meteorological fields matched with the instantaneous satellite cloud-object data are used to drive the CRM, i.e. to provide initial atmospheric state, large-scale total advective tendencies of temperature and moisture, large-scale horizontal wind speed, and sea surface temperature for the CRM simulations. Detailed analyses of the satellite cloud object data and the CRM simulations will be performed (1) to evaluate the CRM, with focus on how the microphysics schemes influence the simulated cloud properties and cloud radiative forcing, and (2) to understand the physical mechanisms for the differences among the three regions of east Pacific. A bootstrapping technique will be used to identify the statistical differences between the simulated and observed histograms.

  7. Ionospheric Simulation System for Satellite Observations and Global Assimilative Modeling Experiments (ISOGAME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pi, Xiaoqing; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Verkhoglyadova, Olga P.; Stephens, Philip; Wilson, Brian D.; Akopian, Vardan; Komjathy, Attila; Lijima, Byron A.

    2013-01-01

    ISOGAME is designed and developed to assess quantitatively the impact of new observation systems on the capability of imaging and modeling the ionosphere. With ISOGAME, one can perform observation system simulation experiments (OSSEs). A typical OSSE using ISOGAME would involve: (1) simulating various ionospheric conditions on global scales; (2) simulating ionospheric measurements made from a constellation of low-Earth-orbiters (LEOs), particularly Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) radio occultation data, and from ground-based global GNSS networks; (3) conducting ionospheric data assimilation experiments with the Global Assimilative Ionospheric Model (GAIM); and (4) analyzing modeling results with visualization tools. ISOGAME can provide quantitative assessment of the accuracy of assimilative modeling with the interested observation system. Other observation systems besides those based on GNSS are also possible to analyze. The system is composed of a suite of software that combines the GAIM, including a 4D first-principles ionospheric model and data assimilation modules, an Internal Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model that has been developed by international ionospheric research communities, observation simulator, visualization software, and orbit design, simulation, and optimization software. The core GAIM model used in ISOGAME is based on the GAIM++ code (written in C++) that includes a new high-fidelity geomagnetic field representation (multi-dipole). New visualization tools and analysis algorithms for the OSSEs are now part of ISOGAME.

  8. The Effect of Satellite Observing System Changes on MERRA Water and Energy Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Bosilovich, M. G.; Chen, J.; Miller, t. L.

    2010-01-01

    Because reanalysis data sets offer state variables and fluxes at regular space / time intervals, atmospheric reanalyses have become a mainstay of the climate community for diagnostic purposes and for driving offline ocean and land models. Although one weakness of these data sets is the susceptibility of the flux products to uncertainties because of shortcomings in parameterized model physics, another issue, perhaps less appreciated, is the fact that continual but discreet changes in the evolving observational system, particularly from satellite sensors, may also introduce artifacts in the time series of quantities. In this paper we examine the ability of the NASA MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications) and other recent reanalyses to determine variability in the climate system over the satellite record (approximately the last 30 years). In particular we highlight the effect on the reanalysis of discontinuities at the junctures of the onset of passive microwave imaging (Special Sensor Microwave Imager) in late 1987 as well as improved sounding and imaging with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit, AMSU-A, in 1998. We first examine MERRA fluxes from the perspective of how physical modes of variability (e.g. ENSO events, Pacific Decadal Variability) are contaminated by artificial step-like trends induced by the onset of new moisture data these two satellite observing systems. Secondly, we show how Redundancy Analysis, a statistical regression methodology, is effective in relating these artifact signals in the moisture and temperature analysis increments to their presence in the physical flux terms (e.g. precipitation, radiation). This procedure is shown to be effective greatly reducing the artificial trends in the flux quantities.

  9. The Effect of Satellite Observing System Changes on MERRA Water and Energy Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Bosilovich, M. G.; Chen, J.; Miller, T. L.

    2011-01-01

    Because reanalysis data sets offer state variables and fluxes at regular space / time intervals, atmospheric reanalyses have become a mainstay of the climate community for diagnostic purposes and for driving offline ocean and land models. Although one weakness of these data sets is the susceptibility of the flux products to uncertainties because of shortcomings in parameterized model physics, another issue, perhaps less appreciated, is the fact that continual but discreet changes in the evolving observational system, particularly from satellite sensors, may also introduce artifacts in the time series of quantities. In this paper we examine the ability of the NASA MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications) and other recent reanalyses to determine variability in the climate system over the satellite record (approx. the last 30 years). In particular we highlight the effect on the reanalysis of discontinuities at the junctures of the onset of passive microwave imaging (Special Sensor Microwave Imager) in late 1987 and, more prominently, with improved sounding and imaging with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit, AMSU-A, in 1998. We first examine MERRA fluxes from the perspective of how physical modes of variability (e.g. ENSO events, Pacific Decadal Variability) are contained by artificial step-like trends induced by the onset of new moisture data these two satellite observing systems. Secondly, we show how Redundancy Analysis, a statistical regression methodology, is effective in relating these artifact signals in the moisture and temperature analysis increments to their presence in the physical flux terms (e.g. precipitation, radiation). This procedure is shown to be effective greatly reducing the artificial trends in the flux quantities.

  10. Dynamical and observational constraints on satellites in the inner Pluto-Charon system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan; Parker, Joel William; Duncan, Martin J.; Snowdall, J. Clark, Jr.; Levison, Harold F.

    1994-01-01

    It is not known if Pluto has other satellites besides its massive partner Charon. In the past, searches for additional satellites in the Pluto-Charon system have extended from the solar-tidal stability boundary (approximately 90 arcsec from Pluto) inward to about 1 arcsec from Pluto. Here we further explore the inner (i.e., less than 10 arcsec) region of the Pluto-Charon system to determine where additional satellites might lie. In particular, we report on (1) dynamical simulations to delineate the region where unstable orbits lie around Charon, (2) dynamical simulations which use the low orbital eccentricity of Charon to constrain the mass of any third body near Pluto, and (3) analysis of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) archival images to search for satellites in the inner Pluto-Charon system. Although no objects were found, significant new constraints on bodies orbiting in the inner Pluto-Charon system were obtained.

  11. Dynamical and observational constraints on satellites in the inner Pluto-Charon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, S. Alan; Parker, Joel William; Duncan, Martin J.; Snowdall, J. Clark, Jr.; Levison, Harold F.

    1994-04-01

    It is not known if Pluto has other satellites besides its massive partner Charon. In the past, searches for additional satellites in the Pluto-Charon system have extended from the solar-tidal stability boundary (approximately 90 arcsec from Pluto) inward to about 1 arcsec from Pluto. Here we further explore the inner (i.e., less than 10 arcsec) region of the Pluto-Charon system to determine where additional satellites might lie. In particular, we report on (1) dynamical simulations to delineate the region where unstable orbits lie around Charon, (2) dynamical simulations which use the low orbital eccentricity of Charon to constrain the mass of any third body near Pluto, and (3) analysis of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) archival images to search for satellites in the inner Pluto-Charon system. Although no objects were found, significant new constraints on bodies orbiting in the inner Pluto-Charon system were obtained.

  12. An Attitude Control System for SumbandilaSAT an Earth Observation Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyn, W. H.

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes the attitude determination and control system to support the multi-spectral earth observation main payload of the SumbandilaSAT microsatellite. The satellite has only a single main Y- body mounted solar panel and the attitude control system must ensure a nominal sun-pointed attitude under all non-imaging conditions during the sunlit part of the orbit. The control actuators employed are 3- axis magnetic torquer rods and reaction wheels. During initial detumbling and safe mode operations a simple new magnetic control law is used to bring the satellite to a sun-pointed Y-spinning attitude for maximum solar power collection. From this sun-pointed, spinning attitude an intermediate control mode is entered when the Y-reaction wheel is utilised as a momentum wheel, to absorb the body spin rate and to inertially stabilise the angular momentum vector towards the sun direction. During the intermediate mode the magnetic rods are used to maintain the momentum vector size and direction and to do nutation damping. The pitch angle is also controlled using the Y-wheel, to keep the main imager payload as close as possible to an earth-pointed attitude and to thermally stabilise the imager telescope. The final and nominal attitude control mode is entered when a zero biased 3-axis reaction wheel controller is enabled, for: 1) sun tracking for optimal solar power collection, 2) target tracking during viewfinder use or during imaging download communication with a ground station and 3) pushbroom imager scanning with a forward motion compensation capability. During the nominal mode the magnetic rods are used to dump the angular momentum from the reaction wheels during sun tracking periods. A short introduction to the Sumbandila satellite will be given. All the control modes, the attitude sensors and estimators utilised, will be introduced in the paper. Specifically, a unique agile viewfinder control mode to manually select targets for subsequent high resolution image scanning, when a control ground station is available within the communication footprint of the satellite, will be explained more thoroughly.

  13. A regional CO2 observing system simulation experiment for the ASCENDS satellite mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. S.; Kawa, S. R.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Baker, D. F.; Mountain, M.; Henderson, J.; Nehrkorn, T.; Zaccheo, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    Top-down estimates of the spatiotemporal variations in emissions and uptake of CO2 will benefit from the increasing measurement density brought by recent and future additions to the suite of in situ and remote CO2 measurement platforms. In particular, the planned NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) satellite mission will provide greater coverage in cloudy regions, at high latitudes, and at night than passive satellite systems, as well as high precision and accuracy. In a novel approach to quantifying the ability of satellite column measurements to constrain CO2 fluxes, we use a portable library of footprints (surface influence functions) generated by the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model in combination with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in a regional Bayesian synthesis inversion. The regional Lagrangian particle dispersion model framework is well suited to make use of ASCENDS observations to constrain weekly fluxes in North America at a high resolution, in this case at 1° latitude × 1° longitude. We consider random measurement errors only, modeled as a function of the mission and instrument design specifications along with realistic atmospheric and surface conditions. We find that the ASCENDS observations could potentially reduce flux uncertainties substantially at biome and finer scales. At the grid scale and weekly resolution, the largest uncertainty reductions, on the order of 50%, occur where and when there is good coverage by observations with low measurement errors and the a priori uncertainties are large. Uncertainty reductions are smaller for a 1.57 μm candidate wavelength than for a 2.05 μm wavelength, and are smaller for the higher of the two measurement error levels that we consider (1.0 ppm vs. 0.5 ppm clear-sky error at Railroad Valley, Nevada). Uncertainty reductions at the annual biome scale range from ~40% to ~75% across our four instrument design cases and from ~65% to ~85% for the continent as a whole. Tests suggest that the quantitative results are moderately sensitive to assumptions regarding a priori uncertainties and boundary conditions. The a posteriori flux uncertainties we obtain, ranging from 0.01 to 0.06 Pg C yr-1 across the biomes, would meet requirements for improved understanding of long-term carbon sinks suggested by a previous study.

  14. A regional CO2 observing system simulation experiment for the ASCENDS Satellite Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. S.; Kawa, S. R.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Baker, D. F.; Mountain, M.; Henderson, J.; Nehrkorn, T.; Zaccheo, T. S.

    2014-05-01

    Top-down estimates of the spatiotemporal variations in emissions and uptake of CO2 will benefit from the increasing measurement density brought by recent and future additions to the suite of in situ and remote CO2 measurement platforms. In particular, the planned NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) satellite mission will provide greater coverage in cloudy regions, at high latitudes, and at night than passive satellite systems, as well as high precision and accuracy. In a novel approach to quantifying the ability of satellite column measurements to constrain CO2 fluxes, we use a portable library of footprints (surface influence functions) generated by the WRF-STILT Lagrangian transport model in a regional Bayesian synthesis inversion. The regional Lagrangian framework is well suited to make use of ASCENDS observations to constrain fluxes at high resolution, in this case at 1° latitude × 1° longitude and weekly for North America. We consider random measurement errors only, modeled as a function of mission and instrument design specifications along with realistic atmospheric and surface conditions. We find that the ASCENDS observations could potentially reduce flux uncertainties substantially at biome and finer scales. At the 1° × 1°, weekly scale, the largest uncertainty reductions, on the order of 50%, occur where and when there is good coverage by observations with low measurement errors and the a priori uncertainties are large. Uncertainty reductions are smaller for a 1.57 μm candidate wavelength than for a 2.05 μm wavelength, and are smaller for the higher of the two measurement error levels that we consider (1.0 ppm vs. 0.5 ppm clear-sky error at Railroad Valley, Nevada). Uncertainty reductions at the annual, biome scale range from ∼40% to ∼75% across our four instrument design cases, and from ∼65% to ∼85% for the continent as a whole. Our uncertainty reductions at various scales are substantially smaller than those from a global ASCENDS inversion on a coarser grid, demonstrating how quantitative results can depend on inversion methodology. The a posteriori flux uncertainties we obtain, ranging from 0.01 to 0.06 Pg C yr-1 across the biomes, would meet requirements for improved understanding of long-term carbon sinks suggested by a previous study.

  15. A Regional CO2 Observing System Simulation Experiment for the ASCENDS Satellite Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. S.; Kawa, S. R.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Baker, D. F.; Mountain, M.; Henderson, J.; Nehrkorn, T.; Zaccheo, T. S.

    2014-01-01

    Top-down estimates of the spatiotemporal variations in emissions and uptake of CO2 will benefit from the increasing measurement density brought by recent and future additions to the suite of in situ and remote CO2 measurement platforms. In particular, the planned NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) satellite mission will provide greater coverage in cloudy regions, at high latitudes, and at night than passive satellite systems, as well as high precision and accuracy. In a novel approach to quantifying the ability of satellite column measurements to constrain CO2 fluxes, we use a portable library of footprints (surface influence functions) generated by the WRF-STILT Lagrangian transport model in a regional Bayesian synthesis inversion. The regional Lagrangian framework is well suited to make use of ASCENDS observations to constrain fluxes at high resolution, in this case at 1 degree latitude x 1 degree longitude and weekly for North America. We consider random measurement errors only, modeled as a function of mission and instrument design specifications along with realistic atmospheric and surface conditions. We find that the ASCENDS observations could potentially reduce flux uncertainties substantially at biome and finer scales. At the 1 degree x 1 degree, weekly scale, the largest uncertainty reductions, on the order of 50 percent, occur where and when there is good coverage by observations with low measurement errors and the a priori uncertainties are large. Uncertainty reductions are smaller for a 1.57 micron candidate wavelength than for a 2.05 micron wavelength, and are smaller for the higher of the two measurement error levels that we consider (1.0 ppm vs. 0.5 ppm clear-sky error at Railroad Valley, Nevada). Uncertainty reductions at the annual, biome scale range from 40 percent to 75 percent across our four instrument design cases, and from 65 percent to 85 percent for the continent as a whole. Our uncertainty reductions at various scales are substantially smaller than those from a global ASCENDS inversion on a coarser grid, demonstrating how quantitative results can depend on inversion methodology. The a posteriori flux uncertainties we obtain, ranging from 0.01 to 0.06 Pg C yr-1 across the biomes, would meet requirements for improved understanding of long-term carbon sinks suggested by a previous study.

  16. Preliminary design of a satellite observation system for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabe, Greg (Editor); Gallagher, Chris; Wilson, Brian; Rehfeld, James; Maurer, Alexa; Stern, Dan; Nualart, Jaime; Le, Xuan-Trang

    1992-01-01

    Degobah Satellite Systems (DSS), in cooperation with the University Space Research Association (USRA), NASA - Johnson Space Center (JSC), and the University of Texas, has completed the preliminary design of a satellite system to provide inexpensive on-demand video images of all or any portion of Space Station Freedom (SSF). DSS has narrowed the scope of the project to complement the work done by Mr. Dennis Wells at Johnson Space Center. This three month project has resulted in completion of the preliminary design of AERCAM, the Autonomous Extravehicular Robotic Camera, detailed in this design report. This report begins by providing information on the project background, describing the mission objectives, constraints, and assumptions. Preliminary designs for the primary concept and satellite subsystems are then discussed in detail. Included in the technical portion of the report are detailed descriptions of an advanced imaging system and docking and safing systems that ensure compatibility with the SSF. The report concludes by describing management procedures and project costs.

  17. Astrometry of natural satellites: improving the dynamics of planetary systems with old observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Vincent; Pascu, Dan; Lainey, Valery; Arlot, Jean-Eudes

    2014-05-01

    A new astrometric reduction of old photographic plates, benefiting from modern technologies such as sub-micrometric scanners associated with a reduction using accurate catalogues (UCAC at the present time and GAIA in a near future), provides improved knowledge of the orbital motion of planetary satellites.In the framework of an international collaboration first, and in the FP7 ESPaCE european project afterward, U.S. Naval Observatory plates were digitized with the new generation DAMIAN scanning machine of the Royal Observatory of Belgium. The procedure was applied to a few hundred photographic plates of the Galilean satellites covering the years 1967-1998, and of the Martian satellites covering the years 1967-1997. We provide results with an accuracy better than 70 mas in (RA,Dec) positions of the Galilean moons, and better than 60 mas in (RA,Dec) positions of the Martian satellites.Since the positions of Jupiter and Mars may be deduced from the observed (RA,Dec) positions of their satellites, we can also assess the accuracy of the ephemerides of Jupiter and Mars.

  18. The Earth Observing System Microwave Limb Sounder (EOS MLS) on the Aura Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, Joe W.; Froidevaux, Lucien; Harwood, Robert S.; Jarnot, Robert F.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Read, William G.; Siegel, Peter H.; Cofield, Richard E.; Filipiak, Mark J.; Flower, Dennis A.; Holden, James R.; Lau, Gary K.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Manney, Gloria L; Pumphrey, Hugh C.; Santee, Michelle L.; Wu, Dong L.; Cuddy, David T.; Lay, Richard R.; Loo, Mario S.; Perun, Vincent S.; Schwartz, Michael J.; Stek, Paul C.; Thurstans, Robert P.; Boyles, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    The Earth Observing System Microwave Limb Sounder measures several atmospheric chemical species (OH, HO2, H2O, O3, HCl, ClO, HOCl, BrO, HNO3, N2O, CO, HCN, CH3CN, volcanic SO2), cloud ice, temperature, and geopotential height to improve our understanding of stratospheric ozone chemistry, the interaction of composition and climate, and pollution in the upper troposphere. All measurements are made simultaneously and continuously, during both day and night. The instrument uses heterodyne radiometers that observe thermal emission from the atmospheric limb in broad spectral regions centered near 118, 190, 240, and 640 GHz, and 2.5 THz. It was launched July 15, 2004 on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Aura satellite and started full-up science operations on August 13, 2004. An atmospheric limb scan and radiometric calibration for all bands are performed routinely every 25 s. Vertical profiles are retrieved every 165 km along the suborbital track, covering 82 S to 82 N latitudes on each orbit. Instrument performance to date has been excellent; data have been made publicly available; and initial science results have been obtained.

  19. Simulating satellite infrared sounding retrievals in support of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Mathews, William; Irion, Frederick W.; Sturm, Erick J.

    2014-09-01

    A new set of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) are underway to assess the impact of higher spatial and temporal resolution sounding on hurricane forecast accuracy. To support these studies, we have developed an OSSE retrieval simulation system. The system uses a simulated satellite orbit track to provide sample locations and footprint area of the infrared sounder configuration to be simulated over the region of interest. The data to be sampled are an OSSE nature run developed by the NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) and the University of Miami (UM). The nature run is sampled at the sounder locations and integrated over the sounder footprint area. The resulting averaged profiles are smoothed vertically with simulated averaging kernels for the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) using a linear retrieval simulation to produce calculated temperature and water vapor profiles. With reasonable fidelity, the sampled and smoothed profiles simulate the retrievals we can expect from a sounder like AIRS for the orbit and sampling configurations under test. Three instruments were simulated corresponding to the AIRS 4545km footprint in LEO, a hypothetical sounder at 22km footprint in LEO, and a hypothetical GEO sounder at 55km regional and 10km 10km full disk footprint sizes. RMS error relative to the nature run is calculated to demonstrate the error characteristics of the simulation system. The simulated retrievals as a result of this effort are currently being assessed by NOAA AOML in an OSSE study to determine the impact of advanced hyperspectral infrared sounders on hurricane forecast improvement.

  20. Estimating Zenith Tropospheric Delays from BeiDou Navigation Satellite System Observations

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Aigong; Xu, Zongqiu; Ge, Maorong; Xu, Xinchao; Zhu, Huizhong; Sui, Xin

    2013-01-01

    The GNSS derived Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) plays today a very critical role in meteorological study and weather forecasts, as ZTDs of thousands of GNSS stations are operationally assimilated into numerical weather prediction models. Recently, the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) was officially announced to provide operational services around China and its neighborhood and it was demonstrated to be very promising for precise navigation and positioning. In this contribution, we concentrate on estimating ZTD using BDS observations to assess its capacity for troposphere remote sensing. A local network which is about 250 km from Beijing and comprised of six stations equipped with GPS- and BDS-capable receivers is utilized. Data from 5 to 8 November 2012 collected on the network is processed in network mode using precise orbits and in Precise Point Positioning mode using precise orbits and clocks. The precise orbits and clocks are generated from a tracking network with most of the stations in China and several stations around the world. The derived ZTDs are compared with that estimated from GPS data using the final products of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The comparison shows that the bias and the standard deviation of the ZTD differences are about 2 mm and 5 mm, respectively, which are very close to the differences of GPS ZTD estimated using different software packages. PMID:23552104

  1. Estimating zenith tropospheric delays from BeiDou navigation satellite system observations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aigong; Xu, Zongqiu; Ge, Maorong; Xu, Xinchao; Zhu, Huizhong; Sui, Xin

    2013-01-01

    The GNSS derived Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) plays today a very critical role in meteorological study and weather forecasts, as ZTDs of thousands of GNSS stations are operationally assimilated into numerical weather prediction models. Recently, the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) was officially announced to provide operational services around China and its neighborhood and it was demonstrated to be very promising for precise navigation and positioning. In this contribution, we concentrate on estimating ZTD using BDS observations to assess its capacity for troposphere remote sensing. A local network which is about 250 km from Beijing and comprised of six stations equipped with GPS- and BDS-capable receivers is utilized. Data from 5 to 8 November 2012 collected on the network is processed in network mode using precise orbits and in Precise Point Positioning mode using precise orbits and clocks. The precise orbits and clocks are generated from a tracking network with most of the stations in China and several stations around the world. The derived ZTDs are compared with that estimated from GPS data using the final products of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The comparison shows that the bias and the standard deviation of the ZTD differences are about 2 mm and 5 mm, respectively, which are very close to the differences of GPS ZTD estimated using different software packages. PMID:23552104

  2. An assessment of the FGGE satellite observing system during SOP-1. [Special Observing Period in First GARP Global Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halem, M.; Kalnay, E.; Baker, W. E.; Atlas, R.

    1982-01-01

    The sensitivity of a Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences global objective analysis cycle to the addition of FGGE level II-b data is assessed. The GOAS system comprises a predictive continuity provided by a model first-guess forecast integrated from a previous forecast and updated by data gathered in the interim. FGGE data originated in the Jan.-Mar. 1979 period and were acquired by rawinsondes, pilot balloons, surface stations, satellites, ships, and drifting buoys deployed during SOP-1. Focussing on 2-5 and 8-day forecasts, comparisons were made of the 6 hr forecast error at the 300 mb height in three experiments using all, no-satellite (NOSAT), and without rawinsondes or pilot balloons modes. Larger errors occurred in the case of NOSAT, while significant corrections to the GOAS predictions were noted using all the FGGE data. It was concluded that all forecasts were improved by inclusion of full FGGE data sets, including forecasting beyond one week.

  3. Operational Applications of Satellite Snowcover Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rango, A. (Editor); Peterson, R. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The history of remote sensing of snow cover is reviewed and the following topics are covered: various techniques for interpreting LANDSAT and NOAA satellite data; the status of future systems for continuing snow hydrology applications; the use of snow cover observations in streamflow forecasts by Applications Systems Verification and Transfer participants and selected foreign investigators; and the benefits of using satellite snow cover data in runoff prediction.

  4. Assessing the Impact of Advanced Satellite Observations in the NASA GEOS-5 Forecast System Using the Adjoint Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelaro, Ron; Liu, Emily; Sienkiewicz, Meta

    2011-01-01

    The adjoint of a data assimilation system provides a flexible and efficient tool for estimating observation impacts on short-range weather forecasts. The impacts of any or all observations can be estimated simultaneously based on a single execution of the adjoint system. The results can be easily aggregated according to data type, location, channel, etc., making this technique especially attractive for examining the impacts of new hyper-spectral satellite instruments and for conducting regular, even near-real time, monitoring of the entire observing system. In this talk, we present results from the adjoint-based observation impact monitoring tool in NASA's GEOS-5 global atmospheric data assimilation and forecast system. The tool has been running in various off-line configurations for some time, and is scheduled to run as a regular part of the real-time forecast suite beginning in autumn 20 I O. We focus on the impacts of the newest components of the satellite observing system, including AIRS, IASI and GPS. For AIRS and IASI, it is shown that the vast majority of the channels assimilated have systematic positive impacts (of varying magnitudes), although some channels degrade the forecast. Of the latter, most are moisture-sensitive or near-surface channels. The impact of GPS observations in the southern hemisphere is found to be a considerable overall benefit to the system. In addition, the spatial variability of observation impacts reveals coherent patterns of positive and negative impacts that may point to deficiencies in the use of certain observations over, for example, specific surface types. When performed in conjunction with selected observing system experiments (OSEs), the adjoint results reveal both redundancies and dependencies between observing system impacts as observations are added or removed from the assimilation system. Understanding these dependencies appears to pose a major challenge for optimizing the use of the current observational network and defining requirements for future observing systems.

  5. Ocean observer study: A proposed national asset to augment the future U.S. operational satellite system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, J.D.; Chambers, D.; Davis, C.O.; Gerber, A.; Helz, R.; McGuire, J.P.; Pichel, W.

    2003-01-01

    The next generation of U.S. polar orbiting environmental satellites, are now under development. These satellites, jointly developed by the Department of Defense (DoD), the Department of Commerce (DOC), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), will be known as the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). It is expected that the first of these satellites will be launched in 2010. NPOESS has been designed to meet the operational needs of the U.S. civilian meteorological, environmental, climatic, and space environmental remote sensing programs, and the Global Military Space and Geophysical Environmental remote sewing programs. This system, however, did not meet all the needs of the user community interested in operational oceanography (particularly in coastal regions). Beginning in the fall of 2000, the Integrated Program Office (IPO), a joint DoD, DOC, and NASA office responsible for the NPOESS development, initiated the Ocean Observer Study (OOS). The purpose of this study was to assess and recommend how best to measure the missing or inadequately sampled ocean parameters. This paper summarizes the ocean measurement requirements documented in the OOS, describes the national need to measure these parameters, and describes the satellite instrumentation required to make those measurements.

  6. Geopotential Error Analysis from Satellite Gradiometer and Global Positioning System Observables on Parallel Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, Bob E.; Baker, Gregory A.

    1997-01-01

    The recovery of a high resolution geopotential from satellite gradiometer observations motivates the examination of high performance computational techniques. The primary subject matter addresses specifically the use of satellite gradiometer and GPS observations to form and invert the normal matrix associated with a large degree and order geopotential solution. Memory resident and out-of-core parallel linear algebra techniques along with data parallel batch algorithms form the foundation of the least squares application structure. A secondary topic includes the adoption of object oriented programming techniques to enhance modularity and reusability of code. Applications implementing the parallel and object oriented methods successfully calculate the degree variance for a degree and order 110 geopotential solution on 32 processors of the Cray T3E. The memory resident gradiometer application exhibits an overall application performance of 5.4 Gflops, and the out-of-core linear solver exhibits an overall performance of 2.4 Gflops. The combination solution derived from a sun synchronous gradiometer orbit produce average geoid height variances of 17 millimeters.

  7. Satellite Observations of Tropospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The troposphere is an essential component of the earth's life support system as well as the gateway for the exchange of chemicals between different geochemical reservoirs of the earth. The chemistry of the troposphere is sensitive to perturbation from a wide range of natural phenomena and human activities. The societal concern has been greatly enhanced in recent decades due to ever increasing pressures of population growth and industrialization. Chemical changes within the troposphere control a vast array of processes that impact human health, the biosphere, and climate. A main goal of tropospheric chemistry research is to measure and understand the response of atmospheric composition to natural and anthropogenic perturbations, and to develop the capability to predict future change. Atmospheric chemistry measurements are extremely challenging due to the low concentrations of critical species and the vast scales over which the observations must be made. Available tropospheric data are mainly from surface sites and aircraft missions. Because of the limited temporal extent of aircraft observations, we have very limited information on tropospheric composition above the surface. This situation can be contrasted to the stratosphere, where satellites have provided critical and detailed chemical data on the global distribution of key trace gases.

  8. Full time and full coverage global observation system for ecological monitoring base on MEO satellite grid constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Rui; Liu, Shuhao

    Human life more and more rely on earth environment and atmosphere, environmental information required by space based monitor is a crucial importance, although GEO and polar weather satellite in orbit by several countries, but it can’t monitor all zone of earth with real time. This paper present a conception proposal which can realize stable, continue and real time observation for any zone(include arctic and ant-arctic zone) of earth and its atmosphere, it base on walker constellation in 20000Km high medium orbit with 24 satellites, payloads configuration with infrared spectrometer, visible camera, ultraviolet ray camera, millimeter wave radiometer, leaser radar, spatial resolution are 1km@ infrared,0.5km@ visible optical. This satellite of grid constellation can monitor any zone of global with 1-3hours retrial observation cycles. Air pollution, ozone of atmosphere, earth surface pollution, desert storm, water pollution, vegetation change, natural disasters, man-made emergency situations, agriculture and climate change can monitor by this MEO satellite grid constellation. This system is a international space infrastructure, use of mature technologies and products, can build by co-operation with multi countries.

  9. Ka-band High-speed Communication Systems on Small Satellites for Future Advanced Communication Networks and Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Toshinori; Lengowski, Michael; Beyermann, Ulrich; Uryu, Alexander; Roeser, Hans-Peter

    The goal of this paper is to describe the capabilities and application methods of Ka-band communication systems for small satellites indicating contributions to future advanced communication networks and Earth observations. This study is based on the actual experience on the design of the Ka-band high-speed communication system of the small satellite Flying Laptop, which is developed at the Institute of Space Systems of the Universitt Stuttgart. The objectives of the Ka-band communication system is to demonstrate high-speed communications with a data rate of up to 500 Mbit/s as well as to conduct scientific Earth observations. Flying Laptop satellite is also equipped with a Ku-band signal transmitter. The attenuation of the two transmission signals in Ka-/Ku-bands are measured with ground stations to estimate the local precipitation rate. The mathematical background and operational scenario of this measurement is summarized. The received Ka-band transmission signal is measured in different meteorological conditions to identify attenuation characteristics of the Ka-band signal due to rain, clouds, trace gases and so forth, which is of great interest for utilization of Ka-band frequencies for future broadband communications.

  10. Satellite services system overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rysavy, G.

    1982-01-01

    The benefits of a satellite services system and the basic needs of the Space Transportation System to have improved satellite service capability are identified. Specific required servicing equipment are discussed in terms of their technology development status and their operative functions. Concepts include maneuverable television systems, extravehicular maneuvering unit, orbiter exterior lighting, satellite holding and positioning aid, fluid transfer equipment, end effectors for the remote manipulator system, teleoperator maneuvering system, and hand and power tools.

  11. Satellite irrigation management support with the terrestrial observation and prediction system: A framework for integration of satellite & surface observations to support improvements in agricultural water resource management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In California and other regions vulnerable to water shortages, satellite-derived estimates of key hydrologic parameters can support agricultural producers and water managers in maximizing the benefits of available water supplies. The Satellite Irrigation Management Support (SIMS) project combines N...

  12. Satellite observed thermodynamics during FGGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    During the First Global Atmospheric Research Program (GARP) Global Experiment (FGGE), determinations of temperature and moisture were made from TIROS-N and NOAA-6 satellite infrared and microwave sounding radiance measurements. The data were processed by two methods differing principally in their horizontal resolution. At the National Earth Satellite Service (NESS) in Washington, D.C., the data were produced operationally with a horizontal resolution of 250 km for inclusion in the FGGE Level IIb data sets for application to large-scale numerical analysis and prediction models. High horizontal resolution (75 km) sounding data sets were produced using man-machine interactive methods for the special observing periods of FGGE at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and archived as supplementary Level IIb. The procedures used for sounding retrieval and the characteristics and quality of these thermodynamic observations are given.

  13. Providing access to satellite imagery through OGC catalog service interfaces in support of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yuqi; Di, Liping

    2011-04-01

    The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) architecture requires supporting discovery and access to large volumes of Earth Observation data. To support this application requirement in a polar ecosystem scenario, the project constructed a metadata catalog service for pre-collected orthorectified Landsat satellite images with global coverage. This study investigates the characteristics and challenges in building Open Geospatial Consortium Inc. (OGC) catalog service. It further presents a general lightweight XML adapter for relational tables, followed by a general OGC catalog service solution based on this adapter. This adapter relies on two configuration files to make the core software modules independent of the underlying metadata database structure. One configuration file identifies how XML schema is mapped into relational schema, and the other represents the XML output template. At runtime, this adapter internally employs a two-step mechanism: XQuery processing and XML publication. In the XQuery processing step, metadata discovery requests are interpreted, resulting in an SQL query clause. In the XML publication step, this SQL query and other dynamically generated queries are executed to generate the output according to the predefined XML template. Successful application of this OGC catalog service solution in the GEOSS AIP-2 polar ecosystem scenario is presented, followed by an analysis on its advantages and limitations.

  14. Future Satellite Observations of Solar Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Rottman, G.; Woods, T.; Lawrence, G.; Harder, J.; McClintock, W.; Kopp, G.

    2003-01-01

    Required solar irradiance measurements for climate studies include those now being made by the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) and the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) onboard the SORCE satellite, part of the Earth Observing System fleet of NASA satellites. Equivalent or better measures of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and Spectral Solar Irradiance (SSI, 200 to 2000 nm) are planned for the post-2010 satellites of the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System ("OESS). The design life of SORCE is 5 years, so a "Solar Irradiance Gap Filler" EOS mission is being planned for launch in the 2007 time frame, to include the same TSI and SSI measurements. Besides avoiding any gap, overlap of the data sources is also necessary for determination of possible multi-decadal trends in solar irradiance. We discuss these requirements and the impacts of data gaps, and data overlaps, that may occur in the monitoring of the critical solar radiative forcing.

  15. A comparison of mapped and measured total ionospheric electron content using global positioning system and beacon satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, Gabor E.; Roth, Titus

    1988-01-01

    Total ionospheric electron contents (TEC) were measured by global positioning system (GPS) dual-frequency receivers developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The measurements included P-code (precise ranging code) and carrier phase data for six GPS satellites during multiple five-hour observing sessions. A set of these GPS TEC measurements were mapped from the GPS lines of sight to the line of sight of a Faraday beacon satellite by statistically fitting the TEC data to a simple model of the ionosphere. The mapped GPS TEC values were compared with the Faraday rotation measurements. Because GPS transmitter offsets are different for each satellite and because some GPS receiver offsets were uncalibrated, the sums of the satellite and receiver offsets were estimated simultaneously with the TEC in a least squares procedure. The accuracy of this estimation procedure is evaluated indicating that the error of the GPS-determined line of sight TEC can be at or below 1 x 10 to the 16th el/sq cm. Consequently, the current level of accuracy is comparable to the Faraday rotation technique; however, GPS provides superior sky coverage.

  16. The atmospheric composition geostationary satellite constellation for air quality and climate science: Evaluating performance with Observation System Simulation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, D. P.; Barre, J.; Worden, H. M.; Arellano, A. F.; Gaubert, B.; Anderson, J. L.; Mizzi, A. P.; Lahoz, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Current satellite observations of tropospheric composition made from low Earth orbit provide at best one or two measurements each day at any given location. Coverage is global but sparse, often with large uncertainties in individual measurements that limit examination of local and regional atmospheric composition over short time periods. This has hindered the operational uptake of these data for monitoring air quality and population exposure, and for initializing and evaluating chemical weather forecasts. By the end of the current decade there are planned geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) satellite missions for atmospheric composition over North America, East Asia and Europe with additional missions proposed. Together, these present the possibility of a constellation of GEO platforms to achieve continuous time-resolved high-density observations of continental domains for mapping pollutant sources and variability on diurnal and local scales. We describe Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) to evaluate the contributions of these GEO missions to improve knowledge of near-surface air pollution due to intercontinental long-range transport and quantify chemical precursor emissions. We discuss the requirements on measurement simulation, chemical transport modeling, and data assimilation for a successful OSSE infrastructure. Our approach uses an efficient computational method to sample a high-resolution global GEOS-5 chemistry Nature Run over each geographical region of the GEO constellation. The demonstration carbon monoxide (CO) observation simulator, which is being expanded to other chemical pollutants, currently produces multispectral retrievals and captures realistic scene-dependent variation in measurement vertical sensitivity and cloud cover. We use the DART Ensemble Adjustment Kalman Filter to assimilate the simulated observations in a CAM-Chem global chemistry-climate model Control Run. The impact of observing over each region is evaluated using data denial experiments. Finally, we report on international collaborations using the OSSE approach to determine expected performance of planned satellite systems and set requirements for future missions.

  17. Voyager 2 radio science observations of the uranian system: atmosphere, rings, and satellites.

    PubMed

    Tyler, G L; Sweetnam, D N; Anderson, J D; Campbell, J K; Eshleman, V R; Hinson, D P; Levy, G S; Lindal, G F; Marouf, E A; Simpson, R A

    1986-07-01

    Voyager 2 radio occultation measurements of the Uranian atmosphere were obtained between 2 and 7 degrees south latitude. Initial atmospheric temperature profiles extend from pressures of 10 to 900 millibars over a height range of about 100 kilometers. Comparison of radio and infrared results yields mole fractions near the tropopause of 0.85 and 0.15 +/- 0.05 for molecular hydrogen and helium, respectively, if no other components are present; for this composition the tropopause is at about 52 kelvins and 110 millibars. Distinctive features in the signal intensity measurements for pressures above 900 millibars strongly favor model atmospheres that include a cloud deck of methane ice. Modeling of the intensity measurements for the cloud region and below indicates that the cloud base is near 1,300 millibars and 81 kelvins and yields an initial methane mole fraction of about 0.02 for the deep atmosphere. Scintillations in signal intensity indicate small-scale stucture throughout the stratosphere and upper troposphere. As judged from data obtained during occultation ingress, the ionosphere consists of a multilayer structure that includes two distinct layers at 2,000 and 3,500 kilometers above the 100-millibar level and an extended topside that may reach altitudes of 10,000 kilometers or more. Occultation measurements of the nine previously known rings at wavelengths of 3.6 and 13 centimeters show characteristic values of optical depth between about 0.8 and 8; the maxim value occurs in the outer region of the in ring, near its periapsis. Forward-scattered signals from this ring have properties that differ from those of any of Saturn's rings, and they are inconsistent with a discrete scattering object or local (three-dimensional) assemblies of orbiting objects. These signals suggest a new kdnd of planetary ring feature characterized by highly ordered cylindrical substructures of radial scale on the order of meters and azimuthal scale of kilometers or more. From radio data alone the mass of the Uranian system is GM(sys) = 5,794,547- 60 cubic kilometers per square second; from a combination of radio and optical navigation data the mass of Uranus alone is GM(u) = 5,793,939+/- 60 cubic kilometers per square second. From all available Voyager data, induding imaging radii, the mean uncompressed density of the five major satellites is 1.40+/- 0.07 grams per cubic centimeter; this value is consistent with a solar mix of material and apparently rules out a cometary origin of the satellites. PMID:17812893

  18. Satellite Antenna Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Through the Technology Affiliates Program at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the ACTS antenna system was transferred from experimental testing status to commercial development with KVH Industries, Inc. The ACTS design enables mobile satellite antennas to remain pointed at the satellite, regardless of the motion or vibration on which it is mounted. KVH's first product based on the ACTS design is a land-mobile satellite antenna system that will enable direct broadcast satellite television aboard moving trucks, recreational vehicles, trains, and buses. Future products could include use in broadcasting, emergency medical and military vehicles.

  19. Measurements of Tropospheric NO2 in Romania Using a Zenith-Sky Mobile DOAS System and Comparisons with Satellite Observations

    PubMed Central

    Constantin, Daniel-Eduard; Merlaud, Alexis; Van Roozendael, Michel; Voiculescu, Mirela; Fayt, Caroline; Hendrick, Franois; Pinardi, Gaia; Georgescu, Lucian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a new method for retrieving tropospheric NO2 Vertical Column Density (VCD) from zenith-sky Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements using mobile observations. This method was used during three days in the summer of 2011 in Romania, being to our knowledge the first mobile DOAS measurements peformed in this country. The measurements were carried out over large and different areas using a mobile DOAS system installed in a car. We present here a step-by-step retrieval of tropospheric VCD using complementary observations from ground and space which take into account the stratospheric contribution, which is a step forward compared to other similar studies. The detailed error budget indicates that the typical uncertainty on the retrieved NO2tropospheric VCD is less than 25%. The resulting ground-based data set is compared to satellite measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2). For instance, on 18 July 2011, in an industrial area located at 47.03N, 22.45E, GOME-2 observes a tropospheric VCD value of (3.4 1.9) 1015 molec./cm2, while average mobile measurements in the same area give a value of (3.4 0.7) 1015 molec./cm2. On 22 August 2011, around Ploiesti city (44.99N, 26.1E), the tropospheric VCD observed by satellites is (3.3 1.9) 1015 molec./cm2 (GOME-2) and (3.2 3.2) 1015 molec./cm2 (OMI), while average mobile measurements give (3.8 0.8) 1015 molec./cm2. Average ground measurements over clean areas, on 18 July 2011, give (2.5 0.6) 1015 molec./cm2 while the satellite observes a value of (1.8 1.3) 1015 molec./cm2. PMID:23519349

  20. Jupiter System Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senske, Dave; Kwok, Johnny

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the proposed mission for the Jupiter System Observer. The presentation also includes overviews of the mission timeline, science goals, and spacecraftspecifications for the satellite.

  1. Satellite Observations of Tropospheric Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, M. W.; Luo, M.; Rinsland, C. P.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Beer, R.; Pinder, R. W.; Henze, D.; Payne, V. H.; Clough, S.; Rodgers, C. D.; Osterman, G. B.; Bowman, K. W.; Worden, H. M.

    2008-12-01

    Global high-spectral resolution (0.06 cm-1) nadir measurements from TES-Aura enable the simultaneous retrieval of a number of tropospheric pollutants and trace gases in addition to the TES standard operationally retrieved products (e.g. carbon monoxide, ozone). Ammonia (NH3) is one of the additional species that can be retrieved in conjunction with the TES standard products, and is important for local, regional, and global tropospheric chemistry studies. Ammonia emissions contribute significantly to several well-known environmental problems, yet the magnitude and seasonal/spatial variability of the emissions are poorly constrained. In the atmosphere, an important fraction of fine particulate matter is composed of ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate. These particles are statistically associated with health impacts. When deposited to ecosystems in excess, nitrogen, including ammonia can cause nutrient imbalances, change in ecosystem species composition, eutrophication, algal blooms and hypoxia. Ammonia is also challenging to measure in-situ. Observations of surface concentrations are rare and are particularly sparse in North America. Satellite observations of ammonia are therefore highly desirable. We recently demonstrated that tropospheric ammonia is detectable in the TES spectra and presented some corresponding preliminary retrievals over a very limited range of conditions (Beer et al., 2008). Presented here are results that expand upon these initial TES ammonia retrievals in order to evaluate/validate the retrieval results utilizing in-situ surface observations (e.g. LADCO, CASTNet, EPA /NC State) and chemical models (e.g. GEOS-Chem and CMAQ). We also present retrievals over regions of interest that have the potential to help further understand air quality and the active nitrogen cycle. Beer, R., M. W. Shephard, S. S. Kulawik, S. A. Clough, A. Eldering, K. W. Bowman, S. P. Sander, B. M. Fisher, V. H. Payne, M. Luo, G. B. Osterman, and J. R. Worden, First satellite observations of lower tropospheric ammonia and methanol, Geophysical Res. Letters, 35, L09801, doi:10.1029/2008GL033642, 2008.

  2. Advanced communications satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivo, J. N.

    1983-01-01

    There is a rapidly growing demand for satellite circuits, particularly for domestic service within the U.S. NASA's current program is aimed at developing the high risk, advanced satellite communications technologies required to significantly increase the capacity of future satellite communications systems. Attention is given to aspects of traffic distribution and service scenario, problems related to effects of rain attenuation, details regarding system configuration, a 30/20 GHz technology development approach, an experimental flight system, the communications payload for the experimental flight system, a typical experiment flight system coverage, and a typical three axis stabilized flight spacecraft.

  3. Cyberinfrastructure Initiatives of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, K. R.; Faundeen, J. L.; Petiteville, I.

    2005-12-01

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) was established in 1984 in response to a recommendation from the Economic Summit of Industrialized Nations Working Group on Growth, Technology, and Employment's Panel of Experts on Satellite Remote Sensing. CEOS participants are Members, who are national or international governmental organizations who operate civil spaceborne Earth observation satellites, and Associates who are governmental organizations with civil space programs in development or international scientific or governmental bodies who have an interest in and support CEOS objectives. The primary objective of CEOS is to optimize benefits of satellite Earth observations through cooperation of its participants in mission planning and in development of compatible data products, formats, services, applications and policies. To pursue its objectives, CEOS establishes working groups and associated subgroups that focus on relevant areas of interest. While the structure of CEOS has evolved over its lifetime, today there are three permanent working groups. One is the Working Group on Calibration and Validation that addresses sensor-specific calibration and validation and geophysical parameter validation. A second is the Working Group on Education, Training, and Capacity Building that facilitates activities that enhance international education and training in Earth observation techniques, data analysis, interpretation and applications, with a particular focus on developing countries. The third permanent working group is the Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS). The purpose of WGISS is to promote collaboration in the development of the systems and services based on international standards that manage and supply the Earth observation data and information from participating agencies' missions. WGISS places great emphasis on the use of demonstration projects involving user groups to solve the critical interoperability issues associated with the achievement of global services and its structure reflects that objective. The Technology and Services Subgroup initiates tasks to explore emerging technologies that can be employed to create data and information systems and to develop interoperable services. The interests of the subgroup span the full range of the information processing chain from the initial ingestion of satellite data into archives through to the incorporation of derived information into end-user applications. The subgroup has overseen the creation of an Interoperable Directory Network and an Interoperable Catalog System and has tasks that are investigating the use of new technologies such as Web Services, Grid, and Open Geographical Information Systems to provide enhanced capabilities. The WGISS Projects and Applications Subgroup works with outside organizations to understand their requirements and then helps them to exploit the tools and services available through WGISS and its members and associates. WGISS has instituted the concept of a WGISS Test Facility to test and develop information systems and services prototypes collaboratively with these organizations to meet their specific requirements. This approach has the dual benefit of addressing real information systems and services needs of science and applications projects and helping WGISS to expand and improve its capabilities based on the experience and lessons learned from working with the projects.

  4. Assessment of errors in Precipitable Water data derived from Global Navigation Satellite System observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hordyniec, Pawel; Bosy, Jaroslaw; Rohm, Witold

    2015-07-01

    Among the new remote sensing techniques, one of the most promising is a GNSS meteorology, which provides continuous remote monitoring of the troposphere water vapor in all weather conditions with high temporal and spatial resolution. The Continuously Operating Reference Station (CORS) network and available meteorological instrumentation and models were scrutinized (we based our analysis on ASG-EUPOS network in Poland) as a troposphere water vapor retrieval system. This paper shows rigorous mathematical derivation of Precipitable Water errors based on uncertainties propagation method using all available data source quality measures (meteorological sensors and models precisions, ZTD estimation error, interpolation discrepancies, and ZWD to PW conversion inaccuracies). We analyze both random and systematic errors introduced by indirect measurements and interpolation procedures, hence estimate the PW system integrity capabilities. The results for PW show that the systematic errors can be under half-millimeter level as long as pressure and temperature are measured at the observation site. In other case, i.e. no direct observations, numerical weather model fields (we used in this study Coupled Ocean Atmospheric Mesoscale Prediction System) serves as the most accurate source of data. Investigated empirical pressure and temperature models, such as GPT2, GPT, UNB3m and Berg introduced into WV retrieval system, combined bias and random errors exceeding PW standard level of accuracy (3 mm according to E-GVAP report). We also found that the pressure interpolation procedure is introducing over 0.5 hPa bias and 1 hPa standard deviation into the system (important in Zenith Total Delay reduction) and hence has negative impact on the WV estimation quality.

  5. A Global Observing System for Mars: The dual satellite Mars Astrobiology and Climate Observatory (MACO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursinski, E. R.; Lyons, J.; Newman, C.; Richardson, M. I.; Ward, D.; Otarola, A. C.

    2009-12-01

    We summarize a planetary decadal survey white paper describing the rationale for and key elements of a dual satellite orbiting mission (DSM) concept called the Mars Astrobiology and Climate Observatory (MACO). MACO uses mm-wavelength satellite to satellite (sat-sat) occultations in combination with solar occultations (SO) to answer and strongly constrain many key lower and middle atmosphere Mars science questions previously considered unachievable from orbit. On the climate side, MACO would focus on the hydrological, dust and energy cycles of Mars. MACO would measure the transport of water in the present Martian climate, identify sources and sinks and constrain processes in order to better understand present and past Martian climate and glacial and subsurface water reservoirs. Dust-penetrating, satellite-to-satellite mm-wave occultations would profile water vapor to 3%, temperature to 0.4K, geopotential height of pressure to 10 m, line of sight winds to < 2 m/s and balanced winds via pressure gradients, as well turbulence and certain trace constituents with 60 meter diffraction limited vertical resolution and high precision extending down to the surface. A prototype mm-wave occultation instrument will be demonstrated in 2010 via high altitude aircraft to aircraft occultations. MACO will make coincident thermal IR and shortwave measurements to characterize airborne dust to understand dust storm initiation and evolution and how atmospheric dust concentrations are maintained in general. The combination of sensitivity, accuracy and vertical resolution from the satellite to satellite occultation is simply not possible with radiometers and will provide ~30,000 globally distributed near-entry probe quality profiles each Martian year profiling the boundary layer and exchange between the atmosphere and surface. A near-IR solar occultation instrument, such as the French SOIR or a derivative of the Canadian ACE FTIR instrument, would survey chemical trace species such as methane in the Martian atmosphere to look for signatures of subsurface processes related to possible habitable zones and life. MACO’s winds will be key in tracing plumes back to their source regions. Proposed near-surface ion-related heterogeneous chemistry will be assessed by profiling near surface concentrations of H2O2, H2O and dust to look for predicted enhancements in of H2O2 and how they vary with H2O and dust concentrations. MACO’s combined capabilities are a superset of the Mars Science Orbiter (MSO) recommended by the Calvin et al. (2007) report. MACO would fit as a moderate scale mission in the 2016 launch opportunity. Alternatively, since NASA and ESA have recently announced their intent to fly a single orbiter, trace gas mission in 2016, the MACO mm occultation receiver (which can also measure thermal emission and solar occultations) could be flown on that mission and the occultation transmitter could be carried on another mission flown by an international partner such as Japan or India.

  6. Applications systems verification and transfer project. Volume 1: Operational applications of satellite snow cover observations: Executive summary. [usefulness of satellite snow-cover data for water yield prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rango, A.

    1981-01-01

    Both LANDSAT and NOAA satellite data were used in improving snowmelt runoff forecasts. When the satellite snow cover data were tested in both empirical seasonal runoff estimation and short term modeling approaches, a definite potential for reducing forecast error was evident. A cost benefit analysis run in conjunction with the snow mapping indicated a $36.5 million annual benefit accruing from a one percent improvement in forecast accuracy using the snow cover data for the western United States. The annual cost of employing the system would be $505,000. The snow mapping has proven that satellite snow cover data can be used to reduce snowmelt runoff forecast error in a cost effective manner once all operational satellite data are available within 72 hours after acquisition. Executive summaries of the individual snow mapping projects are presented.

  7. Investigation of the observability of the initial conditions of the motion of artificial earth satellites according to the direction of the satellite-centric vectors in an inertial coordinate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedova, T. K.

    The paper examines criteria of nonlinear-system observability in the case when the satellite motion is described by finite relationships of the two-body problem. The use of these criteria makes it possible to clarify the possibility of the complete or partial determination of the satellite motion parameters using different types of measurements under different flight conditions. In particular, attention is given to the feasibility of the partial determination of the initial conditions of satellite motion according to the directions of the satellite-centric vectors.

  8. The Effect of Environmental Conditions on Tropical Deep Convective Systems Observed from the TRMM Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Minnis, Patrick; Chambers, Lin H.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Hu, Yongxiang; Fan, Tai-Fang

    2005-01-01

    This study uses measurements of radiation and cloud properties taken between January and August 1998 by three Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) instruments, the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) scanner, the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI), and the Visible and InfraRed Scanner (VIRS), to evaluate the variations of tropical deep convective systems (DCS) with sea surface temperature (SST) and precipitation. This study finds that DCS precipitation efficiency increases with SST at a rate of approx. 2%/K. Despite increasing rainfall efficiency, the cloud areal coverage rises with SST at a rate of about 7%/K in the warm tropical seas. There, the boundary layer moisture supply for deep convection and the moisture transported to the upper troposphere for cirrus-anvil cloud formation increase by approx. 6.3%/K and approx. 4.0%/K, respectively. The changes in cloud formation efficiency, along with the increased transport of moisture available for cloud formation, likely contribute to the large rate of increasing DCS areal coverage. Although no direct observations are available, the increase of cloud formation efficiency with rising SST is deduced indirectly from measurements of changes in the ratio of DCS ice water path and boundary layer water vapor amount with SST. Besides the cloud areal coverage, DCS cluster effective sizes also increase with precipitation. Furthermore, other cloud properties, such as cloud total water and ice water paths, increase with SST. These changes in DCS properties will produce a negative radiative feedback for the earth's climate system due to strong reflection of shortwave radiation by the DCS. These results significantly differ from some previous hypothesized dehydration scenarios for warmer climates, and have great potential in testing current cloud-system resolving models and convective parameterizations of general circulation models.

  9. Recent Greenland ice mass loss by drainage system from satellite gravity observations.

    PubMed

    Luthcke, S B; Zwally, H J; Abdalati, W; Rowlands, D D; Ray, R D; Nerem, R S; Lemoine, F G; McCarthy, J J; Chinn, D S

    2006-11-24

    Mass changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet resolved by drainage system regions were derived from a local mass concentration analysis of NASA-Deutsches Zentrum fr Luftund Raumfahrt Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE mission) observations. From 2003 to 2005, the ice sheet lost 101 +/- 16 gigaton/year, with a gain of 54 gigaton/year above 2000 meters and a loss of 155 gigaton/year at lower elevations. The lower elevations show a large seasonal cycle, with mass losses during summer melting followed by gains from fall through spring. The overall rate of loss reflects a considerable change in trend (-113 +/- 17 gigaton/year) from a near balance during the 1990s but is smaller than some other recent estimates. PMID:17053112

  10. A regional GSI-based EnKF system for the Rapid Refresh configuration: Tests for Satellite Radiance Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Kefeng; Xue, Ming

    2015-04-01

    A regional ensemble Kalman filter data assimilation (EnKF) system based on the NCEP operational Grid-point Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system has been established for the target Rapid Refresh (RAP) applications. The EnKF system borrows the data processing and observation operators from the GSI system, and pre-calculates observation priors using the GSI. The filter is based on the serial ensemble square-root Kalman filter (EnSRF) and updates both the state vector and observation priors and its distributed memory parallelization is carried out at the state vector level. In this study, the impact of satellite radiance including AMSU, AIRS, MHS and HIRS within the established EnKF-RAP framework was examined. Testing is performed at the ~40 km grid spacing, and its performance is compared to the GSI system which uses three dimensional variation method. The performance is evaluated in terms of short-range (up to 18 hours) forecast errors verified again soundings. The assimilation of AMSU-A data improved the forecast accuracy for all the verified variables especially for the wind components; the assimilation of AIRS data greatly improved the forecast accuracy of relative humidity; when all the radiance data were assimilated, the forecast is the best. The forecast started from EnKF analysis is consistently better than from GSI analysis though the relative improvement is smaller than GSI. In additional, the configurations like bias correction and thinning for radiance assimilation within ENKF-RAP will be presented and discussed.

  11. Linking Regional Satellite Observations with Coupled Human-Ecological Systems in Global Drylands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, C.; Reynolds, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    The African Sahel has attracted consistent attention since a series of droughts in the 1970s and 1980s caused widespread famine and land degradation (desertification). These events spawned international conventions and sustained development efforts to increase food security and reverse poverty for the local populations, and to arrest environmental degradation. Since 1985, several studies using satellite data have described a general “greening” in response to increased rainfall trends. However, some areas show more greening while others less greening than can be explained by precipitation alone (Glob. Env. Change 15- 2005). The debated question is how to explain the residual changes: management, policy, human adaptation, or something else? Placing results in an human-ecological framework could help answer this question. Providing a meaningful assessment will allow national and international agencies to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative approaches to poverty alleviation and environmental restoration in drylands at regional and global scales.

  12. Double-decker Earth Observing Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Envisat, which will continue observations from two earlier European remote sensing missions, is "the most complex Earth observation satellite ever to be built," British Science Minister Lord Sainsbury said prior to the satellite's successful 1 March launch from Kourou Spaceport in French Guiana.The $2-billion polar-orbiting satellite, which was developed by the British National Space Center, and by the British space industry in partnership with the European Space Agency includes 10 different instruments to measure Earth's atmosphere, ocean, land, and ice over a 5-year period. Sainsbury said the satellite is like a double-decker bus compared with most satellites that have one or two instruments on board.

  13. Double-decker Earth Observing Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Envisat, which will continue observations from two earlier European remote sensing missions, is the most complex Earth observation satellite ever to be built, British Science Minister Lord Sainsbury said prior to the satellite's successful 1 March launch from Kourou Spaceport in French Guiana.The $2-billion polar-orbiting satellite, which was developed by the British National Space Center, and by the British space industry in partnership with the European Space Agency includes 10 different instruments to measure Earth's atmosphere, ocean, land, and ice over a 5-year period. Sainsbury said the satellite is like a double-decker bus compared with most satellites that have one or two instruments on board.

  14. Satellite communications system 'Tyulpan'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchuyan, R. K.; Tarasov, E. V.; Belousov, A. P.; Balyk, V. M.; Kovtunenko, V. M.; Morozov, V. A.; Andreev, V. A.; v'yunenko, K. A.

    1993-10-01

    A concept of the satellite communication system called 'Tyulpan' (because or its tulip-resembling shape) is considered. This conception envisages the use of six satellites-retranslators installed on high-latitude elliptic orbits. Such a system can provide the communication for mean- and high-latitude region of Europe, Asia, and America. For the communication, super small ground stations of 0.4 m in diameter can be used. In the development of system conception, the already existing technical solutions and possibility of conversion or existing installations of military destination were taken into account. Therefore, the system considered can be realized at the earliest possible date.

  15. AMOS Galaxy 15 Satellite Observations and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, D.

    2011-09-01

    In early April 2010, the Galaxy 15 geosynchronous satellite experienced an on-orbit anomaly. Even though the satellite's transmitters and articulating solar panel were still functioning, ground controllers lost the ability to command and maneuver the satellite. With its orbital position no longer maintained, Galaxy 15 began to drift eastward. This forced several other satellites to make collision avoidance maneuvers during the following months. Soon after the initial anomaly, Galaxy 15's operators predicted that the satellites reaction wheels would eventually become saturated, causing a loss of both spacecraft attitude and proper sunward orientation of the solar panels. This "off-pointing" event finally occurred in late December, ultimately leading to a depletion of Galaxy 15's batteries. This near-death experience had a fortunate side effect, however, in that it forced the satellites command unit to reboot and once again be able to both receive and execute ground commands. The satellite operators have since recovered control of the satellite. AMOS conducted non-resolved photometric observations of Galaxy 15 before, during and after these events. Similar observations were conducted of Galaxy 12, the nearly-identical replacement satellite. This presentation presents and discusses these temporal brightness signatures in detail, comparing the changing patterns in the observations to the known sequence of events.

  16. Automatic derivation of earth observation products from satellite data within the Siberian Earth System Science Cluster (SIB-ESS-C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, J.; Schmullius, C. C.

    2011-12-01

    The Siberian Earth System Science Cluster (SIB-ESS-C) established at the University of Jena (Germany) is a spatial data infrastructure implementing standards published by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) aimed at providing researchers with focus on Siberia with the technical means for data discovery, data access, data publication and data analysis in work with earth observation data. At the current development stage the SIB-ESS-C system comprises a federated metadata catalogue accessible through the SIB-ESS-C Web Portal or from any OGC-CSW compliant client. The Web Portal also contains a simple map-like visualization component which is currently being extended to a comprehensive visualization and analysis tool. The visualization component enables users to overlay different dataset found during a catalogue search. All data products are accessible as Web Mapping, Web Feature or Web Coverage Services allowing users to directly incorporate the data into their application. New developments aims on automatic registration and processing of raw earth observation data to derive permanently earth observation products. A data registry system within a whole process system including process chains to implement algorithms is currently designed. This will be extended with a system to process these incoming data automatically and permanently, depending on registered algorithms. Algorithms should know which input data is necessary and registered data should know which algorithms could be executed on it. This paper describes current developments as well as future ideas to build up a usefull and userfriendly access to satellite data, algorithms and therefrom derived products with state of the art web technologies and standards of the OGC.

  17. Severe storms observing satellite (STORMSAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The primary payload for this satellite is the Advanced Atmospheric Sounding and Imaging Radiometer which will perform precise infrared temperature sounding and visible/infrared imaging from geostationary orbit. A secondary payload instrument which may be utilized on STORMSAT is the Microwave Atmospheric Sounding Radiometer which provides an independent set of temperature and humidity sounding in cloudy, meteorologically active regions. The study provides satellite designs and identifies mission-unique subsystems using the Multimission Modular Spacecraft using a Shuttle/Interim Upper Stage launch vehicle.

  18. Earth and ocean dynamics satellites and systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, F. O.

    1975-01-01

    An overview is presented of the present state of satellite and ground systems making observations of the dynamics of the solid earth and the oceans. Emphasis is placed on applications of space technology for practical use. Topics discussed include: satellite missions and results over the last two decades in the areas of earth gravity field, polar motions, earth tides, magnetic anomalies, and satellite-to-satellite tracking; laser ranging systems; development of the Very Long Baseline Interferometer; and Skylab radar altimeter data applications.

  19. Satellite-observed Characteristics of Mesoscale Convective Systems over the Tibetan Plateau in Warm Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Fu, W.

    2014-12-01

    Using the data sets of the FY-2C and FY-2E hourly equivalent temperature of black body (TBB) from 2005 to 2010, the mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in warm season (March-September) over the Tibetan Plateau are investigated. The large-scale environmental characteristics during the MCSs' life cycle are also analyzed using the NCEP FNL data. The results show that the hinterland of the Tibetan Plateau is the high-frequency occurrence area of MCSs. There is noticeable inter-monthly and diurnal variation in the distribution of MCSs over the Tibetan Plateau. The MCSs precipitation occurs more frequently in the summer season and from sunset to midnight. Most of the MCSs over the Tibetan Plateau are eastward propagating, low-speed, short-life meso-? convective systems. With respect to the large-scale atmospheric condition, the results indicate that in the upper troposphere there is a wind divergence center, and in the low troposphere there is a moisture convergence center associated with strong upward vertical motion, that is beneficial to the occurrence of strong convection. Also, in the mid troposphere (500 hPa) there exists an eastward positive vorticity advection, which might be a reason for the MCSs moving toward the east. The large-scale atmospheric condition in spring is different from that in summer. The vertical wind shear is the main factor for the MCSs to occur in spring, and the unstable atmosphere structure is the reason for the MCSs to occur in summer.

  20. Monitoring Changes in Water Resources Systems Using High Resolution Satellite Observations: Application to Lake Urmia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi, H.; AghaKouchak, A.; Madani, K.; Mirchi, A.; Farahmand, A.; Conway, C.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Urmia with its unique ecosystem in northwestern Iran is the second largest saltwater lake in the world. It is home of more than 300 species of birds, reptiles, and mammals with high salinity level of more than 300 g/l. In recent years, a significant water retreat has occurred in this lake. In this study, we tried to monitor the desiccation of the lake over more than four decades using remote sensing observations. Multi-spectral high-resolution LandSat images of the Lake Urmia region from 1972 to 2012 were acquired to derive the lake area. The composite maps of the lake were created, and a Bayesian Maximum Likelihood classification technique was used to classify land and water in the composite maps. The time series of the lake area reveals that it has shrunk by more than 40% in the past ten years. Moreover, water budget related components such as precipitation, soil moisture, and drought indices from remote sensing of the lake basin were utilized to investigate if droughts or climate change are the primary driving forces behind this phenomenon. These analyses show that the retreat of the lake is not related to droughts or global climate change as it has survived several drought events before year 2000. Similar analyses conducted on Lake Van located about 400 km west of Lake Urmia with very similar climate pattern revealed no significant areal change despite the lake's exposure to similar drought events. These results raise serious concern about the destructive role of unbridled development coupled with supply-oriented water management scheme driven by a classic upstream-downstream competition for water in the Lake Urmia region. There is an urgent need to investigate sustainable restoration initiatives for Lake Urmia in order to prevent an environmental disaster comparable to catastrophic death of Aral Sea.

  1. Satellite Observations for Detecting and Tracking Changes in Atmospheric Composition

    EPA Science Inventory

    The international scientific community's Integrated Global Atmosphere Chemistry Observation System report outlined a plan for ground-based, airborne and satellite Measurements, and models to integrate the observations into a 4-dimensional representation of the atmosphere (space a...

  2. Applications systems verification and transfer project. Volume 4: Operational applications of satellite snow cover observations. Colorado Field Test Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, B. A.; Leaf, C. F.; Danielson, J. A.; Moravec, G. F.

    1981-01-01

    The study was conducted on six watersheds ranging in size from 277 km to 3460 km in the Rio Grande and Arkansas River basins of southwestern Colorado. Six years of satellite data in the period 1973-78 were analyzed and snowcover maps prepared for all available image dates. Seven snowmapping techniques were explored; the photointerpretative method was selected as the most accurate. Three schemes to forecast snowmelt runoff employing satellite snowcover observations were investigated. They included a conceptual hydrologic model, a statistical model, and a graphical method. A reduction of 10% in the current average forecast error is estimated when snowcover data in snowmelt runoff forecasting is shown to be extremely promising. Inability to obtain repetitive coverage due to the 18 day cycle of LANDSAT, the occurrence of cloud cover and slow image delivery are obstacles to the immediate implementation of satellite derived snowcover in operational streamflow forecasting programs.

  3. Applications systems verification and transfer project. Volume 5: Operational applications of satellite snow-cover observations, northwest United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    The study objective was to develop or modify methods in an operational framework that would allow incorporation of satellite derived snow cover observations for prediction of snowmelt derived runoff. Data were reviewed and verified for five basins in the Pacific Northwest. The data were analyzed for up to a 6-year period ending July 1978, and in all cases cover a low, average, and high snow cover/runoff year. Cloud cover is a major problem in these springtime runoff analyses and have hampered data collection for periods of up to 52 days. Tree cover and terrain are sufficiently dense and rugged to have caused problems. The interpretation of snowlines from satellite data was compared with conventional ground truth data and tested in operational streamflow forecasting models. When the satellite snow-covered area (SCA) data are incorporated in the SSARR (Streamflow Synthesis and Reservoir Regulation) model, there is a definite but minor improvement.

  4. The Severe Storms Observation Satellite /SSOS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shenk, W. E.; Raskin, W. H.; Flatow, F. S.; Quann, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of the Severe Storms Observation Satellite (SSOS) is to continuously observe meteorological phenomena from geosynchronous altitude and to acquire data whose analysis will lead to a better understanding, early detection, and prediction of severe storms and other significant mesoscale events such as dust storms. Details are discussed as to the Advanced Atmospheric Sounding and Imaging Radiometer designed for SSOS, the use of a special spacecraft for an R&D mission, data acquisition, and data processing and analysis. The required accurate vertical temperature and moisture profiles as well as high temporal and spatial resolution images can best be obtained by a three-axis stabilized system, which offers approximately an order of magnitude sensing improvement over a comparable spinning system due to its capability to continuously view the earth. A block diagram of the severe storm analysis system is included.

  5. Impacts of geostationary satellite measurements on CO forecasting: An observing system simulation experiment with GEOS-Chem/LETKF data assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumimoto, Keiya

    2013-08-01

    We developed a chemical data assimilation system based on the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model (CTM) and an ensemble-based data assimilation method, and performed an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) to evaluate the impact of geostationary (GEO) satellite data obtained with a multi-spectral (thermal infrared (TIR) and near infrared (NIR)) sensor on air quality forecasting in East Asia. Initial conditions determined by assimilation of the three observation sets improved the forecasting of trans-boundary CO outflow. The performance of GEO satellite with TIR sensor (GEO-TIR) was better than that of LEO satellite with TIR sensor (LEO-TIR). However, in Seoul district (the Korean Peninsula) and Northern Kyushu (western Japan), the positive impact of the wider coverage and higher frequency of GEO disappeared when the forecast time was longer than 48 h. GEO satellite with NIR and TIR sensor (GEO-NIR + TIR) improved the forecast most, reducing the root mean square difference (RMSD), normalized mean bias, and normalized mean difference by more than 20% even for a forecast time longer than 48 h. Using the LEO-TIR result as a benchmark, we evaluated the ability of GEO-NIR + TIR to improve the forecast. The 60-h CO forecasting performances of GEO-TIR and GEO-NIR + TIR were about 30% and 120% better, respectively, than that of LEO-TIR. The wider coverage and higher frequency of GEO therefore improved the RMSD by 30%, and the higher sensitivity in the lower troposphere of NIR + TIR improved it by an additional 90%. Thus, the higher sensitivity in the lower troposphere of NIR + TIR as well as the wider coverage and higher frequency of GEO had a notably positive impact on the forecasting of trans-boundary pollutants over East Asia.

  6. Techniques for computing regional radiant emittances of the earth-atmosphere system from observations by wide-angle satellite radiometers, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pina, J. F.; House, F. B.

    1975-01-01

    Radiometers on earth orbiting satellites measure the exchange of radiant energy between the earth-atmosphere (E-A) system and space at observation points in space external to the E-A system. Observations by wideangle, spherical and flat radiometers are analyzed and interpreted with regard to the general problem of the earth energy budget (EEB) and to the problem of determining the energy budget of regions smaller than the field of view (FOV) of these radiometers.

  7. Laser satellite power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walbridge, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    A laser satellite power system (SPS) converts solar power captured by earth-orbiting satellites into electrical power on the earth's surface, the satellite-to-ground transmission of power being effected by laser beam. The laser SPS may be an alternative to the microwave SPS. Microwaves easily penetrate clouds while laser radiation does not. Although there is this major disadvantage to a laser SPS, that system has four important advantages over the microwave alternative: (1) land requirements are much less, (2) radiation levels are low outside the laser ground stations, (3) laser beam sidelobes are not expected to interfere with electromagnetic systems, and (4) the laser system lends itself to small-scale demonstration. After describing lasers and how they work, the report discusses the five lasers that are candidates for application in a laser SPS: electric discharge lasers, direct and indirect solar pumped lasers, free electron lasers, and closed-cycle chemical lasers. The Lockheed laser SPS is examined in some detail. To determine whether a laser SPS will be worthy of future deployment, its capabilities need to be better understood and its attractiveness relative to other electric power options better assessed. First priority should be given to potential program stoppers, e.g., beam attenuation by clouds. If investigation shows these potential program stoppers to be resolvable, further research should investigate lasers that are particularly promising for SPS application.

  8. Question No. 5: What Role Can Satellites Take, as a Complement to Ground Based Measurement Systems, to Provide Sustained Observations to Monitor GHG Emissions?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, Moustafa; Olsen, Edward

    2011-01-01

    What role can satellites take, as a complement to ground based measurement systems, to provide sustained observations to monitor GHG emissions (e.g., CO2, CH4, O3, N2O, CFC s, NH3, and NF3) that contribute to global warming?

  9. Satellite freeze forecast system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martsolf, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Provisions for back-up operations for the satellite freeze forecast system are discussed including software and hardware maintenance and DS/1000-1V linkage; troubleshooting; and digitized radar usage. The documentation developed; dissemination of data products via television and the IFAS computer network; data base management; predictive models; the installation of and progress towards the operational status of key stations; and digital data acquisition are also considered. The d addition of dew point temperature into the P-model is outlined.

  10. Magnetopause structure from satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnerup, B. U. O.

    1979-01-01

    Observations on magnetopause structure are reported. Major topics covered include: classical reconnection, transport mechanisms, magnetospheric boundary layers, tearing modes, and Jupiter's magnetopause.

  11. Simulations of satellite Doppler wind observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmitt, George D.; Wood, S. A.; Wood, L. S.; Vaughan, O.

    1993-01-01

    This study will involve two objectives: (1) to develop, through computer simulations, optimal satellite-based sensor scanning techniques for direct measurement of tropospheric winds on the meso- and synoptic scales; and (2) to construct simulations of remotely measured wind fields for assessing impact of such fields on the diagnosis and prognosis of atmospheric phenomena through the use of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE). Using the LAWS Simulation Model (LSM), various global coverage scenarios have been investigated as part of an effort to define the optimal orbit, configuration and sampling strategies for observations of winds for use in global circulation models. Simulated data sets have been provided to GSFC, FSU and several LAWS team members. Particular emphasis has been on providing realistic cloud cover, cirrus backscatter, aerosol distribution and wind variance on scales less than 600 km. Progress is currently being made to incorporate other remote sensors (AIRS/AMSU, STIKSCAT) into the global OSSEs.

  12. The artificial satellite observation chronograph controlled by single chip microcomputer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Guangrong; Tan, Jufan; Ding, Yuanjun

    1991-06-01

    The instrument specifications, hardware structure, software design, and other characteristics of the chronograph mounting on a theodolite used for artificial satellite observation are presented. The instrument is a real time control system with a single chip microcomputer.

  13. Satellite power system simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, G.; Grasselli, U.; De Luca, A.; Spizzichino, A.; Falzini, S.

    1997-01-01

    In order to furnish a useful tool for the power system preliminary sizing, a satellite power system simulator was developed. The simulator has a modular structure where each module implements the mathematical model of the system components (solar array, battery, voltage regulators etc.). The software allows both the verification of the rating co-ordination of all those parts composing the power system itself, once the mission is assigned, and the analysis of the time behavior of the electronic regulators during transients. Therefore, by using this simulator, any power system architecture can be easily analyzed. In this paper only the electrical preliminary sizing of the components is treated without considering power system mass and battery thermal calculations. As example of the capabilities of the tool the results of two simulations are reported; in the first, the transient behavior of a sequential switching shunt regulator (S 3R) is analyzed. In the second simulation the power system of a LEO satellite is simulated in order to verify the rating co-ordination in case of unregulated bus voltage. The tool was developed within MATLAB/SIMULINK environment.

  14. Lightning-Generated Whistler Waves Observed by Probes On The Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System Satellite at Low Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzworth, R. H.; McCarthy, M. P.; Pfaff, R. F.; Jacobson, A. R.; Willcockson, W. L.; Rowland, D. E.

    2011-01-01

    Direct evidence is presented for a causal relationship between lightning and strong electric field transients inside equatorial ionospheric density depletions. In fact, these whistler mode plasma waves may be the dominant electric field signal within such depletions. Optical lightning data from the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite and global lightning location information from the World Wide Lightning Location Network are presented as independent verification that these electric field transients are caused by lightning. The electric field instrument on C/NOFS routinely measures lightning ]related electric field wave packets or sferics, associated with simultaneous measurements of optical flashes at all altitudes encountered by the satellite (401.867 km). Lightning ]generated whistler waves have abundant access to the topside ionosphere, even close to the magnetic equator.

  15. ASTER satellite observations for international disaster management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duda, K.A.; Abrams, M.

    2012-01-01

    When lives are threatened or lost due to catastrophic disasters, and when massive financial impacts are experienced, international emergency response teams rapidly mobilize to provide urgently required support. Satellite observations of affected areas often provide essential insight into the magnitude and details of the impacts. The large cost and high complexity of developing and operating satellite flight and ground systems encourages international collaboration in acquiring imagery for such significant global events in order to speed delivery of critical information to help those affected, and optimize spectral, spatial, and temporal coverage of the areas of interest. The International Charter-Space and Major Disasters was established to enable such collaboration in sensor tasking during times of crisis and is often activated in response to calls for assistance from authorized users. Insight is provided from a U.S. perspective into sensor support for Charter activations and other disaster events through a description of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), which has been used to support emergency situations for over a decade through its expedited tasking and near real-time data delivery capabilities. Examples of successes achieved and challenges encountered in international collaboration to develop related systems and fulfill tasking requests suggest operational considerations for new missions as well as areas for future enhancements.

  16. Satellite business networks and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadar, I.; Eaves, R. E.

    1985-07-01

    A compilation of articles concerning the technical aspects of satellite business networks is presented. Among the topics discussed are: flexible satellite data services; service satellite systems for the Atlantic Ocean region; and the design of a 30/20 GHz international business teleconferencing system. Consideration is also given to issues of network architecture including the performance of computer networks in accessing satellite links; advanced satellite communications systems with integrated transponders; full duplex teleconferencing via Intelsat V F-2 and OTS-2 at ll/14 GHz; and digital facsimile communication over satellite links. Among other topics discussed are: cryptographic techniques for satellite networks; a Codec system for world wide video conferencing; and regenerative SCPC satellite communications systems.

  17. Scheduling of VLBI satellite observations for an improved ITRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellerschmied, Andreas; Böhm, Johannes; Neidhardt, Alexander; Haas, Rüdiger; Kodet, Jan; Plank, Lucia

    2015-04-01

    Observations of Earth orbiting satellites with the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) technique provide a variety of new possibilities and promote the integration of different geodetic techniques, which is one of the main purposes of GGOS, the Global Geodetic Observing System of the IAG. Promising applications can be found e.g. in the field of inter-technique frame ties, having the potential to improve future realizations of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). Although several test observations to GNSS satellites have been carried out in recent years, this approach is still far away from being applied operationally. Difficulties already start at the observation planning level, with the standard VLBI scheduling software not being prepared to include satellites as observation targets in the required control files. The newly developed satellite scheduling module of the Vienna VLBI Software (VieVS) for the planning of satellite observations with VLBI antennas offers a solution to this. It allows the user to prepare schedules for selected satellites, which are simultaneously visible from a chosen station network. The generated schedule files in the current VEX format provide the possibility to carry out actual satellite observations with standard geodetic antennas, e.g. of the IVS network. The antennas can be controlled directly with the issued schedule files by commanding sequences of discrete celestial positions, without the requirement of modifications in the antenna control intended for satellite tracking. In January 2014 several successful test observations to GLONASS satellites were carried out on the baseline Onsala-Wettzell based on schedules generated with VieVS. Correlations of the recorded data showed that the observations - and therefore the scheduling with VieVS - were successful. The next step is to update the new software for the possibility to combine observations to satellites and to quasars in one schedule. The development of convenient scheduling software in the form of the new VieVS module is important to promote further research and development in this specific field.

  18. Severe storms observing satellite study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwens, R. P.; Stern, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Payload distribution and the attitude control system for the multi-mission modular spacecraft/StormSat configuration are discussed. The design of the advanced atmospheric sounder and imaging radiometer (AASIR) gimbal drive and its servomechanism is described. Onboard data handling, data downlink communications, and ground data handling systems are developed. Additional topics covered include: magnetic unloading at synchronous altitude, north-south stationkeeping, and the feasibility and impact of flying the microwave atmospheric sounding radiometer (MASR) as an additional payload.

  19. Observing Climate with Satellites - Are We on Thin Ice?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Compton

    2012-01-01

    The Earth s climate is determined by irradiance from the Sun and properties of the atmosphere, oceans, and land that determine the reflection, absorption, and emission of energy within our atmosphere and at the Earth s surface. Since the 1970s, Earth-viewing satellites have complimented non-satellite geophysical observations with consistent, quantitative, and spatially-continuous measurements that have led to an unprecedented understanding of the Earth s climate system. I will describe the Earth s climate system as elaborated by satellite and in situ observations, review arguments against global warming, and show the convergence of evidence for human-caused warming of our planet.

  20. Estimating Soil Moisture from Satellite Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owe, M.; VandeGriend, A. A.; deJeu, R.; deVries, J.; Seyhan, E.

    1998-01-01

    Cooperative research in microwave remote sensing between the Hydrological Sciences Branch of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Earth Sciences Faculty of the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam began with the Botswana Water and Energy Balance Experiment and has continued through a series of highly successful International Research Programs. The collaboration between these two research institutions has resulted in significant scientific achievements, most notably in the area of satellite-based microwave remote sensing of soil moisture. The Botswana Program was the first joint research initiative between these two institutions, and provided a unique data base which included historical data sets of Scanning Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (SN4NM) data, climate information, and extensive soil moisture measurements over several large experimental sites in southeast Botswana. These data were the basis for the development of new approaches in physically-based inverse modelling of soil moisture from satellite microwave observations. Among the results from this study were quantitative estimates of vegetation transmission properties at microwave frequencies. A single polarization modelling approach which used horizontally polarized microwave observations combined with monthly composites of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index was developed, and yielded good results. After more precise field experimentation with a ground-based radiometer system, a dual-polarization approach was subsequently developed. This new approach realized significant improvements in soil moisture estimation by satellite. Results from the Botswana study were subsequently applied to a desertification monitoring study for the country of Spain within the framework of the European Community science research programs EFEDA and RESMEDES. A dual frequency approach with only microwave data was used for this application. The Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI) was calculated from 37 GHz data and used to derive the one-way canopy transmissivity. Using a simple radiative transfer model, this information was combined with horizontally polarized 6.6 GHz SMMR observations to derive a 9-year time series of soil moisture for all of Spain at a one quarter degree spatial scale. Both day and night SMMR observations were used independently, in order to check the consistency of the results. A first order Fourier Transform was performed on the mean monthly soil moisture values to identify major characteristics of time series such as trend, amplitude, and phase shift.

  1. Estimation of differential code biases for Beidou navigation system using multi-GNSS observations: How stable are the differential satellite and receiver code biases?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Junchen; Song, Shuli; Zhu, Wenyao

    2015-11-01

    Differential code biases (DCBs) are important parameters that must be estimated accurately and reliably for high-precision GNSS applications. For optimal operational service performance of the Beidou navigation system (BDS), continuous monitoring and constant quality assessment of the BDS satellite DCBs are crucial. In this study, a global ionospheric model was constructed based on a dual system BDS/GPS combination. Daily BDS DCBs were estimated together with the total electron content from 23 months' multi-GNSS observations. The stability of the resulting BDS DCB estimates was analyzed in detail. It was found that over a long period, the standard deviations (STDs) for all satellite B1-B2 DCBs were within 0.3 ns (average: 0.19 ns) and for all satellite B1-B3 DCBs, the STDs were within 0.36 ns (average: 0.22 ns). For BDS receivers, the STDs were greater than for the satellites, with most values < 2 ns. The DCBs of different receiver families are different. Comparison of the statistics of the short-term stability of satellite DCBs over different time intervals revealed that the difference in STD between 28- and 7-day intervals was small, with a maximum not exceeding 0.06 ns. In almost all cases, the difference in BDS satellite DCBs between two consecutive days was < 0.8 ns. The main conclusion is that because of the stability of the BDS DCBs, they only require occasional estimation or calibration. Furthermore, the 30-day averaged satellite DCBs can be used reliably for the most demanding BDS applications.

  2. The state of the atmosphere as inferred from the FGGE satellite observing systems during SOP-1. [special observing period (SOP-1) of First Global Atmospheric Research Program Global Experiment (FGGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halem, M.; Kalnay-Rivas, E.; Baker, W. E.; Atlas, R.

    1981-01-01

    The statistical properties, and coverage, of satellite temperature sounding data are described. Tropical regions are observed every two days, extratropics from one to four times a day. Oceans are covered two to three times a day. Asynoptic coverage is comparable to the U.S. rawinsonde network twice daily coverage. Lack of ground truth for data sparse areas makes accuracy difficult to assess. The rms differences of layer mean temperatures obtained from collocating rawinsonde observations with satellite temperature profiles in space and time differ from rms differences of layer mean satellite temperature soundings. The FGGE satellite systems can infer the three dimensional motion field and improve the representation of the large scale state of the atmosphere.

  3. Surface albedo based on geostationary satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, J. L.; Lattanzio, A.; Hankins, B.; Inamdar, A.; Knapp, K.; Privette, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Surface albedo is the fraction of incoming solar radiation reflected by the land surface, and therefore is a sensitive indicator of environmental changes. To this end, surface albedo is identified as an Essential Climate Variable (ECV) by the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS). NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) is implementing the Geostationary Surface Albedo (GSA; Lattanzio and Govaerts, 2010) algorithm for GOES data in support of an activity of the Sustained, Coordinated Processing of Environmental Satellite Data for Climate Monitoring (SCOPE-CM). SCOPE-CM helps coordinate ECV production responding to GCOS, WMO, and CEOS goals. The GSA algorithm was developed jointly by EUMETSAT and Joint Research Centre (JRC) using a method proposed by Pinty et al. (2000) to retrieve surface albedo by processing day-time, cloud-free geostationary observations from a single visible band. Currently, the GSA algorithm generates products operationally at EUMETSAT using geostationary data from satellites at 0 and 63E and at JMA using 140E geostationary data. To support development of an aggregate global albedo product, NCDC will apply the GSA algorithm to data from GOES-E (75W) and GOES-W (135W). For the GOES implementation, raw GOES observations are calibrated against AVHRR reflectance data available in PATMOS-x. Surface angular anisotropy is then determined through the inversion of the GSA radiative transfer model using multiple geostationary images collected over a day under different illumination conditions. The inversion process additionally requires ancillary total column ozone and water vapor values, which for the GOES implementation are acquired from the 20th Century Reanalysis V2 data set provided by the NOAA/OAR/ESRL PSD. The GSA algorithm produces a 10-day composite surface albedo map. This product will initially be developed for the period 2000-2003. Later, it will be applied to the complete GOES data collection (1978-present) as part of NOAA's Climate Data Record Program.

  4. First optical observations of artificial Earth's satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykhlova, L. V.

    2008-08-01

    A review of the first optical observations of the artificial satellites in the USSR as well as in former communist countries (DDR, Romania,Poland) is given. The role by Alla G. Masevich, I.D. Zhongolovich and Yu.V. Batrakov is underlined in the organization of observations.

  5. The AMSC mobile satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Carson E.; Bhagat, Jai; Hopper, Edwin A.; Kiesling, John D.; Exner, Michael L.; Melillo, Lawrence; Noreen, Gary K.; Parrott, Billy J.

    1988-01-01

    The American Mobile Satellite Consortium (AMSC) Mobile Satellite Service (MSS) system is described. AMSC will use three multi-beam satellites to provide L-band MSS coverage to the United States, Canada and Mexico. The AMSC MSS system will have several noteworthy features, including a priority assignment processor that will ensure preemptive access to emergency services, a flexible SCPC channel scheme that will support a wide diversity of services, enlarged system capacity through frequency and orbit reuse, and high effective satellite transmitted power. Each AMSC satellite will make use of 14 MHz (bi-directional) of L-band spectrum. The Ku-band will be used for feeder links.

  6. Characteristics of recent dust storms over the Indian region using real time multi-satellite observations from the direct broadcast receiving system at IMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, A. K.; Sharma, A. K.; Soni, V. K.; Kundu, P. K.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, observations from microwave satellites, visible and infrared instruments have been analyzed to detect dust storm over north and north-west part of India during 18-23 March 2012. This study investigated the approach to utilize the multi satellite data of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on-board the Terra and Aqua satellite and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) on-board NOAA satellite to study the characteristics of dust storms from real time direct broadcast (DB) receiving system installed at three places of India Meteorological Department (IMD). The dust storm detection is based on the infrared brightness temperature (BT) difference between channels at 11 and 12 ?m and polarized BT difference between two channels of 89 and 23.8 GHz. It is found that the significant differences between the BT of channel 89 and 23.8 can be used as a discriminator of identifying dust storm. The Total Ozone Mapping Spectroradiometer (TOMS) Aerosol Index (AI) and AMSU-A 23 GHz channel BT from NOAA satellite over the north and north-west part of India have also been analyzed. The result indicated the characteristic behavior between BT and AI during the different phases of the dust storm. Finally, the occurrence of dust outbreaks has also been validated with sky radiometer of IMD, which confirms the presence of a dust storm over the Indian region. Further, the findings of the study and its approaches apply to the other dust storm cases which occurred during the months of April and June 2012. The integrated approach suggested the potential to use high resolution data of microwave as well as thermal-infrared using multi-satellite observations from real time direct broadcast system for the detection of severe, moderate or weak dust storms very well. The approach is found to be promising for operational application.

  7. Satellite personal communications system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reilly, N. B.; Smith, J. G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Voice channel communication between low power mobile stations dispersed over a large area is provided by a system which includes a geostationary satellite utilizing a large UHF antenna that can receive a transmission from a caller and retransmit it over any one beam of a matrix of narrow beams, so the chosen beam covers an area in which a designated called party is located. A single up-link control channel occupying a narrow frequency band, can be utilized to receive dial up signals from a caller, and another single down link control channel can be utilized to ring up the called party located anywhere within the continental United States. The satellite antenna includes a matrix of feed horns that not only direct the beams in a controlled matrix onto the area of the continental United States, but also permit detection of the region from which the caller's signal is transmitted and the region from which the called party's answer is received, to enable the interconnection of signals received from these two regions. The system is particularly useful for rural areas.

  8. Arctic Warming Signals from Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Josefino C.

    2005-01-01

    Global warming signals are expected to be amplified in the Arctic primarily because of ice-albedo feedback associated with the high reflectivity of ice and snow that blankets much of the region. The Arctic had been a poorly explored territory basically because of its general inaccessibility on account of extremely harsh weather conditions and the dominant presence of thick perennial ice in the region. The advent of satellite remote sensing systems since the 1960s, however, enabled the acquisition of synoptic data that depict in good spatial detail the temporal changes of many Arctic surface parameters. Among the surface parameters that have been studied using space based systems are surface temperature, sea ice concentration, snow cover, surface albedo and phytoplankton concentration. Associated atmospheric parameters, such as cloud cover, temperature profile, ozone concentration, and aerosol have also been derived. Recent observational and phenomenological studies have indeed revealed progressively changing conditions in the Arctic during the last few decades (e g , Walsh et al. 1996; Serreze et al 2000; Comiso and Parkinson 2004). The changes included declines in the extent and area of surfaces covered by sea ice and snow, increases in melt area over the Greenland ice sheets, thawing of the permafrost, warming in the troposphere, and retreat of the glaciers. These observations are consistent with the observed global warming that has been associated with the increasing concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere (Karl and Trenberth 2003) and confirmed by modeling studies (Holland and Bitz, 2003). The Arctic system, however, is still not well understood complicated by a largely fluctuating wind circulation and atmospheric conditions (Proshutinsky and Johnson 1997) and controlled by what is now known as the Arctic Oscillation (AO) which provides a measure of the strength of atmospheric activities in the region (Thompson and Wallace 1998). Meanwhile, the observed Arctic conditions since the 1970s have been shown to exhibit a linear behavior that directly contradicts what has been expected from the A0 (Overland, 2005). The decade of the 1990s has been regarded as the warmest decade in the last century and current data indicates that the 2000s may be even a warmer decade than the 1990s further supporting the linear variability. In this paper, we use satellite data to gain insights into the warming Arctic and how the abnormally warm conditions during the last few years are reflected in the region.

  9. Applications of Satellite Observations to Aerosol Analyses and Forecasting using the NAAPS Model and the DataFed Distributed Data System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husar, R. B.; Hoijarvi, K.; Westphal, D. L.; Scheffe, R.; Keating, T.; Frank, N.; Poirot, R.; DuBois, D. W.; Bleiweiss, M. P.; Eberhard, W. L.; Menon, R.; Sethi, V.; Deshpande, A.

    2012-12-01

    Near-real-time (NRT) aerosol characterization, forecasting and decision support is now possible through the availability of (1) surface-based monitoring of regional PM concentrations, (2) global-scale columnar aerosol observations through satellites; (3) an aerosol model (NAAPS) that is capable of assimilating NRT satellite observations; and (4) an emerging cyber infrastructure for processing and distribution of data and model results (DataFed) for a wide range of users. This report describes the evolving NRT aerosol analysis and forecasting system and its applications at Federal and State and other AQ Agencies and groups. Through use cases and persistent real-world applications in the US and abroad, the report will show how satellite observations along with surface data and models are combined to aid decision support for AQ management, science and informing the public. NAAPS is the U.S. Navy's global aerosol and visibility forecast model that generates operational six-day global-scale forecasts for sulfate, dust, sea salt, and smoke aerosol. Through NAVDAS-AOD, NAAPS operationally assimilates filtered and corrected MODIS MOD04 aerosol optical depths and uses satellite-derived FLAMB smoke emissions. Washington University's federated data system, DataFed, consist of a (1) data server which mediates the access to AQ datasets from distributed providers (NASA, NOAA, EPA, etc.,); (2) an AQ Data Catalog for finding and accessing data; and (3) a set of application programs/tools for browsing, exploring, comparing, aggregating, fusing data, evaluating models and delivering outputs through interactive visualization. NAAPS and DataFed are components of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). Satellite data support the detection of long-range transported wind-blown dust and biomass smoke aerosols on hemispheric scales. The AQ management and analyst communities use the satellite/model data through DataFed and other channels as evidence for Exceptional Events (EE) as defined by EPA; i.e., Sahara dust impact on Texas and Florida, local dusts events in the Southwestern U.S. and Canadian smoke events over the Northeastern U.S. Recent applications include the impact analysis of a major Saudi Arabian dust event on Mumbai, India air quality. The NAAPS model and the DataFed tools can visualize the dynamic AQ events as they are manifested through the different sensors. Satellite-derived aerosol observations assimilated into NAAPS provide estimates of daily emission rates for dust and biomass fire sources. Tuning and reconciliation of the observations, emissions and models constitutes a key and novel contribution yielding a convergence toward the true five-dimensional (X, Y, Z, T, Composition) characterization of the atmospheric aerosol data space. This observation-emission-model reconciliation effort is aided by model evaluation tools and supports the international HTAP program. The report will also discuss some of the challenges facing multi-disciplinary, multi-agency, multi-national applications of integrated observation-modeling system of systems that impede the incorporation of satellite observations into AQ management decision support systems.

  10. Applications systems verification and transfer project. Volume 2: Operational applications of satellite snow-cover observations and data-collection systems in the Arizona test site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, H. H.

    1981-01-01

    Ground surveys and aerial observations were used to monitor rapidly changing moisture conditions in the Salt-Verde watershed. Repetitive satellite snow cover observations greatly reduce the necessity for routine aerial snow reconnaissance flights over the mountains. High resolution, multispectral imagery provided by LANDSAT satellite series enabled rapid and accurate mapping of snow-cover distributions for small- to medium-sized subwatersheds; however, the imagery provided only one observation every 9 days of about a third of the watershed. Low resolution imagery acquired by the ITOSa dn SMS/GOES meteorological satellite series provides the daily synoptic observation necessary to monitor the rapid changes in snow-covered area in the entire watershed. Short term runoff volumes can be predicted from daily sequential snow cover observations.

  11. Global canopy interception from satellite observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new methodology for retrieving rainfall interception rates from multi satellite observations is presented. The approach makes use of the daily productof the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) as driving data and applies Gash’s analytical model to derive interception rates at global sc...

  12. Comparison of filter predictions with satellite observations

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-10-01

    Satellite observations of meteor entry are used to calibrate a filter model of fragmentation. Predicted sizes and masses compare favorably with data and analytic interpretations for objects of all sizes. However, objects that fragment into many large objects should be treated by the decomposition of the radiation signal into the contributions from the different fragments.

  13. Satellite Power System (SPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edler, H. G.

    1978-01-01

    Potential organizational options for a solar power satellite system (SPS) were investigated. Selection and evaluation criteria were determined to include timeliness, reliability, and adequacy to contribute meaningfully to the U.S. supply; political feasibility (both national and international); and cost effectiveness (including environmental and other external costs). Based on these criteria, four organizational alternatives appeared to offer reasonable promise as potential options for SPS. A large number of key issues emerged as being factors which would influence the final selection process. Among these issues were a variety having to do with international law, international institutions, environmental controls, economics, operational flexibility, congressional policies, commercial-vs-governmental ownership, national dedication, and national and operational stategic issues.

  14. Seasonal streamflow estimation employing satellite snowcover observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rango, A.; Salomonson, V. V.; Foster, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Low resolution meteorological satellite and high resolution earth resources satellite data have been used to map snow covered area over the upper Indus River and the Wind River Mountains of Wyoming, respectively. For the Indus River early spring snow covered area was extracted and related to April through June stream flow from 1967-1971 using a regression equation. Prediction of the April-June 1972 stream flow from the satellite data was within three percent of the actual total. Composited results from two years of data over seven Wind River Mountain watersheds indicated that LANDSAT-1 snow cover observations, separated on the basis of watershed elevation, could also be related to runoff in significant regression equations.

  15. Scheduling Earth Observing Satellites with Evolutionary Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Crawford, James; Lohn, Jason; Pryor, Anna

    2003-01-01

    We hypothesize that evolutionary algorithms can effectively schedule coordinated fleets of Earth observing satellites. The constraints are complex and the bottlenecks are not well understood, a condition where evolutionary algorithms are often effective. This is, in part, because evolutionary algorithms require only that one can represent solutions, modify solutions, and evaluate solution fitness. To test the hypothesis we have developed a representative set of problems, produced optimization software (in Java) to solve them, and run experiments comparing techniques. This paper presents initial results of a comparison of several evolutionary and other optimization techniques; namely the genetic algorithm, simulated annealing, squeaky wheel optimization, and stochastic hill climbing. We also compare separate satellite vs. integrated scheduling of a two satellite constellation. While the results are not definitive, tests to date suggest that simulated annealing is the best search technique and integrated scheduling is superior.

  16. Inverted cellular radio satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, Harvey M.; Edwards, William L.; Pederson, Lee W.

    In cellular radio systems, frequencies can be reused for mobile communications because of the ability to handoff conversations as a user passes from one cell to another. One of the two focal points of this paper deals with the economics and technical issues pursuant to existing satellite technology interacted with cellular radio technology. The second focal point of this paper concerns the proposed low altitude satellite global packet network called the Multiple Satellite System (MSS).

  17. Global Warming: Evidence from Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Iacovazzi, R.; Yoo, J.-M.; Dalu, G.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Observations made in Channel 2 (53.74 GHz) of the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) radiometer, flown onboard sequential, sun-synchronous, polar-orbiting NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) operational satellites, indicate that the mean temperature of the atmosphere over the globe increased during the period 1980 to 1999. In this study, we have minimized systematic errors in the time series introduced by satellite orbital drift in an objective manner. This is done with the help of the onboard warm-blackbody temperature, which is used in the calibration of the MSU radiometer. The corrected MSU Channel 2 observations of the NOAA satellite series reveal that the vertically-weighted global-mean temperature of the atmosphere, with a peak weight near the mid troposphere, warmed at the rate of 0.13 +/- 0.05 K/decade during 1980 to 1999. The global warming deduced from conventional meteorological data that have been corrected for urbanization effects agrees reasonably with this satellite-deduced result.

  18. Global Warming: Evidence from Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Iacovazzi, R., Jr.; Yoo, J.-M.

    2001-01-01

    Observations made in Channel 2 (53.74 GHz) of the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) radiometer, flown on-board sequential, sun-synchronous, polar orbiting NOAA operational satellites, indicate that the mean temperature of the atmosphere over the globe increased during the period 1980 to 1999. In this study we have minimized systematic errors in the time series introduced by the satellite orbital drift in an objective manner. This is done with the help the onboard warm black body temperature, which is used in the calibration of the MSU radiometer. The corrected MSU Channel 2 observations of the NOAA satellite series reveal that the vertically weighted global mean temperature of the atmosphere, with a peak weight near the mid-troposphere, warmed at the rate of 0.13 K per decade (with an uncertainty of 0.05 K per decade) during 1980 to 1999. The global warming deduced from conventional meteorological data that have been corrected for urbanization effects agrees reasonably with this satellite deuced result.

  19. Globally Gridded Satellite observations for climate studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knapp, K.R.; Ansari, S.; Bain, C.L.; Bourassa, M.A.; Dickinson, M.J.; Funk, C.; Helms, C.N.; Hennon, C.C.; Holmes, C.D.; Huffman, G.J.; Kossin, J.P.; Lee, H.-T.; Loew, A.; Magnusdottir, G.

    2011-01-01

    Geostationary satellites have provided routine, high temporal resolution Earth observations since the 1970s. Despite the long period of record, use of these data in climate studies has been limited for numerous reasons, among them that no central archive of geostationary data for all international satellites exists, full temporal and spatial resolution data are voluminous, and diverse calibration and navigation formats encumber the uniform processing needed for multisatellite climate studies. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) set the stage for overcoming these issues by archiving a subset of the full-resolution geostationary data at ~10-km resolution at 3-hourly intervals since 1983. Recent efforts at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center to provide convenient access to these data include remapping the data to a standard map projection, recalibrating the data to optimize temporal homogeneity, extending the record of observations back to 1980, and reformatting the data for broad public distribution. The Gridded Satellite (GridSat) dataset includes observations from the visible, infrared window, and infrared water vapor channels. Data are stored in Network Common Data Format (netCDF) using standards that permit a wide variety of tools and libraries to process the data quickly and easily. A novel data layering approach, together with appropriate satellite and file metadata, allows users to access GridSat data at varying levels of complexity based on their needs. The result is a climate data record already in use by the meteorological community. Examples include reanalysis of tropical cyclones, studies of global precipitation, and detection and tracking of the intertropical convergence zone.

  20. Simulated NASA Satellite Data Products for the NOAA Integrated Coral Reef Observation Network/Coral Reef Early Warning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estep, Leland; Spruce, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    This RPC (Rapid Prototyping Capability) experiment will demonstrate the use of VIIRS (Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite) and LDCM (Landsat Data Continuity Mission) sensor data as significant input to the NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) ICON/ CREWS (Integrated Coral Reef Observation System/Coral Reef Early Warning System). The project affects the Coastal Management Program Element of the Applied Sciences Program.

  1. A parsimonious data assimilation system for optimally integrating multi-sensor satellite observations over semi-arid areas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land data assimilation systems are commonly tasked with merging remotely sensed surface soil moisture retrievals with information derived from a soil water balance model driven by observed rainfall. The performance of such systems can be degraded by the incorrect specification of parameters describi...

  2. Use of meteorological satellite observations in weather modification programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, A. S.; Smith, P. L., Jr.; Biswas, K. R.

    1973-01-01

    The potential value of weather satellite data in field operations of weather modification is appraised. It was found that satellites could play a useful role in operational weather modification projects, particularly in the recognition of treatment opportunities. Satellite cloud photographs and infrared observations appear promising in the identification of treatment opportunities in seeding orographic cloud systems for increased snowpack, in seeding convective clouds for increased rainfall, in identifying hail threats, and in tracking and observing hurricanes as an aid to timing and location of seeding treatments. It was concluded that the potential value of satellite data in the treatment and evaluation phases of operational projects is not as great as in the recognition of treatment opportunity.

  3. Satellite Observations of Atmospheric Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, D. L.; Waters, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite produced the first global maps of small-scale gravity wave variances in the middle atmosphere. Observations at 30-88 km altitudes show that the variances of 30-100 km horizontal scales are strongly correlated with surface topography and stratospheric jet streams. The several years of MLS data will provide a climatology of global gravity wave activity needed for modeling atmospheric circulations and mixing processes.

  4. Infrared observations of outer planet satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T. V.

    1988-08-01

    This task supports IR observations of the outer planet satellites. These data provide vital information about the thermophysical properties of satellite surfaces, including internal heat sources for Io. Observations include both broad and narrow band measurementsin the 2 to 20 micrometer spectral range. The program in the last year has aimed at obtaining lonitude coverage on Io to establish stability of hot spot patterns previously reported. Several runs produced the most complete data set for an apparition since the start of the program. Unfortunately, bad weather limited coverage of key longitude ranges containing the largest known hot spot Loki. Among the preliminary results is the observation of an outburst in Io's thermal flux that was measured at 4.8, 8.7 and 20 micrometer. Analysis of the data has given the best evidence to date of silicate volcanism on Io; this is one of the most significant pieces of the puzzle as to the relative roles of silicate and sulfur volcanism on Io. Researchers are collaborating with J. Goguen (NRC RRA to finish reduction of mutual event data, which have already improved ephermeris information for the satellites. The data appear to place significant limits on the characteristics of any leading side hot spots.

  5. QSAT: The Satellite for Polar Plasma Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruda, Yoshihiro; Fujimoto, Akiko; Kurahara, Naomi; Hanada, Toshiya; Yumoto, Kiyohumi; Cho, Mengu

    2009-04-01

    This paper introduces QSAT, the satellite for polar plasma observation. The QSAT project began in 2006 as an initiative by graduate students of Kyushu University, and has the potential to contribute greatly to IHY (International Heliophysical Year) by showing to the world the beauty, importance, and relevance of space science. The primary objectives of the QSAT mission are (1) to investigate plasma physics in the Earths aurora zone in order to better understand spacecraft charging, and (2) to conduct a comparison of the field-aligned current observed in orbit with ground-based observations. The QSAT project can provide education and research opportunities for students in an activity combining space sciences and satellite engineering. The QSAT satellite is designed to be launched in a piggyback fashion with the Japanese launch vehicle H-IIA. The spacecraft bus is being developed at the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics of Kyushu University with collaboration of Fukuoka Institute of Technology. Regarding the payload instruments, the Space Environment Research Center of Kyushu University is developing the magnetometers, whereas the Laboratory of Spacecraft Environment Interaction Engineering of Kyushu Institute of Technology is developing the plasma probes. We aim to be ready for launch in 2009 or later.

  6. Communications satellite systems capacity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browne, L.; Hines, T.; Tunstall, B.

    1982-01-01

    Analog and digital modulation techniques are compared with regard to efficient use of the geostationary orbit by communications satellites. Included is the definition of the baseline systems (both space and ground segments), determination of interference susceptibility, calculation of orbit spacing, and evaluation of relative costs. It is assumed that voice or TV is communicated at 14/11 GHz using either FM or QPSK modulation. Both the Fixed-Satellite Service and the Broadcasting-Satellite Service are considered. For most of the cases examined the digital approach requires a satellite spacing less than or equal to that required by the analog approach.

  7. Land mobile satellite system requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiesling, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A Land Mobile Satellite System (LMSS) provides voice, data and related communications services to moving vehicles and persons. Communications between the mobiles and satellite are in the 806-890 MHz band. The satellite translates these signals to a ""fixed services band'' such as 14/12 GHz band (Ku-band), and communicates in this band with fixed terminals called gateways. The gateways are located at convenient places such as telephone switches (which provide entry into the national telephone system), dispatcher headquarters, computer centers, etc. Communications are therefore principally mobile to fixed. A third communications link, also at Ku-band, is needed between the satellite and a single fixed ground station. This link provides satellite command, telemetry and ranging and also provides a network control function. The latter, through a common signalling system, receives requests and assigns channel slots, and otherwise controls, monitors and polices the network and collects billing information.

  8. Land mobile satellite system requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiesling, J. D.

    1983-05-01

    A Land Mobile Satellite System (LMSS) provides voice, data and related communications services to moving vehicles and persons. Communications between the mobiles and satellite are in the 806-890 MHz band. The satellite translates these signals to a ""fixed services band'' such as 14/12 GHz band (Ku-band), and communicates in this band with fixed terminals called gateways. The gateways are located at convenient places such as telephone switches (which provide entry into the national telephone system), dispatcher headquarters, computer centers, etc. Communications are therefore principally mobile to fixed. A third communications link, also at Ku-band, is needed between the satellite and a single fixed ground station. This link provides satellite command, telemetry and ranging and also provides a network control function. The latter, through a common signalling system, receives requests and assigns channel slots, and otherwise controls, monitors and polices the network and collects billing information.

  9. Conceptual study of debris observation and arresting experiment satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimoto, Kenichi; Mori, Hatsuo; Satou, Keiichi; Kitazawa, Yukihito; Miyoshi, Kouichi

    1992-07-01

    Present status of debris environment and predictable damage caused by them, such as effects to manned space activities, damage of satellite or other spacecraft caused by their collision, dropping of substances to the ground, radioactive contamination, effects to astronomical observation, and interference with space experiments are outlined. An overview of present status and problems of debris observation and tracking system and an ideal debris observation system is presented. The objectives of a debris observation and arresting system and definition of their subjects are introduced. The results of studies of observation equipment (sensors), including contacting and non-contacting sensors, and their selection is introduced. Orbits, mission duration, operational condition, and overall satellite systems are outlined.

  10. Satellite Observations for Detecting and Tracking Changes in Atmospheric Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neil, Doreen O.; Kondragunbta, Shobha; Osterman, Gregory; Pickering, Kenneth; Pinder, Robert W.; Prados, Ana I.; Szykman, James

    2009-01-01

    The satellite observations provide constraints on detailed atmospheric modeling, including emissions inventories, indications of transport, harmonized data over vast areas suitable for trends analysis, and a link between spatial scales ranging from local to global, and temporal scales from diurnal to interannual. 1 The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) long-term commitments help provide these observations in cooperation with international meteorological organizations. NASA s long-term commitments will advance scientifically important observations as part of its Earth Science Program, and will assist the transition of the science measurements to applied analyses through the Applied Science Program. Both NASA and NOAA have begun to provide near realtime data and tools to visualize and analyze satellite data,2 while maintaining data quality, validation, and standards. Consequently, decision-makers can expect satellite data services to support air quality decision making now and in the future. The international scientific community's Integrated Global Atmosphere Chemistry Observation System Report3 outlined a plan for ground-based, airborne and satellite measurements and models to integrate the observations into a four-dimensional representation of the atmosphere (space and time) to support assessment and policy information needs. This plan is being carried out under the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). Demonstrations of such an integrated capability4 provide new understanding of the changing atmosphere and link policy decisions to benefits for society. In this article, we highlight the use of satellite data to constrain biomass burning emissions, to assess oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) emission reductions, and to contribute to state implementation plans, as examples of the use of satellite observations for detecting and tracking changes in atmospheric composition.

  11. Multispectral satellite observations for arid land studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    1992-01-01

    Multispectral satellite data when properly calibrated and standardized can be used synergistically for a quantitative analysis of processes and surface characteristics, and for quantifying land surface change. Relationships among multispectral satellite data (visible reflectance, surface temperature and polarization difference of microwave emission at 37 GHz frequency) have been used to develop hypotheses concerning the relative sensitivity of these data to varied land surface characteristics, which needs to be verified by field observations. Radiative transfer models have also been developed to understand these multispectral data. Interannual variations of visible reflectance and polarization difference for the period 1982-1986 over the Sahel and the Sudan zones of Africa show a lagged response with respect to the rainfall deficit during recovery from drought, which needs to be understood in terms of biophysical parameters.

  12. Satellite observations of transionospheric pulse pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, D.N.; Munson, C.P.; Devenport, J.C.

    1995-04-15

    The BLACKBEARD payload aboard the ALEXIS satellite has been making broadband observations in the VHF band of the radio spectrum. Since November of 1993 several hundred unusual signals have been recorded. The peculiar nature of these bursts of radio noise is that they have a duration of approximately 10 {mu}sec, are typically 20 to 40 dB brighter than the average background, and occur in pairs separated by approximately 50 {mu}sec. The authors have dubbed these emissions TransIonospheric Pulse Pairs, or TIPP events. They do not know what the source of these emissions is, but the dispersion of these signals is consistent with an origin at or near the earth`s surface. The satellite field of view and time of day when TIPP events are generally detected are consistent with regions of thunderstorm activity such as south-central Africa or Indonesia. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Meteorological Satellites (METSAT) and Earth Observing System (EOS) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) instruments that are being designed and manufactured for the Meteorological Satellites Project (METSAT) and the Earth Observing System (EOS) integrated programs. The FMEA analyzes the design of the METSAT and EOS instruments as they currently exist. This FMEA is intended to identify METSAT and EOS failure modes and their effect on spacecraft-instrument and instrument-component interfaces. The prime objective of this FMEA is to identify potential catastrophic and critical failures so that susceptibility to the failures and their effects can be eliminated from the METSAT/EOS instruments.

  14. SSETO-Small Satellite for Exoplanetary Transit Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathies, Johannes; Mauceri, Steffen; Pfeiffer, Lukas; Vietze, Marco; Roeser, Hans-Peter; Boehringer, Felix; Lengowski, Michael

    2014-11-01

    SSETO is the result of a phase-A study in context of the small satellite program of the University of Stuttgart that demonstrates the capability of a university institute to build a small satellite with a budget of 5 million Euro. The satellite will be capable of observing exoplanets in a Neptune-Earth scale and obtaining data of interstellar dust. Due to a system failure of NASA's Kepler mission, there is currently (October 2013) a lack of satellites searching for exoplanets. This paper details the design of subsystems and payload, as well as the required test tasks in accordance with the mission profile at a conceptional level. The costs for standard spacecraft testing and integration tasks are included, but not those of launch, ground support, operations and engineer working hours.

  15. Meteorological Satellites (METSAT) and Earth Observing System (EOS) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) Stress Analysis Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffner, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Stress analysis of the primary structure of the Meteorological Satellites Project (METSAT) Advanced Microwave Sounding Units-A, A1 Module using static loads is presented. The structural margins of safety and natural frequency predictions for the METSAT design are reported.

  16. Decadal Record of Satellite Carbon Monoxide Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, H. M.; Deeter, M. N.; Frankenberg, C.; George, M.; Nichitiu, F.; Worden, J.; Aben, I.; Bowman, K. W.; Clerbaux, C.; Coheur, P.; de Laat, J.; Detweiler, R.; Drummond, J. R.; Edwards, D. P.; Gille, J. C.; Hurtmans, D.; Luo, M.; Martinez-Alonso, S.; Massie, S. T.; Pfister, G.; Warner, J. X.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) distributions are controlled by anthropogenic emissions, biomass burning, transport and oxidation by reaction with the hydroxyl radical (OH). Quantifying trends in CO is therefore important for understanding changes related to all of these contributions. Here we present a comprehensive record of satellite observations from 2000 through 2011 of total column CO using the available measurements from nadir-viewing thermal infrared instruments: MOPITT, AIRS, TES and IASI. We examine trends for CO in the Northern and Southern hemispheres along with regional trends for E. China, E. USA, Europe and India. Measurement and sampling methods for each of the instruments are discussed. We find that all the satellite observations are consistent with a modest decreasing trend ~ -1%/year in total column CO over the Northern hemisphere for this time period. Although decreasing trends in the United States and Europe have been observed from surface CO measurements, we also find a decrease in CO over E. China. Some of the interannual variability in the observations can be explained by global fire emissions, but the overall decrease needs further study to understand the implications for changes in anthropogenic emissions.

  17. Decadal record of satellite carbon monoxide observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, H. M.; Deeter, M. N.; Frankenberg, C.; George, M.; Nichitiu, F.; Worden, J.; Aben, I.; Bowman, K. W.; Clerbaux, C.; Coheur, P. F.; de Laat, A. T. J.; Detweiler, R.; Drummond, J. R.; Edwards, D. P.; Gille, J. C.; Hurtmans, D.; Luo, M.; Martínez-Alonso, S.; Massie, S.; Pfister, G.; Warner, J. X.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) distributions are controlled by anthropogenic emissions, biomass burning, transport and oxidation by reaction with the hydroxyl radical (OH). Quantifying trends in CO is therefore important for understanding changes related to all of these contributions. Here we present a comprehensive record of satellite observations from 2000 through 2011 of total column CO using the available measurements from nadir-viewing thermal infrared instruments: MOPITT, AIRS, TES and IASI. We examine trends for CO in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres along with regional trends for Eastern China, Eastern USA, Europe and India. We find that all the satellite observations are consistent with a modest decreasing trend ~ -1 % yr-1 in total column CO over the Northern Hemisphere for this time period and a less significant, but still decreasing trend in the Southern Hemisphere. Although decreasing trends in the United States and Europe have been observed from surface CO measurements, we also find a decrease in CO over E. China that, to our knowledge, has not been reported previously. Some of the interannual variability in the observations can be explained by global fire emissions, but the overall decrease needs further study to understand the implications for changes in anthropogenic emissions.

  18. Decadal record of satellite carbon monoxide observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, H. M.; Deeter, M. N.; Frankenberg, C.; George, M.; Nichitiu, F.; Worden, J.; Aben, I.; Bowman, K. W.; Clerbaux, C.; Coheur, P. F.; de Laat, A. T. J.; Detweiler, R.; Drummond, J. R.; Edwards, D. P.; Gille, J. C.; Hurtmans, D.; Luo, M.; Martínez-Alonso, S.; Massie, S.; Pfister, G.; Warner, J. X.

    2012-09-01

    Atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) distributions are controlled by anthropogenic emissions, biomass burning, transport and oxidation by reaction with the hydroxyl radical (OH). Quantifying trends in CO is therefore important for understanding changes related to all of these contributions. Here we present a comprehensive record of satellite observations from 2000 through 2011 of total column CO using the available measurements from nadir-viewing thermal infrared instruments: MOPITT, AIRS, TES and IASI. We examine trends for CO in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres along with regional trends for Eastern China, Eastern USA, Europe and India. We find that all the satellite observations are consistent with a modest decreasing trend ∼-1% yr-1 in total column CO over the Northern Hemisphere for this time period and a less significant, but still decreasing trend in the Southern Hemisphere. Although decreasing trends in the United States and Europe have been observed from surface CO measurements, we also find a decrease in CO over E. China that, to our knowledge, has not been reported previously. Some of the interannual variability in the observations can be explained by global fire emissions, but the overall decrease needs further study to understand the implications for changes in anthropogenic emissions.

  19. A web-based tool that combines satellite and weather station observations to support irrigation scheduling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract: The Satellite Irrigation Management Support (SIMS) project combines NASA's Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS), Landsat and MODIS satellite imagery, and reference evapotranspiration from surface weather station networks to map daily crop irrigation demand in California in ...

  20. Observing outer planet satellites (except Titan) with JWST: Science justification and observational requirements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kestay, Laszlo P.; Grundy, Will; Stansberry, John; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Thatte, Deepashri; Gudipati, Murthy; Tsang, Constantine; Greenbaum, Alexandra; McGruder, Chima

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will allow observations with a unique combination of spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution for the study of outer planet satellites within our Solar System. We highlight the infrared spectroscopy of icy moons and temporal changes on geologically active satellites as two particularly valuable avenues of scientific inquiry. While some care must be taken to avoid saturation issues, JWST has observation modes that should provide excellent infrared data for such studies.

  1. Students as Ground Observers for Satellite Cloud Retrieval Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Lin H.; Costulis, P. Kay; Young, David F.; Rogerson, Tina M.

    2004-01-01

    The Students' Cloud Observations On-Line (S'COOL) Project was initiated in 1997 to obtain student observations of clouds coinciding with the overpass of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments on NASA's Earth Observing System satellites. Over the past seven years we have accumulated more than 9,000 cases worldwide where student observations are available within 15 minutes of a CERES observation. This paper reports on comparisons between the student and satellite data as one facet of the validation of the CERES cloud retrievals. Available comparisons include cloud cover, cloud height, cloud layering, and cloud visual opacity. The large volume of comparisons allows some assessment of the impact of surface cover, such as snow and ice, reported by the students. The S'COOL observation database, accessible via the Internet at http://scool.larc.nasa.gov, contains over 32,000 student observations and is growing by over 700 observations each month. Some of these observations may be useful for assessment of other satellite cloud products. In particular, some observing sites have been making hourly observations of clouds during the school day to learn about the diurnal cycle of cloudiness.

  2. On the Cloud Observations in JAXA's Next Coming Satellite Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakajima, Takashi Y.; Nagao, Takashi M.; Letu, Husi; Ishida, Haruma; Suzuki, Kentaroh

    2012-01-01

    The use of JAXA's next generation satellites, the EarthCARE and the GCOM-C, for observing overall cloud systems on the Earth is discussed. The satellites will be launched in the middle of 2010-era and contribute for observing aerosols and clouds in terms of climate change, environment, weather forecasting, and cloud revolution process study. This paper describes the role of such satellites and how to use the observing data showing concepts and some sample viewgraphs. Synergistic use of sensors is a key of the study. Visible to infrared bands are used for cloudy and clear discriminating from passively obtained satellite images. Cloud properties such as the cloud optical thickness, the effective particle radii, and the cloud top temperature will be retrieved from visible to infrared wavelengths of imagers. Additionally, we are going to combine cloud properties obtained from passive imagers and radar reflectivities obtained from an active radar in order to improve our understanding of cloud evolution process. This is one of the new techniques of satellite data analysis in terms of cloud sciences in the next decade. Since the climate change and cloud process study have mutual beneficial relationship, a multispectral wide-swath imagers like the GCOM-C SGLI and a comprehensive observation package of cloud and aerosol like the EarthCARE are both necessary.

  3. Decadal Record of Satellite Carbon Monoxide Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, Helen; Deeter, Merritt; Frankenberg, Christian; George, Maya; Nichitiu, Florian; Worden, John; Aben, Ilse; Bowman, Kevin; Clerbaux, Cathy; Coheur, Pierre-Francois; de Laat, Jos; Warner, Juying; Drummond, James; Edwards, David; Gille, John; Hurtmans, Daniel; Ming, Luo; Martinez-Alonso, Sara; Massie, Steven; Pfister, Gabriele

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) distributions are controlled by anthropogenic emissions, biomass burning, chemical production, transport and oxidation by reaction with the hydroxyl radical (OH). Quantifying trends in CO is therefore important for understanding changes related to all of these contributions. Here we present a comprehensive record of satellite observations from 2000 through 2011 of total column CO using the available measurements from nadir-viewing thermal infrared instruments: MOPITT, AIRS, TES and IASI. We examine trends for CO in the Northern and Southern hemispheres along with regional trends for E. China, E. USA, Europe and India. Measurement and sampling methods for each of the instruments are discussed, and we show diagnostics for systematic errors in MOPITT trends. We find that all the satellite observations are consistent with a modest decreasing trend around -1%/year in total column CO over the Northern hemisphere for this time period. Decreasing trends in total CO column are observed for the United States, Europe and E. China with more than 2σ significance. For India, the trend is also decreasing, but smaller in magnitude and less significant. Decreasing trends in surface CO have also been observed from measurements in the U.S. and Europe. Although less information is available for surface CO in China, there is a decreasing trend reported for Beijing. Some of the interannual variability in the observations can be explained by global fire emissions, and there may be some evidence of the global financial crisis in late 2008 to early 2009. But the overall decrease needs further study to understand the implications for changes in anthropogenic emissions.

  4. Comparison of high-level clouds represented in a global cloud system-resolving model with CALIPSO/CloudSat and geostationary satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Toshiro; Satoh, Masaki; Hagihara, Yuichiro; Miura, Hiroaki; Schmetz, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Vertical and horizontal distributions of high-level clouds (ice and snow) simulated in high-resolution global cloud system-resolving simulations by the Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM) are compared with satellite observations. Ice and snow data in a 1 week experiment by the NICAM 3.5 km grid mesh global simulation initiated at 0000 UTC 25 December 2006 are used in this study. The vertical structure of ice and snow represented by NICAM was compared with Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) and CloudSat observations. High-level clouds (cumulonimbus and cirrus type clouds) classified by the split window (11 and 12 μm) data on board geostationary meteorological satellites (GMSs) were used for comparison of the horizontal distributions of ice and snow in NICAM. The vertical distributions of ice and snow simulated by NICAM qualitatively agree well with those of cloud signals observed by CALIPSO and CloudSat. We computed corresponding cloud lidar backscatter coefficients and cloud radar reflectivity signals from ice and snow data of NICAM using Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP) observational simulator packages. The contoured frequency by altitude diagram for the cloud lidar backscatter coefficients shows lower frequency at higher altitude of 8-14 km by NICAM than CALIOP observations. This suggests that the amount of ice is not well represented in NICAM. The simulated cloud radar reflectivity signals by NICAM indicated higher frequency at 8-10 km altitude than CloudSat observations, although there were some differences between over oceans and continents. This implies that the amount of snow is larger in NICAM simulations. The horizontal pattern of ice clouds (column-integrated ice and snow of greater than 0.01 kg/m2) in NICAM shows good agreement with that of high-level clouds identified by the split window analysis. During this 1 week simulation, 48-59% of ice clouds in NICAM matches with observed high-level clouds. The cross correlation between the spatial distributions of simulated ice clouds and satellite-observed high-level clouds is 0.40-0.51, and the equitable threat score is 0.31-0.45. Furthermore, temporal variations of column-integrated ice clouds in NICAM are compared with high-level clouds classified by the split window at the decaying stage of deep convection over the tropics. The results indicate that the mean decaying speed of ice clouds of NICAM and high-level clouds by satellite observations agrees well for this analysis area and period, although the variances are larger in NICAM. This implies that the fall speed of snow in this NICAM experiment is appropriate to depict the decay of anvil clouds by compensating for the excess of snow in NICAM simulations, when we assume that the decay of anvil clouds is largely controlled by the evaporation of ice and snow.

  5. NEOWISE: Observations of the Irregular Satellites of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Mainzer, A. K.; Masiero, J. R.; Nugent, C. R.; Cutri, R. M.; Sonnett, S.; Kramer, E.

    2015-08-01

    We present thermal model fits for 11 Jovian and 3 Saturnian irregular satellites based on measurements from the WISE/NEOWISE data set. Our fits confirm spacecraft-measured diameters for the objects with in situ observations (Himalia and Phoebe) and provide diameters and albedo for 12 previously unmeasured objects, 10 Jovian and 2 Saturnian irregular satellites. The best-fit thermal model beaming parameters are comparable to what is observed for other small bodies in the outer solar system, while the visible, W1, and W2 albedos trace the taxonomic classifications previously established in the literature. Reflectance properties for the irregular satellites measured are similar to the Jovian Trojan and Hilda Populations, implying common origins.

  6. A multipurpose satellite ejection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Michael B.

    1987-01-01

    A design is presented for a pneumatic ejection system capable of ejecting a spin stabilized satellite from the cargo bay of space vehicles. This system was orginally designed for use on the Spacelab 6 shuttle mission, but is now being considered for use with expendable rockets for launching satellites. The ejection system was designed to launch a 150 lb satellite at an initial ejection velocity of 32 ft/sec with a spin rate of 30 rev/min. The ejection system consists of a pneumatic cylinder, satellite retaining mechanism, and bearing assembly to allow the satellite to rotate during the spin up phase. As the cylinder is pressurized rapidly causing movement of the actuation piston, the mechanism automatically releases the spinning satellite by retracting a pneumatic locking pin and three spring loaded holddown pins. When the piston reaches the end of its stroke, it encounters a crushable aluminum honeycomb shock absorber which decelerates the piston and retaining mechanism. The assembly is designed for multiple uses except for the crushable shock absorber and pyrotechnic valves. The advantage of the design is discussed and patent no. and date given.

  7. The data distribution satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, Ronald C.; Weinberg, Aaron

    1991-01-01

    The Data Distributed Satellite (DDS) will be capable of providing the space research community with inexpensive and easy access to space payloads and space data. Furthermore, the DDS is shown to be a natural outgrowth of advances and evolution in both NASA's Space Network and commercial satellite communications. The roadmap and timescale for this evolution is described along with key demonstrations, proof-of-concept models, and required technology development that will support the projected system evolution toward the DDS.

  8. Study of ENSO Using Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, H.; Lagerloef, G. S.

    2013-12-01

    Observations within the last 1 to 1.5 decades indicate that the El Nio warm sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies have peaked more often in the central Pacific than in the eastern Pacific. The advection of the eastern edge of western Pacific warm pool (WPWP) plays an important role modulating the SST in the central Pacific, and satellite observations provide high-resolution information to understand the dynamics in this area. The Aquarius satellite data resolves much more detailed structures of the salinity front (SF) along the eastern edge of WPWP than the in situ observations (i.e. Argo). Together with zonal currents from Ocean Surface Current Analyses Real-Time product (OSCAR), we calculate the advection of the SF at the equator, which is important for three reasons: First, the advection of the SF affects formation the barrier layer (BL), which can further influence the behavior of ENSO. Second, the east-west SF migration is a prominent feature of ENSO variability. For example, during the 2011 La Nia, the salinity front was advected westward, resulting in much higher salinity in the western Pacific compared to the neutral year in 2012. Third, we can analyze how the ocean compensates for the large vertical net freshwater flux (~3 m yr-1) into the warm pool region using simple salt budget analysis. During the boreal fall, Aquarius reveals the strong SF in line with the north-south zonal bounds of the whole Pacific ITCZ rain band centered at about 8-10N, which is also aligned with boundaries between the zonal equatorial current and counter current. At the same time, the thick barrier layers underneath the ITCZ are also observed. In this study, we apply the first two+ years (25 August 2011 - present) of Aquarius data to describe the correlations among the SF, surface currents, precipitation and the BL in the whole tropical Pacific basin, and discuss findings in the context of ENSO prediction and model comparisons.

  9. Ionospheric TEC observations from TOPEX satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimer, J.A.; Ewell, V.R.; Lee, M.C.; Doherty, P.H.; Decker, D.T.; Anderson, D.N.; Klobuchar, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    Variability of Total Electron Content (TEC) in the equatorial anomaly region of the ionosphere can be studied extensively using the results of measurements taken by the NASA/CNES satellite, TOPEX/Poseidon. The NASA radar altimeter (NRA) is the first space-borne dual-frequency altimeter capable of accurately measuring vertical ionospheric TEC below 1,340 km. TOPEX TEC observations have already been used to support results from an ionospheric measurement campaign that was conducted in equatorial anomaly regions of South America by Phillips Laboratory in Spring, 1994. The best agreement in TEC values is seen during intervals of longitudinal proximity of the satellites` paths. The TOPEX over-ocean data can be used as a supplement to land based measurements in applications to ionospheric research at low and middle latitudes. This study focuses on comparisons between TOPEX vertical TEC data and GPS equivalent vertical TEC measurements taken near the East and West coastal regions of South America. Also the Phillips Laboratory Global Parameterized Ionospheric Model (PIM) is utilized in an effort to estimate slant to vertical conversion errors.

  10. Ocean EcoSystem Modelling Based on Observations from Satellite and In-Situ Data: First Results from the OSMOSIS Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rio, M.-H.; Buongiorno-Nardelli, B.; Calmettes, B.; Conchon, A.; Droghei, R.; Guinehut, S.; Larnicol, G.; Lehodey, P.; Matthieu, P. P.; Mulet, S.; Santoleri, R.; Senina, I.; Stum, J.; Verbrugge, N.

    2015-12-01

    Micronekton organisms are both the prey of large ocean predators, and themselves also the predators of eggs and larvae of many species from which most fishes. The micronekton biomass concentration is therefore a key explanatory variable that is usually missing in fish population and ecosystem models to understand individual behaviour and population dynamics of large oceanic predators. In that context, the OSMOSIS (Ocean ecoSystem Modelling based on Observations from Satellite and In-Situ data) ESA project aims at demonstrating the feasibility and prototyping an integrated system going from the synergetic use of many different variables measured from space to the modelling of the distribution of micronektonic organisms. In this paper, we present how data from CRYOSAT, GOCE, SMOS, ENVISAT, together with other non-ESA satellites and in-situ data, can be merged to provide the required key variables needed as input of the micronekton model. Also, first results from the optimization of the micronekton model are presented and discussed.

  11. Odyssey personal communications satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    The spectacular growth of cellular telephone networks has proved the demand for personal communications. Large regions of the world are too sparsely populated to be economically served by terrestrial cellular communications. Since satellites are well suited to this application, TRW filed with the FCC on May 31, 1993 for the Odyssey construction permit. Odyssey will provide high quality wireless communication services worldwide from satellites. These services will include: voice, data, paging, and messaging. Odyssey will be an economical approach to providing communications. A constellation of 12 satellites will be orbited in three, 55 deg. inclined planes at an altitude of 10,354 km to provide continuous coverage of designated regions. Two satellites will be visible anywhere in the world at all times. This dual visibility leads to high line-of-sight elevation angles, minimizing obstructions by terrain, trees and buildings. Each satellite generates a multibeam antenna pattern that divides its coverage area into a set of contiguous cells. The communications system employs spread spectrum CDMA on both the uplinks and downlinks. This signaling method permits band sharing with other systems and applications. Signal processing is accomplished on the ground at the satellite's 'Gateway' stations. The 'bent pipe' transponders accommodates different regional standards, as well as signaling changes over time. The low power Odyssey handset will be cellular compatible. Multipath fade protection is provided in the handset.

  12. Advanced satellite communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staples, Edward J.; Lie, Sen

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research program was to develop an innovative advanced satellite receiver/demodulator utilizing surface acoustic wave (SAW) chirp transform processor and coherent BPSK demodulation. The algorithm of this SAW chirp Fourier transformer is of the Convolve - Multiply - Convolve (CMC) type, utilizing off-the-shelf reflective array compressor (RAC) chirp filters. This satellite receiver, if fully developed, was intended to be used as an on-board multichannel communications repeater. The Advanced Communications Receiver consists of four units: (1) CMC processor, (2) single sideband modulator, (3) demodulator, and (4) chirp waveform generator and individual channel processors. The input signal is composed of multiple user transmission frequencies operating independently from remotely located ground terminals. This signal is Fourier transformed by the CMC Processor into a unique time slot for each user frequency. The CMC processor is driven by a waveform generator through a single sideband (SSB) modulator. The output of the coherent demodulator is composed of positive and negative pulses, which are the envelopes of the chirp transform processor output. These pulses correspond to the data symbols. Following the demodulator, a logic circuit reconstructs the pulses into data, which are subsequently differentially decoded to form the transmitted data. The coherent demodulation and detection of BPSK signals derived from a CMC chirp transform processor were experimentally demonstrated and bit error rate (BER) testing was performed. To assess the feasibility of such advanced receiver, the results were compared with the theoretical analysis and plotted for an average BER as a function of signal-to-noise ratio. Another goal of this SBIR program was the development of a commercial product. The commercial product developed was an arbitrary waveform generator. The successful sales have begun with the delivery of the first arbitrary waveform generator.

  13. Applications systems verification and transfer project. Volume 3: Operational applications of satellite snow cover observations in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. J.; Hannaford, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Five southern Sierra snowmelt basins and two northern Sierra-Southern Cascade snowmelt basins were used to evaluate the effect on operational water supply forecasting from satellite imagery. Manual photointerpretation techniques were used to obtain SCA and equivalent snow line for the years 1973 to 1979 for the seven test basins using LANDSAT imagery and GOES imagery. The use of SCA was tested operationally in 1977-79. Results indicate the addition of SCA improve the water supply forecasts during the snowmelt phase for these basins where there may be an unusual distribution of snowpack throughout the basin, or where there is a limited amount of real time data available. A high correlation to runoff was obtained when SCA was combined with snow water content data obtained from reporting snow sensors.

  14. Satellite Observations of the Epic California Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Famiglietti, J. S.; Thomas, B. F.; Reager, J. T., II; Castle, S. L.; David, C. H.; Thomas, A. C.; Andreadis, K.; Argus, D. F.; Behrangi, A.; Farr, T.; Fisher, J. B.; Landerer, F. W.; Lo, M. H.; Molotch, N. P.; Painter, T. H.; Rodell, M.; Schimel, D.; Swenson, S. C.; Watkins, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    As California enters its third year of drought, questions of future water sustainability are inevitable. Snowpack, soil moisture, streamflow, reservoir and groundwater levels are at record lows. Mandatory water restrictions are being implemented, statewide fines for wasting water have been authorized, and billions of dollars and tens of thousands of jobs have been lost. Enhanced monitoring and modeling of the state's dwindling water supplies can help manage what remains while looking forward to a post-drought, sustainable water future. Here we demonstrate the role of satellite observations in comprehensive drought characterization and monitoring. In particular we highlight changing water supply, declining groundwater and reservoir levels, agricultural and urban stress. Potential contributions to water management will be discussed.

  15. Satellite observation of atmospheric nuclear gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letaw, John R.; Share, G. H.; Kinzer, R. L.; Silberberg, R.; Chupp, E. L.

    1989-01-01

    Satellite observations of the spectrum of gamma radiation from the earth's atmosphere in the energy interval from 300 keV to 8.5 MeV were obtained with a gamma-ray spectrometer during 1980-1983. A total of 20 atmospheric line features are superimposed on a continuum background which is modeled using a power law with an index of -1.16. The line energies and intensities are consistent with production by secondary neutrons interacting with atmospheric N-14 and O-16. The intensity and spectrum of photons at energies below the 511-keV line, in excess of a power law continuum, are explained by Compton scattering of the annihilation line photons in traversing an average of 21 g/sq cm of atmosphere.

  16. Satellite Application for Disaster Management Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okpanachi, George

    Abstract Satellites are becoming increasingly vital to modern day disaster management activities. Earth observation (EO) satellites provide images at various wavelengths that assist rapid-mapping in all phases of the disaster management cycle: mitigation of potential risks in a given area, preparedness for eventual disasters, immediate response to a disaster event, and the recovery/reconstruction efforts follo wing it. Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) assist all the phases by providing precise location and navigation data, helping manage land and infrastructures, and aiding rescue crews coordinate their search efforts. Effective disaster management is a complex problem, because it involves many parameters, which are usually not easy to measure and even identify: Analysis of current situation, planning, optimum resource management, coordination, controlling and monitoring current activities and making quick and correct decisions are only some of these parameters, whose complete list is very long. Disaster management information systems (DMIS) assist disaster management to analyse the situation better, make decisions and suggest further actions following the emergency plans. This requires not only fast and thorough processing and optimization abilities, but also real-time data provided to the DMIS. The need of DMIS for disaster’s real-time data can be satisfied by small satellites data utilization. Small satellites can provide up-to-data, plus a better media to transfer data. This paper suggests a rationale and a framework for utilization of small Satellite data by DMIS. DMIS should be used ‘’before’’, ‘’during’’ and ‘’after’’ the disasters. Data provided by the Small Satellites are almost crucial in any period of the disasters, because early warning can save lives, and satellite data may help to identify disasters before they occur. The paper also presents’ ‘when’’, ‘’where’’ and ‘’how’’ small satellite data should be used by DMIS.

  17. Use of Earth Observing Satellites for Operational Hazard Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, H. M.; Lauritson, L.

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) relies on Earth observing satellite data to carry out its operational mission to monitor, predict, and assess changes in the Earth's atmosphere, land, and oceans. NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) uses satellite data to help lessen the impacts of natural and man-made disasters due to tropical cyclones, flash floods, heavy snowstorms, volcanic ash clouds (for aviation safety), sea ice (for shipping safety), and harmful algal blooms. Communications systems on NOAA satellites are used to support search and rescue and to relay data from data collection platforms to a variety of users. NOAA's Geostationary (GOES) and Polar (POES) Operational Environmental Satellites are used in conjunction with other satellites to support NOAA's operational mission. While NOAA's National Hurricane Center is responsible for predicting tropical cyclones affecting the U.S. mainland, NESDIS continuously monitors the tropics world wide, relaying valuable satellite interpretations of tropical systems strength and position to users throughout the world. Text messages are sent every six hours for tropical cyclones in the Western Pacific, South Pacific, and Indian Oceans. To support the monitoring, prediction, and assessment of flash floods and winter storms, NESDIS sends out text messages alerting U.S. weather forecast offices whenever NOAA satellite imagery indicates the occurrence of heavy rain or snow. NESDIS also produces a 24-hour rainfall composite graphic image covering those areas affected by heavy precipitation. The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and other aviation concerns recognized the need to keep aviators informed of volcanic hazards. To that end, nine Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC's) were created to monitor volcanic ash plumes within their assigned airspace. NESDIS hosts one of the VAAC's. Although the NESDIS VAAC's primary responsibility is the continental U.S., Carribean, and adjacent oceans, it also tracks volcanic eruptions throughout the world. Text messages are produced along with graphic interpretations. This information, along with volcanic ash forecasts produced by NOAA's National Weather Service, is made available to U.S. Government and international agencies concerned with aviation, seismology, and climate analysis. Earth observing satellites help NESDIS to ensure safe navigation of ships through sea ice by measuring the extent, thickness, and age of ice as well as sea surface winds over the polar regions of the globe, coastal areas, and inland waterways. These satellites also help NESDIS to monitor U.S. coastal areas for dangerous algal blooms or other toxic effects to fish and sea mammals as well as monitoring floods and fires. Experimental fire products can help in the monitoring of fires and fire weather, as well as determining fire risk. Experimental soil moisture products support flood and drought monitoring. Flood extent and damage assessment for a variety of hazards can be determined from several satellites at varying spatial resolutions. The Search and Rescue Satellite Aided Tracking (SARSAT) system detects and locates persons in distress on land or water. NOAA satellites relay distress signals from emergency beacons through a network of ground stations to the U.S. Mission Control Center (USMCC). The USMCC processes the data and alerts the appropriate search and rescue authorities. SARSAT is part of the international Cospas-Sarsat Program. NOAA's GOES Data Collection (DCS) and Argos (jointly with the French space agency) POES Data Collection and Locations Systems transmit data collected from remote land and water based platforms and distributes the data to researchers, governmental and environmental organizations worldwide. The GOES DCS system allows near real time and frequent transmissions, e.g. hourly, over the Americas and much of the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific Oceans. ARGOS transmissions are less frequent, but global and provide the location of moving platforms such as animals and d

  18. Advances in Satellite Observations of Earth's Radiation Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeb, N. G.; Kato, S.; Rose, F. G.; Rutan, D. A.

    2013-05-01

    The first observation of Earth's radiation budget from satellite dates back to the beginning of the satellite era in late 1950s, when the first satellite images of the planet were recorded. With each passing decade since then, the science community has made advances in instrument technology that has led to a wealth of new information about the sunlight reaching Earth, Earth's albedo, and the emission of thermal radiation to space. Until recently, however, most of the observational breakthroughs were limited to Earth's top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiation budget. The recent arrival of instruments flown under the Earth Observing System (EOS) and the A-Train constellation of satellites has dramatically changed this situation, providing new opportunities to synergistically combine an array of diverse passive and active satellite instruments to more accurately determine Earth's surface radiation budget. The new data have led to renewed discussions about our basic understanding of Earth's water and energy cycles. The goal of this presentation is to discuss how the new satellite instrument capabilities are being used by the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy (CERES) science team to provide improved observations of the TOA, surface and within-atmosphere radiation budgets and the role clouds play in modulating the energy flows. We focus on the CERES TOA and surface Energy Balanced and Filled (EBAF) product, which combines information from CERES, MODIS, CALIPSO, Cloudsat, AIRS, and geostationary observations all integrated in a consistent manner, and demonstrate how synergistic use of these datasets leads to improved radiative fluxes when compared with surface radiation measurements from the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN), NOAA SURFRAD, and ARM. We find that EBAF-SFC reduces the bias in surface SW downward flux by a factor of 2 compared to other satellite-based surface radiation budget datasets, show marked reductions in surface downward longwave radiation biases over polar regions, and provide consistent interannual variations in surface radiation compared to ground measurements. We use a new approach to explore how cloud radiative effects at the TOA, surface and within the atmosphere respond to variations in large large-scale atmospheric circulation strength using reanalysis data and CERES EBAF-TOA and EBAF-SFC. Results show remarkably robust relationships between observed variations in the strength of the large-scale Hadley circulation and cloud radiative effects in both ascending and descending branches, providing confidence that continued monitoring of the climate system with climate-quality observations will provide critical constraints on the cloud radiative response to future changes in large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns.

  19. Inferring Land Surface Model Parameters for the Assimilation of Satellite-Based L-Band Brightness Temperature Observations into a Soil Moisture Analysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite mission provides global measurements of L-band brightness temperatures at horizontal and vertical polarization and a variety of incidence angles that are sensitive to moisture and temperature conditions in the top few centimeters of the soil. These L-band observations can therefore be assimilated into a land surface model to obtain surface and root zone soil moisture estimates. As part of the observation operator, such an assimilation system requires a radiative transfer model (RTM) that converts geophysical fields (including soil moisture and soil temperature) into modeled L-band brightness temperatures. At the global scale, the RTM parameters and the climatological soil moisture conditions are still poorly known. Using look-up tables from the literature to estimate the RTM parameters usually results in modeled L-band brightness temperatures that are strongly biased against the SMOS observations, with biases varying regionally and seasonally. Such biases must be addressed within the land data assimilation system. In this presentation, the estimation of the RTM parameters is discussed for the NASA GEOS-5 land data assimilation system, which is based on the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and the Catchment land surface model. In the GEOS-5 land data assimilation system, soil moisture and brightness temperature biases are addressed in three stages. First, the global soil properties and soil hydraulic parameters that are used in the Catchment model were revised to minimize the bias in the modeled soil moisture, as verified against available in situ soil moisture measurements. Second, key parameters of the "tau-omega" RTM were calibrated prior to data assimilation using an objective function that minimizes the climatological differences between the modeled L-band brightness temperatures and the corresponding SMOS observations. Calibrated parameters include soil roughness parameters, vegetation structure parameters, and the single scattering albedo. After this climatological calibration, the modeling system can provide L-band brightness temperatures with a global mean absolute bias of less than 10K against SMOS observations, across multiple incidence angles and for horizontal and vertical polarization. Third, seasonal and regional variations in the residual biases are addressed by estimating the vegetation optical depth through state augmentation during the assimilation of the L-band brightness temperatures. This strategy, tested here with SMOS data, is part of the baseline approach for the Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture data product from the planned Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite mission.

  20. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of Planets and Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Philip B.; Lee, Steven W.

    Although exploration by remote, in situ spacecraft has been the primary tool used in scientific exploration of the planets and other solar system objects for the last three decades, the unique capabilities of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have made it an invaluable tool for solar system research and have led to many important discoveries. HST's extended lifetime has made it possible to continue observations of planets and satellites that were started by earlier space missions and has thereby provided new insight into dynamic surface and atmospheric phenomena on these bodies. The ultraviolet capability of HST has made it possible to study important time-variable phenomena such as the auroras on Jupiter and Saturn and the circulation of planetary atmospheres. This review provides an overview of HST observations of and discoveries relating to planets and satellites in the solar system.

  1. Using the JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System to study the climatology of hurricane precipitation structure from 10 years of passive microwave satellite observations in the Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristova-Veleva, Svetla; Haddad, Ziad; Knosp, Brian; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Li, P. Peggy; Poulsen, William; Seo, Eun-Kyoung; Shen, Tsae-Pyng; Turk, Francis J.; Vu, Quoc

    2013-04-01

    In spite of recent improvements in hurricane track forecast accuracy, currently there are still many unanswered questions about the physical processes that determine hurricane genesis, and evolution. Furthermore, a significant amount of work remains to be done in validating and improving hurricane forecast models. None of this can be accomplished without a comprehensive set of multi-parameter observations that are relevant to both the large-scale and the storm-scale processes in the atmosphere and in the ocean. Despite the significant amount of satellite observations today, they are still underutilized in hurricane research and operations, due to complexity and volume. To facilitate hurricane research, we developed the JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) of multi-instrument satellite observations pertaining to: i) the thermodynamic and microphysical structure of the storms; ii) the air-sea interaction processes; iii) the larger-scale environment as depicted by the SST and the Total Precipitable Water of the environment (Hristova-Veleva et al., 2008, 2011). Our goal was to create a one-stop place to provide the researchers with an extensive set of observed hurricane data, and their graphical representation, organized in an easy way to determine when coincident observations from multiple instruments are available. In this study we use the 10+ years of passive microwave observations of Atlantic hurricanes to create composite structures that are segregated by hurricane category and by intensification rate. The use of composite structures provides a statistically robust framework (e.g. Rogers et al., 2012). We analyze the storm asymmetry as depicted by several factors - brightness temperatures and their derivatives such as a newly-develop Rain Indicator and a new convective/stratiform separation that is based on the value and the spatial variability of this Rain Indicator. The goal is to determine whether the storm morphology (in particular, the storm asymmetry or lack thereof) carries predictive skills regarding the potential for intensification. The presentation will describe the JPL TCIS and the results of our analysis of the passive microwave satellite observations of the Atlantic hurricanes. Refernces: Hristova-Veleva, S. M., C. Ao, Y. Chao, V. Dang, R. Fovell, M. Garay, Z. Haddad, B. Knosp, B. Lambrigtsen, P. P. Li, K. J. Park, W. Poulsen, H. Su, S. Tanelli, D. Vane, Q. A. Vu, J. Willis, D. L. Wu, 2008: "Using the JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System for Research and Applications", AMS 28th Hurricane and Tropical Meteorology Conference, Orlando, FL, 28Apr.-02May 2008 Hristova-Veleva, S. M., A. Chau, Z. Haddad, B. Knosp, B. Lambrigtsen, P. P. Li, E. Rodriguez, T. -. P. Shen, B. Stiles, H. Su, J. Turk, and Q. Vu, 2011: "Impact of microphysical parameterizations on the structure and intensity of simulated hurricanes: Using satellite data to determine the parameterizations that produce most realistic storms", 14th Conference on Mesoscale Processes, 1-4 August 2011, Los Angeles, California Rogers, R., S. Lorsolo, P. Reasor, J. Gamache, F. Marks, 2012: Multiscale Analysis of Tropical Cyclone Kinematic Structure from Airborne Doppler Radar Composites. Mon. Wea. Rev., 140, 77-99.

  2. The development of the geosynchronous weather satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greaves, J. R.; Shenk, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    A brief history of the U.S. geosynchronous weather satellite program is presented. The introduction of multiparameter observation systems on the Geostationary Synchronous Environmental Satellite (GOES) is discussed, with emphasis given to the visible spin-scan radiometer (VISSR); Data Collection System (DCS); and the Space Environment Monitor (SEM). A synopsis of current measurement capabilities of the GOES satellites is given with respect to temperature and mositure parameters. Several examples of GOES satellite imagery are provided.

  3. Cloud Detection and Clearing for the Earth Observing System Terra Satellite Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Juying X.; Gille, John C.; Edwards, David P.; Ziskin, Dan C.; Smith, Mark W.; Bailey, Paul L.; Rokke, Laurie

    2001-03-01

    The Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) instrument, which was launched aboard the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra spacecraft on 18 December 1999, is designed to measure tropospheric CO and CH4 by use of a nadir-viewing geometry. The measurements are taken at 4.7 m in the thermal emission and absorption for the CO mixing ratio profile retrieval and at 2.3 and 2.2 m in the reflected solar region for the total CO column amount and CH4 column amount retrieval, respectively. To achieve the required measurement accuracy, it is critical to identify and remove cloud contamination in the radiometric signals. We describe an algorithm to detect cloudy pixels, to reconstruct clear column radiance for pixels with partial cloud covers, and to estimate equivalent cloud top height for overcast conditions to allow CO profile retrievals above clouds. The MOPITT channel radiances, as well as the first-guess calculations, are simulated with a fast forward model with input atmospheric profiles from ancillary data sets. The precision of the retrieved CO profiles and total column amounts in cloudy atmospheres is within the expected -/+10% range. Validations of the cloud-detecting thresholds with the moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer airborne simulator data and MOPITT airborne test radiometer measurements were performed. The validation results showed that the MOPITT cloud detection thresholds work well for scenes covered with more than 5 -10% cloud cover if the uncertainties in the model input profiles are less than 2 K for temperature, 10% for water vapor, and 5% for CO and CH4 .

  4. Earth Observing System/Meteorological Satellite (EOS/METSAT). Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) Contamination Control Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, M.

    1998-01-01

    This Contamination Control Plan is submitted in response the Contract Document requirements List (CDRL) 007 under contract NAS5-32314 for the Earth Observing System (EOS) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit A (AMSU-A). In response to the CDRL instructions, this document defines the level of cleanliness and methods/procedures to be followed to achieve adequate cleanliness/contamination control, and defines the required approach to maintain cleanliness/contamination control through shipping, observatory integration, test, and flight. This plan is also applicable to the Meteorological Satellite (METSAT) except where requirements are identified as EOS-specific. This plan is based on two key factors: a. The EOS/METSAT AMSU-A Instruments are not highly contamination sensitive. b. Potential contamination of other EOS Instruments is a key concern as addressed in Section 9/0 of the Performance Assurance Requirements for EOS/METSAT Integrated Programs AMSU-A Instrument (MR) (NASA Specification S-480-79).

  5. Fourier transform spectrometer for Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamazaki, Takashi; Kaneko, Yutaka; Kuze, Akihiko; Kondo, Kayoko

    2005-01-01

    Global warming has become a very serious issue for human beings. In 1997, the Kyoto Protocol was adopted at the Third Session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP3), making it mandatory for developed nations to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by six (6) to eight (8) per cent of their total emissions in 1990, and to meet this goal sometime between 2008 and 2012. The Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) is designed to monitor the global distribution of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the space. GOSAT is a joint project of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the Ministry of Environment (MOE), and the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES). JAXA is responsible for the satellite and instrument development, MOE is involved in the instrument development, and NIES is responsible for the satellite data retrieval. The satellite is scheduled to be launched in 2008. In order to detect the CO2 variation of boundary layers, both the technique to measure the column density and the retrieval algorithm to remove cloud and aerosol contamination are investigated. Main mission sensor of the GOSAT is a Fourier Transform Spectrometer with high optical throughput, spectral resolution and wide spectral coverage, and a cloud-aerosol detecting imager attached to the satellite. The paper presents the mission sensor system of the GOSAT together with the results of performance demonstration with proto-type instrument aboard an aircraft.

  6. Satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, J.A.; Matthews, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The present work is based on a conference: Natural Satellites, Colloquium 77 of the IAU, held at Cornell University from July 5 to 9, 1983. Attention is given to the background and origins of satellites, protosatellite swarms, the tectonics of icy satellites, the physical characteristics of satellite surfaces, and the interactions of planetary magnetospheres with icy satellite surfaces. Other topics include the surface composition of natural satellites, the cratering of planetary satellites, the moon, Io, and Europa. Consideration is also given to Ganymede and Callisto, the satellites of Saturn, small satellites, satellites of Uranus and Neptune, and the Pluto-Charon system.

  7. Satellite observation of atmospheric nuclear gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Letaw, J R; Share, G H; Kinzer, R L; Silberberg, R; Chupp, E L; Forrest, D J; Rieger, E

    1989-02-01

    We present a satellite observation of the spectrum of gamma radiation from the Earth's atmosphere in the energy interval from 300 keV to 8.5 MeV. The data were accumulated by the gamma ray spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission over 3 1/2 years, from 1980 to 1983. The excellent statistical accuracy of the data allows 20 atmospheric line features to be identified. The features are superimposed on a continuum background which is modeled using a power law with index -1.16. Many of these features contain a blend of more than one nuclear line. All of these lines (with the exception of the 511-keV annihilation line) are Doppler broadened. Line energies and intensities are consistent with production by secondary neutrons interacting with atmospheric 14N and 16O. Although we find no evidence for other production mechanisms, we cannot rule out significant contributions from direct excitation or spallation by primary cosmic ray protons. The relative intensities of the observed line features are in fair agreement with theoretical models; however, existing models are limited by the availability of neutron cross sections, especially at high energies. The intensity and spectrum of photons at energies below the 511-keV line, in excess of a power law continuum, can be explained by Compton scattering of the annihilation line photons in traversing an average of approximately 21 g cm-2 of atmosphere. PMID:11537397

  8. Plasmaspheric ELF hiss observed by ISIS satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondoh, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Watanabe, S.; Aikyo, K.; Murakami, T.

    1982-11-01

    Characteristics of plasmaspheric ELF hiss in the topside ionosphere are statistically investigated using ELF/VLF electric field data of 231 ISIS passes received at Kashima station, Japan, from 1973-1977. ELF hiss is classified into two types, steady ELF hiss whose upper frequency limit is aproximately constant with latitude and ELF hiss whose upper frequency limit increases with increasing latitude. Spectral shape and bandwidth of ELF hiss obseved in the topside ionosphere are very similar to those of the plasmaspheric hiss or inner zone hiss observed by OGO-5 and OGO-6. The occurrence rate of steady ELF hiss is about 0.3 near the geomagnetic equator and decreses rapidly with increasing latitude around L = 3.37 percent of ELF hiss events occured during storms and 63 percent during quiet periods. 67 percent of 82 storm ELF hiss events occurred in the storm recovery phase. Electric field spectra of ELF hiss observed in mid- and low latitudes exhibit marked electric field weakness every ten seconds over one half of the satellite spin period.

  9. Satellite Atmosphere and Io Torus Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program has supported a vigorous three-year program of groundbased observations and detailed analysis of the Jupiter/Io system. Our work focused on Io's escaping atmosphere and the plasma torus that it creates.

  10. Satellite observations of ground water changes in New Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2002 NASA launched the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission. GRACE consists of two satellites with a separation of about 200 km.  By accurately measuring the separation between the twin satellites, the differences in the gravity field can be determined. Monthly observ...

  11. The Mexican national satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Ruiz, M. E.; Briskman, R. D.

    1983-10-01

    The satellites, tracking, telemetry, command, and monitoring facilities, and the earth station complex for the Mexican national satellite system, Morelos, are described. The spacecraft are intended to provide educational television, rural telephony, data transmission, and business and industrial services. Scheduled for 1985 launch, the satellites will be placed in GEO and use the C and Ku bands with 12 narrow band and six wideband transponders. Spin-stabilized and solar cell powered, the functional mass will be 666 kg, including propellant. The solar panels will provide 940 W of power and 830 W will be available from NiCd batteries during eclipse conditions. The earth station will be located at Iztapalapa, which will have a 12 m antenna, redundant uplink and downlink radios, and command and ranging equipment. Back-up capability will be provided by a station at Tulancingo. Ku band and C band stations are in planning.

  12. Constraints on Local-to-Regional Anthropogenic CO2 from Satellite Retrievals of Combustion-related Trace Gases: Initial Assessment Using Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying anthropogenic sources of CO2 is imperative yet challenging. Here, we present data assimilation experiments to assess the information gain in using current satellite observations of atmospheric constituents that are co-emitted during a combustion process. In particular, OSSEs will be conducted to investigate synergistic information from GOSAT (and OCO-2) CO2, MOPITT (and IASI) CO and OMI NO2 retrievals in constraining sources of anthropogenic combustion at city, state, and regional spatiotemporal scales. These experiments will be carried out using ensemble--based data assimilation (DA) system comprising of a regional air quality/weather model, WRF-Chem, global climate/chemistry model, CAM-Chem, and a data assimilation software package, DART. The ensemble-based DA system, which mimics a numerical weather prediction with chemistry, provides a means to statistically estimate local sensitivities across modeled meteorological and chemical states (CO2, CO, NO2, and related species) and parameters (including surface fluxes) using the ensemble statistics derived from dynamical, physical, and chemical perturbations in the model. We take advantage of these sensitivities in fully exploiting the synergistic information provided by the enhancement ratios that are indicative of combustion characteristic for a given location sampled by these space-based observations. Here, we introduce a two-step approach in optimizing anthropogenic CO2. This includes: 1) analysis of atmospheric CO2 distribution using multi--species DA, and 2) Bayesian synthesis time-independent inversion using the CO2 analysis as observational constraints. We evaluate the performance of this approach within an OSSE framework, where one realization of simulated atmosphere is assumed to be the 'truth'. Synthetic observations are then derived from this atmosphere using sampling and error characteristics of the retrievals. The assimilation of these synthetic observations will be evaluated based on how well the analysis reproduce the 'true' anthropogenic CO2. Initial results will be presented comparing the relative contributions of different satellite retrievals in constraining anthropogenic CO2. We will also discuss appropriate sampling characteristics to this effect.

  13. Solar energy microclimate as determined from satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonder Haar, T. H.; Ellis, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    A method is presented for determining solar insolation at the earth's surface using satellite broadband visible radiance and cloud imagery data, along with conventional in situ measurements. Conventional measurements are used to both tune satellite measurements and to develop empirical relationships between satellite observations and surface solar insolation. Cloudiness is the primary modulator of sunshine. The satellite measurements as applied in this method consider cloudiness both explicitly and implicitly in determining surface solar insolation at space scales smaller than the conventional pyranometer network.

  14. Satellite observations of a monsoon depression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, C.

    1984-01-01

    The exploration of a monsoon depression over Burma and the Bay of Bengal is discussed. Aircraft and satellite data were examined, with an emphasis on the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) aboard TIROS-N and the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) aboard Nimbus-7. The structure of the monsoon depression was found to be dominated by cumulus convection. The only systematic large scale behavior discerned was a propagation of the depression westward, and diurnal migration of contours of brightness temperature. These contours in the middle troposphere showed a gradient toward the north with the patterns migrating northward at night. From SMMR and dropwindsonde data, water vapor contents were found to be near 65 mm, increasing to more than 70 mm in the northeast Bay of Bengal. Cloud water contents reached about three mm. Rainfall rates exceeding 5.7 mm/h occurred over a small part of the storm area, while mean rainfall rates in areas of order 20,000 sq km reached approximately 0.5 mm/h. Measured MSU brightness temperatures were reconciled very well with dropwindsonde data and with airborne in situ observations of clouds (by photography) and hydrometeors (by radar). Diffuse scattering was determined to be important in computing brightness temperature.

  15. Seasat-A - An ocean observation satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, F. L.; Mccandless, S. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Mission details, onboard equipment, and measurements to be taken are described for the Seasat-A global ocean monitoring satellite. The satellite is designed for mapping the global ocean geoid, charting ice fields and leads, precision measurement of sea surface topography, global monitoring of wave height and wave directional spectra, surface winds and wind direction, current patterns, and ocean temperature. Data handling subsystems, a compressed pulse radar altimeter, coherent synthetic aperture imaging radar, microwave wind scatterometer, scanning visible/IR radiometer, scanning multispectral (5 freq) microwave radiometer mounted on the satellite are described briefly.

  16. Operational Applications of Satellite Snowcover Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rango, A. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    LANDSAT and NOAA satellites data were used to study snow depth. These snow measurements were used to help forecast runoff and flooding. Many areas of California, Arizona, Colorado, and Wyoming were emphasized.

  17. Evaluating NOx Emissions Using Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, G. J.; Kim, S.; Brioude, J.; McKeen, S. A.; Trainer, M.; Heckel, A.; Hilboll, A.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J. P.; Gleason, J. F.; Boersma, K. F.; Hsie, E.; Lee, S.; Angevine, W. M.; Granier, C.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric NO2 columns retrieved from satellites can provide a useful top-down assessment of bottom-up NOx emissions inventories. We present three case studies of an approach to evaluate NOx emissions at a sector level by comparing satellite retrievals to regional chemical-transport model calculations of NO2 columns. In the first example, the atmospheric impact of implementing NOx controls at eastern US power plants is demonstrated. In the second study, we use NOx monitors at western US power plants to calibrate our satellite-model comparisons. We then apply our approach to evaluate bottom-up estimates of NOx emissions from western US cities. In the third example, we validate our satellite-model approach using in-situ aircraft measurements and assess NOx emissions from power plants, cities, industrial facilities, and ports in eastern Texas. We conclude with some general insights on the usefulness of this approach and suggestions for future areas of research.

  18. Evaluating NOx Emissions Using Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, G. J.; Kim, S.; Trainer, M.; McKeen, S. A.; Lee, S.; Hsie, E.; Heckel, A.; Hilboll, A.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J. P.; Gleason, J. F.; Boersma, F. F.; Granier, C.; Ryerson, T. B.; Peischl, J.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric NO2 columns retrieved from satellites can provide a useful top-down assessment of bottom-up NOx emissions inventories. We present three case studies of an approach to evaluate NOx emissions at a sector level by comparing satellite retrievals to regional chemical-transport model calculations of NO2 columns. In the first example, the atmospheric impact of implementing NOx controls at eastern US power plants is demonstrated. In the second study, we use NOx monitors at western US power plants to calibrate our satellite-model comparisons. We then apply our approach to evaluate bottom-up estimates of NOx emissions from western US cities. In the third example, we validate our satellite-model approach using in-situ aircraft measurements and assess NOx emissions from power plants, cities, industrial facilities, and ports in eastern Texas. We conclude with some general insights on the usefulness of this approach and suggestions for future areas of research.

  19. Monitoring Lake and Reservoir Level: Satellite Observations, Modeling and Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricko, M.; Birkett, C. M.; Adler, R. F.; Carton, J.

    2013-12-01

    Satellite measurements of lake and reservoir water levels complement in situ observations by providing stage information for un-gauged basins and by filling data gaps in gauge records. However, different satellite radar altimeter-derived continental water level products may differ significantly owing to choice of satellites and data processing methods. To explore the impacts of these differences, a direct comparison between three different altimeter-based surface water level estimates (USDA/NASA GRLM, LEGOS and ESA-DMU) will be presented and products validated with lake level gauge time series for lakes and reservoirs of a variety of sizes and conditions. The availability of satellite-based rainfall (i.e., TRMM and GPCP) and satellite-based lake/reservoir levels offers exciting opportunities to estimate and monitor the hydrologic properties of the lake systems. Here, a simple water balance model is utilized to relate net freshwater flux on a catchment basin to lake/reservoir level. Focused on tropical lakes and reservoirs it allows a comparison of the flux to altimetric lake level estimates. The combined use of model, satellite-based rainfall, evaporation information and reanalysis products, can be used to output water-level hindcasts and seasonal future forecasts. Such a tool is fundamental for understanding present-day and future variations in lake/reservoir levels and enabling a better understand of climatic variations on inter-annual to inter-decadal time-scales. New model-derived water level estimates of lakes and reservoirs, on regional to global scales, would assist communities with interests in climate studies focusing on extreme events, such as floods and droughts, and be important for water resources management.

  20. Observations of the Climate System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, Piers J.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of the climate system are critical for model validation and initialization, and also for monitoring in case of "surprises." Presently. we are still benefiting from data provided by the international fleet of Earth Observing satellites launched from the late 1990's onwards as well as from the longer-term record provided hy the operational meteorological satellites. However, we could be facing some data gaps in the near term in some critical areas. In situ measurements continue to be vital and, while they may be augmented hy future satellite measurements, will continue to be irreplaceable.

  1. Observations of the second Chinese satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, G. E.

    1987-11-01

    Softwave transmissions on two frequencies were received following the launch of the second Chinese satellite. The 20.009 MHz transmission was powered by chemical batteries mounted on the final stage of the launch vehicle and ceased within one month of the launch. The 19.995 MHz transmission was powered by solar cells mounted on the satellie and continued until the satellite decayed after more than eight years in orbit. Analysis of this transmission reveals that active thermal control was employed.

  2. The Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, Lisa Robock

    1992-01-01

    The restructuring of the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS), designed to provide comprehensive long term observations from space of changes occurring on the Earth from natural and human causes in order to have a sound scientific basis for policy decisions on protection of the future, is reported. In response to several factors, the original program approved in the fiscal year 1991 budget was restructured and somewhat reduced in scope. The resulting program uses three different sized launch vehicles to put six different spacecraft in orbit in the first phase, followed by two replacement launches for each of five of the six satellites to maintain a long term observing capability to meet the needs of global climate change research and other science objectives. The EOS system, including the space observatories, the data and information system, and the interdisciplinary global change research effort, are approved and proceeding. Elements of EOS are already in place, such as the research investigations and initial data system capabilities. The flights of precursor satellite and Shuttle missions, the ongoing data analysis, and the evolutionary enhancements to the integrated Earth science data management capabilities are all important building blocks to the full EOS program.

  3. Small Aperture Telescope Observations of Co-located Geostationary Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, R.; Wallace, B.

    As geostationary orbit (GEO) continues to be populated, satellite operators are increasing usage of co-location techniques to maximize usage of fewer GEO longitude slots. Co-location is an orbital formation strategy where two or more geostationary satellites reside within one GEO stationkeeping box. The separation strategy used to prevent collision between the co-located satellites generally uses eccentricity (radial separation) and inclination (latitude separation) vector offsets. This causes the satellites to move in relative motion ellipses about each other as the relative longitude drift between the satellites is near zero. Typical separations between the satellites varies from 1 to 100 kilometers. When co-located satellites are observed by optical ground based space surveillance sensors the participants appear to be separated by a few minutes of arc or less in angular extent. Under certain viewing geometries, these satellites appear to visually conjunct even though the satellites are, in fact, well separated spatially. In situations where one of the co-located satellites is more optically reflective than the other, the reflected sunglint from the more reflective satellite can overwhelm the other. This less frequently encountered issue causes the less reflective satellite to be glint masked in the glare of the other. This paper focuses on space surveillance observations on co-located Canadian satellites using a small optical telescope operated by Defence R&D Canada - Ottawa. The two above mentioned problems (cross tagging and glint masking) are investigated and we quantify the results for Canadian operated geostationary satellites. The performance of two line element sets when making in-frame CCD image correlation between the co-located satellites is also examined. Relative visual magnitudes between the co-located members are also inspected and quantified to determine the susceptibility of automated telescopes to glint masking of co-located satellite members.

  4. Mapping of satellite Earth observations using moving window block kriging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadić, J. M.; Qiu, X.; Yadav, V.; Michalak, A. M.

    2015-10-01

    Global gridded maps (a.k.a. Level 3 products) of Earth system properties observed by satellites are central to understanding the spatiotemporal variability of these properties. They also typically serve either as inputs into biogeochemical models or as independent data for evaluating such models. Spatial binning is a common method for generating contiguous maps, but this approach results in a loss of information, especially when the measurement noise is low relative to the degree of spatiotemporal variability. Such "binned" fields typically also lack a quantitative measure of uncertainty. Geostatistical mapping has previously been shown to make higher spatiotemporal resolution maps possible, and also provides a measure uncertainty associated with the gridded products. This study proposes a flexible moving window block kriging method that can be used as a tool for creating high spatiotemporal resolution maps from satellite data. It relies only on the assumption that the observed physical quantity exhibits spatial correlation that can be inferred from the observations. The method has several innovations relative to previously applied methods: (1) it provides flexibility in the spatial resolution of the contiguous maps, (2) it is applicable for physical quantities with varying spatiotemporal coverage (i.e., density of measurements) by utilizing a more general and versatile data sampling approach, and (3) it provides rigorous assessments of the uncertainty associated with the gridded products. The method is demonstrated by creating Level 3 products from observations of column-integrated carbon dioxide (XCO2) from the GOSAT (Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite) satellite, and solar induced fluorescence (SIF) from the GOME-2 (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2) instrument.

  5. Thermal satellite and ground observations in Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronin, A. A.; Molchanov, O. A.; Biagi, P. F.

    2003-04-01

    The numerous observations of thermal anomalies related with seismic activity all over the world is reported. Satellite NOAA/AVHRR data and well observations in Kamchatka peninsula, Far East, Russia were analysed together. This region is remarkable for high seismicity, volcanic activity, geothermal fields, geysers, complex relief and bad weather conditions. Water temperature, debit and pH changes were observed as a response on seismic events in three deep boreholes near Petropavlovsk-Kamchatski. The reaction of thermal anomalies on three strong earthquakes was recorded. Mostly the thermal anomaly was located in the central part of the peninsula in the basin of Kamchatka river. The valley of Kamchatka river is famous artesian basin with numerous hot springs situated on the "thermal lines". Results of thermal anomaly investigations in Kamchatka indicate: 1) the anomalies appeared about 4-7 days before and continued about a few days after earthquake (after-effects of earthquakes in China and Middle Asia are one or two weeks); 2) the anomaly was sensitive to crust earthquakes with a magnitude more than 6 and for distance of up to 500 km, no reaction to deep earthquakes; 3) the size of anomaly is about 180 km in length and 74 km in width, 4) the amplitude of the anomaly vary from 2 to 10 C; 4) thermal anomaly has mosaic internal structure with average element size about 40x130 km; 5) the response of water in wells and surface temperature in thermal anomaly on earthquake looks similar; 6) we can recommend to set ground test site in the basin of Kamchatka river. New model of litho-atmo-ionospheric coupling in seismic processes is proposed. We guess the ascending fluid is essential part of the seismic processes. Depending on geological and tectonic situation, near the surface, on the depth a few kilometres, the fluid is divided on water and gas. The water causes change of debit and chemical composition in wells and springs. This way heat, water vapour, gas reaches the Earth surface. As a result of gas and water appearance on the surface we will find the change in temperature, humidity and atmospheric pressure in surface air. Thermal anomalies are considered as one of the possible source of gravity waves in atmosphere. Gravity waves are able to explain the "seismic" change in stratosphere: ozone concentration and high clouds, and ionosphere: ion concentration and temperature.

  6. Dynamic behaviour of the tethered satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibrario, B.; Musetti, B.

    1993-09-01

    The first Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1) was developed under the management of NASA and ASI; Alenia was responsible for the Sub-Satellite design and integration and Martin Marietta for the tether deployer system and for the overall system integration. The TSS-1 was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-46 mission) on July 31, 1992. It was planned to deploy, from the top of a 12 m boom, up to a total tether length of 20 km, then to remain on station while performing some scientific experiments, finally to retrieve back to the boom tip, with an intermediate stop and station at 2.4 km for further science activities. During the attempted on-orbit operations, the Tethered Satellite System failed to deploy successfully beyond 257 m. Five main anomalies occurred during the mission: (1) initial failure to retract the U2 umbilical (connecting the Sub-Satellite to the Deployer Boom); (2) initial failure to flyaway (i.e. no Sub-Satellite motion when the flyaway procedure was initiated); (3) unplanned tether deployment stop at 179 m; (4) after resuming of deployment, unplanned tether deployment stop at 257 m; (5) after the decision to abort the mission and to retrieve the Sub-Satellite, sticking of the system at 224 m (i.e. failure to move tether in either direction). Nevertheless, in spite of the largely off-nominal mission profile (almost solely due to Deployer System malfunc- tions), the observed dynamics is quite meaningful and allows an experimental validation of the TSS-1 mathematical model, in view of a reflight.

  7. The Chinese FY-1 Meteorological Satellite Application in Observation on Oceanic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weimin, S.

    meteorological satellite is stated in this paper. exploration of the ocean resources has been a very important question of global strategy in the world. The exploration of the ocean resources includes following items: Making full use of oceanic resources and space, protecting oceanic environment. to observe the ocean is by using of satellite. In 1978, US successfully launched the first ocean observation satellite in the world --- Sea Satellite. It develops ancient oceanography in to advanced space-oceanography. FY-1 B and FY- IC respectively. High quality data were acquired at home and abroad. FY-1 is Chinese meteorological satellite, but with 0.43 ~ 0.48 ?m ,0.48 ~ 0.53 ?m and 0.53 ~ 0.58 ?m three ocean color channels, actually it is a multipurpose remote sensing satellite of meteorology and oceanography. FY-1 satellite's capability of observation on ocean partly, thus the application field is expanded and the value is increased. With the addition of oceanic channels on FY-1, the design of the satellite is changed from the original with meteorological observation as its main purpose into remote sensing satellite possessing capability of observing meteorology and ocean as well. Thus, the social and economic benefit of FY-1 is increased. the social and economic benefit of the development of the satellite is the key technique in the system design of the satellite. technically feasible but also save the funds in researching and manufacturing of the satellite, quicken the tempo of researching and manufacturing satellite. the scanning radiometer for FY-1 is conducted an aviation experiment over Chinese ocean. This experiment was of vital importance to the addition of oceanic observation channel on FY-1. FY-1 oceanic channels design to be correct. detecting ocean color. This is the unique character of Chinese FY-1 meteorological satellite. meteorological remote sensing channel on FY-1 to form detecting capability of three visible channels: red, yellow and blue spectrum bands. Thus FY-1 satellite can be used for observation on ocean color experiment. This experiment is successful, a lot of data were acquired. Good application results were obtained in the field of oceanic science research. Therefore, it makes FY-1 a remote sensing satellite used for observation on meteorology and ocean. This is the unique character of Chinese FY-1 meteorological satellite, it is widely noticed all over the world. Chinese meteorological satellite has been realized the aim of using one satellite for multipurpose applications and brought more and more social and economic benefit. oceanic channel in Chinese meteorological satellites is also foreseen to expand the application field in Chinese meteorological satellites. Key Word : Meteorological Satellite Oceanic Remote Sensing

  8. Design and performances of laser retro-reflector arrays for Beidou navigation satellites and SLR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhong-Ping; Zhang, Hai-Feng; Chen, Wan-Zhen; Li, Pu; Meng, Wen-Dong; Wang, Yuan-Ming; Wang, Jie; Hu, Wei; Yang, Fu-Min

    2014-09-01

    Beidou is the regional satellite navigation system in China, consisting of three kinds of orbiting satellites, MEO, GEO and IGSO, with the orbital altitudes of 21500-36000 km. For improving the accuracy of satellites orbit determination, calibrating microwave measuring techniques and providing better navigation service, all Beidou satellites are equipped with laser retro-reflector arrays (LRAs) to implement high precision laser ranging. The paper presents the design of LRAs for Beidou navigation satellites and the method of inclined installation of LRAs for GEO satellites to increase the effective reflective areas for the regional ground stations. By using the SLR system, the observations for Beidou satellites demonstrated a precision of centimeters. The performances of these LRAs on Beidou satellites are very excellent.

  9. Assessing the impact of satellite, aircraft, and surface observations on CO2 flux estimation using an ensemble-based 4-D data assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Kazuyuki; Maki, Takashi; Patra, Prabir; Nakazawa, Takakiyo

    2011-08-01

    The potential impacts of various types of CO2 concentration data obtained from surface, satellite (by the GOSAT project), and aircraft (by the CONTRAIL project) measurements on the estimation of surface CO2 fluxes have been investigated using an ensemble-based data assimilation approach. A four-dimensional ensemble Kalman filter with a 3 day assimilation window was used for analyzing surface fluxes of CO2 at every model grid point (horizontal resolution of 2.8). Observation system simulation experiments have demonstrated a way to make efficient use of various observations and have shown that conventional surface network data contribute to large flux error reductions in the continental areas of the northern extratropics, while GOSAT XCO2 and CONTRAIL profile data provide strong additional constraints. The GOSAT data show a large error reduction over North and South America, South Africa, and temperate and boreal Asia, but the correction in tropical fluxes is lower than expected because of the poor data coverage caused by cloud abstraction. The CONTRAIL data provide large error reductions over Europe and tropical and temperate Asia. The assimilation of the upper tropospheric data gathered by CONTRAIL results in distinct error reductions over Siberia. By combining the information obtained from all the data sets, the global flux estimation is significantly improved. Meanwhile, many sources of error in the observations and the transport model strongly decrease the usefulness of each observation, and this can become a limiting factor in real data assimilation; for example, realistic systematic errors in the GOSAT data can reduce their usefulness by a factor of 2.

  10. Satellite data assimilation in global forecast system in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Swati

    2014-11-01

    Satellite data is very important for model initialization and verification. A large number of satellite observations are currently assimilated into the Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) systems at the National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (NCMRWF). Apart from Global meteorological observations from GTS, near-real time satellite observations are received at NCMRWF from other operational centres like ISRO, NOAA/NESDIS, EUMETCAST, etc. Recently India has become member of Asia-Pacific Regional ATOVS Retransmission Service (APRARS) for faster access to high resolution global satellite data useful for high resolution regional models. Indian HRPT at Chennai covers the APRARS data gap region over South East Asia. A robust data monitoring system has been implemented at NCMRWF to assess the quantity and quality of the data as well as the satellite sensor strength, before getting assimilated in the models. Validation of new satellite observations, especially from Indian satellites are being carried out against insitu observations and similar space borne platforms. After establishing the quality of the data, Observation System Experiments (OSEs) are being conducted to study their impact in the assimilation and forecast systems. OSEs have been carried out with the Oceansat-2 scatterometer winds and radiance data from Megha-Tropiques SAPHIR sensor. Daily rainfall analysis dataset is being generated by merging satellite estimates and in-situ observations. ASCAT soil wetness measurements from METOP satellite is being assimilated into the global model. Land surface parameters (LuLc and albedo) retrieved from Indian satellites are being explored for its possible usage in the global and regional models. OLR from Indian satellites are used for validating model outputs. This paper reviews the efforts made at NCMRWF in (i) assimilating the data from Indian/International satellites and (ii) generating useful products from the satellite data.

  11. Dynamics of satellite separation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyakumar, D.; Rao, B. Nageswara

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents the coordinate systems; coordinate transformations and equations of motion useful for the design and analysis of satellite separation system using the helical compression spring mechanism. A fourth-order Runge-Kutta method is adopted to solve the non-linear ordinary differential equations of motion to obtain the 12 degrees of freedom for the separating bodies, for the specified dynamic parameters. A reliable statistical approach is followed to account the variations in the specified dynamic parameters. The tolerances in the magnitude of the body rates, relative velocity and relative distance between the separating bodies are presented for use in the design to achieve the desired separation system.

  12. Mobile satellite systems. A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, J. L.; Breithaupt, R. W.

    The advantages of a mobile satellite system have been recognized worldwide, and after the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC) identified spectrum in the 806 to 890 MHz band for region 2, the Canadian Government quickly took steps to provide mobile satellite services for all of Canada including the 200 mile offshore ocean territorial limits. A comprehensive set of technical, economic, and policy studies have been completed in Canada to determine the viability of a mobile service to satisfy Canada's requirements. This paper will present an overall review of these studies, give a rationale as to why narrowband technologies are necessary for the commercial viability of this service, and the approach taken in the development of these technologies. A brief review of activities and proposed mobile satellite systems in other areas besides North America is also given. The effect of an early entry by commercial interests (Telesat in Canada) will be examined including system parameters which require careful coordination within Canada and the U.S. operations in order to assure commercial viability in both countries. A review of some common requirements in the Canadian and U.S. systems will be discussed in order to standardize the system and equipment approaches for each country and provide mutual back-up in the event of a spacecraft anomaly. The trade-offs between the use of UHF (800 MHz) and L-Band (1.5 GHz) when used for true mobile applications are discussed. A hybrid system design is explored which would make the most appropriate use of both bands.

  13. Trajectory design for the GEO Debris Observation Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Toru; Takano, Akira

    2001-10-01

    The satellite and debris environment in GEO (Geostationary Satellite orbit) region is also as serious as in the LEO (Low Earth Orbit). In this respect, there has been a need for improved surveillance of objects in the GEO region. In NASDA, a conceptual study has been carried out on the on-orbit debris observation system. In this study, we had designed its trajectories in two types. One is "Near-Geostationary Satellite Orbit (NGEO)" and the other is "Fixed Apsis High Eccentricity Elliptical Recurrent Orbit (HERO)". NGEO orbit is a candidate for circular orbit of 500 km to 1000 km lower than GEO orbit. Using this orbit, whole of the GEO region could be monitored with sufficiency long observation time. The HERO orbit has high eccentricity and high inclination crossing the GEO ring at the apogee point. This orbital apsis line does not move in the orbit plane virtually because it has optimum inclination with J2 term effect. In this paper, we will explain these 2 types of orbits.

  14. Satellite operations support expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Satellite Operations Support Expert System is an effort to identify aspects of satellite ground support activity which could profitably be automated with artificial intelligence (AI) and to develop a feasibility demonstration for the automation of one such area. The hydrazine propulsion subsystems (HPS) of the International Sun Earth Explorer (ISEE) and the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUS) were used as applications domains. A demonstration fault handling system was built. The system was written in Franz Lisp and is currently hosted on a VAX 11/750-11/780 family machine. The system allows the user to select which HPS (either from ISEE or IUE) is used. Then the user chooses the fault desired for the run. The demonstration system generates telemetry corresponding to the particular fault. The completely separate fault handling module then uses this telemetry to determine what and where the fault is and how to work around it. Graphics are used to depict the structure of the HPS, and the telemetry values displayed on the screen are continually updated. The capabilities of this system and its development cycle are described.

  15. Outline of the survey on the development of earth observation satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    An independent earth observation system with land and sea satellites to be developed by Japan is described. Visible and infrared radiometers, microwave radiometers, microwave scattermeters, synthetic aperture radar, and laser sensors are among the instrumentation discussed. Triaxial attitude control, basic technology common to sea and land observation satellites as well as land data analytical technology developed for U.S. LANDSAT data are reviewed.

  16. Satellite Observed Changes in the Arctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Josefino C.; Parkinson, Claire L.

    2004-01-01

    The Arctic is currently considered an area in transformation. Glaciers have been retreating, permafrost has been diminishing, snow covered areas have been decreasing, and sea ice and ice sheets have been thinning. This paper provides an overview of the unique role that satellite sensors have contributed in the detection of changes in the Arctic and demonstrates that many of the changes are not just local but a pan-Arctic phenomenon. Changes from the upper atmosphere to the surface are discussed and it is apparent that the magnitude of the trends tends to vary from region to region and from season to season. Previous reports of a warming Arctic and a retreating perennial ice cover have also been updated, and results show that changes are ongoing. Feedback effects that can lead to amplification of the signals and the role of satellite data in enhancing global circulation models are also discussed.

  17. The Nimbus satellites - Pioneering earth observers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Carolynne

    1990-01-01

    The many scientific achievements of the Nimbus series of seven satellites for low-altitude atmospheric research and global weather surveillance are reviewed. The series provides information on fishery resources, weather modeling, atmospheric pollution monitoring, earth's radiation budget, ozone monitoring, ocean dynamics, and the effects of cloudiness. Data produced by the forty-eight instruments and sensors flown on the satellites are applied in the fields of oceanography, hydrology, geology, geomorphology, geography, cartography, agriculture and meteorology. The instruments include the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (which depicts phytoplankton concentrations in coastal areas), the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (which measures sea-surface temperatures and sea-surface wind-speed), and the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (which provides information on total amounts of ozone in the earth's atmosphere).

  18. The systems background for satellite communication antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnbak, J. C.

    The major elements of the operational environment of satellite communication antennas are reviewed, including: perturbations and stationkeeping in the geostationary orbit; antenna tracking on earth-satellite links; earth-terminal off-axis limitations; satellite link budgets; multiple access and satellite antennas; and the specification of satellite antennas. Also given are definitions and formulas which are intended to provide general guidance and show major constraints relevant at all stages of antenna engineering for satellite systems. Two main trends in satellite communication antenna technology are noted: (1) an increasing impact of general system requirements on the specific design and operational exploitation of antennas in satellite systems; and (2) more emphasis on adaptive, flexible, or multipurpose antenna systems.

  19. Exploiting Satellite Observations in the Development of Global Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pincus, R.

    2014-12-01

    This talk will highlight promising recent directions in the use of satellite observations to inform the development of global weather prediction and climate models. Examples include the development of skill measures that explicitly account for observational uncertainty across the phase space of the observations, the wealth of comparisons made possible by longer records from space-borne lidars and radars, and the use of satellite observations to explore the possible impacts of missing processes such as mesoscale organization of convection.

  20. Automated satellite telemetry processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parunakian, David; Kalegaev, Vladimir; Barinova, Vera

    In this paper we describe the design and important implementation details of the new automated system for processing satellite telemetry developedat Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of Moscow State University (SINP MSU) . We discuss the most common tasks and pitfall for such systems built around data stream from a single spacecraft or a single instrument, and suggest a solution that allows to quickly develop telemetry processing modules and to integrate them with an existing polling mechanism, support infrastructure and data storage in Oracle or MySQL database systems. We also demonstrate the benefits of this approach using modules for processing three different spacecraft data streams: Coronas-Photon (2009-003A), Tatiana-2 (2009-049D) and Meteor-M no.1 (2009-049A). The data format and protocols used by each of these spacecraft have distinct peculiarities, which nevertheless did not pose a problem for integrating their modules into the main system. Remote access via web interface to Oracle databases and sophisticated visualization tools create a possibility of efficient scientific exploitation of satellite data. Such a system is already deployed at the web portal of the Space Monitoring Data Center (SMDC) of SINP MSU (http://smdc.sinp.msu.ru).

  1. Satellite freeze forecast system: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martsolf, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    A satellite-based temperature monitoring and prediction system consisting of a computer controlled acquisition, processing, and display system and the ten automated weather stations called by that computer was developed and transferred to the national weather service. This satellite freeze forecasting system (SFFS) acquires satellite data from either one of two sources, surface data from 10 sites, displays the observed data in the form of color-coded thermal maps and in tables of automated weather station temperatures, computes predicted thermal maps when requested and displays such maps either automatically or manually, archives the data acquired, and makes comparisons with historical data. Except for the last function, SFFS handles these tasks in a highly automated fashion if the user so directs. The predicted thermal maps are the result of two models, one a physical energy budget of the soil and atmosphere interface and the other a statistical relationship between the sites at which the physical model predicts temperatures and each of the pixels of the satellite thermal map.

  2. Teledesic pushes $9-billion, 900-satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-03-01

    Teledesic Corp. is seeking FCC approval to deploy a communication satellite system, costing $9 billion and using more than 900 satellites in low Earth orbit. This system would provide telephone and broadband data service to remote areas and developing countries. The two major stockholders in Teledesic are William Gates (of Microsoft Corp.) and Craig McCaw (of McCaw Cellular Communications). Each satellite would act as a node in a packet-switching network. The satellites would provide continuous global coverage.

  3. Studies of the major planet satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H.; Lowman, P. D.

    1974-01-01

    A summary is presented of the available data on the satellites of the major planets, including the currently most plausible models for several observed phenomena, for the planning of spacecraft missions to these objects. Some of the important questions likely to be solved by flyby and/or orbital missions to the giant planets are detailed, the importance of these studies to our understanding of the solar system as a whole is indicated.

  4. Satellite Atmosphere and Io Torus Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Nicholas M.

    2000-01-01

    Io is the most volcanically active body in the solar system, and it is embedded deep within the strongest magnetosphere of any planet. This combination of circumstances leads to a host of scientifically compelling phenomena, including (1) an atmosphere out of proportion with such a small object, (2) a correspondingly large atmospheric escape rate, (3) a ring of dense plasma locked in a feedback loop with the atmosphere, and (4) a host of Io-induced emissions from radio bursts to UV auroral spots on Jupiter. This proposal seeks to continue our investigation into the physics connecting these phenomena, with emphasis on Io's atmosphere and plasma torus. The physical processes are clearly of interest for Io, and also other places in the solar system where they are important but not readily observable.

  5. Tethered Satellite System Contingency Investigation Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1) was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-46) on July 31, 1992. During the attempted on-orbit operations, the Tethered Satellite System failed to deploy successfully beyond 256 meters. The satellite was retrieved successfully and was returned on August 6, 1992. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Associate Administrator for Space Flight formed the Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1) Contingency Investigation Board on August 12, 1992. The TSS-1 Contingency Investigation Board was asked to review the anomalies which occurred, to determine the probable cause, and to recommend corrective measures to prevent recurrence. The board was supported by the TSS Systems Working group as identified in MSFC-TSS-11-90, 'Tethered Satellite System (TSS) Contingency Plan'. The board identified five anomalies for investigation: initial failure to retract the U2 umbilical; initial failure to flyaway; unplanned tether deployment stop at 179 meters; unplanned tether deployment stop at 256 meters; and failure to move tether in either direction at 224 meters. Initial observations of the returned flight hardware revealed evidence of mechanical interference by a bolt with the level wind mechanism travel as well as a helical shaped wrap of tether which indicated that the tether had been unwound from the reel beyond the travel by the level wind mechanism. Examination of the detailed mission events from flight data and mission logs related to the initial failure to flyaway and the failure to move in either direction at 224 meters, together with known preflight concerns regarding slack tether, focused the assessment of these anomalies on the upper tether control mechanism. After the second meeting, the board requested the working group to complete and validate a detailed integrated mission sequence to focus the fault tree analysis on a stuck U2 umbilical, level wind mechanical interference, and slack tether in upper tether control mechanism and to prepare a detailed plan for hardware inspection, test, and analysis including any appropriate hardware disassembly.

  6. Co-ordination of satellite and data programs: The committee on earth observation satellites' approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embleton, B. J. J.; Kingwell, J.

    1997-01-01

    Every year, an average of eight new civilian remote sensing satellite missions are launched. Cumulatively, over 250 such missions, each with a cost equivalent in current value to between US 100 million to US 1000 million, have been sponsored by space agencies in perhaps two dozen countries. These missions produce data and information products which are vital for informed decision making all over the world, on matters relating to natural resource exploitation, health and safety, sustainable national development, infrastructure planning, and a host of other applications. By contributing to better scientific understanding of global changes in the atmosphere, land surface, oceans and ice caps, these silently orbiting sentinels in the sky make it possible for governments and industries to make wiser environmental policy decisions and support the economic development needs of humanity. The international Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) is the premier world body for co-ordinating and planning civilian satellite missions for Earth observation. Through its technical working groups and special task teams, it endeavours to: maximise the international benefits from Earth observation satellites; and harmonise practice in calibration, validation, data management and information systems for Earth observation. CEOS encompasses not only space agencies (data providers), but also the great international scientific and operational programs which rely on Earth science data from space. The user organisations affiliated with CEOS, together with the mission operators, attempt to reconcile user needs with the complex set of considerations including national interests, cost, schedule which affect the undertaking of space missions. Without such an internationally co-ordinated consensual approach, there is a much greater risk of waste through duplication, and of missed opportunity, or through the absence of measurements of some vital physical or biological parameter by space borne sensors. Mechanisms used by CEOS to carry out these tasks are built upon consensus and understanding, as well as on technology transfer between countries. An area of recent heightened endeavour in CEOS has been to determine and address the special needs of developing countries in respect of Earth observation data. In the next several years, a new wave of Earth observation will break, as the private sector, revitalised with decommissioned military technology, brings exciting new capabilities to international remote sensing. With rapidly burgeoning markets in spatial information or geomatics, as well as the continuing thirst of science programs for spatial information, there is a challenge upon the international space community to reassess continually, the most expedient and socially constructive means of making available in a fair and open way, geographically-reference information obtained with space observation systems.

  7. Costing the satellite power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazelrigg, G. A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents a methodology for satellite power system costing, places approximate limits on the accuracy possible in cost estimates made at this time, and outlines the use of probabilistic cost information in support of the decision-making process. Reasons for using probabilistic costing or risk analysis procedures instead of standard deterministic costing procedures are considered. Components of cost, costing estimating relationships, grass roots costing, and risk analysis are discussed. Risk analysis using a Monte Carlo simulation model is used to estimate future costs.

  8. Satellite voice broadcast system study, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstein, M.

    1985-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of providing Voice of America (VOA) broadcasts by satellite relay, rather than via terrestrial relay stations. Satellite voice broadcast systems are described for three different frequency bands: HF (26 MHz), VHF (68 MHz), and L-band (1.5 GHz). The geographical areas of interest at HF and L-band include all major land masses worldwide with the exception of the U.S., Canada, and Australia. Geostationary satellite configurations are considered for both frequency bands. In addition, a system of subsynchronous, circular satellites with an orbit period of 8 hours is developed for the HF band. VHF broadcasts, which are confined to the Soviet Union, are provied by a system of Molniya satellites. Satellites intended for HF or VHF broadcastinbg are extremely large and heavy. Satellite designs presented here are limited in size and weight to the capability of the STS/Centaur launch vehicle combination. Even so, at HF it would take 47 geostationary satellites or 20 satellites in 8-hour orbits to fully satisfy the voice-channel requirements of the broadcast schedule provided by VOA. On the other hand, three Molniya satellites suffice for the geographically restricted schedule at VHF. At L-band, only four geostationary satellites are needed to meet the requirements of the complete broadcast schedule. Moreover, these satellites are comparable in size and weight to current satellites designed for direct broadcast of video program material.

  9. Assessment of Global Annual Atmospheric Energy Balance from Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Stackhouse, Paul; Minnis, Patrick; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Sun, Wenbo; Fan, Tai-Fang (Alice); Hinkelman, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Global atmospheric energy balance is one of the fundamental processes for the earth's climate system. This study uses currently available satellite data sets of radiative energy at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface and latent and sensible heat over oceans for the year 2000 to assess the global annual energy budget. Over land, surface radiation data are used to constrain assimilated results and to force the radiation, turbulent heat, and heat storage into balance due to a lack of observation-based turbulent heat flux estimations. Global annual means of the TOA net radiation obtained from both direct measurements and calculations are close to zero. The net radiative energy fluxes into the surface and the surface latent heat transported into the atmosphere are about 113 and 86 Watts per square meter, respectively. The estimated atmospheric and surface heat imbalances are about -8 9 Watts per square meter, values that are within the uncertainties of surface radiation and sea surface turbulent flux estimates and likely systematic biases in the analyzed observations. The potential significant additional absorption of solar radiation within the atmosphere suggested by previous studies does not appear to be required to balance the energy budget the spurious heat imbalances in the current data are much smaller (about half) than those obtained previously and debated at about a decade ago. Progress in surface radiation and oceanic turbulent heat flux estimations from satellite measurements significantly reduces the bias errors in the observed global energy budgets of the climate system.

  10. Land surface albedo based on GOES geostationary satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, J. L.; Lattanzio, A.; Hankins, B.; Knapp, K.; Privette, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    Land surface albedo is the fraction of incoming solar radiation reflected by the land surface, and therefore can be a sensitive indicator of environmental changes. To this end, surface albedo is identified as an Essential Climate Variable (ECV) by the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS). NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) recently adapted the Geostationary Surface Albedo (GSA; Lattanzio and Govaerts, 2010) algorithm for use with GOES data in support of a global albedo initiative led by the Sustained, Coordinated Processing of Environmental Satellite Data for Climate Monitoring (SCOPE-CM). SCOPE-CM helps coordinate ECV production responding to GCOS, WMO, and CEOS goals. The GSA algorithm was developed jointly by EUMETSAT and Joint Research Centre (JRC) using a method proposed by Pinty et al. (2000) to determine surface albedo using day-time, cloud-free geostationary observations from a single visible band. For the GOES implementation, raw GOES observations are calibrated using International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) coefficients. Surface angular anisotropy is determined through the inversion of the GSA radiative transfer model using multiple geostationary images collected over a day under different illumination conditions. The inversion process requires ancillary total column ozone and water vapor values, which are acquired from the 20th Century Reanalysis V2 data set. The GSA algorithm produces a 10-day composite surface albedo map. This product is initially being developed for the years 2000-2003. Product quality is being assessed through comparisons with MODIS products as well as ground-based measurements. NCDC is producing albedo products from both GOES-E (75W) and GOES-W (135W). These are being merged with like products from EUMETSAT based on METEOSAT (0 and 63E) and from JMA based on the Geostationary Meteorological Satellite System (140E). In the near future, NOAA's Climate Data Record Program will provide the albedo product over the entire GOES period of record (1978-present).

  11. Assimilation of GOES satellite-based convective initiation and cloud growth observations into the Rapid Refresh and HRRR systems to improve aviation forecast guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecikalski, John; Smith, Tracy; Weygandt, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Latent heating profiles derived from GOES satellite-based cloud-top cooling rates are being assimilated into a retrospective version of the Rapid Refresh system (RAP) being run at the Global Systems Division. Assimilation of these data may help reduce the time lag for convection initiation (CI) in both the RAP model forecasts and in 3-km High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) model runs that are initialized off of the RAP model grids. These data may also improve both the location and organization of developing convective storm clusters, especially in the nested HRRR runs. These types of improvements are critical for providing better convective storm guidance around busy hub airports and aviation corridor routes, especially in the highly congested Ohio Valley - Northeast - Mid-Atlantic region. Additional work is focusing on assimilating GOES-R CI algorithm cloud-top cooling-based latent heating profiles directly into the HRRR model. Because of the small-scale nature of the convective phenomena depicted in the cloud-top cooling rate data (on the order of 1-4 km scale), direct assimilation of these data in the HRRR may be more effective than assimilation in the RAP. The RAP is an hourly assimilation system developed at NOAA/ESRL and was implemented at NCEP as a NOAA operational model in May 2012. The 3-km HRRR runs hourly out to 15 hours as a nest within the ESRL real-time experimental RAP. The RAP and HRRR both use the WRF ARW model core, and the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) is used within an hourly cycle to assimilate a wide variety of observations (including radar data) to initialize the RAP. Within this modeling framework, the cloud-top cooling rate-based latent heating profiles are applied as prescribed heating during the diabatic forward model integration part of the RAP digital filter initialization (DFI). No digital filtering is applied on the 3-km HRRR grid, but similar forward model integration with prescribed heating is used to assimilate information from radar reflectivity, lightning flash density and the satellite based cloud-top cooling rate data. In the current HRRR configuration, 4 15-min cycles of latent heating are applied during a pre-forecast hour of integration. This is followed by a final application of GSI at 3-km to fit the latest conventional observation data. At the conference, results from a 5-day retrospective period (July 5-10, 2012) will be shown, focusing on assessment of data impact for both the RAP and HRRR, as well as the sensitivity to various assimilation parameters, including assumed heating strength. Emphasis will be given to documenting the forecast impacts for aviation applications in the Eastern U.S.

  12. Visibility and Geometry of Global Satellite Navigation Systems Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszewski, Jacek

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays (November 2015) there are two global fully operational satellite navigation systems, American GPS and Russian GLONASS. Two next are under construction, Galileo in Europe and BeiDou in China. As the error of observer's position obtained from these systems depends on geometry factor DOP (Dilution Of Precision) among other things the knowledge of the number of satellites visible by this observer above given masking elevation angle Hmin and the distributions of DOP coefficient values, GDOP in particular, is very important. The lowest and the greatest number of satellites visible in open area by the observer at different latitudes for different Hmin, the percentage of satellites visible above angle H (9 intervals, each 10O wide), distributions (in per cent) of satellites azimuths (8 intervals, each 45O wide) and GDOP coefficient values (8 intervals) for Hmin = 5O for all these four systems at different observer's latitudes (9 intervals, each wide 10O wide) are presented in the paper. Additionally the lowest elevation for which the number of satellites visible at different latitudes by the observer in open area above this angle is equal 4 or 3 and the distributions (in per cent) of GDOP coefficient values for different Hmin at observer's latitudes 50-60O for the same four systems are showed. All calculations were made for constellation of GPS 27 satellites, GLONASS 24, Galileo 30 and BeiDou 27 MEO satellites.

  13. Economics of satellite communications systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, Wilbur L.

    This paper is partly a tutorial, telling systematically how one goes about calculating the total annual costs of a satellite communications system, and partly the expression of some original ideas on the choice of parameters so as to minimize these costs. The calculation of costs can be divided into two broad categories. The first is technical and is concerned with estimating what particular equipment will cost and what will be the annual expense to maintain and operate it. One starts in the estimation of any new system by listing the principal items of equipment, such as satellites, earth stations of various sizes and functions, telemetry and tracking equipment and terrestrial interfaces, and then estimating how much each item will cost. Methods are presented for generating such estimates, based on a knowledge of the gross parameters, such as antenna size, coverage area, transmitter power and information rate. These parameters determine the system performance and it is usually possible, knowing them, to estimate the costs of the equipment rather well. Some formulae based on regression analyses are presented. Methods are then given for estimating closely related expenses, such as maintenance and operation, and then an approximate method is developed for estimating terrestrial interconnection costs. It is pointed out that in specific cases when tariff and geographical information are available, it is usually better to work with specific data, but nonetheless it is often desirable, especially in global system estimating, to approximate these interconnect costs without recourse to individual tariffs. The procedure results in a set of costs for the purchase of equipment and its maintenance, and a schedule of payments. Some payments will be incurred during the manufacture of the satellite and before any systems operation, but many will not be incurred until the system is no longer in use, e.g. incentives. In any case, with the methods presented in the first section, one arrives at a schedule of costs and payments for all the items and the years in which they will be incurred. The second category of costing problems is one of financing or engineering economics. All the costs are first "present valued" to some reference period using rates of return appropriate to the particular situation. One finally arrives at sets of annual costs which can be used as the basis for setting lease costs or revenue requirements and tariffs. The correspondence between methods using discounted rates of return and capital recovery formulae on one hand and those using various depreciation schedules, such as is typical of regulated industries on the other hand, is discussed. The remainder of the paper is devoted to discussing the relationship between critical parameters, such as replacement schedules, design lifetime, satellite power and Earth station antenna size, and the overall costs. It is shown that optima for these parameters may exist and can be calculated. In particular, the optimization of satellite replacement schedules to minimize the present value of total investment over a very long period is presented, along with simplified versions of the theory suitable for system planning. The choice of EIRP is also discussed and a procedure for choosing the value that minimizes the costs is shown.

  14. Interactive analysis of a large aperture Earth observations satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, R. L.; Deryder, D. D.; Ferebee, M. J., Jr.; Smith, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    A system level design and analysis has been conducted on an Earth Observation Satellite (EOS) system using the Interactive Design and Evaluation of Advanced Spacecraft (IDEAS) computer-aided design and analysis program. The IDEAS program consists of about 40 user-friendly technical modules and an interactive graphics display. The reflector support system and feed mast of the EOS spacecraft are constructed with box-truss structural concept, a lattice configuration which can be packaged for delivery in a single Shuttle flight and deployed in orbit. The deployed spacecraft consists of a 120-m by 60-m parabolic focal axis. The spacecraft was modeled for structural, thermal, and control systems analysis and structural elements were designed. On-orbit dynamic and thermal loading analyses were conducted; spacecraft weights and developmental and first unit costs were determined.

  15. Interactive analysis of a large aperture Earth Observations Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, R. L.; Deryder, D. D.; Ferebee, M. J., Jr.; Smith, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    A system level design and analysis has been conducted on an Earth Observation Satellite (EOS) system using the Interactive Design and Evaluation of Advanced Spacecraft (IDEAS) computer-aided design and analysis program. The IDEAS program consists of about 40 user-friendly technical modules and an interactive graphics display. The reflector support system and feed mast of the EOS spacecraft are constructed with a box-truss structural concept, a lattice configuration which can be packaged for delivery in a single Shuttle flight and deployed in orbit. The deployed spacecraft consists of a 120-m by 60-m parabolic reflector, a 120-m-long support structure, and a 30-m feed arc beam on the focal axis. The spacecraft was modeled for structural, thermal, and control systems analysis and structural elements were designed. On-orbit dynamic and thermal loading analyses were conducted and spacecraft weights were determined.

  16. Developing a global aeronautical satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dement, Donald K.

    1988-01-01

    Arinc, an airline industry-owned and operated company in the United States, has taken steps toward establishing a global aeronautical satellite communications system. Plans call for initiation of a thin-route data operation in 1989, upgrading to establish voice communications via shared spot-beam transponders carried on other satellites, and deploying a worldwide network using dedicated satellites by 1994.

  17. The Use of a Parallel Data Processing and Error Analysis System (DPEAS) for the Observational Exploration of Complex Multi-Satellite Non-Gaussian Data Assimilation Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. S.; Fletcher, S. J.; Kidder, S. Q.; Forsythe, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The CSU/NOAA Data Processing and Error Analysis System (DPEAS) was created to merge, or blend, multiple satellite and model data sets within a single consistent framework. DPEAS is designed to be used at both research and operational facilities to facilitate Research-to-Operations technology transfers. The system supports massive parallelization via grid computing technologies, and hosts data fusion techniques for transference to 24/7 operations in a low cost computational environment. In this work, we highlight the data assimilation and data fusion methodologies of the DPEAS framework that facilitates new and complex multi-satellite non-Gaussian data assimilation algorithm developments. DPEAS is in current operational use at NOAA/NESDIS Office of Satellite and Product Operations (OSPO) and performs multi-product data fusion of global "blended" Total Precipitable Water (bTPW) and blended Rainfall Rate (bRR). In this work we highlight: 1) the current dynamic inter-satellite calibration processing performed within the DPEAS data fusion and error analysis, 2) as well as our DPEAS development plans for future blended products (AMSR-2 and Megha-Tropiques), and 3) layered TPW products using the NASA AIRS data for National Weather Service forecaster use via the NASA SPoRT facility at Huntsville, AL. We also discuss new system additions for cloud verification and prediction activities in collaboration with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), and planned use with the USAF Air Force Weather Agency's (AFWA) global Cloud Depiction and Forecast System (CDFS) facilities. Scientifically, we focus on the data fusion of atmospheric and land surface product information, including global cloud and water vapor data sets, soil moisture data, and specialized land surface products. The data fusion methods include the use of 1DVAR data assimilation for satellite sounding data sets, and numerous real-time statistical analysis methods. Our new development activities to extend the current 1DVAR algorithm to use and test a new non-Gaussian data assimilation method are presented. This research was supported by multiple grants from the NOAA/NESDIS Product System Development and Implementation (PSDI) program, a NASA ROSES grant, and a grant by the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA) to the DoD Center for Geosciences / Atmospheric Research (CG/AR) at Colorado State University, as well as a subcontract from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) to CSU.

  18. Applications systems verification and transfer project. Volume 6: Operational applications of satellite snow-cover observations NOAA/NESS support study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    Geostationary and polar orbiting satellite data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration were used to operationally provide field hydrologists with basin snowcover percentages for inclusion in runoff models. Data reduction is accomplished thru the use of optical rectification devices and electronic color density slicers. Over two thousand satellite-derived snow maps covering 30 different basins in the western United States were provided to users. Plans for improving snowmapping techniques on computer interactive systems and by all-digital analysis are presented. A description of the newest generation of NOAA polar orbiters, TIROS-N, and its potential for snowmapping is reviewed. Snowcover percentages for all basins determined between November 1974 and July 1978 are presented in tabular format.

  19. Angular anisotropy of satellite observations of land surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinnikov, Konstantin Y.; Yu, Yunyue; Goldberg, Mitchell D.; Tarpley, Dan; Romanov, Peter; Laszlo, Istvan; Chen, Ming

    2012-12-01

    Satellite-based time series of land surface temperature (LST) have the potential to be an important tool to diagnose climate changes of the past several decades. Production of such a time series requires addressing several issues with using asynchronous satellite observations, including the diurnal cycle, clouds, and angular anisotropy. Here we evaluate the angular anisotropy of LST using one full year of simultaneous observations by two Geostationary Operational Environment Satellites, GOES-EAST and GOES-WEST, at the locations of five surface radiation (SURFRAD) stations. We develop a technique to convert directionally observed LST into direction-independent equivalent physical temperature of the land surface. The anisotropy model consists of an isotropic kernel, an emissivity kernel (LST dependence on viewing angle), and a solar kernel (effect of directional inhomogeneity of observed temperature). Application of this model reduces differences of LST observed from two satellites and between the satellites and surface ground truth - SURFRAD station observed LST. The techniques of angular adjustment and temporal interpolation of satellite observed LST open a path for blending together historical, current, and future observations of many geostationary and polar orbiters into a homogeneous multi-decadal data set for climate change research.

  20. STABILITY OF SATELLITES IN CLOSELY PACKED PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Matthew J.; Holman, Matthew J.; Deck, Katherine M.; Perets, Hagai B.

    2013-10-01

    We perform numerical integrations of four-body (star, planet, planet, satellite) systems to investigate the stability of satellites in planetary systems with tightly packed inner planets (STIPs). We find that the majority of closely spaced stable two-planet systems can stably support satellites across a range of parameter-space which is only slightly decreased compared to that seen for the single-planet case. In particular, circular prograde satellites remain stable out to ?0.4 R{sub H} (where R{sub H} is the Hill radius) as opposed to 0.5 R{sub H} in the single-planet case. A similarly small restriction in the stable parameter-space for retrograde satellites is observed, where planetary close approaches in the range 2.5-4.5 mutual Hill radii destabilize most satellites orbits only if a ? 0.65 R{sub H} . In very close planetary pairs (e.g., the 12:11 resonance) the addition of a satellite frequently destabilizes the entire system, causing extreme close approaches and the loss of satellites over a range of circumplanetary semi-major axes. The majority of systems investigated stably harbored satellites over a wide parameter-space, suggesting that STIPs can generally offer a dynamically stable home for satellites, albeit with a slightly smaller stable parameter-space than the single-planet case. As we demonstrate that multi-planet systems are not a priori poor candidates for hosting satellites, future measurements of satellite occurrence rates in multi-planet systems versus single-planet systems could be used to constrain either satellite formation or past periods of strong dynamical interaction between planets.

  1. Sea surface temperature - Observations from geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J. J.; Smith, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Multispectral image data acquired from the VISSR atmospheric sounder (VAS) on the geostationary GOES satellites were used to estimate sea surface temperatures (SST). A procedure was developed to screen VAS visible and infrared data for cloud-free regions for estimation of SST from the clear infrared radiances. A data set of matches between the VAS radiances and high quality buoy estimates of SST was produced. A linear regression analysis of these matches was performed to generate an empirical algorithm relating the VAS window channel brightness temperatures to the estimates of SST recorded by NOAA fixed environment buoys. Daily maps of SST during Hurricanes Alicia (1983) and Debbie (1982) demonstrated the ability of VAS to monitor air-sea interactions at high temporal and spatial scales.

  2. Perl Tools for Automating Satellite Ground Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLean, David; Haar, Therese; McDonald, James

    2000-01-01

    The freeware scripting language Pert offers many opportunities for automating satellite ground systems for new satellites as well as older, in situ systems. This paper describes a toolkit that has evolved from of the experiences gained by using Pert to automate the ground system for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) and for automating some of the elements in the Earth Observing System Data and Operations System (EDOS) ground system at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). CGRO is an older ground system that was forced to automate because of fund cuts. Three 8 hour shifts were cut back to one 8 hour shift, 7 days per week. EDOS supports a new mission called Terra, launched December 1999 that requires distribution and tracking of mission-critical reports throughout the world. Both of these ground systems use Pert scripts to process data and display it on the Internet as well as scripts to coordinate many of the other systems that make these ground systems work as a coherent whole. Another task called Automated Multimodal Trend Analysis System (AMTAS) is looking at technology for isolation and recovery of spacecraft problems. This effort has led to prototypes that seek to evaluate various tools and technology that meet at least some of the AMTAS goals. The tools, experiences, and lessons learned by implementing these systems are described here.

  3. Observations of orbital debris and satellites in Slovak Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silha, Jiri; Toth, Juraj

    There are many accidental optically tracked artificial objects during observations at Astronom-ical and Geophysical Observatory FMPI CU, Modra, Slovak Republic (AGO). Those objects are usually orbital debris or satellites. A tool to identify such a type of objects was necessary to create. Our software is called SatEph and is used to identify tracked artificial objects and to compute their orbital elements. SatEph is based on analytic propagation model SGP4 and TLE data. Program is still under development and in the near future it will be a part of software for automated search telescope for small near Earth asteroids at AGO. We present orbital debris observation simulation for the new optical searching system. Unlike other aster-oids searching systems (Catalina Sky Survey, LINEAR, Spacewatch etc.) our system should be capable to detect small asteroids in close vicinity of the Earth (smaller then Lunar distance) with high angular speed. The limiting magnitude of observable objects is about +16 magnitude and the pixel scale is 4,6 arcsec/px. This allows us to detect man made objects as well. We studied how many satellites and orbital debris with known orbital elements are able to track per given observing night. We also studied frequency detection of tracked object during one night. The searching system field of view will be 4.4 x 4.4 square degrees and the system will search more then 2000 square degrees per night. Exposure time for every single CCD shot is set to 30 seconds. We found out, there is possible to track from 250 to 450 objects (mostly with geosynchronous orbits) per one night in dependence on given day of the year. More then 200 objects have at least 3 astrometric positions per one night, which can be useful for orbit determination process. The tracked objects are mostly satellites and rocket bodies, which have different orbits, from low Earth orbit to geosynchronous Earth orbit. Data of orbital debris astrometric positions will be offered for national space agencies and used for our own orbit determination. Those data could be useful for orbital elements updating of catalogue, or non catalogue artificial objects.

  4. Improving UK Air Quality Modelling Through Exploitation of Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Richard; Chipperfield, Martyn; Savage, Nick

    2014-05-01

    In this work the applicability of satellite observations to evaluate the operational UK Met Office Air Quality in the Unified Model (AQUM) have been investigated. The main focus involved the AQUM validation against satellite observations, investigation of satellite retrieval error types and of synoptic meteorological-atmospheric chemistry relationships simulated/seen by the AQUM/satellite. The AQUM is a short range forecast model of atmospheric chemistry and aerosols up to 5 days. It has been designed to predict potentially hazardous air pollution events, e.g. high concentrations of surface ozone. The AQUM has only been validated against UK atmospheric chemistry recording surface stations. Therefore, satellite observations of atmospheric chemistry have been used to further validate the model, taking advantage of better satellite spatial coverage. Observations of summer and winter 2006 tropospheric column NO2 from both OMI and SCIAMACHY show that the AQUM generally compares well with the observations. However, in northern England positive biases (AQUM - satellite) suggest that the AQUM overestimates column NO2; we present results of sensitivity experiments on UK emissions datasets suspected to be the cause. In winter, the AQUM over predicts background column NO2 when compared to both satellite instruments. We hypothesise that the cause is the AQUM winter night-time chemistry, where the NO2 sinks are not substantially defined. Satellite data are prone to errors/uncertainty such as random, systematic and smoothing errors. We have investigated these error types and developed an algorithm to calculate and reduce the random error component of DOAS NO2 retrievals, giving more robust seasonal satellite composites. The Lamb Weather Types (LWT), an objective method of classifying the daily synoptic weather over the UK, were used to create composite satellite maps of column NO2 under different synoptic conditions. Under cyclonic conditions, satellite observed UK column NO2 is reduced as the indicative south-westerly flow transports it away from the UK over the North Sea. However, under anticyclonic conditions, the satellite shows that the stable conditions enhance the build-up of column NO2 over source regions. The influence of wind direction on column NO2 can also be seen from space with transport leeward of the source regions.

  5. Characterizing user requirements for future land observing satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.; Cressy, P. J.; Schnetzler, C. C.; Salomonson, V. V.

    1981-01-01

    The objective procedure was developed for identifying probable sensor and mission characteristics for an operational satellite land observing system. Requirements were systematically compiled, quantified and scored by type of use, from surveys of federal, state, local and private communities. Incremental percent increases in expected value of data were estimated for critical system improvements. Comparisons with costs permitted selection of a probable sensor system, from a set of 11 options, with the following characteristics: 30 meter spatial resolution in 5 bands and 15 meters in 1 band, spectral bands nominally at Thematic Mapper (TM) bands 1 through 6 positions, and 2 day data turn around for receipt of imagery. Improvements are suggested for both the form of questions and the procedures for analysis of future surveys in order to provide a more quantitatively precise definition of sensor and mission requirements.

  6. Automatic satellite tracking system for the NASA Satellite Photometric Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mucklow, Glenn H.

    1980-01-01

    The development of an Automatic TV Tracking System for NASA's mobile 61 cm aperture Satellite Photometric Observatory is described. The analysis techniques used to match the FOV and resolutions to changing seeing conditions are covered in details. Theoretical reasons for such matching of general interest are discussed. It is shown that the energy density in a satellite image is 11 times greater during good seeing conditions than during typical seeing conditions. The Z7987 image tube is shown to be able to detect 16th magnitude objects under ideal seeing conditions using only 8 percent of the light collected by the main telescope. Experimental results show that the SPO equipped with a Z7987 camera can track a satellite at any orbital velocity with less than 0.14 mr accuracy using the DBA Series 606 TV Tracker. The manual system used prior to the installation of the Automatic TV Tracking System could maintain track at 1.1 mr accuracy for comparison.

  7. Observations of Reflected Ions and Plasma Turbulence for Satellite Potentials Greater Than the Ion Ram Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. H., Jr.; Stone, N. H.; Sorensen, J.; Winningham, J. D.; Gurgiolo, C.

    1997-01-01

    During the TSS-1R mission, the behavior of the ions flowing from the forward hemisphere of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) satellite was examined as the potential on the satellite was changed from below to above 5 Volts. The ram energy of the ambient atomic oxygen ions is about 5 eV. For satellite potentials less than 5 V, no ions were observed on the ram side of the satellite. When the satellite potential was raised above 5 V, ions were observed to be flowing from the forward region of the satellite. In the region sampled, the ion flux was a few percent of the ambient with energies of about 5 eV. The temperature of the outflowing ions was observed to be enhanced, relative to the ambient ionosphere, and had a maximum in a plane containing the center of the satellite and normal to the geomagnetic field. The net current to the probe package became much more noisy for satellite potentials above 5 V as compared with satellite potentials below 5 V indicating a more disturbed plasma environment.

  8. ECC Ozonesonde Calibration and Observations: Satellite Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidlin, Francis J.; Zukor, Dorothy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The reliability of the Electrochemical Concentration Cell (ECC) ozonesonde depends on the care exercised in preparing the instrument for use. Although the ECC can be quickly prepared and flown, generally within less then one day if necessary, it is best to prepare the instrument at least one week prior to use, and as our tests have confirmed even 2-3 weeks prior to use may actually be better. There are a number of factors that must be considered when preparing an ECC. These basically are the pump efficiency, volumetric flow rate, temperature of the air entering the pump, and the background current. Also of importance is the concentration of the potassium iodide solution. Tests conducted at Wallops Island (38 N) has enabled us to identify potential problem areas and ways to avoid them. The calibration and pre-flight preparation methods will be discussed. The method of calibrating the ECC also is used at Ascension Island (8 S) and Natal, Brazil (5 S). Comparisons between vertical profiles of the ECC instrument and satellites will be reviewed as well as comparison with ground based instruments, such as, the Dobson Spectrophotometer and hand held Microtops photometers.

  9. Observing tectonic plate motions and deformations from satellite laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulidis, D. C.; Smith, D. E.; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Klosko, S. M.; Torrence, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    The scope of geodesy has been greatly affected by the advent of artificial near-earth satellites. The present paper provides a description of the results obtained from the reduction of data collected with the aid of satellite laser ranging. It is pointed out that dynamic reduction of satellite laser ranging (SLR) data provides very precise positions in three dimensions for the laser tracking network. The vertical components of the stations, through the tracking geometry provided by the global network and the accurate knowledge of orbital dynamics, are uniquely related to the center of mass of the earth. Attention is given to the observations, the methodologies for reducing satellite observations to estimate station positions, Lageos-observed tectonic plate motions, an improved temporal resolution of SLR plate motions, and the SLR vertical datum.

  10. Satellite Observation Highlights of the 2010 Russian Wildfires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Douglass, Anne R.; Duncan, Bryan N.; daSilva, Arlindo; Torres, Omar

    2010-01-01

    From late-July through mid-August 2010, wildfires raged in western Russia. The resulting thick smoke and biomass burning products were transported over the highly populated Moscow city and surrounding regions, seriously impairing visibility and affecting human health. We demonstrate the uniqueness of the 2010 Russian wildfires by using satellite observations from NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) platforms. Over Moscow and the region of major fire activity to the southeast, we calculate unprecedented increases in the MODIS fire count record of 178 %, an order of magnitude increase in the MODIS fire radiative power (308%) and OMI absorbing aerosols (255%), and a 58% increase in AIRS total carbon monoxide (CO). The exceptionally high levels of CO are shown to be of comparable strength to the 2006 El Nino wildfires over Indonesia. Both events record CO values exceeding 30x10(exp 7) molec/ square cm.

  11. Index: piggy-back satellite for aurora observation and technology demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, H.; Masumoto, Y.; Mizuno, T.; Miura, A.; Hashimoto, M.; Ogawa, H.; Tachikawa, S.; Oshima, T.; Choki, A.; Fukuda, H.; Hirahara, M.; Okano, S.

    2001-03-01

    This paper describes outline of the piggy-back satellite "INDEX" for demonstration of advanced satellite technologies as well as for observation of fine structure of aurora. Aurora observation will be carried out by three cameras(MAC) with a monochromatic UV filter. Electron and ion spectrum analyzer (ESA/ISA) will measure the particle phenomena together with the aurora imaging. INDEX satellite will be launched in 2002 by Japanese H2-A. The satellite is mainly controlled by the high-speed, fault-tolerant on-board RICS processor (three-voting system of SH-3). The attitude control is a compact system of three-axis stabilization. Although the size of INDEX is small (50Kg class), several newly-developed technologies are applied to the satellite system, including silicon-on-insulator devices, variable emittance radiator, solar-concentrated paddles, lithium-ion battery, and GPS receiver with all-sky antenna-coverage.

  12. International Collaboration in Satellite Observations for Disaster Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duda, Kenneth A.; Abrams, Michael

    2012-01-01

    When lives are threatened or lost due to catastrophic disasters, and when massive financial impacts are experienced, international emergency response teams rapidly mobilize to provide urgently required support. Satellite observations of affected areas often provide essential insight into the magnitude and details of the impacts. The large cost and high complexity of developing and operating satellite flight and ground systems encourages international collaboration in acquiring imagery for such significant global events in order to speed delivery of critical information to help those affected, and optimize spectral, spatial, and temporal coverage of the areas of interest. The International Charter-Space and Major Disasters was established to enable such collaboration in sensor tasking during times of crisis and is often activated in response to calls for assistance from authorized users. Insight is provided from a U.S. perspective into sensor support for Charter activations and other disaster events through a description of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), which has been used to support emergency situations for over a decade through its expedited tasking and near real-time data delivery capabilities. Examples of successes achieved and challenges encountered in international collaboration to develop related systems and fulfill tasking requests suggest operational considerations for new missions as well as areas for future enhancements.

  13. Observing Outer Planet Satellites (Except Titan) with the James Webb Space Telescope: Science Justification and Observational Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keszthelyi, Laszlo; Grundy, Will; Stansberry, John; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Thatte, Deepashri; Gudipati, Murthy; Tsang, Constantine; Greenbaum, Alexandra; McGruder, Chima

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will allow observations with a unique combination of spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution for the study of outer planet satellites within our Solar System. We highlight the infrared spectroscopy of icy moons and temporal changes on geologically active satellites as two particularly valuable avenues of scientific inquiry. While some care must be taken to avoid saturation issues, JWST has observation modes that should provide excellent infrared data for such studies.

  14. PSC Characteristics from Satellite Observations and Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Drdla, K.; Bokarius, K.; Fromm, M.; Alfred, J.

    2004-01-01

    POAM solar occultation observations from 1994 to present are studied for the purpose of determining Type I PSC formation characteristics and winter-long evolution. This study examines PSC observations from many years on a common basis to see if characteristics can be identified. The results show that Type Ia PSCs form at the beginning of the winter, within several days of the first drop in temperature below T_NAT, and peak early in the winter. Type Ia PSCs typically out number Ib PSCs over the winter, especially at the beginning of the winter. Type Ia and Ib PSC observations continue throughout the winter. Micro-physical models of PSC formation must match these observed characteristics. Some models predict that temperatures must be more than 5 K below T_NAT for five days before significant freezing can occur. This is not seen in the POAM observations. Differences in PSC characteristics between the first two Arctic winters (1994-1995 and 1995-1996) and later winters also suggest the influence of volcanic perturbations on PSC formation. Type Ia and Ib PSC Characteristics observed by POAM III and SAGE III for the 2002-2003 Arctic winter are compared.

  15. CEOS Committee on Earth Observations Satellites Consolidated Report, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A concise overview of the committee on Earth Observations Satellites (CEOS) and its Working Groups, covering the history and purpose of the Committee and its accomplishments to date are provided. The report will be updated annually before each Plenary meeting, and as developments in the Working Groups warrant. The committee on Earth Observations Satellites (originally named the International Earth Observations Satellite committee, IEOS) was treated in 1984, in response to a recommendation from the Economic Summit of Industrialized Nations Working Group on Growth, Technology, and Employment's Panel of Experts on Satellite Remote Sensing. This group recognized the multidisciplinary nature of satellite Earth observations, and the value of coordinating across all proposed missions. Thus, CEOS combined the previously existing groups for coordination on Ocean Remote-Sensing Satellites (CORSS) and coordination on Land Remote-Sensing Satellites (CLRSS), and established a broad framework for coordination across all spaceborne Earth observations missions. The first three LEOS Plenary meetings focused on treating and guiding the Working Groups deemed necessary to carry out the objectives of the CEOS members. After the third meeting, it was agreed that a more active orientation was required by the Plenary, and additional issues were brought before the group at the fourth meeting. At the fifth Plenary, international scientific programs and relevant intergovernmental organizations accepted invitations and participated as affiliate members of CEOS. This enabled progress toward integrating satellite data users' requirements into the CEOS process. Data exchange principles for global change research were also adopted. An interim CEOS Plenary meeting was held in April 1992, in preparation for the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED). Brief encapsulations of the Plenary sessions immediately follow the Terms of Reference that govern the activities of CEOS as a whole; Terms of Reference for the individual Working Groups are included as Appendix A. A complete listing of CEOS members is offered as Appendix B.

  16. A study of satellite emergency locator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Satellite emergency locator systems were studied. The objective of the study was to determine the feasibility and hardware requirements for satellite systems capable of identifying and locating the position emergency locator transmitters and emergency position indicating radio beacons. Both geosynchronous and near-polar-orbiting satellites were considered. One of the most important aspects of the study was to minimize the cost of the hardware required.

  17. Global telemedicine using INMARSAT satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhedkar, Dinkar; Laxminarayan, Swamy; Lambert Torres, Germano

    1990-06-01

    Departement of Electrical Engineering Escola Federal de Engenharia de Itajuba Itajuba Minas Gerais Brazil This paper describes a " medical satellite network" for long distance diagnosis. The network proposed will be composed by mobile medical laboratories two transmission stations and a satellite system. This network will allow to link two hospitals for emergency expert medical consultations. INMARSAT satellite system is investigated and a tradeoff is made between a land based I ink and a satellitecommunication link. 1.

  18. Integration of mobile satellite and cellular systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drucker, Elliott H.; Estabrook, Polly; Pinck, Deborah; Ekroot, Laura

    1993-01-01

    By integrating the ground based infrastructure component of a mobile satellite system with the infrastructure systems of terrestrial 800 MHz cellular service providers, a seamless network of universal coverage can be established. Users equipped for both cellular and satellite service can take advantage of a number of features made possible by such integration, including seamless handoff and universal roaming. To provide maximum benefit at lowest posible cost, the means by which these systems are integrated must be carefully considered. Mobile satellite hub stations must be configured to efficiently interface with cellular Mobile Telephone Switching Offices (MTSO's), and cost effective mobile units that provide both cellular and satellite capability must be developed.

  19. Integration of mobile satellite and cellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drucker, Elliott H.; Estabrook, Polly; Pinck, Deborah; Ekroot, Laura

    By integrating the ground based infrastructure component of a mobile satellite system with the infrastructure systems of terrestrial 800 MHz cellular service providers, a seamless network of universal coverage can be established. Users equipped for both cellular and satellite service can take advantage of a number of features made possible by such integration, including seamless handoff and universal roaming. To provide maximum benefit at lowest posible cost, the means by which these systems are integrated must be carefully considered. Mobile satellite hub stations must be configured to efficiently interface with cellular Mobile Telephone Switching Offices (MTSO's), and cost effective mobile units that provide both cellular and satellite capability must be developed.

  20. FORTE satellite observations of VHF radiation from lightning discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Junor, William; Suszcynsky, D. M.; Jacobson, A. R.

    2004-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory/Sandia National Laboratory FORTE satellite is described and its capabilities for global remote sensing of lightning in the radio regime are described. Some results from 7 years of successful operation are presented. A future global lightning monitoring mission, VGLASS, is described. The FORTE satellite program has provided a powerful tool for the observation and understanding of the natural RF background due to thunderstorm activity. Unfortunately, because of hardware failures, the satellite ceased operation in late summer of 2003 after 6 years of very successful operation.

  1. Satellite and ground observation of VLF emissions at low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, U.; Singh, B.

    2012-12-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of VLF emissions in satellite and ground station is examined by analyzing Demeter satellite and ground data observed at Agra station for a period of three months between 01 October and 31 December, 2010. The results show nineteen cases of VLF emissions occurring in the ionosphere in the satellite in narrow and broad frequency bands at low latitudes whereas three cases of hiss bands in the ground station. A clear relation between the ground and satellite data is not established. This is interpreted in terms of nonducted propagation of VLF emissions because of which they are not transmitted to ground. The period of observation was magnetically quite, hence the signals could not propagate on the ground in pro-longitudinal mode of propagation.

  2. Recent state of the Aral sea from regular satellite observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanichny, S.; Davidov, A.; Djenidi, S.; Horstmann, U.; Stanichnaya, R.; Soloviev, D.

    The Aral Sea disaster is one of the most significant examples of ecological catastrophe caused by mismanagement of water resources. Aral sea level dropped on 22 meters for the last 35 years. The sea separated in to two independent parts , the Large Sea(Southern) and the Small Sea (Northern), loosing more than 90% of its original water masses. After the collapse of the former Soviet Union, satellite retrieved data became the main source of information on this perishing system. Regular observations from AVHRR, SeaWiFS, MODIS and ASTER satellite sensors were used for our investigations. Sea surface temperature (SST) data of the AVHRR sensor and digital bottom map topography were used for sea level drop calculations. The Sea level defined as the digital map isobate corresponds quite well to the satellite derived coastline for the Eastern part of the Large Sea with a bottom slope of 0.00015. For the period 1989-2002 the sea level of the Large Sea dropped on 9.2 meters. However in 2003 the sea level remained stable. This stabilisation was due to an increase of water output of the rivers Amu--Darya and Syr-Darya in 2003. High resolution ASTER data showed that the main amount of Syr-Darya waters is discharged into the Large Sea. The dried bottom area now covers more than 45000 km2. On the base of AVHRR-SST data the temperature regime for different parts of the Aral Sea was calculated for the years 2002-2003. The annual amplitude of the SST variation reaches 37 C for the open waters. The observed minimum freezing point was -7 C due to very high salinity. Estimations from satellite retrieved freezing points show an increase of salinity up to 10% in the Eastern part of the Large Sea. It is almost paradox that on satellite images the ice appears warmer than the water. Strong variations of the water temperature (up to 5 C) within a few days could be observed from April to August and could be related to wind induced mixing. SeaWiFS ocean colour data were used for the investigation of the optical properties of the water in different parts of the Aral Sea for the years 2002-2003. A significant relation of optical properties with wind and temperature was obtained. Strong changes of the thermal regimes of the Sea can cause variations in local climatic conditions: The analysis of AVHRR NDVI - data for the surrounding areas demonstrated a shift in the annual vegetation cycle. In addition phenomena like: salt storms, wind driven tides, sources of groundwater, eddies and frontal structures as well as ice coverage of the Aral Sea were demonstrated on satellite images.

  3. ECS - The European Communication Satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooster, C. B.

    1981-09-01

    The evolution of the European Communication Satellite system (ECS) is traced from feasibility studies in 1970 to the development and launch in 1978 of the Orbital Test Satellite (OTS) by the European Space Agency to prove the new satellite and radio transmission technology being used on ECS. This was followed by the establishment of 'Interim EUTELSAT' in 1979 as the organization to operate ECS. The satellite, which operates at 11/14 GHz, covers all the capitals in Europe via three spot beam antennas, supplemented by a 'Eurobeam' regional coverage antenna which extends the range to cover all of Europe and the Mediterranean basin. Telephony channels are transmitted digitally using time division multiple access (TDMA) with digital speech interpolation (DSI) to optimize satellite capacity. Television transmission is by analog FM over the Eurobeam antenna to North African as well as European capitals. System implications of TDMA operation are discussed, and the EUTELSAT policy for Special Services or satellite business systems is discussed.

  4. Autonomous satellite navigation methods using the Global Positioning Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murata, M.; Tapley, B. D.; Schutz, B. E.

    1982-01-01

    This investigation considers the problem of autonomous satellite navigation using the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS). The major topics covered include the design, implementation, and validation of onboard navigation filter algorithms by means of computer simulations. The primary errors that the navigation filter design must minimize are computational effects and modeling inaccuracies due to limited capability of the onboard computer. The minimization of the effect of these errors is attained by applying the sequential extended Kalman filter using a factored covariance implementation with Q-matrix or dynamical model compensations. Peformance evaluation of the navigation filter design is carried out using both the CDC Cyber 170/750 computer and the PDP-11/60 computer. The results are obtained assuming the Phase I GPS constellation, consisting of six satellites, and a Landsat-D type spacecraft as the model for the user satellite orbit.

  5. Joint Polar Satellite System Common Ground System Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Miller, S. W.; Grant, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). JPSS will contribute the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the restructured National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). As such, JPSS replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the ground processing component of both Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) replacement, previously known as the Defense Weather Satellite System (DWSS), managed by the Department of Defense (DoD). The JPSS satellites will carry a suite of sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The ground processing system for JPSS is known as the JPSS Common Ground System (JPSS CGS), and consists of a Command, Control, and Communications Segment (C3S) and an Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS). Both segments are developed by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems (IIS). The C3S currently flies the Suomi National Polar Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite and transfers mission data from Suomi NPP and between the ground facilities. The IDPS processes Suomi NPP satellite data to provide Environmental Data Records (EDRs) to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government. When the JPSS-1 satellite is launched in early 2017, the responsibilities of the C3S and the IDPS will be expanded to support both Suomi NPP and JPSS-1. The JPSS CGS currently provides data processing for Suomi NPP, generating multiple terabytes per day across over two dozen environmental data products; that workload will be multiplied by two when the JPSS-1 satellite is launched. The CGS also provides raw data processing for GCOM-W1 to support further processing by NOAA. The CGS provides data routing for numerous missions, including Coriolis/Windsat, NASA SCaN (including EOS), DMSP, POES and Metop. Each of these satellites orbits the Earth 14 times a day, downlinking mission data once or twice per orbit at up to hundreds of megabits per second, to support the generation of tens of terabytes per day across hundreds of environmental data products. This presentation will provide an overview of the JPSS CGS ground architecture features, ConOps, key specifications, developmental and operational facilities, present and future supported missions, and recent enhancements for support of the Suomi NPP mission. Key features include redundant mission management, a global commercial communications network for data routing and delivery, high-availability and low-latency data processing, a DoD 8500 compliant security posture, and a modular and extensible architecture. Key recent enhancements include a technology refresh of IDPS hardware to improve supportability and latency performance, incorporation of data routing and processing for the Global Change Observation Mission (GCOM), and significant software upgrades to improve overall system robustness and operability. These enhancements lay the foundation for the future evolution of the CGS to support additional missions.

  6. Observations of Reflected Ions and Plasma Turbulence for Satellite Potentials Greater than the Ion Ram Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. H., Jr.; Stone, N. H.; Sorensen, J.; Winningham, J. D.; Gurgiolo, C.

    1998-01-01

    During the TSS-1R mission, the behavior of the ions flowing from the forward hemisphere of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) satellite was examined as the potential of the satellite was changed from below to above 5 V. The ram energy of the ambient atomic oxygen ions is approximately 5 eV. For satellite potentials less than 5 V, no ions were observed on the ram side of the satellite. When the satellite potential was raised greater than 5 V, ions were observed to be flowing from the forward region of the satellite. In the region sampled, the ion flux was a few percent of the ambient with energies of approximately 5 eV. The temperature of the out-flowing ions was observed to be enhanced, relative to the ambient ionosphere. The net current to the probe package became much more noisy for satellite potentials greater than 5 V as compared with satellite potentials less than 5 V, indicating a more disturbed plasma environment.

  7. Observation of suspended sediments in Mobile Bay, Alabama from satellite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumpf, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive geologic study of coastal Alabama and Mississippi, the U.S. Geological Survey is investigating coastal sediment transport in Mobile Bay and the adjacent shelf. Satellite imagery from the NOAA AVHRR is being used to provide data on the variability of spatial patterns in the near-surface suspended sediment concentration. This imagery is processed using atmospheric corrections to remove haze and Rayleigh radiance in order to obtain water reflectances; the reflectances are than converted to approximate sediment concentrations using standard relationships between water reflectance and in situ sediment concentrations. A series of images from early 1990 shows rapid changes in sediment concentrations in response to high river flow of the Alabama-Tombigbee river system. During these times, suspended sediment tends to flow out Mobile Bay without mixing into the eastern lobe of the Bay (Bon Secour Bay). The sediment concentration field also appears to be disturbed by the main ship channel. The sediment plume extends more than 60 km offshore after the peak flow event. One wind event in December 1989 was identified as increasing sediment concentration in the Bay. It is not believed that such an event has been previously observed from satellite.

  8. Satellite Observations of Solar Irradiance and Sun-Climate Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Solar activity is now near its maximum, with events such as the 2001 "Bastille Day Event", a Coronal Mass Ejection which merited a full session at AGUs annual meeting - and two major sunspot groupings earlier this year, with associated variations in TSI (Total Solar Irradiance). We discuss recent satellite measurements of TSI by ACRIM 2 and 3 and Virgo, and new precision observations of TSI and SSI (Solar Spectral Irradiance) expected from the SORCE mission, planned to launch in fall 2002. SSI has been added to TSI as a required EOS and NPOESS measurement because different spectral components provide energy inputs to different components of the climate system - UV into upper atmosphere and ozone, IR into lower atmosphere and clouds, and Visible into the biosphere. Succeeding satellite missions being planned for 2006 and 2010 will continue to monitor both TSI and SSI. We summarize current ideas about the potential impact of solar variability on Earth's climate on time scales from days to decades to centuries.

  9. Satellite Observations of Solar Irradiance and Sun-Climate Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Solar activity is now near its maximum, with events such as the 2001 "Bastille Day Event", a Coronal Mass Ejection which merited a full session at AGO'S annual meeting - and two major sunspot groupings earlier this year, with associated variations in TSI (Total Solar Irradiance). We discuss recent satellite measurements of TSI by ACRIM 2 and 3 And Virgo, and new precision observations of TSI and SSI (Solar Spectral Irradiance) expected from the SORCE mission, planned to launch in fall 2002. SSG has been added to TSI as a required EOS and NPOESS measurement because different spectral components provide energy inputs to different components of the climate system - UV into upper atmosphere and ozone, IR into lower atmosphere and clouds, and Visible into the biosphere. Succeeding satellite missions being planned for 2006 and 2010 will continue to monitor both TSI and SSI. We summarize current ideas about the potential impact of solar variability on Earth's climate on time scales from days to decades to centuries.

  10. The Satellite System: A Model for Deinstitutionalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyan, Craig

    The paper presents the community-based satellite system as a residential and program model to effect deinstitutionalization of mentally retarded young adults in urban centers worldwide. The system is reported to consist of a large, central educational facility surrounded by a series of small houses and apartment units (satellites). Benefits of

  11. Satellite multiple access systems for mobile communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    This paper considers multiple access techniques for a mobile radio system which incorporates a geosynchronous orbiting satellite repeater through which mobile terminals communicate. The communication capacities of FDMA, TDMA and CDMA systems are examined for a 4 MHz bandwidth system to serve up to 10,000 users. An FDMA system with multibeam coverage is analyzed in detail. The system includes an order-wire network for demand-access control and reassignment of satellite channels. Satellite and terminal configurations are developed to a block diagram level and system costs and implementation requirements are discussed.

  12. Unusual satellite data: A black hole?. [International Ultraviolet Explorer observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Data obtained by the NASA-launched European Space Agency's International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite suggests the possibility of a massive black hole at the center of some globular clusters (star groups) in our galaxy. Six of these clusters, three of them X-ray sources, were closely examined. Onboard short wavelength UV instrumentation penetrated the background denseness of the clusters 15,000 light years away where radiation, probably from a group of 10 to 20 bright blue stars orbiting the core, was observed. The stars may well be orbiting a massive black hole the size of 1,000 solar systems. The existence of the black hole is uncertain. The dynamics of the stars must be studied first to determine how they rotate in relation to the center of the million-star cluster. This may better indicate what provides the necessary gravitational pull that holds them in orbit.

  13. Timing of satellite observations for telescope with TV CCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragomiretskoy, V. V.; Koshkin, N. I.; Korobeinikova, E. A.; Melikyants, C. M.; Ryabov, A. V.; Strahova, S. L.; Terpan, S. S.; Shakun, L. S.

    2013-12-01

    The time reference system to be used for linking of the satellite position and brightness measurements to the universal time scale UTC are described. These are used in Odessa astronomical observatory. They provides stable error does not exceeding the absolute value of 0.1 ms. The achieved accuracy of the timing allows us to study a very short-term satellite brightness variations and the actual unevenness of its orbital motion.

  14. Design of the American Mobile Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittiver, Charles

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the American Mobile Satellite Corporation (AMSC) Mobile Satellite System (MSS). A summary of the mobile satellite (MSAT) design and overall performance is provided. The design and components of both the forward link and return link transponders are described in detail. The design and operation of a unique hybrid matrix amplifier that offers flexible power distribution is outlined. The conceptual design and performance of three types of land mobile antennas are described.

  15. Licensing of future mobile satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepkowski, Ronald J.

    1990-01-01

    The regulatory process for licensing mobile satellite systems is complex and can require many years to complete. This process involves frequency allocations, national licensing, and frequency coordination. The regulatory process that resulted in the establishment of the radiodetermination satellite service (RDSS) between 1983 and 1987 is described. In contrast, each of these steps in the licensing of the mobile satellite service (MSS) is taking a significantly longer period of time to complete.

  16. Odyssey, an optimized personal communications satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusch, Roger J.

    Personal communications places severe demands on service providers and transmission facilities. Customers are not satisfied with the current levels of service and want improvements. Among the characteristics that users seek are: lower service rates, hand held convenience, acceptable time delays, ubiquitous service, high availability, reliability, and high quality. The space industry is developing commercial space systems for providing mobile communications to personal telephones. Provision of land mobile satellite service is fundamentally different from the fixed satellite service provided by geostationary satellites. In fixed service, the earth based antennas can depend on a clear path from user to satellite. Mobile users in a terrestrial environment commonly encounter blockage due to vegetation, terrain or buildings. Consequently, high elevation angles are of premium value. TRW studied the issues and concluded that a Medium Earth Orbit constellation is the best solution for Personal Communications Satellite Service. TRW has developed Odyssey, which uses twelve satellites in medium altitude orbit to provide personal communications satellite service. The Odyssey communications system projects a multibeam antenna pattern to the Earth. The attitude control system orients the satellites to ensure constant coverage of land mass and coastal areas. Pointing can be reprogrammed by ground control to ensure optimized coverage of the desired service areas. The payload architecture features non-processing, "bent pipe" transponders and matrix amplifiers to ensure dynamic power delivery to high demand areas. Circuit capacity is 3000 circuits per satellite. Each satellite weighs 1917 kg (4226 pounds) at launch and the solar arrays provide 3126 Watts of power. Satellites are launched in pairs on Ariane, Atlas, or other vehicles. Each satellite is placed in a circular orbit at an altitude of 10,354 km. There are three orbit planes inclined at 55 to the equatorial plane. Deployment of the satellites permits phased introduction of service. After only three launches, in which two satellites are launched into each plane, continuous service can be provided to most of the world. After three more launches for a total of 12 satellites, service can be expanded to all populated regions of the Earth with path diversity to most regions. The Odyssey system is superior to both geostationary satellites and low earth orbiting satellites. Odyssey provides many benefits to the end user which are described in the paper. These include: low cost, convenience, high availability, reliability, and acceptable time delay. Odyssey exhibits benefits for telecommunications operators: simple operations, incremental, phased startup, long space segment life-time, high profitability, dynamic flexibility for adjustment and short time to market. Since submission of an FCC application in 1991, TRW has continued to explore ways to further improve the Odyssey approach by expanding coverage to the entire world and reducing the initial investment while maintaining high quality service.

  17. Observations of Uranus' satellites: Bibliography and literature search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    A literature search has yielded more than 10,000 observations of the satellites of Uranus made from 1787 to 1985. The type (photographic, micrometer) and the number of observations are tabulated in 5 year increments and a complete bibliography is provided.

  18. Multi-sensor Observations of the SpinSat Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, D.

    The Naval Research Laboratory developed and launched the spherical SpinSat satellite to accomplish two primary goals: 1) study the performance of a new class of micro-thrusters, and 2) provide a calibrated drag experiment to characterize Earth's upper atmosphere during the current period of relatively high solar activity. The 55.9 cm diameter aluminum sphere is equipped with a set of Electrically-Controlled Solid Propellant (ESP) thrusters, oriented to allow both translational and spin-up/spin-down maneuvers. To facilitate remote observations of the satellite's spin rate, the sphere's exterior features a reflectance pattern much like that of a beach-ball, as well as an ensemble of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) arranged along a meridian (i.e., a line of longitude) which can be turned on for brief periods. The Air Force Research Laboratory has conducted optical observations of SpinSat from several ground-based sensors, and more are planned. The observational goals include: 1) obtaining time-resolved, multi-band measurements of the satellite actively firing its micro-thrusters, 2) characterizing the detectability and spatial/temporal morphology of the ESP thruster plumes, 3) measuring the spin rate of the satellite with the LEDs turned on, ideally before and after a spin rate adjustment maneuver, and 4) measuring the spin rate of the satellite in its completely inactive mode, using only passive observations of reflected light and/or thermal emissions.

  19. Regional satellite systems: Are they "the solution?"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, Sylvia

    Regional satellite systems are in operation in Europe and the Arab League countries. Several others are under consideration for developing countries in Africa, Asia and South America. Studies have concluded that technically, the regional satellite systems are feasible. However, their viability depends on more than the succesful launch of a satellite. This paper analyzes the existing systems, extrapolates a few "lessons" from their experience and examines how they may be applied to the proposed systems. It is suggested that future feasibility studies should give some attention to terrestrial concerns: the physical infrastructure as well as economic and legal issues which will affect any regional system's viability.

  20. Small satellite radiometric measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for the earth's radiation budget. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on small satellites, aircraft, or remotely piloted aircraft (RPAs). An example of the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite is given. Significant benefits derive from simultaneous measurements of specific narrow (in wavelength) spectral features; such data may be obtained by combining LARI with a compact spectrometer on the same platform. Well-chosen satellite orbits allow one to use data from other satellites (e.g. DMSP) to enhance the data product, or to provide superior coverage of specific locations. 23 refs.

  1. Small satellite radiometric measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for the earth`s radiation budget. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on small satellites, aircraft, or remotely piloted aircraft (RPAs). An example of the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite is given. Significant benefits derive from simultaneous measurements of specific narrow (in wavelength) spectral features; such data may be obtained by combining LARI with a compact spectrometer on the same platform. Well-chosen satellite orbits allow one to use data from other satellites (e.g. DMSP) to enhance the data product, or to provide superior coverage of specific locations. 23 refs.

  2. Planning and Scheduling for Fleets of Earth Observing Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy; Jonsson, Ari; Morris, Robert; Smith, David E.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We address the problem of scheduling observations for a collection of earth observing satellites. This scheduling task is a difficult optimization problem, potentially involving many satellites, hundreds of requests, constraints on when and how to service each request, and resources such as instruments, recording devices, transmitters, and ground stations. High-fidelity models are required to ensure the validity of schedules; at the same time, the size and complexity of the problem makes it unlikely that systematic optimization search methods will be able to solve them in a reasonable time. This paper presents a constraint-based approach to solving the Earth Observing Satellites (EOS) scheduling problem, and proposes a stochastic heuristic search method for solving it.

  3. Global Positioning System Satellite Selection Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, Frederick A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The satellite selection method as utilized by the spaceborne Global Positioning System receiver provides navigational solutions and is designed for use in low Earth orbit. The satellite selection method is a robust algorithm that can be used a GPS receiver to select appropriate GPS satellites for use in calculating point solutions or attitude solutions. The method is takes into account the difficulty of finding a particular GPS satellite phase code, especially when the search range in greatly increased due to Doppler shifts introduced into the carrier frequency. The method starts with an update of the antenna pointing and spacecraft vectors to determine the antenna backplane direction. Next, the GPS satellites that will potentially be in view of the antenna are ranked on a list, whereby the list is generated based on the estimated attitude and position of each GPS satellite. Satellites blocked by the Earth are not entered on this list. A second list is created, whereby the GPS satellites are ranked according to their desirability for use in attitude determination. GPS satellites are ranked according to their orthogonality to the antenna backplane, and according to geometric dilution of precision considerations. After the lists are created, the channels of the spaceborne GPS receiver are assigned to various GPS satellites for acquisition and lock. Preliminary Doppler frequencies for searching are assigned to the various channels.

  4. Observations of the Saturn E ring and a new satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, S. M.; Fountain, J. W.; Smith, B. A.; Reitsema, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    It is noted that the faint E ring of Saturn appears as a narrow ring 246,000 + or - 4000 km from the center of Saturn on photographs taken when the ring-plane inclination was 5.4 deg. The apparent brightness of the ring was uniform at all observed orbital longitudes and makes it possible to estimate the normal optical thickness. In addition, a faint satellite (1981S1) was observed near the L4 triangular libration point of Tethys; this satellite is probably the same object as 1980S13.

  5. Monthly Evapotranspiration from Satellite and Conventional Meteorological Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarpley, J. D.

    1994-05-01

    Monthly mean satellite measurements of surface heating rate, surface temperature, and normalized difference vegetation index were collected for seven locations in Kansas. These were combined with monthly average surface observations and used in a surface energy balance model to estimate monthly mean evapotranspiration at each site. The modeled evapotranspiration and surface energy fluxes are reasonable. The nature of the surface energy balance model is such that it can be solved with satellite measurements and numerical weather forecast model output alone. This suggests that large-scale evapotranspiration climatologies can be made without in situ observations.

  6. Asian Dust Weather Categorization with Satellite and Surface Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Tang-Huang; Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Huang, Shih-Jen

    2011-01-01

    This study categorizes various dust weather types by means of satellite remote sensing over central Asia. Airborne dust particles can be identified by satellite remote sensing because of the different optical properties exhibited by coarse and fine particles (i.e. varying particle sizes). If a correlation can be established between the retrieved aerosol optical properties and surface visibility, the intensity of dust weather can be more effectively and consistently discerned using satellite rather than surface observations. In this article, datasets consisting of collocated products from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Aqua and surface measurements are analysed. The results indicate an exponential relationship between the surface visibility and the satellite-retrieved aerosol optical depth, which is subsequently used to categorize the dust weather. The satellite-derived spatial frequency distributions in the dust weather types are consistent with China s weather station reports during 2003, indicating that dust weather classification using satellite data is highly feasible. Although the period during the springtime from 2004 to 2007 may be not sufficient for statistical significance, our results reveal an increasing tendency in both intensity and frequency of dust weather over central Asia during this time period.

  7. Solar power satellite system definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A synopsis of the study plan for the solar power satellite system is presented. Descriptions of early task progress is reported for the following areas: (1) laser annealing, (2) solid state power amplifiers, (3) rectenna option, (4) construction of an independent electric orbit transfer vehicle, and (5) construction of a 2.5 GW solar power satellite.

  8. Overview of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite: Observations from 1991 to 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Douglass, Anne R.

    2003-01-01

    The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) was launched in September 1991 by the Space Shuttle Discovery and continues to make relevant atmospheric measurements (as of October 2002). This successful satellite has fostered a better understanding of the middle atmospheric processes, especially those important in the control of ozone. Seven of the original ten instruments aboard the UARS are still functional and six instruments regularly make measurements. The UARS is in a stable observing configuration, in spite of experiencing several anomalies over its lifetime. It is expected that the UARS will overlap the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura satellite (scheduled launch in January 2004) for several months before the end of the UARS mission.

  9. A Satellite Observation Information Service for Data Assimilation Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.; Weidner, R. J.; Lynnes, C.; Gerasimov, I. V.

    2013-12-01

    Multi-mission Observation Operator (M2O2) team at NASA is developing a streamlined interface mechanism that simplifies the assimilation process of satellite-observations by providing 'assimilation-ready' observation information 'on-demand'. The 'assimilation-ready' observation information is referred to as L2# (L2-sharp) data in contrast to level-2 (L2) data. The 'on-demand' indicates a web-service protocol for L2# data request handling. A L2# data service is developed for each atmospheric component of a mission to apply component-specific quality screening and post processing and deliver mission-generic observation information required for assimilation. The observation information is organized for sampling (time and location), sounding (pressure profile and averaging kernel), and retrieval results (a priori state, estimated state, and error). The M2O2 extensions to GEOS-Chem (version 9.0.1) and GEOS-Chem-Adjoint (version 34) have been employed to assimilate MLS-O3 (2004-2012), TES-O3 (2005-2009), TES-CH4 (2009) and ACOS-XCO2 (2009-2011). The L2# data services for MLS-O3 (2004-current), ACOS-XCO2 (2009-current), and AIRS-CO (2002-current) have been installed at GES DISC for assimilation-community-wide access. We will present the 'lessons learned' in three areas: 1) diversity of level-2 data product organization, 2) observation information formulation and validation, and 3) generalized model-coupling process. The M2O2 research is supported by NASA's Advancing Collaborative Connections for Earth System Science (ACCESS) program.

  10. CCD observations of Phoebe, 9th satellite of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fienga, A.; Arlot, J.-E.; Baron, N.; Bec-Borsenberger, A.; Crochot, A.; Emelyanov, N.; Thuillot, W.

    2002-08-01

    In 1998 and 1999, we started observations of the 9th satellite of Saturn. We made 163 observations using the 120 cm-telescope of Observatoire de Haute-Provence, France. We used the USNO A2 catalogue of stars for the astrometric reduction. With the help of observations of optical counterparts of ICRF sources, a zonal correction to the USNO A2.0 catalogue was computed and applied to the Phoebe positions. A comparison with the most recent theories was made.

  11. Astrometry of the main satellites of Uranus: 18 years of observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, J. I. B.; Magalhães, F. P.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Assafin, M.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Dias-Oliveira, A.; Benedetti-Rossi, G.; Gomes-Júnior, A. R.; Andrei, A. H.; da Silva Neto, D. N.

    2015-10-01

    Context. We contribute to developing dynamical models of the motions of Uranus' main satellites. Aims: We determine accurate positions of the main satellites of Uranus: Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, and Oberon. Positions of Uranus, as derived from those of these satellites, are also determined. The observational period spans from 1992 to 2011. All runs were made at the Pico dos Dias Observatory, Brazil. Methods: We used the software called Platform for Reduction of Astronomical Images Automatically (PRAIA) to perform a digital coronography to minimise the influence of the scattered light of Uranus on the astrometric measurements and to determine accurate positions of the main satellites. The positions of Uranus were then indirectly determined by computing the mean differences between the observed and ephemeris positions of these satellites. A series of numerical filters was applied to filter out spurious data. These filters are mostly based on (a) the comparison between the positions of Oberon with those of the other satellites and on (b) the offsets as given by the differences between the observed and ephemeris positions of all satellites. Results: We have, for the overall offsets of the five satellites, -29 mas (±63 mas) in right ascension and -27 mas (±46 mas) in declination. For the overall difference between the offsets of Oberon and those of the other satellites, we have +3 mas (±30 mas) in right ascension and -2 mas (±28 mas) in declination. Ephemeris positions for the satellites were determined from DE432+ura111. Comparisons using other modern ephemerides for the solar system - INPOP13c - and for the motion of the satellites - NOE-7-2013 - were also made. They confirm that the largest contribution to the offsets we find comes from the motion of the barycenter of the Uranus system around the barycenter of the solar system, as given by the planetary ephemerides. For the period from 1992 to 2011, our final catalogues contain 584 observed positions of Miranda, 1710 of Ariel, 1987 of Umbriel, 2588 of Titania, 2928 of Oberon, and 3516 of Uranus. Based on observations made at the Pico dos Dias Observatory/ LNA.Tables with the positions of Uranus and its satellites, as well as with the X and Y CCD coordinates of the observed satellites and reference stars are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/582/A8

  12. Combined Use of CO and CO2 Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, M. C.; Basu, S.; Guerlet, S.; Clerbaux, C.; Houweling, S.

    2013-12-01

    CO2 satellite observations from GOSAT may inform about biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2. Here we address the specific question whether we can separate CO2 contributions from biomass burning and the respiration/assimilation exchange. To this end, we first employ IASI CO observations to constrain the biomass burning process. We then translate the CO emissions into CO2 biomass burning emissions using emission factors. Finally, we determine to CO2 exchange flux using the biomass burning CO2 emissions as a prior. All source inversions are done using the TM5-4DVAR system, which allows a 1x1 degree resolution zoom over regions of interest. We focus on regions that experienced drought and fire-related CO anomalies, such as the widespread drought around Moscow in 2010. We show that fire CO2 emissions can only partially explain the observed CO2 anomalies. The remaining anomaly are therefore attributed to reduced net CO2 uptake by the biosphere.

  13. Magnitude Standardization Procedure for OWL-Net Optical Observations of LEO Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Dong-Goo; Choi, Jin; Jo, Jung Hyun; Yim, Hong-Suh; Park, Sun-Youp; Park, Maru; Choi, Young-Jun; Bae, Young-Ho; Park, Young-Sik; Jang, Hyun-Jung; Cho, Sungki; Kim, Ji-Hye; Park, Jang-Hyun

    2015-12-01

    As a governmentally approved domestic entity for Space Situational Awareness, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) is developing and operating an optical telescopes system, Optical Wide-field PatroL (OWL) Network. During the test phase of this system, it is necessary to determine the range of brightness of the observable satellites. We have defined standard magnitude for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites to calibrate their luminosity in terms of standard parameters such as distance, phase angle, and angular rate. In this work, we report the optical brightness range of five LEO Satellites using OWL-Net.

  14. Satellite observations of aerosol and CO over Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massie, Steven T.; Gille, John C.; Edwards, David P.; Nandi, Sreela

    The development of remote sensing satellite technology potentially will lead to the technical means to monitor air pollution emitted from large cities on a global basis. This paper presents observations by the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) and measurements of pollution in the troposphere (MOPITT) experiments of aerosol optical depths and CO mixing ratios, respectively, in the vicinity of Mexico City to illustrate current satellite capabilities. MOPITT CO mixing ratios over Mexico City, averaged between January-March 2002-2005, are 19% above regional values and the CO plume extends over 10 2 in the free troposphere at 500 hPa. Time series of Red Automatica de Monitoreo Ambiental (RAMA) PM10, and (Aerosol Robotic Network) AERONET and MODIS aerosol optical depths, and RAMA and MOPITT CO time series are inter-compared to illustrate the different perspectives of ground based and satellite instrumentation. Finally, we demonstrate, by examining MODIS and MOPITT data in April 2003, that satellite data can be used to identify episodes in which pollution form fires influences the time series of ground based and satellite observations of urban pollution.

  15. NASDA satellite mission operation system and operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaya, Kousaku; Yoshida, Fumiyoshi; Noguchi, Harushige; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Kazuhiro

    1993-01-01

    NASDA has recently developed a new tracking and control system as a basis for future satellite mission operation. It is named type-I Space Operations and Data Systems (type-I SODS). The software of this system is separated into three parts: operation and control system, network system, and support and information system. The operation control system treats telemetry and command operations. The network system controls the communication line and ground station equipments to connect the satellite and the operation control system. The support and information system provides to other systems necessary information. JERS-1 which was launched in February of this year is the first satellite operated by type-l SODS. We explain the architecture and operation methods of this system using JERS-1 mission operations.

  16. Domestic satellite communications systems - Background and projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargellini, P. L.

    Planned and existing national and international communications satellites are reviewed, along with comparative costs for leasing or owning a satellite and the basic capabilities of communications spacecraft. Eleven different satellite communications systems existed in 1982, including Intelsat, Marisat/Inmarsat, and Intersputnik as the international segments, and the Molniya, Telesat, Palapa, Westar, Satcom, Comstar, Amersat, and the SBS national systems. Seven of the twenty countries leasing Intelsat services are planning their own satellites. Leasing permits full capabilities withno development costs and ensures the lessor of full use of the satellite capacities. Developing countries can then gain hands-on experience with space technologies. Future demands are discussed, noting the broadening of the available bandwidths, better orbit utilization, and increases in transponder numbers to handle increased loads in future spacecraft.

  17. Observing Planetary Rings and Small Satellites with the James Webb Space Telescope: Science Justification and Observation Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.; Showalter, Mark R.; French, Richard G.; Burns, Joseph A.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; de Pater, Imke; Hamilton, Douglas P.; Hedman, Matthew M.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Tamayo, Daniel; Verbiscer, Anne J.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Stansberry, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will provide unprecedented opportunities to observe the rings and small satellites in our Solar System, accomplishing three primary objectives: (1) discovering new rings and moons, (2) unprecedented spectroscopy, and (3) time-domain observations. We give details on these science objectives and describe requirements that JWST must fulfill in order to accomplish the science objectives.

  18. Telematics and satellites. Part 1: Information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, W. R.

    1980-06-01

    Telematic systems are identified and described. The applications are examined emphasizing the role played by satellite links. The discussion includes file transfer, examples of distributed processor systems, terminal communication, information retrieval systems, office information systems, electronic preparation and publishing of information, electronic systems for transfer of funds, electronic mail systems, record file transfer characteristics, intra-enterprise networks, and inter-enterprise networks.

  19. Observing convection with satellite, radar, and lightning measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Ulrich; Nisi, Luca; Clementi, Lorenzo; Ventura, Jordi Figueras i.; Gabella, Marco; Hering, Alessandro M.; Sideris, Ioannis; Trefalt, Simona; Germann, Urs

    2015-04-01

    Heavy precipitation, hail, and wind gusts are the fundamental meteorological hazards associated with strong convection and thunderstorms. The thread is particularly severe in mountainous areas, e.g. it is estimated that on average between 50% and 80% of all weather-related damage in Switzerland is caused by strong thunderstorms (Hilker et al., 2010). Intense atmospheric convection is governed by processes that range from the synoptic to the microphysical scale and are considered to be one of the most challenging and difficult weather phenomena to predict. Even though numerical weather prediction models have some skills to predict convection, in general the exact location of the convective initialization and its propagation cannot be forecasted by these models with sufficient precision. Hence, there is a strong interest to improve the short-term forecast by using statistical, object oriented and/or heuristic nowcasting methods. MeteoSwiss has developed several operational nowcasting systems for this purpose such as TRT (Hering, 2008) and COALITION (Nisi, 2014). In this contribution we analyze the typical development of convection using measurements of the Swiss C-band Dual Polarization Doppler weather radar network, the MSG SEVIRI satellite, and the Météorage lighting network. The observations are complemented with the analysis and forecasts of the COSMO model. Special attention is given to the typical evolutionary stages like the pre-convective environment, convective initiation, cloud top glaciation, start, maximum, and end of precipitation and lightning activity. The pre-convective environment is examined using instability indices derived from SEVIRI observations and the COSMO forecasts. During the early development satellite observations are used to observe the rise of the cloud top, the growth of the cloud droplet or crystals, and the glaciation of the cloud top. SEVIRI brightness temperatures, channel differences, and temporal trends as suggested by Mecikalski et al. (2010) are used to identify convectively active regions. Additionally, retrieved physical cloud properties of state-of-the-art cloud remote sensing algorithms such as the cloud top height, multilayer flags, cloud phase, optical depth and effective radius are employed. As soon as larger particles form, radar observations complement the satellite ones. Radar datasets are used in particular to observe the precipitation intensity and type, the vertical extension and structure of the convective cells. In the mature stage convective cells might start to produce lightning. The relation between the different observables and their suitability as predictors for the further convective development are discussed, e.g. strong updrafts in the developing phase are often followed by fast anvil spreading and intense precipitation in the mature phase. Threads and hazards due to heavy precipitation, hail, and wind gusts are estimated. Hering, A. M., Germann, U., Boscacci, M., Sénési, S., 2008: Operational nowcasting of thunderstorms in the Alps during MAP D-PHASE. In Proceedings of 5th European Conference on Radar in Meteorology and Hydrology (ERAD), 30 June - 4 July 2008, Helsinki, Finland. 1-5. Copernicus: Göttingen, Germany. Hilker, N., Badoux, A., Hegg, C., 2010: Unwetterschäden in der Schweiz im Jahre 2009. Wasser Energ. Luft 102: 1-6 (in German). Mecikalski, J. R., Mackenzie, W. M., König, M., Muller, S. 2010: Use of Meteosat Second Generation infrared data in 0-1 hour convective initiation nowcasting. Part 1. Infrared fields. J. Appl. Meteorol. 49: 521-534. Nisi, L., Ambrosetti, P., Clementi, L., 2014: Nowcasting severe convection in the Alpine region: the COALITION approach. QJRMT, 140, 682, 1684-1699, DOI: 10.1002/qj.2249

  20. CORRECTING PHOTOLYSIS RATES ON THE BASIS OF SATELLITE OBSERVED CLOUDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Clouds can significantly affect photochemical activities in the boundary layer by altering radiation intensity, and therefore their correct specification in the air quality models is of outmost importance. In this study we introduce a technique for using the satellite observed c...

  1. Coordinated rocket and satellite observations of the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaumen, W. T.

    1974-01-01

    Coronal condensations associated with active regions are investigated by comparing their X-ray and EUV line intensities. The EUV line measurements were made with the OSO-H satellite, and the X-ray measurements were made with an ATM support rocket. The data obtained from these observations are used to find the emission measure distribution at low temperatures.

  2. Sensor Web Interoperability Testbed Results Incorporating Earth Observation Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, Stuart; Mandl, Daniel J.; Alameh, Nadine; Bambacus, Myra; Cappelaere, Pat; Falke, Stefan; Derezinski, Linda; Zhao, Piesheng

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes an Earth Observation Sensor Web scenario based on the Open Geospatial Consortium s Sensor Web Enablement and Web Services interoperability standards. The scenario demonstrates the application of standards in describing, discovering, accessing and tasking satellites and groundbased sensor installations in a sequence of analysis activities that deliver information required by decision makers in response to national, regional or local emergencies.

  3. Gravity waves in the thermosphere observed by the AE satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, S. H.; Reber, C. A.; Huang, F. T.

    1983-01-01

    Atmospheric Explorer (AE) satellite data were used to investigate the spectra characteristics of wave-like structure observed in the neutral and ionized components of the thermosphere. Power spectral analysis derived by the maximum entropy method indicate the existence of a broad spectrum of scale sizes for the fluctuations ranging from tens to thousands of kilometers.

  4. Pulse strobing in VLBI for observation of geostationary earth satellites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorodetskij, V. M.

    The possibility of broadband synthesis by pulse strobing for observation of slow-moving objects using standard MARK-1 VLBI processing methods is discussed. The possibility of increasing the SNR by using a special type of pulse function is indicated. A specific scheme for application of the method in satellite radiointerferometry is examined.

  5. Greenland surface albedo changes 1981-2012 from satellite observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Significant melt over Greenland has been observed during the last several decades associated with extreme warming events over the northern Atlantic Ocean. An analysis of surface albedo change over Greenland is presented, using a 32-year consistent satellite albedo product from the Global Land Surfac...

  6. A new digital land mobile satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Philip

    1990-01-01

    A description is given of the different digital services planned to be carried over existing and planned mobile satellite systems. These systems are then compared with analog services in terms of bandwidth and power efficiency. This comparison provides the rationale for the establishment of a digital land mobile satellite service (DLMSS) to use frequencies that are currently available but not yet assigned to a domestic mobile satellite system in the United States. The focus here is on the expected advantages of digital transmission techniques in accommodating additional mobile satellite systems in this portion of the spectrum, and how such techniques can fully satisfy voice, data and facsimile mobile communications requirements in a cost effective manner. A description is given of the system architecture of the DMLSS service proposed by the Geostar Messaging Corporation (GMC) and the market potential of DLMSS.

  7. Globally Gridded Satellite (GridSat) Observations for Climate Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, Kenneth R.; Ansari, Steve; Bain, Caroline L.; Bourassa, Mark A.; Dickinson, Michael J.; Funk, Chris; Helms, Chip N.; Hennon, Christopher C.; Holmes, Christopher D.; Huffman, George J.; Kossin, James P.; Lee, Hai-Tien; Loew, Alexander; Magnusdottir, Gudrun

    2012-01-01

    Geostationary satellites have provided routine, high temporal resolution Earth observations since the 1970s. Despite the long period of record, use of these data in climate studies has been limited for numerous reasons, among them: there is no central archive of geostationary data for all international satellites, full temporal and spatial resolution data are voluminous, and diverse calibration and navigation formats encumber the uniform processing needed for multi-satellite climate studies. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project set the stage for overcoming these issues by archiving a subset of the full resolution geostationary data at approx.10 km resolution at 3 hourly intervals since 1983. Recent efforts at NOAA s National Climatic Data Center to provide convenient access to these data include remapping the data to a standard map projection, recalibrating the data to optimize temporal homogeneity, extending the record of observations back to 1980, and reformatting the data for broad public distribution. The Gridded Satellite (GridSat) dataset includes observations from the visible, infrared window, and infrared water vapor channels. Data are stored in the netCDF format using standards that permit a wide variety of tools and libraries to quickly and easily process the data. A novel data layering approach, together with appropriate satellite and file metadata, allows users to access GridSat data at varying levels of complexity based on their needs. The result is a climate data record already in use by the meteorological community. Examples include reanalysis of tropical cyclones, studies of global precipitation, and detection and tracking of the intertropical convergence zone.

  8. A scheduling and diagnostic system for scientific satellite GEOTAIL using expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakatani, I; Hashimoto, M.; Mukai, T.; Obara, T.; Nishigori, N.

    1994-01-01

    The Intelligent Satellite Control Software (ISACS) for the geoMagnetic tail observation satellite named GEOTAIL (launched in July 1992) has been successfully developed. ISACS has made it possible by applying Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology including an expert system to autonomously generate a tracking schedule, which originally used to be conducted manually. Using ISACS, a satellite operator can generate a maximum four day period of stored command stream autonomously and can easily confirm its safety. The ISACS system has another function -- to diagnose satellite troubles and to suggest necessary remedies. The workload of satellite operators has drastically been reduced since ISACS has been introduced into the operations of GEOTAIL.

  9. Satellite observations of transient radio impulses from thunderstorms

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.E.; Kirkland, M.; Jacobson, A.; Massey, R.; Suszynsky, D.; Eack, K.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Smith, D.

    1999-06-01

    Transient radio emissions from thunderstorms detected by satellites were first reported in 1995. The nature and source of these emissions remained a mystery until the launch of the FORTE satellite in 1997. FORTE, with its more sophisticated triggering and larger memory capacity showed that these emissions were connected to major thunderstorm systems. The analysis reported here, connecting FORTE RF events with ground based lightning location data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), shows that localized regions within thunderstorms are responsible for the creation of the satellite detected rf signals. These regions are connected with the areas of strong radar returns from the NEXRAD Doppler radar system, indicating that they are from regions of intense convection. The authors will also show data from several storms detected in the extended Caribbean, in which the height profile of the source regions can be determined. Although as a single low earth orbit satellite FORTE cannot provide global coverage of thunderstorm/lightning events, follow-on satellite constellations should be able to provide detailed information on global lightning in near real-time.

  10. NASA Satellite Observations: A Unique Asset for the Study of the Environment and Implications for Public Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes Sue M.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation highlights how satellite observation systems are assets for studying the environment in relation to public health. It includes information on current and future satellite observation systems, NASA's public health and safety research, surveillance projects, and NASA's public health partners.

  11. Satellite voice broadcast. Volume 2: System study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachtell, E. E.; Bettadapur, S. S.; Coyner, J. V.; Farrell, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    The Technical Volume of the Satellite Broadcast System Study is presented. Designs are synthesized for direct sound broadcast satellite systems for HF-, VHF-, L-, and Ku-bands. Methods are developed and used to predict satellite weight, volume, and RF performance for the various concepts considered. Cost and schedule risk assessments are performed to predict time and cost required to implement selected concepts. Technology assessments and tradeoffs are made to identify critical enabling technologies that require development to bring technical risk to acceptable levels for full scale development.

  12. A small terminal for satellite communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Fuqin; Wu, Dong; Jin, Min

    1994-01-01

    A small portable, low-cost satellite communications terminal system incorporating a modulator/demodulator and convolutional-Viterbi coder/decoder is described. Advances in signal processing and error-correction techniques in combination with higher power and higher frequencies aboard satellites allow for more efficient use of the space segment. This makes it possible to design small economical earth stations. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) was chosen to test the system. ACTS, operating at the Ka band incorporates higher power, higher frequency, frequency and spatial reuse using spot beams and polarization.

  13. Tropospheric effects of satellite power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, K.L.; Lee, J.

    1980-01-01

    The construction and operation of a system of solar power satellites is expected to have a variety of effects on the troposphere. The launching of large space vehicles affects the air quality in the vicinity of the launch site, and the ground cloud associated with such a launch is known to stimulate the growth of water clouds under some circumstances. The transmission of power from satellite to the Earth's surface may affect certain meteorological parameters in the vicinity of the rectenna site. These and other effects are discussed in reference to the proposed solar power satellite system.

  14. Generation of VLF saucer emissions observed by the Viking satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Loennqvist, H.; Andre, M.; Matson, L.; Bahnsen, A.; Blomberg, L.G.; Erlandson, R.E.

    1993-08-01

    The authors report observations of V shaped saucer emissions by the Viking satellite. This V shaped saucer emission refers to the observational feature of the VLF or ELF emissions which shows a v shaped appearance on a plot of frequency as a function of time. Viking provided not only wave, but electric and magnetic field measurements, as well as charged particle measurements. These measurements show electrons flowing upwards with enegies of up to a few hundred eV in conjunction with the saucer emissions. Other wave structures observed in this same region may originate from the electron flows. The satellite observations also find such events at altitudes from 4000 to 13000km, where the generation region is found to be much more spread out in space.

  15. Voyager 2 photopolarimeter observations of the Uranian satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Robert M.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Wallis, Brad D.; Lane, Arthur L.; West, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The surfaces of the principal Uranian satellites are characterized on the basis of UV and IR geometric albedos, phase curves, and phase coefficients obtained in full-disk photopolarimetric observations during the Voyager 2 encounter with Uranus in January 1986. The data are presented in tables and graphs and found to be consistent with a heavily cratered terrain and loosely packed regolith. The Bond albedos are calculated as 0.22 + or - 0.1 for Ariel, 0.07 + or - 0.05 for Umbriel, 0.16 + or - 0.12 for Titania, and 0.19 + or - 0.22 for Oberon. The characteristics of the Uranian satellites indicate compositions (and probably formation conditions and surface-modification mechanisms) distinct from those of the Saturnian and Jovian satellites.

  16. Distance law and formation of satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhong-Wei; Chen, Zhi-Xiong

    In the solar system satellite systems of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus are typical ones. The distribution of the semi-major axis of satellite orbits in each system may be expressed by an empirical formula corresponding to the Titius-Bode law. The authors found that it can be written as an = B'mBn, where B' and B are constants. Values of B' and B depend on formation conditions of each system. Satellites should be formed in the gas-satellitesimal disk around a planet and by aggregation of satellitesimals. The gas is the major component in the disk and its damping effect must play an important role in the process of aggregation of satellitesimals. It may be proved that radial small perturbation in the disk can cause the gravitational instability and the formation of gaseous rings with increased density, where satellitesimals can easy aggregat into satellites.

  17. Satellite Observations for Evaluating CMIP5/IPCC Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, R.; Waliser, D. E.; Teixeira, J.; Gleckler, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    Taylor et al (2008) have defined the protocol for the CMIP5 simulations that will be used for the next IPCC Assessment Report, AR5. The protocol defines the scope of simulations that will be undertaken by the participating modeling groups. For several of the prescribed retrospective simulations (e.g, decadal hindcasts, AMIP and 20th Century coupled simulations) observational data sets can be used to evaluate and diagnose the simulation outputs. In this presentation, we will report on a collaborative activity between NASA and PCMDI that has provided the community of researchers with a set of observations that align with key physical variables in these simulation outputs. These datasets contain temperature, specific humidity, ozone, ocean surface winds, SST, SSH, TOA outgoing radiation, and cloud fraction measurements from NASA satellites that have been formatted to match the CMIP5/IPCC climate model data sets. Each dataset is accompanied by a technical note that explains key details the user needs to be aware of in performing comparisons of the data with model output. The data sets are accessible via the same Earth System Grid (ESG) web portal as the model data. Community input is welcome on the long-term aspects of this project in terms of additional data sets, analysis capabilities, performance metrics, and relevant information technology issues (e.g., ESG).

  18. Magnetic field observations on the Akebono (EXOS-D) satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukunishi, H.; Fujii, R.; Kokubun, S.; Hayashi, K.; Tohyama, T.

    The Akebono (EXOS-D) satellite carries triaxial fluxgate and search coil magnetometers with sensors mounted on 5- and 3-m masts, respectively. The fluxgate magnetometer has four automatically switchable ranges from + or - 1024 to + or - 65536 nT (full scale), and resolutions commensurate with a 16-bit A/D converter in each range (0.031 to 2 nT). The rate of sampling is 32 vectors/sec. The triaxial search coil magnetometer has a frequency response up to 800 Hz. Signals in the frequency range higher than 100 Hz are used for VLF plasma wave experiments, while signals less than 100 Hz are used for magnetic field experiments. After the 3- and 5-m masts were extended on March 7 and 8, 1989, respectively, both the magnetometers are operating continuously. Intense small-scale field-aligned currents embedded in the large-scale field-aligned current system were always observed at 1-2 Re altitudes in all local time regions. The region 0 currents which flow in the poleward region adjacent to the region 1 currents were also frequently observed. The search coil magnetometer measured ion cyclotron waves at 1-2 Re altitudes near the equator.

  19. Anti-sway control of tethered satellite systems using attitude control of the main satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefian, Peyman; Salarieh, Hassan

    2015-06-01

    In this study a new method is introduced to suppress libration of a tethered satellite system (TSS). It benefits from coupling between satellites and tether libration dynamics. The control concept uses the main satellite attitude maneuvers to suppress librational motion of the tether, and the main satellite's actuators for attitude control are used as the only actuation in the system. The study considers planar motion of a two body TSS system in a circular orbit and it is assumed that the tether's motion will not change it. Governing dynamic equations of motion are derived using the extended Lagrange method. Controllability of the system around the equilibrium state is studied and a linear LQG controller is designed to regulate libration of the system. Tether tension and satellite attitude are assumed as only measurable outputs of the system. The Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is used to estimate states of the system to be used as feedback to the controller. The designed controller and observer are implemented to the nonlinear plant and simulations demonstrate that the controller lead to reduction of the tether libration propoerly. By the way, because the controller is linear, it is applicable only at low amplitudes in the vicinity of equilibrium point. To reach global stability, a nonlinear controller is demanded.

  20. Influence of ground scattering on satellite auroral observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, P. B.; Anger, C. D.

    1978-01-01

    Satellite observations of the optical emission features in the aurora and nighttime airglow are usually contaminated by scattering from clouds and snow. It is shown here that this contamination can easily be removed when the emission layer is viewed against a surface of known albedo. The effect of the earth's curvature, parallax, and varying image angle are found to be significant but can be removed from the observation.

  1. Influence of ground scattering on satellite auroral observations.

    PubMed

    Hays, P B; Anger, C D

    1978-06-15

    Satellite observations of the optical emission features in the aurora and nighttime airglow are usually contaminated by scattering from clouds and snow. It is shown here that this contamination can easily be removed when the emission layer is viewed against a surface of known albedo. The effect of the earth's curvature, parallax, and varying image angle are found to be significant but can be removed from the observation. PMID:20198091

  2. Whistler-triggered emissions observed by ISIS satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Ondoh, T.

    1989-01-01

    A statistical examination has been conducted of the ducted and nonducted whistler-triggered emissions (WTEs) observed by the ISIS satellites in the 1979-1981 period. Most WTEs are observed with simultaneous lower hybrid resonance in the topside ionosphere. The VLF emissions triggered by ducted whistlers frequently occur at L of 2-3, while those triggered by nonducted whistlers occur in the wider latitudinal regions at L of 2.2-4.3.

  3. Satellite power system (SPS) initial insurance evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    The beginning of a process to educate the insurance industry about the Satellite Power System is reported. The report is divided into three sections. In the first section a general history describes how space risks are being insured today. This is followed by an attempt to identify the major risks inherent to the SPS. The final section presents a general projection of insurance market reactions to the Satellite Power System.

  4. Satellite antenna management system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leath, Timothy T (Inventor); Azzolini, John D (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The antenna management system and method allow a satellite to communicate with a ground station either directly or by an intermediary of a second satellite, thus permitting communication even when the satellite is not within range of the ground station. The system and method employ five major software components, which are the control and initialization module, the command and telemetry handler module, the contact schedule processor module, the contact state machining module, and the telemetry state machine module. The control and initialization module initializes the system and operates the main control cycle, in which the other modules are called. The command and telemetry handler module handles communication to and from the ground station. The contact scheduler processor module handles the contact entry schedules to allow scheduling of contacts with the second satellite. The contact and telemetry state machine modules handle the various states of the satellite in beginning, maintaining and ending contact with the second satellite and in beginning, maintaining and ending communication with the satellite.

  5. A baseline maritime satellite communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durrani, S. H.; Mcgregor, D. N.

    1974-01-01

    This paper describes a baseline system for maritime communications via satellite during the 1980s. The system model employs three geostationary satellites with global coverage antennas. Access to the system is controlled by a master station; user access is based on time-ordered polling or random access. Each Thor-Delta launched satellite has an RF power of 100 W (spinner) or 250 W (three-axis stabilized), and provides 10 equivalent duplex voice channels for up to 1500 ships with average waiting times of approximately 2.5 minutes. The satellite capacity is bounded by the available bandwidth to 50 such channels, which can serve up to 10,000 ships with an average waiting time of 5 minutes. The ships must have peak antenna gains of approximately 15.5 dB or 22.5 dB for the two cases (10 or 50 voice channels) when a spinner satellite is used; the required gains are 4 dB lower if a three-axis stabilized satellite is used. The ship antenna requirements can be reduced by 8 to 10 dB by employing a high-gain multi-beam phased array antenna on the satellite.

  6. Remote Observing with the Keck Telescope Using the ACTS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Judy; Shopbell, Patrick; Bergman, Larry

    1998-01-01

    As a technical demonstration project for the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), we have implemented remote observing on the 10-meter Keck II telescope on Mauna Kea in Hawaii from the California Institute of Technology campus in Pasadena. The data connection consists of optical fiber networks in Hawaii and California, connecting the end-points to high data rate (HDR) ACTS satellite antennae at JPL in Pasadena and at the Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu. The terrestrial fiber networks run the asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) protocol at DS-3 (45 Mbit/sec) speeds, providing ample bandwidth to enable remote observing with a software environment identical to that used for on-site observing in Hawaii. This experiment has explored the data requirements of remote observing with a modern research telescope and large-format detector arrays. While the maximum burst data rates are lower than those required for many other applications (e.g., HDTV), the network reliability and data integrity requirements are critical. As we show in this report, the former issue particularly may be the greatest challenge for satellite networks for this class of application. We have also experimented with the portability of standard TCP/IP applications to satellite networks, demonstrating the need for alternative TCP congestion algorithms and minimization of bit error rates (BER). Reliability issues aside, we have demonstrated that true remote observing over high-speed networks provides several important advantages over standard observing paradigms. Technical advantages of the high-speed network access include more rapid download of data to a user's home institution and the opportunity for alternative communication facilities between members of an observing team, such as audio- and videoconferencing.

  7. Time Resolved Atmospheric Carbon Satellite Observations from Geostationary Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, David; Worden, Helen

    This presentation describes proposed satellite carbon measurements from CHRONOS (Commercially Hosted spectroRadiometer Observations and New Opportunities for Science). The primary goal of this mission is to measure the atmospheric pollutants carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) from geostationary orbit, with hourly observations of North America at high spatial resolution. Carbon monoxide is produced by combustion processes such as urban activity and wildfires, and serves as a proxy for other combustion pollutants that are not easily measured. Both CO and CH4 are chemical precursors of tropospheric ozone pollution. Methane has diverse anthropogenic sources ranging from fossil fuel production, animal husbandry, agriculture and waste management. The impact of gas exploration in the Western States of the USA and oil extraction from the Canadian tar sands will be particular foci of the mission, as will the poorly-quantified natural CH4 emissions from wetlands and thawing permafrost. In addition to characterizing pollutant sources, improved understanding of the domestic CH4 budget is a priority for policy decisions related to short-lived climate forcers. A primary motivation for targeting CO is its value as a tracer of atmospheric pollution. The CHRONOS measurements will provide insight into local and long-range transport across the North American continent, as well as the processes governing the entrainment and venting of pollution in and out of the planetary boundary layer. As a result of significantly improved characterization of diurnal changes in atmospheric composition, CHRONOS observations will find direct societal applications for air quality regulation and forecasting. We present a quantification of this expected improvement in the prediction of near-surface concentrations when CHRONOS measurements are used in Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). If CHRONOS and the planned NASA Earth Venture TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution) mission were implemented concurrently, the resulting measurement suite would efficiently and expeditiously serve to address the science goals of the Decadal Survey proposed GEO-CAPE mission.

  8. Time Resolved Atmospheric Carbon Satellite Observations from Geostationary Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, D. P.; Worden, H. M.; Deeter, M. N.; Worden, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation describes proposed satellite carbon measurements from CHRONOS (Commercially Hosted spectroRadiometer Observations and New Opportunities for Science). The primary goal of this mission is to measure the atmospheric pollutants carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) from geostationary orbit, with hourly observations of North America at high spatial resolution. Carbon monoxide is produced by combustion processes such as urban activity and wildfires, and serves as a proxy for other combustion pollutants that are not easily measured. Both CO and CH4 are chemical precursors of tropospheric ozone pollution. Methane has diverse anthropogenic sources ranging from fossil fuel production, animal husbandry, agriculture and waste management. The impact of gas exploration in the Western States of the USA and oil extraction from the Canadian tar sands will be particular foci of the mission, as will the poorly-quantified natural CH4 emissions from wetlands and thawing permafrost. In addition to characterizing pollutant sources, improved understanding of the domestic CH4 budget is a priority for policy decisions related to short-lived climate forcers. A primary motivation for targeting CO is its value as a tracer of atmospheric pollution. The CHRONOS measurements will provide insight into local and long-range transport across the North American continent, as well as the processes governing the entrainment and venting of pollution in and out of the planetary boundary layer. As a result of significantly improved characterization of diurnal changes in atmospheric composition, CHRONOS observations will find direct societal applications for air quality regulation and forecasting. We present a quantification of this expected improvement in the prediction of near-surface concentrations when CHRONOS measurements are used in Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). If CHRONOS and the planned NASA Earth Venture TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution) mission were implemented concurrently, the resulting measurement suite would efficiently and expeditiously serve to address the science goals of the Decadal Survey proposed GEO-CAPE mission.

  9. Observed Weather Satellite Thermal IR Responses Prior to Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, N. A.; Zobrist, A. L.; Logan, L. L.; Freund, F.; Nishenko, S.

    2002-12-01

    A number of observers claim to have seen thermal anomalies prior to earthquakes, but subsequent analysis by others have failed to produce similar findings. It was the purpose of this study to determine if thermal anomalies could be found in association with known earthquakes by systematically co-registering weather satellite images at the sub-pixel level and then determining if statistically significant responses had occurred prior to an event. Earthquakes associated with plate movement (strike-slip and thrust faulting), rather than volcanism, were to be considered. A new set of automatic co-registration procedures were developed for this task to accommodate all properties particular to weather satellite observations taken at night. Spacecraft and sensor ephemeris and the horizontal displacement due to elevation were all factored in, and final adjustment for minor satellite deviations (related to roll, pitch, and yaw) were made by using image-to-image tiepoint correlations. Reliance upon visual clues in an image (frequently the subject of debate in the past) is not required. The technique relies on the general condition where ground cools after sunset. The technique applies best to the use of the geosynchronous weather satellites (GOES, Meteosat, and GMS), where images are taken every thirty minutes. Use of the geosynchronous satellites also reduces the potential for miscalculation of trends due to weather front movement or local cloud/fog formation. The polar orbiting satellites have better resolution (1km vs 5km) and better signal-to-noise, but only acquire images twice during an evening, thereby making trend analysis difficult. Case studies investigated to date include the Hector Mine California and Ikrit Turkey earthquakes of 1999, and the Bhuj India quake of 2001. The result of the new analytic procedures has been the observance of apparent heating trends close to epicenters in satellite data acquisitions a few hours prior to an earthquake. When observations along known fault-lines showed a much-reduced `temperature' decline through the evening, or in some cases an actual `temperature' increase, an earthquake occurred. This result may indicate mid-infrared luminescence associated with crustal deformation(Freund, 2002), rather than heat emission. Other events are currently under investigation using the methods developed.

  10. Principle characteristics of the National Earth Observation Satellite. Project SPOT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cazenave, M.

    1977-01-01

    A recent meeting of the Economic and Social Committee examined the programs and means currently being implemented by France in the field in the field of space research and industry which could bring about fast results. This was prompted by man's desire to insure rational resource management of his planet and by man's awareness of the definite contribution that space observation can make to this field of research. Through discussion, the Economic and Social Committee has approved the plan for creating an earth observation satellite. A detailed discussion of the principle characteristics of this earth observation satellite include the objectives, the orbit, characteristics and operations of the platform, maintenance, attitude measurement, the power available and many other characteristics.

  11. Geomagnetic pulsations observed simultaneously on three geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. J.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Barfield, J. N.

    1978-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of magnetic pulsations have been made by three geostationary satellites carrying similar magnetometers and acting as an azimuthal array. Autospectral and cross-spectral analysis yields coherence and phase differences between the pulsations at the satellite positions. The majority of the data fit the Kelvin-Helmholtz generation mechanism. The azimuthal wave number changes sign near noon and corresponds to propagation away from noon. Usually, the wave number is less than 10 deg per degree of longitude. Later in the afternoon, however, strong pulsations are observed with low coherence, implying large wave numbers. This suggests an instability driven by a gradient in the intensity of energetic protons, which may be expected at this local time. The data also suggest that some of the observed phase difference between the azimuthal components is due to small separations in magnetic shell, whereas this is not the case for the radial components. This implies a localized field-line resonance.

  12. Possible satellite-based observations of the 1997 Leonid meteoroids

    SciTech Connect

    Pongratz, M.B.; Carlos, R.C.; Cayton, T.

    1998-12-01

    The Block IIA GPS satellites are equipped with a sensor designed to detect electromagnetic transients. Several phenomena will produce triggers in this sensor. They include earth-based electromagnetic transients such as lightning and two space-based phenomena--deep dielectric discharge and meteoroid or hyper-velocity micro-gram particle impact (HMPI). Energetic electrons in the GPS environment cause the deep dielectric charging. HMPIs cause triggers through the transient electric fields generated by the ejecta plasma. During the 1997 Leonid passage the energetic particle fluxes were very low. In the presence of such low fluxes the typical median trigger rate is 20 per minute with a standard deviation of about 20 per minute. Between 0800 UT and 1200 UT on November 17, 1997, the sensor on a specially configured satellite observed trigger rates more than 10 sigma above the nominal median rate. Sensors on other Block IIA GPS satellites also observed excess triggers during November. Detection is enhanced when the sensor antenna is oriented into the Leonid radiant. While many questions persist the authors feel that it is likely that the excess events during the November interval were caused by the close approach of the satellites to the Leonid meteoroid path.

  13. Observations of artificially produced scintillations using satellite transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, J. H.; Fritz, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    The ionospheric modification experiment, utilizing a high-powered transmitter, provides an opportunity to study ionospheric irregularities under relatively known conditions. The irregularities were studied by means of transionospheric signals from the polar-orbiting satellite ESSA 8 transmitting at 137 MHz. These observations show that scintillations occur when the satellite to ground station geometry is such that the ray from the satellite passes through the region in the ionosphere under modification. In general, a cut across the illuminated volume is obtained; thus an active region of about 100 km in diameter is indicated. For the most part, the artificial scintillations appear to be similar to those obtained from naturally occurring irregularities, but a systematic change from 3 to 1 sec in the fluctuation period is usually observed as the satellite traverses from the northern to the southern portions of the active region. The change in period appears to be produced by a systematic change in irregularity scale size from about 4 to about 1 km.

  14. Development of an ice crystal scattering database for the global change observation mission/second generation global imager satellite mission: investigating the refractive index grid system and potential retrieval error.

    PubMed

    Letu, Husi; Nakajima, Takashi Y; Matsui, Takashi N

    2012-09-01

    Computing time and retrieval error of the effective particle radius are important considerations when developing an ice crystal scattering database to be used in radiative transfer simulation and satellite remote sensing retrieval. Therefore, the light scattering database should be optimized based on the specifications of the satellite sensor. In this study, the grid system of the complex refractive index in the 1.6 ?m (SW3) channel of the Global Change Observation Mission/Second Generation Global Imager satellite sensor is investigated for optimizing the ice crystal scattering database. This grid system is separated into twelve patterns according to the step size of the real and imaginary parts of the refractive index. Specifically, the LIght Scattering solver Applicable to particles of arbitrary Shape/Geometrical-Optics Approximation technique is used to simulate the scattering of light by randomly oriented large hexagonal ice crystals. The difference of radiance with different step size of the refractive index is calculated from the developed light scattering database using the radiative transfer (R-STAR) solver. The results indicated that the step size of the real part is a significant factor in difference of radiance. PMID:22945165

  15. NASA Perspectives on Earth Observations from Satellite or 50 Years of Meteorological Satellite Experiments-The NASA Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Einaudi, Franco

    2010-01-01

    The NASA was established in 1959. From those very eady days to the present NASA has been intimately involved with NOAA and the scientific community in the development and operation of satellite and sensor experiments. The early efforts included experiments on the TIROS and geostationary Applications Technology Satellites (ATS) series. In the latter case the spin-scan cameras conceived by Verner Suomi, along with the TIROS cameras, opened new vistas at what could be done in meteorological studies with the daily, nearly global, synoptic views from space-borne sensors As the years passed and the Nimbus series of satellites came into being in the 1960's, more quantitative observations with longer-lifetime, increasingly capable, better calibrated instruments came into being. NASA, in collaboration with and in support of NOAA, implemented operational systems that we now know as the Polar Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) series and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) series that provided dependable, continuous, dedicated satellite observations for use by the weather and atmospheric science communities. Through the 1970's, 1980's, and 1990's improved, well-calibrated instruments with more spectral bands extending into the thermal and the microwave portions of the electromagnetic spectrum were provided to obtain accurate soundings of the atmosphere, atmospheric chemistry constituents such as ozone, global sea surface temperature, snow and ice extent, vegetation dynamics, etc. In the 1990's and up to the present the NASA/Earth Observing System (EOS) has been developed, implemented, and operated over many years to provide a very comprehensive suite of observations of the atmosphere, as well as land and ocean parameters. The future looks bright wherein the development of new systems, broadly described by the National Academy of Science Decadal Study, is now underway. NASA, along with collaborations with NOAA, other agencies, and the scientific and applications communities looks forward to achieving in the years to come goals possible with the global information provided by satellites and continuously improved with technology development, joint data assimilation efforts, and attendant research studies.

  16. A land mobile satellite data system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, John D. B.

    The Telesat Mobile Incorporated (TMI) Mobile Data System (MDS) was developed to apply satellite technology to the transportation industry's requirement for a fleet management system. It will provide two-way messaging and automatic position reporting capabilities between dispatch centers and customers' fleets of trucks. The design was based on the Inmarsat L-Band space segment with system link parameters and margins adjusted to meet the land mobile satellite channel characteristics. The system interfaces with the Teleglobe Des Laurentides earth station at Weir, Quebec. The signaling protocols were derived from the Inmarsat Standard C packet signalling system with unique trucking requirements incorporated where necessary.

  17. A land mobile satellite data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, John D. B.

    1990-01-01

    The Telesat Mobile Incorporated (TMI) Mobile Data System (MDS) was developed to apply satellite technology to the transportation industry's requirement for a fleet management system. It will provide two-way messaging and automatic position reporting capabilities between dispatch centers and customers' fleets of trucks. The design was based on the Inmarsat L-Band space segment with system link parameters and margins adjusted to meet the land mobile satellite channel characteristics. The system interfaces with the Teleglobe Des Laurentides earth station at Weir, Quebec. The signaling protocols were derived from the Inmarsat Standard C packet signalling system with unique trucking requirements incorporated where necessary.

  18. The Ellipso (TM) mobile satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castiel, David; Draim, John E.

    1995-01-01

    The Ellipso(trademark) Mobile Satellite System is conceived to extend telecommunication services throughout the world to users that are not well, or not at all served by existing mobile or fixed telephone systems. Unlike cellular telephones, Ellipso(trademark) offers fully nationwide service to every served country, thereby providing service to users located anywhere within the national boundaries, no matter how isolated or remote. With Ellipso(trademark), a user in the middle of a wilderness area will have the same mobile telecommunications service as a user in a major metropolitan area. Ellipso(trademark) uses medium earth orbiting (MEO) satellites and an efficient system design to reach its subscribers directly and at a price that is competitive with terrestrial telephone services. The subscriber only requires a clear view of a serving satellite to achieve a connection and to connect to anyone else served by the national telecommunications system. Subscribers within view of two or more satellites will benefit from Ellipso's(trademark) unique satellite diversity processing, using all available satellites simultaneously to optimize circuit quality.

  19. Astrometric observations of the faint satellites of Jupiter during the 1975 - 1976 opposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, J. D.; Shelus, P. J.; Benedict, G. F.

    1979-01-01

    The series of astrometric observations of the satellites of the trans-martian planets re-established at the McDonald Observatory in 1972 is continued. The positions deduced from photographic observations of the jovian system obtained during the 1975-76 opposition are presented together with the discovery positions of four asteroids found on these plates.

  20. ECC Ozonesonde Reliability, Observations, and Comparisons with Satellite Ozone Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidlin, F. J.; Northam, E. T.; Ross, E. D.; Schauer, A. G.; Gerlach, John C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Electrochemical Concentration Cell (ECC) ozone instruments depend on the quality of care exercised in their pre-flight preparation. The ozone-measuring project conducted at Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility uses a number of mechanisms designed to inspect the ECC for anomalies that may interfere with the reception of valid ozone profiles. Complete electronic testing of the instrument, individually and when coupled to its radiosonde has led to exceptional monitoring of ozone for detecting long-term atmospheric changes. A number of factors are considered when preparing an ECC instrument for flight. These basically are specific calibrations of pump efficiency, volumetric flow rate, temperature of the air entering the pump, and background current. The concentration of the potassium iodide solution is also important. Wallops is the only site using a UV photometer (Dasibi) to compare ECC ozone output at various concentrations of ozone that allows adjustment to be made to offsets that may appear in the balloon-borne instrument prior to release. All of the above procedures allow identification of potential problems before release of the ECC instrument. Procedures followed at Wallops also are employed in Brazil, and Ascension Island where NASA has cooperative agreements in place to obtain ozonesondes data. All ECC instruments are prepared 3-4 weeks prior to the day of observation. We will briefly describe the instrumental tests employed. These tests have included simultaneous dual observations to compare the effect of different solution concentrations, comparison of sensors of different manufacturers, and comparisons with surface- and space-based instrumentation such as the Dobson Spectrophotometer and satellites. Vertical profiles of ozone from Arctic, mid-latitudes, and Antarctica will be discussed. Although not unusual, the data reveals ozone structure that correlate well with typical atmospheric temperatures and possibly relative humidity. Finally, vertical ozone distribution, compared with remotely measured ozone from lidar and satellite, will be discussed. Specific comparisons between ECC and HALOE measurements, integrated ECC total ozone overburden with the EP-TOMS and the Dobson, as well as comparisons with lidar are discussed. Results show agreement and some disagreement between the in situ measurements of the ECC and the remote instruments. We postulate reasons for the differences, or biases, which in spite of the excellent ECC quality control during pre-flight preparation and data analysis processes, may be due to uncertainties in both measuring systems.

  1. Assimilating Satellite SST Observations into a Diurnal Cycle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, S.; Haines, K.; Nichols, N. K.

    2006-12-01

    The wealth of satellite sea surface temperature (SST) data now available opens the possibility of large improvements in SST estimation. However the use of such data is not straight forward; a major difficulty in assimilating satellite observations is that they represent a near surface temperature, whereas in ocean models the top level represents the temperature at a greater depth. During the day, under favourable conditions of clear skies and calm winds, the near surface temperature is often seen to have a diurnal cycle that is picked up in satellite observations. Current ocean models do not have the vertical or temporal resolution to adequately represent this daytime warming. The usual approach is to discard daytime observations as they are considered diurnally `corrupted'. A new assimilation technique is developed here that assimilates observations into a diurnal cycle model. The diurnal cycle of SSTs are modelled using a 1-D mixed layer model with fine near surface resolution and 6 hourly forcing from NWP analyses. The accuracy of the SST estimates are hampered by uncertainties in the forcing data. The extent of diurnal SST warming at a particular location and time is predominately governed by a non-linear response to cloud cover and sea surface wind speeds which greatly affect the air-sea fluxes. The method proposed here combines infrared and microwave SST satellite observations in order to derive corrections to the cloud cover and wind speed values over the day. By adjusting the forcing, SST estimation and air-sea fluxes should be improved and are at least more consistent with each other. This new technique for assimilating SST data can be considered a tool for producing more accurate diurnal warming estimates.

  2. Observation of global electromagnetic resonances by low- orbiting satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surkov, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Penetration of Schumann resonances energy from the Earth-ionosphere resonance cavity into the circumterrestrial space is examined. This study focuses on estimates of Alfvén wave amplitude and spectra in the frequency range of 7-50 Hz which can be observed by low-orbiting satellites. Differences in Schumann resonances observation conditions between the nighttime and sunlit sides of the ionosphere are analyzed. Particular emphasis has been placed on the ionospheric Alfvén resonator (IAR) excited by both global thunderstorm activity and individual lightning discharges. IAR spectra in the frequency range of 0.5-10 Hz are calculated for ionospheric altitudes. The calculated spectral amplitudes of IAR and Schumann resonances are compatible with C/NOFS satellite observations. To explain a shift of IAR resonant frequencies observed during C/NOFS satellite passage through terminator region, the IAR model is developed in which an interference of Alfvén waves reflected from the ionospheric E-layer and the IAR upper boundary is taken into account.

  3. The Synchronous Meteorological Satellite /SMS/ system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fordyce, D. V.; Wirth, R. J.; Shenk, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    The Synchronous Meteorological Satellite (SMS) system is described which is being utilized in a program to obtain day and night information on the earth's weather by means of earth imaging, retransmission of imaged data, meteorological data collection and relay, and space environment monitoring. The components and functions of the ground system are discussed together with the basic satellite payloads. The launch and orbit of SMS-A are reviewed, and the functions of the visible IR spin-scan radiometer are described in detail. Other systems and units discussed include the data collection system, solar environment monitor, weather-facsimile unit, and central data distribution system. It is noted that SMS-A was used to support the Global Atlantic Tropical Experiment and that the SMS system will be complemented by geostationary environmental satellites from ESRO, Japan, and the USSR.

  4. SOFT project: a new forecasting system based on satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual, Ananda; Orfila, A.; Alvarez, Alberto; Hernandez, E.; Gomis, D.; Barth, Alexander; Tintore, Joaquim

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the SOFT project is to develop a new ocean forecasting system by using a combination of satellite dat, evolutionary programming and numerical ocean models. To achieve this objective two steps are proved: (1) to obtain an accurate ocean forecasting system using genetic algorithms based on satellite data; and (2) to integrate the above new system into existing deterministic numerical models. Evolutionary programming will be employed to build 'intelligent' systems that, learning form the past ocean variability and considering the present ocean state, will be able to infer near future ocean conditions. Validation of the forecast skill will be carried out by comparing the forecasts fields with satellite and in situ observations. Validation with satellite observations will provide the expected errors in the forecasting system. Validation with in situ data will indicate the capabilities of the satellite based forecast information to improve the performance of the numerical ocean models. This later validation will be accomplished considering in situ measurements in a specific oceanographic area at two different periods of time. The first set of observations will be employed to feed the hybrid systems while the second set will be used to validate the hybrid and traditional numerical model results.

  5. Correction of real-time satellite precipitation with satellite soil moisture observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, W.; Pan, M.; Wanders, N.; Wood, E. F.

    2015-10-01

    Rainfall and soil moisture are two key elements in modeling the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere. Accurate and high-resolution real-time precipitation is crucial for monitoring and predicting the onset of floods, and allows for alert and warning before the impact becomes a disaster. Assimilation of remote sensing data into a flood-forecasting model has the potential to improve monitoring accuracy. Space-borne microwave observations are especially interesting because of their sensitivity to surface soil moisture and its change. In this study, we assimilate satellite soil moisture retrievals using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land surface model, and a dynamic assimilation technique, a particle filter, to adjust the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) real-time precipitation estimates. We compare updated precipitation with real-time precipitation before and after adjustment and with NLDAS gauge-radar observations. Results show that satellite soil moisture retrievals provide additional information by correcting errors in rainfall bias. The assimilation is most effective in the correction of medium rainfall under dry to normal surface conditions, while limited/negative improvement is seen over wet/saturated surfaces. On the other hand, high-frequency noises in satellite soil moisture impact the assimilation by increasing rainfall frequency. The noise causes larger uncertainty in the false-alarmed rainfall over wet regions. A threshold of 2 mm day-1 soil moisture change is identified and applied to the assimilation, which masked out most of the noise.

  6. Extreme ultraviolet explorer satellite observation of Jupiter's Io plasma torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. T; Gladstone, G. R.; Moos, H. W.; Bagenal, F.; Clarke, J. T.; Feldman, P. D.; Mcgrath, M. A.; Schneider, N. M.; Shemansky, D. E.; Strobel, D. F.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite observation of the Jupiter system, obtained during the 2 day period 1993 March 30 through April 1, which shows a rich emission-line spectrum from the Io plasma torus spanning wavelengths 370 to 735 A. The emission features correspond primarily to known multiplets of oxygen and sulfur ions, but a blended feature near 372 A is a plausible Na II transition. The summed detected energy flux of (7.2 +/- 0.2) x 10(exp -11) ergs/sq cm(s) corresponds to a radiated power of approximately equal to 4 x 10(exp 11) W in this spectral range. All ansa emissions show a distinct dawn-dusk brightness asymmetry and the measured dusk/dawn ratio of the bright S III lambda-680 feature is 2.3 +/- 0.3, significantly larger than the ratio measured by the Voyager spacecraft ultraviolet (UV) instruments. A preliminary estimate of ion partitioning indicates that the oxygen/sulfur ion ratio is approximately equal to 2, compared to the value approximately equal to 1.3 measured by Voyager, and that (Na(+))/(e) greater than 0.01.

  7. Satellite Communication Hardware Emulation System (SCHES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Ted

    1993-01-01

    Satellite Communication Hardware Emulator System (SCHES) is a powerful simulator that emulates the hardware used in TDRSS links. SCHES is a true bit-by-bit simulator that models communications hardware accurately enough to be used as a verification mechanism for actual hardware tests on user spacecraft. As a credit to its modular design, SCHES is easily configurable to model any user satellite communication link, though some development may be required to tailor existing software to user specific hardware.

  8. Earth Observing System: Global Observations to Study the Earth's Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is a space-based observing system comprised of a series of satellite sensors by which scientists can monitor the Earth, a Data and Information System (EOSDIS) enabling researchers worldwide to access the satellite data, and an interdisciplinary science research program to interpret the satellite data. During the last couple of years, four EOS science missions were launched, representing observations of (i) total solar irradiance, (ii) Earth radiation budget, (iii) land cover & land use change, (iv) ocean processes (vector wind, sea surface temperature, and ocean color), (v) atmospheric processes (aerosol and cloud properties, water vapor, and temperature and moisture profiles), and (vi) tropospheric chemistry. In succeeding years many more satellites will be launched that will contribute immeasurably to our understanding of the Earth's environment. In this presentation I will describe how scientists are using NASA's Earth science data to examine land use and natural hazards, environmental air quality, including: dust storms over the worlds deserts, cloud and radiation properties, sea surface temperature, and winds over the ocean, with a special emphasis on satellite observations available for studying the southern African environment.

  9. Satellite power system salvage and disposal alternatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A wide range of salvage options for the SPS satellite, ranging from use in and beyond geosynchronous orbit to use in low Earth orbit in return and use on Earth are presented. The satellite can be used intact to provide power for various purposes, it can be cannibalized or it can be melted down to supply materials for space or ground based products. The use of SPS beyond its nominal lifetime provides value that can be deducted from the SPS capital investment cost. The present value of the salvage value of the SPS satellites, referenced to the system initial operation data, is on the order of five to ten percent of its on-orbit capital cost. (Given a 30 year satellite lifetime and a four percent discount rate, the theoretical maximum salvage value is 30.8 percent of the capital cost.) The SPS demonstration satellite is available some 30 years earlier than the first full scale SPS satellite and has a salvage value on the order of 80 percent of its on-orbit capital cost. In the event that it becomes desirable to dispose of either the demonstration of full scale SPS satellite, a number of disposal options is presented for which intact disposal costs are less than one percent of capital costs.

  10. The Saturn System's Icy Satellites: New Results from Cassini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes-Gautier, Rosaly M.; Buratti, Bonnie; Hendrix, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    Cassini-Huygens is a multidisciplinary, international planetary mission consisting of an orbiting spacecraft and a probe. The Huygens probe successfully landed on Titan's surface on January 14, 2005, while the orbiter has performed observations of Saturn, its rings, satellites, and magnetosphere since it entered orbit around Saturn on July 1, 2004. The Cassini mission has been prolific in its scientific discoveries about the Saturn system. In this special section, we present new mission results with a focus on the 'icy satellites,' which we define as all Saturn's moons with the exception of Titan. The results included in this section have come out of the Cassini SOST--Satellites Orbiter Science Team--a multi-instrument and multidiscipline group that works together to better understand the icy satellites and their interactions with Saturn and its rings. Other papers included in this issue present ground-based observations and interior modeling of these icy moons.

  11. Satellite observations of wave disturbances caused by moving solar terminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bespalova, A. V.; Fedorenko, A. K.; Cheremnykh, O. K.; Zhuk, I. T.

    2016-03-01

    Wave disturbances caused by moving solar terminator were studied using in situ satellite measurements. Neutral species densities measured by low-latitude satellite Atmosphere Explorer-E in the altitude range of 250-400 km were used for analysis. Wave disturbances of neutral species density with amplitudes of 2-4% were observed during few hours after passing the terminator, predominantly in time intervals of 6-9 LST and 20-23 LST. These disturbances were interpreted as the acoustic-gravity waves. Spatial scales of such waves range from few hundred to few thousand kilometers, major part of wave spectral power being concentrated in the horizontal wavelength range from 1000 km to 1200 km. It was shown that vertical and horizontal components of phase velocity of these waves coincide with vertical and horizontal components of terminator velocity, i.e. observed wave are synchronized with the terminator.

  12. Satellite microwave observations of a storm complex: A comparative analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    The hypothesis that cold events correspond to a particular stage in a class of thunderstorms was tested. That class is a storms class which updrafts are: (1) strong, broad and moist, and (2) extend well above the freezing level. Condition (1) implies strong mesoscale forcing. Condition (2) implies a tall updraft or a relatively low freezing level. Such storms should have big, intense radar echoes and cold, fast-growing anvils. The thunderstorm events were analyzed by radar, rain gauge and GOES infrared observations. Radar was the starting point for detection and definition of the hypothesized thunderstorms. The radar signature is compared to the signature of the storm in rain gauge observations, satellite infrared images and satellite microwave images.

  13. Odyssey, an optimized personal communications satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusch, Roger J.

    Personal communications places severe demands on service providers and transmission facilities. Customers are not satisfied with the current levels of service and want improvements. Among the characteristics that users seek are: lower service rates, hand held convenience, acceptable time delays, ubiquitous service, high availability, reliability, and high quality. The space industry in developing commercial space systems for providing mobile communications to personal telephones. Provision of land mobile satellite service is fundamentally different from the fixed satellite service provided by geostationary satellites. In fixed service, the earth based antennas can depend on a clear path from user to satellite. Mobile users in a terrestrial environment commonly encounter blockage due to vegetation, terrain or buildings. Consequently, high elevation angles are of premium value. TRW studied the issues and concluded that a Medium Earth Orbit constellation is the best solution for Personal Communications Satellite Service. TRW has developed Odyssey, which uses twelve satellites in medium altitude orbit to provide personal communications satellite service. The Odyssey communications system projects a multibeam antenna pattern to the Earth. The attitude control system orients the satellites to ensure constant coverage of land mass and coastal areas. Pointing can be reprogrammed by ground control to ensure optimized coverage of the desired service areas. The payload architecture features non-processing, 'bent pipe' transponders and matrix amplifiers to ensure dynamic power delivery to high demand areas. Circuit capacity is 3000 circuits per satellite. Each satellite weighs 1917 kg (4226 pounds) at launch and the solar arrays provide 3126 watts of power. Satellites are launched in pairs on Ariane, Atlas, or other vehicles. Each satellite is placed in a circular orbit at an altitude of 10,354 km. satellites permits phased introduction of service. After only three launches, in which two satellites are launched into each plane, continuous service can be provided to most of the world. After three more launches for a total of 12 satellites, service can be expanded to all populated regions of the Earth with path diversity to most regions. *The Odyssey system is superior to both geostationary satellites and low earth orbiting satellites. -Odyssey provides many benefits to the end user which are described in the paper. These include: low cost, convenience, high availability, reliability, and acceptable time delay. Odyssey exhibits benefits for telecommunications operators: simple operations, incremental, phased startup, long space segment life-time, high profitability, dynamic flexibility for adjustment and short time to market. %Since submission of an FCC application in 1991, TRW has continued to explore ways to further improve the Odyssey approach by expanding coverage to the entire world and reducing the initial investment while maintaining high quality service.

  14. Observations of RR Lyrae with the ANS satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnell, J.; Wu, C.-C.; Bell, R. A.; Hutchinson, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Photometric observations of RR Lyr in the ultraviolet have been obtained using the Astronomical Netherlands Satellite. The observations are compared with theoretical light curves calculated using synthetic spectra and angular diameters determined as a function of phase for RR Lyr by Manduca et al. from photometry at longer wavelengths. A good agreement is found. A bump in the observed light curves in the phase range 0.6 to 0.8 supports the existence of a shock as predicted by Hutchinson, Hill, and Lillie.

  15. Large Scale Surface Radiation Budget from Satellite Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinker, R. T.

    1995-01-01

    During the current reporting period, the focus of our work was on preparing and testing an improved version of our Surface Radiation Budget algorithm for processing the ISCCP D1 data routinely at the SRB Satellite Data Analysis Center (SDAC) at NASA Langley Research Center. The major issues addressed are related to gap filling and to testing whether observations made from ERBE could be used to improve current procedures of converting narrowband observations, as available from ISCCP, into broadband observations at the TOA. The criteria for selecting the optimal version are to be based on results of intercomparison with ground truth.

  16. Al Gore attends Fall Meeting session on Earth observing satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    2011-12-01

    Former U.S. vice president Al Gore, making unscheduled remarks at an AGU Fall Meeting session, said, "The reason you see so many pictures" of the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite at this session is "that it already has been built." However, "because one of its primary missions was to help document global warming, it was canceled. So for those who are interested in struggling against political influence," Gore said, "the benefits have been documented well here." Gore made his comments after the third oral presentation at the 8 December session entitled "Earth Observations From the L1 (Lagrangian Point No. 1)," which focused on the capabilities of and progress on refurbishing DSCOVR. The satellite, formerly called Triana, had been proposed by Gore in 1998 to collect climate data. Although Triana was built, it was never launched: Congress mandated that before the satellite could be sent into space the National Academies of Science needed to confirm that the science it would be doing was worthwhile. By the time the scientific validation was complete, the satellite "was no longer compatible with the space shuttle manifest," Robert C. Smith, program manager for strategic integration at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, told Eos.

  17. Unzen volcano from 1990 to 1995 observed by satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.; Nakayama, Y.; Inanaga, A.; Endo, K.

    This is a record of the phenomena at Mt. Unzen, an active volcano in Japan, seen by the earth observation satellites during the active period from 1990 to 1995. Unzen volcano started the series of activities in November 1990 after 198-year dormancy and ceased them in the spring of 1995. Conditions of the area affected by ashfall, pyroclastic or debris flows and topographic deformation are described.

  18. A Space Based Solar Power Satellite System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, J. M.; Polling, D.; Ustamujic, F.; Yaldiz, R.; et al.

    2002-01-01

    (SPoTS) supplying other satellites with energy. SPoTS is due to be commercially viable and operative in 2020. of Technology designed the SPoTS during a full-time design period of six weeks as a third year final project. The team, organized according to the principles of systems engineering, first conducted a literature study on space wireless energy transfer to select the most suitable candidates for use on the SPoTS. After that, several different system concepts have been generated and evaluated, the most promising concept being worked out in greater detail. km altitude. Each SPoTS satellite has a 50m diameter inflatable solar collector that focuses all received sunlight. Then, the received sunlight is further redirected by means of four pointing mirrors toward four individual customer satellites. A market-analysis study showed, that providing power to geo-stationary communication satellites during their eclipse would be most beneficial. At arrival at geo-stationary orbit, the focused beam has expended to such an extent that its density equals one solar flux. This means that customer satellites can continue to use their regular solar arrays during their eclipse for power generation, resulting in a satellite battery mass reduction. the customer satellites in geo-stationary orbit, the transmitted energy beams needs to be pointed with very high accuracy. Computations showed that for this degree of accuracy, sensors are needed, which are not mainstream nowadays. Therefore further research must be conducted in this area in order to make these high-accuracy-pointing systems commercially attractive for use on the SPoTS satellites around 2020. Total 20-year system lifetime cost for 18 SPoT satellites are estimated at approximately USD 6 billion [FY2001]. In order to compete with traditional battery-based satellite power systems or possible ground based wireless power transfer systems the price per kWh for the customer must be significantly lower than the present one. Based on the expected revenues from about 300 customers, SPoTS needs a significant contribution from public funding to be commercial viable. However, even though the system might seem to be a huge investment first, it provides a unique steppingstone for future space based wireless transfer of energy to the Earth. Also the public funding is considered as an interest free loan and is due to be paid back over de lifetime period of SPoTS. These features make the SPoTS very attractive in comparison to other space projects of the same science field.

  19. A Metric to Evaluate Mobile Satellite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Elizabeth L.

    1997-01-01

    The concept of a "cost per billable minute" methodology to analyze mobile satellite systems is reviewed. Certain assumptions, notably those about the marketplace and regulatory policies, may need to be revisited. Fading and power control assumptions need to be tested. Overall, the metric would seem to have value in the design phase of a system and for comparisons between and among alternative systems.

  20. Critical areas: Satellite power systems concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Critical Areas are defined and discussed in the various areas pertinent to satellite power systems. The presentation is grouped into five areas (General, Space Systems, Solar Energy Conversion, Microwave Systems, and Environment/Ecology) with a sixth area (Power Relay) considered separately in an appendix. Areas for Future Consideration as critical areas are discussed in a second appendix.

  1. Evaluation of Modeled Clouds using the Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Klein, S. A.; Boyle, J. S.; Kay, J. E.; Mace, G. G.

    2010-12-01

    The merged CloudSat and CALIPSO data streams provide the first global survey of the vertical distribution of cloud condensate and precipitation. We exploit the synergy of the "A-Train", a constellation of satellites flying in formation, to deliver complementary measurements of the same environmental phenomena and the collocated large scale variables along the CloudSat flight track to further understand model deficiencies. The NCAR's Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4 for IPCC integrations) are evaluated. To make the comparison between model output and observations in a more consistent manner, the CFMIP Observation Simulator Package (COSP) is applied to the model output. The COSP converts model clouds into pseudosatellite observations with a model to satellite approach that mimics the satellite view of an atmospheric column with model specified physical properties. The COSP output from the simulators of multiple sensors are compared with model output. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. HST observations of Saturn's satellites on the eve of Cassini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, R.; McGhee, C.

    In April, 2004, the cameras aboard the Cassini spacecraft will at last rival the superb resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Planetary Camera (WFPC2). For the past ten years, we have monitored the positions of Saturn's satellites with an accuracy of about 0.02" using WFPC2. One of our key findings was that tiny Prometheus and Pandora are affecting each other gravitationally, showing roughly equal and opposite orbital changes in late 2000 (French et al. 2002 Icarus 162, 143-170). The dynamical explanation for this abrupt change is that the two moons are affected by a third-order mean motion resonance, resulting in chaotic orbital motion (Goldreich and Rappaport 2003 Icarus 166, 320-327). Since these publications, we have continued to measure the two wandering satellites with the HST, including dozens of measurements in 2003/2004 and an upcoming set of observations in late March, 2004. This decade of astrometric data is more than twice as long as the projected Cassini orbital tour, and provides the observational underpinning for Cassini's search for additional changes in the orbits of these two intriguing satellites. This work was supported in part by the NASA PGG program and the Massachusetts Space Grant Consortium. Our results are based on observations with ther NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the STScI, which is operated by AURA under NASA Contract NAS5-26555.

  3. Design and evaluation of control systems for large communications satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiber, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Control techniques for future large flexible spacecraft are developed. Control design and analysis are supported by a comprehensive CAD system. The proposed operational mobile communications satellite (OMSAT) featuring a 44 m offset fed antenna is used as target application. Requirements for satellite attitude control and communications beam pointing are defined. The following control methods are applied to the system: standard linear optimal regulator (LOR) with Luenberger observer, LOR/observer with selective spill-over suppression, frequency shaped LOR, LOR with closed-loop order reduction by cost decoupling, and robust servomechanism.

  4. Future satellite systems - Market demand assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, P. S.

    1981-01-01

    During 1979-80, a market study was performed regarding the future total demand for communications services, and satellite transmission service at the 4/6 GHz, 12/14 GHz, and 20/30 GHz frequencies. Included in the study were a variety of communications traffic characteristics as well as projections of the cost of C and Ku band satellite systems through the year 2000. In connection with the considered study, a total of 15 major study tasks and subtasks were undertaken and were all interrelated in various ways. The telecommunications service forecasts were concerned with a total of 21 data services, 5 voice services, and 5 video services. The traffic volumes within the U.S. for the three basic services were projected for three time periods. It is found that the fixed frequency allocation for domestic satellites combined with potential interference from adjacent satellites means a near term lack of orbital positions above the U.S.

  5. Land-mobile satellite communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Tsun-Yee (Inventor); Rafferty, William (Inventor); Dessouky, Khaled I. (Inventor); Wang, Charles C. (Inventor); Cheng, Unjeng (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A satellite communications system includes an orbiting communications satellite for relaying communications to and from a plurality of ground stations, and a network management center for making connections via the satellite between the ground stations in response to connection requests received via the satellite from the ground stations, the network management center being configured to provide both open-end service and closed-end service. The network management center of one embodiment is configured to provides both types of service according to a predefined channel access protocol that enables the ground stations to request the type of service desired. The channel access protocol may be configured to adaptively allocate channels to open-end service and closed-end service according to changes in the traffic pattern and include a free-access tree algorithm that coordinates collision resolution among the ground stations.

  6. Optimizing space constellations for mobile satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussel, T.; Taisant, J.-P.

    1993-01-01

    Designing a mobile satellite system entails many complex trade-offs between a great number of parameters including: capacity, complexity of the payload, constellation geometry, number of satellites, quality of coverage, etc. This paper aims at defining a methodology which tries to split the variables to give rapidly some first results. The major input considered is the traffic assumption which would be offered by the system. A first key step is the choice of the best Rider or Walker constellation geometries - with different numbers of satellites - to insure a good quality of coverage over a selected service area. Another aspect to be addressed is the possible altitude location of the constellation, since it is limited by many constraints. The altitude ranges that seem appropriate considering the spatial environment, the launch and orbit keeping policy and the feasibility of the antenna allowing sufficient frequency reuse are briefly analyzed. To support these first considerations, some 'reference constellations' with similar coverage quality are chosen. The in-orbit capacity needed to support the assumed traffic is computed versus altitude. Finally, the exact number of satellite is determined. It comes as an optimum between a small number of satellites offering a high (and costly) power margin in bad propagation situation and a great number of less powerful satellites granting the same quality of service.

  7. Solar power satellite, system definition study. Part 2, volume 3: SPS satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The differences in approach to solar energy conversion by solar cells and thermal engine systems are examined. Systems requirements for the solar power satellite (SPS) are given along with a description of the primary subsystems. Trades leading to exact configuration selection, for example, selection of the Rankine cycle operating temperatures are explained, and two satellite configurations are discussed.

  8. Introduction to Global Navigation Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreau, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the fundamentals of satellite navigation, and specifically how GPS works. It presents an overview and status of Global Positioning System, for both the current GPS, and plans to modernize it in the future. There is also a overview and status of other Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), specifically GLONASS, Galileo, and QZSS. There is also a review of Satellite based time transfer techniques. The topic is of interest to the Time and Frequency Community, because the Global Positioning system has become the primary system for distributing Time and frequency globally, and because it allows users to synchronize clocks and calibrate and control oscillators in any location that has a GPS antenna.

  9. Observation of blue satellite bands and photoassociation at ultracold temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Pichler, Marin; Qi Jianbing; Stwalley, William C.; Beuc, Robert; Pichler, Goran

    2006-02-15

    We have observed atomic line self-broadening of Cs near 7P{sub 3/2} and 7P{sub 1/2} atomic lines at ultracold temperatures using a magneto-optical trap and resonant ionization detection. We have observed blue satellite band features at detunings of 560 and 800 MHz, respectively, as well as sharp hyperfine-split photoassociative spectra on the red wings of each line and also on the blue wings. Possible explanations of these features are discussed.

  10. Applications systems verification and transfer project. Volume 7: Cost/benefit analysis for the ASVT on operational applications of satellite snow-cover observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castruccio, P.; Loats, H.; Lloyd, D.; Newman, P.

    1981-01-01

    The results of the OASSO ASVT's were used to estimate the benefits accruing from the added information available from satellite snowcover area measurement. Estimates of the improvement in runoff prediction due to addition of SATSCAM were made by the Colorado ASVT personnel. The improvement estimate is 6-10%. Data were applied to subregions covering the Western States snow area amended by information from the ASVT and other watershed experts to exclude areas which are not impacted by snowmelt runoff. Benefit models were developed for irrigation and hydroenergy uses. The benefit/cost ratio is 72:1. Since only two major benefit contributors were used and since the forecast improvement estimate does not take into account future satellite capabilities these estimates are considered to be conservative. The large magnitude of the benefit/cost ratio supports the utility and applicability of SATSCAM.

  11. Novel method of fast satellite movement information acquisition from VLBI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weimin; Yang, Yan

    2005-10-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is a radio astronomy technique. The diameter of a VLBI synthetic telescope equals the longest baseline (>1000 Km). Therefore, VLBI can achieve very high angular resolution, and has unique advantage in the deep space tracking compared with the traditional radio ranging and Doppler tracking technologies. In the satellite VLBI observations, the spacecraft movement information such as delay or delay rate observable is very useful in the spacecraft position and orbit determination. This paper introduces an algorithm of obtaining satellite VLBI delay and delay rate based on short time correlation. Using the Differential One-way Doppler of the telemetry carrier, this method is able to complete fast fringe search, correlation, producing delay and delay rate with high accuracy from the satellite telemetry signals automatically, without any apriori orbit information. A special software correlator--Fast Fringe Searcher (FFS) was developed and successfully used in the data processing of the satellite VLBI experiments, such as the Chinese TC-1 Geospace satellite and the European SMART-1 lunar probe VLBI observations. The delay and delay rate produced by FFS were used in TC-1 orbit determination, which was the first Chinese VLBI satellite orbit determination experiment. Besides, an accurate VLBI correlator delay model can be constructed from FFS output. According to this model, a general VLBI correlator can produce more precise delay and delay rate through long time integration. This method will be applied to the real-time VLBI correlator system of the Chinese lunar exploration project in the near future.

  12. Observations of the Galilean satellites of Jupiter with Pulkovo Normal Astrograph during 2009-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narizhnaya, N. V.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the results of observations of Jupiter and its Galilean moons, performed with the Normal Astrograph ( D/ F=0.33 m/3.5 m, CCD S2C, FOV 18' × 16') at Pulkovo observatory during 2009-2011. We obtained 140 positions of the Galilean satellites and 42 calculated positions of Jupiter in the system of UCAC4 (ICRS, J2000.0) catalogue. The equatorial coordinates of satellites have been compared to eight most current theories of planetary and satellite motion. The average residuals between the observed and calculated coordinates (O-C) using the selected theories of motion do not exceed 0.08″. The behavior and magnitudes of the (O-C) residuals in the positions of Ganymede and Callisto satellites show that the theory of their motion was elaborated worse than in the case of Io and Europa satellites. Distribution of the (O-C) residuals for Callisto differs from a normal distribution. Comparison of the calculated equatorial coordinates of Jupiter, based on the observed positions of satellites and their theoretical Jovi-centric coordinates calculated using the INPOP10 theory of planetary motion revealed satisfactory results. The average residuals are, respectively, (O-C)α = 0.040″ and (O-C)δ =-0.053″ assuming the normal distribution law.

  13. Tropical convective systems life cycle characteristics from geostationary satellite and precipitating estimates derived from TRMM and ground weather radar observations for the West African and South American regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiolleau, T.; Roca, R.; Angelis, F. C.; Viltard, N.

    2012-12-01

    In the tropics most of the rainfall comes in the form of individual storm events embedded in the synoptic circulations (e.g., monsoons). Understanding the rainfall and its variability hence requires to document these highly contributing tropical convective systems (MCS). Our knowledge of the MCS life cycle, from a physical point of view mainly arises from individual observational campaigns heavily based on ground radar observations. While this large part of observations enabled the creation of conceptual models of MCS life cycle, it nevertheless does not reach any statistically significant integrated perspective yet. To overcome this limitation, a composite technique, that will serve as a Day-1 algorithm for the Megha-Tropiques mission, is considered in this study. this method is based on a collocation in space and time of the level-2 rainfall estimates (BRAIN) derived from the TMI radiometer onboard TRMM with the cloud systems identified by a new MCS tracking algorithm called TOOCAN and based on a 3-dimensional segmentation (image + time) of the geostationary IR imagery. To complete this study, a similar method is also developed collocating the cloud systems with the precipitating features derived from the ground weather radar which has been deployed during the CHUVA campaign over several Brazilian regions from 2010 up to now. A comparison of the MCSs life cycle is then performed for the 2010-2012 summer seasons over the West African, and South American regions. On the whole region of study, the results show that the temporal evolution of the cold cloud shield associated to MCSs describes a symmetry between the growth and the decay phases. It is also shown that the parameters of the conceptual model of MCSs are strongly correlated, reducing thereby the problem to a single degree of freedom. At the system scale, over both land and oceanic regions, rainfall is described by an increase at the beginning (the first third) of the life cycle and then smoothly decreases as the system shrinks and dissipates. The evolutions of the precipitating properties associated to MCSs indicate that the life cycle of these systems can be described by three phases: initiation, mature and dissipation. This pattern is robust across the entire monsoonal region and the scale factors of this idealized model indicate complex regional specificities.

  14. Observational and Dynamical Wave Climatologies. VOS vs Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorieva, Victoria; Badulin, Sergei; Chernyshova, Anna

    2013-04-01

    The understanding physics of wind-driven waves is crucially important for fundamental science and practical applications. This is why experimental efforts are targeted at both getting reliable information on sea state and elaborating effective tools of the sea wave forecasting. The global Visual Wave Observations and satellite data from the GLOBWAVE project of the European Space Agency are analyzed in the context of these two viewpoints. Within the first "observational" aspect we re-analyze conventional climatologies of all basic wave parameters for the last decades [5]. An alternative "dynamical" climatology is introduced as a tool of prediction of dynamical features of sea waves on global scales. The features of wave dynamics are studied in terms of one-parametric dependencies of wave heights on wave periods following the theoretical concept of self-similar wind-driven seas [3, 1, 4] and recently proposed approach to analysis of Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS) data [2]. Traditional "observational" climatologies based on VOS and satellite data collections demonstrate extremely consistent pictures for significant wave heights and dominant periods. On the other hand, collocated satellite and VOS data show significant differences in wave heights, wind speeds and, especially, in wave periods. Uncertainties of visual wave observations can explain these differences only partially. We see the key reason of this inconsistency in the methods of satellite data processing which are based on formal application of data interpolation methods rather than on up-to-date physics of wind-driven waves. The problem is considered within the alternative climatology approach where dynamical criteria of wave height-to-period linkage are used for retrieving wave periods and constructing physically consistent dynamical climatology. The key dynamical parameter - exponent R of one-parametric dependence Hs ~ TR shows dramatically less pronounced latitudinal dependence as compared to observed Hs and T of conventional climatology in both satellite and VOS data collections. It can be treated as an effect of interaction of wind-driven seas and swell on global scales as it was stated in [2]. Further study combining the alternative and conventional climatologies can help to detail this important dynamical effect of global wave dynamics. The progress in satellite data processing and their physical interpretation is of great value for such study. The work was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research grant 11-05-01114-a and the Russian government contracts No.11.G34.31.0035, No.11.G34.31.0078. References [1] S. I. Badulin, A. V. Babanin, D. Resio, and V. Zakharov. Weakly turbulent laws of wind-wave growth. J. Fluid Mech., 591:339-378, 2007. [2] S. I. Badulin and Grigorieva V. G. On discriminating swell and wind-driven seas in voluntary observing ship data. J. Geophys. Res., 117(C00J29), 2012. [3] S. I. Badulin, A. N. Pushkarev, D. Resio, and V. E. Zakharov. Self-similarity of wind-driven seas. Nonl. Proc. Geophys., 12:891-946, 2005. [4] E. Gagnaire-Renou, M. Benoit, and S. I. Badulin. On weakly turbulent scaling of wind sea in simulations of fetch-limited growth. J. Fluid Mech., 669:178-213, 2011. [5] S. K. Gulev, V. Grigorieva, A. Sterl, and D. Woolf. Assessment for the reliability of wave observations from voluntary observing ships: insights from the validation of a global wind wave climatology based on voluntary observing ship data. J. Geophys. Res. - Oceans, 108(C7):3236, doi:10,1029/2002JC001437, 2003.

  15. An advanced domestic satellite communications system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An updated traffic projection for U.S. domestic satellite communications service covering a period of 15 years; mid-1980 to mid-1995 was prepared. This model takes into account expected technology advances and reductions in transmission costs, legislative and regulatory changes permitting increased competition, and rising energy costs which will encourage more extensive substitution of telecommunications for travel. The historical development and current status of satellite systems are discussed as well as the characteristics of follow-on systems. Orbital arc utilization, spacecraft configuration for single shuttle launch, Earth station configuration, and system costs are examined. Areas which require technology development include multiple beam frequency reuse antennas, on-board switching, intersatellite links, and ka-band operation. Packing and deployment schemes for enclosing the satellite within the shuttle orbiter bay must also be devised.

  16. Data distribution satellite system architecture concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Kent M.; Jorasch, Ronald E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a future communications satellite system architecture concept called the Data Distribution Satellite (DDS). The DDS is envisioned as a new system to be used as an adjunct to TDRS/TDAS for distributing new NASA science data throughout the U.S. as well as internationally. The DDS would also provide networking capability for interchange of science database files among science users and NASA archive depositories. Experimenters would be able to access and control their experimental packages remotely, relieving astronaut workload. This paper gives a conceptual system design based on year 1995 technology. Features of the design include use of Ku and Ka-bands, use of fixed spot beams, 2 Gb/s throughput, and on-board demodulation and switching. The satellite dry mass is 1,300 kg and end-of-life power is 4 kW.

  17. A Comparison of Techniques for Scheduling Earth-Observing Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Crawford, James; Lohn, Jason; Pryor, Anna

    2004-01-01

    Scheduling observations by coordinated fleets of Earth Observing Satellites (EOS) involves large search spaces, complex constraints and poorly understood bottlenecks, conditions where evolutionary and related algorithms are often effective. However, there are many such algorithms and the best one to use is not clear. Here we compare multiple variants of the genetic algorithm: stochastic hill climbing, simulated annealing, squeaky wheel optimization and iterated sampling on ten realistically-sized EOS scheduling problems. Schedules are represented by a permutation (non-temperal ordering) of the observation requests. A simple deterministic scheduler assigns times and resources to each observation request in the order indicated by the permutation, discarding those that violate the constraints created by previously scheduled observations. Simulated annealing performs best. Random mutation outperform a more 'intelligent' mutator. Furthermore, the best mutator, by a small margin, was a novel approach we call temperature dependent random sampling that makes large changes in the early stages of evolution and smaller changes towards the end of search.

  18. Improving a Spectral Bin Microphysical Scheme Using TRMM Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaowen; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Matsui, Toshihisa; Liu, Chuntao; Masunaga, Hirohiko

    2010-01-01

    Comparisons between cloud model simulations and observations are crucial in validating model performance and improving physical processes represented in the mod Tel.hese modeled physical processes are idealized representations and almost always have large rooms for improvements. In this study, we use data from two different sensors onboard TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission) satellite to improve the microphysical scheme in the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. TRMM observed mature-stage squall lines during late spring, early summer in central US over a 9-year period are compiled and compared with a case simulation by GCE model. A unique aspect of the GCE model is that it has a state-of-the-art spectral bin microphysical scheme, which uses 33 different bins to represent particle size distribution of each of the seven hydrometeor species. A forward radiative transfer model calculates TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) reflectivity and TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) 85 GHz brightness temperatures from simulated particle size distributions. Comparisons between model outputs and observations reveal that the model overestimates sizes of snow/aggregates in the stratiform region of the squall line. After adjusting temperature-dependent collection coefficients among ice-phase particles, PR comparisons become good while TMI comparisons worsen. Further investigations show that the partitioning between graupel (a high-density form of aggregate), and snow (a low-density form of aggregate) needs to be adjusted in order to have good comparisons in both PR reflectivity and TMI brightness temperature. This study shows that long-term satellite observations, especially those with multiple sensors, can be very useful in constraining model microphysics. It is also the first study in validating and improving a sophisticated spectral bin microphysical scheme according to long-term satellite observations.

  19. ORBITAL DEPENDENCE OF GALAXY PROPERTIES IN SATELLITE SYSTEMS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Park, Changbom E-mail: cbp@kias.re.k

    2010-09-01

    We study the dependence of satellite galaxy properties on the distance to the host galaxy and the orbital motion (prograde and retrograde orbits) using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data. From SDSS Data Release 7, we find 3515 isolated satellite systems of galaxies at z < 0.03 that contain 8904 satellite galaxies. Using this sample, we construct a catalog of 635 satellites associated with 215 host galaxies whose spin directions are determined by our inspection of the SDSS color images and/or by spectroscopic observations in the literature. We divide satellite galaxies into prograde and retrograde orbit subsamples depending on their orbital motion with respect to the spin direction of the host. We find that the number of galaxies in prograde orbit is nearly equal to that of retrograde orbit galaxies: the fraction of satellites in prograde orbit is 50% {+-} 2%. The velocity distribution of satellites with respect to their hosts is found to be almost symmetric: the median bulk rotation of satellites is -1 {+-} 8 km s{sup -1}. It is found that the radial distribution of early-type satellites in prograde orbit is strongly concentrated toward the host while that of retrograde ones shows much less concentration. We also find the orbital speed of late-type satellites in prograde orbit increases as the projected distance to the host (R) decreases while the speed decreases for those in retrograde orbit. At R less than 0.1 times the host virial radius (R < 0.1r{sub vir,host}), the orbital speed decreases in both prograde and retrograde orbit cases. Prograde satellites are on average fainter than retrograde satellites for both early and late morphological types. The u - r color becomes redder as R decreases for both prograde and retrograde orbit late-type satellites. The differences between prograde and retrograde orbit satellite galaxies may be attributed to their different origin or the different strength of physical processes that they have experienced through hydrodynamic interactions with their host galaxies.

  20. The United States regional mobile satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Roy E.; Cooperman, Richard S.

    Commercial interests within the United States and Canada are preparing to implement cooperative systems that will provide land and aeronautical mobile satellite services in those two countries and in Mexico. Wide bandwidth, linear satellites ('bent pipe transponders') in geostationary orbit will be built and operated by a consortium of companies in the United States. The consortium will act as a carrier's carrier, leasing bandwidth and power to resellers and private radio leasees who will tailor the ground systems and signal characteristics to the needs of end users. A variety of voice, data, and position fixing services will add new dimensions to mobile communications throughout North America.

  1. Satellite Power System (SPS) public outreach experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcneal, S. R.

    1980-01-01

    An outreach experiment was conducted to improve the results of the satellite power system (SPS) concept development and evaluation program. The objectives of the outreach were to: (1) determine the areas of major concern relative to the SPS concept and (2) gain experience with an outreach process for use in future public involvement. The response to the outreach effort was positive, suggesting that the effort extended by the SPS project division to encourage an information exchange with the public was well received. The responses were analyzed and from them some questions and answers about the satellite power system are presented.

  2. Domestic mobile satellite systems in North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wachira, Muya

    1990-01-01

    Telest Mobile Inc. (TMI) and the American Mobile Satellite Corporation (AMSC) are authorized to provide mobile satellite services (MSS) in Canada and the United States respectively. They are developing compatible systems and are undertaking joint specification and procurement of spacecraft and ground segment with the aim of operational systems by late 1993. Early entry (phase 1) mobile data services are offered in 1990 using space segment capacity leased from Inmarsat. Here, an overview is given of these domestic MSS with an emphasis on the TMI component of the MSAT systen.

  3. Correction of real-time satellite precipitation with satellite soil moisture observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, W.; Pan, M.; Wanders, N.; Wood, E. F.

    2015-06-01

    Rainfall and soil moisture are two key elements in modeling the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere. Accurate and high-resolution real-time precipitation is crucial for monitoring and predicting the on-set of floods, and allows for alert and warning before the impact becomes a disaster. Assimilation of remote sensing data into a flood-forecasting model has the potential to improve monitoring accuracy. Space-borne microwave observations are especially interesting because of their sensitivity to surface soil moisture and its change. In this study, we assimilate satellite soil moisture retrievals using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land surface model, and a dynamic assimilation technique, a particle filter, to adjust the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) real-time precipitation estimates. We compare updated precipitation with real-time precipitation before and after adjustment and with NLDAS gauge-radar observations. Results show that satellite soil moisture retrievals provide additional information by correcting errors in rainfall bias. High accuracy soil moisture retrievals, when merged with precipitation, generally increase both rainfall frequency and intensity, and are most effective in the correction of rainfall under dry to normal surface condition while limited/negative improvement is seen over wet/saturated surfaces. Errors from soil moisture, mixed among the real signal, may generate a false rainfall signal approximately 2 mm day-1 and thus lower the precipitation accuracy after adjustment.

  4. Astrometric observations of the satellites of the outer planets. I - The Galilean satellites in 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ianna, P. A.; Seitzer, P.; Levinson, F.

    1979-01-01

    Astrometric observations of the Galilean satellites of Jupiter performed around the opposition of 1977 with a 67-cm photovisual refractor are reported. The measurements are reduced to absolute and intersatellite positions by two different methods: a linear least-squares plate-constant solution to the AGK3 reference-star frame and the trail-scale method of Pascu (1977). Results of a plate-constant reduction are also presented for two observations of JV (Amalthea). Comparison of the data with Liske's (1978) theoretical predictions for the intersatellite positions indicates no systematic bias in the data; a probable scatter of about 15 arcsec in both right ascension and declination is estimated.

  5. The Global Ocean Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kester, Dana

    1992-01-01

    A Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) should be established now with international coordination (1) to address issues of global change, (2) to implement operational ENSO forecasts, (3) to provide the data required to apply global ocean circulation models, and (4) to extract the greatest value from the one billion dollar investment over the next ten years in ocean remote sensing by the world's space agencies. The objectives of GOOS will focus on climatic and oceanic predictions, on assessing coastal pollution, and in determining the sustainability of living marine resources and ecosystems. GOOS will be a complete system including satellite observations, in situ observations, numerical modeling of ocean processes, and data exchange and management. A series of practical and economic benefits will be derived from the information generated by GOOS. In addition to the marine science community, these benefits will be realized by the energy industries of the world, and by the world's fisheries. The basic oceanic variables that are required to meet the oceanic and predictability objectives of GOOS include wind velocity over the ocean, sea surface temperature and salinity, oceanic profiles of temperature and salinity, surface current, sea level, the extent and thickness of sea ice, the partial pressure of CO2 in surface waters, and the chlorophyll concentration of surface waters. Ocean circulation models and coupled ocean-atmosphere models can be used to evaluate observing system design, to assimilate diverse data sets from in situ and remotely sensed observations, and ultimately to predict future states of the system. The volume of ocean data will increase enormously over the next decade as new satellite systems are launched and as complementary in situ measuring systems are deployed. These data must be transmitted, quality controlled, exchanged, analyzed, and archived with the best state-of-the-art computational methods.

  6. Contributions of Satellite Observations to Understanding Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, Anne R.

    2006-01-01

    One of the challenges facing atmospheric scientists is to interpret trends in multi-decadal data records. Although data records from satellite instruments are not as long as some ground-based records, global coverage and resolved vertical profiles provide unique information for identifying signatures of climate change. For example, the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite provided profiles of O3, H2O, HC1, HF, CH4 from October 1991 until November 2005. There are also multi-annual ground based measurements of the column HCl. Middle latitude ground-based measurements show a seasonal cycle, and the HALOE profiles show that this is driven by the seasonal change in the composition and mass of the region between the tropopause and 380K surface (the lowermost stratosphere). Understanding the processes that produce the seasonal cycle makes it possible to interpret a future change in the seasonal cycle as a marker of a change in the stratospheric residual circulation. Satellite observations have also provided key information for improving the physical basis of models used to predict future composition and climate circulation. An example is the "tape recorder" signature in tropical stratospheric water vapor, i.e., the slow ascent of high and low water vapor anomalies roughly corresponding to the tropopause temperature at the time air entered the stratosphere. This signature has become a key diagnostic of performance for climate models.

  7. Satellite reconnaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloor, G. P.

    1984-06-01

    The potential of the observation equipment in remote sensing satellites is described. United States meteorology, land use and oceanography satellites and the major US Earth observation programs are listed. Imaging satellite systems are described such as: visible light and near infrared, thermal IR window, and microwave window. It is concluded that a geometrical resolution between 10 and 40 m can be expected. In order to reduce the data flow from the satellite system the input side of the system (the object-sensor interaction) has to be known. Satellites with synthetic aperture radar are increasingly important, but satellites can never fully replace observations with aircraft and drones.

  8. The investigation of tethered satellite system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in tethered satellite system dynamics research is reported. A retrieval rate control law with no angular feedback to investigate the system's dynamic response was studied. The initial conditions for the computer code which simulates the satellite's rotational dynamics were extended to a generic orbit. The model of the satellite thrusters was modified to simulate a pulsed thrust, by making the SKYHOOK integrator suitable for dealing with delta functions without loosing computational efficiency. Tether breaks were simulated with the high resolution computer code SLACK3. Shuttle's maneuvers were tested. The electric potential around a severed conductive tether with insulator, in the case of a tether breakage at 20 km from the Shuttle, was computed. The electrodynamic hazards due to the breakage of the TSS electrodynamic tether in a plasma are evaluated.

  9. Satellite sound broadcasting system study: Mobile considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nasser

    1990-01-01

    Discussed here is the mobile reception part of a study to investigate a satellite sound broadcast system in the UHF or L bands. Existing propagation and reception measurements are used with proper interpretation to evaluate the signaling, coding, and diversity alternatives suitable for the system. Signal attenuation in streets shadowed by buildings appear to be around 29 db, considerably higher than the 10 db adopted by CCIR. With the marriage of proper technologies, an LMSS class satellite can provide substantial direct satellite audio broadcast capability in UHF or L bands for high quality mobile and portable indoor reception by low cost radio receivers. This scheme requires terrestrial repeaters for satisfactory mobile reception in urban areas. A specialized bandwidth efficient spread spectrum signalling technique is particularly suitable for the terrestrial repeaters.

  10. LNG satellites in a distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, C.T.

    1980-04-01

    An LNG satellite system using two LNG sources has been developed by Bay State Gas Co. for Massachusetts incorporating small, portable ambient vaporizers and a large peak-shaving facility. The primary facilities at Ludlow, MA, consist of a 1 billion cu ft storage tank, equipment capable of liquefying 7.5 million cu ft/day of gas, vaporization equipment with a capacity of 55 million cu ft/day, and LNG transport trailer loading-unloading facilities. Secondary facilities are located at a similar terminal at Everett, MA. The largest satellite station has an 8 billion cu ft storage tank, equipment capable of vaporizing 35 million cu ft/day, and LNG transport trailer loading-unloading facilities. Mobile units consisting of a trailer-mounted vaporizer and an LNG trailer also are in use. Factors in safe and dependable operation of the satellite LNG system are reviewed, including local transportation restrictions.

  11. Fast Emission Estimates in China Constrained by Satellite Observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijling, B.; van der A, R.

    2013-12-01

    Emission inventories of air pollutants are crucial information for policy makers and form important input data for air quality models. Unfortunately, bottom-up emission inventories, compiled from large quantities of statistical data, are easily outdated for an emerging economy such as China, where rapid economic growth changes emissions accordingly. Alternatively, top-down emission estimates from satellite observations of air constituents have important advantages of being spatial consistent, having high temporal resolution, and enabling emission updates shortly after the satellite data become available. Constraining emissions from concentration measurements is, however, computationally challenging. Within the GlobEmission project of the European Space Agency (ESA) a new algorithm has been developed, specifically designed for fast daily emission estimates of short-lived atmospheric species on a mesoscopic scale (0.25 0.25 degree) from satellite observations of column concentrations. The algorithm needs only one forward model run from a chemical transport model to calculate the sensitivity of concentration to emission, using trajectory analysis to account for transport away from the source. By using a Kalman filter in the inverse step, optimal use of the a priori knowledge and the newly observed data is made. We apply the algorithm for NOx emission estimates in East China, using the CHIMERE model together with tropospheric NO2 column retrievals of the OMI and GOME-2 satellite instruments. The observations are used to construct a monthly emission time series, which reveal important emission trends such as the emission reduction measures during the Beijing Olympic Games, and the impact and recovery from the global economic crisis. The algorithm is also able to detect emerging sources (e.g. new power plants) and improve emission information for areas where proxy data are not or badly known (e.g. shipping emissions). The new emission estimates result in a better agreement between observations and simulations of air pollutant concentrations, facilitating improved air quality forecasts. The EU project MarcoPolo will combine these emission estimates from space with statistical information on e.g. land use, population density and traffic to construct a new up-to-date emission inventory for China.

  12. Comparing soil moisture memory in satellite observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacke, Tobias; Hagemann, Stefan; Loew, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    A major obstacle to a correct parametrization of soil processes in large scale global land surface models is the lack of long term soil moisture observations for large parts of the globe. Currently, a compilation of soil moisture data derived from a range of satellites is released by the ESA Climate Change Initiative (ECV_SM). Comprising the period from 1978 until 2010, it provides the opportunity to compute climatological relevant statistics on a quasi-global scale and to compare these to the output of climate models. Our study is focused on the investigation of soil moisture memory in satellite observations and models. As a proxy for memory we compute the autocorrelation length (ACL) of the available satellite data and the uppermost soil layer of the models. Additional to the ECV_SM data, AMSR-E soil moisture is used as observational estimate. Simulated soil moisture fields are taken from ERA-Interim reanalysis and generated with the land surface model JSBACH, which was driven with quasi-observational meteorological forcing data. The satellite data show ACLs between one week and one month for the greater part of the land surface while the models simulate a longer memory of up to two months. Some pattern are similar in models and observations, e.g. a longer memory in the Sahel Zone and the Arabian Peninsula, but the models are not able to reproduce regions with a very short ACL of just a few days. If the long term seasonality is subtracted from the data the memory is strongly shortened, indicating the importance of seasonal variations for the memory in most regions. Furthermore, we analyze the change of soil moisture memory in the different soil layers of the models to investigate to which extent the surface soil moisture includes information about the whole soil column. A first analysis reveals that the ACL is increasing for deeper layers. However, its increase is stronger in the soil moisture anomaly than in its absolute values and the first even exceeds the latter in the deepest layer. From this we conclude that the seasonal soil moisture variations dominate the memory close to the surface but these are dampened in lower layers where the memory is mainly affected by longer term variations.

  13. Impulse strobing method in superlong baseline radiointerferometry for observing geostationary artificial Earth satellites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorodetskij, V. M.

    The new possibility of synthesizing the wide frequency band for the VLBI observation of slowly moving objects with the standard MARK-1 processing system using the impulse strobing method is described. It is shown that the signal-to-noise ratio may be improved due to specific type of the impulse function. An original system of realization of these methods in the satellite VLBI observation is suggested.

  14. High resolution earth observation satellites and services in the next decade a European perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Gunter; Dech, Stefan

    2005-07-01

    Projects to use very high resolution optical satellite sensor data started in the late 90s and are believed to be the major driver for the commercialisation of earth observation. The global political security situation and updated legislative frameworks created new opportunities for high resolution, dual use satellite systems. In addition to new optical sensors, very high resolution synthetic aperture radars will become in the next few years an important component in the imaging satellite fleet. The paper will review the development in this domain so far, and give perspectives on future emerging markets and opportunities. With dual-use satellite initiatives and new political frameworks agreed between the European Commission and the European Space Agency (ESA), the European market becomes very attractive for both service suppliers and customers. The political focus on "Global Monitoring for Environment and Security" (GMES) and the "European Defence and Security Policy" drive and amplify this demand which ranges from low resolution climate monitoring to very high resolution reconnaissance tasks. In order to create an operational and sustainable GMES in Europe by 2007, the European infrastructure need to be adapted and extended. This includes the ESA SENTINEL and OXYGEN programmes, aiming for a fleet of earth observation satellites and an open and operational earth observation ground segment. The harmonisation of national and regional geographic information is driven by the European Commission's INSPIRE programme. The necessary satellite capacity to complement existing systems in the delivery of space based data required for GMES is currently under definition. Embedded in a market with global competition and in the global political framework of a Global Earth Observation System of Systems, European companies, agencies and research institutions are now contributing to this joint undertaking. The paper addresses the chances, risks and options for the future.

  15. Satellite-based Observation of the Tectonics of Southern Tibet

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F J; Finkel, R; van der Woerd, J

    2003-02-06

    The Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau were formed as a result of the collision of India and Asia, and provide an excellent natural laboratory for the investigation of the mechanical response of the outer 100 km of the Earth (the lithosphere) to tectonic stress. Geophysicists are divided in their views on the nature of this response with one group advocating homogeneously distributed deformation in which the lithosphere deforms as a fluid continuum while others contend that deformation is highly localized with the lithosphere deforming as a system of rigid blocks. These rigid blocks or plate undergo little internal deformation. The latter group draws support from the high slip-rates recently observed on strike-slip faults along the northern edge of the Plateau (the Altyn Tagh Fault, ATF), coupled with seismic observations suggesting that these faults penetrate the entire lithosphere. These ''lithospheric faults'' define continental lithospheric plates and facilitate the eastward extrusion of the ''central Tibet plate''. If extrusion of a rigid Tibet occurs then there must be equivalent features at its southern boundary with slip-rates similar to those in the north. The southern boundary of Tibet, defined by the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT), has no lateral component of motion and is therefore kinematically incompatible with motion in the north. However, a series of features, the Karakorum Fault, the Karakorum-Jiali Fracture Zone (KJFZ), the Jiali Fault and the Red River Fault which lie to the north of the MHT may define the actual, kinematic, southern boundary of this ''central Tibet plate''. We have investigated the rate of slip along the Karakorum Fault (KKF), the major strike-slip fault in southwestern Tibet. If the KKF represents the actual, kinematic, southern boundary of this Tibet, and is the only feature accommodating eastward extrusion of Tibet, then its slip-rate should be similar to that of the ATF in the north. Offsets along the Karakorum Fault ranging from tens of meters to kilometers have been mapped using satellite imagery and field mapping, and samples ages determined by cosmic-ray exposure dating. Near Bulong Kol (39{sup o}N, 75{sup o}E) cosmogenic dating of a 40 m fluvial offset yields a slip rate of {approx}6.5 mm/yr. Near Mt. Kailas (31.5{sup o}N, 80.7{sup o}E), a glacial moraine offset by {approx}350 m has been dated at 32.3 {+-} 9.5 thousand years, yielding a slip rate of 10.8 {+-} 3.6 mm/yr. In the Gar Valley (32{sup o}N, 80{sup o}E) a river channel incised in glacial sediments yields an offset of 1750 m and an age of 283,000 years equivalent to a slip-rate of 6 mm/yr. Relative to the ATF, the slip rates on the KKF are lower than expected, and since these measurements cover almost the entire length of the KKF, the disparity cannot be attributed to along strike variation in the rate. Based upon the analysis of satellite images along the Karakorum Fault, we believe that this apparent slip deficit may be to the en echelon arrangement of multiple strike slip fault segments that characterize what should more appropriately be called the Karakorum Fault Zone. The geometric arrangement of parallel fault segments produces the ''pull apart'' basins that form the valleys along the KKF. Hence, at any given latitude, slip along the KKF may be distributed among numerous fault segments. This investigation supports efforts to understand the structure and mechanical response of the Earth's crust and supports the application of remote sensing methods.

  16. Can Mixed Layer Depths Be Estimated From Satellite Observations ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyer, J. L.; Quadfasel, D.

    Late winter mixed layer depths in the oceans are important for processes such as ven- tilation of the main thermocline. The high accuracy of satellite observed sea surface height (SSH) and sea surface temperature (SST) now provide an opportunity to es- timate the winter mixed layer depths using only satellite observations. In this study we use in situ observations from the Ocean Weather Ship Mike and from the repeated XBT line AX03 in the North Atlantic to determine the validity of the assumptions involved in the conversion of SSH and SST changes into a mixed layer deepening. It is shown that the largest errors arise from the assumption that seasonal SSH changes correspond to changes in the local heat content. These errors dominate in regions with swift currents such as the Gulf Stream Extension but in the eastern part of the AX03 line it is possible to estimate the winter mixed layer depths within 50 meters. The gen- eral limitation of this method is that the spatial averaging scales needed for the SSH tend to be larger than the spatial scale of mixed layer depth variations.

  17. Surface topography estimated by inversion of satellite gravity gradiometry observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramillien, Guillaume

    2015-04-01

    An integration of mass elements is presented for evaluating the six components of the 2-order gravity tensor (i.e., second derivatives of the Newtonian mass integral for the gravitational potential) created by an uneven sphere topography consisting of juxtaposed vertical prisms. The method is based on Legendre polynomial series with the originality of taking elastic compensation of the topography by the Earth's surface into account. The speed of computation of the polynomial series increases logically with the observing altitude from the source of anomaly. Such a forward modelling can be easily used for reduction of observed gravity gradient anomalies by the effects of any spherical interface of density. Moreover, an iterative least-square inversion of the observed gravity tensor values ??? is proposed to estimate a regional set of topographic heights. Several tests of recovery have been made by considering simulated gradiometry anomaly data, and for varying satellite altitudes and a priori levels of accuracy. In the case of GOCE-type gradiometry anomalies measured at an altitude of ~300 km, the search converges down to a stable and smooth topography after 20-30 iterations while the final r.m.s. error is ~100 m. The possibility of cumulating satellite information from different orbit geometries is also examined for improving the prediction.

  18. Satellite Observations of Desert Dust-induced Himalayan Snow Darkening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gautam, Ritesh; Hsu, N. Christina; Lau, William K.-M.; Yasunari, Teppei J.

    2013-01-01

    The optically thick aerosol layer along the southern edge of the Himalaya has been subject of several recent investigations relating to its radiative impacts on the South Asian summer monsoon and regional climate forcing. Prior to the onset of summer monsoon, mineral dust from southwest Asian deserts is transported over the Himalayan foothills on an annual basis. Episodic dust plumes are also advected over the Himalaya, visible as dust-laden snow surface in satellite imagery, particularly in western Himalaya. We examined spectral surface reflectance retrieved from spaceborne MODIS observations that show characteristic reduction in the visible wavelengths (0.47 nm) over western Himalaya, associated with dust-induced solar absorption. Case studies as well as seasonal variations of reflectance indicate a significant gradient across the visible (0.47 nm) to near-infrared (0.86 nm) spectrum (VIS-NIR), during premonsoon period. Enhanced absorption at shorter visible wavelengths and the resulting VIS-NIR gradient is consistent with model calculations of snow reflectance with dust impurity. While the role of black carbon in snow cannot be ruled out, our satellite-based analysis suggests the observed spectral reflectance gradient dominated by dust-induced solar absorption during premonsoon season. From an observational viewpoint, this study underscores the importance of mineral dust deposition toward darkening of the western Himalayan snow cover, with potential implications to accelerated seasonal snowmelt and regional snow albedo feedbacks.

  19. A native IP satellite communications system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudelka, O.; Schmidt, M.; Ebert, J.; Schlemmer, H.; Kastner-Puschl, S.; Riedler, W.

    2004-08-01

    ? In the framework of ESA's ARTES-5 program the Institute of Applied Systems Technology (Joanneum Research) in cooperation with the Department of Communications and Wave Propagation has developed a novel meshed satellite communications system which is optimised for Internet traffic and applications (L*IPLocal Network Interconnection via Satellite Systems Using the IP Protocol Suite). Both symmetrical and asymmetrical connections are supported. Bandwidth on demand and guaranteed quality of service are key features of the system. A novel multi-frequency TDMA access scheme utilises efficient methods of IP encapsulation. In contrast to other solutions it avoids legacy transport network techniques. While the DVB-RCS standard is based on ATM or MPEG transport cells, the solution of the L*IP system uses variable-length cells which reduces the overhead significantly. A flexible and programmable platform based on Linux machines was chosen to allow the easy implementation and adaptation to different standards. This offers the possibility to apply the system not only to satellite communications, but provides seamless integration with terrestrial fixed broadcast wireless access systems. The platform is also an ideal test-bed for a variety of interactive broadband communications systems. The paper describes the system architecture and the key features of the system.

  20. Land Mobile Satellite Systems (LMSS): Single aperture system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, W. J., III

    1982-01-01

    The large size of the UHF antenna on the satellite provides two advantages with respect to the Land Mobile Satellite System design. It provides tremendous gain for both transmitting and receiving at the satellite and enables very simple, low power equipment in the mobile vehicle. The UHF antenna for this study was selected to have an aperture of 55 meters. This implies a beamwidth of roughly 0.45 degree and requires 87 beams to cover the continental United States.

  1. Correlation of satellite lightning observations with ground-based lightning experiments in Florida, Texas and Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, B. C.; Turman, B. N.

    1982-01-01

    Satellite observations of lightning were correlated with ground-based measurements of lightning from data bases obtained at three separate sites. The percentage of ground-based observations of lightning that would be seen by an orbiting satellite was determined.

  2. The flash phase of solar flares - Satellite observations of electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    Satellite observations of solar electrons bearing on flare particle acceleration and the generation of radio and X-ray emission are reviewed. The observations support a two-stage acceleration process for electrons, one stage commonly occurring at the flare flash phase and accelerating electrons up to about 100 keV, and a second stage occurring only in large proton flares and accelerating electrons up to relativistic energies. The location of the acceleration region appears to be no lower than the lower corona. The accelerated non-relativistic electrons generate type III radio burst emission as they escape from the sun. Direct spacecraft observations of the type III emission generated near 1 AU and the energetic electrons, provide quantitative information on the characteristics of the electrons exciting type III emission, the production of plasma waves, and the conversion from plasma waves to electromagnetic radiation.

  3. System specification for the reusable reentry satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The RRS design shall provide a relatively inexpensive method of access to micro and fractional gravity space environments for an extended period of time, with eventual intact recovery on the surface of the Earth. This specification establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) system.

  4. Solar power satellite system sizing tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. D.; Monford, L. G.

    1981-01-01

    Technical and economic tradeoffs of smaller solar power satellite systems configured with larger antennas, reduced output power, and smaller rectennas, are considered. The differential costs in electricity for seven antenna/rectenna configurations operating at 2.45 GHz and five satellite systems operating at 5.8 GHz are calculated. Two 2.45 GHz configurations dependent upon the ionospheric power density limit are chosen as examples. If the ionospheric limit could be increased to 54 mW sq/cm from the present 23 mW sq/cm level, a 1.53 km antenna satellite operating at 2.45 GHz would provide 5.05 GW of output power from a 6.8 km diameter rectenna. This system gives a 54 percent reduction in rectenna area relative to the reference solar power satellite system at a modest 17 percent increase in electricity costs. At 5.8 GHz, an 0.75 km antenna providing 2.72 GW of power from a 5.8 km diameter rectenna is selected for analysis. This configuration would have a 67 percent reduction in rectenna area at a 36 percent increase in electricity costs. Ionospheric, atmospheric, and thermal limitations are discussed. Antenna patterns for three configurations to show the relative main beam and sidelobe characteristics are included.

  5. Satellite Power System (SPS) military implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, C. N.

    1978-01-01

    The military implications of the reference satellite power system (SPS) were examined is well as important military related study tasks. Primary areas of investigation were the potential of the SPS as a weapon, for supporting U.S. military preparedness, and for affecting international relations. In addition, the SPS's relative vulnerability to overt military action, terrorist attacks, and sabotage was considered.

  6. Satellite Power System (SPS) military applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozeroff, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The potential military role, both offensive and defensive, of a Satellite Power System (SPS) is examined. A number of potential military support possibilities are described. An SPS with military capabilities may have a strong negative impact on international relations if it is not internationalized. The SPS satellite would be vulnerable to military action of an enemy with good space capability, but would experience little or no threat from saboteurs or terrorists, except via the ground controls. The paper concludes with an outline of some of the key issues involved, and a number of recommendations for future study, including some areas for long term efforts.

  7. An automated mapping satellite system ( Mapsat).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colvocoresses, A.P.

    1982-01-01

    The favorable environment of space permits a satellite to orbit the Earth with very high stability as long as no local perturbing forces are involved. Solid-state linear-array sensors have no moving parts and create no perturbing force on the satellite. Digital data from highly stabilized stereo linear arrays are amenable to simplified processing to produce both planimetric imagery and elevation data. A satellite imaging system, called Mapsat, including this concept has been proposed to produce data from which automated mapping in near real time can be accomplished. Image maps as large as 1:50 000 scale with contours as close as a 20-m interval may be produced from Mapsat data. -from Author

  8. Satellite sound broadcasting system, portable reception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nasser; Vaisnys, Arvydas

    1990-01-01

    Studies are underway at JPL in the emerging area of Satellite Sound Broadcast Service (SSBS) for direct reception by low cost portable, semi portable, mobile and fixed radio receivers. This paper addresses the portable reception of digital broadcasting of monophonic audio with source material band limited to 5 KHz (source audio comparable to commercial AM broadcasting). The proposed system provides transmission robustness, uniformity of performance over the coverage area and excellent frequency reuse. Propagation problems associated with indoor portable reception are considered in detail and innovative antenna concepts are suggested to mitigate these problems. It is shown that, with the marriage of proper technologies a single medium power satellite can provide substantial direct satellite audio broadcast capability to CONUS in UHF or L Bands, for high quality portable indoor reception by low cost radio receivers.

  9. Modeling Prairie Pothole Lakes: Linking Satellite Observation and Calibration (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, F. W.; Liu, G.; Zhang, B.; Yu, Z.

    2009-12-01

    This paper examines the response of a complex lake wetland system to variations in climate. The focus is on the lakes and wetlands of the Missouri Coteau, which is part of the larger Prairie Pothole Region of the Central Plains of North America. Information on lake size was enumerated from satellite images, and yielded power law relationships for different hydrological conditions. More traditional lake-stage data were made available to us from the USGS Cottonwood Lake Study Site in North Dakota. A Probabilistic Hydrologic Model (PHM) was developed to simulate lake complexes comprised of tens-of-thousands or more individual closed-basin lakes and wetlands. What is new about this model is a calibration scheme that utilizes remotely-sensed data on lake area as well as stage data for individual lakes. Some ¼ million individual data points are used within a Genetic Algorithm to calibrate the model by comparing the simulated results with observed lake area-frequency power law relationships derived from Landsat images and water depths from seven individual lakes and wetlands. The simulated lake behaviors show good agreement with the observations under average, dry, and wet climatic conditions. The calibrated model is used to examine the impact of climate variability on a large lake complex in ND, in particular, the “Dust Bowl Drought” 1930s. This most famous drought of the 20th Century devastated the agricultural economy of the Great Plains with health and social impacts lingering for years afterwards. Interestingly, the drought of 1930s is unremarkable in relation to others of greater intensity and frequency before AD 1200 in the Great Plains. Major droughts and deluges have the ability to create marked variability of the power law function (e.g. up to one and a half orders of magnitude variability from the extreme Dust Bowl Drought to the extreme 1993-2001 deluge). This new probabilistic modeling approach provides a novel tool to examine the response of the behavior of a complex of closed lakes vary in scale from the footprint of a small house to that of a small city.

  10. Role of light satellites in the high-resolution Earth observation domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Moshe

    1999-12-01

    Current 'classic' applications using and exploring space based earth imagery are exclusive, narrow niche tailored, expensive and hardly accessible. On the other side new, inexpensive and widely used 'consumable' applications will be only developed concurrently to the availability of appropriate imagery allowing that process. A part of these applications can be imagined today, like WWW based 'virtual tourism' or news media, but the history of technological, cultural and entertainment evolution teaches us that most of future applications are unpredictable -- they emerge together with the platforms enabling their appearance. The only thing, which can be ultimately stated, is that the definitive condition for such applications is the availability of the proper imagery platform providing low cost, high resolution, large area, quick response, simple accessibility and quick dissemination of the raw picture. This platform is a constellation of Earth Observation satellites. Up to 1995 the Space Based High Resolution Earth Observation Domain was dominated by heavy, super-expensive and very inflexible birds. The launch of Israeli OFEQ-3 Satellite by MBT Division of Israel Aircraft Industries (IAI) marked the entrance to new era of light, smart and cheap Low Earth Orbited Imaging satellites. The Earth Resource Observation System (EROS) initiated by West Indian Space, is based on OFEQ class Satellites design and it is capable to gather visual data of Earth Surface both at high resolution and large image capacity. The main attributes, derived from its compact design, low weight and sophisticated logic and which convert the EROS Satellite to valuable and productive system, are discussed. The major advantages of Light Satellites in High Resolution Earth Observation Domain are presented and WIS guidelines featuring the next generation of LEO Imaging Systems are included.

  11. Geodetic satellite observations in North American (solution NA-9)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, I. I.; Reilly, J. P.; Soler, T.

    1972-01-01

    A new detailed geoidal map with claimed accuracies of plus or minus 2 meters (on land), based on gravimetric and satellite data, was presented. With the new geoid and the orthometric heights given, more reliable height constraints were calculated and applied. The basic purpose of this experiment was to compute the new solution NA9 by defining the origin of the system, from the point of view of error propagation, in the most favorable position applying inner constraints and imposing new weighted height constraints to all of the stations. The major differences with respect to formerly published adjustments are presented.

  12. Alaskan mountain glacial melting observed by satellite gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. L.; Tapley, B. D.; Wilson, C. R.

    2006-08-01

    We use satellite gravity measurements from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) as an indication of mass change to study potential long-term mountain glacial melting in southern Alaska and West Canada. The first 3.5 yr of GRACE monthly gravity data, spanning April 2002-November 2005, show a prominent glacial melting trend in the mountain regions around the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). GRACE-observed surface mass changes correlate remarkably well with available mass balance data at Gulkana and Wolverine, two benchmark glaciers of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), although the GRACE signals are smaller in magnitude. In addition, terrestrial water storage (TWS) changes estimated from an advanced land surface model show significant mass loss in this region during the same period. After correcting for the leakage errors and removing TWS contributions using model estimates, we conclude that GRACE-observed glacial melting in the GOA mountain region is equivalent to - 101 22 km 3/yr, which agrees quite well with the assessment of - 96 35 km 3/yr based on airborne laser altimetry data, and is consistent with an earlier estimate based on the first 2 yr of GRACE data. This study demonstrates the significant potentials of satellite gravity measurements for monitoring mountain glacial melting and regional climate change.

  13. Earth Observing System: Global Observations to Study the Earth's Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2001-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is a space-based observing system comprised of a series of satellite sensors by which scientists can monitor the Earth, a Data and Information System (EOSDIS) enabling researchers worldwide to access the satellite data, and an interdisciplinary science research program to interpret the satellite data. During the last couple of years, four EOS science missions were launched, representing observations of (1) total solar irradiance, (2) Earth radiation budget, (3) land cover & land use change, (4) ocean processes (vector wind, sea surface temperature, and ocean color), (5) atmospheric processes (aerosol and cloud properties, water vapor, and temperature and moisture profiles), and (6) tropospheric chemistry. In succeeding years many more satellites will be launched that will contribute immeasurably to our understanding of the Earth's environment. In this presentation I will describe how scientists are using NASA's Earth science data to examine land use and natural hazards, environmental air quality, including dust storms over the world's deserts, cloud and radiation properties, sea surface temperature, and winds over the ocean.

  14. Analysis of L5 phase variations in GPS IIF satellites by the raw observation PPP approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sha; Becker, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    GPS modernization along with Glonass modernization and the emerging Galileo and Compass system has been highly anticipated by every GNSS user since several years. The third civilian L5 signal transmitted by the modernized GPS satellites brings us to the GNSS multi-frequency era. The first GPS IIF satellite was launched in May 2010, until now there are eight block IIF satellites in service and the remaining four IIF satellites are planned to be launched by 2016. The introduction of the third frequency to GPS and the usage of advanced atomic clocks not only provide the users more possibilities but also enable higher positioning accuracy. Nevertheless phase variations are found on the new L5 observation of GPS SVN62. Further investigations suggest that the variations of this satellite are strongly dependent on the satellite inner temperature variation caused by sun illumination. Besides achieving precise positioning accuracy, PPP is also frequently used as a tool to analyze and evaluate various GNSS errors, for instance, tropospheric delays and receiver clock errors. Other than with differential GNSS, it is possible to separate different errors and to identify the error sources with PPP. Conventional PPP is based on the ionosphere-free linear combination, in order to eliminate the first-order ionospheric delays. However only dual frequencies can be used to build ionosphere-free linear combination, which leads to the waste of the information on the third frequency. Furthermore, the frequency dependent errors can not be separated and traced. A new PPP approach that avoids using any linear combination is proposed recently, which is called the raw observation PPP. One advantage of the raw observation PPP approach is that data of all frequencies and all GNSS systems can be jointly used. In addition, the frequency dependent errors are possible to be separated, identified and analyzed. In this paper the raw observation PPP is utilized to analyze the phase variations on L5 for all available GPS IIF satellites. IGS MGEX stations with good global distribution are chosen to analyze this effect continuously. The L5 phase variations are detected in all 8 GPS block IIF satellites, the amplitude of the variations varies with the sun elevation angle above the satellite plane. The correction model proposed by Montenbruck is used to correct the variations. Finally, the influence of the L5 phase variations on PPP performance is investigated. Keywords: GPS block IIF, L5 phase variation, PPP, raw observation PPP, MGEX station

  15. Using Satellite Observations to Infer the Relationship Between Cold Pools and Subsequent Convection Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsaesser, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Cold pools are increasingly being recognized as important players in the evolution of both shallow and deep convection; hence, the incorporation of cold pool processes into a number of recently developed convective parameterizations. Unfortunately, observations serving to inform cold pool parameterization development are limited to select field programs and limited radar domains. However, a number of recent studies have noted that cold pools are often associated with arcs-lines of shallow clouds traversing 10 100 km in visible satellite imagery. Boundary layer thermodynamic perturbations are plausible at such scales, coincident with such mesoscale features. Atmospheric signatures of features at these spatial scales are potentially observable from satellites. In this presentation, we discuss recent work that uses multi-sensor, high-resolution satellite products for observing mesoscale wind vector fluctuations and boundary layer temperature depressions attributed to cold pools produced by antecedent convection. The relationship to subsequent convection as well as convective system longevity is discussed. As improvements in satellite technology occur and efforts to reduce noise in high-resolution orbital products progress, satellite pixel level (10 km) thermodynamic and dynamic (e.g. mesoscale convergence) parameters can increasingly serve as useful benchmarks for constraining convective parameterization development, including for regimes where organized convection contributes substantially to the cloud and rainfall climatology.

  16. The 'Moskva' satellite television broadcasting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantor, L. Ia.; Minashin, V. P.; Povolotskii, I. S.; Sokolov, A. V.; Talyzin, N. V.

    1980-01-01

    The Moskva television broadcasting system which uses the high-power links from the Gorizont satellite is described. The transmitting device of the ground station is similar to that of the Ekran and Intersputnik systems. The system includes a special television signal processing unit, a unit for introducing dispersion signals, and transmitting equipment for the sound and radio-broadcasting channels. The signal translated by the satellite is received by a network of ground receiving stations and fed to a television transmitter with a power of 1, 10, or 100 W. The signal in the radio-broadcasting channel can be transmitted into the local radio repeater network or transmitted by a USW FM radio-broadcasting transmitter. The results of system tests are provided.

  17. A computer system for geosynchronous satellite navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    A computer system specifically designed to estimate and predict Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-4) navigation parameters using Earth imagery is described. The estimates are needed for spacecraft maneuvers while prediction provide the capability for near real-time image registration. System software is composed of four functional subsystems: (1) data base management; (2) image processing; (3) navigation; and (4) output. Hardware consists of a host minicomputer, a cathode ray tube terminal, a graphics/video display unit, and associated input/output peripherals. System validity is established through the processing of actual imagery obtained by sensors on board the Synchronous Meteorological Satellite (SMS-2). Results indicate the system is capable of operationally providing both accurate GOES-4 navigation estimates and images with a potential registration accuracy of several picture elements (pixels).

  18. LCROSS: Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marmie, John

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the success of the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) project. The LCROSS mission science goals was to: (1) Confirm the presence or absence of water ice in a permanently shadowed region on the Moon (2) Identify the form/state of hydrogen observed by at the lunar poles (3) Quantify, if present, the amount of water in the lunar regolith, with respect to hydrogen concentrations (4) Characterize the lunar regolith within a permanently shadowed crater on the Moon. The mission confirmed the presence of water ice on the moon by impacting a part of the spent Centaur upper stage into the Cabeus crater.. The presentation includes pictures of the development of the spacecraft, testing, launch, impact site, impact and a section of what the author called "Lunacy" which showed joking cartoons.

  19. Satellite microwave observations of the Utah Great Salt Lake Desert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Dellwig, L. F.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    Microwave data acquired over the Great Salt Lake Desert by sensors aboard Skylab and Nimbus 5 indicate that microwave emission and backscatter were strongly influenced by contributions from subsurface layers of sediment saturated with brine. This phenomenon was observed by Skylab's S-194 radiometer operating at 1.4 GHz, S-193 RADSCAT (Radiometer-Scatterometer) operating at 13.9 GHz and the Nimbus 5 ESMR (Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer) operating at 19.35 GHz. The availability of ESMR data over an 18 month period allowed an investigation of temporal variations. Aircraft 1.4 GHz radiometer data acquired two days after one of the Skylab passes confirm the satellites observations. Data from the ESMR revealed similar responses over the Bolivian deserts, which have geologic features similar to those of the Utah desert.

  20. South Atlantic anomaly filter for satellite UV observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Jianguo; Flynn, Lawrence E.

    2011-10-01

    A South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) filter has been developed to filter out large amounts of noise caused by high energy protons hitting onto the optical instrument focal plane when the satellite passes through the SAA region. The filter is based on the Principal Component Analysis (PCA)/Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis. The EOF vectors derived from an orbit outside of the SAA region were used to represent the observations coming from the noisy SAA region. Then using the clear EOF vectors, the observations within SAA region are rebuilt with the most important principle components. The filter works well in UV region. Tests on L1B data from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME2) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) have been conducted. It is expected that this filter can help to improve the measurements and retrievals for the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) nadir profiler in the SAA region.

  1. Antenna drive system for the Nimbus satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wedlake, G. J.; Loudon, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    A two-axis drive system is described for pointing a high gain antenna. Motion about each axis is provided by identical drive mechanisms. Only three gear passes are required to obtain the necessary 900:1 gear reduction. The drive system is a primary element of an experiment that will provide a real time data link between Nimbus and ground stations. Data are transmitted from Nimbus to the applications technology satellite, which relays the data to ground stations.

  2. Satellite temperature monitoring and prediction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, U. R.; Martsolf, J. D.; Crosby, F. L.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes the Florida Satellite Freeze Forecast System (SFFS) in its current state. All data collection options have been demonstrated, and data collected over a three year period have been stored for future analysis. Presently, specific minimum temperature forecasts are issued routinely from November through March. The procedures for issuing these forecast are discussed. The automated data acquisition and processing system is described, and the physical and statistical models employed are examined.

  3. Subtropical Gyre Variability Observed by Ocean Color Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Charles R.; Signorini, Sergio R.; Christian, James R.

    2002-01-01

    The subtropical gyres of the world are extensive, coherent regions that occupy about 40% of the surface of the earth. Once thought to be homogeneous and static habitats, there is increasing evidence that mid-latitude gyres exhibit substantial physical and biological variability on a variety of time scales. While biological productivity within these oligotrophic regions may be relatively small, their immense size makes their total contribution significant. Global distributions of dynamic height derived from satellite altimeter data, and chlorophyll concentration derived from satellite ocean color data, show that the dynamic center of the gyres, the region of maximum dynamic height where the thermocline is deepest, does not coincide with the region of minimum chlorophyll concentration. The physical and biological processes by which this distribution of ocean properties is maintained, and the spatial and temporal scales of variability associated with these processes, are analyzed using global surface chlorophyll-a concentrations, sea surface height, sea surface temperature and surface winds from operational satellite and meteorological sources, and hydrographic data from climatologies and individual surveys. Seasonal and interannual variability in the areal extent of the subtropical gyres are examined using 8 months (November 1996 - June 1997) of OCTS and nearly 5 years (September 1997 - June 02) of SeaWiFS ocean color data and are interpreted in the context of climate variability and measured changes in other ocean properties (i.e., wind forcing, surface currents, Ekman pumping, and vertical mixing). The North Pacific and North Atlantic gyres are observed to be shrinking over this period, while the South Pacific, South Atlantic, and South Indian Ocean gyres appear to be expanding.

  4. Networks for Autonomous Formation Flying Satellite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoblock, Eric J.; Konangi, Vijay K.; Wallett, Thomas M.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    2001-01-01

    The performance of three communications networks to support autonomous multi-spacecraft formation flying systems is presented. All systems are comprised of a ten-satellite formation arranged in a star topology, with one of the satellites designated as the central or "mother ship." All data is routed through the mother ship to the terrestrial network. The first system uses a TCP/lP over ATM protocol architecture within the formation the second system uses the IEEE 802.11 protocol architecture within the formation and the last system uses both of the previous architectures with a constellation of geosynchronous satellites serving as an intermediate point-of-contact between the formation and the terrestrial network. The simulations consist of file transfers using either the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) or the Simple Automatic File Exchange (SAFE) Protocol. The results compare the IF queuing delay, and IP processing delay at the mother ship as well as application-level round-trip time for both systems, In all cases, using IEEE 802.11 within the formation yields less delay. Also, the throughput exhibited by SAFE is better than FTP.

  5. Cooling systems for satellite remote sensing instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, R. J.; Oren, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of a cryogenic cooling system for the Pollution Monitoring Satellite (PMS) are discussed. Studies were conducted to make the following determinations: (1) the characteristics and use of proven and state-of-the-art cryogenic cooling systems for six specified ranges of performance, (2) the system most applicable for each of the six cooling categories, and (3) conceptual designs for candidate system for each of the six representative cooling categories. The six cooling categories of electrical loads are defined. The desired mission life for the cooling system is two years with both continuous and intermittent operating conditions.

  6. SEU induced errors observed in microprocessor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Asenek, V.; Underwood, C.; Oldfield, M.; Velazco, R.; Rezgui, S.; Cheynet, P.; Ecoffet, R.

    1998-12-01

    In this paper, the authors present software tools for predicting the rate and nature of observable SEU induced errors in microprocessor systems. These tools are built around a commercial microprocessor simulator and are used to analyze real satellite application systems. Results obtained from simulating the nature of SEU induced errors are shown to correlate with ground-based radiation test data.

  7. Cloudsat and MTSAT Satellites Observer Atsani - Duration: 25 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This Aug. 19 image combines cloud imagery from Japan's MTSAT satellite and NASA's CloudSat satellite. Areas of pink and red designate larger amounts of liquid and ice. Light blue indicate smaller c...

  8. Assimilation of hyperspectral satellite radiance observations within tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Haidao

    The availability of high resolution temperature and water vapor data is critical for the study of mesoscale scale weather phenomena (e.g., convective initiations, and tropical cyclones). As hyperspectral infrared sounders, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) could provide high resolution atmospheric profiles by measuring radiations in many thousands of different channels. This work focuses on the assessment of the potential values of satellite hyperspectral radiance data on the study of convective initiations (CI) and the assimilation of AIRS radiance observations within tropical storms. First, the potential capability of hyperspectral infrared measurements (GIFTS) to provide convective precipitation forecasts has been studied and assessed. Using both the observed and the model-predicted profiles as input to the GIFTS radiative transfer model (RTM), it is shown that the simulated GIFTS radiance could capture the high vertical and temporal variability of the real and modeled atmosphere prior to a convective initiation, as well as the differences between observations and model forecasts. This study suggests the potential for hyperspectral infrared radiance data to make an important contribution to the improvement of the forecast skill of convective precipitation. Second, as the first step toward applying AIRS data to tropical cyclone (TC) prediction, a set of dropsonde profiles during Hurricane Rita (2005) is used to simulate AIRS radiance data and to assess the ability of AIRS data in capturing the vertical variability within TCs through one-dimensional variational (1D-Var) twin experiments. The AIRS observation errors and background errors are first estimated. Five sets of 1D-Var twin experiments are then performed using different combinations of AIRS channels. Finally, results from these 1D-Var experiments are analyzed. Major findings are: (1) AIRS radiance data contain useful information about the vertical variability of the temperature and water vapor within hurricanes; (2) assimilation of AIRS radiances significantly reduced errors in background temperature in the lower troposphere and relative humidity in the upper troposphere; (3) the near-real time (NRT) channel set provided by NOAA/NESDIS seems sufficient for capturing the vertical variability of the atmosphere in the upper troposphere of TCs, but not in the lower troposphere; and (4) the channels with weighting functions peak within the layer between 500-700 hPa could provide useful information to the atmospheric state below 700 hPa. A channel selection method is proposed to capture most vertical variability of temperature and water vapor within TCs contained in AIRS data. Finally, AIRS radiance data within TCs have been assimilated in the 1D-Var experiments with comparisons of the retrieval temperature and water vapor profiles with co-located Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) soundings and dropsonde profiles. The comparisons of AIRS 1DVar retrieval profiles with GPS RO sounding show that AIRS data can greatly improve the analysis of temperature and water vapor profiles within TCs. The comparisons of retrieval profiles with dropsonde data during Hurricane Rita, however, showed some discrepancies partly due to the difference of these two measurements and the uncertainties of the AIRS errors.

  9. Maui Space Surveillance System Satellite Categorization Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiotte, R.; Guyote, M.; Kelecy, T.; Hall, D.; Africano, J.; Kervin, P.

    The MSSS satellite categorization laboratory is a fusion of robotics and digital imaging processes that aims to decompose satellite photometric characteristics and behavior in a controlled setting. By combining a robot, light source and camera to acquire non-resolved images of a model satellite, detailed photometric analyses can be performed to extract relevant information about shape features, elemental makeup, and ultimately attitude and function. Using the laboratory setting a detailed analysis can be done on any type of material or design and the results cataloged in a database that will facilitate object identification by "curve-fitting" individual elements in the basis set to observational data that might otherwise be unidentifiable. Currently the laboratory has created, an ST-Robotics five degree of freedom robotic arm, collimated light source and non-focused Apogee camera have all been integrated into a MATLAB based software package that facilitates automatic data acquisition and analysis. Efforts to date have been aimed at construction of the lab as well as validation and verification of simple geometric objects. Simple tests on spheres, cubes and simple satellites show promising results that could lead to a much better understanding of non-resolvable space object characteristics. This paper presents a description of the laboratory configuration and validation test results with emphasis on the non-resolved photometric characteristics for a variety of object shapes, spin dynamics and orientations. The future vision, utility and benefits of the laboratory to the SSA community as a whole are also discussed.

  10. Satellite observations support to disaster monitoring: the operational use of COSMO-SkyMed constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, Laura; Cardaci, Chiara; Coletta, Alessandro; Corina, Angela; Di Bucci, Daniela; Giuliani, Roberta; Pagliara, Paola; Zoffoli, Simona; Boni, Giorgio

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work is to show some experiences recently made by ASI and DPC, with the collaboration of Italian research institutes and academies, in using satellite observations to monitor different steps of emergency management in Italy: the 2012 Emilia earthquakes and the 2012 seismic sequence in the Mt. Pollino area, the volcano Stromboli eruption, the floods occurred in Tuscany and Lazio. The effectiveness of the satellite observations contribution to the disaster management is to day in phase of demonstration, and the encouraging results obtained up to now rely not only on the maturity of the data processing and interpretation techniques (more exploited), but also on the coordination in accessing and programming satellites systems. During the past year, COSMO-SkyMed has been successfully used to acquire, in very short times, high quality images of disaster areas. When the emergency evolution made it necessary, after the set up the monitoring service went on several months. Our experience confirmed how important is the availability of consistent series of satellite data, acquired on disaster prone areas in order to enable and facilitate post-disaster activities. Moreover, some results have been made possible thanks to science oriented initiatives sponsored by ASI and to the long-lasting cooperation among DPC and the national research institutions. In general, to meet civil protection needs after a disaster, typical activities based on earth observation techniques, as rapid mapping, recovery and first evaluation of damage, require the following observation capabilities: medium-to-high spatial resolution high revisit time, coupled with large spatial and spectral coverage night/daylight and all-weather observations capability of very short response time and frequent revisit opportunities for the study area availability of a good reference archive access and provision of satellite data for operational purposes, based on well defined rules and procedures. The experience made shows how all these characteristics play a key role during real emergencies. Many players, each with its specific role but working as a single team, are involved in the emergency management: the Italian Space Agency, the national Department of Civil Protection, and the scientific institutions that are in charge to elaborate and interpret satellite data. The work done up to now shows the importance of coordination for a sustained access to data source, in order to meet the requirements of the disaster monitoring and fully exploit the satellite system capabilities. This experience paves the way for a more effective and enlarged use of satellite observations in the civil protection domain.

  11. Observability of complex systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang-Yu; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Barabsi, Albert-Lszl

    2013-01-01

    A quantitative description of a complex system is inherently limited by our ability to estimate the systems internal state from experimentally accessible outputs. Although the simultaneous measurement of all internal variables, like all metabolite concentrations in a cell, offers a complete description of a systems state, in practice experimental access is limited to only a subset of variables, or sensors. A system is called observable if we can reconstruct the systems complete internal state from its outputs. Here, we adopt a graphical approach derived from the dynamical laws that govern a system to determine the sensors that are necessary to reconstruct the full internal state of a complex system. We apply this approach to biochemical reaction systems, finding that the identified sensors are not only necessary but also sufficient for observability. The developed approach can also identify the optimal sensors for target or partial observability, helping us reconstruct selected state variables from appropriately chosen outputs, a prerequisite for optimal biomarker design. Given the fundamental role observability plays in complex systems, these results offer avenues to systematically explore the dynamics of a wide range of natural, technological and socioeconomic systems. PMID:23359701

  12. Satellite observation and mapping of wintertime ozone variability in the lower stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, M. A.; Chi, Yuechen; Rood, R. B.; Douglass, A. R.; Kaye, J. A.; Allen, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Comparison is made between 30 mbar ozone fields that are generated by a transport chemistry model utilizing the winds from the Goddard Space Flight Center stratospheric data assimilation system (STRATAN), observations from the LIMS instrument on Nimbus-7, and the ozone fields that result from 'flying' a mathematical simulation of LIMS observations through the transport chemistry model ozone fields. The modeled ozone fields were found to resemble the LIMS observations, but the model fields show much more temporal and spatial structure than do the LIMS observations. The 'satellite mapped' model results resemble the LIMS observations much more closely. These results are very consistent with the earlier discussions of satellite space-time sampling by Salby.

  13. Satellite observation and mapping of wintertime ozone variability in the lower stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Chi, Yuechen; Rood, Richard B.; Douglass, Anne R.; Kaye, Jack A.; Allen, Dale J.

    1992-01-01

    Comparison is made between 30 mbar ozone fields that are generated by a transport chemistry model utilizing the winds from the Goddard Space Flight Center stratospheric data assimilation system (STRATAN), observations from the LIMS instrument on Nimbus-7, and the ozone fields that result from 'flying a mathematical simulation of LIMS observations through the transport chemistry model ozone fields. The modeled ozone fields were found to resemble the LIMS observations, but the model fields show much more temporal and spatial structure than do the LIMS observations. The 'satellite mapped' model results resemble the LIMS observations much more closely. These results are very consistent with the earlier discussions of satellite space-time sampling by Salby.

  14. Arctic Sea ice studies with passive microwave satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to improve sea ice concentration determinations from passive microwave space observations; (2) to study the role of Arctic polynyas in the production of sea ice and the associated salinization of Arctic shelf water; and (3) to study large scale sea ice variability in the polar oceans. The strategy is to analyze existing data sets and data acquired from both the DMSP SSM/I and recently completed aircraft underflights. Special attention will be given the high resolution 85.5 GHz SSM/I channels for application to thin ice algorithms and processes studies. Analysis of aircraft and satellite data sets is expected to provide a basis for determining the potential of the SSM/I high frequency channels for improving sea ice algorithms and for investigating oceanic processes. Improved sea ice algorithms will aid the study of Arctic coastal polynyas which in turn will provide a better understanding of the role of these polynyas in maintaining the Arctic watermass structure. Analysis of satellite and archived meteorological data sets will provide improved estimates of annual, seasonal and shorter-term sea ice variability.

  15. Antartic sea ice, 1973 - 1976: Satellite passive-microwave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. J.; Comiso, J. C.; Parkinson, C. L.; Campbell, W. J.; Carsey, F. D.; Gloersen, P.

    1983-01-01

    Data from the Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) on the Nimbus 5 satellite are used to determine the extent and distribution of Antarctic sea ice. The characteristics of the southern ocean, the mathematical formulas used to obtain quantitative sea ice concentrations, the general characteristics of the seasonal sea ice growth/decay cycle and regional differences, and the observed seasonal growth/decay cycle for individual years and interannual variations of the ice cover are discussed. The sea ice data from the ESMR are presented in the form of color-coded maps of the Antarctic and the southern oceans. The maps show brightness temperatures and concentrations of pack ice averaged for each month, 4-year monthly averages, and month-to-month changes. Graphs summarizing the results, such as areas of sea ice as a function of time in the various sectors of the southern ocean are included. The images demonstrate that satellite microwave data provide unique information on large-scale sea ice conditions for determining climatic conditions in polar regions and possible global climatic changes.

  16. An Examination of Intertidal Temperatures Through Remotely Sensed Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, V.

    2010-12-01

    MODIS Aqua and Terra satellites produce both land surface temperatures and sea surface temperatures using calibrated algorithms. In this study, the land surface temperatures were retrieved during clear-sky (non-cloudy) conditions at a 1 km2 resolution (overpass time at 10:30 am) whereas the sea surface temperatures are also retrieved during clear-sky conditions at approximately 4 km resolution (overpass time at 1:30 pm). The purpose of this research was to examine remotely sensed sea surface (SST), intertidal (IST), and land surface temperatures (LST), in conjunction with observed in situ mussel body temperatures, as well as associated weather and tidal data. In Strawberry Hill, Oregon, it was determined that intertidal surface temperatures are similar to but distinctly different from land surface temperatures although influenced by sea surface temperatures. The air temperature and differential heating throughout the day, as well as location in relation to the shore, can greatly influence the remotely sensed surface temperatures. Therefore, remotely sensed satellite data is a very useful tool in examining intertidal temperatures for regional climatic changes over long time periods and may eventually help researchers forecast expected climate changes and help determine associated biological implications.

  17. Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Systems Engineering Office (SEO). Ocean Surface Topography (OST) Workshop, Ruedesheim an Rhein, Germany. [CEOS SEO Status Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killough, Brian D., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    The CEOS Systems Engineering Office will present a 2007 status report of the CEOS constellation process, present a new systems engineering framework, and analysis results from the GEO Societal Benefit Area (SBA) assessment and the OST constellation requirements assessment.

  18. Anomalous event diagnosis for environmental satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsay, Bruce H.

    1993-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) is responsible for the operation of the NOAA geostationary and polar orbiting satellites. NESDIS provides a wide array of operational meteorological and oceanographic products and services and operates various computer and communication systems on a 24-hour, seven days per week schedule. The Anomaly Reporting System contains a database of anomalous events regarding the operations of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), communication, or computer systems that have degraded or caused the loss of GOES imagery. Data is currently entered manually via an automated query user interface. There are 21 possible symptoms (e.g., No Data), and 73 possible causes (e.g., Sectorizer - World Weather Building) of an anomalous event. The determination of an event's cause(s) is made by the on-duty computer operator, who enters the event in a paper based daily log, and by the analyst entering the data into the reporting system. The determination of the event's cause(s) impacts both the operational status of these systems, and the performance evaluation of the on-site computer and communication operations contractor.

  19. Effects of the Satellite Power System on low Earth orbit and geosynchronous satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, W. B.; Morrison, E. L.; Juroshek, J. R.

    1981-06-01

    The large amount of power contained in the main beam and principal sidelobes of the proposed Solar Power System (SPS), now under study by DOE and NASA, potentially presents an EMC problem for other satellite systems. This report examines selected geosynchronous orbit (GEO) satellites in adjacent slots to an SPS, GEO satellites on a chord passing an Earth horizon, and low-earth-orbit (LEO) satellites which may pass throught the SPS power beam. Potential functional and operational impacts to on-board systems are analyzed. Mitigation techniques for SPS effects are examined, and recommendations summarized to allow satellites to operate satisfactorily in an SPS environment.

  20. Jupiter System Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senske, Dave; Prockter, Louise

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the scientific philosophy that is guiding the planning behind the Jupiter System Observer (JSO). The JSO would be a long-term platform for studying Jupiter and the complete Jovian system. The goal is to advance the understanding of the fundamental processes of planetary systems, their formation and evolution.

  1. A preliminary global oceanic cloud climatology from satellite albedo observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, N. A.; Henderson-Sellers, A.

    1983-01-01

    A predictive relationship is developed between over-ocean cloud system albedo and the cloud amount present, using as a data base ERB satellite microwave readings at 0.5-0.7 micron and the USAF three-dimensional nephanalysis archive. The ERB data provided global coverage at a resolution of 2.5 x 2.5 deg during the 1974-78 period. Regression analyses were performed on the amounts and albedos for several years of data for one month in order to detect seasonal variations. A logarithmic relationship was found between the cloud system albedo and cloud amount over the oceans, with negligible seasonal variance. The analysis is noted to apply only where low surface albedos are encountered, and further work to extend the study to continental vegetated areas is indicated.

  2. Solar power satellite system definition study, volume 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Guidelines and assumptions used in the design of a system of geosynchronous satellites for transmitting solar power to earth were discussed as well as the design evolutions of the principle types of solar power satellites and space support systems.

  3. Application of OSSEs to observing system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlas, Robert; Riishojgaard, Lars P.

    2008-08-01

    Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) are an important tool for evaluating the potential impact of proposed new observing systems, as well as for evaluating trade-offs in observing system design, and in developing and assessing improved methodology for assimilating new observations. Extensive OSSEs have been conducted at NASA/ GSFC and NOAA/AOML in collaboration with Simpson Weather Associates and operational data assimilation centers over the last 23 years. These OSSEs determined correctly the quantitative potential for several proposed satellite observing systems to improve weather analysis and prediction prior to their launch, evaluated trade-offs in orbits, coverage and accuracy for space-based wind lidars, and were used in the development of the methodology that led to the first beneficial impacts of satellite surface winds on numerical weather prediction. In this paper, we summarize OSSE methodology and earlier OSSE results, and present methodology and results from recent OSSEs.

  4. Climate variability and atmospheric teleconnection from satellite observed cloud fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K. M.; Chan, P. H.

    1983-01-01

    To investigate the low-frequency variability of the large-scale circulation over the tropics and its relationship with different regions of the globe, statistics of cloud fluctuations, as inferred from outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) are used. The data consists of seven years of global OLR in a 2.5 x 2.5-deg grid derived from NOAA polar orbiting satellite observations. The time series of area-averaged monthly deviation from the seven-year mean of OLR over an equatorial Central Pacific region is presented. It is shown that positive and negative deviations reflect local drier and wetter than normal conditions, respectively. Consideration is given to teleconnection based on the Central Pacific variations and to southern oscillation contributions.

  5. Interpretation of satellite gyroharmonic resonance observations. [of ionosphere by Alouette

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. F.; Bitoun, J.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical expression is obtained for the rendezvous conditions between a propagating wave near nfH and a moving ionospheric sounder antenna, where fH is the ambient value of the electron gyrofrequency and n is an integer greater than 1. The agreement between the theoretical predictions and Alouette 1 satellite observations indicates that most of the long duration resonances (those with durations greater than about 2 msec) can be interpreted in terms of the reception of sounder-stimulated electrostatic waves that are reflected and returned to the sounder antenna. The results provide a technique for obtaining from sounder-stimulated plasma resonances information on ambient electron temperature corresponding to electron motions perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field.

  6. Satellites - New global observing techniques for ice and snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, P.; Salomonson, V. V.

    1975-01-01

    The possibility that the variation in areal extent of the snow cover may be related by empirical means to the average monthly run-off in a given watershed was demonstrated by comparing run-off records from the Indus River Basin in south-east Asia with a series of snow-cover maps obtained from Nimbus-3 and 4 imagery. Similar studies using the higher spatial resolution available with ERTS-1 imagery were carried out for the Wind River Mountains watersheds in Wyoming, where it was found that the empirical relationship varied with mean elevation of the watershed. In addition, digital image enhancement techniques are shown to be useful for identifying glacier features thought to be related to extent of snow cover, moraine characteristics, debris coverage, and the like. Finally, longer wavelength observations using sensors on board the Nimbus-5 satellite are shown to be useful for indicating crystal size distributions and onset of melting on glacier snow cover.

  7. Terrestrial Myriametric Radio Burst Observed by IMAGE and Geotail Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.; Hashimoto, KoZo; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Boardson, Scott A.; Garcia, Leonard N.; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Green, James L.; Reinisch, Bodo W.

    2013-01-01

    We report the simultaneous detection of a terrestrial myriametric radio burst (TMRB) by IMAGE and Geotail on 19 August 2001. The TMRB was confined in time (0830-1006 UT) and frequency (12-50kHz). Comparisons with all known nonthermal myriametric radiation components reveal that the TMRB might be a distinct radiation with a source that is unrelated to the previously known radiation. Considerations of beaming from spin-modulation analysis and observing satellite and source locations suggest that the TMRB may have a fan beamlike radiation pattern emitted by a discrete, dayside source located along the poleward edge of magnetospheric cusp field lines. TMRB responsiveness to IMF Bz and By orientations suggests that a possible source of the TMRB could be due to dayside magnetic reconnection instigated by northward interplanetary field condition.

  8. Regional satellite systems - Required or redundant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filep, R.

    1981-09-01

    It is shown that the development of such regional satellite systems as the Arab League's Arabsat, the South American Aseta, and the ASEAN nations' Palapa II, will be redundant if Intelsat moves ahead with its expanded service options with multiple frequency and beam configurations. Attention is given to direct broadcast satellite systems and the geostationary platform concept, which would incorporate C-band high-volume trunking, meteorological data relay, interplatform link, and Ku-band TV distribution and could be constructed in orbit by the Space Shuttle. The platform concept offers antenna reflectors that could be utilized by many 'feeds' or multiple-phase arrays, permitting frequency reuse many hundreds of times over.

  9. A Geostationary Satellite Constellation for Observing Global Air Quality: Status of the CEOS Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saadi, J. A.; Zehner, C.

    2011-12-01

    Several countries and space agencies are currently planning to launch geostationary satellites in the 2017-2022 time frame to obtain atmospheric composition measurements for characterizing anthropogenic and natural distributions of tropospheric ozone, aerosols, and their precursors, which are important factors in understanding air quality and climate change. While a single geostationary satellite can view only a portion of the globe, it is possible for a minimum of three geostationary satellites, positioned to view Europe/Middle East/Africa, Asia/Australasia, and the Americas, to collectively provide near-global coverage. Harmonizing the planned geostationary missions to be contemporaneous and have common observing capabilities and data distribution protocols would synergistically enable critically needed understanding of the interactions between regional and global atmospheric composition and of the implications for air quality and climate. Such activities would directly address societal benefit areas of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), including Health, Energy, Climate, Disasters, and Ecosystems, and are responsive to the requirements of each mission to provide advanced user services and societal benefits. Over the past 2 years, the Atmospheric Composition Constellation (ACC) of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) has developed a white paper describing such collaboration and the benefits to be derived from it. The resulting ACC recommendations were endorsed by CEOS in May 2011. Here we will present an update on collaborative activities and next steps. This presentation is envisioned to serve as an introduction to the oral sessions associated with Session A.25.

  10. Observations of H? surges and ultraviolet jets above satellite sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. D.; Jiang, Y. C.; Ma, S. L.

    2008-02-01

    Aims:To know more about the physical origin of surges and jets, we investigated seven successive surge events, which occurred above the satellite sunspots of active region NOAA 10720 on 2005 January 15. Methods: Using data from the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE), Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), we present a detailed study of the surges and their relations with the associated small arch filament, UV jets, flares and photospheric longitudinal magnetic fields. Results: The seven H? surges we studied repeatedly occurred where the photospheric longitudinal fluxes of opposite magnetic polarities emerged, converged and were canceled by each other. Correspondingly, a small satellite spot emerged, decayed and disappeared during a period of about 2 hours in the white-light observations. In morphology, all surges displayed almost linear ejective structures. Their dynamic properties, such as the transverse velocity, projected maximum length and lifetime, varied in wide ranges. They are 30-200 km s-1, 38 000-220 000 km and from several to tens of minutes, respectively. Correspondingly, the intensities of their correlated microflares were different too. The surges of major velocities or maximum lengths seemed to be accompanied by processes of more energy release. Prior to these surge events, a small H? arch filament connecting the opposite flux elements was found at the base region. Instead of erupting completely, it gradually disappeared during the surges. Its role in the surge activities is very like a bipolar flux, which contained the cool plasma and reconnected with the ambient magnetic fields. In 1600 , three surge events exhibited the composite structures of bright jets and nearby small flaring loops, which provides direct evidence of magnetic reconnection origin of the surges. A careful comparison revealed that the ends of the arch filament, the UV jets and the small flaring loops just corresponded to the interacting longitudinal fluxes in the photosphere. Conclusions: These observational results support the magnetic reconnection model of surges and jets.

  11. Earth observations satellite data policy: Process and outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, L.R.

    1994-12-31

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) develops, launches, and operates satellites to observe and monitor the Earth and its environment. This study categorizes each program based on the relationship between NASA and external organizations. A program can be an autonomous mission undertaken for NASA`s own constituency, or it can involve a client agency or a partner. These relationships affect how data policy decisions are made and implemented, and how the valuable output of NASA`s Earth observations satellites is managed. The process in NASA for determining which programs will be approved is very informal. Ideas and concepts surface and reach the consciousness of NASA management; if sufficient support is achieved, a proposal can move to the feasibility study phase and from there become an approved and funded mission. The handling of data can be an important consideration in generating political support for program approval. Autonomous programs tend to have decisions made at lower levels and documented informally or not at all. Data policy is part of routine implementation of programs and does not generally rise to the visibility of the agency head or congressional staff or the Executive Office of the President. Responsibility for data management for autonomous missions is retained at NASA centers. Client programs involve higher level decision makers, and are the subject of political interest because they cross agency boundaries. The data policy process includes presidential statements on data access. As part of the client relationship, NASA often provides resources to the client for data handling and analysis, and shares these responsibilities. Data policy for partner programs is the result of bargaining between the partners, either foreign government agencies or private companies.

  12. Observability of complex systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang-Yu; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Barabsi, Albert-Lszl

    2013-02-12

    A quantitative description of a complex system is inherently limited by our ability to estimate the system's internal state from experimentally accessible outputs. Although the simultaneous measurement of all internal variables, like all metabolite concentrations in a cell, offers a complete description of a system's state, in practice experimental access is limited to only a subset of variables, or sensors. A system is called observable if we can reconstruct the system's complete internal state from its outputs. Here, we adopt a graphical approach derived from the dynamical laws that govern a system to determine the sensors that are necessary to reconstruct the full internal state of a complex system. We apply this approach to biochemical reaction systems, finding that the identified sensors are not only necessary but also sufficient for observability. The developed approach can also identify the optimal sensors for target or partial observability, helping us reconstruct selected state variables from appropriately chosen outputs, a prerequisite for optimal biomarker design. Given the fundamental role observability plays in complex systems, these results offer avenues to systematically explore the dynamics of a wide range of natural, technological and socioeconomic systems. PMID:23359701

  13. A commercial communications satellite system for Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, M. A.; Marumo, M.

    1986-03-01

    JC SAT will provide commercial Ku-band communications service to the Japanese islands commencing in early 1988. The satellite is a Hughes HS-393 with 32 transponders and a 27 MHz bandwidth. The communications payload has 40 for 32 redundancy with nominal 20 watt traveling wave tubes. Eighteen of the transponders contain linearizer-TWT combinations. This system will provide highly reliable service for the complete range of applications from TV broadcast to digital data dissemination using relatively small receiving antennas.

  14. Observing System Simulation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prive, Nikki

    2015-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). The components of an OSSE are described, along with discussion of the process for validating, calibrating, and performing experiments. a.

  15. Satellite Situation Center data system for magnetospheric science planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aist-Sagara, L.; Cooper, J. F.; McGuire, R. E.; Parthasarathy, R.; Peredo, M.

    1995-01-01

    Critical problems in planning coordinated observation campaigns for magnetospheric science include the need to predict time intervals when one or more observing satellites or ground stations will be connected along magnetic field lines to other observation sites, or when such sites will be located within magnetospheric regions of common interest. The Satellite Situation Center (SSC) was created at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) during the International Magnetospheric Study in the 1970s to address these problems. The SSC Data System has evolved since that era to support potentially complex queries by SSC staff and has now been opened to NASA Science Internet access via the NSSDC On-line Data Information System (NODIS). The SSC software, ephemeris data base, and access modes are described for the Version 2.1 release in 1993.

  16. Single-satellite global positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrov, Alexander V.; Leonov, Vladislav A.; Mitkin, Alexander S.; Nasyrov, Alexander F.; Ponomarenko, Andreu D.; Pichkhadze, Konstantin M.; Sysoev, Valentin K.

    2015-12-01

    A new concept of a global positioning support system, based on only one satellite, was offered. Unlike all other GPS and GLONASS satellite systems that are in use, within the offered modification, all metrological support is provided by on-board measurements, which means, that it does not need any ground support of coordinate measurements or orbital characteristics of the satellite system. The cosmic-based angle-measuring instrument measures the arcs lengths between the measured ground-points, that are marked with light beacons, and navigation stars. Each measurement takes approximately 0.04 s, with the precision of 1 mm in recalculation to ground-relations. Long series of arc measurements between different objects on the ground and in the sky enable the solution of both determination of geodesic coordinates of the measured points and position of the spacecraft during the measuring process by using geodesic equation methods. In addition, it enables the qualification of the geopotential guaranties. The offered scheme will be used for the determination of the frame of selenocentric coordinates during the "Luna-Globe" and "Luna-Resource" missions for precise navigation of landing modules and maybe will be used for precise gridding of the Martian surface.

  17. Satellite Telemetry and Command using Big LEO Mobile Telecommunications Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huegel, Fred

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with satellite telemetry and command using Big LEO mobile telecommunications systems are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Commercial Satellite system overviews: Globalstar, ICO, and Iridium; 2) System capabilities and cost reduction; 3) Satellite constellations and contact limitations; 4) Capabilities of Globalstar, ICO and Iridium with emphasis on Globalstar; and 5) Flight transceiver issues and security.

  18. Monitoring tropical cyclone evolution with NOAA satellite microwave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velden, C.; Smith, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    NOAA satellite microwave soundings, which penetrate high clouds, delineate the development and dissipation of the upper tropospheric warm core associated with a tropical cyclone. The storm's 'core" may be detected from microwave imagery. Vertical cross sections reveal the intensification of the upper tropospheric warm core as the storm develops, and the downward propagation of the warm core as the storm dissipates. Excellent correlation is found between the horizontal Laplacian of an upper tropospheric temperature field and the intensity of the storm, as categorized by its surface central pressure and maximum sustained wind speed at the eye wall. The microwave monitoring of tropical cyclones is achieved in real time at the University of Wisconsin's Space Science and Engineering Center through high-speed teleconnections to direct readout receiving systems at Wallops Island, Virginia and Redwood City, California.

  19. Fuel models and fire potential from satellite and surface observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burgan, R.E.; Klaver, R.W.; Klarer, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    A national 1-km resolution fire danger fuel model map was derived through use of previously mapped land cover classes and ecoregions, and extensive ground sample data, then refined through review by fire managers familiar with various portions of the U.S. The fuel model map will be used in the next generation fire danger rating system for the U.S., but it also made possible immediate development of a satellite and ground based fire potential index map. The inputs and algorithm of the fire potential index are presented, along with a case study of the correlation between the fire potential index and fire occurrence in California and Nevada. Application of the fire potential index in the Mediterranean ecosystems of Spain, Chile, and Mexico will be tested.

  20. Satellite voice broadcase system study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstein, M.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of providing Voice of America (VOA) broadcasts by satellite relay was investigated. Satellite voice broadcast systems are described for three different frequency bands: HF, FHV, and L-band. Geostationary satellite configurations are considered for both frequency bands. A system of subsynchronous, circular satellites with an orbit period of 8 hours was developed for the HF band. The VHF broadcasts are provided by a system of Molniya satellites. The satellite designs are limited in size and weight to the capability of the STS/Centaur launch vehicle combination. At L-band, only four geostationary satellites are needed to meet the requirements of the complete broadcast schedule. These satellites are comparable in size and weight to current satellites designed for the direct broadcast of video program material.

  1. A comparison of satellite water vapor observations with model simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.J.

    1997-11-01

    This paper compares observations of precipitable water (PW) and upper tropospheric humidity (UTH) with Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) simulations. PW observational data was from a scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SSMR); the mean observed PW for the 6-year coincident period was compared with AMIP simulation. Upper tropospheric relative humidity observational data was obtained from high resolution infrared radiometer instruments on NOAA satellites. Direct comparisons of observed UTH data are made with AMIP relative humidity. The model means and variability over the oceans compare well with values from SMMR observations. The mean annual cycle of PW from AMIP compares well with SMMR data, although SMMR values are consistently higher in the tropics. Interannual anomaly time series correlations between SMMR and AMIP PW values show a high regional dependence. In the subtropics, about one third of the AMIP models show highly significant interannual anomaly correlations, about one third show significant correlations, and about one third are not significantly correlated. In the tropics, almost all of the AMIP models are highly significantly correlated with the SMMR interannual PW anomalies; this is attributed to similar model responses during the extreme El Nino event of 1982-83. All models show significantly higher relative humidity at all levels; this may be due to tuning against radiosonde climatologies of upper tropospheric humidity climatologies that contain known large systematic biases. Variations in 10-year mean 300 millibar relative humidity between models was shown to be significantly different. Overall, the models are doing only an adequate job in simulation of PW and its variability, and are doing a completely inadequate job of simulating UTH and its variability. Inadequate simulation of UTH translates into large errors in simulation of the outgoing longwave radiation. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Satellites: New global observing techniques for ice and snow. [using erts-1 and nimbus 5 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, P.; Salomonson, V. V.

    1974-01-01

    The relation of aereal extent of snow cover to the average monthly runoff in a given watershed was investigated by comparing runoff records with a series of snowcover maps. Studies using the high spatial resolution available with ERTS-1 imagery were carried out for the Wind River Mountains watersheds in Wyoming, where it was found that the empirical relationship varied with mean elevation of the watershed. In addition, digital image enhancement techniques are shown to be useful for identifying glacier features related to extent of snowcover, moraine characteristics, and debris average. Longer wavelength observations using sensors on board the Nimbus 5 Satellite are shown to be useful for indicating crystal size distributions and onset of melting on glacier snow cover.

  3. Impact of Forests on Local Temperature Based on Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Zhao, M.; Motesharrei, S.; Mu, Q.; Kalnay, E.; Shuangcheng, L.

    2014-12-01

    Much of current knowledge on the biophysical effect of forests on climate comes from large-scale vegetation clearing experiments in climate models. However, due to uncertainties and coarse spatial resolution, models are unable to provide reliable information on local climate effect. Evidence on local temperature effects of forests from field observations is limited within a small spatial range, which is insufficient to address global forests with high heterogeneity. In this study, we present new evidence acquired from satellite observations to investigate how forest affects local temperature through biophysical mechanisms from a global perspective. Results show tropical forest has strong cooling effect throughout the year. Northern/southern temperate forests have weak/moderate cooling, peak in summer but weak in winter. Boreal forest has significant warming effect in particularly in winter. A diurnal asymmetric feature is observed at most forests, which is daytime cooling and nighttime warming relative to open land. The spatiotemporal patterns are largely a consequence of the competing effects of albedo and evapotranspiration, which also depend on climate conditions especially humidity and snow. Our study reveals biophysical mechanisms have consistent impact on local climate in terms of temperature with those large-scale impacts from climate models. This information could be used to inform forest management at local level and possible climate effects of the ongoing land use activities of forestry.

  4. Observing the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, Gerald

    2012-10-01

    1. Earth and sky; 2. Moon and planet observer's hardware; 3. The Solar System framed; 4. Stacking up the Solar System; 5. Our Moon; 6. Mercury and Venus; 7. Mars; 8. Jupiter; 9. Saturn, Uranus and Neptune; 10. Small worlds; 11. Comets; 12. Our daytime star; Appendices; Index.

  5. Ambiguity resolution for satellite Doppler positioning systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argentiero, P.; Marini, J.

    1979-01-01

    The implementation of satellite-based Doppler positioning systems frequently requires the recovery of transmitter position from a single pass of Doppler data. The least-squares approach to the problem yields conjugate solutions on either side of the satellite subtrack. It is important to develop a procedure for choosing the proper solution which is correct in a high percentage of cases. A test for ambiguity resolution which is the most powerful in the sense that it maximizes the probability of a correct decision is derived. When systematic error sources are properly included in the least-squares reduction process to yield an optimal solution the test reduces to choosing the solution which provides the smaller valuation of the least-squares loss function. When systematic error sources are ignored in the least-squares reduction, the most powerful test is a quadratic form comparison with the weighting matrix of the quadratic form obtained by computing the pseudoinverse of a reduced-rank square matrix. A formula for computing the power of the most powerful test is provided. Numerical examples are included in which the power of the test is computed for situations that are relevant to the design of a satellite-aided search and rescue system.

  6. Improved satellite-based emergency alerting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, E. N.; Milburn, H. B.

    1991-12-01

    Rapid-onset natural hazards have claimed more than 2.8 million lives worldwide in the past 20 years. This category includes such events as earthquakes, landslides, hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, volcanic eruptions, wildfires, and tsunamis. Effective hazard mitigation is particularly difficult in such cases, since the time available to issue warnings can be very short or even nonexistent. A general approach to mitigate the effects of these disasters was demonstrated in 1988 that included preevent emergency planning, real-time hazard assessment, and rapid warning via satellite communication links. This article reports on improvements in this satellite-based emergency alerting communication system that have reduced the response time from 87 to 17 sec and expanded the broadcast coverage from 40 percent to 62 percent of the earth's surface.

  7. The investigation of tethered satellite system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E.

    1985-01-01

    A progress report is presented that deals with three major topics related to Tethered Satellite System Dynamics. The SAO rotational dynamics computer code was updated. The program is now suitable to deal with inclined orbits. The output has been also modified in order to show the satellite Euler angles referred to the rotating orbital frame. The three-dimensional high resolution computer program SLACK3 was developed. The code simulates the three-dimensional dynamics of a tether going slack taking into account the effect produced by boom rotations. Preliminary simulations on the three-dimensional dynamics of a recoiling slack tether are shown in this report. A program to evaluate the electric potential around a severed tether is immersed in a plasma. The potential is computed on a three-dimensional grid axially symmetric with respect to the tether longitudinal axis. The electric potential variations due to the plasma are presently under investigation.

  8. Whistler-triggered emissions observed by ISIS satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Y.; Ondoh, T. )

    1989-01-01

    VLF emissions triggered by whistlers are often observed at middle and high latitudes in the topside ionosphere by ISIS satellites. Most of them are so-called LHR emissions lasting for a few seconds. Latitudinal distributions of the occurrence rate for the whistler-triggered emissions in the topside ionosphere have been obtained by using VLF electric field data received from the ISIS 1 and 2 satellites at Kashima station, Communications Research Laboratory, Japan. These VLF emissions are classified into two groups according to the type of whistlers, i.e., ducted whistlers with a continuous trace over the full frequency range of the spectrum and nonducted whistlers without a complete trace below f{sub LHR}. The latitudinal distribution of the occurrence rate for emissions triggered by ducted whistlers is considerably different from that for emissions triggered by nonducted whistlers, especially at high latitudes. The occurrence rate for the emissions by nonducted whistlers is distributed rather randomly in latitude between L = 2.0 and L = 4.2. The occurrence rate for emissions by ducted whistlers increases with latitudes between L = 1.5 and L = 2.9, and it attains a maximum of 0.33 at L = 2.7. It then abruptly drops to 0.1 at L = 3.0, and it remains below 0.1 between L = 3.0 and L = 4.0. The decrease of the occurrence rate for emissions by ducted whistlers at L = 3.0 seems to be caused by the decrease of the radiation belt electron flux near the slot region. These results suggest that the VLF emissions triggered by ducted whistlers in the topside ionosphere are generated by the cyclotron resonant interaction of ducted whistlers with the magnetospheric electrons near the geomagnetic equatorial plane.

  9. The Role of Satellite Earth Observation Data in Monitoring and Verifying International Environmental Treaties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Shaida

    2004-01-01

    The term verification implies compliance verification in the language of treaty negotiation and implementation, particularly in the fields of disarmament and arms control. The term monitoring on the other hand, in both environmental and arms control treaties, has a much broader interpretation which allows for use of supporting data sources that are not necessarily acceptable or adequate for direct verification. There are many ways that satellite Earth observation (EO) data can support international environmental agreements, from national forest inventories to use in geographic information system (GIs) tools. Though only a few references to satellite EO data and their use exist in the treaties themselves, an expanding list of applications can be considered in support of multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs). This paper explores the current uses of satellite Earth observation data which support monitoring activities of major environmental treaties and draws conclusions about future missions and their data use. The scope of the study includes all phases of environmental treaty fulfillment - development, monitoring, and enforcement - and includes a multinational perspective on the use of satellite Earth observation data for treaty support.

  10. Establishing the Antarctic Dome C community reference standard site towards consistent measurements from Earth observation satellites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cao, C.; Uprety, S.; Xiong, J.; Wu, A.; Jing, P.; Smith, D.; Chander, G.; Fox, N.; Ungar, S.

    2010-01-01

    Establishing satellite measurement consistency by using common desert sites has become increasingly more important not only for climate change detection but also for quantitative retrievals of geophysical variables in satellite applications. Using the Antarctic Dome C site (75°06′S, 123°21′E, elevation 3.2 km) for satellite radiometric calibration and validation (Cal/Val) is of great interest owing to its unique location and characteristics. The site surface is covered with uniformly distributed permanent snow, and the atmospheric effect is small and relatively constant. In this study, the long-term stability and spectral characteristics of this site are evaluated using well-calibrated satellite instruments such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). Preliminary results show that despite a few limitations, the site in general is stable in the long term, the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model works well, and the site is most suitable for the Cal/Val of reflective solar bands in the 0.4–1.0 µm range. It was found that for the past decade, the reflectivity change of the site is within 1.35% at 0.64 µm, and interannual variability is within 2%. The site is able to resolve calibration biases between instruments at a level of ~1%. The usefulness of the site is demonstrated by comparing observations from seven satellite instruments involving four space agencies, including OrbView-2–SeaWiFS, Terra–Aqua MODIS, Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) – Hyperion, Meteorological Operational satellite programme (MetOp) – Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), Envisat Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) – dvanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR), and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+). Dome C is a promising candidate site for climate quality calibration of satellite radiometers towards more consistent satellite measurements, as part of the framework for climate change detection and data quality assurance for the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS).

  11. Satellite communications systems and technology. Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelson, Burton I.; Pelton, Joseph N.; Bostian, Charles W.; Brandon, William T.; Chan, Vincent W. S.; Hager, E. Paul; Helm, Neil R.; Jennings, Raymond D.; Kwan, Robert; Mahle, Christoph E.

    1993-01-01

    NASA and the National Science Foundation (NSF) commissioned a panel of US experts to study the international status of satellite communications systems and technology. The study covers emerging systems concepts, applications, services, and the attendant technologies. The panel members travelled to Europe, Japan, and Russia to gather information first-hand. They visited 17 sites in Europe, 20 sites in Japan, and four in Russia. These included major manufacturers, government organizations, service providers, and associated R&D facilities. The panel's report was reviewed by the sites visited, by the panel, and by representatives of US industry. The report details the information collected and compares it to US activities.

  12. Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) system definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An executive summary of a study on the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) was presented. It was concluded that the overall costs of space systems could be reduced significantly by the development of a modular shuttle compatible standard spacecraft, and the use of that spacecraft with the Shuttle Transportation System. It was also demonstrated that the development of the standard spacecraft is feasible, desirable, and cost effective if applied to a series of missions. The ability to initially retrieve, refurbish, and reuse the spacecraft and its payload, and ultimately to perform in-orbit servicing, would result in significant cost savings. A number of specific conclusions and recommendations were also suggested.

  13. Spectroradiometric considerations for advanced land observing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1986-01-01

    Research aimed at improving the inflight absolute radiometric calibration of advanced land observing systems was initiated. Emphasis was on the satellite sensor calibration program at White Sands. Topics addressed include: absolute radiometric calibration of advanced remote sensing; atmospheric effects on reflected radiation; inflight radiometric calibration; field radiometric methods for reflectance and atmospheric measurement; and calibration of field relectance radiometers.

  14. FIDEX: An expert system for satellite diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durkin, John; Tallo, Donald; Petrik, Edward J.

    1991-01-01

    A Fault Isolation and Diagnostic Expert system (FIDEX) was developed for communication satellite diagnostics. It was designed specifically for the 30/20 GHz satellite transponder. The expert system was designed with a generic structure and features that make it applicable to other types of space systems. FIDEX is a frame based system that enjoys many of the inherent frame base features, such as hierarchy that describes the transponder's components, with other hierarchies that provide structural and fault information about the transponder. This architecture provides a flexible diagnostic structure and enhances maintenance of the system. FIDEX also includes an inexact reasoning technique and a primitive learning ability. Inexact reasoning was an important feature for this system due to the sparse number of sensors available to provide information on the transponder's performance. FIDEX can determine the most likely faulted component under the constraint of limited information. FIDEX learns about the most likely faults in the transponder by keeping a record of past established faults. FIDEX also has the ability to detect anomalies in the sensors that provide information on the transponders performance.

  15. Astrometric positions for 18 irregular satellites of giant planets from 23 years of observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes-Júnior, A. R.; Assafin, M.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Arlot, J.-E.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Braga-Ribas, F.; da Silva Neto, D. N.; Andrei, A. H.; Dias-Oliveira, A.; Morgado, B. E.; Benedetti-Rossi, G.; Duchemin, Y.; Desmars, J.; Lainey, V.; Thuillot, W.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The irregular satellites of the giant planets are believed to have been captured during the evolution of the solar system. Knowing their physical parameters, such as size, density, and albedo is important for constraining where they came from and how they were captured. The best way to obtain these parameters are observations in situ by spacecrafts or from stellar occultations by the objects. Both techniques demand that the orbits are well known. Aims: We aimed to obtain good astrometric positions of irregular satellites to improve their orbits and ephemeris. Methods: We identified and reduced observations of several irregular satellites from three databases containing more than 8000 images obtained between 1992 and 2014 at three sites (Observatório do Pico dos Dias, Observatoire de Haute-Provence, and European Southern Observatory - La Silla). We used the software Platform for Reduction of Astronomical Images Automatically (PRAIA) to make the astrometric reduction of the CCD frames. The UCAC4 catalog represented the International Celestial Reference System in the reductions. Identification of the satellites in the frames was done through their ephemerides as determined from the SPICE/NAIF kernels. Some procedures were followed to overcome missing or incomplete information (coordinates, date), mostly for the older images. Results: We managed to obtain more than 6000 positions for 18 irregular satellites: 12 of Jupiter, 4 of Saturn, 1 of Uranus (Sycorax), and 1 of Neptune (Nereid). For some satellites the number of obtained positions is more than 50% of what was used in earlier orbital numerical integrations. Conclusions: Comparison of our positions with recent JPL ephemeris suggests there are systematic errors in the orbits for some of the irregular satellites. The most evident case was an error in the inclination of Carme. Position tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/580/A76 and IAU NSDC database at http://www.imcce.fr/nsdcPartially based on observations made at Laboratório Nacional de Astrofísica (LNA), Itajubá-MG, Brazil.Partially based on observations through the ESO runs 079.A-9202(A), 075.C-0154, 077.C-0283 and 079.C-0345.Partially based on observations made at Observatoire de Haute Provence (OHP), 04870 Saint-Michel l'observatoire, France.

  16. Monitoring of global geodynamic processes using satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatevian, S. K.; Attia, G. F.; Abou-Aly, N.; Ghoneim, R.; Hegazy, M.

    2014-06-01

    To study mechanisms of destructive geodynamic phenomena including determination of places of possible severe earthquakes, volcano eruptions and some other natural hazards, it is important to have means to evolve areas where maximum changes of the displacement velocities and the terrestrial crust vertical movements are possible. The previous experience has shown that the satellite geodesy techniques including global navigation systems and satellite laser ranging are the most effective for research activities in this field. Permanent control of secular movement of GPS-stations of the international geodynamic network, located in Russia, has allowed improving the reference coordinate frame for North Eurasia since Russian network stations provide representative covering of the largest stable areas (the Siberian and the East European) of the Eurasian plate. Along its southern border, there is a zone consisting of a great number of microplates surrounding the South-Eurasian stable plate. Interaction of these small plates and blocks influences distribution of seismic stresses in internal parts of the continent that is confirmed by the highest seismic activity of the triangle bordered by thrusts of the Himalayas and faults of the Pamirs, the Tien-Shan, the Baikal and the North-Eastern China. One of the active tectonic zones of Egypt located in Aswan, is characterized by regional basement rock uplift and regional faulting. In 1997, the African Regional Geodynamic Network was developed around the northern part of Lake Nasser, consists of 11 points, on both sides of the Lake. Its main goal is to study the geodynamical behavior around the northern part of the lake. The collected data were processed using the Bernese software version 5.0. From the velocity results, including also the African plate motion, it can be noticed that all stations of this network are moved to the northeast direction and it is typically the direction of the African plate motion.

  17. Satellite microwave observations of soil moisture variations. [by the microwave radiometer on the Nimbus 5 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Rango, A.; Neff, R.

    1975-01-01

    The electrically scanning microwave radiometer (ESMR) on the Nimbus 5 satellite was used to observe microwave emissions from vegetated and soil surfaces over an Illinois-Indiana study area, the Mississippi Valley, and the Great Salt Lake Desert in Utah. Analysis of microwave brightness temperatures (T sub B) and antecedent rainfall over these areas provided a way to monitor variations of near-surface soil moisture. Because vegetation absorbs microwave emission from the soil at the 1.55 cm wavelength of ESMR, relative soil moisture measurements can only be obtained over bare or sparsely vegetated soil. In general T sub B increased during rainfree periods as evaporation of water and drying of the surface soil occurs, and drops in T sub B are experienced after significant rainfall events wet the soil. Microwave observations from space are limited to coarse resolutions (10-25 km), but it may be possible in regions with sparse vegetation cover to estimate soil moisture conditions on a watershed or agricultural district basis, particularly since daily observations can be obtained.

  18. The Next Gamma-Ray Satellite GLAST for BLAZAR Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukazawa, Y.; Ohsugi, T.; Yoshida, S.; Kamae, T.; Mizuno, T.; Takahashi, T.; Ozaki, M.; Kawai, N.; Kataoka, J.; Team, G.

    The next gamma-ray satellite GLAST will be launched in 2007, under the cooperation of the USA, Japan, Italy, France, Sweden, and so on. GLAST sensitivity is several tens times higher than the EGRET, thanks to good position determination, large effective area, and wide field of view. The key technology to achieve these capabilities is low-noise ``silicon-strip-detector" (SSD), developed and designed by Hiroshima University and Hamamatsu Photonics. Most of the GLAST SSD has been produced, and found to be very high-quality devices with quite a low rate of dead channels of < 0.01 The detector assembly has started, and soon one tower will become built for various environmental tests. GLAST will detect several thousands of BLAZARs, and thus enable us to probe the jet mechanisms and evolution of massive black holes. Good position accuracy will in addition increase an identification. The high-sensitivity, wide-energy-band, and continuous-long-time observations of BLAZARs with GLAST LAT will be hoped to open a new epoch of massive black-hole observations. Especially, the flare history is very important to consider the jet mechanims and particle acceleration.

  19. Satellite Observations of Antarctic Sea Ice Thickness and Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Nathan; Markus, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    We utilize satellite laser altimetry data from ICESat combined with passive microwave measurements to analyze basin-wide changes in Antarctic sea ice thickness and volume over a 5 year period from 2003-2008. Sea ice thickness exhibits a small negative trend while area increases in the summer and fall balanced losses in thickness leading to small overall volume changes. Using a five year time-series, we show that only small ice thickness changes of less than -0.03 m/yr and volume changes of -266 cu km/yr and 160 cu km/yr occurred for the spring and summer periods, respectively. The calculated thickness and volume trends are small compared to the observational time period and interannual variability which masks the determination of long-term trend or cyclical variability in the sea ice cover. These results are in stark contrast to the much greater observed losses in Arctic sea ice volume and illustrate the different hemispheric changes of the polar sea ice covers in recent years.

  20. Saturn's F ring and shepherd satellites a natural outcome of satellite system formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, Ryuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji

    2015-09-01

    Saturn's F ring is a narrow ring of icy particles, located 3,400 km beyond the outer edge of the main ring system. Enigmatically, the F ring is accompanied on either side by two small satellites, Prometheus and Pandora, which are called shepherd satellites. The inner regular satellites of giant planets are thought to form by the accretion of particles from an ancient massive ring and subsequent outward migration. However, the origin of a system consisting of a narrow ring and shepherd satellites remains poorly understood. Here we present N-body numerical simulations to show that a collision of two of the small satellites that are thought to accumulate near the main ring's outer edge can produce a system similar to the F ring and its shepherd satellites. We find that if the two rubble-pile satellites have denser cores, such an impact results in only partial disruption of the satellites and the formation of a narrow ring of particles between two remnant satellites. Our simulations suggest that the seemingly unusual F ring system is a natural outcome at the final stage of the formation process of the ring-satellite system of giant planets.

  1. Investigation of Interpolation for Solar Irradiation in Non-Observed Point Based on Satellite Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, Yukio; Fujisawa, Sei; Seki, Tomomichi

    Penetrating the Photovoltaic Power Generation System (PV) on an enormous scale over a next decade has some crucial problems which affect on, for example, power grid stabilization and operation including existing power stations for electric power utilities. It would be therefore important for future operation to estimate power output generated by PV in advance. We focus on interpolation using observed solar irradiation (SI) and brightness of pixel on a satellite visible image for estimating SI even in non-observed point. Our results by single regression analysis between observed SI and brightness on a satellite image as cloudiness show that a shift of highest determination coefficient on each hour would represent solar movement and this higher determination coefficient would indicate a position which SI and cloud would cross. Finally assessment of error in this interpolation shows enough accuracy at least in daytime period, which is important for electricity utilities.

  2. Communications satellite systems operations with the space station, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, K.; Dixon, J.; Weyandt, C.

    1987-01-01

    A financial model was developed which described quantitatively the economics of the space segment of communication satellite systems. The model describes the economics of the space system throughout the lifetime of the satellite. The expected state-of-the-art status of communications satellite systems and operations beginning service in 1995 were assessed and described. New or enhanced space-based activities and associated satellite system designs that have the potential to achieve future communications satellite operations in geostationary orbit with improved economic performance were postulated and defined. Three scenarios using combinations of space-based activities were analyzed: a spin stabilized satellite, a three axis satellite, and assembly at the Space Station and GEO servicing. Functional and technical requirements placed on the Space Station by the scenarios were detailed. Requirements on the satellite were also listed.

  3. Satellite observations of large power plants and megacities from GOSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Tom; Maksyutov, Shamil; Boesch, Hartmut; Butz, Andre; Ganshin, Alexander; Guerlet, Sandrine; Parker, Robert; O'Dell, Chris; Oshchepkov, Sergey; Yoshida, Yukio; Zhuravlev, Ruslan; Yokota, Tatsuya

    2013-04-01

    Fossil fuel CO2 emissions are a major source of CO2 to the global carbon cycle over decadal time scales and international efforts to curb those missions are required for mitigating climate change. Although emissions from nations are estimated and reported to help monitor their compliance of emission reductions, we still lack an objective method to monitor emissions directly. Future carbon-observing space missions are thus expected to provide an independent tool for directly measuring emissions. We proposed and have implemented satellite observations specifically over intense large point sources (LPS), including large fossil-fueled power plants and megacities, worldwide (N > 300) using the Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing SATelllite (GOSAT). Our target LPS sites have been occasionally included in the observation schedule of GOSAT and the measurements are made using the target observation mode. This proposal was officially accepted by the GOSAT project office and we have attempted to use these data to detect signatures of man-made greenhouse gas emissions. We have submitted our locations of interest on a monthly basis two month prior to observation. We calculated the X_CO2 concentration enhancement due to the LPS emissions. We analyzed GOSAT X_CO2 retrievals from four research groups (five products total): the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) (both the NIES standard Level 2 and NIES-PPDF products), the NASA Atmospheric CO2 from Space (ACOS) team (ACOS Level 2 product), the Netherlands Institute for Space Research (SRON)/Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany (RemoTeC), and the University of Leicester, UK (Full-Physics CO2 retrieval dataset). Although we obtained fewer retrieved soundings relative to what we requested (probably due to geophysical difficulties in the retrievals), we did obtain statistically significant enhancements at some LPS sites where weather condition were ideal for viewing. We also implemented simulations of enhanced X_CO2 using a global Eulerian-Lagrangian coupled atmospheric transport model (GELCA) and a high-resolution fossil fuel emissions dataset (Odiac). Odiac includes emissions information on the power plants requested in our target observations. Our model simulations tend to underestimate the enhancements, but showed good correlation with observed enhancements.

  4. Engineering calculations for communications satellite systems planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reilly, C. H.; Levis, C. A.; Buyukdura, O. M.; Mount-Campbell, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    Observed solution times were analyzed for the extended gradient and cyclic coordinate search procedures. The times used in the analysis come from computer runs made during a previously-reported experiment conducted to assess the quality of the solutions to a BSS synthesis problem found by the two search methods. The results of a second experiment with a Fixed Satellite Service (FSS) test problem are also presented. Computational results are summarized for mixed integer programming approaches for solving FSS synthesis problems. A promising heuristic algorithm is described. A synthesis model is discussed for orbital arc allotment optimization. Research plans for the near future are also presented.

  5. Domestic satellite communication system to be established in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhou, Z.; Yucheng, B.

    1984-01-01

    The establishment of a domestic satellite communication system for China is discussed. To experiment, China built miniaturized ground stations and used the idle transponders of two INTELSAT satellites. The experiment was divided into three phases: verification and test of ground facilities; test of channel operations; and functional test of the Chinese built ground facilities. From a technical and economic point of view, developing China's domestic satellite communication system by leasing foreign satellites and building China's own ground stations is both efficient and effective.

  6. Pseudo-coherent demodulation for mobile satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Simon, Marvin K.

    1993-01-01

    This paper proposes three so-called pseudo-coherent demodulation schemes for use in land mobile satellite channels. The schemes are derived based on maximum likelihood (ML) estimation and detection of an N-symbol observation of the received signal. Simulation results for all three demodulators are presented to allow comparison with the performance of differential PSK (DPSK) and ideal coherent demodulation for various system parameter sets of practical interest.

  7. Arctic Sea Ice Thickness from Satellite Observations, Aircraft Field Campaign Measurements, and Numerical Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Kwok, R.; Zhang, J.; Liu, Y.; Key, J.

    2013-12-01

    Sea ice is an important indicator and effective modulator of regional and global climate change because it significantly affects the complex exchanges of momentum, heat, and mass between the sea and atmosphere. At present, there are datasets for Arctic sea ice thickness from satellite observations, aircraft field campaign measurements, numerical model simulations, and some in-situ measurements. Among satellite derived data sets, one satellite ice thickness product has been generated using NASA's Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) observations (Kwok et al., 2009), another has been produced from long-term optical (visible, near-IR, and thermal IR) imager data from NOAA Polar Orbiting Satellites (Wang et al., 2010). The approaches are completely different: the ICESat product estimates ice thickness from surface elevation; the optical imager approach estimates ice thickness by solving the surface energy budget equation. NASA's IceBridge program fills the gap between the loss of ICESat in 2010 and the launch of ICESat-2 in 2016. IceBridge employs an aircraft for altimeter and other measurements of the ice sheets and sea ice. The IceBridge Snow Radar, Digital Mapping System (DMS), Continuous Airborne Mapping By Optical Translator (CAMBOT), and Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) instruments can be used to estimate ice thickness with a methodology similar to that used for ICESat. Ice thickness has also been modeled with the numerical model called Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS) (Zhang and Rothrock, 2003). Arctic sea ice thickness estimates from these different data sources will be examined and inter-compared to evaluate their consistency and validity with in-situ measurements. Arctic sea ice thickness variations over time and space will be also investigated.

  8. System implementation for Earth Radiation Budget Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. E.; Woerner, C. V.

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of the instrument system which is needed for the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite System (ERBSS). The system is to be composed of instruments on two of NOAA's near-polar sun-synchronous Tiros-N/NOAA A through G series of operational satellites and on a NASA midinclination satellite of the Applications Explorer Mission (AEM) type referred to as ERBS-A/AEM. The Tiros-N/NOAA satellites will be in nominal 833 km altitude circular orbits with orbital inclinations of 98 deg. The AEM satellite will be in a circular orbit with an inclination of approximately 56 deg and a nominal altitude of 600 km. Each satellite will carry wide field-of-view (WFOV) and medium field-of-view (MFOV) sensors, a sensor for measuring the solar constant, and a narrow field-of-view (NFOV) cross-track scanner. The conceptual design of the W/MFOV instrument is discussed along with the conceptual design of the scanner.

  9. Cassini VIMS observations of the Galilean satellites including the VIMS calibration procedure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCord, T.B.; Coradini, A.; Hibbitts, C.A.; Capaccioni, F.; Hansen, G.B.; Filacchione, G.; Clark, R.N.; Cerroni, P.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Bussoletti, E.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Formisano, V.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.

    2004-01-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observed the Galilean satellites during the Cassini spacecraft's 2000/2001 flyby of Jupiter, providing compositional and thermal information about their surfaces. The Cassini spacecraft approached the jovian system no closer than about 126 Jupiter radii, about 9 million kilometers, at a phase angle of < 90 ??, resulting in only sub-pixel observations by VIMS of the Galilean satellites. Nevertheless, most of the spectral features discovered by the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) aboard the Galileo spacecraft during more than four years of observations have been identified in the VIMS data analyzed so far, including a possible 13C absorption. In addition, VIMS made observations in the visible part of the spectrum and at several new phase angles for all the Galilean satellites and the calculated phase functions are presented. In the process of analyzing these data, the VIMS radiometric and spectral calibrations were better determined in preparation for entry into the Saturn system. Treatment of these data is presented as an example of the VIMS data reduction, calibration and analysis process and a detailed explanation is given of the calibration process applied to the Jupiter data. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Observational capabilities of solar satellite "Coronas-Photon"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Yu.

    Coronas-Photon mission is the third satellite of the Russian Coronas program on solar activity observation The main goal of the Coronas-Photon is the study of solar hard electromagnetic radiation in the wide energy range from UV up to high energy gamma-radiation sim 2000MeV Scientific payload for solar radiation observation consists of three type of instruments 1 monitors Natalya-2M Konus-RF RT-2 Penguin-M BRM Phoka Sphin-X Sokol for spectral and timing measurements of full solar disk radiation with timing in flare burst mode up to one msec Instruments Natalya-2M Konus-RF RT-2 will cover the wide energy range of hard X-rays and soft Gamma rays 15keV to 2000MeV and will together constitute the largest area detectors ever used for solar observations Detectors of gamma-ray monitors are based on structured inorganic scintillators with energy resolution sim 5 for nuclear gamma-line band to 35 for GeV-band PSD analysis is used for gamma neutron separation for solar neutron registration T 30MeV Penguin-M has capability to measure linear polarization of hard X-rays using azimuth are measured by Compton scattering asymmetry in case of polarization of an incident flux For X-ray and EUV monitors the scintillation phoswich detectors gas proportional counter CZT assembly and Filter-covered Si-diodes are used 2 Telescope-spectrometer TESIS for imaging solar spectroscopy in X-rays with angular resolution up to 1 in three spectral lines and RT-2 CZT assembly of CZT

  11. Classification of Clouds and Deep Convection from GEOS-5 Using Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putman, William; Suarez, Max

    2010-01-01

    With the increased resolution of global atmospheric models and the push toward global cloud resolving models, the resemblance of model output to satellite observations has become strikingly similar. As we progress with our adaptation of the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) as a high resolution cloud system resolving model, evaluation of cloud properties and deep convection require in-depth analysis beyond a visual comparison. Outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) provides a sufficient comparison with infrared (IR) satellite imagery to isolate areas of deep convection. We have adopted a binning technique to generate a series of histograms for OLR which classify the presence and fraction of clear sky versus deep convection in the tropics that can be compared with a similar analyses of IR imagery from composite Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) observations. We will present initial results that have been used to evaluate the amount of deep convective parameterization required within the model as we move toward cloud system resolving resolutions of 10- to 1-km globally.

  12. Satellite-derived normalized difference convection index for typhoon observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chung-Chih; Shyu, Tian-Yow; Lin, Tang-Huang; Liu, Chian-Yi

    2015-01-01

    This study used the spectral features of the geostationary satellite infrared window channel and the water vapor channel data to calculate a new parameter, normalized difference convection index (NDCI), to help determine the overshooting areas in typhoon cloud systems and the centers and intensity of typhoons. The results showed that the two-dimensional NDCI analysis helped to identify typhoon convective cloud systems and the positions of overshooting areas. In addition, because the NDCI values near a typhoon eye were rather significant, if a typhoon eye was formed, the NDCI cross-section analysis could help to confirm its position. When the center of a typhoon was covered by the high anvils and cirrus layers, it could still be qualitatively found through two-dimensional analysis. As for determining the intensity of typhoons, this study also tried to perform correlation analyses with NDCI and maximum sustained wind speed. The result showed that in the ranges within circles of 200 to 250 km radii with a typhoon eye as the center, the correlation between the area with the NDCI values <0 and the maximum sustained wind speed is high with a coefficient 0.7. Thus, the NDCI value could be a referential index to determine the intensity of a typhoon.

  13. SORCE and Future Satellite Observations of Solar Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Rottman, G.; Woods, T.; Lawrence, G.; Kopp, G.; Harder, J.; McClintock, W.

    2003-01-01

    With solar activity just passing the maximum of cycle 23, SORCE is beginning a 5 year mission to measure total solar irradiance (TSI) with unprecedented accuracy using phase-sensitive detection, and to measure spectral solar irradiance (SSI) with unprecedented spectral coverage, from 1 to 2000 nm. The new Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) has 4 active cavity radiometers, any one of which can be used as a fixed-temperature reference against any other that is exposed to the Sun via a shutter that cycles at a rate designed to minimize noise at the shutter frequency. The new Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) is a dual Fery prism spectrometer that can employ either prism as a monochromatic source on the other prism, thus monitoring its transmission during the mission lifetime. Either prism can measure SSI from 200 to 2000 nm, employing the same phase-sensitive electrical substitution strategy as TIM. SORCE also carries dual SOLSTICE instruments to cover the spectral range 100-320 nm, similar to the instruments onboard UARS, and also an XUV Photometer System (XPS) similar to that on TIMED. SSI has now been added to TSI as a requirement of EOS and NPOESS, because different spectral components drive different components of the climate system - UV into upper atmosphere and stratospheric ozone, IR into tropospheric water vapor and clouds, and Visible into the oceans and biosphere. Succeeding satellite missions being planned for 2006 and 2011 will continue to monitor these critical solar variables.

  14. Improvements and Extensions for Joint Polar Satellite System Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, K. D.; Feeley, J. H.; Miller, S. W.; Jamilkowski, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). JPSS replaced the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the old POES system managed by the NOAA. JPSS satellites will carry sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The ground processing system for the JPSS is the Common Ground System (CGS), and provides command, control, and communications (C3), data processing and product delivery. CGS's data processing capability processes the data from the JPSS satellites to provide environmental data products (including Sensor Data Records (SDRs) and Environmental Data Records (EDRs)) to the NOAA Satellite Operations Facility. The first satellite in the JPSS constellation, known as the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, was launched on 28 October 2011. CGS is currently processing and delivering SDRs and EDRs for S-NPP and will continue through the lifetime of the JPSS program. The EDRs for S-NPP are currently undergoing an extensive Calibration and Validation (Cal/Val) campaign. Changes identified by the Cal/Val campaign are coming available for implementation into the operational system in support of both S-NPP and JPSS-1 (scheduled for launch in 2017). Some of these changes will be available in time to update the S-NPP algorithm baseline, while others will become operational just prior to JPSS-1 launch. In addition, new capabilities, such as higher spectral and spatial resolution, will be exercised on JPSS-1. This paper will describe changes to current algorithms and products as a result of the Cal/Val campaign and related initiatives for improved capabilities. Improvements include Cross Track Infrared Sounder high spectral processing, extended spectral and spatial ranges for Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite ozone Total Column and Nadir Profiles, and updates to Vegetation Index, Snow Cover, Active Fires, Suspended Matter, and Ocean Color. Updates will include Sea Surface Temperature, Cloud Mask, Cloud Properties, and other improvements.

  15. Interleaved Observation Execution and Rescheduling on Earth Observing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khatib, Lina; Frank, Jeremy; Smith, David; Morris, Robert; Dungan, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    Observation scheduling for Earth orbiting satellites solves the following problem: given a set of requests for images of the Earth, a set of instruments for acquiring those images distributed on a collecting of orbiting satellites, and a set of temporal and resource constraints, generate a set of assignments of instruments and viewing times to those requests that satisfy those constraints. Observation scheduling is often construed as a constrained optimization problem with the objective of maximizing the overall utility of the science data acquired. The utility of an image is typically based on the intrinsic importance of acquiring it (for example, its importance in meeting a mission or science campaign objective) as well as the expected value of the data given current viewing conditions (for example, if the image is occluded by clouds, its value is usually diminished). Currently, science observation scheduling for Earth Observing Systems is done on the ground, for periods covering a day or more. Schedules are uplinked to the satellites and are executed rigorously. An alternative to this scenario is to do some of the decision-making about what images are to be acquired on-board. The principal argument for this capability is that the desirability of making an observation can change dynamically, because of changes in meteorological conditions (e.g. cloud cover), unforeseen events such as fires, floods, or volcanic eruptions, or un-expected changes in satellite or ground station capability. Furthermore, since satellites can only communicate with the ground between 5% to 10% of the time, it may be infeasible to make the desired changes to the schedule on the ground, and uplink the revisions in time for the on-board system to execute them. Examples of scenarios that motivate an on-board capability for revising schedules include the following. First, if a desired visual scene is completely obscured by clouds, then there is little point in taking it. In this case, satellite resources, such as power and storage space can be better utilized taking another image that is higher quality. Second, if an unexpected but important event occurs (such as a fire, flood, or volcanic eruption), there may be good reason to take images of it, instead of expending satellite resources on some of the lower priority scheduled observations. Finally, if there is unexpected loss of capability, it may be impossible to carry out the schedule of planned observations. For example, if a ground station goes down temporarily, a satellite may not be able to free up enough storage space to continue with the remaining schedule of observations. This paper describes an approach for interleaving execution of observation schedules with dynamic schedule revision based on changes to the expected utility of the acquired images. We describe the problem in detail, formulate an algorithm for interleaving schedule revision and execution, and discuss refinements to the algorithm based on the need for search efficiency. We summarize with a brief discussion of the tests performed on the system.

  16. Comparison of land surface temperature measurements at NOAA CRN sites with airborne and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, P.; Kochendorfer, J.; Baker, B.; Dumas, E.; Meyers, T. P.; Guillevic, P.; Corda, S.; Muratore, J.; Martos, B.

    2011-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a key variable for studying global or regional land surface processes and the energy and water vapor exchange at the biosphere-atmosphere interface. In an effort to better quantify the spatial variability and overall representativeness of single-point surface temperature measurement being recorded at NOAA's Climate Reference Network (CRN) sites and to improve the accuracy of satellite land surface temperature measurements, airborne flight campaigns were conducted over two vegetated sites in Tennessee, USA during 2010 to 2011. During the campaign, multiple measurements of land surface temperature were made using Infra-Red temperature sensors at micrometeorological tower sites and onboard an instrumented Piper Navajo airborne research aircraft. In addition to this, coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LST observations, onboard the NASA Terra and Aqua Earth Observing System satellites were used. The aircraft-based and satellite based land surface temperature measurements were compared to in situ, tower based LST measurements. Preliminary results show good agreement between in situ, aircraft and satellite measurements.

  17. Solar wind helium observations on the Prognoz 7 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yermolaev, Yu. I.

    1995-01-01

    Solar wind data obtained with ion mass-energy-spectrometer on the Prognoz 7 satellite are analyzed to study the alpha-particle and proton features in different types of solar wind streams. In the streams from coronal holes the abundance of helium relative to proton slightly increases with increasing solar wind flux and proton density while in the streams from coronal streamers it decreases. These results indicate that the mechanisms of solar wind formation in different regions of solar corona differ. Preferential alpha-particle acceleration and heating are often observed in the streams from coronal holes. Minimum (as well as negative) values of alpha-proton velocity difference are recorded in the heliospheric current sheet, shocked plasma, and coronal mass ejections. Dependences of alpha-proton velocity difference and temperature ratio on several MHD parameters (Alfven velocity, number of Coulomb collisions. etc.) are compared for different types of streams. For velocity difference the dependences in streams from coronal holes and streamers are often similar to each other, and they differ from the ones in the heliospheric current sheet. For temperature ratio the dependences in heliospheric current sheet and streams from coronal streamers are similar, and they differ in streams from coronal holes.

  18. First Satellite Observations of Lower Tropospheric Ammonia and Methanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Shephard, Mark W.; Kulawik, Susan S.; Clough, Shepard A.; Eldering, Annmarie; Bowman, Kevin W.; Sander, Stanley P.; Fisher, Brendan M.; Payne, Vivienne H.; Luo, Mingzhao; Osterman, Gregory B.; Worden, John R.

    2008-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the EOS Aura satellite makes global measurements of infrared radiances which are used to derive profiles of species such as O3, CO, H2O, HDO and CH4 as routine standard products. In addition, TES has a variety of special modes that provide denser spatial mapping over a limited geographical area. A continuous-coverage mode (called ''transect'', about 460 km long) has now been used to detect additional molecules indicative of regional air pollution. On 10 July 2007 at about 05:37 UTC (13:24 LMST) TES conducted such a transect observation over the Beijing area in northeast China. Examination of the residual spectral radiances following the retrieval of the TES standard products revealed surprisingly strong features attributable to enhanced concentrations of ammonia (NH3) and methanol (CH3OH), well above the normal background levels. This is the first time that these molecules have been detected in space-based nadir viewing measurements that penetrate into the lower atmosphere.

  19. Making Data Visible: Satellite Observations of Arctic Change (SOAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beitler, J.; Tanner, S.; Barrett, A. P.; Savoie, M. H.; Wilcox, H.; Hoyer, T.; Beam, K.

    2014-12-01

    A new Web site, Satellite Observations of Arctic Change (SOAC, http://nsidc.org/soac), was developed to open up NASA Earth science data that show changes taking place in the Arctic over time to a broader range of users. The site was designed to be used by decision makers, teachers, non-specialist scientists, and the motivated public without the need for technical tools or expertise in manipulating data. The data are displayed on interactive maps, allowing users to explore how and where conditions in the Arctic have changed from the 1970s to the present. Users may animate a time series, zoom in or out, and view a bar graph of anomalies over time. Supporting pages provide brief scientific discussion and background to help users understand the data and the significance of the changes. Links to the source data and documentation are also included. Initial data products for SOAC include anomalies associated with near-surface air temperature; water vapor; sea ice concentration; snow cover; and several others. The potential for use and for inclusion of more data will be discussed.

  20. First satellite observations of lower tropospheric ammonia and methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Shephard, Mark W.; Kulawik, Susan S.; Clough, Shepard A.; Eldering, Annmarie; Bowman, Kevin W.; Sander, Stanley P.; Fisher, Brendan M.; Payne, Vivienne H.; Luo, Mingzhao; Osterman, Gregory B.; Worden, John R.

    2008-05-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the EOS Aura satellite makes global measurements of infrared radiances which are used to derive profiles of species such as O3, CO, H2O, HDO and CH4 as routine standard products. In addition, TES has a variety of special modes that provide denser spatial mapping over a limited geographical area. A continuous-coverage mode (called ``transect'', about 460 km long) has now been used to detect additional molecules indicative of regional air pollution. On 10 July 2007 at about 05:37 UTC (13:24 LMST) TES conducted such a transect observation over the Beijing area in northeast China. Examination of the residual spectral radiances following the retrieval of the TES standard products revealed surprisingly strong features attributable to enhanced concentrations of ammonia (NH3) and methanol (CH3OH), well above the normal background levels. This is the first time that these molecules have been detected in space-based nadir viewing measurements that penetrate into the lower atmosphere.

  1. Satellite Power System (SPS) student participation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladwig, A.; David, L.

    1978-01-01

    A assessment of methods which are appropriate to initiate student participation in the discussion of a satellite power system (SPS) is presented. Methods which are incorporated into the campus environment and the on-going learning experience are reported. The discussion of individual methods for student participation includes a description of the technique, followed by comments on its enhancing and limiting factors, references to situations where the method has been demonstrated, and a brief consideration of cost factors. The two categories of recommendations presented are: an outline of fourteen recommendations addressing specific activities related to student participation in the discussion of SPS, and three recommendations pertaining to student participation activities in general.

  2. Inmarsat aeronautical mobile satellite system: Internetworking issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Jay R.

    1990-01-01

    The Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite System (AMSS) provides air-ground and air-air communications services to aero-mobile users on a global basis. Communicating parties may be connected either directly, or more commonly, via interconnecting networks to the Inmarsat AMSS, in order to construct end-to-end communications circuits. The aircraft earth station (AES) and the aeronautical ground earth station (GES) are the points of interconnection of the Inmarsat AMSS to users, as well as to interconnecting networks. This paper reviews the internetworking aspects of the Inmarsat AMSS, by introducing the Inmarsat AMSS network architecture and services concepts and then discussing the internetwork address/numbering and routing techniques.

  3. DCS/FTS Commercial Satellite Communications System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimabukuro, T.; Rosner, R.; Pearsall, C.

    In order to control the rising costs of telephonic services and meeting the increasing demand for wideband video and data services within U.S. Federal Government agencies, the Defense Communications Agency and the General Services Administration have begun the implementation of a leased Commercial Satellite Communications System. Service volume demand, commonality of service requirements, and common geographic communities of interest facilitate economies of scale in the course of meeting DOD and other Federal agencies' objectives. The service, which incorporates the Federal Telecommunications Service and is therefore designated DCS/FTS, is presently studied with respect to military and national objectives.

  4. Payload system tradeoffs for mobile communications satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moody, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    System level trade-offs carried out during Mobile Satellite (M-SAT) design activities are described. These trade-offs relate to the use of low level beam forming, flexible power and spectrum distribution, and selection of the number of beams to cover the service area. It is shown that antenna performance can be improved by sharing horns between beams using a low level beam forming network (BFN). Additionally, greatly increased power utilization is possible using a hybrid matrix concept to share power between beams.

  5. Reduced Toxicity Fuel Satellite Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A reduced toxicity fuel satellite propulsion system including a reduced toxicity propellant supply for consumption in an axial class thruster and an ACS class thruster. The system includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying the reduced toxicity propellant to the ACS decomposing element of an ACS thruster. The ACS decomposing element is operative to decompose the reduced toxicity propellant into hot propulsive gases. In addition the system includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying the reduced toxicity propellant to an axial decomposing element of the axial thruster. The axial decomposing element is operative to decompose the reduced toxicity propellant into hot gases. The system further includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying a second propellant to a combustion chamber of the axial thruster, whereby the hot gases and the second propellant auto-ignite and begin the combustion process for producing thrust.

  6. Prospects for satellite and space debris observations with Pi of the Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćwiek, A.; Batsch, T.; Majcher, A.; Mankiewicz, L.; Wrochna, G.; ZadroŻny, A.; Żarnecki, A. F.

    2015-09-01

    Pi of the Sky is a system of wide field-of-view robotic telescopes designed for observations of short timescale astrophysical phenomena, especially for prompt optical GRB emission. The apparatus designed for autonomous operation follows the predefined observing strategy and adopts to the actual running conditions, monitoring a large part of the sky with time resolution of the order of 1 - 10 seconds and range 12m-13m. Observation strategy and system design was successfully tested with a prototype detector in Chile and starting 2013 the final Pi of the Sky detector system in operation at the INTA El Arenosillo Test Centre in Spain. For the analysis of the data from a wide field-of-view system a set of dedicated algorithms have been developed, which allowed us to reduce photometry uncertainty for bright stars to the level of 0.015m- 0.02m. Design of the Pi of the Sky telescopes allows also for measurements of near-Earth objects as comets, asteroids, satellites and space debris. Precise determination of the orbit parameters of the geostationary satellites is possible when using a parallax measured with simultaneous observations from Spain and Chile. Dedicated tests have been performed recently to verify system capabilities for observation of objects on lower orbits, moving at higher speeds. First results are discussed in this contribution.

  7. Advanced Microelectronics Technologies for Future Small Satellite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkalai, Leon

    1999-01-01

    Future small satellite systems for both Earth observation as well as deep-space exploration are greatly enabled by the technological advances in deep sub-micron microelectronics technologies. Whereas these technological advances are being fueled by the commercial (non-space) industries, more recently there has been an exciting new synergism evolving between the two otherwise disjointed markets. In other words, both the commercial and space industries are enabled by advances in low-power, highly integrated, miniaturized (low-volume), lightweight, and reliable real-time embedded systems. Recent announcements by commercial semiconductor manufacturers to introduce Silicon On Insulator (SOI) technology into their commercial product lines is driven by the need for high-performance low-power integrated devices. Moreover, SOI has been the technology of choice for many space semiconductor manufacturers where radiation requirements are critical. This technology has inherent radiation latch-up immunity built into the process, which makes it very attractive to space applications. In this paper, we describe the advanced microelectronics and avionics technologies under development by NASA's Deep Space Systems Technology Program (also known as X2000). These technologies are of significant benefit to both the commercial satellite as well as the deep-space and Earth orbiting science missions. Such a synergistic technology roadmap may truly enable quick turn-around, low-cost, and highly capable small satellite systems for both Earth observation as well as deep-space missions.

  8. Current Sounding Capability From Satellite Meteorological Observation With Ultraspectral Infrared Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Larar, Allen M.

    2008-01-01

    Ultraspectral resolution infrared spectral radiance obtained from near nadir observations provide atmospheric, surface, and cloud property information. The intent of the measurement of tropospheric thermodynamic state and trace abundances is the initialization of climate models and the monitoring of air quality. The NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I), designed to support the development of future satellite temperature and moisture sounders, aboard high altitude aircraft has been collecting data throughout many field campaigns. An advanced retrieval algorithm developed with NAST-I is now applied to satellite data collected with the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the Aqua satellite launched on 4 May 2002 and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the MetOp satellite launched on October 19, 2006. These instruments possess an ultra-spectral resolution, for example, both IASI and NAST-I have 0.25 cm-1 and a spectral coverage from 645 to 2760 cm-1. The retrieval algorithm with a fast radiative transfer model, including cloud effects, is used for atmospheric profile and cloud parameter retrieval. The physical inversion scheme has been developed, dealing with cloudy as well as cloud-free radiance observed with ultraspectral infrared sounders, to simultaneously retrieve surface, atmospheric thermodynamic, and cloud microphysical parameters. A fast radiative transfer model, which applies to the clouded atmosphere, is used for atmospheric profile and cloud parameter retrieval. A one-dimensional (1-d) variational multi-variable inversion solution is used to improve an iterative background state defined by an eigenvector-regression-retrieval. The solution is iterated in order to account for non-linearity in the 1-d variational solution. It is shown that relatively accurate temperature and moisture retrievals can be achieved below optically thin clouds. For optically thick clouds, accurate temperature and moisture profiles down to cloud top level are obtained. For both optically thin and thick cloud situations, the cloud top height can be retrieved with relatively high accuracy (i.e., error less than 1 km). Retrievals of atmospheric soundings, surface properties, and cloud microphysical properties with the AIRS and IASI observations are obtained and presented. These retrievals are further inter-compared with those obtained from airborne FTS system, such as the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed? Interferometer (NAST I), dedicated dropsondes, radiosondes, and ground based Raman Lidar. The capabilities of satellite ultra-spectral sounder such as the AIRS and IASI are investigated. These advanced satellite ultraspectral infrared instruments are now playing an important role in satellite meteorological observation for numerical weather prediction.

  9. 1993 Earth Observing System reference handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asrar, Ghassem (Editor); Dokken, David Jon (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) is a NASA-sponsored concept that uses space- and ground-based measurement systems to provide the scientific basis for understanding global change. The space-based components of MTPE will provide a constellation of satellites to monitor the Earth from space. Sustained observations will allow researchers to monitor climate variables overtime to determine trends; however, space-based monitoring alone is not sufficient. A comprehensive data and information system, a community of scientists performing research with the data acquired, and extensive ground campaigns are all important components. Brief descriptions of the various elements that comprise the overall mission are provided. The Earth Observing System (EOS) - a series of polar-orbiting and low-inclination satellites for long-term global observations of the land surface, biosphere, solid Earth, atmosphere, and oceans - is the centerpiece of MTPE. The elements comprising the EOS mission are described in detail.

  10. Detailed Analysis of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall Processes with Modern/High-Quality Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Mehta, Amita V.; Yang, Song

    2007-01-01

    We examine, in detail, Indian Summer Monsoon rainfall processes using modernhigh quality satellite precipitation measurements. The focus here is on measurements derived from three NASA cloud and precipitation satellite missionslinstruments (TRMM/PR&TMI, AQUNAMSRE, and CLOUDSATICPR), and a fourth TRMM Project-generated multi-satellite precipitation measurement dataset (viz., TRMM standard algorithm 3b42) -- all from a period beginning in 1998 up to the present. It is emphasized that the 3b42 algorithm blends passive microwave (PMW) radiometer-based precipitation estimates from LEO satellites with infi-ared (IR) precipitation estimates from a world network of CEO satellites (representing -15% of the complete space-time coverage) All of these observations are first cross-calibrated to precipitation estimates taken from standard TRMM combined PR-TMI algorithm 2b31, and second adjusted at the large scale based on monthly-averaged rain-gage measurements. The blended approach takes advantage of direct estimates of precipitation from the PMW radiometerequipped LEO satellites -- but which suffer fi-om sampling limitations -- in combination with less accurate IR estimates from the optical-infrared imaging cameras on GEO satellites -- but which provide continuous diurnal sampling. The advantages of the current technologies are evident in the continuity and coverage properties inherent to the resultant precipitation datasets that have been an outgrowth of these stable measuring and retrieval technologies. There is a wealth of information contained in the current satellite measurements of precipitation regarding the salient precipitation properties of the Indian Summer Monsoon. Using different datasets obtained from the measuring systems noted above, we have analyzed the observations cast in the form of: (1) spatially distributed means and variances over the hierarchy of relevant time scales (hourly I diurnally, daily, monthly, seasonally I intra-seasonally, and inter-annually), (2) time series at these different time scales taken as area-averages over the hierarchy of relevant space scales (Indian sub-Division, Indian sub-continent, and Circumambient Indian Ocean), (3) principal autocorrelation and cross-correlation structures over various monsoon space-time domains, (4) diurnally modulated amplitude-phase properties of rain rates over different monsoon space-time domains, (5) foremost rain rate probability distributions intrinsic to monsoon precipitation, and (6) behavior of extreme events including occurrences of flood and drought episodes throughout the course of inter-annual monsoon processes.

  11. Development of a Reduction Algorithm of GEO Satellite Optical Observation Data for Optical Wide Field Patrol (OWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sun-youp; Choi, Jin; Jo, Jung Hyun; Son, Ju Young; Park, Yung-Sik; Yim, Hong-Suh; Moon, Hong-Kyu; Bae, Young-Ho; Choi, Young-Jun; Park, Jang-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    An algorithm to automatically extract coordinate and time information from optical observation data of geostationary orbit satellites (GEO satellites) or geosynchronous orbit satellites (GOS satellites) is developed. The optical wide-field patrol system is capable of automatic observation using a pre-arranged schedule. Therefore, if this type of automatic analysis algorithm is available, daily unmanned monitoring of GEO satellites can be possible. For data acquisition for development, the COMS1 satellite was observed with 1-s exposure time and 1-m interval. The images were grouped and processed in terms of action, and each action was composed of six or nine successive images. First, a reference image with the best quality in one action was selected. Next, the rest of the images in the action were geometrically transformed to fit in the horizontal coordinate system (expressed in azimuthal angle and elevation) of the reference image. Then, these images were median-combined to retain only the possible non-moving GEO candidates. By reverting the coordinate transformation of the positions of these GEO satellite candidates, the final coordinates could be calculated.

  12. An observational philosophy for GEOS-C satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiffenbach, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    The parameters necessary for obtaining a 10 cm accuracy for GEOS-C satellite altimetry are outlined. These data include oceanographic parameters, instrument calibration, pulse propagation, sea surface effects, and optimum design.

  13. Accessing Recent Trend of Land Surface Temperature from Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, S.; Leptoukh, G. G.; Romanov, P.

    2011-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is an important element to measure the state of the terrestrial ecosystems and to study the surface energy budgets. In support of the land cover/land use change related international program MAIRS (Monsoon Asia Integrated Regional Study), we have collected the global monthly LST measured by MODIS since the beginning of the missions. The MODIS LST time series have ~11 years of data from Terra since 2000 and ~9 years of data from Aqua since 2002, which makes possible to study the recent climate, such as trend and variability. In this study, monthly climatology from two satellite platforms are calculated and compared. The spatial patterns of LST trends are accessed, focusing on the Asian Monsoon region. Furthermore, the MODIS LST trends are compared with the skin temperature trend from the NASA's atmospheric assimilation model, MERRA (MODERN ERA RETROSPECTIVE-ANALYSIS FOR RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS), which has longer data record since 1979. The calculated climatology and anomaly of MODIS LST will be integrated into the online visualization system, Giovanni, at NASA GES DISC for easy access and use by scientists and general public.

  14. The Variation of Tropical Cyclone Rainfall within the North Atlantic and Pacific as Observed from Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, Edward; Pierce, Harold; Adler, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Tropical cyclone monthly rainfall amounts are estimated from passive microwave satellite observations in the North Atlantic and in three equal geographical regions of the North Pacific (i.e., Western, Central, and Eastern North Pacific). These satellite-derived rainfall amounts are used to assess the impact of tropical cyclone rainfall in altering the geographical, seasonal, and inter-annual distribution of the 1987-1989, 1991-1998 North Atlantic and Pacific rainfall during June-November when tropical cyclones are most abundant. To estimate these tropical cyclone rainfall amounts, mean monthly rain rates are derived from the Defence Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Special Sensor Microwave/ Radiometer (SSM/I) observations within 444 km radius of the center of those North Atlantic and Pacific tropical cyclones that reached storm stage and greater. These rain rate observations are then multiplied by the number of hours in a given month. Mean monthly rainfall amounts are also constructed for all the other North Atlantic and Pacific raining systems during this eleven year period for the purpose of estimating the geographical distribution and intensity of rainfall contributed by non-tropical cyclone systems. Further, the combination of the non-tropical cyclone and tropical cyclone (i.e., total) rainfall is constructed to delineate the fractional amount that tropical cyclones contributed to the total North Pacific rainfall.

  15. Assimilating multi-sensor satellite observations for initializing hydrologic and agricultural forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreadis, Konstantinos; Das, Narendra; Granger, Stephanie; Han, Eunjin; Ines, Amor; Stampoulis, Dimitrios

    2015-04-01

    The application of data assimilation techniques in hydrologic studies has been gaining traction in the last 10-15 years. Most of these studies have focused on a single water cycle component, while few studies have examined methods of assimilating multiple observations from different sensors and of different hydrologic variables. The latter is challenging since any potential disparities in the observations could lead to suboptimal estimates after assimilation. The optimal estimates of hydrologic states, such as soil moisture, can be used as initial conditions for hydrologic forecasting systems. A multi-sensor and multivariate data assimilation forecast system has been developed at JPL (RHEAS, Regional Hydrologic Extremes Assessment System) with an initial focus on forecasting drought characteristics. The core of RHEAS is the VIC hydrology model, which has been widely used for many water resources applications. Apart from hydrologic forecasts, RHEAS can produce agricultural forecasts by coupling VIC with the DSSAT crop growth model. The modeling system is supported by a spatial database component, which provides access to multiple in-situ and satellite observations and allows data to be delivered to users through web-GIS or mobile application interfaces. The satellite observations, which include soil moisture, water storage, evapotranspiration, and snow cover, are assimilated into the VIC model to update the initial state of seasonal hydrologic and crop growth forecasts. We demonstrate the value of ingesting satellite observations by performing a series of hindcast experiments over both the United States (California and Upper Colorado basins) and Kenya (Nzoia basin). In-situ measurements along with a simulation with the best available datasets are used as the benchmark to evaluate the hindcasts against. The impact of each observation type or sensor is quantified, allowing for evaluating their relative contribution to improving the forecast skill. Particular case studies that are discussed in more detail include the ongoing California as well as the 2011 East Africa droughts.

  16. National Satellite Forest Monitoring systems for REDD+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonckheere, I. G.

    2012-12-01

    Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) is an effort to create a financial value for the carbon stored in forests, offering incentives for developing countries to reduce emissions from forested lands and invest in low-carbon paths to sustainable development. "REDD+" goes beyond deforestation and forest degradation, and includes the role of conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancement of forest carbon stocks. In the framework of getting countries ready for REDD+, the UN-REDD Programme assists developing countries to prepare and implement national REDD+ strategies. For the monitoring, reporting and verification, FAO supports the countries to develop national satellite forest monitoring systems that allow for credible measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) of REDD+ activities. These are among the most critical elements for the successful implementation of any REDD+ mechanism. The UN-REDD Programme through a joint effort of FAO and Brazil's National Space Agency, INPE, is supporting countries to develop cost- effective, robust and compatible national monitoring and MRV systems, providing tools, methodologies, training and knowledge sharing that help countries to strengthen their technical and institutional capacity for effective MRV systems. To develop strong nationally-owned forest monitoring systems, technical and institutional capacity building is key. The UN-REDD Programme, through FAO, has taken on intensive training together with INPE, and has provided technical help and assistance for in-country training and implementation for national satellite forest monitoring. The goal of the support to UN-REDD pilot countries in this capacity building effort is the training of technical forest people and IT persons from interested REDD+ countries, and to set- up the national satellite forest monitoring systems. The Brazilian forest monitoring system, TerraAmazon, which is used as a basis for this initiative, allows countries to adapt it to country needs and the training on the TerraAmazon system is a tool to enhance existing capacity on carbon monitoring systems. The support with the National Forest Monitoring System will allow these countries to follow all actions related to the implementation of its national REDD+ policies and measures. The monitoring system will work as a platform to obtain information on their REDD+ results and actions, related directly or indirectly to national REDD+ strategies and may also include actions unrelated to carbon assessment, such as forest law enforcement. With the technical assistance of FAO, INPE and other stakeholders, the countries will set up an autonomous operational forest monitoring system. An initial version and the methodologies of the system for DRC and PNG has been launched in Durban, South Africa during COP 17 and in 2012 Paraguay, Viet Nam and Zambia will be launched in Doha, Qatar at COP 18. The access to high-quality satellite data for t