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Sample records for obstetric brachial plexus

  1. Limb preference in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lynda J-S; Anand, Praveen; Birch, Rolfe

    2005-07-01

    Brachial plexus palsy affects children differently than adults. In children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy, motor development must depend on nervous system adaptation. Previous studies report sensory plasticity in these children. This noninvasive study provides support for neural plasticity (the general ability of the brain to reorganize neural pathways based on new experiences) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy by considering upper limb preference. As in the general population, we expect that 90% of children would prefer their right upper limb. However, only 17% of children affected by right obstetric brachial plexus palsy prefer the right upper limb for overall movement; children with left obstetric brachial plexus palsy did not significantly differ from the general population in upper limb preference. This study also provides the first evidence of a significant correlation between actual task performance and select obstetric brachial plexus palsy outcome measurement systems, thereby justifying the routine use of these outcome measurement systems as a reflection of the practical utility of the affected limb to the patient. PMID:15876521

  2. Management of Shoulder Problems Following Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Matthew; Trail, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus injuries are common, with an incidence of 0.42 per 1000 live births in the UK, and with 25% of patients being left with permanent disability without intervention. The shoulder is the most commonly affected joint and, as a result of the subsequent imbalance of musculature, the abnormal deforming forces cause dysplasia of the glenohumeral joint. In the growing child, this presents with changing pattern of pathology, which requires a multidisciplinary approach and a broad range of treatment modalities to optimize function.

  3. Upright MRI of glenohumeral dysplasia following obstetric brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Nath, Rahul K; Paizi, Melia; Melcher, Sonya E; Farina, Kim L

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of upright magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shoulder scanning in the diagnosis of glenohumeral deformity following obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI). Eighty-nine children (ages 0.4 to 17.9 years) with OBPI who have medial rotation contracture and reduced passive and active lateral rotation of the shoulder were evaluated via upright MRI of the affected glenohumeral joint. Qualitative impressions of glenoid form were recorded, and quantitative measurements were made of glenoid version and posterior subluxation. Glenoid version of the affected shoulder averaged -16.8 +/- 11.0 degrees (range, -55 degrees to 1 degrees ), and percentage of the humeral head anterior to the glenoid fossa (PHHA) averaged 32.6 +/- 16.5% (range, -17.8% to 52.4%). The glenoid form was normal in 43 children, convex in 19 children and biconcave in 27 children. Standard MRI protocols were used to obtain bilateral images from 14 of these patients. Among the patients with bilateral MR images, glenoid version and PHHA were significantly different between the involved and uninvolved shoulders (P<.000). Glenoid version in the involved shoulder averaged -19.0 +/- 13.1 degrees (range, -52 degrees to -3 degrees ), and PHHA averaged 29.7 +/- 18.4% (range, -16.2% to 48.7%). In the uninvolved shoulder, the average glenoid version and PHHA were -5.2 +/- 3.7 degrees (range, -12 degrees to -1 degrees ) and 47.7 +/- 3.0% (range, 43% to 54%), respectively. The relative beneficial aspects of upright MRI include lack of need for sedation, low claustrophobic potential and, most important, natural, gravity-influenced position, enabling the surgeon to visualize the true preoperative picture of the shoulder. It is an effective tool for demonstrating glenohumeral abnormalities resulting from brachial plexus injury worthy of surgical exploration. PMID:17448618

  4. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy: Two Single-Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buesch, Francisca Eugster

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy and receive preliminary information about functional improvements. Two patients (age 12 years) with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were included for a 126-h home-based CIMT…

  5. Brachial plexus

    MedlinePlus

    The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that run from the lower neck through the upper shoulder area. These ... Damage to the brachial plexus nerves can cause muscle and sensation problems that are often associated with pain in the same area. Symptoms may ...

  6. Three dimensionality of gleno-humeral deformities in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Brochard, Sylvain; Mozingo, Joseph D; Alter, Katharine E; Sheehan, Frances T

    2016-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that gleno-humeral deformity in children and adolescent with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy is three-dimensional (3D). The study also compared the metrological properties of typical two-dimensional gleno-humeral measures to the newly developed 3D measures. Thirteen individuals (age = 11.8 ± 3.3 years) with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy participated in this IRB-approved study. 3D axial magnetic resonance images were acquired for both shoulders. Glenoid and humeral models were created in order to quantify 3D glenoid version, humeral head migration, and glenoid concavity. Two-dimensional (2D) measures were acquired as recommended in the literature. All measures were completed by two observers in this observer-blind study. Compared to the non-involved side, the glenoid was more retroverted (7.91°, p = 0.003) and inferiorly oriented (7.28°, p = 0.009). The humeral head was migrated more posteriorly (5.54 mm, p = 0.007), inferiorly (-3.96 mm, p = 0.013), and medially (-3.63 mm,p = 0.002). Eleven of the 13 glenoids were concave, based on the 3D glenoid models. The concurrent validity between three- and 2D measures were highly dependent of the parameter measured, the slice level used for the 2D analysis, and the presence/absence of pathology (0.63 < r < 0.91). The standard error of measurement for the 2D anterior-posterior version (>3°) was larger than that for the 3D measure of version (<1°) on the involved side. This study clearly demonstrated that the gleno-humeral deformation in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy is 3D, emphasizing the need for 3D subject specific gleno-humeral shape analysis for follow-up and treatment plans in children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. PMID:26363273

  7. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brachial Plexus Injuries Information Page Synonym(s): Erb's Palsy Table of Contents ( ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What are Brachial Plexus Injuries? The brachial plexus is a network of nerves ...

  8. Obstetric brachial plexus palsy: reviewing the literature comparing the results of primary versus secondary surgery.

    PubMed

    Socolovsky, Mariano; Costales, Javier Robla; Paez, Miguel Domínguez; Nizzo, Gustavo; Valbuena, Sebastian; Varone, Ernesto

    2016-03-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus injuries (OBPP) are a relatively common stretch injury of the brachial plexus that occurs during delivery. Roughly 30 % of patients will not recover completely and will need a surgical repair. Two main treatment strategies have been used: primary surgery, consisting in exploring and reconstructing the affected portions of the brachial plexus within the first few months of the patient's life, and secondary procedures that include tendon or muscle transfers, osteotomies, and other orthopedic techniques. Secondary procedures can be done as the only surgical treatment of OBPP or after primary surgery, in order to minimize any residual deficits. Two things are crucial to achieving a good outcome: (1) the appropriate selection of patients, to separate those who will spontaneously recover from those who will recover only partially or not at all; and (2) a good surgical technique. The objective of the present review is to assess the published literature concerning certain controversial issues in OBPP, especially in terms of the true current state of primary and secondary procedures, their results, and the respective roles each plays in modern-day treatment of this complex pathology. Considerable published evidence compiled over decades of surgical experience favors primary nerve surgery as the initial therapeutic step in patients who do not recover spontaneously, followed by secondary surgeries for further functional improvement. As described in this review, the results of such treatment can greatly ameliorate function in affected limbs. For best results, multi-disciplinary teams should treat these patients. PMID:26615411

  9. Extended Long-Term (5 Years) Outcomes of Triangle Tilt Surgery in Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the "extended" long-term (5 years) functional outcomes in obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) patients, who underwent triangle tilt surgery between February 2005 and January 2008. Methods: Twenty two children (9 girls and 13 boys, mean age at surgery was 5.8 years; ranging 2.1-11.8 years old), who initially presented with medial rotation contracture and scapula deformity secondary to obstetric brachial plexus injury were included in this study. Functional movements were evaluated pre-operatively, and 5 years following triangle tilt surgery by modified Mallet scale. Results: Here, we report long-term (5 years) follow-up of triangle tilt surgery for 22 OBPI patients. Upper extremity functional movements such as, external rotation (2.5±0.6 to 4.1±0.8, p<0.0001), hand-to-spine (2.6±0.6 to 3.4±1.1, p<0.005), hand-to-neck (2.7±0.7 to 4.3±0.7, p<0.0001), hand-to-mouth (2.3±0.9 (92º±33) to 4.2±0.5 (21º±16), p<0.0001), and supination (2.6±1.1 (-8.2º ±51) to 4.1±0.7 (61±32)) were significantly improved (p<0.0001), and maintained over the extended long-term (5 years). Total modified Mallet functional score was also shown to improve from 14.1±2.7 to 20.3±2.5. Conclusions: The triangle tilt surgery improved all shoulder functions significantly, and maintained over the extended long-term (5 years) in these patients. PMID:23730369

  10. Brachial plexus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that originate from the neck region and branch off to give rise ... movement in the upper limb. Injuries to the brachial plexus are common and can be debilitating. If the ...

  11. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Brachial plexus injuries are caused by damage to those nerves. Symptoms ... sensation in the arm or hand Brachial plexus injuries can occur as a result of shoulder trauma, ...

  12. Three-dimensional Humeral Morphological Alterations and Atrophy Associated with Obstetrical Brachial Plexus Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Frances T.; Brochard, Sylvain; Behnam, Abrahm J.; Alter, Katharine E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Obstetrical Brachial Plexus Palsy (OBPP) is a common birth injury, resulting in severe functional losses. Yet, little is known about how OBPP affects the 3D humeral morphology. Thus, the purpose of this study was to measure the 3D humeral architecture in children with unilateral OBPP. Methods Thirteen individuals (4F/9M, age=11.8±3.3 years, Mallet score=15.1±3.0) participated in this IRB-approved study. A three-dimensional T1-weighted gradient-recalled-echo magnet resonance image set was acquired for both upper limbs (involved/non-involved). Humeral size, version, and inclination were quantified from 3D humeral models derived from these images. Results The involved humeral head was significantly less retroverted and in declination (medial humeral head pointed anteriorly and inferiorly), relative to the non-involved side. Osseous atrophy was present in all three dimensions and affected the entire humerus. The inter-rater reliability was excellent (ICC = 0.96–1.00). Discussion This study demonstrated that both humeral atrophy and bone shape deformities associated with OBPP are not limited to the axial plane, but are three-dimensional phenomena. Incorporating information related to these multiplanar, 3D, humeral deformities into surgical planning could potentially improve functional outcomes following surgery. The documented reduction in retroversion is an osseous adaptation, which may help maintain glenohumeral congruency by partially compensating for the internal rotation of the arm. The humeral head declination is a novel finding and may be an important factor to consider when developing OBPP management strategies, as it has been shown to lead to significant supraspinatus inefficiencies and increased required elevation forces. Level of evidence Anatomic Study, Imaging PMID:24291045

  13. Developing core sets for patients with obstetric brachial plexus injury based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health

    PubMed Central

    Duijnisveld, B. J.; Saraç, Ç.; Malessy, M. J. A.; Vliet Vlieland, T. P. M.; Nelissen, R. G. H. H.; Brachial Plexus Advisory Board, The ICF

    2013-01-01

    Background Symptoms of obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) vary widely over the course of time and from individual to individual and can include various degrees of denervation, muscle weakness, contractures, bone deformities and functional limitations. To date, no universally accepted overall framework is available to assess the outcome of patients with OBPI. The objective of this paper is to outline the proposed process for the development of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Sets for patients with an OBPI. Methods The first step is to conduct four preparatory studies to identify ICF categories important for OBPI: a) a systematic literature review to identify outcome measures, b) a qualitative study using focus groups, c) an expert survey and d) a cross-sectional, multicentre study. A first version of ICF Core Sets will be defined at a consensus conference, which will integrate the evidence from the preparatory studies. In a second step, field-testing among patients will validate this first version of Core Sets for OBPI. Discussion The proposed method to develop ICF Core Sets for OBPI yields a practical tool for multiple purposes: for clinicians to systematically assess and evaluate the individual’s functioning, for researchers to design and compare studies, and for patients to get more insight into their health problems and their management. PMID:23836476

  14. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy: Can excision of upper trunk neuroma and nerve grafting improve function in babies with adequate elbow flexion at nine months of age?

    PubMed

    Argenta, Anne E; Brooker, Jack; MacIssac, Zoe; Natali, Megan; Greene, Stephanie; Stanger, Meg; Grunwaldt, Lorelei

    2016-05-01

    Accepted indications for exploration in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) vary by center. Most agree that full elbow flexion against gravity at nine months of age implies high chance of spontaneous recovery and thus excludes a baby from surgical intervention. However, there are certain movements of the shoulder and forearm that may not be used frequently by the infant, but are extremely important functionally as they grow. These movements are difficult to assess in a baby and may lead to some clinicians to recommend conservative treatment, when this cohort of infants may in fact benefit substantially from surgery. A retrospective review was conducted on all infants managed surgically at the Brachial Plexus Center of a major children's hospital from 2009 to 2014. Further analysis identified five patients who had near-normal AMS scores for elbow flexion but who had weakness of shoulder abduction, flexion, external rotation, and/or forearm supination. In contrast to standard conservative management, this cohort underwent exploration, C5-6 neuroma excision, and sural nerve grafting. Data analysis was performed on this group to look for overall improvement in function. During an average follow-up period of 29 months, all patients made substantial gains in motor function of the shoulder and forearm, without loss of elbow flexion or extension, or worsening of overall outcome. In select infants with brachial plexus injuries but near-normal AMS scores for elbow flexion, surgical intervention may be indicated to achieve the best functional outcome. PMID:26806089

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Caranci, F; Briganti, F; La Porta, M; Antinolfi, G; Cesarano, E; Fonio, P; Brunese, L; Coppolino, F

    2013-08-01

    Brachial plexus injury represents the most severe nerve injury of the extremities. While obstetric brachial plexus injury has showed a reduction in the number of cases due to the improvements in obstetric care, brachial plexus injury in the adult is an increasingly common clinical problem. The therapeutic measures depend on the pathologic condition and the location of the injury: Preganglionic avulsions are usually not amenable to surgical repair; function of some denervated muscles can be restored with nerve transfers from intercostals or accessory nerves and contralateral C7 transfer. Postganglionic avulsions are repaired with excision of the damaged segment and nerve autograft between nerve ends or followed up conservatively. Magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice for depicting the anatomy and pathology of the brachial plexus: It demonstrates the location of the nerve damage (crucial for optimal treatment planning), depicts the nerve continuity (with or without neuroma formation), or may show a completely disrupted/avulsed nerve, thereby aiding in nerve-injury grading for preoperative planning. Computed tomography myelography has the advantage of a higher spatial resolution in demonstration of nerve roots compared with MR myelography; however, it is invasive and shows some difficulties in the depiction of some pseudomeningoceles with little or no communication with the dural sac. PMID:23949940

  16. Brachial plexus injury in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... and vascular disorders. In: Fenichel GM, ed. Neonatal Neurology . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2006: ... CB, Kratz JR, Jelin AC, Gelfand AA. Child neurology: brachial plexus birth injury: what every neurologist needs ...

  17. Birth brachial plexus palsy: a race against time.

    PubMed

    Patra, Sambeet; Narayana Kurup, Jayakrishnan K; Acharya, Ashwath M; Bhat, Anil K

    2016-01-01

    A 5-year-old child presented to us with weakness of the left upper limb since birth. With the given history of obstetric trauma and limb examination, a diagnosis of birth brachial plexus palsy was made. Brachial plexus exploration along with microsurgery was performed at the same time which included extrinsic neurolysis of the roots and trunks and nerve transfer for better shoulder external rotation and elbow flexion. Both the movements were severely restricted previously due to co-contractures with the shoulder internal rotators and triceps. The problem of birth brachial plexus palsy is proving to be a global health burden both in developed countries and in developing countries such as India. The lack of awareness among the general public and primary healthcare providers and inadequate orthopaedic and neurosurgeons trained to treat the condition have worsened the prognosis. This case lays stress on the delayed complications in birth brachial palsy and its effective management. PMID:27402656

  18. Nerve Transfers in Birth Related Brachial Plexus Injuries: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed

    Davidge, Kristen M; Clarke, Howard M; Borschel, Gregory H

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews the assessment and management of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. The potential role of distal nerve transfers in the treatment of infants with Erb's palsy is discussed. Current evidence for motor outcomes after traditional reconstruction via interpositional nerve grafting and extraplexal nerve transfers is reviewed and compared with the recent literature on intraplexal distal nerve transfers in obstetrical brachial plexus injury. PMID:27094890

  19. Neurinomas of the brachial plexus: case report.

    PubMed

    Forte, A; Gallinaro, L S; Bertagni, A; Montesano, G; Prece, V; Illuminati, G

    1999-01-01

    Neurinomas, also referred to as neurilemmomas and schwannomas, are rare benign tumours of the peripheral nerves, a low proportion of which arise from the brachial plexus. Authors report a case of an ancient schwannoma arising from the brachial plexus. The tumour, usually asymptomatic, may cause sensory radicular symptoms, or rarely motor deficits in the involved arm. Enucleation of the tumour from the nerve without damage to any of the fascicles is the correct treatment. PMID:10710825

  20. 3T MR tomography of the brachial plexus: structural and microstructural evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mallouhi, Ammar; Marik, Wolfgang; Prayer, Daniela; Kainberger, Franz; Bodner, Gerd; Kasprian, Gregor

    2012-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) neurography comprises an evolving group of techniques with the potential to allow optimal noninvasive evaluation of many abnormalities of the brachial plexus. MR neurography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected brachial plexus traumatic injuries, intrinsic and extrinsic tumors, and post-radiogenic inflammation, and can be particularly beneficial in pediatric patients with obstetric trauma to the brachial plexus. The most common MR neurographic techniques for displaying the brachial plexus can be divided into two categories: structural MR neurography; and microstructural MR neurography. Structural MR neurography uses mainly the STIR sequence to image the nerves of the brachial plexus, can be performed in 2D or 3D mode, and the 2D sequence can be repeated in different planes. Microstructural MR neurography depends on the diffusion tensor imaging that provides quantitative information about the degree and direction of water diffusion within the nerves of the brachial plexus, as well as on tractography to visualize the white matter tracts and to characterize their integrity. The successful evaluation of the brachial plexus requires the implementation of appropriate techniques and familiarity with the pathologies that might involve the brachial plexus. PMID:21763092

  1. Augmentation of partially regenerated nerves by end-to-side side-to-side grafting neurotization: experience based on eight late obstetric brachial plexus cases

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Objective The effect of end-to-side neurotization of partially regenerated recipient nerves on improving motor power in late obstetric brachial plexus lesions, so-called nerve augmentation, was investigated. Methods Eight cases aged 3 – 7 years were operated upon and followed up for 4 years (C5,6 rupture C7,8T1 avulsion: 5; C5,6,7,8 rupture T1 avulsion:1; C5,6,8T1 rupture C7 avulsion:1; C5,6,7 ruptureC8 T1 compression: one 3 year presentation after former neurotization at 3 months). Grade 1–3 muscles were neurotized. Grade0 muscles were neurotized, if the electromyogram showed scattered motor unit action potentials on voluntary contraction without interference pattern. Donor nerves included: the phrenic, accessory, descending and ascending loops of the ansa cervicalis, 3rd and 4th intercostals and contralateral C7. Results Superior proximal to distal regeneration was observed firstly. Differential regeneration of muscles supplied by the same nerve was observed secondly (superior supraspinatus to infraspinatus regeneration). Differential regeneration of antagonistic muscles was observed thirdly (superior biceps to triceps and pronator teres to supinator recovery). Differential regeneration of fibres within the same muscle was observed fourthly (superior anterior and middle to posterior deltoid regeneration). Differential regeneration of muscles having different preoperative motor powers was noted fifthly; improvement to Grade 3 or more occurred more in Grade2 than in Grade0 or Grade1 muscles. Improvements of cocontractions and of shoulder, forearm and wrist deformities were noted sixthly. The shoulder, elbow and hand scores improved in 4 cases. Limitations The sample size is small. Controls are necessary to rule out any natural improvement of the lesion. There is intra- and interobserver variability in testing muscle power and cocontractions. Conclusion Nerve augmentation improves cocontractions and muscle power in the biceps, pectoral muscles, supraspinatus

  2. Brachial plexus variations during the fetal period.

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Jowita; Kędzia, Alicja; Dudek, Krzysztof

    2012-12-01

    The brachial plexus is an important nervous system structure. It can be injured during the perinatal period and by postnatal damage. The goal of this study was to assess human fetal brachial plexus variability. A total of 220 brachial plexuses were surgically prepared from 110 human fetuses aged 14-32 weeks of fetal life (50 females and 60 males) ranging in CRL from 80 to 233 mm. The study incorporated the following methods: dissectional and anthropological, digital image acquisition, digital image processing using Image J and GIMP software, and statistical methods (Statistica 9.0). Symmetry and sexual dimorphism were examined. Anomalies of the brachial plexuses were observed in 117 (53.18 %) cases. No sexual dimorphism was found. It was observed that cord variations occurred more often on the left side. Division variants (33.64 %) occurred most often, but also cords (18.18 %) as well as root nerves and terminal ramifications (15.90 %) were found. Trunk anomalies were rare and occurred in only 5.45 % of plexuses. Three height types of median nerve roots in combination with the nerve were distinguished. In one-third of cases, median nerve root connections were found below the axillary fossa and even half in the proximal part of the humerus. In conclusion, the brachial plexus was characterized for anatomical structural variability. Most often division and cord variations were observed. Anomalies occurred regardless of sex or body side except for cord variants. Brachial plexus variation recognition is significant from the neurosurgical and traumatological point of view. PMID:22945314

  3. Magnetic resonance neurography of the brachial plexus

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Vaishali; Upadhyaya, Divya Narain; Kumar, Adarsh; Pandey, Ashok Kumar; Gujral, Ratni; Singh, Arun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is being increasingly recognised all over the world as the imaging modality of choice for brachial plexus and peripheral nerve lesions. Recent refinements in MRI protocols have helped in imaging nerve tissue with greater clarity thereby helping in the identification, localisation and classification of nerve lesions with greater confidence than was possible till now. This article on Magnetic Resonance Neurography (MRN) is based on the authors’ experience of imaging the brachial plexus and peripheral nerves using these protocols over the last several years. PMID:26424974

  4. What has changed in brachial plexus surgery?

    PubMed Central

    de Rezende, Marcelo Rosa; Silva, Gustavo Bersani; de Paula, Emygdio José Leomil; Junior, Rames Mattar; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2013-01-01

    Brachial plexus injuries, in all their severity and complexity, have been extensively studied. Although brachial plexus injuries are associated with serious and often definitive sequelae, many concepts have changed since the 1950s, when this pathological condition began to be treated more aggressively. Looking back over the last 20 years, it can be seen that the entire approach, from diagnosis to treatment, has changed significantly. Some concepts have become better established, while others have been introduced; thus, it can be said that currently, something can always be offered in terms of functional recovery, regardless of the degree of injury. Advances in microsurgical techniques have enabled improved results after neurolysis and have made it possible to perform neurotization, which has undoubtedly become the greatest differential in treating brachial plexus injuries. Improvements in imaging devices and electrical studies have allowed quick decisions that are reflected in better surgical outcomes. In this review, we intend to show the many developments in brachial plexus surgery that have significantly changed the results and have provided hope to the victims of this serious injury. PMID:23644864

  5. Axillary brachial plexus blockade in moyamoya disease?

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Saban; Cece, Hasan; Nacar, Halil; Karahan, Mahmut Alp

    2011-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is characterized by steno-occlusive changes of the intracranial internal carotid arteries. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism are strictly impaired. The goal in perioperative anaesthetic management is to preserve the stability between oxygen supply and demand in the brain. Peripheral nerve blockade allows excellent neurological status monitoring and maintains haemodynamic stability which is very important in this patient group. Herein, we present an axillary brachial plexus blockade in a moyamoya patient operated for radius fracture. PMID:21712873

  6. Axillary brachial plexus blockade in moyamoya disease?

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Saban; Cece, Hasan; Nacar, Halil; Karahan, Mahmut Alp

    2011-03-01

    Moyamoya disease is characterized by steno-occlusive changes of the intracranial internal carotid arteries. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism are strictly impaired. The goal in perioperative anaesthetic management is to preserve the stability between oxygen supply and demand in the brain. Peripheral nerve blockade allows excellent neurological status monitoring and maintains haemodynamic stability which is very important in this patient group. Herein, we present an axillary brachial plexus blockade in a moyamoya patient operated for radius fracture. PMID:21712873

  7. Changes in Spinal Cord Architecture after Brachial Plexus Injury in the Newborn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korak, Klaus J.; Tam, Siu Lin; Gordon, Tessa; Frey, Manfred; Aszmann, Oskar C.

    2004-01-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus palsy is a devastating birth injury. While many children recover spontaneously, 20-25% are left with a permanent impairment of the affected limb. So far, concepts of pathology and recovery have focused on the injury of the peripheral nerve. Proximal nerve injury at birth, however, leads to massive injury-induced…

  8. Central Adaptation following Brachial Plexus Injury.

    PubMed

    Simon, Neil G; Franz, Colin K; Gupta, Nalin; Alden, Tord; Kliot, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Brachial plexus trauma (BPT) often affects young patients and may result in lasting functional deficits. Standard care following BPT involves monitoring for clinical and electrophysiological evidence of muscle reinnervation, with surgical treatment decisions based on the presence or absence of spontaneous recovery. Data are emerging to suggest that central and peripheral adaptation may play a role in recovery following BPT. The present review highlights adaptive and maladaptive mechanisms of central and peripheral nervous system changes following BPT that may contribute to functional outcomes. Rehabilitation and other treatment strategies that harness or modulate these intrinsic adaptive mechanisms may improve functional outcomes following BPT. PMID:26409073

  9. Idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis after laparoscopic treatment of endometriosis: a complication that may mimic position-related brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Minas, Vasileios; Aust, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 37-year-old woman who developed idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis, also referred to as Parsonage-Turner syndrome, after laparoscopic excision of endometriosis. The differential diagnosis between this non-position-related neuritis and brachial plexus injury is discussed. The aim of this report was to raise awareness on this distressing postoperative complication. PMID:24183278

  10. [Brachial plexus. Long lasting neurological deficit following interscalene blockade of the brachial plexus].

    PubMed

    Funk, W; Angerer, M; Sauer, K; Altmeppen, J

    2000-07-01

    An interscalene block of the brachial plexus was combined with general anaesthesia for repair of a complex chronic lesion of the shoulder. The localisation of the plexus with electro-stimulation and the injection of Bupivacain 0.5% were accomplished easily and without painful sensations. 48 hours later the block was still partially present. Paraesthesia and a sensory and motor innervation deficit affected mainly the dorsal fascicle, but also areas innervated by the median and lateral fascicles. The deficit did not completely disappear for 18 month. The cause could have been due to direct traumatisation during blockade or operation, toxic action of the injected substance (Bupivacain 0.5%, 30 ml), distension of the plexus, a cervical syndrome or an aseptic plexitis, although a definite determination is not possible. However, the pattern of the lesion and the lack of pain during localisation of the plexus and injection favour traumatisation during the acromioplasty. PMID:10969388

  11. Brachial plexus injuries in neonates: an osteopathic approach.

    PubMed

    Mason, David C; Ciervo, Carman A

    2009-02-01

    Neonates and infants with brachial plexus injuries are typically treated using splinting, range-of-motion exercise, and, in more severe cases, nerve reconstruction. However, myofascial release--a common osteopathic manipulative treatment technique that has been used to manage thoracic outlet syndrome in adults--may provide effective, noninvasive management of brachial plexus injuries in neonates and infants. While emphasizing the importance of good communication with parents of affected patients, the authors review brachial plexus anatomy, describe diagnostic examinations, and outline a comprehensive treatment strategy. PMID:19269939

  12. [Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma of the brachial plexus].

    PubMed

    Giner, Javier; Isla, Alberto; Hernández, Borja; Nistal, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma is a soft tissue sarcoma that is extremely rare in the brachial plexus. We report a case of a myxoid/round cell liposarcoma originating in the brachial plexus that was surgically resected and evolved well, with no deficit or recurrence after 2 years of follow-up. To date, there has been no other case of this sarcoma in the literature. PMID:25126709

  13. mRNA expression characteristics are different in irreversibly atrophic intrinsic muscles of the forepaw compared with reversibly atrophic biceps in a rat model of obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP).

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji-Xin; Chen, Liang; Ding, Fei; Chen, Le-Zi; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2016-04-01

    In obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP), irreversible muscle atrophy occurs much faster in intrinsic muscles of the hand than in the biceps. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, mRNA expression profiles of denervated intrinsic muscles of the forepaw (IMF) and denervated biceps were determined by microarray using the rat model of OBPP where atrophy of IMF is irreversible while atrophy of biceps is reversible. Relative to contralateral control, 446 dysregulated mRNAs were detected in denervated IMF and mapped to 51 KEGG pathways, and 830 dysregulated mRNAs were detected in denervated biceps and mapped to 52 KEGG pathways. In denervated IMF, 10 of the pathways were related to muscle regulation; six with down-regulated and one with up-regulated mRNAs. The remaining three pathways had both up- and down-regulated mRNAs. In denervated biceps, 13 of the pathways were related to muscle regulation, six with up-regulated and seven with down-regulated mRNAs. Five of the pathways with up-regulated mRNAs were related to regrowth and differentiation of muscle cells. Among the 23 pathways with dysregulated mRNAs, 13 were involved in regulation of neuromuscular junctions. Our results demonstrated that mRNAs expression characteristics in irreversibly atrophic denervated IMF were different from those in reversibly atrophic denervated biceps; dysregulated mRNAs in IMF were associated with inactive pathways of muscle regulation, and in biceps they were associated with active pathways of regrowth and differentiation. Lack of self-repair potential in IMF may be a major reason why atrophy of IMF becomes irreversible much faster than atrophy of biceps after denervation. PMID:26902607

  14. Respiratory arrest in patients undergoing arteriovenous graft placement with supraclavicular brachial plexus block: a case series.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Anoushka; Beilin, Yaakov

    2013-06-01

    Supraclavicular brachial plexus block is commonly used for upper extremity surgery. Respiratory arrest in three patients with end-stage renal disease after ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block for creation of an arteriovenous graft over a 6-month period is presented. Patients with renal failure may represent a group at particular risk for respiratory failure following supraclavicular brachial plexus block. PMID:23830847

  15. Herpetic Brachial Plexopathy: Application of Brachial Plexus Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasound-Guided Corticosteroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Gil; Chung, Sun G

    2016-05-01

    Herpes zoster, commonly known as shingles, is an infectious viral disease characterized by painful, unilateral skin blisters occurring in specific sensory dermatomes. Motor paresis is reported in 0.5% to 5% of patients. Although the mechanism of zoster paresis is still unclear, the virus can spread from the dorsal root ganglia to the anterior horn cell or anterior spinal nerve roots. It rarely involves the brachial plexus. We report a case of brachial plexitis following herpes zoster infection in which pathological lesions were diagnosed using brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging and treated with ultrasound-guided perineural corticosteroid injection. PMID:26829085

  16. Permanent upper trunk plexopathy after interscalene brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Avellanet, Merce; Sala-Blanch, Xavier; Rodrigo, Lidia; Gonzalez-Viejo, Miguel A

    2016-02-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) has been widely used in shoulder surgical procedures. The incidence of postoperative neural injury has been estimated to be as high as 3 %. We report a long-term neurologic deficit after a nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. A 55 year-old male, with right shoulder impingement syndrome was scheduled for elective surgery. The patient was given an oral dose of 10 mg of diazepam prior to the nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. The patient immediately complained, as soon as the needle was placed in the interscalene area, of a sharp pain in his right arm and he was sedated further. Twenty-four hours later, the patient complained of severe shoulder and arm pain that required an increased dose of analgesics. Severe peri-scapular atrophy developed over the following days. Electromyography studies revealed an upper trunk plexus injury with severe denervation of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and deltoid muscles together with a moderate denervation of the biceps brachii muscle. Chest X-rays showed a diaphragmatic palsy which was not present post operatively. Pulmonary function tests were also affected. Phrenic nerve paralysis was still present 18 months after the block as was dysfunction of the brachial plexus resulting in an inability to perform flexion, abduction and external rotation of the right shoulder. Severe brachial plexopathy was probably due to a local anesthetic having been administrated through the perineurium and into the nerve fascicles. Severe brachial plexopathy is an uncommon but catastrophic complication of IBPB. We propose a clinical algorithm using ultrasound guidance during nerve blocks as a safer technique of regional anesthesia. PMID:25744163

  17. Axillary Brachial Plexus Blockade for the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribbers, G. M.; Geurts, A. C. H.; Rijken, R. A. J.; Kerkkamp, H. E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD) is a neurogenic pain syndrome characterized by pain, vasomotor and dystrophic changes, and often motor impairments. This study evaluated the effectiveness of brachial plexus blockade with local anaesthetic drugs as a treatment for this condition. Three patients responded well; three did not. (DB)

  18. General intravenous anesthesia for brachial plexus surgery in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Reichert, P; Rutowski, R; Kielbowicz, Z; Kuryszko, J; Kielbowicz, M

    2013-01-01

    The rabbit is a good experimental model for brachial plexus surgery. The risks of death during anesthesia were significantly greater in rabbits than cats or dogs. This article presents the protocol of injectable anesthesia for a short surgical procedure, safe for the rabbit patient and convenient for the surgeon. PMID:24597314

  19. Continuous shoulder analgesia via an indwelling axillary brachial plexus catheter.

    PubMed

    Reuben, S S; Steinberg, R B

    2000-09-01

    Continuous interscalene brachial plexus blockade can provide anesthesia and analgesia in the shoulder region. Difficulty accessing the interscalene space and premature displacement of interscalene catheters may preclude their use in certain situations. We present two case reports in which a catheter was advanced from the axilla along the brachial plexus sheath to the interscalene space to provide continuous cervicobrachial plexus analgesia. In the first case report, previous neck surgery made the anatomic landmarks for performing an interscalene block very difficult. An epidural catheter was advanced from the axillary brachial plexus sheath to the interscalene space under fluoroscopic guidance. This technique provided both intraoperative analgesia for shoulder surgery as well as 24-hour postoperative analgesia by an infusion of 0.125% bupivacaine. In the second case report, a catheter was inserted in a similar fashion from the axillary to the interscalene space to provide 14 days of continuous analgesia in the management of complex regional pain syndrome. We have found that this technique allows us to secure the catheter more easily than with the traditional interscalene approach and thus prevents premature dislodgment. This approach may be a suitable alternative when either an interscalene or an infraclavicular catheter may not be inserted. PMID:11090734

  20. Transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells repairs brachial plexus injury: pathological and biomechanical analyses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qi; Luo, Min; Li, Peng; Jin, Hai

    2014-01-01

    A brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits by stretching the C6 nerve root. Immediately after the stretching, a suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was injected into the injured brachial plexus. The results of tensile mechanical testing of the brachial plexus showed that the tensile elastic limit strain, elastic limit stress, maximum stress, and maximum strain of the injured brachial plexuses were significantly increased at 24 weeks after the injection. The treatment clearly improved the pathological morphology of the injured brachial plexus nerve, as seen by hematoxylin eosin staining, and the functions of the rabbit forepaw were restored. These data indicate that the injection of human amniotic epithelial cells contributed to the repair of brachial plexus injury, and that this technique may transform into current clinical treatment strategies. PMID:25657737

  1. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jimmy

    2014-01-01

    This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed. PMID:25593443

  2. Penile erectile dysfunction after brachial plexus root avulsion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Guo; Qin, Bengang; Jiang, Li; Huang, Xijun; Lu, Qinsen; Zhang, Dechun; Liu, Xiaolin; Zhu, Jiakai; Zheng, Jianwen; Li, Xuejia; Gu, Liqiang

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that some male patients suffering from brachial plexus injury, particularly brachial plexus root avulsion, show erectile dysfunction to varying degrees. However, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated the erectile function after establishing brachial plexus root avulsion models with or without spinal cord injury in rats. After these models were established, we administered apomorphine (via a subcutaneous injection in the neck) to observe changes in erectile function. Rats subjected to simple brachial plexus root avulsion or those subjected to brachial plexus root avulsion combined with spinal cord injury had significantly fewer erections than those subjected to the sham operation. Expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase did not change in brachial plexus root avulsion rats. However, neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression was significantly decreased in brachial plexus root avulsion + spinal cord injury rats. These findings suggest that a decrease in neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression in the penis may play a role in erectile dysfunction caused by the combination of brachial plexus root avulsion and spinal cord injury. PMID:25422647

  3. Brachial plexopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - brachial plexus; Brachial plexus dysfunction; Parsonage Turner syndrome; Pancoast syndrome ... dysfunction (brachial plexopathy) is a form of peripheral neuropathy . It occurs when there is damage to the ...

  4. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus. PMID:26860655

  5. Brachial Plexus Involvement of Myeloid Sarcoma Detected by Reconstruction Magnetic Resonance Neurography.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Atsuhiko; Ito, Shoichi; Sugita, Yasumasa; Shimada, Jun-Ichiro; Takeuchi, Masahiro; Hirano, Shigeki; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a rare hematological disorder that presents as an extramedullary mass of immature myeloid precursors. We herein present the case of a 57-year-old man with a seven-month history of progressive weakness in the right upper extremity. Reconstruction magnetic resonance neurography showed a marked enlargement of the right brachial plexus. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed a radioactive lesion in the sacrum, in addition to the right brachial plexus, and a biopsy of the sacrum revealed myeloid sarcoma. The brachial plexus lesion was also regarded as myeloid sarcoma because of the treatment response. Isolated myeloid sarcoma involving the brachial plexus is very rare and its diagnosis is difficult as there was neither a history of leukemia nor bone marrow involvement in this patient. In this case, reconstructed magnetic resonance neurography was useful for detecting the brachial plexus mass lesion which led to an early diagnosis and good recovery. PMID:26328656

  6. Ultrasonography of the brachial plexus, normal appearance and practical applications.

    PubMed

    Lapegue, F; Faruch-Bilfeld, M; Demondion, X; Apredoaei, C; Bayol, M A; Artico, H; Chiavassa-Gandois, H; Railhac, J-J; Sans, N

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound examination of the brachial plexus, although at first sight difficult, is perfectly feasible with fairly rapid practical and theoretical training. The roots are accurately identified due to the shape (a single tubercle) of the transverse process of C7 in the paravertebral space, and the superficial position of C5 in the interscalene groove. The téléphérique technique allows the roots, trunks and cords to be followed easily into the supraclavicular fossa. In just a few years, ultrasound imaging of the plexus has become a routine anesthesia examination for guiding nerve blocks. In trained hands, it also provides information in thoracic outlet syndromes, traumatic conditions (particularly for postganglionic lesions) and tumoral diseases. Even if MRI remains the standard examination in these indications, ultrasound, with its higher definition and dynamic character, is an excellent additional method which is still under-exploited. PMID:24603038

  7. Interscalenic approach to the cervico-brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Evenepoel, M C; Blomme, A

    1981-12-01

    The concept of a closed peri-neurovascular space surrounding the cervicobrachial plexus, introduced by A. Winnie, allows the blockade of the cervical and brachial plexuses by means of a single puncture technique. The single puncture has positive advantages: 1. The rapidity of the blockade; 2. The simplicity of the blockade; 3. Comfort for the patient. The landmarks are easy to make. As with epidural blockade, the injection level and the volume of local anesthetic determine the quality and extent of the block. The traditional indication is surgery of the shoulder and of the supraclavicular area. A new indication seems to be the implantation of a cardiac pacemaker. Complications often quoted in literature are Horner syndrome-a minor complication-and blockade of the ascending branches of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and of the phrenic nerve. The risk of a pneumothorax is almost nil. PMID:7324853

  8. Obesity in children with brachial plexus birth palsy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Avreeta K; Mills, Janith; Bauer, Andrea S; Ezaki, Marybeth

    2015-11-01

    Fetal macrosomia is associated with a 14-fold increased risk of brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP), and is a predictor of childhood obesity. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationships between BPBP, fetal macrosomia, and childhood obesity. We retrospectively reviewed 214 children with BPBP. The average age was 8 years and 53% had a Narakas 1 grade BPBP. Overall, 49% of children were normal weight, 22% overweight, and 29% obese. Of the children with a history of fetal macrosomia, 41% were obese; a statistically significant difference. Overall quality of life scores, however, were not correlated with obesity. PMID:26163865

  9. Boston Children's Hospital approach to brachial plexus birth palsy.

    PubMed

    Vuillermin, Carley; Bauer, Andrea S

    2016-07-01

    The treatment of infants with brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) continues to be a focus at Boston Children's Hospital. Over the last 15 years, there have been many developments in the treatment of infants with BPBP. Some of the greatest changes have emerged through technical advances such as the advent of distal nerve transfers to allow targeted reinnervation as well as through research to understand the pathoanatomical changes that lead to glenohumeral dysplasia and how this dysplasia can be remodeled. This review will discuss our current practice of evaluation of the infant with BPBP, techniques for microsurgical reconstruction, and prevention and treatment of secondary glenohumeral dysplasia. PMID:27137763

  10. Acromioclavicular joint dislocation with associated brachial plexus injury

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Charles Alexander; Blakeney, William; Zellweger, René

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 32-year-old female who sustained a left acromioclavicular (AC) joint type V injury and brachial plexus injury. The patient's AC joint injury was identified 6 days after she was involved in a motorbike accident where she sustained multiple other injuries. She required operative fixation of the AC joint using a locking compression medial proximal tibial plate. At 3 months post operatively, the patient was found to have a subluxed left shoulder as a result of an axonal injury to the upper trunk of the brachial plexus. In addition, the tibial plate had cut out. The plate was subsequently removed. At 8 months the glenohumeral articulation had been restored and the patient had clinically regained significant shoulder function. After 15 months the patient was pain free and could complete all her activities of daily living without impediment. She returned to playing competitive pool after 24 months. PMID:24855076

  11. Injury mechanisms in supraclavicular stretch injuries of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Soldado, Francisco; Ghizoni, Marcos F; Bertelli, Jayme

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the mechanisms involved in stretch injuries of the brachial plexus. One hundred and fifty consecutive patients with supraclavicular brachial plexus injuries (BPI) were asked about the mechanism of injury during the actual injury event, particularly about the type of trauma to their shoulder, shoulder girdle and head. Fifty-seven of the patients provided enough information about their accident to allow for analysis of the shoulder trauma. The injury mechanism for all patients having upper root or total palsy (n=46) was described as a direct vertical impact to the shoulder. In 44 of these patients, the trauma followed a motorcycle accident and, in most of them, the patient hit a fixed vertical structure before falling to the ground. The injury mechanism for the lower root palsy cases (n=11) was variable. The most frequent mechanism was forceful anterior shoulder compression by a car seat belt. We found that injury mechanisms differed significantly from the ones commonly discussed in published studies. PMID:27117025

  12. The Impact of Pediatric Brachial Plexus Injury on Families

    PubMed Central

    Allgier, Allison; Overton, Myra; Welge, Jeffrey; Mehlman, Charles T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the impact on families of children with brachial plexus injuries in order to best meet their clinical and social needs. Methods Our cross-sectional study included families with children between the ages of 1 and 18 with birth or non-neonatal brachial plexus injuries (BPI). The consenting parent or guardian completed a demographic questionnaire and the validated Impact on Family Scale during a single assessment. Total scores can range from 0-100, with the higher the score indicating a higher impact on the family. Factor analysis and item-total correlations were used to examine structure, individual items, and dimensions of family impact. Results One hundred two caregivers participated. Overall, families perceived various dimensions of impact on having a child with a BPI. Total family impact was 43. The 2 individual items correlating most strongly with the overall total score were from the financial dimension of the Impact on Family Scale. The strongest demographic relationship was traveling nationally for care and treatment of the BPI. Severity of injury was marginally correlated with impact on the family. Parent-child agreement about the severity of the illness was relatively high. Conclusion Caretakers of children with a BPI perceived impact on their families in the form of personal strain, family/social factors, financial stress, and mastery. A multidisciplinary clinical care team should address the various realms of impact on family throughout the course of treatment. Level of Evidence II Prognostic PMID:25936738

  13. Traumatic Pseudoaneurysm of Axillary Artery Combined with Brachial Plexus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Peng, Feng; Wang, Tao; Chen, Desong; Yang, Jianyun

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the axillary artery combined with brachial plexus injury is extremely rare. The factors that influence the symptoms and functional recovery related to this condition are unclear. Nine patients who had sustained this trauma were surgically treated at our unit between June 1999 and November 2010. The cause of trauma, symptoms, signs and examinations of neurological and vascular deficits, and the surgical findings of the involved nerves and vessels were recorded in detail. The functional recovery of vessels and nerves, as well as the extent of pain, were evaluated, respectively. The average length of patient follow-up was 4.5 years (range, 24 months to 11.3 years). After vessel repair, whether by endovascular or operative treatment, the distending, constant, and pulsating pain was relieved in all patients. Furthermore, examination of the radial artery pulse on the repaired side appeared normal at last follow-up. All patients showed satisfactory sensory recovery, with motor recovery rated as good in five patients and fair in four patients. The symptom characteristics varied with the location of the damage to the axillary artery. Ultrasound examination and computed tomography angiography are useful to evaluate vascular injury and provide valuable information for operative planning. Surgical exploration is an effective therapy with results related to the nerve injury condition of the brachial plexus. PMID:25412426

  14. Pulsed radiofrequency treatment within brachial plexus for the management of intractable neoplastic plexopathic pain.

    PubMed

    Arai, Young-Chang P; Nishihara, Makoto; Aono, Shuichi; Ikemoto, Tatsunori; Suzuki, Chiharu; Kinoshita, Akiko; Ushida, Takahiro

    2013-04-01

    We report on the use of pulsed radiofrequency (RF) within the plexus for the management of intractable pain in three patients with metastatic or invasive plexopathy. The patients were a 38-year-old woman with a history of breast cancer 6 years earlier whose computed tomography (CT) scans revealed a mass lesion at the infraclavicular part of the right brachial plexus, a 68-year-old man diagnosed with advanced lung cancer whose CT scans revealed a bone metastasis in the right humerus invading the axillary region of the right brachial plexus, and a 67-year-old woman diagnosed with advanced lung cancer whose CT scans revealed a bone metastasis in the left humerus invading the axillary region of the left brachial plexus. Ultrasound-guided pulsed RF was performed within the interscalene brachial plexus. During the follow-up period, their intractable pain was moderately controlled. PMID:23070568

  15. Avulsion of the brachial plexus in a great horned owl (Bubo virginaus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, M.P.; Stauber, E.; Thomas, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Avulsion of the brachial plexus was documented in a Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus). A fractured scapula was also present. Cause of these injuries was not known but was thought to be due to trauma. Differentiation of musculoskeletal injury from peripheral nerve damage can be difficult in raptors. Use of electromyography and motor nerve conduction velocity was helpful in demonstrating peripheral nerve involvement. A brachial plexus avulsion was suspected on the basis of clinical signs, presence of electromyographic abnormalities in all muscles supplied by the nerves of the brachial plexus and absence of median-ulnar motor nerve conduction velocities.

  16. [Ipsilateral brachial plexus C7 root transfer. Presentation of a case and a literature review].

    PubMed

    Vergara-Amador, Enrique; Ramírez, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The C7 root in brachial plexus injuries has been used since 1986, since the first description by Gu at that time. This root can be used completely or partially in ipsilateral or contralateral lesions of the brachial plexus. A review of the literature and the case report of a 21-month-old girl with stab wounds to the neck and section of the C5 root of the right brachial plexus are presented. A transfer of the anterior fibres of the ipsilateral C7 root was performed. At 9 months there was complete recovery of abduction and external rotation of the shoulder. PMID:23474130

  17. Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block for Arteriovenous Hemodialysis Access Procedures.

    PubMed

    Hull, Jeffrey; Heath, Jean; Bishop, Wendy

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block using 1% and 2% lidocaine in 21 procedures is reported. Average procedure time was 5.1 minutes (± 1.2 min; range, 2-8 min). Average time of onset and duration were 4.8 minutes (± 3.7 min; range, 0-10 min) and 77.9 minutes (± 26.7 min; range, 44-133 min), respectively, for sensory block and 8.4 minutes (± 5.7 min; range, 3-23 min) and 99 minutes (± 40.5 min; range, 45-171 min), respectively, for motor block. The pain scale assessment averaged 0.4 (± 1.1; range, 0-4). There were no complications. PMID:27106648

  18. OCT/PS-OCT imaging of brachial plexus neurovascular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raphael, David T.; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yaoping; Chen, Zhongping; Miller, Carol; Zhou, Li

    2004-07-01

    Introduction: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows high-resolution imaging (less than 10 microns) of tissue structures. A pilot study with OCT and polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) was undertaken to image ex-vivo neurovascular structures (vessels, nerves) of the canine brachial plexus. Methods: OCT is an interferometry-based optical analog of B-mode ultrasound, which can image through non-transparent biological tissues. With approval of the USC Animal Care and Use Committee, segments of the supra- and infraclavicular brachial plexus were excised from euthanized adult dogs, and the ex-vivo specimens were placed in cold pH-buffered physiologic solution. An OCT beam, in micrometer translational steps, scanned the fixed-position bisected specimens in transverse and longitudinal views. Two-dimensional images were obtained from identified arteries and nerves, with specific sections of interest stained with hematoxylin-eosin for later imaging through a surgical microscope. Results: with the beam scan direction transverse to arteries, the resulting OCT images showed an identifiable arterial lumen and arterial wall tissue layers. By comparison, transverse beam OCT images of nerves revealed a multitude of smaller nerve bundles contained within larger circular-shaped fascicles. PS-OCT imaging was helpful in showing the characteristic birefringence exhibited by arrayed neural structures. Discussion: High-resolution OCT imaging may be useful in the optical identification of neurovascular structures during attempted regional nerve blockade. If incorporated into a needle-shaped catheter endoscope, such a technology could prevent intraneural and intravascular injections immediately prior to local anesthetic injection. The major limitation of OCT is that it can form a coherent image of tissue structures only to a depth of 1.5 - 2 mm.

  19. Morphometric Atlas Selection for Automatic Brachial Plexus Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Velde, Joris; Wouters, Johan; Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Duprez, Fréderic; De Neve, Wilfried; Van Hoof, Tom

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of atlas selection based on different morphometric parameters, on the accuracy of automatic brachial plexus (BP) segmentation for radiation therapy planning. The segmentation accuracy was measured by comparing all of the generated automatic segmentations with anatomically validated gold standard atlases developed using cadavers. Methods and Materials: Twelve cadaver computed tomography (CT) atlases (3 males, 9 females; mean age: 73 years) were included in the study. One atlas was selected to serve as a patient, and the other 11 atlases were registered separately onto this “patient” using deformable image registration. This procedure was repeated for every atlas as a patient. Next, the Dice and Jaccard similarity indices and inclusion index were calculated for every registered BP with the original gold standard BP. In parallel, differences in several morphometric parameters that may influence the BP segmentation accuracy were measured for the different atlases. Specific brachial plexus-related CT-visible bony points were used to define the morphometric parameters. Subsequently, correlations between the similarity indices and morphometric parameters were calculated. Results: A clear negative correlation between difference in protraction-retraction distance and the similarity indices was observed (mean Pearson correlation coefficient = −0.546). All of the other investigated Pearson correlation coefficients were weak. Conclusions: Differences in the shoulder protraction-retraction position between the atlas and the patient during planning CT influence the BP autosegmentation accuracy. A greater difference in the protraction-retraction distance between the atlas and the patient reduces the accuracy of the BP automatic segmentation result.

  20. Brachial Plexus Injury from CT-Guided RF Ablation Under General Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, Sridhar Sonnenberg, Eric van; Silverman, Stuart G.; Tuncali, Kemal; Flanagan, Hugh L.; Whang, Edward E.

    2005-06-15

    Brachial plexus injury in a patient under general anesthesia (GA) is not uncommon, despite careful positioning and, particularly, awareness of the possibility. The mechanism of injury is stretching and compression of the brachial plexus over a prolonged period. Positioning the patient within the computed tomography (CT) gantry for abdominal or chest procedures can simulate a surgical procedure, particularly when GA is used. The potential for brachial plexus injury is increased if the case is prolonged and the patient's arms are raised above the head to avoid CT image degradation from streak artifacts. We report a case of profound brachial plexus palsy following a CT-guided radiofrequency ablation procedure under GA. Fortunately, the patient recovered completely. We emphasize the mechanism of injury and detail measures to combat this problem, such that radiologists are aware of this potentially serious complication.

  1. Large cervicothoracic myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma with brachial plexus invasion: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiaotian; Yang, Jianyun; Chen, Lin; Yu, Cong

    2016-01-01

    Myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma is a rare sarcoma that develops in patients of all ages, which usually presents as a slow-growing painless mass in the distal extremities. To date, myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma with invasion of the brachial plexus has rarely been reported in the literature. In this study, a case of large cervicothoracic sarcoma, which invaded the brachial plexus, is presented. The patient reported no sensory disturbance or dyskinesia. The tumor was completely resected without injury of the brachial plexus. The postoperative histological diagnosis was myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma. Follow-up examination performed 24 months after surgery revealed no tumor recurrence and no sensory disturbance or dyskinesia was reported. This study presents a rare case of large myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma with brachial plexus invasion that was successfully managed by surgery. PMID:27588121

  2. Brachial plexus injury as an unusual complication of coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chong, A; Clarke, C; Dimitri, W; Lip, G

    2003-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury is an unusual and under-recognised complication of coronary artery bypass grafting especially when internal mammary artery harvesting takes place. It is believed to be due to sternal retraction resulting in compression of the brachial plexus. Although the majority of cases are transient, there are cases where the injury is permanent and may have severe implications as illustrated in the accompanying case history. PMID:12612322

  3. Axillary nerve neurotization with the anterior deltopectoral approach in brachial plexus injuries.

    PubMed

    Jerome, J Terrence Jose; Rajmohan, Bennet

    2012-09-01

    Combined neurotization of both axillary and suprascapular nerves in shoulder reanimation has been widely accepted in brachial plexus injuries, and the functional outcome is much superior to single nerve transfer. This study describes the surgical anatomy for axillary nerve relative to the available donor nerves and emphasize the salient technical aspects of anterior deltopectoral approach in brachial plexus injuries. Fifteen patients with brachial plexus injury who had axillary nerve neurotizations were evaluated. Five patients had complete avulsion, 9 patients had C5, six patients had brachial plexus injury pattern, and one patient had combined axillary and suprascapular nerve injury. The long head of triceps branch was the donor in C5,6 injuries; nerve to brachialis in combined nerve injury and intercostals for C5-T1 avulsion injuries. All these donors were identified through the anterior approach, and the nerve transfer was done. The recovery of deltoid was found excellent (M5) in C5,6 brachial plexus injuries with an average of 134.4° abduction at follow up of average 34.6 months. The shoulder recovery was good with 130° abduction in a case of combined axillary and suprascapular nerve injury. The deltoid recovery was good (M3) in C5-T1 avulsion injuries patients with an average of 64° shoulder abduction at follow up of 35 months. We believe that anterior approach is simple and easy for all axillary nerve transfers in brachial plexus injuries. PMID:22434572

  4. Brachial plexopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - brachial plexus; Brachial plexus dysfunction; Parsonage Turner syndrome; Pancoast syndrome ... or post-viral brachial plexus disease called Parsonage Turner syndrome. Tests that may be done to diagnose ...

  5. Brachial Plexus Neuritis Associated With Streptococcus agalactiae Infection: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yu Jung; Lee, Yu Jin; Kim, Joon Sung; Lim, Seong Hoon; Hong, Bo Young

    2014-08-01

    Brachial plexus neuritis is reportedly caused by various factors; however, it has not been described in association with Streptococcus agalactiae. This is a case report of a patient diagnosed with brachial plexus neuritis associated with pyogenic arthritis of the shoulder. A 57-year-old man visited the hospital complaining of sudden weakness and painful swelling of the left arm. The diagnosis was pyogenic arthritis of the left shoulder, and the patient was treated with open irrigation and debridement accompanied by intravenous antibiotic therapy. S. agalactiae was isolated from a wound culture, and an electrodiagnostic study showed brachial plexopathy involving the left upper and middle trunk. Nine weeks after onset, muscle strength improved in most of the affected muscles, and an electrodiagnostic study showed signs of reinnervation. In conclusion, S. agalactiae infection can lead to various complications including brachial plexus neuritis. PMID:25229037

  6. Brachial Plexus Neuritis Associated With Streptococcus agalactiae Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yu Jung; Lee, Yu Jin; Kim, Joon Sung; Lim, Seong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Brachial plexus neuritis is reportedly caused by various factors; however, it has not been described in association with Streptococcus agalactiae. This is a case report of a patient diagnosed with brachial plexus neuritis associated with pyogenic arthritis of the shoulder. A 57-year-old man visited the hospital complaining of sudden weakness and painful swelling of the left arm. The diagnosis was pyogenic arthritis of the left shoulder, and the patient was treated with open irrigation and debridement accompanied by intravenous antibiotic therapy. S. agalactiae was isolated from a wound culture, and an electrodiagnostic study showed brachial plexopathy involving the left upper and middle trunk. Nine weeks after onset, muscle strength improved in most of the affected muscles, and an electrodiagnostic study showed signs of reinnervation. In conclusion, S. agalactiae infection can lead to various complications including brachial plexus neuritis. PMID:25229037

  7. A novel technique of ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block in calves.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Jiro; Yamagishi, Norio; Sasaki, Kouya; Kim, Danil; Devkota, Bhuminand; Furuhama, Kazuhisa

    2012-12-01

    An interventional ultrasound technique to increase the safety of surgical treatment of the calf forelimb was tested. First, the brachial plexus was evaluated using ultrasonography and then 2% lidocaine was injected under ultrasound guidance. Ultrasonically, the brachial plexus appeared as multiple hypoechoic areas surrounded by a hyperechoic rim or a hyperechoic structure characterised by multiple discontinuous lines. It was located between the omotransverse muscle and axillary artery and vein. The sensitive effect in the forelimb was seen mainly in the area supplied by the musculocutaneous nerve, indicating successful blockage in the nerve plexus. Out of the eight forelimbs, the motor effect was observed in seven forelimbs. These results suggest the clinical feasibility of ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block in bovine medicine, although further studies are needed to examine various approaches, including the sites of needle insertion and the appropriate volume and dosage of anaesthetic. PMID:22682007

  8. Postfixed Brachial Plexus Radiculopathy Due to Thoracic Disc Herniation in a Collegiate Wrestler: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, Scott A.; Doberstein, Scott T.; Rushlow, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To present the unique case of a collegiate wrestler with C7 neurologic symptoms due to T1–T2 disc herniation. Background: A 23-year-old male collegiate wrestler injured his neck in a wrestling tournament match and experienced pain, weakness, and numbness in his left upper extremity. He completed that match and 1 additional match that day with mild symptoms. Evaluation by a certified athletic trainer 6 days postinjury showed radiculopathy in the C7 distribution of his left upper extremity. He was evaluated further by the team physician, a primary care physician, and a neurosurgeon. Differential Diagnosis: Cervical spine injury, stinger/burner, peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord injury, thoracic outlet syndrome, brachial plexus radiculopathy. Treatment: The patient initially underwent nonoperative management with ice, heat, massage, electrical stimulation, shortwave diathermy, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs without symptom resolution. Cervical spine radiographs were negative for bony pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging showed evidence of T1–T2 disc herniation. The patient underwent surgery to resolve the symptoms and enable him to participate for the remainder of the wrestling season. Uniqueness: Whereas brachial plexus radiculopathy commonly is seen in collision sports, a postfixed brachial plexus in which the T2 nerve root has substantial contribution to the innervation of the upper extremity is a rare anatomic variation with which many health care providers are unfamiliar. Conclusions: The injury sustained by the wrestler appeared to be C7 radiculopathy due to a brachial plexus traction injury. However, it ultimately was diagnosed as radiculopathy due to a T1–T2 thoracic intervertebral disc herniation causing impingement of a postfixed brachial plexus and required surgical intervention. Athletic trainers and physicians need to be aware of the anatomic variations of the brachial plexus when evaluating and caring for

  9. Above Elbow Amputation Under Brachial Plexus Block at Supraclavicular and Interscalene Levels

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Hassan; Yadagiri, Manjula; Macrosson, Duncan; Majeed, Amer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The brachial plexus block is a commonly performed procedure in the anesthetic practice today. It is performed for analgesia as well as anesthesia for upper limb procedures. It has been used for amputation and replantation surgeries of the upper limb. Case presentation: We present the case of a 68-year-old gentleman who had brachial plexus block at supraclavicular and interscalene levels as the sole anesthetic for undergoing above elbow amputation. He was deemed to be very high risk for a general anesthetic as he suffered from severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and a very poor exercise tolerance (NYHA Class III). The supraclavicular brachial plexus block was supplemented with an interscalene brachial plexus block due to inadequate surgical anesthesia encountered with the former. The procedure was successfully completed under regional anesthesia. Conclusions: The brachial plexus block can be performed at different levels in the same patient to achieve desired results, while employing sound anatomical knowledge and adhering to the maximum safe dose limit of the local anesthetic. PMID:26705518

  10. Compromising abnormalities of the brachial plexus as displayed by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Collins, J D; Shaver, M L; Disher, A C; Miller, T Q

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance images (MRI) of brachial plexus anatomy bilaterally, not possible by plain radiographs or CT, were presented to the Vascular Surgery, Neurology, and the Neurosurgery departments. Patients were requested for MRI of their brachial plexus. They were referred for imaging and the imaging results were presented to the faculty and housestaff. Our technique was accepted and adopted to begin referrals for MRI evaluation of brachial plexopathy. Over 175 patients have been studied. Eighty-five patients were imaged with the 1.5 Tesla magnet (Signa; General Electric Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) 3-D reconstruction MRI. Coronal, transverse (axial), oblique transverse, and sagittal plane T1-weighted and selected T2-weighted pulse sequences were obtained at 4-5 mm slice thickness, 40-45 full field of view, and a 512 x 256 size matrix. Saline water bags were used to enhance the signal between the neck and the thorax. Sites of brachial plexus compromise were demonstrated. Our technique with 3-D reconstruction increased the definition of brachial plexus pathology. The increased anatomical definition enabled the vascular surgeons and neurosurgeons to improve patient care. Brachial plexus in vivo anatomy as displayed by MRI, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and 3-D reconstruction offered an opportunity to augment the teaching of clinical anatomy to medical students and health professionals. Selected case presentations (bodybuilder, anomalous muscle, fractured clavicle, thyroid goiter, silicone breast implant rupture, and cervical rib) demonstrated compromise of the brachial plexus displayed by MRI. The MRI and 3-D reconstruction techniques, demonstrating the bilateral landmark anatomy, increased the definition of the clinical anatomy and resulted in greater knowledge of patient care management. PMID:7697507

  11. A cadaveric microanatomical study of the fascicular topography of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sumit; Prasad, G Lakshmi; Lalwani, Sanjeev

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Mapping of the fascicular anatomy of the brachial plexus could provide the nerve surgeon with knowledge of fascicular orientation in spinal nerves of the brachial plexus. This knowledge might improve the surgical outcome of nerve grafting in brachial plexus injuries by anastomosing related fascicles and avoiding possible axonal misrouting. The objective of this study was to map the fascicular topography in the spinal nerves of the brachial plexus. METHODS The entire right-sided brachial plexus of 25 adult male cadavers was dissected, including all 5 spinal nerves (C5-T1), from approximately 5 mm distal to their exit from the intervertebral foramina, to proximal 1 cm of distal branches. All spinal nerves were tagged on the cranial aspect of their circumference using 10-0 nylon suture for orientation. The fascicular dissection of the C5-T1 spinal nerves was performed under microscopic magnification. The area occupied by different nerve fascicles was then expressed as a percentage of the total cross-sectional area of a spinal nerve. RESULTS The localization of fascicular groups was fairly consistent in all spinal nerves. Overall, 4% of the plexus supplies the suprascapular nerve, 31% supplies the medial cord (comprising the ulnar nerve and medial root of the median nerve [MN]), 27.2% supplies the lateral cord (comprising the musculocutaneous nerve and lateral root of the MN), and 37.8% supplies the posterior cord (comprising the axillary and radial nerves). CONCLUSIONS The fascicular dissection and definitive anatomical localization of fascicular groups is feasible in plexal spinal nerves. The knowledge of exact fascicular location might be translatable to the operating room and can be used to anastomose related fascicles in brachial plexus surgery, thereby avoiding the possibility of axonal misrouting and improving the results of plexal reconstruction. PMID:26654179

  12. Hand Function in Children with an Upper Brachial Plexus Birth Injury: Results of the Nine-Hole Peg Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Immerman, Igor; Alfonso, Daniel T.; Ramos, Lorna E.; Grossman, Leslie A.; Alfonso, Israel; Ditaranto, Patricia; Grossman, John A. I.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate hand function in children with Erb upper brachial plexus palsy. Method: Hand function was evaluated in 25 children (eight males; 17 females) with a diagnosed upper (C5/C6) brachial plexus birth injury. Of these children, 22 had undergone primary nerve reconstruction and 13 of the 25 had undergone…

  13. Double free gracilis muscle transfer after complete brachial plexus injury: First Canadian experience

    PubMed Central

    Elzinga, Kate; Zuo, Kevin J; Olson, Jaret L; Morhart, Michael; Babicki, Sasha; Chan, K Ming

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brachial plexus root avulsions are devastating injuries, and are complex and challenging to reconstruct. Double free muscle transfer using the gracilis muscles is a potentially effective method of restoring upper extremity function. The authors report on the first two patients treated using this technique in Canada. Both sustained traumatic brachial plexus root avulsion injuries resulting in a flail arm. In the first step of this two-stage procedure, a gracilis muscle was transferred to restore elbow flexion, and wrist and digit extension. Months later, the transfer of the second gracilis muscle was performed to enhance elbow flexion and to enable wrist and digit flexion. Postoperatively, both patients achieved Medical Research Council grade 4 elbow flexion, functional handgrip and were able to return to gainful employment. Patient satisfaction was high and active range of motion improved substantially. The authors’ experience supports the use of this technique following severe brachial plexus injury. PMID:25152644

  14. Does C5 or C6 Radiculopathy Affect the Signal Intensity of the Brachial Plexus on Magnetic Resonance Neurography?

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Tae Gyu; Kim, In-Soo; Son, Eun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Patients with C5 or C6 radiculopathy complain of shoulder area pain or shoulder girdle weakness. Typical idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy (INA) is also characterized by severe shoulder pain, followed by paresis of shoulder girdle muscles. Recent studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) of the brachial plexus and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder in patients with INA show high signal intensity (HSI) or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle. We evaluated the value of brachial plexus MRN and shoulder MRI in four patients with typical C5 or C6 radiculopathy. HSI of the brachial plexus was noted in all patients and intramuscular changes were observed in two patients who had symptoms over 4 weeks. Our results suggest that HSI or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle on MRN and MRI may not be specific for INA. PMID:27152289

  15. Does C5 or C6 Radiculopathy Affect the Signal Intensity of the Brachial Plexus on Magnetic Resonance Neurography?

    PubMed

    Seo, Tae Gyu; Kim, Du Hwan; Kim, In-Soo; Son, Eun Seok

    2016-04-01

    Patients with C5 or C6 radiculopathy complain of shoulder area pain or shoulder girdle weakness. Typical idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy (INA) is also characterized by severe shoulder pain, followed by paresis of shoulder girdle muscles. Recent studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) of the brachial plexus and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder in patients with INA show high signal intensity (HSI) or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle. We evaluated the value of brachial plexus MRN and shoulder MRI in four patients with typical C5 or C6 radiculopathy. HSI of the brachial plexus was noted in all patients and intramuscular changes were observed in two patients who had symptoms over 4 weeks. Our results suggest that HSI or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle on MRN and MRI may not be specific for INA. PMID:27152289

  16. Outcome in adolescence of brachial plexus birth palsy

    PubMed Central

    Hulleberg, Gunn; Elvrum, Ann-Kristin G; Brandal, Merethe; Vik, Torstein

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose — The frequency and severity of a permanent lesion after brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) and its impact on activities of daily living are not well documented. We therefore investigated the outcome of BPBP in adolescents, regarding arm function and consequences for activity and participation. Participants and methods — Of 30,574 babies born at St. Olavs University Hospital in 1991–2000, 91 had BPBP (prevalence 3 per 1,000), and 69 of these individuals were examined at a median age of 14 (10–20) years. The examination included the modified Mallet classification, range of motion, shoulder rotation and grip strength, Assisting Hand Assessment, and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Of the 22 subjects who were not examined, 3 could not be traced and 19 reported having no problems in the affected arm. Results — At follow-up, 17 adolescents had a permanent lesion (i.e. individual Mallet subscore below 4) with a median Mallet total score of 15 (9–19), while 52 had good or normal shoulder function (median Mallet total score 25 (23–25)). All participants with a permanent lesion had reduced active shoulder rotation (≤ 15°), 16 had elbow extension deficit, and 10 had subnormal grip strength. External rotation was considerably weaker in the affected shoulder. In addition, they had ineffective use of the affected arm in bimanual activities. Even so, all except 1 were independent in activities of daily living, although 15 experienced minor difficulties. Interpretation — Every fourth to fifth child with BPBP had a permanent lesion as an adolescent. External rotation was the most impaired movement. Despite ineffective use of the affected arm in bimanual activities, all of the participants except one were independent in activities of daily living. PMID:25238434

  17. Brachial Plexus Tumors in a Consecutive Series of Twenty One Patients

    PubMed Central

    Go, Myeong Hoon; Cho, Ki Hong

    2012-01-01

    Objective This is a retrospective review of 22 surgically treated benign and malignant tumors of brachial plexus region to describe clinical presentation, the characteristics of brachial plexus tumor and clinical outcomes with a literature review. Methods Twenty-one patients with consecutive 22 surgeries for primary brachial plexus tumors were enrolled between February 2002 and November 2011 were included in this study. The medical records of all patients were reviewed. Results Eleven male and 10 female patients were enrolled. Mean age was 39 years. Three patients had brachial plexus tumor associated with neurofibromatosis (13.6%). Presenting signs and symptoms included parenthesis and numbness (54.5%), radiating pain (22.7%), direct tenderness and pain (27.2%), palpable mass (77.3%). Twelve patients presented preoperative sensory deficit (54.5%) and 9 patients presented preoperative motor deficit (40.9%). Twenty tumors (90.9%) were benign and 2 tumors (9.1%) were malignant. Benign tumors included 15 schwannomas (68.2%), 4 neurofibromas (18.2%) and 1 granular cell tumor (4.5%). There were 1 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) and 1 malignant granular cell tumor. Gross total resection was achieved in 16 patients (72.7%), including all schwannomas, 1 neurofibroma. Subtotal resection was performed in 6 tumors (27.3%), including 3 neurofibromatosis associated with brachial plexus neurofibromas, 1 MPNST and 2 granular cell tumor in one patient. Conclusion Resection of tumor is the choice of tumor in the most of benign and malignant brachial plexus tumors. Postoperative outcomes are related to grade of resection at surgery and pathological features of tumor. PMID:23091673

  18. Quality of life following traumatic brachial plexus injury: A questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    Gray, Beverley

    2016-08-01

    There is limited qualitative research available that explores the impact of a traumatic brachial plexus injury on patients and their quality of life experiences. This paper builds upon previous work on this subject by this author. Patients were selected from those who were on the database for the Scottish National Brachial Plexus Injury Service between 2011 and 2013. The World Health Organization (WHO) Quality of Life (QoL) - BREF questionnaire was used and 47 questionnaires were distributed with 22 returned. Findings included patients' ratings of their quality of life, physical and psychological health along with their perceived satisfaction with social relationships. PMID:27091305

  19. Brachial plexus injury in two red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    PubMed

    Shell, L; Richards, M; Saunders, G

    1993-01-01

    Two red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), found near Deltaville, Virginia (USA), were evaluated because of inability to use a wing. Results of needle electromyographic studies of the affected wing muscles in both hawks were compatible with denervation. On euthanasia, one hawk had extensive axon and myelin loss with multifocal perivascular lymphocytic inflammation of its brachial plexus and radial nerve. Demyelination and axon loss in the dorsal white matter of the spinal cord on the affected side also were found at the origin of the brachial plexus. The other hawk's wing had not returned to functional status > 2 yr after injury. PMID:8383253

  20. Sup-ER orthosis: an innovative treatment for infants with birth related brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Durlacher, Kim M; Bellows, Doria; Verchere, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Impairments in active and passive range of upper extremity supination and shoulder external rotation are common sequelae for children with delayed recovery from birth related brachial plexus injury. Orthotic intervention may complement traditional treatment strategies commonly employed in the newborn period. These authors describe their custom fabricated orthosis designed to balance shoulder growth and muscular function, and improve prognosis of long term functional outcomes for children with birth related brachial plexus injury. - Victoria Priganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT, Practice Forum Editor. PMID:25042285

  1. The Extent of Blockade Following Axillary and Infraclavicular Approaches of Brachial Plexus Block in Uremic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sariguney, Damla; Mahli, Ahmet; Coskun, Demet

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This study was aimed to compare the axillary approach performed through multiple injection method and vertical infraclavicular approach performed through single injection method in terms of the sensory and motor block onset, quality, and extent of blocks of brachial plexus in uremic patients who underwent arteriovenous fistula surgery. Methods Forty patients scheduled for creation of arteriovenous fistula with axillary brachial plexus block (group AX, n = 20) or infraclavicular brachial plexus block (IC group, n = 20) were examined. The median, radial, ulnar, and musculocutaneous nerves were selectively localized by nerve stimulation. The volume of the local anesthetics was calculated based on the height of each patient, and the volume determined was prepared by mixing 2% lidocaine and 0.5% bupivacaine in equal proportions. Sensory and motor block were assessed at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, and 30th min and their durations were measured. Results While the adequate sensory and motor block rate with axillary approach was 100% in musculocutaneous, median, radial, ulnar and medial antebrachial cutaneous nerves, it was 65% in axillary nerve, 80% in intercostobrachial nerve and 95% in medial brachial cutaneous nerve. This rate was found to be 100% for all the nerves with infraclavicular approach. Conclusion For arteriovenous fistula surgeries in uremic patients, both axillary approach performed through multiple injection method and vertical infraclavicular approach performed through single injection method can be used successfully; however, for the short performance of the procedure, infraclavicular block may be preferred. Keywords Brachial plexus block; Axillary; Infraclavicular; Uremic patients PMID:22383924

  2. Perspectives on glenohumeral joint contractures and shoulder dysfunction in children with perinatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Gharbaoui, Idris S; Gogola, Gloria R; Aaron, Dorit H; Kozin, Scott H

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder joint deformities continue to be a challenging aspect of treating upper plexus lesions in children with perinatal brachial plexus palsy (PBPP). It is increasingly recognized that PBPP affects the glenohumeral joint specifically, and that abnormal scapulothoracic movements are a compensatory development. The pathophysiology and assessment of glenohumeral joint contractures, the progression of scapular dyskinesia and skeletal dysplasia, and current shoulder imaging techniques are reviewed. PMID:25835253

  3. Origin of Medial and Lateral Pectoral Nerves from the Supraclavicular Part of Brachial Plexus and its Clinical Importance – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Prakashchandra; Nayak, Satheesha B; Kumar, Naveen; Thangarajan, Rajesh; D’Souza, Melanie Rose

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of normal and anomalous formation of brachial plexus and its branches is of utmost importance to anatomists, clinicians, anesthesiologists and surgeons. Possibility of variations in the origin, course and distribution of branches of brachial plexus must be kept in mind during anesthetizing the brachial plexus, mastectomy and plastic surgery procedures. In the current case, the medial pectoral nerve arose directly from the middle trunk of the brachial plexus and the lateral pectoral nerve arose from the anterior division of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus. The lateral pectoral nerve supplied the pectoralis major and the medial pectoral nerve supplied pectoralis major and pectoralis minor muscles through two separate branches. PMID:24701504

  4. Assessment of variation in depth of brachial plexus using ultrasound for supraclavicular brachial plexus block in patients undergoing elective upper limb surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Tuhin; Mangal, Vandana; Sharma, Gaurav; Agrawal, Aachu

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Supraclavicular approach to the brachial plexus may be associated with complications such as pneumothorax, inadvertent vascular puncture, inter-scalene block and neurovascular injuries. The present study was conceived to find out the variation in depth of brachial plexus to suggest the minimum length of needle required to effectively perform the block, thus preventing possible complications. Methods: After approval from our Institutional Ethical Committee, informed and written consent was obtained from each of the ninety American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status I and II patients recruited, of either sex in the age group of 20–50 years. Supraclavicular fossa was scanned using a high-frequency linear probe, and the distances (shortest distance [SD] from skin to the most superficial neural element and longest distance [LD] from skin to the most deep neural element) were measured using on-screen callipers on optimal frozen image. Pearson correlation was used to find out the relation between these two distances and demographic parameters. Results: Mean SD was 0.60 ± 0.262 cm, and mean LD was found to be 1.34 ± 0.385 cm. We observed significant correlation between these two distances with weight and body mass index (BMI). Conclusion: Significant correlation was observed between SD and LD with weight and BMI. We suggest that a needle with a shaft length of 3 cm will be sufficient to reach the sheath of the brachial plexus during performance of the block. PMID:27330200

  5. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hua; Yang, Qi; Ji, Feng; Zhang, Ya-jie; Zhao, Yan; Luo, Min

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 106 cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections) immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals. PMID:25883625

  6. Luxation de l’épaule compliquée de paralysie du plexus brachial

    PubMed Central

    Lukulunga, Loubet Unyendje; Moussa, Abdou Kadri; Mahfoud, Mustapha; EL Bardouni, Ahmed; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; El Yaacoubi, Moradh

    2014-01-01

    Les auteurs rapportent l'observation d'une paralysie totale du plexus brachial survenue trois mois après un épisode de luxation antéro-interne sous coracoïdienne associée à une fracture du trochiter chez une patiente âgée de 88 ans. PMID:25426187

  7. Ultrasound Guided Low Approach Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block for Upper Limb Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Kyung; Sung, Min Ha; Suh, Hae Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background The interscalene brachial plexus block is widely used for pain control and anesthetic purposes during shoulder arthroscopic surgeries and surgeries of the upper extremities. However, it is known that interscalene brachial plexus block is not appropriate for upper limb surgeries because it does not affect the lower trunk (C8-T1, ulnar nerve) of the brachial plexus. Methods A low approach, ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (LISB) was performed on twenty-eight patients undergoing surgery of the upper extremities. The patients were assessed five minutes and fifteen minutes after the block for the degree of block in each nerve and muscle as well as for any complications. Results At five minutes and fifteen minutes after the performance of the block, the degree of the block in the ulnar nerve was found to be 2.8 ± 2.6 and 1.1 ± 1.8, respectively, based on a ten-point scale. Motor block occurred in the median nerve after fifteen minutes in 26 of the 28 patients (92.8%), and in all of the other three nerves in all 28 patients. None of the patients received additional analgesics, and none experienced complications. Conclusions The present study confirmed the achievement of an appropriate sensory and motor block in the upper extremities, including the ulnar nerve, fifteen minutes after LISB, with no complications. PMID:26839666

  8. Intraoperative brachial plexus injury during emergence following movement with arms restrained: a preventable complication?

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Mark H; DiMatteo, Laura; Hasenboehler, Erik A; Temple, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite considerable analysis and preventive strategies, brachial plexus injuries remain fairly common in the perioperative setting. These injuries range from brief periods of numbness or discomfort in the immediate postoperative period to, in rare cases, profound, prolonged losses of sensation and function. We present a case of an orthopedic surgery patient who suffered a brachial plexus injury while under anesthesia after trying to sit upright with his arms restrained. Case presentation After the uneventful placement of an intramedullary tibial nail, an 18 year old patient tried to sit upright with his arms restrained while still under the influence of anesthesia. In the immediate postoperative period, the patient complained of a profound loss of sensation in his left arm and an inability to flex his left elbow, suppinate his arm, or abduct and rotate his shoulder. Neurological examination and subsequent studies revealed a C5-6 brachial plexus injury. The patient underwent range of motion physical therapy and, over the next three months, regained the full function and sensation of his left arm. Conclusion Restraining arms during general anesthesia to prevent injury remains a wise practice. However, to avoid injuring the brachial plexus while the arms are restrained, extra caution must be used to prevent unexpected patient movement and to ensure gentle emergence. PMID:18271944

  9. Robot-assisted surgery of the shoulder girdle and brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Facca, Sybille; Hendriks, Sarah; Mantovani, Gustavo; Selber, Jesse C; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    New developments in the surgery of the brachial plexus include the use of less invasive surgical approaches and more precise techniques. The theoretical advantages of the use of robotics versus endoscopy are the disappearance of physiological tremor, three-dimensional vision, high definition, magnification, and superior ergonomics. On a fresh cadaver, a dissection space was created and maintained by insufflation of CO2. The supraclavicular brachial plexus was dissected using the da Vinci robot (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA). A segment of the C5 nerve root was grafted robotically. A series of eight clinical cases of nerve damage around the shoulder girdle were operated on using the da Vinci robot. The ability to perform successful microneural repair was confirmed in both the authors' clinical and experimental studies, but the entire potential of robotically assisted microneural surgery was not realized during these initial cases because an open incision was still required. Robotic-assisted surgery of the shoulder girdle and brachial plexus is still in its early stages. It would be ideal to have even finer and more suitable instruments to apply fibrin glue or electrostimulation in nerve surgery. Nevertheless, the prospects of minimally invasive techniques would allow acute and subacute surgical approach of traumatic brachial plexus palsy safely, without significant and cicatricial morbidity. PMID:24872778

  10. Brachial plexus palsy after a left-side modified radical mastectomy with immediate latissimusdorsi flap reconstruction: report of a case

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury is a rare complication during operation and anesthesia; it can occur as a result of various mechanisms such as inappropriate positioning, over-abduction and stretching the upper limbs. Brachial plexus injury can cause the poor function of the upper limb before recovery, and sometimes serious injury is unable to completely recovered the function permanently. Here, we report a female breast cancer patient who sustained a left brachial plexus palsy after modified radical mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction with latissimusdorsi flap (LDF). The patient had fully recovered with normal function of her left upper limb six months postoperation after conservative treatment. PMID:24127915

  11. Gross anatomy of the brachial plexus in the giant Anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla).

    PubMed

    Souza, P R; Cardoso, J R; Araujo, L B M; Moreira, P C; Cruz, V S; Araujo, E G

    2014-10-01

    Ten forelimbs of five Myrmecophaga tridactyla were examined to study the anatomy of the brachial plexus. The brachial plexuses of the M. tridactyla observed in the present study were formed by the ventral rami of the last four cervical spinal nerves, C5 through C8, and the first thoracic spinal nerve, T1. These primary roots joined to form two trunks: a cranial trunk comprising ventral rami from C5-C7 and a caudal trunk receiving ventral rami from C8-T1. The nerves originated from these trunks and their most constant arrangement were as follows: suprascapular (C5-C7), subscapular (C5-C7), cranial pectoral (C5-C8), caudal pectoral (C8-T1), axillary (C5-C7), musculocutaneous (C5-C7), radial (C5-T1), median (C5-T1), ulnar (C5-T1), thoracodorsal (C5-C8), lateral thoracic (C7-T1) and long thoracic (C6-C7). In general, the brachial plexus in the M. tridactyla is similar to the plexuses in mammals, but the number of rami contributing to the formation of each nerve in the M. tridactyla was found to be larger than those of most mammals. This feature may be related to the very distinctive anatomical specializations of the forelimb of the anteaters. PMID:23952693

  12. Anatomical Variations of Brachial Plexus in Adult Cadavers; A Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Emamhadi, Mohammadreza; Chabok, Shahrokh Yousefzadeh; Samini, Fariborz; Alijani, Babak; Behzadnia, Hamid; Firozabadi, Fariborz Ayati; Reihanian, Zoheir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Variations of the brachial plexus are common and a better awareness of the variations is of crucial importance to achieve successful results in its surgical procedures. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anatomical variations of the brachial plexus in adult cadavers. Methods: Bilateral upper limbs of 32 fresh cadavers (21 males and 11 females) consecutively referred to Guilan legal medicine organization from November 2011 to September 2014, were dissected and the trunks, cords and terminal nerves were evaluated. Results: Six plexuses were prefixed in origin. The long thoracic nerve pierced the middle scalene muscle in 6 cases in the supra clavicular zone. The suprascapular nerve in 7 plexuses was formed from posterior division of the superior trunk. Five cadavers showed anastomosis between medial brachial cutaneous nerve and T1 root in the infra clavicular zone. Terminal branches variations were the highest wherein the ulnar nerve received a communicating branch from the lateral cord in 3 cases. The median nerve was formed by 2 lateral roots from lateral cord and 1 medial root from the medial cord in 6 cadavers. Some fibers from C7 root came to the musculocutaneous nerve in 8 cadavers. Conclusion: The correlation analysis between the variations and the demographic features was impossible due to the small sample size. The findings of the present study suggest a meta-analysis to assess the whole reported variations to obtain a proper approach for neurosurgeons. PMID:27517072

  13. Ultrasound-guided central cluster approach for the supraclavicular brachial plexus block: a case series.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Geum; Lee, Kyung Cheon; Kim, Hong Soon; Park, Seol Ju; Suh, Young Je; Shin, Hyeon Ju

    2015-12-01

    There are many different approaches to ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block (US-SCBPB), and each has a different success rate and complications. The most commonly performed US-SCBPB is the corner pocket approach in which the needle is advanced very close to the subclavian artery and pleura. Therefore, it may be associated with a risk of subclavian artery puncture or pneumothorax. We advanced the needle into the central part of the neural cluster after penetrating the sheath of the brachial plexus in US-SCBPB. We refer to this new method as the "central cluster approach." In this approach, the needle does not have to advance close to the subclavian artery or pleura. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of the central cluster approach in US-SCBPB. PMID:26634085

  14. Ultrasound-guided central cluster approach for the supraclavicular brachial plexus block: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Geum; Lee, Kyung Cheon; Kim, Hong Soon; Park, Seol Ju; Suh, Young Je

    2015-01-01

    There are many different approaches to ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block (US-SCBPB), and each has a different success rate and complications. The most commonly performed US-SCBPB is the corner pocket approach in which the needle is advanced very close to the subclavian artery and pleura. Therefore, it may be associated with a risk of subclavian artery puncture or pneumothorax. We advanced the needle into the central part of the neural cluster after penetrating the sheath of the brachial plexus in US-SCBPB. We refer to this new method as the "central cluster approach." In this approach, the needle does not have to advance close to the subclavian artery or pleura. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of the central cluster approach in US-SCBPB. PMID:26634085

  15. Prolonged hemidiaphragmatic paresis following continuous interscalene brachial plexus block: A case report.

    PubMed

    Shinn, Helen Ki; Kim, Byung-Gun; Jung, Jong Kwon; Kwon, Hee Uk; Yang, Chunwoo; Won, Jonghun

    2016-06-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block provides effective anesthesia and analgesia for shoulder surgery. One of the disadvantages of this technique is the risk of hemidiaphragmatic paresis, which can occur as a result of phrenic nerve block and can cause a decrease in the pulmonary function, limiting the use of the block in patients with reduced functional residual capacity or a preexisting pulmonary disease. However, it is generally transient and is resolved over the duration of the local anesthetic's action.We present a case of a patient who experienced prolonged hemidiaphragmatic paresis following a continuous interscalene brachial plexus block for the postoperative pain management of shoulder surgery, and suggest a mechanism that may have led to this adverse effect.Nerve injuries associated with peripheral nerve blocks may be caused by several mechanisms. Our findings suggest that perioperative nerve injuries can occur as a result of combined mechanical and chemical injuries. PMID:27310984

  16. Successful Outcome of Modified Quad Surgical Procedure in Preteen and Teen Patients with Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K.; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the outcome of modified Quad procedure in preteen and teen patients with brachial plexus birth palsy. Background: We have previously demonstrated a significant improvement in shoulder abduction, resulting from the modified Quad procedure in children (mean age 2.5 years; range, 0.5–9 years) with obstetric brachial plexus injury. Methods: We describe in this report the outcome of 16 patients (6 girls and 10 boys; 7 preteen and 9 teen) who have undergone the modified Quad procedure for the correction of the shoulder function, specifically abduction. The patients underwent transfer of the latissimus dorsi and teres major muscles, release of contractures of subscapularis pectoralis major and minor, and axillary nerve decompression and neurolysis (the modified Quad procedure). Mean age of these patients at surgery was 13.5 years (range, 10.1–17.9 years). Results: The mean preoperative total Mallet score was 14.8 (range, 10–20), and active abduction was 84° (range, 20°–140°). At a mean follow-up of 1.5 years, the mean postoperative total Mallet score increased to 19.7 (range, 13–25, P < .0001), and the mean active abduction improved to 132° (range, 40°–180°, P < .0003). Conclusion: The modified Quad procedure greatly improves not only the active abduction but also other shoulder functions in preteen and teen patients, as this outcome is the combined result of decompression and neurolysis of the axillary nerve and the release of the contracted internal rotators of the shoulder. PMID:23308301

  17. Sensory Evaluation of the Hands in Children with Brachial Plexus Birth Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmgren, Tove; Peltonen, Jari; Linder, Tove; Rautakorpi, Sanna; Nietosvaara, Yrjana

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine sensory changes of the hand in brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI). Ninety-five patients (43 females, 52 males) comprising two age groups, 6 to 8 years (mean age 7y 6mo) and 12 to 14 years (mean age 13y 2mo), were included. Sixty-four had upper (cervical [C] 5-6), 19 upper and middle (C5-7), and 12 had total…

  18. Watson-Jones Lecture, 1976. Some lesions of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, G.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of lesion of the brachial plexus are discussed: entrapment syndrome; tumours; and traumatic lesions. In the first the importance of the pathological anatomy is stressed; in the second the rewarding results of accurate diagnosis and careful treatment are noted; and in the third the expanding possibilities of neural reconstruction and of specific treatment for pain are described. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:879635

  19. Unusual brachial plexus lesion: Hematoma masquerading as a peripheral nerve sheath tumor

    PubMed Central

    Krisht, Khaled M.; Karsy, Michael; Shah, Lubdha M.; Schmidt, Meic H.; Dailey, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) of the brachial plexus have unique radiographic and clinical findings. Patients often present with progressive upper extremity paresthesias, weakness, and pain. On magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, lesions are isointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted sequences, while also demonstrating marked enhancement on MR studies with gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid. On the basis of their characteristic MR imaging features and rapid clinical progression, two brachial plexus lesions proved to be organizing hematomas rather than MPNST. Methods: A 51-year-old male and a 31-year-old female were both assessed for persistent and worsened left-sided upper extremity pain, paresthesias, and weakness. In both cases, the MR imaging of the brachial plexus demonstrated an extraspinal enhancing lesion located within the left C7–T1 neuroforamina. Results: Although the clinical and radiographic MR features for these 2 patients were consistent with MPNSTs, both lesions proved to be benign organizing hematomas. Conclusions: These two case studies emphasize that brachial plexus hematomas may mimic MPNSTs on MR studies. Accurate diagnosis of these lesions is critical for determining the appropriate management options and treatment plans. Delaying the treatment of a highly aggressive nerve sheath tumor can have devastating consequences, whereas many hematomas resolve without surgery. Therefore, if the patient has stable findings on neurological examination and a history of trauma, surgical intervention may be delayed in favor of repeat MR imaging in 2–3 months to re-evaluate the size of the mass. PMID:26904368

  20. Influence of contralateral homologous cortices on motor cortical reorganization after brachial plexus injuries in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Liang; Gu, Yu-dong

    2015-10-01

    Brachial plexus injuries induce corresponding cortical representations to be occupied by adjacent cortices. The purpose of this study was to clarify if contralateral homologous motor regions of adjacent cortices influence occupation of deafferented motor cortex. 36 rats were divided into 3 groups of 12 each. In group 1, total brachial plexus root avulsion (tBPRA) was made on the left side. In group 2, rats underwent left tBPRA combined with corpus callosum transection (CCX). In group 3, only CCX was performed. 6 rats in each group were used for intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) to map representations of motor cortex in the right hemisphere at 7 days and the other 6 rats, at 3 months. 18 more rats without any operation underwent ICMS, with 6 each taken to serve as normal control for motor cortical representations' changes caused by different surgery. Results showed that in groups 1 and 2, sites for motor cortical representations of vibrissae, of neck and of the hindlimb was statistically more than that of control, respectively, and statistically more sites were found at 3 months than at 7 days, respectively. At the two time points, sites for vibrissa cortices and that for the hindlimb were statistically more in group 2 than in group 1, respectively. CCX alone did not induce change of site number for motor cortical representations. We conclude that after tBPRA, contralateral homologous motor cortices may, to some extent, prevent neighboring cortices from encroachment on motor cortical representations of the brachial plexus. PMID:26314511

  1. Does retraction of the sternum during median sternotomy result in brachial plexus injuries?

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Scott; O'Neill, Bridie; Bilal, Haris; Waterworth, Paul

    2013-01-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was ‘does retraction of the sternum during median sternotomy result in brachial plexus injuries or peripheral neuropathies?’ Altogether 58 papers were found using the reported search, of which 12 represented the best evidence to answer the question. The authors, date, journal and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers were tabulated. Caudal placement of the retractor or relieving the pressure superiorly by removing the upper blades of a retractor (P = 0.02) and use of a caudally placed symmetrical retractor has been shown to reduce neuropathy. Positioning of the patient with ‘hands up’ positioning showed significant reduction in the incidence of brachial plexus injuries. Furthermore, how wide the retractor is opened and use of an asymmetrical retractor for internal mammary artery (IMA) harvesting are also important factors in quantifying risk of postoperative neuropathy. Wider sternal retraction and longer bypass time did increase the risk of developing postoperative neuropathy. Three asymmetrical retractors were looked at that demonstrates the Delacroix–Chevalier to be the safest (P < 0.05). We conclude that median sternotomy risks brachial plexus injury and where possible the sternum should be opened as small a distance as possible with symmetrical retractor and using a caudally placed retractor. PMID:23513004

  2. Surgical outcomes of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot wounds in adults

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The management of brachial plexus injuries due to gunshot wounds is a surgical challenge. Better surgical strategies based on clinical and electrophysiological patterns are needed. The aim of this study is to clarify the factors which may influence the surgical technique and outcome of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries. Methods Two hundred and sixty five patients who had brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries were included in this study. All of them were male with a mean age of 22 years. Twenty-three patients were improved with conservative treatment while the others underwent surgical treatment. The patients were classified and managed according to the locations, clinical and electrophysiological findings, and coexisting lesions. Results The wounding agent was shrapnel in 106 patients and bullet in 159 patients. Surgical procedures were performed from 6 weeks to 10 months after the injury. The majority of the lesions were repaired within 4 months were improved successfully. Good results were obtained in upper trunk and lateral cord lesions. The outcome was satisfactory if the nerve was intact and only compressed by fibrosis or the nerve was in-contunuity with neuroma or fibrosis. Conclusion Appropriate surgical techniques help the recovery from the lesions, especially in patients with complete functional loss. Intraoperative nerve status and the type of surgery significantly affect the final clinical outcome of the patients. PMID:19627573

  3. [Differential diagnostics of diseases of the brachial plexus].

    PubMed

    Ritter, C; Wunderlich, G; Macht, S; Schroeter, M; Fink, G R; Lehmann, H C

    2014-02-01

    Progressive, atrophic, asymmetrically distributed flaccid paresis of arm and hand muscles represents a frequent symptom of neuromuscular diseases that can be attributed to injury of the arm nerves, the plexus or the cervical roots. A timely and exact diagnosis is mandatory; however, the broad spectrum of differential diagnoses often represents a diagnostic challenge. A large variety of neuromuscular disorders need to be considered, encompassing autoimmune mediated inflammatory neuropathic conditions, such as multifocal motor neuropathy, as well as chronic degenerative and nerve compression disorders. This review provides an overview of the most frequent disorders of the upper plexus and cervical roots and summarizes the characteristic clinical features as well as electrodiagnostic and laboratory test results. In addition the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging and sonography is discussed. PMID:24343110

  4. Blockade of the brachial plexus abolishes activation of specific brain regions by electroacupuncture at LI4: a functional MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Weidong; Jiang, Wei; He, Jingwei; Liu, Songbin; Wang, Zhaoxin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to test the hypothesis that electroacupuncture (EA) at acupuncture point LI4 activates specific brain regions by nerve stimulation that is mediatied through a pathway involving the brachial plexus. Methods Twelve acupuncture naive right-handed volunteers were allocated to receive three sessions of EA at LI4 in a random different order (crossover): (1) EA alone (EA); EA after injection of local anaesthetics into the deltoid muscle (EA+LA); and (3) EA after blockade of the brachial plexus (EA+NB). During each session, participants were imaged in a 3 T MRI scanner. Brain regions showing change in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal (activation) were identified. Subjective acupuncture sensation was quantified after functional MRI scanning was completed. Results were compared between the three sessions for each individual, and averaged. Results Blockade of the brachial plexus inhibited acupuncture sensation during EA. EA and EA+LA activated the bilateral thalamus, basal ganglia, cerebellum and left putamen, whilst no significant activation was observed during EA+NB. The BOLD signal of the thalamus correlated significantly with acupuncture sensation score during EA. Conclusions Blockade of the brachial plexus completely abolishes patterns of brain activation induced by EA at LI4. The results suggest that EA activates specific brain regions through stimulation of the local nerves supplying the tissues at LI4, which transmit sensory information via the brachial plexus. Trial registration number ChiCTR-OO-13003389. PMID:26464415

  5. End-to-side nerve suture in traumatic injuries of brachial plexus: review of the literature and personal case series.

    PubMed

    Battiston, B; Artiaco, S; Conforti, L G; Vasario, G; Tos, P

    2009-10-01

    We used end-to-side nerve coaptation combined with standard end-to-end neurotisations to treat 11 patients who presented with complete (six cases) or incomplete (five cases) traumatic brachial plexus injuries. All patients were available for functional evaluation at a minimum of 2 years postoperatively. In three patients with shoulder abduction recovery, electromyographical studies (EMG) showed a contribution from the end-to-side neurotisation. In the remaining cases end-to-side neurotisations were unsuccessful. Our study did not demonstrate a reliable role for end-to-side nerve suture in brachial plexus surgery. We believe that at present end-to-side suture must not be a substitute for standard reconstructive techniques in brachial plexus surgery. Occasionally termino-lateral nerve sutures may represent a support to standard reconstructive procedures especially in case of severe injuries when few undamaged donor nerves are available. PMID:19587073

  6. Range of motion and strength after surgery for brachial plexus birth palsy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is little information about the range of motion (ROM) and strength of the affected upper limbs of patients with permanent brachial plexus birth palsy. Patients and methods 107 patients who had brachial plexus surgery in Finland between 1971 and 1998 were investigated in this population-based, cross-sectional, 12-year follow-up study. During the follow-up, 59 patients underwent secondary procedures. ROM and isometric strength of the shoulders, elbows, wrists, and thumbs were measured. Ratios for ROM and strength between the affected and unaffected sides were calculated. Results 61 patients (57%) had no active shoulder external rotation (median 0° (-75–90)). Median active abduction was 90° (1–170). Shoulder external rotation strength of the affected side was diminished (median ratio 28% (0–83)). Active elbow extension deficiency was recorded in 82 patients (median 25° (5–80)). Elbow flexion strength of the affected side was uniformly impaired (median ratio 43% (0–79)). Median active extension of the wrist was 55° (-70–90). The median ratio of grip strength for the affected side vs. the unaffected side was 68% (0–121). Patients with total injury had poorer ROM and strength than those with C5–6 injury. Incongruity of the radiohumeral joint and avulsion were associated with poor strength values. Interpretation ROM and strength of affected upper limbs of patients with surgically treated brachial plexus birth palsy were reduced. Patients with avulsion injuries and/or consequent joint deformities fared worst. PMID:21142823

  7. Effect of dexamethasone in low volume supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A double-blinded randomized clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Alarasan, Arun Kumar; Agrawal, Jitendre; Choudhary, Bhanu; Melhotra, Amrita; Uike, Satyendre; Mukherji, Arghya

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: With the use of ultrasound, a minimal effective volume of 20 ml has been described for supraclavicular brachial plexus block. However achieving a long duration of analgesia with this minimal volume remains a challenge. We aimed to determine the effect of dexamethasone on onset and duration of analgesia in low volume supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Material and Methods: Sixty patients were randomly divided into two groups of 30 each. Group C received saline (2 ml) + 20 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine and Group D received dexamethasone (8 mg) + 20 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Hemodynamic variables and visual analog scale (VAS) score were noted at regular intervals until 450 min. The onset and duration of sensory and motor block were measured. The incidence of “Halo” around brachial plexus was observed. Student's t-test and Chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. Results: The onset of sensory and motor block was significantly earlier in dexamethasone group (10.36 ± 1.99 and 12 ± 1.64) minutes compared to control group (12.9 ± 2.23 and 18.03 ± 2.41) minutes. The duration of sensory and motor block was significantly prolonged in dexamethasone group (366 ± 28.11 and 337.33 ± 28.75) minutes compared to control group (242.66 ± 26.38 and 213 ± 26.80) minutes. The VAS score was significantly lower in dexamethasone group after 210 min. “Halo” was present around the brachial plexus in all patients in both the groups. Conclusion: Dexamethasone addition significantly increases the duration of analgesia in patients receiving low volume supraclavicular brachial plexus block. No significant side-effects were seen in patients receiving dexamethasone as an adjunct. PMID:27275056

  8. Successful management of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 using single injection interscalene brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Fallatah, Summayah M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type 1 of the upper limb is a painful and debilitating condition. Interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) in conjugation with other modalities was shown to be a feasible therapy with variable success. We reported a case of CRPS type 1 as diagnosed by International Association for the Study of Pain criteria in which pharmacological approaches failed to achieve adequate pain relief and even were associated with progressive dysfunction of the upper extremity. Single injection ISB, in combination with physical therapy and botulinum toxin injection, was successful to alleviate pain with functional restoration. PMID:25422619

  9. Brachial plexus birth palsy: Management during the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Abid, A

    2016-02-01

    Brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) is defined as an injury to any nerve root of the brachial plexus during difficult delivery. BPBP is relatively rare; its incidence has remained constant over the last few decades, mostly due to unpredictable risk factors, such as shoulder dystocia. Both diagnosis and assessment of spontaneous recovery is based on clinical examination. Electromyography is difficult to interpret in the newborn and is therefore not meaningful. MRI of the cervical spine requires sedation or general anesthesia. Searching for a pre-ganglion tear prior to surgery is indicted. Prognosis depends on the level of the injury (pre- or post-ganglion), size and severity of the post-ganglion tears, speed of recovery, and quality of initial management. Although spontaneous recovery is frequent, some children suffer various degrees of sequelae, up to complete loss of function of the affected upper limb. Recent publications have improved general knowledge and indications for surgery. However, some aspects, such as indication and timing of nerve repair continue to be debated. PMID:26774906

  10. Dual Nerve Transfers for Restoration of Shoulder Function After Brachial Plexus Avulsion Injury.

    PubMed

    Chu, Bin; Wang, Huan; Chen, Liang; Gu, Yudong; Hu, Shaonan

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of shoulder function restoration by dual nerve transfers, spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve and 2 intercostal nerves to the anterior branch of the axillary nerve, in patients with shoulder paralysis that resulted from brachial plexus avulsion injury. It was a retrospective analysis to assess the impact of a variety of factors on reanimation of shoulder functions with dual nerve transfers. A total of 19 patients were included in this study. Most of these patients sustained avulsions of C5, C6, and C7 nerve roots (16 patients). Three of them had avulsions of C5 and C6 roots only. Through a posterior approach, direct coaptation of the intercostal nerves and the anterior branch of the axillary nerve was performed, along with accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve. Satisfactory shoulder function recovery (93.83° of shoulder abduction and 54.00° of external rotation on average) was achieved after a 62-month follow-up. This dual nerve transfer procedure provided us with a reliable and effective method for shoulder function reconstruction after brachial plexus root avulsion, especially C5/C6/C7 avulsion. The level of evidence is therapeutic IV. PMID:26835823

  11. The minimum effective concentration (MEC90 ) of ropivacaine for ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Fang, G; Wan, L; Mei, W; Yu, H H; Luo, A L

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the minimum effective concentration of ropivacaine for ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Fifty-one patients undergoing arm surgery received double-injection ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block using ropivacaine 40 ml. The concentration of ropivacaine administered to each patient started at 0.225% and then depended on the response of the previous one, based on a biased coin design up-and-down sequential method. In case of failure, the ropivacaine concentration was increased by 0.025% w/v in the next subject. In the case of a successful block, the next patient was randomised to the same concentration or a concentration 0.025% w/v less. Success was defined as complete sensory blockade of the brachial plexus 30 min after the block together with pain-free surgery. The minimum effective ropivacaine concentration in 90% of subjects was 0.257% w/v (95% CI 0.241-0.280%). PMID:26945818

  12. Recovery of brachial plexus lesions resulting from heavy backpack use: A follow-up case series

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Brachial plexus lesions as a consequence of carrying a heavy backpack have been reported, but the typical clinical course and long-term consequences are not clear. Here we evaluated the clinical course and pattern of recovery of backpack palsy (BPP) in a large series of patients. Methods Thirty-eight consecutive patients with idiopathic BPP were identified from our population of 193,450 Finnish conscripts by means of computerised register. A physiotherapist provided instructions for proper hand use and rehabilitative exercises at disease onset. The patients were followed up for 2 to 8 years from the diagnosis. We also searched for genetic markers of hereditary neuropathy with pressure palsies. Mann-Whitney U-test was used to analyze continuous data. The Fischer's exact test was used to assess two-way tables. Results Eighty percent of the patients recovered totally within 9 months after the onset of weakness. Prolonged symptoms occurred in 15% of the patients, but daily activities were not affected. The weight of the carried load at the symptom onset significantly affected the severity of the muscle strength loss in the physiotherapeutic testing at the follow-up. The initial electromyography did not predict recovery. Genetic testing did not reveal de novo hereditary neuropathy with pressure palsies. Conclusions The prognosis of BPP is favorable in the vast majority of cases. Electromyography is useful for diagnosis. To prevent brachial plexus lesions, backpack loads greater than 40 kg should be avoided. PMID:21429232

  13. MR Imaging of Brachial Plexus and Limb-Girdle Muscles in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gerevini, Simonetta; Agosta, Federica; Riva, Nilo; Spinelli, Edoardo G; Pagani, Elisabetta; Caliendo, Giandomenico; Chaabane, Linda; Copetti, Massimiliano; Quattrini, Angelo; Comi, Giancarlo; Falini, Andrea; Filippi, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    Purpose To assess brachial plexus magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features and limb-girdle muscle abnormalities as signs of muscle denervation in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Materials and Methods This study was approved by the local ethical committees on human studies, and written informed consent was obtained from all subjects before enrollment. By using an optimized protocol of brachial plexus MR imaging, brachial plexus and limb-girdle muscle abnormalities were evaluated in 23 patients with ALS and clinical and neurophysiologically active involvement of the upper limbs and were compared with MR images in 12 age-matched healthy individuals. Nerve root and limb-girdle muscle abnormalities were visually evaluated by two experienced observers. A region of interest-based analysis was performed to measure nerve root volume and T2 signal intensity. Measures obtained at visual inspection were analyzed by using the Wald χ(2) test. Mean T2 signal intensity and volume values of the regions of interest were compared between groups by using a hierarchical linear model, accounting for the repeated measurement design. Results The level of interrater agreement was very strong (κ = 0.77-1). T2 hyperintensity and volume alterations of C5, C6, and C7 nerve roots were observed in patients with ALS (P < .001 to .03). Increased T2 signal intensity of nerve roots was associated with faster disease progression (upper-limb Medical Research Council scale progression rate, r = 0.40; 95% confidence interval: 0.001, 0.73). Limb-girdle muscle alterations (ie, T2 signal intensity alteration, edema, atrophy) and fat infiltration also were found, in particular, in the supraspinatus muscle, showing more frequent T2 signal intensity alterations and edema (P = .01) relative to the subscapularis and infraspinatus muscles. Conclusion Increased T2 signal intensity and volume of brachial nerve roots do not exclude a diagnosis of ALS and suggest involvement of the peripheral

  14. Electrostimulation with or without ultrasound-guidance in interscalene brachial plexus block for shoulder surgery.

    PubMed

    Salem, Mohamed H; Winckelmann, Jörg; Geiger, Peter; Mehrkens, Hans-Hinrich; Salem, Khaled H

    2012-08-01

    In a prospective controlled trial to compare conventional interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) using anatomic landmarks and electro-stimulation with a combined technique of ultrasound guidance followed by nerve stimulation, 60 patients were randomized into 2 matched equal groups: Group A using nerve stimulation (NS) alone and Group B using the combination of ultrasound and NS. The time to detect the plexus (3.9 ± 4 min in Group A and 3.3 ± 1.4 min in Group B) was not significantly different. We needed to reposition the needle once (n = 13) or twice (n = 4) in Group B. First-shot motor response was achieved in all but one patient in Group A; here we were only able to locate the plexus by use of ultrasound. None of the patients needed general anaesthesia. There were no significant differences between postoperative pain, motor power, or patient's satisfaction. ISBPB seems similarly effective using electro-stimulation and ultrasound if performed by experienced anesthesiologists. PMID:22391670

  15. Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Hall, William H.; Li, Judy; Beckett, Laurel; Farwell, D. Gregory; Lau, Derick H.; Purdy, James A.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and treatment-related predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred thirty patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively screened using a standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from completion of radiation therapy was 56 months (range, 6-135 months). One-hundred fifty-five patients (47%) were treated by definitive radiation therapy, and 175 (53%) were treated postoperatively. Radiation doses ranged from 50 to 74 Gy (median, 66 Gy). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used in 62% of cases, and 133 patients (40%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Forty patients (12%) reported neuropathic symptoms, with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), motor weakness, and/or muscle atrophy (25%). When patients with <5 years of follow-up were excluded, the rate of positive symptoms increased to 22%. On univariate analysis, the following factors were significantly associated with brachial plexus symptoms: prior neck dissection (p = 0.01), concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001). Cox regression analysis confirmed that both neck dissection (p < 0.001) and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001) were independently predictive of symptoms. Conclusion: The incidence of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer may be underreported. In view of the dose-response relationship identified, limiting radiation dose to the brachial plexus should be considered when possible.

  16. Clinical Assessment of the Infant and Child Following Perinatal Brachial Plexus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Duff, Susan V.; DeMatteo, Carol

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Literature review INTRODUCTION After perinatal brachial plexus injury (PBPI), clinicians play an important role in injury classification as well as the assessment of recovery and secondary conditions. Early assessment guides the initial plan of care and influences follow-up and long-term outcome. PURPOSE To review methods used to assess, classify and monitor the extent and influence of PBPI with an emphasis on guidelines for clinicians. METHODS We use The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) model to provide a guide to assessment after PBPI for rehabilitation clinicians. DISCUSSION With information gained from targeted assessments, clinicians can design interventions to increase the opportunities infants and children have for optimal recovery and to attain skills that allow participation in areas of interest. PMID:25840493

  17. A low energy paediatric clavicle fracture associated with acute brachial plexus injury and subclavian artery compression.

    PubMed

    Gill, I; Quayle, J; Fox, M

    2013-03-01

    Paediatric clavicle fractures are common injuries presenting to orthopaedic surgeons. The majority of these represent midshaft low energy fractures, which in the vast majority of cases are treated non-operatively and recover rapidly. The main indications to consider operative intervention include high energy of injury, >2 cm shortening, open fractures and associated vascular or neurological injuries. Brachial plexus (BP) injuries are uncommon with variable outcomes. They often result from high energy motorcycle related accidents with potentially fatal associated injuries such as vascular disruption. Their management is complex, requiring expertise, and they are therefore usually managed in supraregional centres. We present a unique case of a low energy midshaft clavicle fracture in a paediatric patient in whom there was an acute BP injury and subclavian artery compression that has not been described previously. PMID:23484977

  18. Axillary artery pseudoaneurysm resulting in brachial plexus injury in a patient taking new oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Monem, Mohammed; Iskandarani, Mohamad Khalid; Gokaraju, Kishan

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the case of an independent 80-year-old Caucasian woman, being treated with new oral anticoagulants for a previous deep vein thrombosis, who had fallen on her right shoulder. She made a delayed presentation to the emergency department with a wrist drop in her right dominant hand. She had right arm bruising with good distal pulses but had a global neurological deficit in the hand. Plain radiographs of the shoulder, humerus, elbow, forearm and wrist demonstrated no fractures. MRI showed a significant right axillary lesion distorting the surrounding soft tissues, including the brachial plexus, and CT with contrast confirmed this to be a large axillary pseudoaneurysm. This was treated with an endovascular stent resulting in slightly improved motor function, but the significant residual deficit required subsequent rehabilitation to improve right upper limb function. PMID:27535738

  19. [Brachial plexus compression from supraclavicular encapsulated fat necrosis. A case report].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Páez, Miguel; de Miguel-Pueyo, Luis; Marín-Salido, Esteban José; Carrasco-Brenes, Antonio; Martín-Gallego, Alvaro; Arráez-Sánchez, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 44-year-old male, lacking clinical history of previous illness, who had surgery at our hospital to treat a mass in the supraclavicular space. The patient presented with a 1-month progressive distal paresis of the left arm. The histo-pathological examination of the mass revealed an encapsulated fat necrosis. Fat necrosis is characterised by cystic architecture, encapsulation with fat necrosis within, and inflammatory infiltration of its walls. Neural structure compression secondary to this tumour mass is very rare. Fat necrosis is more frequent in the lower limbs, in areas exposed to trauma. This article is the first report of brachial plexus compression due to supraclavicular fat necrosis. PMID:24837841

  20. Brachial plexus neuropathy secondary to septic arthritis and osteomyelitis: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y C; Lin, F K; Hung, K L; Wu, D Y

    1994-01-01

    Two infants, delivered uneventfully, later developed right brachial plexus palsy secondary to pyogenic osteomyelitis and arthritis of the right shoulder joint. Weakness of right arms occurred at the sixth and tenth days of age respectively. Both had right arm tenderness on palpation and passive movement. Roentgenograms of their right shoulder joints showed irregular radiolucency of the proximal margin of right humerus head. In both cases, electromyography revealed various degrees of significant denervation pattern for the C5-C7 innervated muscles. Pus culture from right shoulder joints grew Streptococcus viridans and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. After antibiotic therapy and arthrotomy with drainage, weakness improved gradually following continuous rehabilitation. Follow-up at six months of age showed almost complete recovery of right upper extremity function in one patient, but mild residual weakness in the other. Follow-up electromyography studies showed continued improvement. The possible mechanism of this rare occurrence is discussed. PMID:7942033

  1. Clinical aspects of patients with traumatic lesions of the brachial plexus following surgical treatment☆

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Frederico Barra; Kwae, Mário Yoshihide; da Silva, Ricardo Pereira; Porto, Celmo Celeno; Magalhães, Daniel de Paiva; Paulino, Matheus Veloso

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate sociodemographic and clinical aspects of patients undergoing operations due to traumatic lesions of the brachial plexus. Method This was a retrospective study in which the medical files of a convenience sample of 48 patients operated between 2000 and 2010 were reviewed. The following were evaluated: (1) range of motion (ROM) of the shoulder, elbow and wrist/hand, in degrees; (2) grade of strength of the shoulder, elbow and wrist/hand; (3) sensitivity; and (4) visual analogue scale (VAS) (from 0 to 10). The Student's t, chi-square, Friedman, Wilcoxon and Kruskal–Wallis tests were used (p < 0.05). Results The patients’ mean age was 30.6 years; 60.4% of them had suffered motorcycle accidents and 52.1%, multiple trauma. The mean length of time until surgery was 8.7 months (range: 2–48). Thirty-one patients (64.6%) presented complete rupture of the plexus. The frequent operation was neurosurgery in 39 cases (81.3%). The ROM achieved was ≥30° in 20 patients (41.6%), with a range from 30° to 90° and mean of 73° (p = 0.001). Thirteen (27.1%) already had shoulder strength ≥M3 (p = 0.001). Twenty-seven patients (56.2%) had elbow flexion ≥80°, with a range from 30° to 160° and mean of 80.6° (p < 0.001). Twenty-two had strength ≥M3 (p < 0.001). Twenty-two patients (45.8%) had wrist extension ≥30° starting from flexion of 45°, with a range from 30° to 90° and mean of 70° (p = 0.003). Twenty-seven (56.3%) presented wrist/hand extension strength ≥M3 (p = 0.002). Forty-five (93.8%) had hypoesthesia and three (6.2%) had anesthesia (p = 0.006). The initial VAS was 4.5 (range: 1.0–9.0) and the final VAS was 3.0 (range: 1.0–7.0) (p < 0.001). Conclusion Traumatic lesions of the brachial plexus were more prevalent among young adults (21–40 years), men, people living in urban areas, manual workers and motorcycle accidents, with multiple trauma and total rupture of the plexus. Neurosurgery, with a second

  2. Anatomical variations in the brachial plexus roots: implications for diagnosis of neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leonhard, Vanessa; Smith, Riley; Caldwell, Gregory; Smith, Heather F

    2016-07-01

    Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS) is the most common type of TOS. Typically it results from impingement of the neurovasculature as it passes between the anterior and middle scalene muscles; this classic anatomical relationship being the foundation of clinical diagnosis. Positional testing relies on vascular compromise occurring when the subclavian artery is compressed in this space. This study describes several anatomical variations observed in this relationship. Sixty-five cadavers (35m/30f) were assessed to determine the frequency and extent of brachial plexus branching variants. A total of thirty-one variations from "classic" anatomy were observed (47.7%). In two specimens (3.1%), the entire superior trunk coursed completely anterior to the anterior scalene in a position of relative vulnerability. In 27 instances, a portion of or the entire superior trunk pierced the anterior scalene muscle, and in two, the middle trunk also pierced the muscle belly. Interestingly, while two bilateral branching variations were observed, the majority occurred unilaterally, and almost exclusively on the left side. There were no sex differences in frequency. The high frequency of these variations and their potential to predispose patients to neurogenic TOS suggest that current diagnostic methods may be insufficient in clinical diagnosis. Due to lack of vascular compromise, patients with the piercing variant would not display positive signs on the traditional positional tests. The use of ultrasound to determine the route of the brachial plexus could determine whether this variation is present in patients who suffer from TOS symptoms but lack a diagnosis based on traditional positional testing. PMID:27133185

  3. Progressive Brachial Plexus Palsy after Osteosynthesis of an Inveterate Clavicular Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Rosati, Marco; Andreani, Lorenzo; Poggetti, Andrea; Zampa, Virna; Parchi, Paolo; Lisanti, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a rare complication of clavicular fracture, occurring in 0.5-9% of cases. In the literature from 1965 – 2010, 425 cases of TOS complicating a claviclular fracture were described. However, only 5 were observed after a surgical procedure of reduction and fixation. The causes of this complication were due to the presence of an exuberant callus, to technical surgery errors or to vascular lesions. In this paper we describe a case of brachial plexus plasy after osteosynthesis of clavicle fracture Case Report: A 48 year old female, presented to us with inveterate middle third clavicle fracture of 2 months duration. She was an alcoholic, smoker with an history of opiate abuse and was HCV positive. At two month the fracture was displaced with no signs of union and open rigid fixation with plate was done. The immediate postoperative patient had signs of neurologic injury. Five days after surgery showed paralysis of the ulnar nerve, at 10 days paralysis of the median nerve, radial and ulnar paresthesias in the territory of the C5-C6-C7-C8 roots. She was treated with rest, steroids and neurotrophic drugs. One month after surgery the patient had signs of complete denervation around the brachial plexus. Implant removal was done and in a month ulnar and median nerve functions recovered. At three months post implant removal the neurological picture returned to normal. Conclusion: We can say that TOS can be seen as arising secondary to an “iatrogenic compartment syndrome” justified by the particular anatomy of the space cost joint. The appropriateness of the intervention for removal of fixation devices is demonstrated by the fact that the patient has returned to her daily activities in the absence of symptoms and good functional recovery in about three months, despite fracture nonunion. PMID:27298912

  4. Clonidine as an adjuvant to ropivacaine-induced supraclavicular brachial plexus block for upper limb surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Kalyani Nilesh; Singh, Noopur Dasmit

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Ropivacaine is a new amide, long acting, pure S-enantiomer, local anesthetic, with differential blocking effect. The addition of clonidine to local anesthetic improves the quality of peripheral nerve blocks. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of clonidine on characteristics of ropivacaine-induced supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Material and Methods: A total of 60 adult patients were randomly recruited to two groups of 30 each: Group I: 30 ml 0.75% ropivacaine + 1 ml normal saline. Group II: 30 ml 0.75% ropivacaine + 1 mcg/kg clonidine diluted to 1 ml with normal saline. Results: The onset of sensorimotor block was earlier in Group II (4.36 ± 0.81 min for sensory block and 9.83 ± 1.12 min for motor block) than in Group I (4.84 ± 0.65 min for sensory block and 10.85 ± 0.79 min for motor block). The duration of both sensory and motor block were significantly prolonged by clonidine (P < 0.001). The duration of analgesia was also prolonged in patients receiving clonidine (613.10 ± 51.797 min vs. 878.33 ± 89.955 min). Although incidence of hypotension and bradycardia was higher in Group II when compared to Group I, it was not clinically significant. Conclusions: Ropivacaine 0.75% is well-tolerated and provides effective surgical anesthesia as well as relief of postoperative pain. Clonidine as an adjuvant to ropivacaine significantly enhances the quality of supraclavicular brachial plexus block by faster onset, prolonged duration of sensory and motor block and improved postoperative analgesia, without associated adverse effects at the dose used. PMID:26330717

  5. Dose–Volume Modeling of Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Findings From a Prospective Screening Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Daly, Megan E.; Cui, Jing; Hall, William H.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Phillips, Theodore L.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Purdy, James A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Data from a prospective screening protocol administered for patients previously irradiated for head-and-neck cancer was analyzed to identify dosimetric predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred fifty-two patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were prospectively screened from August 2007 to April 2013 using a standardized self-administered instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from radiation therapy was 40 months (range, 6-111 months). A total of 177 patients (50%) underwent neck dissection. Two hundred twenty-one patients (63%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Fifty-one patients (14%) reported brachial plexus-related neuropathic symptoms with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), and motor weakness and/or muscle atrophy (25%). The 3- and 5-year estimates of freedom from brachial plexus-associated neuropathy were 86% and 81%, respectively. Clinical/pathological N3 disease (P<.001) and maximum radiation dose to the ipsilateral brachial plexus (P=.01) were significantly associated with neuropathic symptoms. Cox regression analysis revealed significant dose–volume effects for brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. The volume of the ipsilateral brachial plexus receiving >70 Gy (V70) predicted for symptoms, with the incidence increasing with V70 >10% (P<.001). A correlation was also observed for the volume receiving >74 Gy (V74) among patients treated without neck dissection, with a cutoff of 4% predictive of symptoms (P=.038). Conclusions: Dose–volume guidelines were developed for radiation planning that may limit brachial plexus-related neuropathies.

  6. Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block With or Without Dexamethasone as an Adjuvant to 0.5% Levobupivacaine: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhupal, Jatinder Paul Singh; Kumar, Parmod; Gandhi, Gurjit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Brachial plexus block is an excellent method for attaining optimal operating conditions by producing complete muscular relaxation, maintaining stable intraoperative haemodynamics and the associated sympathetic block. In addition, they provide extended postoperative analgesia with minimal side effects. Different adjuvants have been described in literature to hasten the onset and prolong the duration of block. The present study was conducted to study the effect of adding dexamethasone to levobupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Aim To observe the effect of dexamethasone on onset and duration of anaesthesia, when used as an adjuvant to levobupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Materials and Methods A total of 60 patients in the age group of 18-65 years belonging to ASA physical status I or II were included in the study. They are randomly allocated in two groups and each group included 30 patients. In group 1, patients received 30ml of 0.5% isobaric levobupivacaine with 2ml of isotonic sodium chloride. In group 2 patients received 8mg (2ml) dexamethasone in addition to 30ml of 0.5% isobaric levobupivacaine. Results The results showed that the onset of sensory and motor block were faster in group 2(p<0.05). The duration of sensory and motor block were significantly longer in group 2 (p<0.05). VAS score at 12 hours were significantly lower in group 2 (p<0.05). None of the patients had bradycardia, hypotension or any other side effects. Conclusion Dexamethasone added to levobupivacaine for supraclavicular brachial plexus block reduces the time to onset of sensory and motor blockage and prolongs the duration of analgesia. PMID:27504384

  7. Unusual and Unique Variant Branches of Lateral Cord of Brachial Plexus and its Clinical Implications- A Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Padur, Ashwini Aithal; Shanthakumar, Swamy Ravindra; Shetty, Surekha Devadas; Prabhu, Gayathri Sharath; Patil, Jyothsna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adequate knowledge on variant morphology of brachial plexus and its branches are important in clinical applications pertaining to trauma and surgical procedures of the upper extremity. Aim Current study was aimed to report variations of the branches of the lateral cord of brachial plexus in the axilla and their possible clinical complications. Materials and Methods Total number of 82 upper limbs from 41 formalin embalmed cadavers was dissected. Careful observation was made to note the formation and branching pattern of lateral cord. Meticulous inspection for absence of branches, presence of additional or variant branches and presence of abnormal communications between its branches or with branches of other cords was carried out. Results In the present study, we noted varied branching pattern of lateral cord in 6 out of 82 limbs (7%). In one of the limb, the median nerve was formed by three roots; two from lateral cord and one from medial cord. Two limbs had absence of lateral pectoral nerve supplemented by medial pectoral nerves. One of which had an atypical ansa pectoralis. In 2 upper limbs, musculocutaneous nerve was absent and in both cases it was supplemented by median nerve. In one of the limb, coracobrachialis had dual nerve supply by musculocutaneous nerve and by an additional branch from the lateral cord. Conclusion Variations of brachial plexus and its branches could pose both intraoperative and postoperative complications which eventually affect the normal sensory and motor functions of the upper limb. PMID:27190783

  8. Magnetic stimulation of the radial nerve in dogs and cats with brachial plexus trauma: a report of 53 cases.

    PubMed

    Van Soens, Iris; Struys, Michel M; Polis, Ingeborgh E; Bhatti, Sofie F; Van Meervenne, Sofie A; Martlé, Valentine A; Nollet, Heidi; Tshamala, Mulenda; Vanhaesebrouck, An E; Van Ham, Luc M

    2009-10-01

    Brachial plexus trauma is a common clinical entity in small animal practice and prognostic indicators are essential early in the course of the disease. Magnetic stimulation of the radial nerve and consequent recording of the magnetic motor evoked potential (MMEP) was examined in 36 dogs and 17 cats with unilateral brachial plexus trauma. Absence of deep pain perception (DPP), ipsilateral loss of panniculus reflex, partial Horner's syndrome and a poor response to MMEP were related to the clinical outcome in 29 of the dogs and 13 of the cats. For all animals, a significant difference was found in MMEP between the normal and the affected limb. Absence of DPP and unilateral loss of the panniculus reflex were indicative of an unsuccessful outcome in dogs. Additionally, the inability to evoke a MMEP was associated with an unsuccessful outcome in all animals. It was concluded that magnetic stimulation of the radial nerve in dogs and cats with brachial plexus trauma may provide an additional diagnostic and prognostic tool. PMID:18602850

  9. Evaluating the acromion marker cluster as a method for measuring scapular orientation in children with brachial plexus birth palsy.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Kristen F; Russo, Stephanie A; Kozin, Scott H; Zlotolow, Dan A; Hulbert, Robert L; Rowley, K Michael; Richards, James G

    2014-02-01

    Several studies have described using an acromion marker cluster for measuring scapular orientation in healthy adults performing planar motions. It is unknown whether the acromion marker cluster method will provide the same level of accuracy in children with brachial plexus birth palsy. This study compared this method to palpation for calculating scapular orientation in children with brachial plexus birth palsy performing clinically relevant movements. Scapular orientation in ten patients was determined by palpation and an acromion marker cluster in neutral and six Modified Mallet positions. RMSEs and mean relative errors were calculated. Resultant RMSEs ranged from 5.2 degrees to 21.4 degrees. The averages of the mean relative errors across all positions for each axis were 177.4% for upward/downward rotation, 865.0% for internal/external rotation, and 166.2% for anterior/posterior tilt. The acromion marker cluster method did not accurately measure scapular rotation relative to the total movement on an individual or group basis in the population. With most relative errors over 100%, the acromion marker cluster method often produced errors larger than the actual measured motion. The accuracy of the acromion marker cluster method limits its use as a clinical tool for measuring scapular kinematics on children with brachial plexus birth palsy. PMID:24676519

  10. Hands-up positioning during asymmetric sternal retraction for internal mammary artery harvest: a possible method to reduce brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Jellish, W S; Blakeman, B; Warf, P; Slogoff, S

    1997-02-01

    This study compares the hands-up (HU) with the arms at side (AAS) position to determine whether one is beneficial in reducing brachial plexus stress during asymmetric sternal retraction. Eighty patients undergoing cardiac surgery were assigned to either Group 1 (AAS) or Group 2 (HU). Perioperative neurologic evaluations of the brachial plexus were performed and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) were collected during internal mammary artery harvest using asymmetric sternal retraction. Demographic data, SSEP changes, and postoperative brachial plexus symptoms were compared between groups. SSEP amplitude decreased in 95% of all patients during retractor placement with substantial decreases (> 50%) observed on the left side in 50% of the AAS and 35% of the HU patients. Amplitude recovery was normally seen in both groups after asymmetric retractor removal. Similar changes were noted, to a lesser degree, on the right side. During asymmetric sternal retraction, HU positioning offered minimal benefit in reducing brachial plexus stress as measured by SSEP. Three of the seven AAS patients who reported brachial plexus symptoms had an ulnar nerve distribution of injury. However, none of the four patients with plexus symptoms in the HU group had ulnar nerve problems, suggesting that the higher incidence of postoperative symptoms observed with AAS positioning may occur from ulnar nerve compression. PMID:9024012

  11. Comparison of the Vertical and the Highest Point of Shoulder Methods in Brachial Plexus Block

    PubMed Central

    S, Kiritoglu; G, Basaranoglu; M, Comlekci; M, Suren; K, Erkalp; G, Teker; L, Saidoglu

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aim: Brachial plexus block by the highest point of the shoulder method may decrease the rate of complication in comparing with the vertical method because the needle is more lateral in the former. We aimed to investigate the highest point of the shoulder block technique against the vertical infraclavicular plexus method regarding the success rates and complications. Patients and Methods: Thirty patients with ASA I-III undergoing elective surgery were included in this study. Patients were divided into two groups, randomly. Group 1 was the highest point of the shoulder method (n of 15), and goup 2 was the vertical approach technique (n of 15). The extensor motor response of hand, wrist and elbow (The target nerves in the operation area: n. medianus, n. ulnaris, n. radialis and n. musculocutanaeus) was obtained by neurostimulation technique. Then, 30 ml bupivacaine (0.5%) was used for the initial block. Spread of analgesia and sensory and motor blocks were evaluated every 5 minutes by an anesthesiologist who was blind to the block techniques. Statistical Analysis: T-test and Mann-Whitney U test were used. Results: Successful block was achieved in all patients in both groups. There was no difference among the groups for the onset of block and the duration of block (both sensory and motor), the number of attempt, and the depth of the neddle. One patient developed pneumothorax in group 2. Procedure time of the block was longer in group 2 than in group 1 (p<0.05). Conclusions: The highest point of shoulder method with a less complication rate and shorter procedure time has a comparable success rate to vertical approach technique. PMID:23675114

  12. Imaging assessment of glenohumeral dysplasia secondary to brachial plexus birth palsy*

    PubMed Central

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete; Dalto, Vitor Faeda; Crema, Michel Daoud; Waters, Peter M.; Gregio-Junior, Everaldo; Mazzer, Nilton; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess imaging parameters related to the morphology of the glenohumeral joint in children with unilateral brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP), in comparison with those obtained for healthy shoulders. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective search for cases of unilateral BPBP diagnosed at our facility. Only patients with a clinical diagnosis of unilateral BPBP were included, and the final study sample consisted of 10 consecutive patients who were assessed with cross-sectional imaging. The glenoid version, the translation of the humeral head, and the degrees of glenohumeral dysplasia were assessed. Results The mean diameter of the affected humeral heads was 1.93 cm, compared with 2.33 cm for those of the normal limbs. In two cases, there was no significant posterior displacement of the humeral head, five cases showed posterior subluxation of the humeral head, and the remaining three cases showed total luxation of the humeral head. The mean glenoid version angle of the affected limbs (90-α) was -9.6º, versus +1.6º for the normal, contralateral limbs. Conclusion The main deformities found in this study were BPBP-associated retroversion of the glenoid cavity, developmental delay of the humeral head, and posterior translation of the humeral head. PMID:27403013

  13. Balance Impairments after Brachial Plexus Injury as Assessed through Clinical and Posturographic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Lidiane; Lemos, Thiago; Silva, Débora C.; de Oliveira, José M.; Guedes Corrêa, José F.; Tavares, Paulo L.; Oliveira, Laura A.; Rodrigues, Erika C.; Vargas, Claudia D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether a sensorimotor deficit of the upper limb following a brachial plexus injury (BPI) affects the upright balance. Design: Eleven patients with a unilateral BPI and 11 healthy subjects were recruited. The balance assessment included the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the number of feet touches on the ground while performing a 60 s single-leg stance and posturographic assessment (eyes open and feet placed hip-width apart during a single 60 s trial). The body weight distribution (BWD) between the legs was estimated from the center of pressure (COP) lateral position. The COP variability was quantified in the anterior-posterior and lateral directions. Results: BPI patients presented lower BBS scores (p = 0.048) and a higher frequency of feet touches during the single-leg stance (p = 0.042) compared with those of the healthy subjects. An asymmetric BWD toward the side opposite the affected arm was shown by 73% of BPI patients. Finally, higher COP variability was observed in BPI patients compared with healthy subjects for anterior-posterior (p = 0.020), but not for lateral direction (p = 0.818). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that upper limb sensorimotor deficits following BPI affect body balance, serving as a warning for the clinical community about the need to prevent and treat the secondary outcomes of this condition. PMID:26834610

  14. Reduced functional connectivity within the primary motor cortex of patients with brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Fraiman, D; Miranda, M F; Erthal, F; Buur, P F; Elschot, M; Souza, L; Rombouts, S A R B; Schimmelpenninck, C A; Norris, D G; Malessy, M J A; Galves, A; Vargas, C D

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at the effects of traumatic brachial plexus lesion with root avulsions (BPA) upon the organization of the primary motor cortex (M1). Nine right-handed patients with a right BPA in whom an intercostal to musculocutaneous (ICN-MC) nerve transfer was performed had post-operative resting state fMRI scanning. The analysis of empirical functional correlations between neighboring voxels revealed faster correlation decay as a function of distance in the M1 region corresponding to the arm in BPA patients as compared to the control group. No differences between the two groups were found in the face area. We also investigated whether such larger decay in patients could be attributed to a gray matter diminution in M1. Structural imaging analysis showed no difference in gray matter density between groups. Our findings suggest that the faster decay in neighboring functional correlations without significant gray matter diminution in BPA patients could be related to a reduced activity in intrinsic horizontal connections in M1 responsible for upper limb motor synergies. PMID:27547727

  15. High prevalence of early language delay exists among toddlers with neonatal brachial plexus palsy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kate Wan-Chu; Yang, Lynda J-S.; Driver, Lynn; Nelson, Virginia S.

    2016-01-01

    AIM Association of language impairment with neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) has not been reported in the literature. The current treatment paradigm for NBPP focuses on upper extremity motor recovery with little formal assessment of other aspects of development, such as language. We performed a cross-sectional pilot study to investigate early language delay prevalence in toddlers with NBPP and potential NBPP-related factors involved. METHOD Twenty toddlers with NBPP were consecutively recruited (12 males, 8 females; mean age 30 mos). Preschool Language Scale Score (4th edition), demographics, and socioeconomic status were collected. NBPP-related factors such as palsy side, treatment type, Narakas grade, muscle MRC score, and Raimondi hand score were reported. Student t test, chi-square, or Fisher exact test were applied. Statistical significance level was established at p<0.05. RESULTS Of study participants, 30% were diagnosed with language delay, while the prevalence of language delay in the population with normal development in this age range was approximately 5-15%. INTERPRETATION We observed high language delay prevalence among toddlers with NBPP. Although our subject sample is small, our findings warrant further study of this phenomenon. Early identification and timely intervention based on type of language impairment may be critical for improving communication outcome in this population. PMID:25160543

  16. Comparison of the Supraclavicular, Infraclavicular and Axillary Approaches for Ultrasound-Guided Brachial Plexus Block for Surgical Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Stav, Anatoli; Reytman, Leonid; Stav, Michael-Yohay; Portnoy, Isaak; Kantarovsky, Alexander; Galili, Offer; Luboshitz, Shmuel; Sevi, Roger; Sternberg, Ahud

    2016-01-01

    Objective We hypothesized that ultrasound (US)-guided technique of the supra- and infraclavicular and axillary approaches of brachial plexus block (BPB) will produce a high quality of surgical anesthesia for operations below the shoulder independently of the approach and body mass index (BMI). Intercostobrachial and medial brachial cutaneous nerves will be blocked separately because they are not a part of the brachial plexus. Methods This is a prospective randomized observer-blinded study. The three approaches of the US-guided BPB without neurostimulation were compared for quality, performance time, and correlation between performance time and BMI. Intercostobrachial and medial brachial cutaneous nerve blocks were used in all patients. Results A total of 101 patients were randomized into three groups: SCL (supraclavicular), ICL (infraclavicular), and AX (axillary). Seven patients were excluded due to various factors. All three groups were similar in demographic data, M:F proportion, preoperative diagnosis and type of surgery, anesthesiologists who performed the block, and surgical staff that performed the surgical intervention. The time between the end of the block performance and the start of the operation was also similar. The quality of the surgical anesthesia and discomfort during the operation were identical following comparison between groups. No direct positive correlation was observed between BMI and the block performance time. The time for the axillary block was slightly longer than the time for the supra- and infraclavicular approaches, but it had no practical clinical significance. Transient Horner syndrome was observed in three patients in the SCL group. No other adverse effects or complications were observed. Conclusions All three approaches can be used for US-guided BPB with similar quality of surgical anesthesia for operations of below the shoulder. A block of the intercostobrachial and medial brachial cutaneous nerves is recommended. Obesity is not

  17. The investigation of traumatic lesions of the brachial plexus by electromyography and short latency somatosensory potentials evoked by stimulation of multiple peripheral nerves.

    PubMed Central

    Yiannikas, C; Shahani, B T; Young, R R

    1983-01-01

    A study of 10 patients with brachial plexus trauma was performed to determine whether the diagnostic accuracy of sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) may be improved by using stimulation of multiple peripheral nerves (median, radial, musculocutaneous and ulnar). In addition, the relative advantages of SEPs and peripheral electrophysiological studies were considered. SEP patterns following most common brachial plexus lesions were predictable. Injuries to the upper trunk affected the musculocutaneous and radial SEPs predominantly. Lower trunk or medial cord lesions primarily affected ulnar SEPs. Diffuse brachial plexus lesions affected SEPs from all stimulation sites. In the majority of cases, the necessary information was obtainable from conventional EMG: however, for lesions involving the upper segments only, SEP techniques were more useful. It is suggested that selective SEPs from appropriate peripheral nerves when interpreted in combination with conventional EMG may add useful additional information. PMID:6317804

  18. Clonidine as an adjuvant for ultrasound guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block for upper extremity surgeries under tourniquet: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kumkum; Tiwari, Vaibhav; Gupta, Prashant K; Pandey, Mahesh Narayan; Singhal, Apoorva B; Shubham, Garg

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Clonidine has been used as an adjuvant to local anesthetic to extend the duration of block. The present study was aimed to compare the onset and duration of sensory and motor blockade of 0.75% ropivacaine alone or in combination with clonidine during ultrasound guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block for upper extremity surgeries under tourniquet. Materials and Methods: Sixty four adult American Society of Anesthesiologist grade 1 and 2 patients, scheduled for upper extremity surgeries were randomized to receive either 19.8 mL of 0.75% ropivacaine with 0.2 mL of normal saline (Group R) or 0.2 mL (30 μg) of clonidine (Group RC) in supraclavicular block. Onset and duration of sensory and motor blockade was compared. The hemodynamic variability, sedation, respiratory adequacy and any other adverse effects were also recorded. Result: Ultrasound helped to visualize the nerves, needle and spread of local anesthetic at the brachial plexus block site. There was no statistically significant difference in the onset of sensory and motor blockade between the groups. Surgical anesthesia was achieved at the mean time of 20 min in all patients. Prolonged post-operative analgesia (mean duration 956 min) was observed in RC group as compared with R group (736 min). No complication of technique or adverse effect of ropivacaine and clonidine was reported. Conclusion: Clonidine as an adjuvant to ropivacaine for ultrasound guided supraclavicular brachial plexus enhanced duration of post-operative analgesia. There was no incidence of vessel puncture or pneumothorax. PMID:25425780

  19. A comparative study of clonidine and dexmedetomidine as an adjunct to bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Archana; Sharma, Khushboo; Somvanshi, Mukesh; Samal, Rajib Lochan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Various additives are mixed with local anesthetic agents to increase the quality of block in regional anesthesia. We compared clonidine and dexmedetomidine as an adjunct to bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block with respect to the onset and duration of sensory and motor block and duration of analgesia. Material and Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists Grades I and II patients scheduled for various orthopedic surgeries of the upper limb under supraclavicular brachial plexus block were divided into two equal groups in a randomized, double-blind manner. Patients were assigned randomly to one of the two groups. In Group C (n = 30), 39 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine plus 1 ml (1 μg/kg) clonidine and in Group D (n = 30), 39 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine plus 1 ml (1 μg/kg) dexmedetomidine were given. The onset and duration of sensory and motor block, duration of analgesia, and quality of anesthesia were studied in both the groups. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the onset of sensory and motor block in both the groups. The durations of sensory and motor block were 316.67 ± 45.21 and 372.67 ± 44.48 min, respectively, in Group C, whereas they were 502.67 ± 43.78 and 557.67 ± 38.83 min, respectively, in Group D. The duration of analgesia was 349.33 ± 42.91 min, significantly less in Group C compared to 525.33 ± 42.89 min in Group D (P < 0.001). The quality of anesthesia was significantly better in dexmedetomidine group compared to clonidine group (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The addition of dexmedetomidine prolongs the durations of sensory and motor block and duration of analgesia and improves the quality of anesthesia as compared with clonidine when injected with bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block. PMID:27625483

  20. Local injection of autologous bone marrow cells to regenerate muscle in patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury

    PubMed Central

    Hogendoorn, S.; Duijnisveld, B. J.; van Duinen, S. G.; Stoel, B. C.; van Dijk, J. G.; Fibbe, W. E.; Nelissen, R. G. H. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Traumatic brachial plexus injury causes severe functional impairment of the arm. Elbow flexion is often affected. Nerve surgery or tendon transfers provide the only means to obtain improved elbow flexion. Unfortunately, the functionality of the arm often remains insufficient. Stem cell therapy could potentially improve muscle strength and avoid muscle-tendon transfer. This pilot study assesses the safety and regenerative potential of autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cell injection in partially denervated biceps. Methods Nine brachial plexus patients with insufficient elbow flexion (i.e., partial denervation) received intramuscular escalating doses of autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells, combined with tendon transfers. Effect parameters included biceps biopsies, motor unit analysis on needle electromyography and computerised muscle tomography, before and after cell therapy. Results No adverse effects in vital signs, bone marrow aspiration sites, injection sites, or surgical wound were seen. After cell therapy there was a 52% decrease in muscle fibrosis (p = 0.01), an 80% increase in myofibre diameter (p = 0.007), a 50% increase in satellite cells (p = 0.045) and an 83% increase in capillary-to-myofibre ratio (p < 0.001) was shown. CT analysis demonstrated a 48% decrease in mean muscle density (p = 0.009). Motor unit analysis showed a mean increase of 36% in motor unit amplitude (p = 0.045), 22% increase in duration (p = 0.005) and 29% increase in number of phases (p = 0.002). Conclusions Mononuclear cell injection in partly denervated muscle of brachial plexus patients is safe. The results suggest enhanced muscle reinnervation and regeneration. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:38–47. PMID:24565688

  1. Preoperative interscalene brachial plexus block aids in perioperative temperature management during arthroscopic shoulder surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Se Hun; Lee, Wonjin; Park, JaeGwan; Kim, Myoung-hun; Cho, Kwangrae; Lee, Jeong Han; Cheong, Soon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypothermia is common during arthroscopic shoulder surgery under general anesthesia, and anesthetic-impaired thermoregulation is thought to be the major cause of hypothermia. This prospective, randomized, double-blind study was designed to compare perioperative temperature during arthroscopic shoulder surgery with interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) followed by general anesthesia vs. general anesthesia alone. Methods Patients scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery were randomly allocated to receive IBPB followed by general anesthesia (group GB, n = 20) or general anesthesia alone (group GO, n = 20), and intraoperative and postoperative body temperatures were measured. Results The initial body temperatures were 36.5 ± 0.3℃ vs. 36.4 ± 0.4℃ in group GB vs. GO, respectively (P = 0.215). The body temperature at 120 minutes after induction of anesthesia was significantly higher in group GB than in group GO (35.8 ± 0.3℃ vs. 34.9 ± 0.3℃; P < 0.001). The body temperatures at 60 minutes after admission to the post-anesthesia care unit were 35.8 ± 0.3℃ vs. 35.2 ± 0.2℃ in group GB vs. GO, respectively (P < 0.001). The concentrations of desflurane at 0, 15, and 120 minutes after induction of anesthesia were 6.0 vs. 6.0% (P = 0.330), 5.0 ± 0.8% vs. 5.8 ± 0.4% (P = 0.001), and 3.4 ± 0.4% vs. 7.1 ± 0.9% (P < 0.001) in group GB vs. GO, respectively. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that preoperative IBPB could reduce both the intraoperative concentration of desflurane and the reduction in body temperature during and after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. PMID:27482313

  2. Incidence of hemidiaphragmatic paresis after peripheral nerve stimulator versus ultrasound guided interscalene brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Ghodki, Poonam Sachin; Singh, Noopur Dasmit

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: We compared interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) using peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) and ultrasound (US) techniques. The primary outcomes were the incidence of hemidiaphragmatic paresis (HDP) and the duration of the block. Secondary outcomes were the block success rate, time to conduct the block, onset of sensory block, and dermatomal spread, postoperative pain by Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), duration of postoperative analgesia and incidence of complications. Material and Methods: We conducted a prospective, randomized, and observer-blinded study in 60 patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy under block plus general anesthesia. ISBPB was performed with 10 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine using either PNS (Group PNS, n = 30) or US (Group US, n = 30). Hemidiaphragmatic function, the primary outcome, was assessed by ultrasonographic evaluation of diaphragmatic movement and pulmonary function tests using a bedside spirometer (forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s and peak expiratory flow rate). General anesthesia was administered to all the patients for surgery. P < 0.05 test was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Twelve patients in Group PNS had HDP and none in Group US (P < 0.0001). PFTs were also significantly reduced in Group PNS (P < 0.0001). The time to conduct the block and sensory onset time both were less in Group US (P < 0.05). The groups did not differ in block success rate, duration of analgesia, and NRS. Other complications like incidence of Horner's syndrome and vascular puncture were comparable in both the groups. Conclusions: PNS guided ISBPB with 10 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine is associated with a higher incidence of HDP as compared to US guided ISBPB. There is no significant difference in quality or duration of analgesia in the two groups.

  3. Coordination and Balance in Children with Birth-Related Brachial Plexus Injury: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Bucevska, Marija; Verchere, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Most children with severe birth-related brachial plexus injury (BRBPI) have some functional impairment, but information on the impact of BRBPI on coordination and balance is limited. The study's purpose was to determine whether children with BRBPI exhibit deficits in body coordination and balance. Method: A prospective cohort study involving 39 children with BRBPI aged 5–15 years was conducted. Range of motion, strength, active movement, and balance and coordination motor skills were assessed using the Bruininks–Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, Second Edition (BOT-2), and the Movement Assessment Battery for Children—Second Edition (MABC-2). A self-report measure of physical disability, the Activities Scale for Kids—Performance Version (ASKp), was also administered. Results: Participants scored a mean of 44.72 on the BOT-2 Body Coordination composite subtest; scores can range from 20 to 80. Eleven participants (28.2%) scored below average on this test. Participants scored a mean of 7.3 on the Balance subtest of the MABC-2; scores can range from 1 to 19. Twenty-six participants (66.7%) scored below average on this test. Of 38 participants, 25 (65.8%) had an ASKp score indicating some level of disability (<95/100); we found a statistically significant difference in balance (p=0.007) between these 25 participants and those without disability (ASKp score 95–100). Conclusions: The majority of our study population scored in the categories of at risk or significant difficulty for balance on the MABC-2. Balance rehabilitation may be a valuable treatment adjunct for children with BRBPI. PMID:25931660

  4. An Anatomically Validated Brachial Plexus Contouring Method for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Velde, Joris; Audenaert, Emmanuel; Speleers, Bruno; Vercauteren, Tom; Mulliez, Thomas; Vandemaele, Pieter; Achten, Eric; Kerckaert, Ingrid; D'Herde, Katharina; De Neve, Wilfried; Van Hoof, Tom

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines for the brachial plexus (BP) using anatomically validated cadaver datasets. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were used to obtain detailed visualizations of the BP region, with the goal of achieving maximal inclusion of the actual BP in a small contoured volume while also accommodating for anatomic variations. Methods and Materials: CT and MRI were obtained for 8 cadavers positioned for intensity modulated radiation therapy. 3-dimensional reconstructions of soft tissue (from MRI) and bone (from CT) were combined to create 8 separate enhanced CT project files. Dissection of the corresponding cadavers anatomically validated the reconstructions created. Seven enhanced CT project files were then automatically fitted, separately in different regions, to obtain a single dataset of superimposed BP regions that incorporated anatomic variations. From this dataset, improved BP contouring guidelines were developed. These guidelines were then applied to the 7 original CT project files and also to 1 additional file, left out from the superimposing procedure. The percentage of BP inclusion was compared with the published guidelines. Results: The anatomic validation procedure showed a high level of conformity for the BP regions examined between the 3-dimensional reconstructions generated and the dissected counterparts. Accurate and detailed BP contouring guidelines were developed, which provided corresponding guidance for each level in a clinical dataset. An average margin of 4.7 mm around the anatomically validated BP contour is sufficient to accommodate for anatomic variations. Using the new guidelines, 100% inclusion of the BP was achieved, compared with a mean inclusion of 37.75% when published guidelines were applied. Conclusion: Improved guidelines for BP delineation were developed using combined MRI and CT imaging with validation by anatomic dissection.

  5. Comparison of two techniques for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blockade in cats.

    PubMed

    Ansón, Agustina; Laredo, Francisco G; Gil, Francisco; Soler, Marta; Belda, Eliseo; Ayala, Maria D; Agut, Amalia

    2015-06-01

    Axillary blockade of the brachial plexus (BP) is advocated in humans and dogs for surgical procedures carried out on the foot, carpus and elbow as it provides complete analgesia distally from above the elbow joint. The aim of this study was to develop an ultrasound (US)-guided approach to block the BP in cats. Two groups of 12 feline cadavers each were used to compare two different techniques to block the BP at the axillary level. The reliability of the techniques was assessed by anatomical and computed tomography (CT) studies. Cadavers of the first group were positioned in dorsal recumbency with the forelimb to be blocked adducted (thoracic limbs flexed and orientated caudally) (FAD technique). The second group was positioned in dorsal recumbency with the forelimb abducted 90° (FAB technique). The accuracy of the techniques was determined by US after injecting 1 ml blue ink along the BP nerves, and by CT after injecting 1 ml of an iodinated contrast medium. The anatomical and CT studies confirmed the accuracy of the US location of the BP nerves. Staining of the axillaris, musculocutaneous, radialis, medianus and ulnaris nerves was observed in 100% of cats using the FAB technique and in 66% of the cats using the FAD technique. Rate of complications was higher in the FAD technique. In conclusion, a US-guided axillary approach to the BP by the use of a FAB technique is a safe and feasible procedure to block the BP in the cat. Further studies are needed to ascertain whether the technique can be applied in a clinical setting. PMID:25193280

  6. Validating the RTOG-Endorsed Brachial Plexus Contouring Atlas: An Evaluation of Reproducibility Among Patients Treated by Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Sun K.; Hall, William H.; Mathai, Mathew; Dublin, Arthur B.; Gupta, Vishal; Purdy, James A.; Chen, Allen M.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate interobserver variability for contouring the brachial plexus as an organ-at-risk (OAR) and to analyze its potential dosimetric consequences in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-endorsed brachial plexus contouring atlas, three radiation oncologists independently delineated the OAR on treatment planning computed-tomography (CT) axial scans from 5 representative patients undergoing IMRT to a prescribed dose of 70 Gy for head-and-neck cancer. Dose-volume histograms for the brachial plexus were calculated, and interobserver differences were quantified by comparing various dosimetric statistics. Qualitative analysis was performed by visually assessing the overlapping contours on a single beam's eye view. Results: Brachial plexus volumes for the 5 patients across observers were 26 cc (18-35 cc), 25 cc (21-30 cc), 29 cc (28-32 cc), 29 cc (23-38 cc), and 29 cc (23-34 cc). On qualitative analysis, minimal variability existed except at the inferolateral portion of the OAR, where slight discrepancies were noted among the physicians. Maximum doses to the brachial plexus ranged from 71.6 to 72.6 Gy, 75.2 to 75.8 Gy, 69.1 to 71.0 Gy, 76.4 to 76.9 Gy, and 70.6 to 71.4 Gy. Respective volumes receiving doses greater than 60 Gy (V60) were 8.6 to 10.9 cc, 6.2 to 8.1 cc, 8.2 to 11.6 cc, 8.3 to 10.5 cc, and 5.6 to 9.8 cc. Conclusion: The RTOG-endorsed brachial plexus atlas provides a consistent set of guidelines for contouring this OAR with essentially no learning curve. Adoption of these contouring guidelines in the clinical setting is encouraged.

  7. Somatosensory evoked potential monitoring of the brachial plexus to predict nerve injury during internal mammary artery harvest: intraoperative comparisons of the Rultract and Pittman sternal retractors.

    PubMed

    Jellish, W S; Martucci, J; Blakeman, B; Hudson, E

    1994-08-01

    Brachial plexus injury after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) continues to be a common problem postoperatively. With the use of somatosensory evoked potential monitoring (SSEP), neurologic integrity of the brachial plexus during internal mammary artery (IMA) harvest was assessed and the Rultract and Pittman sternal retractors were compared to determine what effect they had on SSEP characteristics. Results showed that the Rultract and Pittman retractors caused large decreases in SSEP amplitudes after insertion, (1.25 +/- 0.14 versus 0.72 +/- 0.09, P < 0.05; and 1.64 +/- 0.27 versus 0.91 +/- 0.14, P < 0.05) respectively. This decrease was noted in 85% of Rultract and 68.75% of Pittman patients, respectively. Amplitudes increased after retractor removal but never returned to baseline values. Cooley retractor placement in the patients not undergoing IMA harvest (control) produced only mild decreases in amplitude. Waveform latency increased in all groups after retractor placement, but these increases were thought to be clinically insignificant. Postoperatively, three patients in each of the IMA retractor groups had brachial plexus symptoms (18%), whereas only one patient in the control group had symptoms. Somatosensory evoked potential monitoring seems to be a sensitive intraoperative monitor for assessing brachial plexus injury during CABG. The nerve plexus seems to be most at risk for pathologic injury during retraction of the sternum for IMA harvest. Though the Rultract retractor caused greater changes in SSEP characteristics than the Pittman, no clinical outcome differences between the two could be ascertained. Using SSEP monitoring may reduce brachial plexus injury during IMA harvest by allowing early detection of nerve compromise and therapeutic interventions to alleviate the insult while under general anesthesia. PMID:7948794

  8. Functioning free gracilis transfer to reconstruct elbow flexion and quality of life in global brachial plexus injured patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Yang, Jian-Tao; Fu, Guo; Li, Xiang-Ming; Qin, Ben-Gang; Hou, Yi; Qi, Jian; Li, Ping; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Gu, Li-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    In the study, the functional recovery and relative comprehensive quality of life of cases of global brachial plexus treated with free functioning muscle transfers were investigated. Patients who received functioning gracilis muscle transfer between August 1999 and October 2014 to reconstruct elbow flexion, wrist and fingers extension were recruited. The mean age of the patients was 26.36 (range, 16–42) years. The mean period of time from gracilis transfer to the last follow-up was 54.5 months (range, 12–185 months). Muscle power, active range of motion of the elbow flexion, wrist extension, and total active fingers extension were recorded. SDS, SAS and DASH questionnaires were given to estimate patients’ quality of life. 35.71% reported good elbow flexion and 50.00% reported excellent elbow flexion. The average ROM of the elbow flexion was 106.5° (range, 0–142°) and was 17.00° (range, 0–72°) for wrist extension. The average DASH score was 51.14 (range, 17.5–90.8). The prevalence of anxiety and depression were 42.86% and 45.24%. Thrombosis and bowstringing were the most common short and long-term complications. Based on these findings, free gracilis transfer using accessory nerve as donor nerve is a satisfactory treatment to reconstruct the elbow flexion and wrist extension in global-brachial-plexus-injured patients. PMID:26935173

  9. Dexamethasone or Dexmedetomidine as Local Anesthetic Adjuvants for Ultrasound-guided Axillary Brachial Plexus Blocks with Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myeong Jong; Koo, Dae Jeong; Choi, Yu Sun; Lee, Kyu Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone or dexmedetomidine added to ropivacaine on the onset and duration of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blocks (BPB). Methods Fifty-one ASA physical status I-II patients with elective forearm and hand surgery under axillary brachial plexus blocks were randomly allocated to receive 20 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine with 2 ml of isotonic saline (C group, n = 17), 20 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine with 2 ml (10 mg) of dexamethasone (D group, n = 17) or 20 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine with 2 ml (100 µg) of dexmedetomidine (DM group, n = 17). A nerve stimulation technique with ultrasound was used in all patients. The onset time and duration of sensory blocks were assessed. Results The duration of the sensory block was extended in group D and group DX compared with group C (P < 0.05), but there was no significant difference between group D and group DX. However, there were no significant differences in onset time in all three groups. Conclusions Dexamethasone 10 mg and dexmedetomidine 100 µg were equally effective in extending the duration of ropivacaine in ultrasound-guided axillary BPB with nerve stimulation. However, neither drug has significantly effects the onset time. PMID:26839668

  10. Persistence of Neonatal Brachial Plexus Palsy Associated with Maternally Reported Route of Delivery: Review of 387 Cases.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kate W-C; Ankumah, Nana-Ama E; Wilson, Thomas J; Yang, Lynda J-S; Chauhan, Suneet P

    2016-07-01

    Objective The factors associated with persistent neonatal brachial plexus palsy (PNBPP) are unknown. Our objectives are to compare PNBPP at 1 and 2 years in children delivered via vaginal delivery (VD) versus cesarean delivery (CD) and in children delivered via VD with or without reported shoulder dystocia (SD). Study Design Retrospective cohort of children diagnosed with neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP). Maternally reported delivery history and presence of SD were recorded with Student t-test, chi-square test, and odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) calculated for comparisons. Results Of 387 cases of NBPP, 8% (30) delivered via CD. Rates of PNBPP were higher in the VD group at 1 and 2 years (60% of CD and 85% of VD; OR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.11-0.62 at 1 year; 33% of CD and 73% of VD; OR, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.05-0.39 at 2 years). There was no difference in PNBPP in women with VD with or without maternally reported SD (87 vs. 85%, p = 0.68 at 1 year; 64 vs. 61%, p = 0.61 at 2 years). Conclusion PNBPP is possible with CD, and there is no difference in PNBPP in VD with or without maternally reported SD. A prospective study is warranted to ascertain associative factors. PMID:26890435

  11. Use of chemical shift encoded magnetic resonance imaging (CSE-MRI) for high resolution fat-suppressed imaging of the brachial and lumbosacral plexuses

    PubMed Central

    Grayev, Allison; Reeder, Scott; Hanna, Amgad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the era of increasingly complex surgical techniques for peripheral nerve repair, there is a need for high spatial resolution imaging of the neural plexuses in the body. We describe our experience with chemical shift encoded MRI and its implications for patient management. Materials and methods IDEAL water-fat separation is a chemical shift based method of homogeneously suppressing signal from fat, while maintaining adequate signal. This technique was used in clinical practice and the patient images reviewed. Results IDEAL water-fat separation was shown to improve visualization of the brachial and lumbosacral plexuses with good fat suppression and high signal to noise ratio. Conclusion IDEAL water − fat separation is an excellent technique to use in the imaging of the brachial and lumbosacral plexuses as it balances the need for homogeneous fat suppression with maintenance of excellent signal to noise ratio. PMID:27161071

  12. Results of spinal accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer in 110 patients with complete palsy of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Transfer of the spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve is a common procedure, performed to reestablish shoulder motion in patients with total brachial plexus palsy. However, the results of this procedure remain largely unknown. METHODS Over an 11-year period (2002-2012), 257 patients with total brachial plexus palsy were operated upon in the authors' department by a single surgeon and had the spinal accessory nerve transferred to the suprascapular nerve. Among these, 110 had adequate follow-up and were included in this study. Their average age was 26 years (SD 8.4 years), and the mean interval between their injury and surgery was 5.2 months (SD 2.4 months). Prior to 2005, the suprascapular and spinal accessory nerves were dissected through a classic supraclavicular L-shape incision (n = 29). Afterward (n = 81), the spinal accessory and suprascapular nerves were dissected via an oblique incision, extending from the point at which the plexus crossed the clavicle to the anterior border of the trapezius muscle. In 17 of these patients, because of clavicle fractures or dislocation, scapular fractures or retroclavicular scarring, the incision was extended by detaching the trapezius from the clavicle to expose the suprascapular nerve at the suprascapular fossa. In all patients, the brachial plexus was explored and elbow flexion reconstructed by root grafting (n = 95), root grafting and phrenic nerve transfer (n = 6), phrenic nerve transfer (n = 1), or third, fourth, and fifth intercostal nerve transfer. Postoperatively, patients were followed for an average of 40 months (SD 13.7 months). RESULTS Failed recovery, meaning less than 30° abduction, was observed in 10 (9%) of the 110 patients. The failure rate was 25% between 2002 and 2004, but dropped to 5% after the staged/extended approach was introduced. The mean overall range of abduction recovery was 58.5° (SD 26°). Comparing before and after distal suprascapular nerve exploration (2005-2012), the

  13. Sudden severe postoperative dyspnea following shoulder surgery: Remember inadvertent phrenic nerve block due to interscalene brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Jariwala, Arpit; Kumar, B C Raju Pavan; Coventry, David M

    2014-04-01

    Advanced imaging techniques, improved operative techniques, and instrumentation combined with better patient awareness and expectations have resulted in an exponential increase in upper limb surgical procedures during recent times. Surgical teams expect superior analgesia and regional blocks have matched these expectations quite often resulting in improved patient satisfaction and early rehabilitation to achieve best results. Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) is commonly used to provide analgesia for procedures involving shoulder girdle. We report a case of symptomatic hemi-diaphragmatic paresis (HDP) due to the phrenic nerve block following ISB for arthroscopic sub-acromial decompression of the shoulder presenting as severe postoperative dyspnea. There is strong evidence of HDP following ISB in anesthetic literature, but not reported in related surgical specialties such as orthopedics. We wish to inform upper-limb surgeons and educate junior doctors and other ancillary staff working in upper-limb units to be aware of this serious but reversible complication. PMID:25114416

  14. Effect of adding tetracaine to bupivacaine on duration of analgesia in supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve blocks for ambulatory shoulder surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Linda T.; Lowry, Benjamin P.; Culp, William C.; Kitchings, Olen E.; Meyer, Tricia A.; McAllister, Russell K.; Roberson, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if the addition of 1% tetracaine to 0.25% bupivacaine prolonged the duration of postoperative analgesia of supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve blockade for patients undergoing ambulatory shoulder surgery. We conducted a prospective, double-blinded, randomized controlled clinical study at an ambulatory surgery center utilizing ultrasound- and nerve stimulation-guided supraclavicular nerve blockade for postoperative analgesia. The control group received 30 mL of 0.25% bupivacaine plus 4 mL preservative-free saline. The study group received 30 mL of 0.25% bupivacaine plus 4 mL of 1% tetracaine. Patients documented their visual analog scale scores and intake of pain medications for 3 days. Primary outcomes included time of first postoperative pain, time of first postoperative pain pill, and time of return of motor and sensory function. Secondary outcomes included pain score and pain medication intake trends and adverse events secondary to the nerve block. A total of 84 patients completed the study, 42 patients in each group. The study group was statistically significantly older than the control group (mean age, 54 vs 48 years; P = 0.04). The mean duration of analgesia was 16.6 ± 8.3 h for the control group and 17.1 ± 7.3 h for the study group (P = 0.69). No outcomes were statistically different. In conclusion, there was no significant difference in duration of postoperative analgesia with the addition of 1% tetracaine to 0.25% bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve blockade. No differences were identified in postoperative pain medications, pain scores, or complications. PMID:26130874

  15. Effect of Collateral Sprouting on Donor Nerve Function After Nerve Coaptation: A Study of the Brachial Plexus

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Paweł; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Puła, Bartosz; Wrzosek, Marcin; Bocheńska, Aneta; Gosk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the donor nerve from the C7 spinal nerve of the rabbit brachial plexus after a coaptation procedure. Assessment was performed of avulsion of the C5 and C6 spinal nerves treated by coaptation of these nerves to the C7 spinal nerve. Material/Methods After nerve injury, fourteen rabbits were treated by end-to-side coaptation (ETS), and fourteen animals were treated by side-to-side coaptation (STS) on the right brachial plexus. Electrophysiological and histomorphometric analyses and the skin pinch test were used to evaluate the outcomes. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the G-ratio proximal and distal to the coaptation in the ETS group, but the differences in the axon, myelin sheath and fiber diameters were statistically significant. The comparison of the ETS and STS groups distal to the coaptation with the controls demonstrated statistically significant differences in the fiber, axon, and myelin sheath diameters. With respect to the G-ratio, the ETS group exhibited no significant differences relative to the control, whereas the G-ratio in the STS group and the controls differed significantly. In the electrophysiological study, the ETS and STS groups exhibited major changes in the biceps and subscapularis muscles. Conclusions The coaptation procedure affects the histological structure of the nerve donor, but it does not translate into changes in nerve conduction or the sensory function of the limb. The donor nerve lesion in the ETS group is transient and has minimal clinical relevance. PMID:26848925

  16. Effect of Collateral Sprouting on Donor Nerve Function After Nerve Coaptation: A Study of the Brachial Plexus.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Pawel; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Puła, Bartosz; Wrzosek, Marcin; Bocheńska, Aneta; Gosk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of the present study was to evaluate the donor nerve from the C7 spinal nerve of the rabbit brachial plexus after a coaptation procedure. Assessment was performed of avulsion of the C5 and C6 spinal nerves treated by coaptation of these nerves to the C7 spinal nerve. MATERIAL AND METHODS After nerve injury, fourteen rabbits were treated by end-to-side coaptation (ETS), and fourteen animals were treated by side-to-side coaptation (STS) on the right brachial plexus. Electrophysiological and histomorphometric analyses and the skin pinch test were used to evaluate the outcomes. RESULTS There was no statistically significant difference in the G-ratio proximal and distal to the coaptation in the ETS group, but the differences in the axon, myelin sheath and fiber diameters were statistically significant. The comparison of the ETS and STS groups distal to the coaptation with the controls demonstrated statistically significant differences in the fiber, axon, and myelin sheath diameters. With respect to the G-ratio, the ETS group exhibited no significant differences relative to the control, whereas the G-ratio in the STS group and the controls differed significantly. In the electrophysiological study, the ETS and STS groups exhibited major changes in the biceps and subscapularis muscles. CONCLUSIONS The coaptation procedure affects the histological structure of the nerve donor, but it does not translate into changes in nerve conduction or the sensory function of the limb. The donor nerve lesion in the ETS group is transient and has minimal clinical relevance. PMID:26848925

  17. Computerized tomography myelography with coronal and oblique coronal view for diagnosis of nerve root avulsion in brachial plexus injury

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background The authors describe a new computerized tomography (CT) myelography technique with coronal and oblique coronal view to demonstrate the status of the cervical nerve rootlets involved in brachial plexus injury. They discuss the value of this technique for diagnosis of nerve root avulsion compared with CT myelography with axial view. Methods CT myelography was performed with penetration of the cervical subarachnoid space by the contrast medium. Then the coronal and oblique coronal reconstructions were created. The results of CT myelography were evaluated and classified with presence of pseudomeningocele, intradural ventral nerve rootlets, and intradural dorsal nerve rootlets. The diagnosis was by extraspinal surgical exploration with or without spinal evoked potential measurements and choline acetyl transferase activity measurement in 25 patients and recovery by a natural course in 3 patients. Its diagnostic accuracy was compared with that of CT myelography with axial view, correlated with surgical findings or a natural course in 57 cervical roots in 28 patients. Results Coronal and oblique coronal views were superior to axial views in visualization of the rootlets and orientation of the exact level of the root. Sensitivity and specificity for coronal and oblique coronal views of unrecognition of intradural ventral and dorsal nerve root shadow without pseudomeningocele in determining pre-ganglionic injury were 100% and 96%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between coronal and oblique coronal views and axial views. Conclusion The information by the coronal and oblique coronal slice CT myelography enabled the authors to assess the rootlets of the brachial plexus and provided valuable data for helping to decide whether to proceed with exploration, nerve repair, primary reconstruction. PMID:17651476

  18. MICROSURGICAL TRANSFER OF THE GRACILIS MUSCLE FOR ELBOW FLEXION IN BRACHIAL PLEXUS INJURY IN ADULTS: RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF EIGHT CASES

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Luiz Koiti; do Nascimento, Alexandre Tadeu; Capócio, Roberto; Mattar, Rames; Rezende, Marcelo Rosa; Wei, Teng Hsiang; Torres, Luciano Ruiz; Moya, Fernando Munhoz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treating brachial plexus injuries is a major challenge, especially lesions that are presented late, with more than 12 months of evolution. We retrospectively analyzed patients who underwent one of the possibilities for attempting to restore the function of upper limbs affected under such conditions: microsurgical transfer of the gracilis muscle for elbow flexion. Methods: Eight patients were included, divided into two groups: one in which the procedure consisted of neurorrhaphy of the muscle flap with sural nerve grafting and anastomosis more distally; and the other, in which the neurorrhaphy was performed directly on the spinal accessory nerve, with anastomosis in thoracoacromial vessels. Results: We found a significant difference between the groups. A greater number of satisfactory results (75% M4) were found among patients who underwent direct neurorrhaphy, whereas the procedure using grafts for neurorrhaphy was less successful (25% M4). Conclusion: Patients who underwent microsurgical functional transfer of the gracilis muscle in which vascular anastomoses were performed in thoracoacromial vessels presented better functional outcomes than shown by those whose anastomoses were in the brachial artery with subsequent use of a nerve graft. PMID:27027050

  19. Percutaneous T2 and T3 Radiofrequency Sympathectomy for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Secondary to Brachial Plexus Injury: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Phui, Vui Eng; Nizar, Abd Jalil; Yeo, Sow Nam

    2013-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome secondary to brachial plexus injury is often severe, debilitating and difficult to manage. Percuteneous radiofrequency sympathectomy is a relatively new technique, which has shown promising results in various chronic pain disorders. We present four consecutive patients with complex regional pain syndrome secondary to brachial plexus injury for more than 6 months duration, who had undergone percutaneous T2 and T3 radiofrequency sympathectomy after a diagnostic block. All four patients experienced minimal pain relief with conservative treatment and stellate ganglion blockade. An acceptable 6 month pain relief was achieved in all 4 patients where pain score remained less than 50% than that of initial score and all oral analgesics were able to be tapered down. There were no complications attributed to this procedure were reported. From this case series, percutaneous T2 and T3 radiofrequency sympathectomy might play a significant role in multi-modal approach of CRPS management. PMID:24156009

  20. Effect of ketamine as an adjuvant in ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A double-blind randomized clinical trial study

    PubMed Central

    Lashgarinia, Mohammadreza; Naghibi, Khosro; Honarmand, Azim; Safavi, Mohammadreza; Khazaei, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Supraclavicular brachial plexus block is one of the most effective anesthetic procedures in operations for the upper extremity. Ketamine has been reported to enhance the analgesic effects of local anesthetics. We have conducted this study to assess whether coadministration of ketamine can prolong the local analgesic effect of lidocaine in the supraclavicular brachial plexus block for patients undergoing elective upper extremity surgery. Materials and Methods: Sixty adult patients undergoing elective surgery of the elbow, forearm, wrist or hand were randomly allocated in two groups of 30 patients each. Group 1 (ketamine group) received 5 mg/kg lidocaine 1.5% plus 2 mg/kg ketamine, Group 2 (control group) received 5 mg/kg lidocaine 1.5% and saline. The outcome measures included severity of pain by using visual analog scale (VAS, 0 = no pain 10 cm = the most severe pain), time of first request for analgesia, and total dose of postoperative opioid administration. The data was analyzed using the χ2 test, student's t-test, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and Multivariate analysis tests. Results: Patients in the control group had a higher VAS than patients who received ketamine, at all time points during the first 24 hours after surgery (all P < 0.05). The time of first request for analgesia in the ketamine group was significantly more than in the control group (8.93 ± 1.0 vs. 7.30 ± 1.9, respectively, P < 0.001). Conclusion: The addition of ketamine to lidocaine in the ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block could decrease the postoperative pain and need for analgesic. Therefore, it could be considered as an option in the brachial plexus block to enhance the analgesic action of lidocaine. PMID:25538918

  1. Pain relief after ambulatory hand surgery: A comparison between dexmedetomidine and clonidine as adjuvant in axillary brachial plexus block: A prospective, double-blinded, randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Das, A; Dutta, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Chhaule, S; Mitra, T; Banu, R; Mandal, P; Chandra, M

    2016-01-01

    Background: For ages various adjuvants have been tried to prolong axillary brachial plexus block. We compared the effect of adding dexmedetomidine versus clonidine to ropivacaine for axillary brachial plexus blockade. The primary endpoints were the onset and duration of sensory and motor block and duration of analgesia. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 patients (20-40 years) posted for ambulatory elective hand surgery under axillary brachial plexus block were divided into two equal groups (groups ropivacaine dexmedetomidine [RD] and ropivacaine clonidine [RC]) in a randomized, double-blind fashion. In group RD (n = 45) 30 ml 0.5% ropivacaine + 100 μg of dexmedetomidine and group RC (n = 45) 30 ml 0.5% ropivacaine + 75 μg clonidine were administered in axillary plexus block. Sensory and motor block onset times and block durations, time to first analgesic use, total analgesic need, postoperative visual analog scale (VAS), hemodynamics and side-effects were recorded for each patient. Results: Though with similar demographic profile in both groups, sensory and motor block in group RD (P < 0.05) was earlier than group RC. Sensory and motor block duration and time to first analgesic use were significantly longer and the total need for rescue analgesics was lower in group RD (P < 0.05) than group RC. Postoperative VAS value at 18 h were significantly lower in group RD (P < 0.05). Intraoperative hemodynamics were insignificantly lower in group RD (P < 0.05) without any appreciable side-effects. Conclusion: It can be concluded that adding dexmedetomidine to axillary plexus block increases the sensory and motor block duration and time to first analgesic use, and decreases total analgesic use with no side-effects. PMID:26955303

  2. Unusual Origin of a Double Upper Subscapular Nerve from the Suprascapular Nerve and the Posterior Division of the Upper Trunk of the Brachial Plexus: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, George; Koutsouflianiotis, Konstantinos; Iliou, Kalliopi; Bitsis, Theodosios; Kitsoulis, Panagiotis

    2016-06-01

    A double upper subscapular nerve on the right side was detected in a male cadaver, with the proximal one arising from the suprascapular nerve and the distal one from the posterior division of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus. Both of them penetrated and supplied the uppermost portion of the right subscapularis muscle. That anatomic variation was associated with a median nerve formed by two lateral roots. The origin and pattern of the upper subscapular nerve displays high variability, however the presented combination of the variable origin of a double upper subscapular nerve has rarely been described in the literature. The knowledge of such an anatomic variation is essential for the surgeon operating in the region especially in instances of brachial plexus' repair after any traumatic injury. Moreover, the awareness of the precise origin and topography of these nerves is important for the physician attempting to block these nerves or utilizing these nerves as grafts for neurotization of adjacent damaged nerves of the brachial plexus. PMID:27504272

  3. A randomised placebo-controlled trial examining the effect on hand supination after the addition of a suprascapular nerve block to infraclavicular brachial plexus blockade.

    PubMed

    Flohr-Madsen, S; Ytrebø, L M; Valen, K; Wilsgaard, T; Klaastad, Ø

    2016-08-01

    Some surgeons believe that infraclavicular brachial plexus blocks tends to result in supination of the hand/forearm, which may make surgical access to the dorsum of the hand more difficult. We hypothesised that this supination may be reduced by the addition of a suprascapular nerve block. In a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled study, our primary outcome measure was the amount of supination (as assessed by wrist angulation) 30 min after infraclavicular brachial plexus block, with (suprascapular group) or without (control group) a supplementary suprascapular block. All blocks were ultrasound-guided. The secondary outcome measure was an assessment by the surgeon of the intra-operative position of the hand. Considering only patients with successful nerve blocks, mean (SD) wrist angulation was lower (33 (27) vs. 61 (44) degrees; p = 0.018) and assessment of the hand position was better (11/11 vs. 6/11 rated as 'good'; p = 0.04) in the suprascapular group. The addition of a suprascapular nerve block to an infraclavicular brachial plexus block can provide a better hand/forearm position for dorsal hand surgery. PMID:27396247

  4. The efficacy of adding dexamethasone, midazolam, or epinephrine to 0.5% bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    El-Baradey, Ghada F.; Elshmaa, Nagat S.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The aim was to assess the effectiveness of adding either dexamethasone or midazolam in comparison with epinephrine addition to 0.5% bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Settings and Design: This is a prospective randomized controlled observer-blinded study. Subjects and Methods: This study was carried out in Tanta University Hospital on 60 patients of both sexes; American Society of Anesthesiologists physical Status I and II, age range from 18 to 45 years undergo elective surgery to upper limb. All patients were anesthetized with ultrasound guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block and randomly divided into three groups (each group 20 patients) Group E (epinephrine): 30 mL bupivacaine 0.5%with 1:200,000 epinephrine (5 μg/mL). Group D (dexamethasone): 30 mL bupivacaine 0.5% and dexamethasone 8 mg. Group M (midazolam): 30 ml bupivacaine 0.5% and midazolam 50 μg/kg. The primary outcome measures were onset and duration of sensory and motor block and time to first analgesic request. Statistical Analysis Used: The windows version of SPSS 11.0.1 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) was used for statistical analysis. Data were presented in form of mean ± standard deviation multiple analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the three groups and Scheffe test was used after ANOVA. Power of significance P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Onset of sensory and motor block was significantly rapid (P < 0.05) in Groups D and M in comparison with Group E. Time of administration of rescue analgesic, duration of sensory and motor block showed significant increase (P < 0.05) in Group D in comparison with Group M which showed significant increase (P < 0.05) in comparison with Group E. Conclusions: In comparison with epinephrine and midazolam addition of dexamethasone to bupivacaine had rapid onset of block and longer time to first analgesic request with fewer side-effects. PMID:25538528

  5. Infusion Methods for Continuous Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block for Postoperative Pain Control after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Gyeong Jo; Yoon, Ji Uk; Kim, Eun Jung; Baek, Seung Hoon; Ri, Hyun Su

    2015-01-01

    Background Infusion methods during regional analgesia using perineural catheters may influence the quality of postoperative analgesia. This study was conducted to compare the effects of combined or bolus-only infusion of 0.2% ropivacaine on the postoperative analgesia in interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) with perineural catheterization. Methods Patients scheduled for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were divided into two groups, one that would receive a combined infusion (group C, n = 32), and one that would receive intermittent infusion (group I, n = 32). A perineural catheter was inserted into the interscalene brachial plexus (ISBP) using ultrasound (US) and nerve stimulation, and 10 ml of 0.2% ropivacaine was administered. After the operation, group C received a continuous infusion of 4 ml/h, and a 4 ml bolus with a lockout interval of 60 min. Group I received only a 4 ml bolus, and the lockout interval was 30 min. Postoperative pain by the numeric rating scale (NRS) and the forearm muscle tone by the manual muscle test (MMT) were checked and evaluated at the following timepoints: preoperative, and postoperative 1, 4, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h. Supplemental opioid requirements, total consumed dose of local anesthetic, and adverse effects were compared between the two groups. Results Sixty-four patients completed the study and the postoperative values such as operation time, time to discharge, and operation site were comparable. There were no differences in NRS scores and supplemental opioid requirements between the two groups. The MMT scores of group I at 4 and 12 h after surgery were significantly higher than those of group C (P < 0.05). The total consumed dose of local anesthetic was significantly lower in group I than in group C (P < 0.05). The adverse effects were not different between the groups. Conclusions The bolus-only administration of 0.2% ropivacaine provided a similar analgesic effect with a lower total volume of local anesthetic and decreased

  6. To determine block establishment time of supraclavicular brachial plexus block using blunt versus short bevel needle: A prospective randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, V; Thapa, D; Gombar, S; Dhiman, D

    2016-01-01

    Background: Unintentional intraneural injection under ultrasound guidance (USG) with fine caliber needles and lower success rate with large caliber Tuohy needles in supraclavicular brachial plexus block (SCB) have been reported. Materials and Methods: We undertook study to standardize the use of 20-gauge short versus blunt bevel needle for SCB. After approval of Institutional Ethics Committee and written informed consent, patients were randomized using computer-generated random number table to either of the two groups; blunt bevel needle group (n = 30): SCB under USG using 20-gauge Tuohy needle or short bevel needle group (n = 30): SCB under USG using 20-gauge short bevel needle. The primary outcome of the study was time to establishment of sensory and motor block of individual nerves, and secondary outcome was tolerability and any adverse effects. Results: The time to establishment of sensory and motor block in individual nerve territory was similar in both the groups. The complete sensory and motor anesthesia was achieved in 78.3% patients and complete sensory and motor anesthesia after supplementary block was achieved in 86.6% patients. Paresthesias during SCB were recorded in 15 patients. Out of these eight patients were of blunt bevel group and seven patients were of short bevel group. None of the patients experienced any neurological adverse effects. Conclusion: The establishment of sensory and motor blockade of individual nerves was similar to 20-gauge short and blunt bevel needle under ultrasound guide with no neurological adverse events. PMID:27375378

  7. Mobile technology: Creation and use of an iBook to teach the anatomy of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Stuart; Choudhury, Bipasha

    2015-01-01

    In an era of digitally connected students, there is a demand for academic material to be delivered through electronic mobile devices and not just through traditional methods such as lectures and tutorials. A digital interactive book-iBook (for use on the Apple iPad)-was created to teach undergraduate anatomical science students (n = 26) four key areas of the brachial plexus: definitions, gross anatomy, relative anatomy, and functions of terminal branches. Students were asked to complete preresource and postresource questionnaires, which were used to calculate the mean improvement score and ultimately the efficacy of the resource. Free text comments were gathered to evaluate student opinions on this mode of learning. The mean score on the preresource and postresource questionnaires was 4.07 of 8 and 5.69 of 8, respectively. The overall mean improvement score was 1.62, determined statistically significant by a dependent t-test (P = 0.0004). Findings demonstrate that digital books on the iPad provide a uniquely interactive way of delivering information and engaging students. Furthermore, digital books can be used alongside traditional methods of teaching anatomy to enhance and promote deep learning in students. PMID:25351850

  8. The anesthetic considerations while performing supraclavicular brachial plexus block in emergency surgical patients using a nerve stimulator

    PubMed Central

    Tantry, Thrivikrama Padur; Shetty, Pramal; Shetty, Rithesh; Shenoy, Sunil P.

    2015-01-01

    Regional anesthesia is favored in patients who undergo emergency extremity (limb) surgery, and specifically so in the absence of fasting status. In the absence of ultrasonic guidance, the nerve stimulator still remains a valuable tool in performing a brachial block, but its use is difficult in an emergency surgical patient and greater cautious approach is essential. We identified the supraclavicular plexus by the nerve stimulation-motor response technique as follows. Anterior chest muscles contractions, diaphragmatic contraction, deltoid contractions, and posterior shoulder girdle muscle contractions when identified were taken as “negative response” with decreasing stimulating current. A forearm muscle contraction, especially “wrist flexion” and “finger flexion” at 0.5 mA of current was taken as “positive response.” If no positive response was identified, the “elbow flexion” was considered as the final positive response for successful drug placement. The series of patients had difficulty for administering both general and regional anesthesia and we considered them as complex scenarios. The risk of the block failure was weighed heavily against the benefits of its success. The described series includes patients who had successful outcomes in the end and the techniques, merits, and risks are highlighted. PMID:26417145

  9. MUSCLE TRANSFER FROM TRICEPS TO BICEPS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC INJURY OF THE UPPER TRUNK OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Fabiano Inúcio de; Saito, Mateus; Kimura, Luiz Koiti; Júnior, Rames Mattar; Zumiotti, Arnaldo Valdir

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results from transposition of the triceps for elbow flexion in patients with chronic and complete injury to the upper trunk of the brachial plexus. Methods: This was a retrospective study, including only patients who had biceps grade 0 and triceps grade 5, who underwent anterior transfer of the triceps muscle, performed between 1998 and 2005. The affected side, sex, type of accident, strength of elbow flexion, complications and patient satisfaction were investigated in 11 cases. Results: 10 patients were male; the age range was from 24 to 49 years, with a mean of 33.7 years. The minimum time between injury and surgery was 21 months (range 21-74 months). The left side was affected in eight cases, and the right only in three. Good results were obtained in 10 patients, who acquired elbow flexion strength of grade 3 (two cases) and grade 4 (eight cases), while one evolved unfavorably with grade 2 strength. Two cases had complications (initial compartment syndrome and insufficient tensioning). All the patients said that they were satisfied with the procedure. Conclusion: Anterior transposition of the triceps muscle provided patient satisfaction in all cases except one, attaining strength grade 4 in eight cases, grade 3 in two cases and grade 2 in one case. PMID:27022572

  10. Surgical correction of ulnar deviation deformity of the wrist in patients with birth brachial plexus palsy sequelae.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Praveen; Parekh, Harshil; Venkatramani, Hari; Raja Sabapathy, S

    2015-01-01

    Ulnar deviation deformity of the wrist in patients with birth brachial plexus palsy is an important cosmetic concern among the patients and their relatives; especially in the patients who have recovered the basic limb functions. Though there is ample literature available regarding the management of the shoulder deformity there is paucity of literature regarding management of wrist ulnar deviation deformity. We report our experience with correction of this deformity in five cases with isolated ulnar deviation deformity without forearm rotational deformity or weakness of the wrist muscles. All the patients underwent extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) to extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) tendon transfer. At a minimum of 18 months follow-up all the patients and their families were satisfied with the cosmetic appearance of the limb. Correction of the deformity improves the appearance of the limb, improves self-confidence of the child, and allows them to integrate well into the society. Interestingly, the patients expressed improvement in their grip strength and overall hand function after this surgery. The notable functions which improved were easy reach of the hand-to-mouth for feeding and easy handling of the things requiring bimanual activities. Although the main aim of this operation was to correct the appearance of the hand it was found to be also functionally useful by the patients and hence we are encouraged to report it for wider use. The results were maintained during the follow-up period of as long as 47 months. PMID:25609294

  11. Unusual Origin of a Double Upper Subscapular Nerve from the Suprascapular Nerve and the Posterior Division of the Upper Trunk of the Brachial Plexus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Koutsouflianiotis, Konstantinos; Iliou, Kalliopi; Bitsis, Theodosios; Kitsoulis, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    A double upper subscapular nerve on the right side was detected in a male cadaver, with the proximal one arising from the suprascapular nerve and the distal one from the posterior division of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus. Both of them penetrated and supplied the uppermost portion of the right subscapularis muscle. That anatomic variation was associated with a median nerve formed by two lateral roots. The origin and pattern of the upper subscapular nerve displays high variability, however the presented combination of the variable origin of a double upper subscapular nerve has rarely been described in the literature. The knowledge of such an anatomic variation is essential for the surgeon operating in the region especially in instances of brachial plexus’ repair after any traumatic injury. Moreover, the awareness of the precise origin and topography of these nerves is important for the physician attempting to block these nerves or utilizing these nerves as grafts for neurotization of adjacent damaged nerves of the brachial plexus. PMID:27504272

  12. Brachial plexopathy.

    PubMed

    Khadilkar, Satish V; Khade, Snehaldatta S

    2013-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury can occur as a result of trauma, inflammation or malignancies, and associated complications. The current topic is concerned with various forms of brachial plexopathy, its clinical features, pathophysiology, imaging findings, and management. Idiopathic brachial neuritis (IBN), often preceded with antecedent events such as infection, commonly present with abruptonset painful asymmetric upper limb weakness with associated wasting around the shoulder girdle and arm muscles. Idiopathic hypertrophic brachial neuritis, a rare condition, is usually painless to begin with, unlike IBN. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by repeated episodes of paralysis and sensory disturbances in an affected limb, which is preceded by severe pain. While the frequency of the episodes tends to decrease with age, affected individuals suffer from residual deficits. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome affects the lower trunk of the brachial plexus. It is diagnosed on the basis of electrophysiology and is amenable to surgical intervention. Cancer-related brachial plexopathy may occur secondary to metastatic infiltration or radiation therapy. Traumatic brachial plexus injury is commonly encountered in neurology, orthopedic, and plastic surgery set-ups. Trauma may be a direct blow or traction or stretch injury. The prognosis depends on the extent and site of injury as well as the surgical expertise. PMID:23661957

  13. Brachial plexopathy

    PubMed Central

    Khadilkar, Satish V.; Khade, Snehaldatta S.

    2013-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury can occur as a result of trauma, inflammation or malignancies, and associated complications. The current topic is concerned with various forms of brachial plexopathy, its clinical features, pathophysiology, imaging findings, and management. Idiopathic brachial neuritis (IBN), often preceded with antecedent events such as infection, commonly present with abruptonset painful asymmetric upper limb weakness with associated wasting around the shoulder girdle and arm muscles. Idiopathic hypertrophic brachial neuritis, a rare condition, is usually painless to begin with, unlike IBN. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by repeated episodes of paralysis and sensory disturbances in an affected limb, which is preceded by severe pain. While the frequency of the episodes tends to decrease with age, affected individuals suffer from residual deficits. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome affects the lower trunk of the brachial plexus. It is diagnosed on the basis of electrophysiology and is amenable to surgical intervention. Cancer-related brachial plexopathy may occur secondary to metastatic infiltration or radiation therapy. Traumatic brachial plexus injury is commonly encountered in neurology, orthopedic, and plastic surgery set-ups. Trauma may be a direct blow or traction or stretch injury. The prognosis depends on the extent and site of injury as well as the surgical expertise. PMID:23661957

  14. Consideration of Dose Limits for Organs at Risk of Thoracic Radiotherapy: Atlas for Lung, Proximal Bronchial Tree, Esophagus, Spinal Cord, Ribs, and Brachial Plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Feng-Ming; Ritter, Timothy; Quint, Douglas J.; Senan, Suresh; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Hurkmans, Coen W.; Timmerman, Robert; Bezjak, Andrea; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Movsas, Benjamin; Marsh, Lon; Okunieff, Paul; Choy, Hak; Curran, Walter J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To review the dose limits and standardize the three-dimenional (3D) radiographic definition for the organs at risk (OARs) for thoracic radiotherapy (RT), including the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: The present study was performed by representatives from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Soutwestern Oncology Group lung cancer committees. The dosimetric constraints of major multicenter trials of 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT were reviewed and the challenges of 3D delineation of these OARs described. Using knowledge of the human anatomy and 3D radiographic correlation, draft atlases were generated by a radiation oncologist, medical physicist, dosimetrist, and radiologist from the United States and reviewed by a radiation oncologist and medical physicist from Europe. The atlases were then critically reviewed, discussed, and edited by another 10 radiation oncologists. Results: Three-dimensional descriptions of the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus are presented. Two computed tomography atlases were developed: one for the middle and lower thoracic OARs (except for the heart) and one focusing on the brachial plexus for a patient positioned supine with their arms up for thoracic RT. The dosimetric limits of the key OARs are discussed. Conclusions: We believe these atlases will allow us to define OARs with less variation and generate dosimetric data in a more consistent manner. This could help us study the effect of radiation on these OARs and guide high-quality clinical trials and individualized practice in 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT.

  15. Comparative evaluation of adding different opiates (morphine, meperidine, buprenorphine, or fentanyl) to lidocaine in duration and quality of axillary brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Saryazdi, Hamid; Yazdani, Alireza; Sajedi, Parvin; Aghadavoudi, Omid

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is no agreement about the effect of adding opioids to local anesthetics in peripheral nerve blocks. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of adding different opioids with equipotent doses of lidocaine in axillary brachial plexus block using ultrasonography and nerve locator guidance. Materials and Methods: In a prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial study, 72 adult patients aged 18–65 years old scheduled for orthopedic surgery of the forearm and hand with axillary brachial plexus block were selected and randomly allocated to four groups. Meperidine (pethidine), buprenorphine, morphine, and fentanyl with equipotent doses were added in 40cc of 1% lidocaine in P, B, M, and F groups, respectively. The onset and duration of sensory and motor blocks, severity of patients’ pain, duration of analgesia, hemodynamic and respiratory parameters, and adverse events (such as nausea and pruritus) during perioperative period were recorded. Results: The onset time for the sensory block was similar in the four groups. The onset time for the motor block was significantly faster in morphine and pethidine groups (P = 0.006). The duration of sensory and motor blocks was not statistically different among the four groups. The quality of motor blockade was complete in 100% of patients receiving pethidine or morphine and 77.8% of patients receiving buprenorphine or fentanyl (P = 0.021). Conclusion: In the upper extremity surgeries performed under axillary brachial plexus block addition of morphine or pethidine to lidocaine may be superior to other opioids (i.e. fentanyl and buprenorphine) due to better quality and quantity of motor blockade and faster onset of the block. PMID:26645017

  16. CONSIDERATION OF DOSE LIMITS FOR ORGANS AT RISK OF THORACIC RADIOTHERAPY: ATLAS FOR LUNG, PROXIMAL BRONCHIAL TREE, ESOPHAGUS, SPINAL CORD, RIBS, AND BRACHIAL PLEXUS

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Feng-Ming (Spring); Ritter, Timothy; Quint, Douglas J.; Senan, Suresh; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Hurkmans, Coen W.; Timmerman, Robert; Bezjak, Andrea; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Movsas, Benjamin; Marsh, Lon; Okunieff, Paul; Choy, Hak; Curran, Walter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To review the dose limits and standardize the three-dimenional (3D) radiographic definition for the organs at risk (OARs) for thoracic radiotherapy (RT), including the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus. Methods and Materials The present study was performed by representatives from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Soutwestern Oncology Group lung cancer committees. The dosimetric constraints of major multicenter trials of 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT were reviewed and the challenges of 3D delineation of these OARs described. Using knowledge of the human anatomy and 3D radiographic correlation, draft atlases were generated by a radiation oncologist, medical physicist, dosimetrist, and radiologist from the United States and reviewed by a radiation oncologist and medical physicist from Europe. The atlases were then critically reviewed, discussed, and edited by another 10 radiation oncologists. Results Three-dimensional descriptions of the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus are presented. Two computed tomography atlases were developed: one for the middle and lower thoracic OARs (except for the heart) and one focusing on the brachial plexus for a patient positioned supine with their arms up for thoracic RT. The dosimetric limits of the key OARs are discussed. Conclusions We believe these atlases will allow us to define OARs with less variation and generate dosimetric data in a more consistent manner. This could help us study the effect of radiation on these OARs and guide high-quality clinical trials and individualized practice in 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT. PMID:20934273

  17. Risk of Encountering Dorsal Scapular and Long Thoracic Nerves during Ultrasound-guided Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block with Nerve Stimulator

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Dong; Yu, Jae Yong; Shim, Junho; Heo, Hyun Joo

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, ultrasound has been commonly used. Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) by posterior approach is more commonly used because anterior approach has been reported to have the risk of phrenic nerve injury. However, posterior approach also has the risk of causing nerve injury because there are risks of encountering dorsal scapular nerve (DSN) and long thoracic nerve (LTN). Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of encountering DSN and LTN during ultrasound-guided IBPB by posterior approach. Methods A total of 70 patients who were scheduled for shoulder surgery were enrolled in this study. After deciding insertion site with ultrasound, awake ultrasound-guided IBPB with nerve stimulator by posterior approach was performed. Incidence of muscle twitches (rhomboids, levator scapulae, and serratus anterior muscles) and current intensity immediately before muscle twitches disappeared were recorded. Results Of the total 70 cases, DSN was encountered in 44 cases (62.8%) and LTN was encountered in 15 cases (21.4%). Both nerves were encountered in 10 cases (14.3%). Neither was encountered in 21 cases (30.4%). The average current measured immediately before the disappearance of muscle twitches was 0.44 mA and 0.50 mA at DSN and LTN, respectively. Conclusions Physicians should be cautious on the risk of injury related to the anatomical structures of nerves, including DSN and LTN, during ultrasound-guided IBPB by posterior approach. Nerve stimulator could be another option for a safer intervention. Moreover, if there is a motor response, it is recommended to select another way to secure better safety. PMID:27413483

  18. Volumetric tumor burden and its effect on brachial plexus dosimetry in head and neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Romesser, Paul B.; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Truong, Minh Tam

    2014-07-01

    To determine the effect of gross tumor volume of the primary (GTV-P) and nodal (GTV-N) disease on planned radiation dose to the brachial plexus (BP) in head and neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Overall, 75 patients underwent definitive IMRT to a median total dose of 69.96 Gy in 33 fractions. The right BP and left BP were prospectively contoured as separate organs at risk. The GTV was related to BP dose using the unpaired t-test. Receiver operating characteristics curves were constructed to determine optimized volumetric thresholds of GTV-P and GTV-N corresponding to a maximum BP dose cutoff of > 66 Gy. Multivariate analyses were performed to account for factors associated with a higher maximal BP dose. A higher maximum BP dose (> 66 vs ≤ 66 Gy) correlated with a greater mean GTV-P (79.5 vs 30.8 cc; p = 0.001) and ipsilateral GTV-N (60.6 vs 19.8 cc; p = 0.014). When dichotomized by the optimized nodal volume, patients with an ipsilateral GTV-N ≥ 4.9 vs < 4.9 cc had a significant difference in maximum BP dose (64.2 vs 59.4 Gy; p = 0.001). Multivariate analysis confirmed that an ipsilateral GTV-N ≥ 4.9 cc was an independent predictor for the BP to receive a maximal dose of > 66 Gy when adjusted individually for BP volume, GTV-P, the use of a low anterior neck field technique, total planned radiation dose, and tumor category. Although both the primary and the nodal tumor volumes affected the BP maximal dose, the ipsilateral nodal tumor volume (GTV-N ≥ 4.9 cc) was an independent predictor for high maximal BP dose constraints in head and neck IMRT.

  19. Rehabilitation Considerations of a Brachial Plexus Injury with Complete Avulsion of C5 and C6 Nerve Roots in a College Football Player

    PubMed Central

    Saliba, Susan; Saliba, Ethan N.; Pugh, Kelli F.; Chhabra, Abhinav; Diduch, David

    2009-01-01

    Severe brachial plexus injuries are rare in sports, but they have catastrophic results with a significant loss of function in the involved upper extremity. Nerve root avulsions must be timely managed with prompt evaluation, accurate diagnosis, and surgical treatment to optimize the potential for a functional outcome. This case report describes the mechanism of injury, diagnostic evolution, surgical management, and rehabilitation of a college football player who sustained a traumatic complete nerve root avulsion of C5 and C6 (upper trunk of the brachial plexus). Diagnostics included clinical evaluation, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography myelogram, and electromyogram. Surgical planning included nerve grafting and neurotization (nerve transfer). Rehabilitation goals were to bring the hand to the face (active biceps function), to stabilize the shoulder for abduction and flexion, and to reduce neuropathic pain. Direct current stimulation, bracing, therapeutic exercise, and biofeedback were used to maximize the use of the athlete’s upper extremity. Although the athlete could not return to sport or normal function by most standards, his results were satisfactory in that he regained an ability to perform many activities of daily living. PMID:23015895

  20. Knee megaprosthesis: a salvage solution for severe open and complex distal femoral fracture associated with an ipsilateral brachial plexus injury (a case report with literature review).

    PubMed

    Ennaciri, Badr; Vasile, Christian; Lebredonchel, Thierry; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; Montbarbon, Eric; Beaudouin, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Complex distal femoral fractures in the young patient often occur as a result of high velocity trauma. Timely recognition and treatment is everything in such a situation, and it needs a robust staged management pathway to optimize the chance of limb preservation. We report a case of a motorcyclist admitted to the department of orthopedics at Chambery hospital, France, with a complex comminuted and open distal femoral fracture of the left leg, associated with a brachial plexus injury to the ipsilateral upper limb. On arrival to the emergency department, damage control stabilization and surgery was commenced, debridement of contaminated non-viable tissue, abundant antiseptic lavage and application of external fixation coupled with the use of antibiotic spacer. Following normalization of inflammatory markers and ensuring no clinical signs of infection, subsequent management consisted of joint reconstruction to achieve a functional knee. The external fixator and femoral spacer was removed and a modular megaprosthesis was implanted with a lateral gastrocnemius flap to cover the exposed knee joint and reinforce the extensor apparatus. Nerve graft to the left brachial plexus injury was performed at University Hospital of Grenoble. Our patient entered an intensive rehabilitation program and at 1 year follow-up achieved good knee function and sensation to the left upper limb. PMID:26421102

  1. Comparison between perivascular and perineural ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block using levobupivacaine: A prospective, randomised clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Ambi, Uday; Bhanupriya, PVV; Hulkund, Shivanand Y; Prakashappa, DS

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Ultrasound (US)-guided regional blocks are becoming increasingly popular as its use increases success rate, shortens block onset time and reduces complications. Currently, there exist two methods to perform US-guided axillary brachial plexus block (US-ABPB), the perivascular (PV) and the perineural (PN) techniques. We compared the two techniques to study the block characteristics and other variables using levobupivacaine. Methods: In this prospective, randomised trial, 60 patients were randomly allocated to receive a PV (n = 30) or PN (n = 30) US-ABPB. The local anaesthetic agent, 0.5% levobupivacaine and total volume of 36 ml of solution were identical in all the subjects. For both the groups, the musculocutaneous nerve was first located and then anaesthetised with 6 ml. Subsequently in the PV group, 30 ml was deposited dorsal to the axillary artery (6 o’clock position). In PN group, the median, ulnar and radial nerves were individually anaesthetised with volumes of 10 ml each. The onset and duration of sensory block, the onset and duration of motor block, number of failed blocks and complications were noted. Results: No difference was observed between the two groups in terms of success rate (PV - 93.33%, PN - 96.66%), sensory onset (PN: 8.07 (standard deviation [SD] ± 0.651) min and PV: 8.14 [SD ± 1.079] min; P = 0.754), motor onset (PN: 14.62 [SD ± 2.077] min and PV: 14.93 [SD ± 1.844] min; P = 0.557) and total duration of anaesthesia. No complications were observed in both groups. Conclusion: The PV technique provides a simple alternative for PN US-ABPB. In the light of emerging needling positions for PV and PN techniques, this study calls for large scale trials and much research in this area before one defines best or safe approach. PV technique may be considered as an alternative method for US-ABPB in patients with anatomical variation or difficulties in identifying the individual nerves. PMID:26644614

  2. Peripartum and neonatal factors associated with the persistence of neonatal brachial plexus palsy at 1 year: a review of 382 cases.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Thomas J; Chang, Kate W C; Chauhan, Suneet P; Yang, Lynda J S

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) occurs due to the stretching of the nerves of the brachial plexus before, during, or after delivery. NBPP can resolve spontaneously or become persistent. To determine if nerve surgery is indicated, predicting recovery is necessary but difficult. Historical attempts explored the association of recovery with only clinical and electrodiagnostic examinations. However, no data exist regarding the neonatal and peripartum factors associated with NBPP persistence. METHODS This retrospective cohort study involved all NBPP patients at the University of Michigan between 2005 and 2015. Peripartum and neonatal factors were assessed for their association with persistent NBPP at 1 year, as defined as the presence of musculoskeletal contractures or an active range of motion that deviated from normal by > 10° (shoulder, elbow, hand, and finger ranges of motion were recorded). Standard statistical methods were used. RESULTS Of 382 children with NBPP, 85% had persistent NBPP at 1 year. A wide range of neonatal and peripartum factors was explored. We found that cephalic presentation, induction or augmentation of labor, birth weight > 9 lbs, and the presence of Horner syndrome all significantly increased the odds of persistence at 1 year, while cesarean delivery and Narakas Grade I to II injury significantly reduced the odds of persistence. CONCLUSIONS Peripartum/neonatal factors were identified that significantly altered the odds of having persistent NBPP at 1 year. Combining these peripartum/neonatal factors with previously published clinical examination findings associated with persistence should allow the development of a prediction algorithm. The implementation of this algorithm may allow the earlier recognition of those cases likely to persist and thus enable earlier intervention, which may improve surgical outcomes. PMID:26799409

  3. Correlation of preoperative MRI with the long-term outcomes of dorsal root entry zone lesioning for brachial plexus avulsion pain.

    PubMed

    Ko, Andrew L; Ozpinar, Alp; Raskin, Jeffrey S; Magill, Stephen T; Raslan, Ahmed M; Burchiel, Kim J

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Lesioning of the dorsal root entry zone (DREZotomy) is an effective treatment for brachial plexus avulsion (BPA) pain. The role of preoperative assessment with MRI has been shown to be unreliable for determining affected levels; however, it may have a role in predicting pain outcomes. Here, DREZotomy outcomes are reviewed and preoperative MRI is examined as a possible prognostic factor. METHODS A retrospective review was performed of an institutional database of patients who had undergone brachial plexus DREZ procedures since 1995. Preoperative MRI was examined to assess damage to the DREZ or dorsal horn, as evidenced by avulsion of the DREZ or T2 hyperintensity within the spinal cord. Phone interviews were conducted to assess the long-term pain outcomes. RESULTS Between 1995 and 2012, 27 patients were found to have undergone cervical DREZ procedures for BPA. Of these, 15 had preoperative MR images of the cervical spine available for review. The outcomes were graded from 1 to 4 as poor (no significant relief), good (more than 50% pain relief), excellent (more than 75% pain relief), or pain free, respectively. Overall, DREZotomy was found to be a safe, efficacious, and durable procedure for relief of pain due to BPA. The initial success rate was 73%, which declined to 66% at a median follow-up time of 62.5 months. Damage to the DREZ or dorsal horn was significantly correlated with poorer outcomes (p = 0.02). The average outcomes in patients without MRI evidence of DREZ or dorsal horn damage was significantly higher than in patients with such damage (3.67 vs 1.75, t-test; p = 0.001). A longer duration of pain prior to operation was also a significant predictor of treatment success (p = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS Overall, the DREZotomy procedure has a 66% chance of achieving meaningful pain relief on long-term follow-up. Successful pain relief is associated with the lack of damage to the DREZ and dorsal horn on preoperative MRI. PMID:26406799

  4. Radiation Dose to the Brachial Plexus in Head-and-Neck Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Its Relationship to Tumor and Nodal Stage

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Minh Tam; Romesser, Paul B.; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Orlina, Lawrence; Willins, John

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine tumor factors contributing to brachial plexus (BP) dose in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) when the BP is routinely contoured as an organ at risk (OAR) for IMRT optimization. Methods and Materials From 2004 to 2011, a total of 114 HNC patients underwent IMRT to a total dose of 69.96 Gy in 33 fractions, with the right and left BP prospectively contoured as separate OARs in 111 patients and the ipsilateral BP contoured in 3 patients (total, 225 BP). Staging category T4 and N2/3 disease were present in 34 (29.8%) and 74 (64.9%) patients, respectively. During IMRT optimization, the intent was to keep the maximum BP dose to ≤60 Gy, but prioritizing tumor coverage over achieving the BP constraints. BP dose parameters were compared with tumor and nodal stage. Results With a median follow-up of 16.2 months, 43 (37.7%) patients had ≥24 months of follow-up with no brachial plexopathy reported. Mean BP volume was 8.2 ± 4.5 cm3. Mean BP maximum dose was 58.1 ± 12.2 Gy, and BP mean dose was 42.2 ± 11.3 Gy. The BP maximum dose was ≤60, ≤66, and ≤70 Gy in 122 (54.2%), 185 (82.2%), and 203 (90.2%) BP, respectively. For oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx sites, the mean BP maximum dose was 58.4 Gy and 63.4 Gy in T0–3 and T4 disease, respectively (p = 0.002). Mean BP maximum dose with N0/1 and N2/3 disease was 52.8 Gy and 60.9 Gy, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusions In head-and-neck IMRT, dose constraints for the BP are difficult to achieve to ≤60 to 66 Gy with T4 disease of the larynx, hypopharynx, and oropharynx or N2/3 disease. The risk of brachial plexopathy is likely very small in HNC patients undergoing IMRT, although longer follow-up is required. PMID:22300574

  5. Radiation Dose to the Brachial Plexus in Head-and-Neck Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Its Relationship to Tumor and Nodal Stage

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Minh Tam; Romesser, Paul B.; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Orlina, Lawrence; Willins, John

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine tumor factors contributing to brachial plexus (BP) dose in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) when the BP is routinely contoured as an organ at risk (OAR) for IMRT optimization. Methods and Materials: From 2004 to 2011, a total of 114 HNC patients underwent IMRT to a total dose of 69.96 Gy in 33 fractions, with the right and left BP prospectively contoured as separate OARs in 111 patients and the ipsilateral BP contoured in 3 patients (total, 225 BP). Staging category T4 and N2/3 disease were present in 34 (29.8%) and 74 (64.9%) patients, respectively. During IMRT optimization, the intent was to keep the maximum BP dose to {<=}60 Gy, but prioritizing tumor coverage over achieving the BP constraints. BP dose parameters were compared with tumor and nodal stage. Results: With a median follow-up of 16.2 months, 43 (37.7%) patients had {>=}24 months of follow-up with no brachial plexopathy reported. Mean BP volume was 8.2 {+-} 4.5 cm{sup 3}. Mean BP maximum dose was 58.1 {+-} 12.2 Gy, and BP mean dose was 42.2 {+-} 11.3 Gy. The BP maximum dose was {<=}60, {<=}66, and {<=}70 Gy in 122 (54.2%), 185 (82.2%), and 203 (90.2%) BP, respectively. For oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx sites, the mean BP maximum dose was 58.4 Gy and 63.4 Gy in T0-3 and T4 disease, respectively (p = 0.002). Mean BP maximum dose with N0/1 and N2/3 disease was 52.8 Gy and 60.9 Gy, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: In head-and-neck IMRT, dose constraints for the BP are difficult to achieve to {<=}60 to 66 Gy with T4 disease of the larynx, hypopharynx, and oropharynx or N2/3 disease. The risk of brachial plexopathy is likely very small in HNC patients undergoing IMRT, although longer follow-up is required.

  6. Effect of intravenous ondansetron on reducing the incidence of hypotension and bradycardia events during shoulder arthroscopy in sitting position under interscalene brachial plexus block: A prospective randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Nallam, Srinivasa Rao; Dara, Sudheer

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Sudden, profound hypotension and bradycardia events (HBEs) have been reported in more than 20% of patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy in the sitting position. The present study was designed to know whether intravenous (IV) ondansetron (selective 5-hydroxy tryptamine 3-antagonist) can help in reducing the HBEs associated with shoulder arthroscopy performed in sitting position under interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB). Methods: A total of 100 patients (age 20–50 years) undergoing shoulder arthroscopy performed in the sitting position under ISBPB were assigned randomly to one of the two groups: Group C received 10 ml of normal saline and Group T received 4 mg of ondansetron diluted in 10 ml of normal saline` IV. All patients received ISBPB using levobupivacaine 0.5%. Assessment of motor and sensory blockade, pulse rate, systolic blood pressure, respiration, and side effects were noted every 5 min for first 30 min and every 10 min till the end of surgery. HBEs were recorded in both groups. Results: IV injection of ondansetron significantly reduces the incidence of HBEs from 11 (22.44% in Group C) to 3 (6.1% in Group T). The duration of analgesia was significantly longer in Group C (8.1 ± 3.3) in comparison with Group T (6.3 ± 4.2 h). Conclusion: We conclude that 4 ml of IV ondansetron can significantly reduce the HBEs during shoulder arthroscopy done in the sitting position under ISBPB. PMID:26195831

  7. Results of wrist extension reconstruction in C5-8 brachial plexus palsy by transferring the pronator quadratus motor branch to the extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio; Tacca, Cristiano Paulo

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to report the results of pronator quadratus (PQ) motor branch transfers to the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) motor branch to reconstruct wrist extension in C5-8 root lesions of the brachial plexus. METHODS Twenty-eight patients, averaging 24 years of age, with C5-8 root injuries underwent operations an average of 7 months after their accident. In 19 patients, wrist extension was impossible at baseline, whereas in 9 patients wrist extension was managed by activating thumb and wrist extensors. When these 9 patients grasped an object, their wrist dropped and grasp strength was lost. Wrist extension was reconstructed by transferring the PQ motor to the ECRB motor branch. After surgery, patients were followed for at least 12 months, with final follow-up an average of 22 months after surgery. RESULTS Successful reinnervation of the ECRB was demonstrated in 27 of the 28 patients. In 25 of the patients, wrist extension scored M4, and in 2 it scored M3. CONCLUSIONS In C5-8 root injuries, wrist extension can be predictably reconstructed by transferring the PQ motor branch to reinnervate the ECRB. PMID:26430841

  8. Ontology-based image navigation: exploring 3.0-T MR neurography of the brachial plexus using AIM and RadLex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kenneth C; Salunkhe, Aditya R; Morrison, James J; Lee, Pearlene P; Mejino, José L V; Detwiler, Landon T; Brinkley, James F; Siegel, Eliot L; Rubin, Daniel L; Carrino, John A

    2015-01-01

    Disorders of the peripheral nervous system have traditionally been evaluated using clinical history, physical examination, and electrodiagnostic testing. In selected cases, imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance (MR) neurography may help further localize or characterize abnormalities associated with peripheral neuropathies, and the clinical importance of such techniques is increasing. However, MR image interpretation with respect to peripheral nerve anatomy and disease often presents a diagnostic challenge because the relevant knowledge base remains relatively specialized. Using the radiology knowledge resource RadLex®, a series of RadLex queries, the Annotation and Image Markup standard for image annotation, and a Web services-based software architecture, the authors developed an application that allows ontology-assisted image navigation. The application provides an image browsing interface, allowing users to visually inspect the imaging appearance of anatomic structures. By interacting directly with the images, users can access additional structure-related information that is derived from RadLex (eg, muscle innervation, muscle attachment sites). These data also serve as conceptual links to navigate from one portion of the imaging atlas to another. With 3.0-T MR neurography of the brachial plexus as the initial area of interest, the resulting application provides support to radiologists in the image interpretation process by allowing efficient exploration of the MR imaging appearance of relevant nerve segments, muscles, bone structures, vascular landmarks, anatomic spaces, and entrapment sites, and the investigation of neuromuscular relationships. PMID:25590394

  9. Ontology-based Image Navigation: Exploring 3.0-T MR Neurography of the Brachial Plexus Using AIM and RadLex

    PubMed Central

    Salunkhe, Aditya R.; Morrison, James J.; Lee, Pearlene P.; Mejino, José L. V.; Detwiler, Landon T.; Brinkley, James F.; Siegel, Eliot L.; Rubin, Daniel L.; Carrino, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Disorders of the peripheral nervous system have traditionally been evaluated using clinical history, physical examination, and electrodiagnostic testing. In selected cases, imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance (MR) neurography may help further localize or characterize abnormalities associated with peripheral neuropathies, and the clinical importance of such techniques is increasing. However, MR image interpretation with respect to peripheral nerve anatomy and disease often presents a diagnostic challenge because the relevant knowledge base remains relatively specialized. Using the radiology knowledge resource RadLex®, a series of RadLex queries, the Annotation and Image Markup standard for image annotation, and a Web services–based software architecture, the authors developed an application that allows ontology-assisted image navigation. The application provides an image browsing interface, allowing users to visually inspect the imaging appearance of anatomic structures. By interacting directly with the images, users can access additional structure-related information that is derived from RadLex (eg, muscle innervation, muscle attachment sites). These data also serve as conceptual links to navigate from one portion of the imaging atlas to another. With 3.0-T MR neurography of the brachial plexus as the initial area of interest, the resulting application provides support to radiologists in the image interpretation process by allowing efficient exploration of the MR imaging appearance of relevant nerve segments, muscles, bone structures, vascular landmarks, anatomic spaces, and entrapment sites, and the investigation of neuromuscular relationships. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:25590394

  10. Co-infusion of autologous adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells, a viable therapy for post-traumatic brachial plexus injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Umang G; Vanikar, Aruna V; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is emerging as a viable approach in regenerative medicine. A 31-year-old male with brachial plexus injury had complete sensory-motor loss since 16 years with right pseudo-meningocele at C5-D1 levels and extra-spinal extension up to C7-D1, with avulsion on magnetic resonance imaging and irreversible damage. We generated adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (N-AD-MSC) and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSC-BM). Neuronal stem cells expressed β-3 tubulin and glial fibrillary acid protein which was confirmed on immunofluorescence. On day 14, 2.8 ml stem cell inoculum was infused under local anesthesia in right brachial plexus sheath by brachial block technique under ultrasonography guidance with a 1.5-inch-long 23 gauge needle. Nucleated cell count was 2 × 10 4 /μl, CD34+ was 0.06%, and CD45-/90+ and CD45-/73+ were 41.63% and 20.36%, respectively. No untoward effects were noted. He has sustained recovery with re-innervation over a follow-up of 4 years documented on electromyography-nerve conduction velocity study. PMID:25116721

  11. Neurotization of free gracilis transfer with the brachialis branch of the musculocutaneous nerve to restore finger and thumb flexion in lower trunk brachial plexus injury: an anatomical study and case report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Zou, Xue-jun; Fu, Guo; Qin, Ben-Gang; Yang, Jian-Tao; Li, Xiang-Ming; Hou, Yi; Qi, Jian; Li, Ping; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Gu, Li-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the feasibility of using free gracilis muscle transfer along with the brachialis muscle branch of the musculocutaneous nerve to restore finger and thumb flexion in lower trunk brachial plexus injury according to an anatomical study and a case report. METHODS: Thirty formalin-fixed upper extremities from 15 adult cadavers were used in this study. The distance from the point at which the brachialis muscle branch of the musculocutaneous nerve originates to the midpoint of the humeral condylar was measured, as well as the length, diameter, course and branch type of the brachialis muscle branch of the musculocutaneous nerve. An 18-year-old male who sustained an injury to the left brachial plexus underwent free gracilis transfer using the brachialis muscle branch of the musculocutaneous nerve as the donor nerve to restore finger and thumb flexion. Elbow flexion power and hand grip strength were recorded according to British Medical Research Council standards. Postoperative measures of the total active motion of the fingers were obtained monthly. RESULTS: The mean length and diameter of the brachialis muscle branch of the musculocutaneous nerve were 52.66±6.45 and 1.39±0.09 mm, respectively, and three branching types were observed. For the patient, the first gracilis contraction occurred during the 4th month. A noticeable improvement was observed in digit flexion one year later; the muscle power was M4, and the total active motion of the fingers was 209°. CONCLUSIONS: Repairing injury to the lower trunk of the brachial plexus by transferring the brachialis muscle branch of the musculocutaneous nerve to the anterior branch of the obturator nerve using a tension-free direct suture is technically feasible, and the clinical outcome was satisfactory in a single surgical patient. PMID:27166768

  12. Dosimetric benefits of placing dose constraints on the brachial plexus in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hailan; Lu, Heming; Yuan, Hong; Huang, Huixian; Wei, Yinglin; Zhang, Yanxian; Liu, Xu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether placing dose constraints on the brachial plexus (BP) could provide dosimetric benefits in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Planning CT images for 30 patients with NPC treated with definitive IMRT were retrospectively reviewed. Target volumes, the BP and other critical structures were delineated; two separate IMRT plans were designed for each patient: one set no restrictions for the BP; the other considered the BP as a critical structure for which a maximum dose limit of ≤66 Gy was set. No significant differences between the two plans were observed in the conformity index, homogeneity index, maximum dose to the planning target volumes (PTVs), minimum dose to the PTVs, percentages of the volume of the PTVnx and PTVnd receiving more than 110% of the prescribed dose, or percentages of the volume of the PTVs receiving 95% and > 93% of the prescribed dose. Dose constraints significantly reduced the maximum dose, mean dose, V45, V50, V54, V60, V66 and V70 to the BP. Dose constraints significantly reduced the maximum dose to the BP, V45, V60 and V66 in both N0–1 and N2–3 disease; however, the magnitude of the dosimetric gain for each parameter between N0–1 and N2–3 disease was not significantly different, except for the V60 and V66. In conclusion, placing dose constraints on the BP can significantly decrease the irradiated volume and dose, without compromising adequate dose delivery to the target volume. PMID:25173085

  13. Efficacy of two cannabis based medicinal extracts for relief of central neuropathic pain from brachial plexus avulsion: results of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Berman, Jonathan S; Symonds, Catherine; Birch, Rolfe

    2004-12-01

    The objective was to investigate the effectiveness of cannabis-based medicines for treatment of chronic pain associated with brachial plexus root avulsion. This condition is an excellent human model of central neuropathic pain as it represents an unusually homogenous group in terms of anatomical location of injury, pain descriptions and patient demographics. Forty-eight patients with at least one avulsed root and baseline pain score of four or more on an 11-point ordinate scale participated in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three period crossover study. All patients had intractable symptoms regardless of current analgesic therapy. Patients entered a baseline period of 2 weeks, followed by three, 2-week treatment periods during each of which they received one of three oromucosal spray preparations. These were placebo and two whole plant extracts of Cannabis sativa L.: GW-1000-02 (Sativex), containing Delta(9)tetrahydrocannabinol (THC):cannabidiol (CBD) in an approximate 1:1 ratio and GW-2000-02, containing primarily THC. The primary outcome measure was the mean pain severity score during the last 7 days of treatment. Secondary outcome measures included pain related quality of life assessments. The primary outcome measure failed to fall by the two points defined in our hypothesis. However, both this measure and measures of sleep showed statistically significant improvements. The study medications were generally well tolerated with the majority of adverse events, including intoxication type reactions, being mild to moderate in severity and resolving spontaneously. Studies of longer duration in neuropathic pain are required to confirm a clinically relevant, improvement in the treatment of this condition. PMID:15561385

  14. Addition of a third field significantly increases dose to the brachial plexus for patients undergoing tangential whole-breast therapy after lumpectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Stanic, Sinisa; Mathai, Mathew; Mayadev, Jyoti S.; Do, Ly V.; Purdy, James A.; Chen, Allen M.

    2012-07-01

    Our goal was to evaluate brachial plexus (BP) dose with and without the use of supraclavicular (SCL) irradiation in patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy with whole-breast radiation therapy (RT) after lumpectomy. Using the standardized Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-endorsed guidelines delineation, we contoured the BP for 10 postlumpectomy breast cancer patients. The radiation dose to the whole breast was 50.4 Gy using tangential fields in 1.8-Gy fractions, followed by a conedown to the operative bed using electrons (10 Gy). The prescription dose to the SCL field was 50.4 Gy, delivered to 3-cm depth. The mean BP volume was 14.5 {+-} 1.5 cm{sup 3}. With tangential fields alone, the median mean dose to the BP was 0.57 Gy, the median maximum dose was 1.93 Gy, and the irradiated volume of the BP receiving 40, 45, and 50 Gy was 0%. When the third (SCL field) was added, the dose to the BP was significantly increased (P = .01): the median mean dose to the BP was 40.60 Gy, and the median maximum dose was 52.22 Gy. With 3-field RT, the median irradiated volume of the BP receiving 40, 45, and 50 Gy was 83.5%, 68.5%, and 24.6%, respectively. The addition of the SCL field significantly increases dose to the BP. The possibility of increasing the risk of BP morbidity should be considered in the context of clinical decision making.

  15. Nerve injuries due to obstetric trauma.

    PubMed

    Bhat, V; Ravikumara; Oumachigui, A

    1995-01-01

    The incidence of nerve injuries among 32,637 deliveries over a period of ten years was 1.81/1000. Brachial plexus injury (1/1000) and facial nerve injury (0.74/1000) accounted for 98% of nerve injuries. Both the right and left side were involved equally. Bilateral nerve injury was not seen. Lack of antenatal care, macrosomia, abnormal presentations, and operative vaginal deliveries significantly increased the risk of nerve injuries. These babies had significantly higher incidence of meconium stained liquor and intrapartum asphyxia. Parity of the mother, gestational age and sex of the baby did not have significant role in the causation of nerve injuries. Injuries to brachial plexus and facial nerve were seen even in babies born by caesarean section, when it was performed for obstructed labour caused by cephalo-pelvic disproportion and abnormal presentations. Three babies with injuries expired and forty-three could be followed up for varying periods. None of the babies had residual defects. Detection of cephalopelvic disproportion and abnormal lie in the third trimester and their appropriate management would decrease the incidence of obstetric palsies to a significant extent. PMID:10829869

  16. Brachial plexus injury in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... A loss of movement or weakness of the arm may occur if these nerves are damaged. This ... head-first delivery Pressure on the baby's raised arms during a breech (feet-first) delivery There are ...

  17. Choroid Plexus

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread widely via the cerebrospinal fluid. Choroid plexus papilloma is a rare, benign (noncancerous) tumor. Choroid plexus ... the malignant (cancerous) form of the choroid plexus papilloma. Choroid plexus carcinoma occurs primarily in children. Location ...

  18. Karolinska institutet 200-year anniversary. Symposium on traumatic injuries in the nervous system: injuries to the spinal cord and peripheral nervous system - injuries and repair, pain problems, lesions to brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Sköld, Mattias K; Svensson, Mikael; Tsao, Jack; Hultgren, Thomas; Landegren, Thomas; Carlstedt, Thomas; Cullheim, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    The Karolinska Institutet 200-year anniversary symposium on injuries to the spinal cord and peripheral nervous system gathered expertise in the spinal cord, spinal nerve, and peripheral nerve injury field spanning from molecular prerequisites for nerve regeneration to clinical methods in nerve repair and rehabilitation. The topics presented at the meeting covered findings on adult neural stem cells that when transplanted to the hypoglossal nucleus in the rat could integrate with its host and promote neuron survival. Studies on vascularization after intraspinal replantation of ventral nerve roots and microarray studies in ventral root replantation as a tool for mapping of biological patterns typical for neuronal regeneration were discussed. Different immune molecules in neurons and glia and their very specific roles in synapse plasticity after injury were presented. Novel strategies in repair of injured peripheral nerves with ethyl-cyanoacrylate adhesive showed functional recovery comparable to that of conventional epineural sutures. Various aspects on surgical techniques which are available to improve function of the limb, once the nerve regeneration after brachial plexus lesions and repair has reached its limit were presented. Moreover, neurogenic pain after amputation and its treatment with mirror therapy were shown to be followed by dramatic decrease in phantom limb pain. Finally clinical experiences on surgical techniques to repair avulsed spinal nerve root and the motoric as well as sensoric regain of function were presented. PMID:21629875

  19. Idiopathic brachial neuritis in a child: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shikha; Bhatt, Girish Chandra; Rai, Nirendra; Bhan, Bhavna Dhingra

    2014-01-01

    Brachial neuritis is a rare disease in children, affecting mainly the lower motor neurons of the brachial plexus and/or individual nerves or nerve branches. We report a case of idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis in a 2½-year-old female child admitted with acute respiratory distress and given antibiotic therapy following which she developed weakness of the left hand. She was diagnosed as a case of idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis and was given supportive care. Although, the association with antibiotic therapy in this case could be incidental, indeed it is intriguing and requires further studies. PMID:25624937

  20. Idiopathic brachial neuritis in a child: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shikha; Bhatt, Girish Chandra; Rai, Nirendra; Bhan, Bhavna Dhingra

    2014-01-01

    Brachial neuritis is a rare disease in children, affecting mainly the lower motor neurons of the brachial plexus and/or individual nerves or nerve branches. We report a case of idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis in a 2½-year-old female child admitted with acute respiratory distress and given antibiotic therapy following which she developed weakness of the left hand. She was diagnosed as a case of idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis and was given supportive care. Although, the association with antibiotic therapy in this case could be incidental, indeed it is intriguing and requires further studies. PMID:25624937

  1. Brachial neuritis following a corticosteroid injection.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Matthew; Fulcher, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This report presents a case of brachial neuritis following a subacromial corticosteroid injection. The patient developed an anterior interosseous neuropathy shortly after the injection, with no other trigger being identified. This neuropathy has unfortunately not shown any sign of recovery at 2 years. The authors propose that corticosteroid injection be added to the list of possible triggering events of brachial neuritis and highlight the frequent use of oral corticosteroids in its treatment. (1) The injection of local anaesthetic and corticosteroid should be considered as a potential trigger for brachial neuritis. (2) Brachial neuritis should be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients presenting with severe arm pain and weakness. (3) The nerves originating from the upper trunk of the brachial plexus are most commonly affected. (4) The anterior interosseous nerve is involved in one-third of cases. PMID:24596414

  2. High resolution neurography of the lumbosacral plexus on 3T magneteic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cejas, C; Escobar, I; Serra, M; Barroso, F

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance neurography is a technique that complements clinical and electrophysiological study of the peripheral nerves and brachial and lumbosacral plexuses. Numerous focal processes (inflammatory, traumatic, primary tumors, secondary tumors) and diffuse processes (diabetic polyneuropathy, chronic idiopathic demyelinating polyneuropathy due to amyloidosis or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease) can involve the lumbosacral plexus. This article reviews the anatomy of the lumbosacral plexus, describes the technique for neurography of the plexus at our institution, and shows the diverse diseases that affect it. PMID:25447367

  3. Lightning strike-induced brachial plexopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Amita N.; Kasundra, Gaurav M.; Khichar, Subhakaran; Bhushan, Bharat S. K.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a patient who presented with a history of lightning strike injury. Following the injury, he sustained acute right upper limb weakness with pain. Clinically, the lesion was located to the upper and middle trunk of the right brachial plexus, and the same confirmed with electrophysiological studies. Nerve damage due to lightning injuries is considered very rare, and a plexus damage has been described infrequently, if ever. Thus, the proposed hypothesis that lightning rarely causes neuropathy, as against high-voltage electric current, due to its shorter duration of exposure not causing severe burns which lead to nerve damage, needs to be reconsidered. PMID:25288846

  4. Characteristic features of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) presenting with brachial plexopathy in soldiers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Eun

    2014-11-15

    A brachial plexus lesion is not common in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP). We report the clinical and electrodiagnostic features of young soldiers with HNPP presenting with brachial plexopathy. By reviewing 2year medical records from Korean military hospitals, we identified soldiers with brachial plexus lesions. Among them, patients diagnosed with HNPP were determined and clinical and electrophysiological findings were compared between HNPP and non-HNPP patients with a brachial plexus lesion. Thirteen patients (6.8%) were diagnosed with HNPP among 189 patients with a brachial plexus lesion. Push-ups, as either a punishment or an exercise, was the most frequent preceding event in HNPP patients (76.9%), whereas it was rare in non-HNPP patients. The distal motor latency of the median nerve showed the highest sensitivity (90.9%) and specificity (100%) for HNPP in patients with a brachial plexus lesion. In conclusion, HNPP should be suspected in patients with brachial plexopathy if brachial plexopathy develops after push-ups or if the distal motor latency of median nerves is prolonged. PMID:25175852

  5. Kaiser Wilhelm syndrome: obstetric trauma or placental insult in a historical case mimicking Erb's palsy.

    PubMed

    Jain, Venu; Sebire, Neil J; Talbert, David G

    2005-01-01

    Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany (1859) developed a weak and noticeably short left arm during childhood, commonly attributed to nerve damage caused by the use of excessive force during his difficult breech delivery, Erb's palsy. However, Wilhelm's mother had a severe fall when about four months pregnant and the child was reported to be very thin at birth, suggesting intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Wilhelm blamed the British doctor for his deformity, and formed an enmity, which ultimately led to the 1914-1918 world war. We propose an alternative theory, considering the possibility of placental damage and consequential flow redistribution caused by the fall. In severe IUGR, the Doppler pulsatility index (PI) of the brachial arteries differs, that of the right arm being lower than the left. We used a computer model of the fetoplacental unit and reduced its functional placental area until such resistance asymmetry was produced. This would occur in extreme hypoxia when flow in the aortic isthmus is reversed, bringing right ventricular blood of lower oxygen content to the left subclavian artery. The reduced PI in the right arm is a normal vasodilatory hypoxic response, but the apparently normal PI in the left arm results from decreased demand due to metabolic failure. We suggest that the nerve damage affecting the Kaiser's left arm was due to placental insufficiency during pregnancy, and not mechanical brachial plexus injury during delivery. We further suggest that such a mechanism be called Kaiser Wilhelm syndrome to distinguish it from Erb's palsy originating from obstetric trauma. PMID:15893138

  6. Brachial Plexopathy due to Myeloid Sarcoma in a Patient With Acute Myeloid Leukemia After Allogenic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ha, Yumi; Sung, Duk Hyun; Park, Yoonhong; Kim, Du Hwan

    2013-04-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a solid, extramedullary tumor comprising of immature myeloid cells. It may occur in any organ; however, the invasion of peripheral nervous system is rare. Herein, we report the case of myeloid sarcoma on the brachial plexus. A 37-year-old woman with acute myelogenous leukemia achieved complete remission after chemotherapy. One year later, she presented right shoulder pain, progressive weakness in the right upper extremity and hypesthesia. Based on magnetic resonance images (MRI) and electrophysiologic study, a provisional diagnosis of brachial plexus neuritis was done and hence steroid pulse therapy was carried out. Three months later the patient presented epigastric pain. After upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, myeloid sarcoma of gastrointestinal tract was confirmed pathologically. Moreover, 18-fluoride fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed a fusiform shaped mass lesion at the brachial plexus overlapping with previous high signal lesion on the MRI. Therefore, we concluded the final diagnosis as brachial plexopathy due to myeloid sarcoma. PMID:23705126

  7. Electrodiagnosis of brachial plexopathies and proximal upper extremity neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the normal anatomy of the brachial plexus and its major terminal branches, as well as the major causes and clinical presentations of lesions of these structures. An approach to electrodiagnosis of brachial plexopathies and proximal upper extremity neuropathies is provided, with an emphasis on those nerve conduction studies and portions of the needle examination, which permit localization of lesions to specific trunks, cords, and terminal branches. The importance of specific sensory nerve conduction studies for differentiating plexopathies from radiculopathies and mononeuropathies is emphasized. PMID:23177028

  8. Pediatric Stinger Syndrome: Acute Brachial Plexopathy After Minor Trauma.

    PubMed

    Quong, Whitney L; Hynes, Sally L; Arneja, Jugpal S

    2015-11-01

    The "stinger" or "burner" is a form of transient brachial plexopathy termed for its characteristic knife-like pain extending from the neck to the fingertips. Muscle weakness and paresthesia are oftentimes associated symptoms and are similarly temporary. Commonly observed in athletes of contact sports, the stinger results from high force trauma causing either traction/direct compression to the brachial plexus or extension/compression of the cervical nerve roots. We describe a pediatric case of a stinger in a 14-year-old boy, which was caused by a relatively low force trauma accident. Our management strategy and recommendations are discussed. PMID:26893985

  9. Obstetrical Forceps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Marshall inventors Seth Lawson and Stanley Smeltzer display a pair of obstetrical forceps they designed. The forceps, made from composite space-age materials, measure the force applied during instrument-assisted delivery. The new forceps will help medical students get a feel for instrument-assisted deliveries before entering practice.

  10. Contribution of plexus MRI in the diagnosis of atypical chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lozeron, Pierre; Lacour, Marie-Christine; Vandendries, Christophe; Théaudin, Marie; Cauquil, Cécile; Denier, Christian; Lacroix, Catherine; Adams, David

    2016-01-15

    Nerve enlargement has early been recognized in CIDP and plexus MRI hypertrophy has been reported in typical CIDP cases. Our aim is to determine plexus MRI value in the diagnosis of CIDP with an initial atypical presentation, which, up to now, has not been demonstrated. Retrospective study of 33 consecutive patients suspected of CIDP. Plexus MRI was performed on the most affected territory (brachial or lumbar). Were assessed: plexus trophicity, T2-STIR signal intensity and gadolinium enhancement. Final CIDP diagnosis was made after comprehensive workup. A histo-radiological correlation was performed. Final CIDP diagnosis was made in 25 (76%) including 21 with initial atypical clinical presentation. Eleven CIDP patients (52%) with initial atypical clinical presentation had abnormal plexus MRI including 9 suggestive of CIDP (43%) and none of the patients with an alternative diagnosis. Hypertrophy of the proximal plexus and/or extraforaminal roots was found in 8 cases and Gadolinium enhancement in 2 cases. Abnormalities were more frequent on brachial (86%) than lumbosacral MRIs (29%) and asymmetrical (72%) and most often associated with histological signs of demyelination. The nerve biopsy was suggestive of CIDP in 9/13 patients with normal MRI. Plexus MRI seems useful in the diagnostic strategy of patients with suspicion of CIDP with atypical presentation. Nerve biopsy remains important when other investigations are inconclusive. PMID:26723995

  11. A case of relapsing-remitting facial palsy and ipsilateral brachial plexopathy caused by HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Alstadhaug, Karl B; Kvarenes, Hanne W; Prytz, Jan; Vedeler, Christian

    2016-05-01

    The etiologies of Bell's palsy and brachial neuritis remain uncertain, and the conditions rarely co-occur or reoccur. Here we present a woman in her twenties who had several relapsing-remitting episodes with left-sided facial palsy and brachial neuropathy. The episodes always started with painful left-sided oral blisters. Repeat PCRs HSV-1 DNA from oral vesicular lesions were positive. Extensive screening did not reveal any other underlying cause. Findings on MRI T2-weighted brachial plexus STIR images, using a 3.0-Tesla scanner during an episode, were compatible with brachial plexus neuritis. Except a mannose-binding lectin deficiency, a congenital complement deficiency that is frequently found in the general Caucasian population, no other immunodeficiency was demonstrated in our patient. In vitro resistance to acyclovir was tested negative, but despite prophylactic treatment with the drug in high doses, relapses recurred. To our knowledge, this is the first ever reported documentation of relapsing-remitting facial and brachial plexus neuritis caused by HSV-1. PMID:26991053

  12. Brachial Plexopathy/Nerve Root Avulsion in a Football Player: The Role of Electrodiagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Radecki, Jeffrey; Wolfe, Scott W.; Strauss, Helene L.; Mintz, Douglas N.

    2008-01-01

    Electromyography (EMG) studies are a useful tool in anatomical localization of peripheral nerve and brachial plexus injuries. They are especially helpful in distinguishing between brachial plexopathy and nerve root injuries where surgical intervention may be indicated. EMG can also assist in providing prognostic information after nerve injury as well as after nerve repair. In this case report, a football player presented with weakness in his right upper limb after a traction/traumatic injury to the right brachial plexus. EMG studies revealed evidence of both pre- and postganglionic injury to multiple cervical roots. The injury was substantial enough to cause nerve root avulsions involving the C6 and C7 levels. Surgical referral led to nerve grafts targeted at regaining function in shoulder abduction and elbow flexion. After surgery, the patient’s progress was monitored utilizing EMG to assist in identifying true axonal regeneration. PMID:18751870

  13. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy: Neurological follow-up in 161 recurrence-free breast cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Johannsen, L.; Schroder, H.; Rose, C. )

    1993-04-30

    The purpose was to assess the incidence and clinical manifestations of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy in breast cancer patients, treated according to the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group protocols. One hundred and sixty-one recurrence-free breast cancer patients were examined for radiation-induced brachial plexopathy after a median follow-up period of 50 months (13-99 months). After total mastectomy and axillary node sampling, high-risk patients were randomized to adjuvant therapy. One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy with 50 Gy in 25 daily fractions over 5 weeks. In addition, 82 of these patients received cytotoxic therapy (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) and 46 received tamoxifen. Five percent and 9% of the patients receiving radiotherapy had disabling and mild radiation-induced brachial plexopathy, respectively. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy was more frequent in patients receiving cytotoxic therapy (p = 0.04) and in younger patients (p = 0.04). The clinical manifestations were paraesthesia (100%), hypaesthesia (74%), weakness (58%), decreased muscle stretch reflexes (47%), and pain (47%). The brachial plexus is more vulnerable to large fraction size. Fractions of 2 Gy or less are advisable. Cytotoxic therapy adds to the damaging effect of radiotherapy. Peripheral nerves in younger patients seems more vulnerable. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy occurs mainly as diffuse damage to the brachial plexus. 24 refs., 9 tabs.

  14. Shoulder pain and isolated brachial plexopathy.

    PubMed

    Kishan, Amar U; Syed, Sana; Fiorito-Torres, Franchesca; Thakore-James, Manisha

    2012-01-01

    Pancoast syndrome, classically considered as a constellation of (1) pain along the C8-T2 dermatomes, (2) weakness and atrophy of the hand and (3) Horner's syndrome, often presents a diagnostic challenge. In fact, it may manifest as a singular orthopaedic complaint, prompting a futile barrage of tests and referrals. The authors present the case of an elderly man who initially presented with severe shoulder pain. Due to progressive pain and weakness, he was referred to rheumatology and was treated with corticosteroid injections for a presumed musculoskeletal lesion. Ultimately, he manifested gross muscular atrophy and worsening pain, prompting a referral to neurology. An electromyogram (EMG) suggested a lower brachial plexopathy, and a follow-up brachial plexus MRI identified a large Pancoast tumour. Unfortunately, his disease was rapidly progressive, and he passed away within 2 months. While the MRI remains the gold standard for diagnosing Pancoast syndrome, an EMG can facilitate diagnosis in difficult cases such as this one. PMID:22744250

  15. Early transient radiation-induced brachial plexopathy in locally advanced head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Etiz, Durmus

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Early transient brachial plexopathy following radiotherapy (RT) in patients with head and neck cancer may be underreported and associated with a dose-response. Our purpose was to determine the incidence of early transient radiation-ınduced brachial plexopathy (RIBP) in patients receiving primary RT (± chemotherapy) for locally advanced head and neck cancer (HNC). Material and methods Twenty-seven locally advanced HNC patients who have no finding of brachial plexopathy at the diagnosis were evaluated 3 times by a specifically developed 13-item questionnaire for determining early transient RIBP. The 54 brachial plexus in 27 patients were delineated and dose volume histograms were calculated. Results Median follow-up period was 28 (range: 15–40) months. The mean BP volume was 7.9 ±3.6 cm3, and the mean and maximum doses to the BP were 45.3 (range: 32.3–59.3) Gy, and 59.4 (range: 41.4–70.3) Gy, respectively. Maximum dose to the BP was ≥ 70 Gy only in 2 nasopharyngeal cancer patients. Two (7%) early transient RIBP were reported at 7th and 8th month after RT under maximum 67.17 and 55.37 Gy, and mean 52.95 and 38.60 Gy RT doses. Conclusions Two (7%) early RIBP were seen in the patient group, although brachial plexus maximum doses were ≥ 66 Gy in 75% of patients. PMID:27095943

  16. Plexus structure imaging with thin slab MR neurography: rotating frames, fly-throughs, and composite projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raphael, David T.; McIntee, Diane; Tsuruda, Jay S.; Colletti, Patrick; Tatevossian, Raymond; Frazier, James

    2006-03-01

    We explored multiple image processing approaches by which to display the segmented adult brachial plexus in a three-dimensional manner. Magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) 1.5-Tesla scans with STIR sequences, which preferentially highlight nerves, were performed in adult volunteers to generate high-resolution raw images. Using multiple software programs, the raw MRN images were then manipulated so as to achieve segmentation of plexus neurovascular structures, which were incorporated into three different visualization schemes: rotating upper thoracic girdle skeletal frames, dynamic fly-throughs parallel to the clavicle, and thin slab volume-rendered composite projections.

  17. Brachial artery pseudoaneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Katie; Radwan, Rami; Shingler, Guy; Davies, Chris

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of an elderly man who presented with an upper arm swelling that had developed following a humeral fracture 8 months previously. The swelling was painless but associated with significantly diminished motor function of his right hand and concurrent paraesthaesia. On examination, a large pulsatile mass was identified and CT angiography confirmed the presence of an 11×7 cm brachial artery pseudoaneurysm. The patient underwent surgical repair in which a fragment of the humerus was found to have punctured the brachial artery resulting in a pseudoaneurysm. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative period and was discharged 2 days later having regained some motor function in his right hand. PMID:24859555

  18. Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Valverde, E; Ferrer-Oliveras, R; Alijotas-Reig, J

    2016-04-01

    Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome is an acquired autoimmune disorder that is associated with various obstetric complications and, in the absence of prior history of thrombosis, with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies directed against other phospholipids, proteins called cofactors or PL-cofactor complexes. Although the obstetric complications have been related to the procoagulant properties of antiphospholipid antibodies, pathological studies of human placenta have shown the proinflammatory capacity of antiphospholipid antibodies via the complement system and proinflammatory cytokines. There is no general agreement on which antiphospholipid antibodies profile (laboratory) confers the greatest obstetric risk, but the best candidates are categories I and IIa. Combined treatment with low doses of aspirin and heparin achieves good obstetric and maternal outcomes. In this study, we also review the therapeutic possibilities in refractory cases, although the likelihood of progressing to other autoimmune diseases is low. We briefly comment on incomplete obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome, also known as antiphospholipid antibody-mediated pregnancy morbidity syndrome. PMID:26603476

  19. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ruying; Rong, Xiaoming; Wu, Rong; Cheng, Jinping; Huang, Xiaolong; Luo, Jinjun; Tang, Yamei

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RIBP) is one of the late complications in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients who received radiotherapy. We conducted a retrospective study to investigate its clinical characteristics and risk factors. Thirty-onepatients with RIBP after radiotherapy for NPC were enrolled. Clinical manifestations of RIBP, electrophysiologic data, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the correlation between irradiation strategy and incidence of RIBP were evaluated. The mean latency at the onset of RIBP was 4.26 years. Of the symptoms, paraesthesia usually presented first (51.6%), followed by pain (22.6%) and weakness (22.6%). The major symptoms included paraesthesia (90.3%), pain (54.8%), weakness (48.4%), fasciculation (19.3%) and muscle atrophy (9.7%). Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and electromyography (EMG) disclosed that pathological changes of brachial plexus involved predominantly in the upper and middle trunks in distribution. MRI of the brachial plexus showed hyper-intensity on T1, T2, post-contrast T1 and diffusion weighted whole body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) images in lower cervical nerves. Radiotherapy with Gross Tumor volume (GTVnd) and therapeutic dose (mean 66.8±2.8Gy) for patients with lower cervical lymph node metastasis was related to a significantly higher incidence of RIBP (P<0.001). Thus, RIBP is a severe and progressive complication of NPC after radiotherapy. The clinical symptoms are predominantly involved in upper and middle trunk of the brachial plexus in distribution. Lower cervical lymph node metastasis and corresponding radiotherapy might cause a significant increase of the RIBP incidence. PMID:26934119

  20. Combined Spinal Cord Stimulation and Peripheral Nerve Stimulation for Brachial Plexopathy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Hye; Choi, Shu Chung; Kim, Dong Kyu; Sung, Choon Ho; Chon, Jin Young; Hong, Sung Jin; Lee, Ji Young; Moon, Ho Sik

    2016-03-01

    Brachial plexopathy usually results from an iatrogenic brachial plexus injury and can sometimes cause severe chronic pain and disability. There are a number of possible treatments for this condition, including medication, physical therapy, nerve blocks, and neuromodulation, but they are not always successful. Recently, combined spinal cord stimulation (SCS) and peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) have been tried for various chronic pain diseases because of their different mechanisms of action.Here, we describe the case of a 54-year-old man who was diagnosed with brachial plexopathy 8 years ago. He underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery to remove a superior mediastinal mass. However, his brachial plexus was damaged during the surgery. Although he had received various treatments, the pain did not improve. For the management of intractable severe pain, he underwent SCS 2 years ago, which initially reduced his pain from numeric rating scale (NRS) 10/10 to NRS 4 - 5/10, but the pain then gradually increased, reaching NRS 8/10, 6 months ago. At that time, he was refractory to other treatments, and we therefore applied PNS in combination with SCS. The PNS electrode was positioned on the radial nerve under ultrasound guidance. After combined PNS and SCS, his background pain disappeared, although a breakthrough pain (NRS 3 - 4/10) was caused intermittently by light touch. Furthermore, the patient's need for analgesics decreased, and he was satisfied with the outcome of this combined treatment. We concluded that combined SCS and PNS is a very useful treatment modality, which can stimulate the target nerve both directly and indirectly, and hence, relieve pain from brachial plexopathy. PMID:27008302

  1. Choroid plexus cysts and aneuploidy.

    PubMed Central

    Peleg, D; Yankowitz, J

    1998-01-01

    The association of choroid plexus cysts with fetal aneuploidy, particularly trisomy 18, was first noted in 1986. Through the years there have been numerous reports on this subject, but no consensus has been reached with regard to chromosomal risk. In this review, we attempt to summarise published reports on second trimester choroid plexus cysts, with an emphasis on the strengths and weaknesses of each report. Based on these reports, additional malformations are a significant risk factor for aneuploidy and an indication for determination of fetal karyotype. The management of isolated choroid plexus cysts remains controversial. PMID:9678699

  2. [Livid discoloration of the hand as complication during plexus anaesthesia].

    PubMed

    Varelmann, D; Hostmann, F; Stüber, F; Schroeder, S

    2004-05-01

    During axillary brachial plexus block for hand surgery, the axillary artery was accidentally punctured. After skin disinfection of the operation site a livid discoloration of the hand appeared. The initial intention of stopping surgery and performing an angiography for clarification of the suspicion of a vessel lesion was dismissed after recording the pulse at the wrist and all fingertips employing a pulsoximeter. Further investigation showed that the livid discoloration of the hand was a product of the interaction of the octenidin solution used for pre-operative hand disinfection with the polyvidone-iodine solution used for surgical skin disinfection. This case report shows that interactions of topically administered pharmaceuticals have to be taken into consideration. Lack of knowledge might lead to unnecessary and unjustified diagnostic procedures which imply additional costs and dangers for the patient. PMID:15014896

  3. Xanthogranuloma of the choroid plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Pear, B.L.

    1984-08-01

    Uncommon tumefactions known as xanthogranulomas can occur throughout the body. Some appear to develop as benign or malignant neoplasms. An even less familiar xanthogranuloma occurs within the choroid plexus. Most are tiny plaques only a few millimeters in diameter. However, they can present as masses of significant size within the glomus. When large and unilateral, they are included in the differential diagnosis of choroid plexus tumors. A computed tomographic (CT) study of such a tumor is presented.

  4. Obstetric ultrasound simulation.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Joshua F; Brost, Brian C

    2013-06-01

    Obstetric ultrasound is becoming an increasingly important part of the practice of maternal-fetal medicine. Thus, it is important to develop rigorous and effective training curricula for obstetrics and gynecology residents and maternal-fetal medicine fellows. Traditionally, this training has come almost entirely from exposure to ultrasound in the clinical setting. However, with the increased complexity of modern ultrasound and advent of duty-hour restrictions, a purely clinical training model is no longer viable. With the advent of high-fidelity obstetric ultrasound simulators, a significant amount of training can occur in a non-clinical setting which allows learners to obtain significant skill prior to their first patient ultrasound encounter and obtain proficiency in a shorter period of time. In this manuscript we discuss the available obstetric ultrasound simulators and ways to construct a comprehensive ultrasound training curricula to meet the increasing demands of modern maternal-fetal medicine. PMID:23721777

  5. Obstetric life support.

    PubMed

    Puck, Andrea Lorraine; Oakeson, Ann Marie; Morales-Clark, Ana; Druzin, Maurice

    2012-01-01

    The death of a woman during pregnancy is devastating. Although the incidence of maternal cardiac arrest is increasing, it continues to be a comparatively rare event. Obstetric healthcare providers may go through their entire career without participating in a maternal cardiac resuscitation. Concern has been raised that when an arrest does occur in the obstetric unit, providers who are trained in life support skills at 2-year intervals are ill equipped to provide the best possible care. The quality of resuscitation skills provided during cardiopulmonary arrest of inpatients often may be poor, and knowledge of critical steps to be followed during resuscitation may not be retained after life support training. The Obstetric Life Support (ObLS) training program is a method of obstetric nursing and medical staff training that is relevant, comprehensive, and cost-effective. It takes into consideration both the care needs of the obstetric patient and the adult learning needs of providers. The ObLS program brings obstetric nurses, obstetricians, and anesthesiologists together in multidisciplinary team training that is crucial to developing efficient emergency response. PMID:22551860

  6. True aneurysm of brachial artery.

    PubMed

    Hudorović, Narcis; Lovričević, Ivo; Franjić, Dario Bjorn; Brkić, Petar; Tomas, Davor

    2010-10-01

    True upper extremity peripheral artery aneurysms are a rarely encountered arterial disorder. Following computer-tomography angiographic (CT-a) imaging examination, true saccular aneurysm, originating from the left brachial artery was diagnosed in the 77-year-old female without history of trauma. The aneurysm was resected by surgical intervention, and primary repair of the brachial artery was performed by interposition of a part of great saphenous vein harvested from the left groin and creation of two end-to-end anastomoses between interposition graft and previously resected part of brachial artery. No complication was observed during the follow-up. Surgical intervention for upper extremity aneurysms should be initiated without delay. Factors combined with minimal morbidity associated with repair suggest that surgical repair should be performed routinely for true upper extremity arterial aneurysms. PMID:20865459

  7. Obstetrical data management systems.

    PubMed

    1997-03-01

    Obstetrical data management systems (OBDMSs) are computer systems designed to interface with fetal and maternal monitors. This allows monitoring and charting records to be created and maintained electronically and to be viewed from centralized workstations. In theory, these systems could eliminate paper record keeping from the obstetrics department altogether, although currently at least some paper documentation, such as fetal monitoring strips, is being kept. We evaluated five OBDMSs, one of which is no longer on the market and which we did not rate. Of the remaining systems, three were rated Acceptable; the fourth was rated Acceptable-Not Recommended because it lacks several important features and functions. This Evaluation also includes a Technology Overview, in which we discuss how OBDMSs function. The Overview incorporates a supplementary article, "Obstetrical Care Monitoring and Documentation," describing the monitoring and documentation typically performed during a pregnancy. And in the Selection and Use Guide, we discuss issues involved in choosing, purchasing, and implementing an OBDMS. PMID:9067726

  8. Prevention in Obstetrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children in the Tropics, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this issue of "Children in the Tropics" is to describe work that may be done by a motivated health team having only the strict minimum of material resources. While not a handbook of obstetrics, this text serves as a reminder of basic information and procedures workers must be able to perform. Following a review of the educational and…

  9. Radiation Therapy to the Plexus Brachialis in Breast Cancer Patients: Analysis of Paresthesia in Relation to Dose and Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstedt, Dan; Gustafsson, Magnus; Steineck, Gunnar; Sundberg, Agnetha; Wilderäng, Ulrica; Holmberg, Erik; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Karlsson, Per

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To identify volume and dose predictors of paresthesia after irradiation of the brachial plexus among women treated for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The women had breast surgery with axillary dissection, followed by radiation therapy with (n=192) or without irradiation (n=509) of the supraclavicular lymph nodes (SCLNs). The breast area was treated to 50 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions, and 192 of the women also had 46 to 50 Gy to the SCLNs. We delineated the brachial plexus on 3-dimensional dose-planning computerized tomography. Three to eight years after radiation therapy the women answered a questionnaire. Irradiated volumes and doses were calculated and related to the occurrence of paresthesia in the hand. Results: After treatment with axillary dissection with radiation therapy to the SCLNs 20% of the women reported paresthesia, compared with 13% after axillary dissection without radiation therapy, resulting in a relative risk (RR) of 1.47 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-2.11). Paresthesia was reported by 25% after radiation therapy to the SCLNs with a V{sub 40} {sub Gy} ≥ 13.5 cm{sup 3}, compared with 13% without radiation therapy, RR 1.83 (95% CI 1.13-2.95). Women having a maximum dose to the brachial plexus of ≥55.0 Gy had a 25% occurrence of paresthesia, with RR 1.86 (95% CI 0.68-5.07, not significant). Conclusion: Our results indicate that there is a correlation between larger irradiated volumes of the brachial plexus and an increased risk of reported paresthesia among women treated for breast cancer.

  10. Prohemostatic interventions in obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Marie-Pierre; Basso, Olga

    2012-04-01

    Obstetric hemorrhage is a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Pregnancy is associated with substantial hemostatic changes, resulting in a relatively hypercoagulable state. Acquired coagulopathy can, however, develop rapidly in severe obstetric hemorrhage. Therefore, prohemostatic treatments based on high fresh frozen plasma and red blood cell (FFP:RBC) ratio transfusion and procoagulant agents (fibrinogen concentrates, recombinant activated factor VII, and tranexamic acid) are crucial aspects of management. Often, evidence from trauma patients is applied to obstetric hemorrhage management, although distinct differences exist between the two situations. Therefore, until efficacy and safety are demonstrated in obstetric hemorrhage, clinicians should be cautious about wholesale adoption of high FFP:RBC ratio products. Applications of transfusion protocols, dedicated to massive obstetric hemorrhage and multidisciplinarily developed, currently remain the best available option. Similarly, while procoagulant agents appear promising in treatment of obstetric hemorrhage, caution is nonetheless warranted as long as clear evidence in the context of obstetric hemorrhage is lacking. PMID:22510859

  11. Obstetric (nonfetal) complications.

    PubMed

    Shanbhogue, Alampady K P; Menias, Christine O; Lalwani, Neeraj; Lall, Chandana; Khandelwal, Ashish; Nagar, Arpit

    2013-11-01

    Pregnancy predisposes women to a wide array of obstetric and gynecological complications which are often complex, challenging and sometimes life-threatening. While some of these are unique to pregnancy, a few that occur in nonpregnant women are more common during pregnancy. Imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of pregnancy-related obstetric and gynecologic complications. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging confer the least risk to the fetus and should be the preferred examinations for evaluating these complications. Multidetector computed tomography should be used after carefully weighing the risk-benefit ratio based on the clinical condition in question. Interventional radiology is emerging as a preferred, noninvasive or minimally invasive treatment option that can obviate surgery and its antecedent short term and long term complications. Knowledge of appropriateness of imaging and image guided intervention is necessary for accurate patient management. PMID:24210440

  12. Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galarza-Maldonado, Claudio; Kourilovitch, Maria R; Pérez-Fernández, Oscar M; Gaybor, Mariana; Cordero, Christian; Cabrera, Sonia; Soroka, Nikolai F

    2012-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in pregnancy has a serious impact on maternal and fetal morbidity. It causes recurrent pregnancy miscarriage and it is associated with other adverse obstetric findings like preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome and others. The 2006 revised criteria, which is still valid, is used for APS classification. Epidemiology of obstetric APS varies from one population group to another largely due to different inclusion criteria and lack of standardization of antibody detection methods. Treatment is still controversial. This topic should include a multidisciplinary team and should be individualized. Success here is based on strict control and monitoring throughout pregnancy and even in the preconception and postpartum periods. Further research in this field and unification of criteria are required to yield better therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:22001418

  13. Cell Salvage in Obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Goucher, Haley; Wong, Cynthia A; Patel, Samir K; Toledo, Paloma

    2015-08-01

    Intraoperative cell salvage is a strategy to decrease the need for allogeneic blood transfusion. Traditionally, cell salvage has been avoided in the obstetric population because of the perceived risk of amniotic fluid embolism or induction of maternal alloimmunization. With advances in cell salvage technology, the risks of cell salvage in the obstetric population parallel those in the general population. Levels of fetal squamous cells in salvaged blood are comparable to those in maternal venous blood at the time of placental separation. No definite cases of amniotic fluid embolism have been reported and appear unlikely with modern equipment. Cell salvage is cost-effective in patients with predictably high rates of transfusion, such as parturients with abnormal placentation. PMID:26197375

  14. Emergency preparedness in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Haeri, Sina; Marcozzi, David

    2015-04-01

    During and after disasters, focus is directed toward meeting the immediate needs of the general population. As a result, the routine health care and the special needs of some vulnerable populations such as pregnant and postpartum women may be overlooked within a resource-limited setting. In the event of hazards such as natural disasters, manmade disasters, and terrorism, knowledge of emergency preparedness strategies is imperative for the pregnant woman and her family, obstetric providers, and hospitals. Individualized plans for the pregnant woman and her family should include knowledge of shelter in place, birth at home, and evacuation. Obstetric providers need to have a personal disaster plan in place that accounts for work responsibilities in case of an emergency and business continuity strategies to continue to provide care to their communities. Hospitals should have a comprehensive emergency preparedness program utilizing an "all hazards" approach to meet the needs of pregnant and postpartum women and other vulnerable populations during disasters. With lessons learned in recent tragedies such as Hurricane Katrina in mind, we hope this review will stimulate emergency preparedness discussions and actions among obstetric providers and attenuate adverse outcomes related to catastrophes in the future. PMID:25751222

  15. Blood transfusion in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Nigam, A; Prakash, A; Saxena, P

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion of blood and blood components is a common practice in obstetric wards but it is not without risk. The incidence of transfusion reactions varies from 4 in every hundred transfusions for non-haemolytic reactions to one in every 40,000 for haemolytic transfusion reactions. The physiological basis of blood transfusion is outlined in this article. Most of the donated blood is processed into components: packed red cells (PRBCs), platelets, and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) or cryoprecipitate. Various alternatives to blood transfusion exist and include autotransfusion, pre-autologous blood storage, use of oxygen carrying blood substitutes and intraoperative cell salvage. Despite the risks associated with transfusions, obstetricians are frequently too aggressive in transfusing blood and blood products to their patients. Acute blood loss in obstetrics is usually due to placenta praevia, postpartum blood loss and surgery related. An early involvement of a consultant obstetrician, anaesthetist, haematologist and the blood bank is essential. There are no established criteria for initiating red cell transfusions and the decision is purely based on clinical and haematological parameters, which have been discussed along with the general principles of blood transfusion in obstetrics and some practical guidelines. PMID:24899337

  16. Brachial Plexopathy in Apical Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation: Dosimetric Analysis and Clinical Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Eblan, Michael J.; Corradetti, Michael N.; Lukens, J. Nicholas; Xanthopoulos, Eric; Mitra, Nandita; Christodouleas, John P.; Grover, Surbhi; Fernandes, Annemarie T.; Langer, Corey J.; Evans, Tracey L.; Stevenson, James; Rengan, Ramesh; Apisarnthanarax, Smith

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Data are limited on the clinical significance of brachial plexopathy in patients with apical non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiation therapy. We report the rates of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RIBP) and tumor-related brachial plexopathy (TRBP) and associated dosimetric parameters in apical NSCLC patients. Methods and Materials: Charts of NSCLC patients with primary upper lobe or superiorly located nodal disease who received {>=}50 Gy of definitive conventionally fractionated radiation or chemoradiation were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of brachial plexopathy and categorized as RIBP, TRBP, or trauma-related. Dosimetric data were gathered on ipsilateral brachial plexuses (IBP) contoured according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group atlas guidelines. Results: Eighty patients were identified with a median follow-up and survival time of 17.2 and 17.7 months, respectively. The median prescribed dose was 66.6 Gy (range, 50.4-84.0), and 71% of patients received concurrent chemotherapy. RIBP occurred in 5 patients with an estimated 3-year rate of 12% when accounting for competing risk of death. Seven patients developed TRBP (estimated 3-year rate of 13%), comprising 24% of patients who developed locoregional failures. Grade 3 brachial plexopathy was more common in patients who experienced TRBP than RIBP (57% vs 20%). No patient who received {<=}78 Gy to the IBP developed RIBP. On multivariable competing risk analysis, IBP V76 receiving {>=}1 cc, and primary tumor failure had the highest hazard ratios for developing RIBP and TRBP, respectively. Conclusions: RIBP is a relatively uncommon complication in patients with apical NSCLC tumors receiving definitive doses of radiation, while patients who develop primary tumor failures are at high risk for developing morbid TRBP. These findings suggest that the importance of primary tumor control with adequate doses of radiation outweigh the risk of RIBP in this population of

  17. Obesity and obstetric anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Mace, H S; Paech, M J; McDonnell, N J

    2011-07-01

    Obesity is increasing in the population as a whole, and especially in the obstetric population, among whom pregnancy-induced physiological changes impact on those already present due to obesity. In particular, changes in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems during pregnancy further alter the physiological effects and comorbidities of obesity. Obese pregnant women are at increased risk of diabetes, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, ischaemic heart disease, congenital malformations, operative delivery postpartum infection and thromboembolism. Regional analgesia and anaesthesia is usually preferred but may be challenging. Obese pregnant women appear to have increased morbidity and mortality associated with caesarean delivery and general anaesthesia for caesarean delivery in particular, and more anaesthesia-related complications. This article summarises the physiological and pharmacological implications of obesity and pregnancy and describes the issues surrounding the management of these women for labour and delivery. PMID:21823371

  18. Potential barriers to randomized clinical trials in infants with brachial plexus birth palsy.

    PubMed

    Figoni, Andrew; Bauer, Andrea; James, Michelle

    2015-09-01

    Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are the gold standard for comparing medical treatments. However, pediatric surgical RCTs are uncommon. We sought the opinions of parents whose children had undergone reconstructive nerve surgery on participating in research studies. Twenty-nine of 30 parents indicated that they would enroll their child in a research study, and 24 of them indicated that they would enroll their child in a surgical RCT. However, the most common reason for willingness to participate was a desire to help their child, demonstrating a fundamental misunderstanding of RCTs. The burden is on the researcher to ascertain the subject's level of understanding before consenting to randomization. PMID:25856278

  19. Potential barriers to randomized clinical trials in infants with brachial plexus birth palsy

    PubMed Central

    Figoni, Andrew; Bauer, Andrea; James, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are the gold standard for comparing medical treatments. However, pediatric surgical RCTs are uncommon. We sought the opinions of parents whose children had undergone reconstructive nerve surgery regarding participating in research studies. Twenty-nine of 30 parents indicated they would enroll their child in a research study, and 24 of these would enroll in a surgical RCT. However, the most common reason for willingness to participate was a desire to help their child, demonstrating a fundamental misunderstanding of RCTs. The burden is on the researcher to ascertain the subject’s level of understanding before consenting to randomization. PMID:25856278

  20. Urgent interscalene brachial plexus block for management of traumatic luxatio erecta in the ED.

    PubMed

    Brant-Zawadzki, Graham; Herring, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Trauma in the emergency department may present providers with amyriad of unforeseen clinical scenarios.We present an example of how an urgent nerve block facilitated rapid management of a luxatio erecta shoulder fracture-dislocation without sedation. A 20-year-old female pedestrian presented to our level II trauma center after being stuck bya motor vehicle. At arrival, she had clinical indications of severe blunt trauma as well as a left-sided luxatio erect a shoulder dislocation and fracture. Immediate computed tomography (CT) imaging as requestedby the trauma service; however, the patient could not tolerate any movement of her left arm, precluding entry into the scanner's narrow antrum. This scenario presented a clinical dilemma: an undifferentiated victim of severe blunt trauma requiring urgent CT scanning to exclude possible intracranial, intrathoracic, and/or intra-abdominal injury in need of immediate reduction of a dislocated joint to allow entry into the CT scanner. Conscious sedation risked loss of neurologic examination,hypotension, apnea, and further delay to definitive imaging. As an alternative, our team reduced the shoulder under regional anesthesia with an interscalene nerve block using a “stay-away” technique and chloroprocaine. Regional anesthesia presents a viable option in this scenario for rapid-onset analgesia available urgently at the bedside. In our experience, using a stay-away technique in conjunction with short-acting, low-toxicity chloroprocaine provides safe, quick, and effective anesthesia. This allowed for prompt reduction of the dislocated joint and timely evaluation for potential life-threatening injuries while avoiding the risks associated with conscious sedation. PMID:25701213

  1. Three-dimensional obstetric ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Tache, Veronique; Tarsa, Maryam; Romine, Lorene; Pretorius, Dolores H

    2008-04-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound has gained a significant popularity in obstetrical practice in recent years. The advantage of this modality in some cases is in question, however. This article provides a basic review of volume acquisition, mechanical positioning, and display modalities. Multiple uses of this technique in obstetrical care including first trimester applications and its utility in clarification of fetal anatomy such as brain, face, heart, and skeleton is discussed. PMID:18450140

  2. Doing obstetrics and staying alive.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Many family physicians have a love-hate relationship with childbirth care and struggle to balance their personal and family needs with the need to provide high-quality personal care during labour and birth. Many false assumptions undermine family practice obstetrics. Strategies are presented to simplify obstetric care for women and families while promoting reasoned self-care for physicians. Images p1948-a PMID:8219843

  3. Safety Assurance in Obstetrical Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L

    2008-01-01

    Safety assurance for diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics began with a tacit assumption of safety allowed by a federal law enacted in 1976 for then-existing medical ultrasound equipment. The implementation of the 510(k) pre-market approval process for diagnostic ultrasound resulted in the establishment of guideline upper limits for several examination categories in 1985. The obstetrical category has undergone substantial evolution from initial limits (I. e., 46 mW/cm2 spatial peak temporal average (SPTA) intensity) set in 1985. Thermal and mechanical exposure indices, which are displayed on-screen according to an Output Display Standard (ODS), were developed for safety assurance with relaxed upper limits. In 1992, with the adoption of the ODS, the allowable output for obstetrical ultrasound was increased both in terms of the average exposure (e. g. to a possible 720 mW/cm2 SPTA intensity) and of the peak exposure (via the Mechanical Index). There has been little or no subsequent research with the modern obstetrical ultrasound machines to systematically assess potential risks to the fetus using either relevant animal models of obstetrical exposure or human epidemiology studies. The assurance of safety for obstetrical ultrasound therefore is supported by three ongoing means: (I) review of a substantial but uncoordinated bioeffect research literature, (ii) the theoretical evaluation of diagnostic ultrasound exposure in terms of thermal and nonthermal mechanisms for bioeffects, and (iii) the skill and knowledge of professional sonographers. At this time, there is no specific reason to suspect that there is any significant health risk to the fetus or mother from exposure to diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics. This assurance of safety supports the prudent use of diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics by trained professionals for any medically indicated examination. PMID:18450141

  4. Safety assurance in obstetrical ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L

    2008-04-01

    Safety assurance for diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics began with a tacit assumption of safety allowed by a federal law enacted in 1976 for then-existing medical ultrasound equipment. The implementation of the 510(k) pre-market-approval process for diagnostic ultrasound resulted in the establishment of guideline upper limits for several examination categories in 1985. The obstetrical category has undergone substantial evolution from initial limits (ie, 46 mW/cm2 spatial peak temporal average [SPTA] intensity) set in 1985. Thermal and mechanical exposure indices, which are displayed onscreen according to an Output Display Standard, were developed for safety assurance with relaxed upper limits. In 1992, with the adoption of the Output Display Standard, the allowable output for obstetrical ultrasound was increased in terms of both the average exposure (eg, to a possible 720 mW/cm2 SPTA intensity) and the peak exposure (via the Mechanical Index). There has been little or no subsequent research with the modern obstetrical ultrasound machines to systematically assess potential risks to the fetus using either relevant animal models of obstetrical exposure or human epidemiology studies. The assurance of safety for obstetrical ultrasound therefore is supported by three ongoing means: (1) review of a substantial but uncoordinated bioeffect research literature; (2) the theoretical evaluation of diagnostic ultrasound exposure in terms of thermal and nonthermal mechanisms for bioeffects; and (3) the skill and knowledge of professional sonographers. At this time, there is no specific reason to suspect that there is any significant health risk to the fetus or mother from exposure to diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics. This assurance of safety supports the prudent use of diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics by trained professionals for any medically indicated examination. PMID:18450141

  5. Obstetric management of conjoined twins.

    PubMed

    Sakala, E P

    1986-03-01

    Three cases of conjoined twins are presented: two thorocopagus and one craniopagus. The diagnosis of conjoining varied from late second trimester to time of term delivery. Delivery mode was both by vaginal and cesarean routes, and occurred at both level one and level three hospitals. Antenatal diagnostic procedures and issues in obstetric management are discussed. A suggested obstetric management sequence for conjoined twins is proposed. PMID:3511423

  6. Vascularized Thoracodorsal to Suprascapular Nerve Transfer, a Novel Technique to Restore Shoulder Function in Partial Brachial Plexopathy

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Shirley M.; Ferris, Scott I.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the clinical outcome of a novel nerve transfer to restore active shoulder motion in upper brachial plexus injury. The thoracodorsal nerve (TDN) was successfully used as a vascularized donor nerve to neurotize to the suprascapular nerve (SSN) in a patient with limited donor nerve availability. At 4 years follow-up, he had regained useful external rotation of the injured limb, with no significant donor site morbidity. Shoulder abduction return was less impressive, however, and reasons for this are discussed. We provide a comprehensive review of the literature on this topic and a subsequent discussion on the details of this novel technique. This is the first reported case of TDN to SSN transfer, and also the first reported case of a vascularized TDN transfer in the English language literature. We advocate direct thoracodorsal to SSN transfer as a valid surgical option for the restoration of shoulder function in patients with partial brachial plexus avulsion, when conventional nerve donors are unavailable. PMID:27014699

  7. Analgesia in Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Heesen, M.; Veeser, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: An effective relief of labour pain has become an important part of obstetric medicine. Therefore regional nerve blocks, systemic analgesic and non-pharmacologic techniques are commonly used. This review article gives a summary of pathophysiology and anatomy of labour pain as well as advantages, disadvantages, risks and adverse reactions of analgesic techniques in newborns and parturients. Methods: We performed a selective literature search in Medline via PubMed using the search-terms “Analgesia” and “Obstetrics”. We also included the current guidelines of the German Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. Results: PDA and CSE are safe techniques for the relief of labour pain if contraindications are excluded. The risk for instrumental delivery but not for caesarean section is increased under neuraxial analgesia. PDA and CSE should be performed in an early stage of labour using low doses of local anaesthetics if possible. It is not necessary to wait for a defined cervical dilatation before starting neuraxial analgesia. Anesthesiologists and obstetricians should inform patients as soon as possible before the situation of stress during labour. Systemic opioid analgesia is a possible alternative for neuraxial techniques. Because of possible side effects systemic remifentanil analgesia should only be performed under continuous monitoring. Several nonpharmacologic methods can also relieve labour pain, but results of studies about their effectiveness are inconsistent. PMID:25264376

  8. Choroid plexus papilloma with a hyperdiploid karyotype

    SciTech Connect

    Roland, B.; Pinto, A.

    1994-09-01

    An 11-month-old male underwent surgery for a choroid plexus neoplasm, which on histologic examination was diagnosed as a benign papilloma. Chromosome analysis showed a karyotype of 55,XY,+7+7,+8,+9,+12,+12,+15,+20,+21 in all 20 metaphases analyzed. This is only the third benign choroid plexus papilloma that has been karyotyped, with the others being normal and hypodiploid (33 chromosomes). Three malignant choroid plexus carcinomas have also been analyzed, two with normal karyotypes and one hypodiploid (34 - 35 chromosomes). The two hypoidiploid neoplasms lack chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 13, 14, 17 and 18. Since the chromosomes that are lost in the hypodiploid neoplasms are different from the chromosomes gained in our tumor, it appears that the dosage of specific chromosomes is important in the origin of choroid plexus neoplasms. Benign choroid plexus papillomas can be difficult to differentiate from choroid plexus carcinomas. With the data available so far, it does not appear that cytogenetics can assist in making the diagnosis.

  9. Brachial Neuritis With Phrenic Nerve Involvement in a Patient With a Possible Connective Tissue Disease.

    PubMed

    Subash, Meera; Patel, Gaurav; Welker, John; Nugent, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Background. Brachial neuritis (BN) is a rare inflammatory condition of peripheral nerves, usually involving the cervicobrachial plexus. These patients present with sudden onset of shoulder and arm pain that evolves into muscle weakness and atrophy.. Case Report. A 33-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of diffuse pain in her thorax. She had no trauma or inciting incident prior to the onset of this pain and was initially treated for muscle spasms. The patient was seen in the emergency room multiple times and was treated with several courses of antibiotics for pneumonia on the basis of clinical symptoms and abnormal x-rays. The pleuritic chest pain persisted for at least 4 months, and the patient was eventually admitted for worsening pain and dyspnea. On physical examination, crackles were heard at both lung bases, and chest inspection revealed increased expansion in the upper thorax but poor expansion of the lower thorax and mild paradoxical respiration. "Sniff" test revealed no motion of the left hemidiaphragm and reduced motion on the right hemidiaphragm. Her computed tomography scan revealed bilateral atelectasis, more severe at the left base. She reported no symptoms involving her joints or skin or abdomen. Her presentation and clinical course are best explained by BN with a bilateral diaphragmatic weakness. However, she had a positive ANA, RF, anti-RNP antibody, and anti SS-A. Conclusion. Patients with BN can present with diffuse thoracic pain, pleuritic chest pain, and diaphragmatic weakness. Our patient may represent a case of connective tissue disease presenting with brachial plexus neuritis. PMID:26425609

  10. Brachial Neuritis With Phrenic Nerve Involvement in a Patient With a Possible Connective Tissue Disease

    PubMed Central

    Subash, Meera; Patel, Gaurav; Welker, John

    2014-01-01

    Background. Brachial neuritis (BN) is a rare inflammatory condition of peripheral nerves, usually involving the cervicobrachial plexus. These patients present with sudden onset of shoulder and arm pain that evolves into muscle weakness and atrophy.. Case Report. A 33-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of diffuse pain in her thorax. She had no trauma or inciting incident prior to the onset of this pain and was initially treated for muscle spasms. The patient was seen in the emergency room multiple times and was treated with several courses of antibiotics for pneumonia on the basis of clinical symptoms and abnormal x-rays. The pleuritic chest pain persisted for at least 4 months, and the patient was eventually admitted for worsening pain and dyspnea. On physical examination, crackles were heard at both lung bases, and chest inspection revealed increased expansion in the upper thorax but poor expansion of the lower thorax and mild paradoxical respiration. “Sniff” test revealed no motion of the left hemidiaphragm and reduced motion on the right hemidiaphragm. Her computed tomography scan revealed bilateral atelectasis, more severe at the left base. She reported no symptoms involving her joints or skin or abdomen. Her presentation and clinical course are best explained by BN with a bilateral diaphragmatic weakness. However, she had a positive ANA, RF, anti-RNP antibody, and anti SS-A. Conclusion. Patients with BN can present with diffuse thoracic pain, pleuritic chest pain, and diaphragmatic weakness. Our patient may represent a case of connective tissue disease presenting with brachial plexus neuritis. PMID:26425609